National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for agricultural products algae

  1. Wastewater Reclamation and Biofuel Production Using Algae | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wastewater Reclamation and Biofuel Production Using Algae Wastewater Reclamation and Biofuel Production Using Algae Breakout Session 2-A: The Future of Algae-Based Biofuels...

  2. Aridity and Algae: Biodiesel Production in Arizona Jenna Bloxom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    Aridity and Algae: Biodiesel Production in Arizona Jenna Bloxom Advisor: Dr. Scott Whiteford Center resources. Often excluded from the typical water- related concerns associated with biofuels as algae as the best location in the world to grow algae, the state of Arizona is now home to several premier algae

  3. Analytical approaches to photobiological hydrogen production in unicellular green algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemschemeier, Anja; Melis, Anastasios; Happe, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Photofermentation and hydrogen production upon sulphurG, Happe T (2008) Hydrogen production by ChlamydomonasA, Happe T (2001) Hydrogen production. Green algae as a

  4. Photobiological hydrogen production with switchable photosystem-II designer algae

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, James Weifu

    2014-02-18

    A process for enhanced photobiological H.sub.2 production using transgenic alga. The process includes inducing exogenous genes in a transgenic alga by manipulating selected environmental factors. In one embodiment inducing production of an exogenous gene uncouples H.sub.2 production from existing mechanisms that would downregulate H.sub.2 production in the absence of the exogenous gene. In other embodiments inducing an exogenous gene triggers a cascade of metabolic changes that increase H.sub.2 production. In some embodiments the transgenic alga are rendered non-regenerative by inducing exogenous transgenes for proton channel polypeptides that are targeted to specific algal membranes.

  5. Mass Production of Biodiesel From Algae UROP Summer 2008 Project Proposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    1 Mass Production of Biodiesel From Algae UROP Summer 2008 Project Proposal Steven A. Biorn Faculty energy products from algae. The first step in this process is to select species of algae with high growth of green algae. Once the oils have been extracted, the remnants of the algae contain protein, starches

  6. Micro-algae come of age as a platform for recombinant protein production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Specht, Elizabeth; Miyake-Stoner, Shigeki; Mayfield, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    in therapeutic protein production in algae Expression levelrecombinant protein production Elizabeth Specht • Shigekirecombinant protein production in Chlamydomonas, including

  7. Micro-algae come of age as a platform for recombinant protein production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Specht, Elizabeth; Miyake-Stoner, Shigeki; Mayfield, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    et al. 2008), chlorophyta alga Ulva pertusa Table 1 Recentprotein production in algae Expression level achieved010-0326-5 REVIEW Micro-algae come of age as a platform for

  8. Designer proton-channel transgenic algae for photobiological hydrogen production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, James Weifu (Knoxville, TN)

    2011-04-26

    A designer proton-channel transgenic alga for photobiological hydrogen production that is specifically designed for production of molecular hydrogen (H.sub.2) through photosynthetic water splitting. The designer transgenic alga includes proton-conductive channels that are expressed to produce such uncoupler proteins in an amount sufficient to increase the algal H.sub.2 productivity. In one embodiment the designer proton-channel transgene is a nucleic acid construct (300) including a PCR forward primer (302), an externally inducible promoter (304), a transit targeting sequence (306), a designer proton-channel encoding sequence (308), a transcription and translation terminator (310), and a PCR reverse primer (312). In various embodiments, the designer proton-channel transgenic algae are used with a gas-separation system (500) and a gas-products-separation and utilization system (600) for photobiological H.sub.2 production.

  9. Adding Value to Agricultural Products 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, David P.; Hanselka, Daniel

    2009-06-01

    You can significantly increase farm income by adding value to agricultural products and marketing those products effectively. This publication explains how to design a value-added product based on consumer preferences and how to build a business...

  10. Analytical approaches to photobiological hydrogen production in unicellular green algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemschemeier, Anja; Melis, Anastasios; Happe, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    monas reinhardtii (green alga). Planta 214:552–561. doi:adaptation in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Eurhydrogenase from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

  11. Benthic algae as bioindicators of agricultural pollution in the streams and rivers of southern Quebec (Canada)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent, Warwick F.

    Benthic algae as bioindicators of agricultural pollution in the streams and rivers of southern Qu´ebec´epartement de biologie, Universit´e Laval, Qu´ebec, G1K 7P4 Canada 2Centre d' ´Etudes Nordiques, Universit´e Laval, Qu´ebec, G1K 7P4 Canada 3D´epartement de g´eographie, Universit´e Laval, Qu´ebec, G1K 7P4 Canada

  12. Switchable photosystem-II designer algae for photobiological hydrogen production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, James Weifu (Knoxville, TN)

    2010-01-05

    A switchable photosystem-II designer algae for photobiological hydrogen production. The designer transgenic algae includes at least two transgenes for enhanced photobiological H.sub.2 production wherein a first transgene serves as a genetic switch that can controls photosystem II (PSII) oxygen evolution and a second transgene encodes for creation of free proton channels in the algal photosynthetic membrane. In one embodiment, the algae includes a DNA construct having polymerase chain reaction forward primer (302), a inducible promoter (304), a PSII-iRNA sequence (306), a terminator (308), and a PCR reverse primer (310). In other embodiments, the PSII-iRNA sequence (306) is replaced with a CF.sub.1-iRNA sequence (312), a streptomycin-production gene (314), a targeting sequence (316) followed by a proton-channel producing gene (318), or a PSII-producing gene (320). In one embodiment, a photo-bioreactor and gas-product separation and utilization system produce photobiological H.sub.2 from the switchable PSII designer alga.

  13. Life-Cycle Greenhouse Gas and Energy Analyses of Algae Biofuels Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Life-Cycle Greenhouse Gas and Energy Analyses of Algae Biofuels Production Transportation Energy The Issue Algae biofuels directly address the Energy Commission's Public Interest Energy Research fuels more carbonintensive than conventional biofuels. Critics of this study argue that alternative

  14. A Framework to Report the Production of Renewable Diesel from Algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Framework to Report the Production of Renewable Diesel from Algae Colin M. Beal & Colin H. Smith(s) 2010. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com Abstract Recently, algae have algae are a viable source for renewable diesel, three questions that must be answered are (1) how much

  15. Optimal engineered algae composition for the integrated simultaneous production of bioethanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    2009, Martin & Grossmann 2011 a,b,c,d) in terms of energy and water consumption and low production cost1 Optimal engineered algae composition for the integrated simultaneous production of bioethanol of the algae for the simultaneous production of bioethanol and biodiesel. We consider two alternative

  16. ALTERNATIVE AGRICULTURAL ENTERPRISES PRODUCTION, MANAGEMENT & MARKETING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Laughlin, Jay

    ALTERNATIVE AGRICULTURAL ENTERPRISES PRODUCTION, MANAGEMENT & MARKETING Cooperative Extension directly. Otherwise, backtrack to their suppliers, in person or by telephone. For the first few years

  17. Agriculture, Forest Products and Commercial Fishing ECONOMICENGINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Agriculture, Forest Products and Commercial Fishing ECONOMICENGINE NORTHEAST #12;Dear Reader, We and Commercial Fishing. This report confirms what we all know, but sometimes take for granted. Agriculture, commercial fishing and the forest products industries are all important contributors to the Northeast economy

  18. Chromatin landscaping in algae reveals novel regulation pathway for biofuels production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ngan, Chew Yee; Wong, Chee-Hong; Choi, Cindy; Pratap, Abhishek; Han, James; Wei, Chia-Lin

    2013-02-19

    The diminishing reserve of fossil fuels calls for the development of biofuels. Biofuels are produced from renewable resources, including photosynthetic organisms, generating clean energy. Microalgae is one of the potential feedstock for biofuels production. It grows easily even in waste water, and poses no competition to agricultural crops for arable land. However, little is known about the algae lipid biosynthetic regulatory mechanisms. Most studies relied on the homology to other plant model organisms, in particular Arabidopsis or through low coverage expression analysis to identify key enzymes. This limits the discovery of new components in the biosynthetic pathways, particularly the genetic regulators and effort to maximize the production efficiency of algal biofuels. Here we report an unprecedented and de novo approach to dissect the algal lipid pathways through disclosing the temporal regulations of chromatin states during lipid biosynthesis. We have generated genome wide chromatin maps in chlamydomonas genome using ChIP-seq targeting 7 histone modifications and RNA polymerase II in a time-series manner throughout conditions activating lipid biosynthesis. To our surprise, the combinatory profiles of histone codes uncovered new regulatory mechanism in gene expression in algae. Coupled with matched RNA-seq data, chromatin changes revealed potential novel regulators and candidate genes involved in the activation of lipid accumulations. Genetic perturbation on these candidate regulators further demonstrated the potential to manipulate the regulatory cascade for lipid synthesis efficiency. Exploring epigenetic landscape in microalgae shown here provides powerful tools needed in improving biofuel production and new technology platform for renewable energy generation, global carbon management, and environmental survey.

  19. Method to transform algae, materials therefor, and products produced thereby

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunahay, T.G.; Roessler, P.G.; Jarvis, E.E.

    1997-08-26

    Disclosed is a method to transform chlorophyll C-containing algae. The method includes introducing a recombinant molecule comprising a nucleic acid molecule encoding a dominant selectable marker operatively linked to an algal regulatory control sequence into a chlorophyll C-containing alga in such a manner that the marker is produced by the alga. In a preferred embodiment the algal regulatory control sequence is derived from a diatom and preferably Cyclotella cryptica. Also disclosed is a chimeric molecule having one or more regulatory control sequences derived from one or more chlorophyll C-containing algae operatively linked to a nucleic acid molecule encoding a selectable marker, an RNA molecule and/or a protein, wherein the nucleic acid molecule does not normally occur with one or more of the regulatory control sequences. Further, specifically disclosed are molecules pACCNPT10, pACCNPT4.8 and pACCNPT5.1. The methods and materials of the present invention provide the ability to accomplish stable genetic transformation of chlorophyll C-containing algae. 2 figs.

  20. Method to transform algae, materials therefor, and products produced thereby

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunahay, Terri Goodman (2710 Arbor Glen Pl., Boulder, CO 80304); Roessler, Paul G. (15905 Ellsworth Pl., Golden, CO 80401); Jarvis, Eric E. (3720 Smuggler Pl., Boulder, CO 80303)

    1997-01-01

    Disclosed is a method to transform chlorophyll C-containing algae which includes introducing a recombinant molecule comprising a nucleic acid molecule encoding a dominant selectable marker operatively linked to an algal regulatory control sequence into a chlorophyll C-containing alga in such a manner that the marker is produced by the alga. In a preferred embodiment the algal regulatory control sequence is derived from a diatom and preferably Cyclotella cryptica. Also disclosed is a chimeric molecule having one or more regulatory control sequences derived from one or more chlorophyll C-containing algae operatively linked to a nucleic acid molecule encoding a selectable marker, an RNA molecule and/or a protein, wherein the nucleic acid molecule does not normally occur with one or more of the regulatory control sequences. Further specifically disclosed are molecules pACCNPT10, pACCNPT4.8 and pACCNPT5.1. The methods and materials of the present invention provide the ability to accomplish stable genetic transformation of chlorophyll C-containing algae.

  1. Fuel from wastewater : harnessing a potential energy source in Canada through the co-location of algae biofuel production to sources of effluent, heat and CO2.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Passell, Howard David; Whalen, Jake (SmartWhale Consulting, Dartmouth, NS, CA); Pienkos, Philip P. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO); O'Leary, Stephen J. (National Research Council Canada, Institute for Marine Biosciences, Halifax, NS, CA); Roach, Jesse Dillon; Moreland, Barbara D.; Klise, Geoffrey Taylor

    2010-12-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is collaborating with the National Research Council (NRC) Canada and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to develop a decision-support model that will evaluate the tradeoffs associated with high-latitude algae biofuel production co-located with wastewater, CO2, and waste heat. This project helps Canada meet its goal of diversifying fuel sources with algae-based biofuels. The biofuel production will provide a wide range of benefits including wastewater treatment, CO2 reuse and reduction of demand for fossil-based fuels. The higher energy density in algae-based fuels gives them an advantage over crop-based biofuels as the 'production' footprint required is much less, resulting in less water consumed and little, if any conversion of agricultural land from food to fuel production. Besides being a potential source for liquid fuel, algae have the potential to be used to generate electricity through the burning of dried biomass, or anaerobically digested to generate methane for electricity production. Co-locating algae production with waste streams may be crucial for making algae an economically valuable fuel source, and will certainly improve its overall ecological sustainability. The modeling process will address these questions, and others that are important to the use of water for energy production: What are the locations where all resources are co-located, and what volumes of algal biomass and oil can be produced there? In locations where co-location does not occur, what resources should be transported, and how far, while maintaining economic viability? This work is being funded through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Biomass Program Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, and is part of a larger collaborative effort that includes sampling, strain isolation, strain characterization and cultivation being performed by the NREL and Canada's NRC. Results from the NREL / NRC collaboration including specific productivities of selected algal strains will eventually be incorporated into this model.

  2. Re-utilization of Industrial CO2 for Algae Production Using a Phase Change Material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph, Brian

    2013-12-31

    This is the final report of a 36-month Phase II cooperative agreement. Under this project, Touchstone Research Laboratory (Touchstone) investigated the merits of incorporating a Phase Change Material (PCM) into an open-pond algae production system that can capture and re-use the CO2 from a coal-fired flue gas source located in Wooster, OH. The primary objective of the project was to design, construct, and operate a series of open algae ponds that accept a slipstream of flue gas from a coal-fired source and convert a significant portion of the CO2 to liquid biofuels, electricity, and specialty products, while demonstrating the merits of the PCM technology. Construction of the pilot facility and shakedown of the facility in Wooster, OH, was completed during the first two years, and the focus of the last year was on operations and the cultivation of algae. During this Phase II effort a large-scale algae concentration unit from OpenAlgae was installed and utilized to continuously harvest algae from indoor raceways. An Algae Lysing Unit and Oil Recovery Unit were also received and installed. Initial parameters for lysing nanochloropsis were tested. Conditions were established that showed the lysing operation was effective at killing the algae cells. Continuous harvesting activities yielded over 200 kg algae dry weight for Ponds 1, 2 and 4. Studies were conducted to determine the effect of anaerobic digestion effluent as a nutrient source and the resulting lipid productivity of the algae. Lipid content and total fatty acids were unaffected by culture system and nutrient source, indicating that open raceway ponds fed diluted anaerobic digestion effluent can obtain similar lipid productivities to open raceway ponds using commercial nutrients. Data were also collected with respect to the performance of the PCM material on the pilot-scale raceway ponds. Parameters such as evaporative water loss, temperature differences, and growth/productivity were tracked. The pond with the PCM material was consistently 2 to 5°C warmer than the control pond. This difference did not seem to increase significantly over time. During phase transitions for the PCM, the magnitude of the difference between the daily minimum and maximum temperatures decreased, resulting in smaller daily temperature fluctuations. A thin layer of PCM material reduced overall water loss by 74% and consistently provided algae densities that were 80% greater than the control pond.

  3. Characterization of the bacterial metagenome in an industrial algae bioenergy production system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Shi; Fulbright, Scott P; Zeng, Xiaowei; Yates, Tracy; Wardle, Greg; Chisholm, Stephen T; Xu, Jian; Lammers, Peter

    2011-03-16

    Cultivation of oleaginous microalgae for fuel generally requires growth of the intended species to the maximum extent supported by available light. The presence of undesired competitors, pathogens and grazers in cultivation systems will create competition for nitrate, phosphate, sulfate, iron and other micronutrients in the growth medium and potentially decrease microalgal triglyceride production by limiting microalgal health or cell density. Pathogenic bacteria may also directly impact the metabolism or survival of individual microalgal cells. Conversely, symbiotic bacteria that enhance microalgal growth may also be present in the system. Finally, the use of agricultural and municipal wastes as nutrient inputs for microalgal production systems may lead to the introduction and proliferation of human pathogens or interfere with the growth of bacteria with beneficial effects on system performance. These considerations underscore the need to understand bacterial community dynamics in microalgal production systems in order to assess microbiome effects on microalgal productivity and pathogen risks. Here we focus on the bacterial component of microalgal production systems and describe a pipeline for metagenomic characterization of bacterial diversity in industrial cultures of an oleaginous alga, Nannochloropsis salina. Environmental DNA was isolated from 12 marine algal cultures grown at Solix Biofuels, a region of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified by PCR, and 16S amplicons were sequenced using a 454 automated pyrosequencer. The approximately 70,000 sequences that passed quality control clustered into 53,950 unique sequences. The majority of sequences belonged to thirteen phyla. At the genus level, sequences from all samples represented 169 different genera. About 52.94% of all sequences could not be identified at the genus level and were classified at the next highest possible resolution level. Of all sequences, 79.92% corresponded to 169 genera and 70 other taxa. We apply a principal component analysis across the initial sample set to draw correlations between sample variables and changes in microbiome populations.

  4. Chromatin landscaping in algae reveals novel regulation pathway for biofuels production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ngan, Chew Yee

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin landscaping in algae reveals novel regulationChromatin landscaping in algae reveals novel regulationis known about the algae lipid biosynthetic regulatory

  5. Soil and Plant Responses to Lipid-Extracted Algae 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Katie

    2014-08-25

    following lipid extraction that might be used as a soil amendment for agricultural production. The overall objective of this series of experiments was to determine the feasibility and management strategies required to best utilize lipid-extracted algae...

  6. Agricultural Productivity Growth in China: Farm Level versus National Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Colin A.; Chen, Jing; Chu, Baojin

    1999-01-01

    bias any measurement of agricultural productivity, becauseProductivity Growth in China: Farm Level versus National MeasurementProductivity Growth in China: Farm Level versus National Measurement

  7. A Realistic Technology and Engineering Assessment of Algae Biofuel Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, Nigel

    microalgae biofuel technologies for both oil and biogas production, provides an initial assessment of the US or wastewater treatment, (2) biofuel outputs--either biogas only or biogas plus oil, and (3) farm size

  8. Algae Biotechnology

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for advancements in algae biotechnology and bioengineering to support algae feedstock logistics operations; and - will help position the algae biofuels industry for further growth....

  9. Dr. Carlo Fezzi Valuing production: the agricultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateman, Ian J.

    impact of adaptation 2040 Changes #12;Adaptation and environmental policy 2040 Changes Woodland planting) The environmental impact of climate change adaptation on land use and water quality, Nature Climate Change, vol. 5 Climate change impacts Climate change #12;Agriculture Climate change impacts Climate change Environment

  10. Important driving forces in livestock production and agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Archer, Steven R.

    global shifts in consumption, marketing, production and trade: Rising incomes. Demographic shifts#12;Important driving forces in livestock production and agriculture are responsible for major the past four decades, but increasing trends due to changes in land use and crop production shifting from

  11. Microalgae Cultivation using Offshore Membrane Enclosures for Growing Algae (OMEGA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiley, Patrick Edward

    2013-01-01

    Production of biodiesel and biogas from algae: A review ofProduction of Biodiesel and Biogas from Algae: A Review ofProduction of biodiesel and biogas from algae: A review of

  12. A National-Scale Comparison of Resource and Nutrient Demands for Algae-Based Biofuel Production by Lipid Extraction and Hydrothermal Liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venteris, Erik R.; Skaggs, Richard; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Coleman, Andre M.

    2014-03-01

    Algae’s high productivity provides potential resource advantages over other fuel crops. However, demand for land, water, and nutrients must be minimized to avoid impacts on food production. We apply our national-scale, open-pond, growth and resource models to assess several biomass to fuel technological pathways based on Chlorella. We compare resource demands between hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) and lipid extraction (LE) to meet 1.89E+10 and 7.95E+10 L yr-1 biofuel targets. We estimate nutrient demands where post-fuel biomass is consumed as co-products and recycling by anaerobic digestion (AD) or catalytic hydrothermal gasification (CHG). Sites are selected through prioritization based on fuel value relative to a set of site-specific resource costs. The highest priority sites are located along the Gulf of Mexico coast, but potential sites exist nationwide. We find that HTL reduces land and freshwater consumption by up to 46% and saline groundwater by around 70%. Without recycling, nitrogen (N) and phosphorous (P) demand is reduced 33%, but is large relative to current U.S. agricultural consumption. The most nutrient-efficient pathways are LE+CHG for N and HTL+CHG for P (by 42%). Resource gains for HTL+CHG are offset by a 344% increase in N consumption relative to LE+CHG (with potential for further recycling). Nutrient recycling is essential to effective use of alternative nutrient sources. Modeling of utilization availability and costs remains, but we find that for HTL+CHG at the 7.95E+10 L yr-1 production target, municipal sources can offset 17% of N and 40% of P demand and animal manures can generally meet demands.

  13. Fuel alcohol production from agricultural lignocellulosic feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farina, G.E.; Barrier, J.W.; Forsythe, M.L. )

    1988-01-01

    A two-stage, low-temperature, ambient pressure, acid hydrolysis process that utilizes separate unit operations to convert hemicellulose and cellulose in agricultural residues and crops to fermentable sugars is being developed and tested. Based on the results of the bench-scale tests, an acid hydrolysis experimental plant to demonstrate the concepts of low-temperature acid hydrolysis on a much larger scale was built. Plant tests using corn stover have been conducted for more that a year and conversion efficiences have equaled those achieved in the laboratory. Laboratory tests to determine the potential for low-temperature acid hydrolysis of other feedstocks - including red clover, alfalfa, kobe lespedeza, winter rape, and rye grass - are being conducted. Where applicable, process modifications to include extraction before or after hydrolysis also are being studied. This paper describes the experimental plant and process, results obtained in the plant, results of alternative feedstocks testing in the laboratory, and a plan for an integrated system that will produce other fuels, feed, and food from crops grown on marginal land.

  14. Constraints and potentials of future irrigation water availability on agricultural production under

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    | hydrology | uncertainty Alack of available water for agricultural production, energy projects, other formsConstraints and potentials of future irrigation water availability on agricultural production under, United Kingdom; e Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, 14473 Potsdam, Germany; f Department

  15. Increasing global agricultural production by reducing ozone damages via methane emission controls and ozone-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauzerall, Denise

    Increasing global agricultural production by reducing ozone damages via methane emission controls demonstrate the significant potential to sustainably improve global agricultural production by decreasing O3 degradation poses a major challenge for agricultural production. Because surface ozone (O3) has a significant

  16. Analysis of Land Suitable for Algae State of Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Analysis of Land Suitable for Algae Production State of Hawaii Prepared by Mele Chillingworth Scott of Hawaii at Manoa August 2011 #12;i Executive Summary Algae are considered to be a viable crop for biofuel for biofuels has increased interest in growing algae in Hawaii for biofuels. An analysis of algae production

  17. BROWN ALGAE Colpomenia sinuosa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Matthew B.

    BROWN ALGAE Colpomenia sinuosa GREEN ALGAE Dictyosphaeria cavernosa Amphiroa fragilissima Gelidiopsis intricata Botryocladia pyriformis RED ALGAE CYANOBACTERIA Oscillitoria acuminata Schizothrix sp. "ALGAE"­ A DIVERSE ASSORTMENT OF LIFE FORMS Photosynthesis is performed by a taxonomically diverse

  18. Algae Biodiesel: Commercialization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Algae Biodiesel: A Path to Commercialization Algae Biodiesel: A Path to Commercialization Center conservation and biomonitoring · Algae biodiesel is largest CEHMM project #12;Project Overview: The Missing replace petroleum #12;Project Overview: Local Resources for Algae Biodiesel Project Overview: Local

  19. Naturally occurring radionuclides in agricultural products: An overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanlon, E.A.

    1994-07-01

    Low levels of naturally occurring radionuclides exist in phosphatic clays, a by-product of phosphatic mining and beneficiation processes. Concerns about these radionuclides entering the human food chain were an immediate research priority before the phosphate clays could be reclaimed for intensive agricultural purposes. Efforts included the assembly of a large body of data from both sons and plants, part of which were produced by the Polk County (Florida) Mined Lands Agricultural Research/Demonstration Project MLAR/DP. Additional detailed studies involving dairy and beef cattle (Bos taurus) were conducted by researchers working with the MLAR/DP. A national symposium was conducted in which data concerning the MLAR/DP work and other research projects also dealing with naturally occurring radionuclides in agriculture could be discussed. The symposium included invited review papers dealing with the identification of radionuclide geological origins, the geochemistry and movement of radionuclides within the environment, mechanisms of plant uptake, entry points into the food chain, and evaluation of dose and risk assessment to the consumer of low levels of radionuclides. The risk to human health of an individual obtaining 0.1 of his or her dietary intake from crops produced on phosphatic clays increased by 1 in 5 x 10{sup 6}/yr above a control individual consuming no food grown on phosphatic clays. Leaf tissues were found to be generally higher than fruit, grain, or root tissues. The natural range in radionuclide content among various food types was greater than the difference in radionuclides content between the same food produced on phosphatic clays vs. natural soils. 19 refs.

  20. Chromatin landscaping in algae reveals novel regulation pathway for biofuels production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ngan, Chew Yee

    2014-01-01

    regulation pathway for biofuels production Chew Yee Ngan ,regulation pathway for biofuels production Chew Yee Ngan,for the development of biofuels. Biofuels are produced from

  1. Agricultural Productivity and Mortality: Evidence from Kagera, Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ikegami, Munenobu

    2009-01-01

    and seminar participants at “Agriculture for Development in Sub-Saharan Africa” or- ganized by African Economic Research

  2. Energy Supply- Production of Fuel from Agricultural and Animal Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gabriel Miller

    2009-03-25

    The Society for Energy and Environmental Research (SEER) was funded in March 2004 by the Department of Energy, under grant DE-FG-36-04GO14268, to produce a study, and oversee construction and implementation, for the thermo-chemical production of fuel from agricultural and animal waste. The grant focuses on the Changing World Technologies (CWT) of West Hempstead, NY, thermal conversion process (TCP), which converts animal residues and industrial food processing biproducts into fuels, and as an additional product, fertilizers. A commercial plant was designed and built by CWT, partially using grant funds, in Carthage, Missouri, to process animal residues from a nearby turkey processing plant. The DOE sponsored program consisted of four tasks. These were: Task 1 Optimization of the CWT Plant in Carthage - This task focused on advancing and optimizing the process plant operated by CWT that converts organic waste to fuel and energy. Task 2 Characterize and Validate Fuels Produced by CWT - This task focused on testing of bio-derived hydrocarbon fuels from the Carthage plant in power generating equipment to determine the regulatory compliance of emissions and overall performance of the fuel. Task 3 Characterize Mixed Waste Streams - This task focused on studies performed at Princeton University to better characterize mixed waste incoming streams from animal and vegetable residues. Task 4 Fundamental Research in Waste Processing Technologies - This task focused on studies performed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) on the chemical reformation reaction of agricultural biomass compounds in a hydrothermal medium. Many of the challenges to optimize, improve and perfect the technology, equipment and processes in order to provide an economically viable means of creating sustainable energy were identified in the DOE Stage Gate Review, whose summary report was issued on July 30, 2004. This summary report appears herein as Appendix 1, and the findings of the report formed the basis for much of the subsequent work under the grant. An explanation of the process is presented as well as the completed work on the four tasks.

  3. Solar Grade Silicon from Agricultural By-products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard M. Laine

    2012-08-20

    In this project, Mayaterials developed a low cost, low energy and low temperature method of purifying rice hull ash to high purity (5-6Ns) and converting it by carbothermal reduction to solar grade quality silicon (Sipv) using a self-designed and built electric arc furnace (EAF). Outside evaluation of our process by an independent engineering firm confirms that our technology greatly lowers estimated operating expenses (OPEX) to $5/kg and capital expenses (CAPEX) to $24/kg for Sipv production, which is well below best-in-class plants using a Siemens process approach (OPEX of 14/kg and CAPEX of $87/kg, respectively). The primary limiting factor in the widespread use of photovoltaic (PV) cells is the high cost of manufacturing, compared to more traditional sources to reach 6 g Sipv/watt (with averages closer to 8+g/watt). In 2008, the spot price of Sipv rose to $450/kg. While prices have since dropped to a more reasonable $25/kg; this low price level is not sustainable, meaning the longer-term price will likely return to $35/kg. The 6-8 g Si/watt implies that the Sipv used in a module will cost $0.21-0.28/watt for the best producers (45% of the cost of a traditional solar panel), a major improvement from the cost/wafer driven by the $50/kg Si costs of early 2011, but still a major hindrance in fulfilling DOE goal of lowering the cost of solar energy below $1/watt. The solar cell industry has grown by 40% yearly for the past eight years, increasing the demand for Sipv. As such, future solar silicon price spikes are expected in the next few years. Although industry has invested billions of dollars to meet this ever-increasing demand, the technology to produce Sipv remains largely unchanged requiring the energy intensive, and chlorine dependent Siemens process or variations thereof. While huge improvements have been made, current state-of-the-art industrial plant still use 65 kWh/kg of silicon purified. Our technology offers a key distinction to other technologies as it starts one step upstream from all other Sipv production efforts. Our process starts by producing high purity SiO2/C feedstocks from which Sipv can be produced in a single, chlorine free, final EAF step. Specifically, our unique technology, and the resultant SiO2/C product can serve as high purity feedstocks to existing metallurgical silicon (Simet) producers, allowing them to generate Sipv with existing US manufacturing infrastructure, reducing the overall capital and commissioning schedule. Our low energy, low CAPEX and OPEX process purifies the silica and carbon present in rice hull ash (RHA) at low temperatures (< 200C) to produce high purity (5-6 Ns) feedstock for production of Sipv using furnaces similar to those used to produce Simet. During the course of this project we partnered with Wadham Energy LP (Wadham), who burns 220k ton of rice hulls (RH)/yr generating 200 GWh of electricity/yr and >30k ton/yr RHA. The power generation step produces much more energy (42 kWh/kg of final silicon produced) than required to purify the RHA (5 kWh/kg of Sipv, compared to 65 kWh/kg noted above. Biogenic silica offers three very important foundations for producing high purity silicon. First, wastes from silica accumulating plants, such as rice, corn, many grasses, algae and grains, contain very reactive, amorphous silica from which impurities are easily removed. Second, plants take up only a limited set of, and minimal quantities of the heavy metals present in nature, meaning fewer minerals must be removed. Third, biomass combustion generates a product with intrinsic residual carbon, mixed at nanometer length scales with the SiO2. RHA is 80-90 wt% high surface area (20 m2/g), amorphous SiO2 with some simple mineral content mixed intimately with 5-15 wt% carbon. The mineral content is easily removed by low cost, acid washes using Mayaterials IP, leading to purified rice hull ash (RHAclean) at up to 6N purity. This highly reactive silica is partially extracted from RHAclean at 200 C in an environmentally benign process to adjust SiO2:C ratios to those needed in EA

  4. Economic effect on agricultural production of alternative energy input prices: Texas High Plains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Benjamin Michael

    1975-01-01

    ECONOMIC EFFECT ON AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION OF ALTERNATIYE ENERGy INPUT PRICES: TEXAS HIGH PLAlNS A Thesis by BENJAMIN MICHAEL ADAMS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1975 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics ECONOMIC EFFECT ON AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION OF ALTERNATIVE ENERGY INPUT PRICES: TEXAS HIGH PLAINS A Thesis by BENJAMIN MICHAEL ADAMS Approved as to style and content...

  5. Agricultural

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D S TA I N P A T T E R N A NABPA'sDepositAgricultural Sign

  6. Agricultural

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D S TA I N P A T T E R N A NABPA'sDepositAgricultural

  7. Fuel From Algae: Scaling and Commercialization of Algae Harvesting Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-01-15

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Led by CEO Ross Youngs, AVS has patented a cost-effective dewatering technology that separates micro-solids (algae) from water. Separating micro-solids from water traditionally requires a centrifuge, which uses significant energy to spin the water mass and force materials of different densities to separate from one another. In a comparative analysis, dewatering 1 ton of algae in a centrifuge costs around $3,400. AVS’s Solid-Liquid Separation (SLS) system is less energy-intensive and less expensive, costing $1.92 to process 1 ton of algae. The SLS technology uses capillary dewatering with filter media to gently facilitate water separation, leaving behind dewatered algae which can then be used as a source for biofuels and bio-products. The biomimicry of the SLS technology emulates the way plants absorb and spread water to their capillaries.

  8. Microalgae Cultivation using Offshore Membrane Enclosures for Growing Algae (OMEGA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiley, Patrick Edward

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of Algal Biofuel Production: Experimental andon investment for algal biofuel production coupled withAssessment of Algae Biofuel Production” Energy Biosciences

  9. Three Essays on Climate Variability, Water and Agricultural Production 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Jinxiu

    2014-07-23

    examine the implications of increasing drought frequency in the Edwards Aquifer (EA) region of Texas on municipal, industrial, and agricultural water; land allocation; environmental flows; and welfare. To carry out this study we expand a regional...

  10. Analysis of Land Suitable for Algae State of Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Analysis of Land Suitable for Algae Production State of Hawaii Prepared for the U.S. Department agency thereof. #12;Analysis of Land Suitable for Algae Production State of Hawaii Prepared by Mele University of Hawaii at Manoa August 2011 #12;i Executive Summary Algae are considered to be a viable crop

  11. Robotics in Crop Production Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, University of Illinois at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robotics in Crop Production Tony Grift Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering such as harvesting of citrus fruits, grapes, and raisins. An important part of Automation is the use of robots. Robotics in agriculture is not a new concept; in controlled environments (green houses), it has a his- tory

  12. Multi-factor impact analysis of agricultural production in Bangladesh with climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multi-factor impact analysis of agricultural production in Bangladesh with climate change Alex C, Washington, DC, United States d Bangladesh Centre for Advanced Studies (BCAS), Dhaka, Bangladesh e Bangladesh Agricultural Research Council (BARC), Dhaka, Bangladesh f Institute of Water Modelling (IWM), Dhaka, Bangladesh

  13. The economic impact of global climate and tropospheric oxone on world agricultural production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaodu

    2005-01-01

    The objective of my thesis is to analyze the economic impact on agriculture production from changes in climate and tropospheric ozone, and related policy interventions. The analysis makes use of the Emissions Prediction ...

  14. Increasing corn for biofuel production reduces biocontrol services in agricultural landscapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landis, Doug

    Increasing corn for biofuel production reduces biocontrol services in agricultural landscapes-fold expansion of biofuel production (4), which will likely drive further expansion of corn area crops that compete with corn for land. Increased corn acreage for biofuel production has raised con

  15. BETO Deputy Director Publishes Commentary on Development of Algae...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    challenge of using algae for biofuel production. "Algal lipids are useful for the production of biodiesel, bioethanol, renewable diesel and biogasoline, biohydrogen, and...

  16. Microalgae Cultivation using Offshore Membrane Enclosures for Growing Algae (OMEGA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiley, Patrick Edward

    2013-01-01

    2011). Production of biodiesel and biogas from algae: A2007). Y. Chisti, Biodiesel from microalgae. Biotechnologyas a potential source for biodiesel production. Applied

  17. Brown blob (algae?) (Native) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James R. Manhart

    2011-08-10

    | pg. 20 cientists at three Texas universities investigating golden algae, its explosive growth, and its deadly toxins have dis- covered an apparent competition between golden algae and blue green algae in certain Texas lakes. Understanding... this competition could lead them closer to controlling this harmful algae, the researchers said. ?Our biggest finding so far,? said Dr. Daniel Roelke of Texas AgriLife Research and one of the investigators, ?is that there appears to be a chemical warfare...

  18. Biogeography of Marine Algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biogeography of Marine Algae David J Garbary, St Francis Xavier University, Antigonish, Nova Scotia and vicariance in establishing distributions and as factors associated with speciation. Since eukaryotic algae. There are many species that are virtually cosmopolitan (e.g. the green alga Enteromorpha intestinalis, the red

  19. 16 Louisiana Agriculture, Summer 2005 ice production in the United

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -added applications is so far limited. Trans- forming the straw fiber resources into high quality panel products provides a prospective solution to the straw disposal problem. Straw-based compos- ites offer potential). The samples were cleaned with water at room temperature and subse- quently conditioned for two weeks

  20. Formation of algae growth constitutive relations for improved algae modeling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gharagozloo, Patricia E.; Drewry, Jessica L.

    2013-01-01

    This SAND report summarizes research conducted as a part of a two year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project to improve our abilities to model algal cultivation. Algae-based biofuels have generated much excitement due to their potentially large oil yield from relatively small land use and without interfering with the food or water supply. Algae mitigate atmospheric CO2 through metabolism. Efficient production of algal biofuels could reduce dependence on foreign oil by providing a domestic renewable energy source. Important factors controlling algal productivity include temperature, nutrient concentrations, salinity, pH, and the light-to-biomass conversion rate. Computational models allow for inexpensive predictions of algae growth kinetics in these non-ideal conditions for various bioreactor sizes and geometries without the need for multiple expensive measurement setups. However, these models need to be calibrated for each algal strain. In this work, we conduct a parametric study of key marine algae strains and apply the findings to a computational model.

  1. THE POTENTIAL FOR MICRO-ALGAE AND OTHER "MICRO-CROPS" TO PRODUCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Paul N.

    THE POTENTIAL FOR MICRO-ALGAE AND OTHER "MICRO-CROPS" TO PRODUCE SUSTAINABLE BIOFUELS A REVIEW INTRODUCTION Biofuel derived from algae and other micro-crops has been proposed as an environmentally benign transportation fuel. Algae can be cultivated on low productivity lands using low quality water. Interest in algae

  2. Whole Turf Algae to biofuels-final-sm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    turf algae polyculture maximizes fuels, chemicals and nutrients New Approach to Algal Biomass Production Sandia National Laboratories in partnership with the Smithsonian Institute...

  3. Method and apparatus for processing algae

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chew, Geoffrey; Reich, Alton J.; Dykes, Jr., H. Waite; Di Salvo, Roberto

    2012-07-03

    Methods and apparatus for processing algae are described in which a hydrophilic ionic liquid is used to lyse algae cells. The lysate separates into at least two layers including a lipid-containing hydrophobic layer and an ionic liquid-containing hydrophilic layer. A salt or salt solution may be used to remove water from the ionic liquid-containing layer before the ionic liquid is reused. The used salt may also be dried and/or concentrated and reused. The method can operate at relatively low lysis, processing, and recycling temperatures, which minimizes the environmental impact of algae processing while providing reusable biofuels and other useful products.

  4. Algae Protein Fermentation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of microalgal proteins to mixed alcohol liquid fuels * Increase the yield of algae biofuel intermediates by integrated conversion of all of the major algal biochemical...

  5. Siting algae cultivation facilities for biofuel production in the United States: trade-offs between growth rate, site constructability, water availability, and infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venteris, Erik R.; McBride, Robert; Coleman, Andre M.; Skaggs, Richard; Wigmosta, Mark S.

    2014-02-21

    Locating sites for new algae cultivation facilities is a complex task. The climate must support high growth rates, and cultivation ponds require appropriate land and water resources as well as key utility and transportation infrastructure. We employ our spatiotemporal Biomass Assessment Tool (BAT) to select promising locations based on the open-pond cultivation of Arthrospira sp. and a strain of the order Desmidiales. 64,000 potential sites across the southern United States were evaluated. We progressively apply a range of screening criteria and track their impact on the number of selected sites, geographic location, and biomass productivity. Both strains demonstrate maximum productivity along the Gulf of Mexico coast, with the highest values on the Florida peninsula. In contrast, sites meeting all selection criteria for Arthrospira were located along the southern coast of Texas and for Desmidiales were located in Louisiana and southern Arkansas. Site selection was driven mainly by the lack of oil pipeline access in Florida and elevated groundwater salinity in southern Texas. The requirement for low salinity freshwater (<400 mg L-1) constrained Desmidiales locations; siting flexibility is greater for salt-tolerant species such as Arthrospira. Combined siting factors can result in significant departures from regions of maximum productivity but are within the expected range of site-specific process improvements.

  6. Realization of Algae Potential Algae Biomass Yield Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Realization of Algae Potential Algae Biomass Yield Program March 25, 2015 Technology Area Review Peter Lammers, P.I. New Mexico State University -> Arizona State University This...

  7. Bio-crude transcriptomics: Gene discovery and metabolic network reconstruction for the biosynthesis of the terpenome of the hydrocarbon oil-producing green alga, Botryococcus braunii race B (Showa)*

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Molnár, István; Lopez, David; Wisecaver, Jennifer H.; Devarenne, Timothy P.; Weiss, Taylor L.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Hackett, Jeremiah D.

    2012-10-30

    Microalgae hold promise for yielding a biofuel feedstock that is sustainable, carbon-neutral, distributed, and only minimally disruptive for the production of food and feed by traditional agriculture. Amongst oleaginous eukaryotic algae, the B race of Botryococcus braunii is unique in that it produces large amounts of liquid hydrocarbons of terpenoid origin. These are comparable to fossil crude oil, and are sequestered outside the cells in a communal extracellular polymeric matrix material. The biosynthetic engineering of terpenoid bio-crude production requires identification of genes and reconstruction of metabolic pathways responsible for production of both hydrocarbons and other metabolites of the alga thatmore »compete for photosynthetic carbon and energy.« less

  8. Bio-crude transcriptomics: Gene discovery and metabolic network reconstruction for the biosynthesis of the terpenome of the hydrocarbon oil-producing green alga, Botryococcus braunii race B (Showa)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Molnár, István [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Natural Products Center and Bio5 Institute; Lopez, David [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology; Wisecaver, Jennifer H. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; Devarenne, Timothy P. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Biophysics; Weiss, Taylor L. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Biophysics; Pellegrini, Matteo [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology; Hackett, Jeremiah D. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Bio5 Institute and Dept. of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

    2012-01-01

    Microalgae hold promise for yielding a biofuel feedstock that is sustainable, carbon-neutral, distributed, and only minimally disruptive for the production of food and feed by traditional agriculture. Amongst oleaginous eukaryotic algae, the B race of Botryococcus braunii is unique in that it produces large amounts of liquid hydrocarbons of terpenoid origin. These are comparable to fossil crude oil, and are sequestered outside the cells in a communal extracellular polymeric matrix material. Biosynthetic engineering of terpenoid bio-crude production requires identification of genes and reconstruction of metabolic pathways responsible for production of both hydrocarbons and other metabolites of the alga that compete for photosynthetic carbon and energy.

  9. Using a Decision Support System to Optimize Production of Agricultural Crop Residue Biofeedstock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed L. Hoskinson; Ronald C. Rope; Raymond K. Fink

    2007-04-01

    For several years the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been developing a Decision Support System for Agriculture (DSS4Ag) which determines the economically optimum recipe of various fertilizers to apply at each site in a field to produce a crop, based on the existing soil fertility at each site, as well as historic production information and current prices of fertilizers and the forecast market price of the crop at harvest, for growing a crop such as wheat, potatoes, corn, or cotton. In support of the growing interest in agricultural crop residues as a bioenergy feedstock, we have extended the capability of the DSS4Ag to develop a variable-rate fertilizer recipe for the simultaneous economically optimum production of both grain and straw, and have been conducting field research to test this new DSS4Ag. In this paper we report the results of two years of field research testing and enhancing the DSS4Ag’s ability to economically optimize the fertilization for the simultaneous production of both grain and its straw, where the straw is an agricultural crop residue that can be used as a biofeedstock.

  10. Production

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Algae production R&D focuses on exploring resource use and availability, algal biomass development and improvements, characterizing algal biomass components, and the ecology and engineering of cultivation systems.

  11. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    Europe. It is producing biodiesel from veg- etable oil, fromsuch as Jatropha, for biodiesel. Some industrial forestsfor the production of biodiesel. The econom- ics of algae as

  12. Suppression of Tla1 gene expression for improved solar conversion efficiency and photosynthetic productivity in plants and algae

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Melis, Anastasios; Mitra, Mautusi

    2010-06-29

    The invention provides method and compositions to minimize the chlorophyll antenna size of photosynthesis by decreasing TLA1 gene expression, thereby improving solar conversion efficiencies and photosynthetic productivity in plants, e.g., green microalgae, under bright sunlight conditions.

  13. Turning Algae into Energy in New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sayre, Richard; Olivares, Jose; Lammers, Peter

    2013-07-29

    Los Alamos National Laboratory, as part of the New Mexico Consortium - comprised of New Mexico's major research universities, the Lab, and key industry partners - is conducting research into using algae as a feed stock for a renewable source of fuels, and other products. There are hundreds of thousands of different algae species on Earth. They account for approximately half of the net photosynthesis on the planet, yet they have not been used in any kind of a large scale by humanity, with just a few exceptions. And yet, the biomass is easy to transform into useful products, including fuels, and they contain many other natural products that have high value. In this video Los Alamos and New Mexico State University scientists outline the opportunities and challenges of using science to turn algae into energy.

  14. Turning Algae into Energy in New Mexico

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Sayre, Richard; Olivares, Jose; Lammers, Peter

    2014-06-24

    Los Alamos National Laboratory, as part of the New Mexico Consortium - comprised of New Mexico's major research universities, the Lab, and key industry partners - is conducting research into using algae as a feed stock for a renewable source of fuels, and other products. There are hundreds of thousands of different algae species on Earth. They account for approximately half of the net photosynthesis on the planet, yet they have not been used in any kind of a large scale by humanity, with just a few exceptions. And yet, the biomass is easy to transform into useful products, including fuels, and they contain many other natural products that have high value. In this video Los Alamos and New Mexico State University scientists outline the opportunities and challenges of using science to turn algae into energy.

  15. Method and apparatus for lysing and processing algae

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chew, Geoffrey; Reich, Alton J.; Dykes, Jr., H. Waite H.; Di Salvo, Roberto

    2013-03-05

    Methods and apparatus for processing algae are described in which a hydrophilic ionic liquid is used to lyse algae cells at lower temperatures than existing algae processing methods. A salt or salt solution is used as a separation agent and to remove water from the ionic liquid, allowing the ionic liquid to be reused. The used salt may be dried or concentrated and reused. The relatively low lysis temperatures and recycling of the ionic liquid and salt reduce the environmental impact of the algae processing while providing biofuels and other useful products.

  16. Method and apparatus using an active ionic liquid for algae biofuel harvest and extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salvo, Roberto Di; Reich, Alton; Dykes, Jr., H. Waite H.; Teixeira, Rodrigo

    2012-11-06

    The invention relates to use of an active ionic liquid to dissolve algae cell walls. The ionic liquid is used to, in an energy efficient manner, dissolve and/or lyse an algae cell walls, which releases algae constituents used in the creation of energy, fuel, and/or cosmetic components. The ionic liquids include ionic salts having multiple charge centers, low, very low, and ultra low melting point ionic liquids, and combinations of ionic liquids. An algae treatment system is described, which processes wet algae in a lysing reactor, separates out algae constituent products, and optionally recovers the ionic liquid in an energy efficient manner.

  17. Climate implications of algae-based bioenergy systems Andres Clarens, PhD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Climate implications of algae-based bioenergy systems Andres Clarens, PhD Assistant Professor Civil of algae and other nonconventional feedstocks, are being developed. This talk will explore several systems priorities. This is an especially challenging problem for algae-based biofuels because production pathways

  18. 1128 volume 27 number 12 december 2009 nature biotechnology square meter per day of algae containing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    1128 volume 27 number 12 december 2009 nature biotechnology square meter per day of algae, such as triglycerides from algae or cellulosic biomass from higher plants, as feedstocks for biofuel production. The algal program sought to develop high-oil-content algae that grow at very fast rates. In our report

  19. Potential for Biofuels from Algae (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pienkos, P. T.

    2007-11-15

    Presentation on the potential for biofuels from algae presented at the 2007 Algae Biomass Summit in San Francisco, CA.

  20. Developing New Alternative Energy in Virginia: Bio-Diesel from Algae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatcher, Patrick

    2012-03-29

    The overall objective of this study was to select chemical processing equipment, install and operate that equipment to directly convert algae to biodiesel via a reaction patented by Old Dominion University (Pat. No. US 8,080,679B2). This reaction is a high temperature (250- 330{degrees}C) methylation reaction utilizing tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) to produce biodiesel. As originally envisioned, algal biomass could be treated with TMAH in methanol without the need to separately extract triacylglycerides (TAG). The reactor temperature allows volatilization and condensation of the methyl esters whereas the spent algae solids can be utilized as a high-value fertilizer because they are minimally charred. During the course of this work and immediately prior to commencing, we discovered that glycerol, a major by-product of the conventional transesterification reaction for biofuels, is not formed but rather three methoxylated glycerol derivatives are produced. These derivatives are high-value specialty green chemicals that strongly upgrade the economics of the process, rendering this approach as one that now values the biofuel only as a by-product, the main value products being the methoxylated glycerols. A horizontal agitated thin-film evaporator (one square foot heat transfer area) proved effective as the primary reactor facilitating the reaction and vaporization of the products, and subsequent discharge of the spent algae solids that are suitable for supplementing petrochemicalbased fertilizers for agriculture. Because of the size chosen for the reactor, we encountered problems with delivery of the algal feed to the reaction zone, but envision that this problem could easily disappear upon scale-up or can be replaced economically by incorporating an extraction process. The objective for production of biodiesel from algae in quantities that could be tested could not be met, but we implemented use of soybean oil as a surrogate TAG feed to overcome this limitation. The positive economics of this process are influenced by the following: 1. the weight percent of dry algae in suspension that can be fed into the evaporator, 2. the alga species’ ability to produce a higher yield of biodiesel, 3. the isolation of valuable methoxylated by-products, 4. recycling and regeneration of methanol and TMAH, and 5. the market value of biodiesel, commercial agricultural fertilizer, and the three methoxylated by-products. The negative economics of the process are the following: 1. the cost of producing dried, ground algae, 2. the capital cost of the equipment required for feedstock mixing, reaction, separation and recovery of products, and reactant recycling, and 3. the electrical cost and other utilities. In this report, the economic factors and results are assembled to predict the commercialization cost and its viability. This direct conversion process and equipment discussed herein can be adapted for various feedstocks including: other algal species, vegetable oil, jatropha oil, peanut oil, sunflower oil, and other TAG containing raw materials as a renewable energy resource.

  1. Overall Energy Considerations for Algae Species Comparison and Selection in Algae-to-Fuels Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Link, D.; Kail, B.; Curtis, W.; Tuerk,A.

    2011-01-01

    The controlled growth of microalgae as a feedstock for alternative transportation fuel continues to receive much attention. Microalgae have the characteristics of rapid growth rate, high oil (lipid) content, and ability to be grown in unconventional scenarios. Algae have also been touted as beneficial for CO{sub 2} reuse, as algae can be grown using CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil-based energy generation. Moreover, algae does not compete in the food chain, lessening the 'food versus fuel' debate. Most often, it is assumed that either rapid production rate or high oii content should be the primary factor in algae selection for algae-to-fuels production systems. However, many important characteristics of algae growth and lipid production must be considered for species selection, growth condition, and scale-up. Under light limited, high density, photoautotrophic conditions, the inherent growth rate of an organism does not affect biomass productivity, carbon fixation rate, and energy fixation rate. However, the oil productivity is organism dependent, due to physiological differences in how the organisms allocate captured photons for growth and oil production and due to the differing conditions under which organisms accumulate oils. Therefore, many different factors must be considered when assessing the overall energy efficiency of fuel production for a given algae species. Two species, Chlorella vulgaris and Botryococcus braunii, are popular choices when discussing algae-to-fuels systems. Chlorella is a very robust species, often outcompeting other species in mixed-culture systems, and produces a lipid that is composed primarily of free fatty acids and glycerides. Botryococcus is regarded as a slower growing species, and the lipid that it produces is characterized by high hydrocarbon content, primarily C28-C34 botryococcenes. The difference in growth rates is often considered to be an advantage oiChlorella. However, the total energy captured by each algal species in the same photobioreactor system should be similar at light limited growth conditions based on photon flux. It is how the algae 'allocate' this energy captured that will vary: Data will be presented that shows that Botryococcus invests greater energy in oil production than Chlorella under these growth conditions. In essence, the Chlorella can grow 'fast and lean' or can be slowed to grow 'slow and fat'. The overall energy potential between the Chlorella and Botryococcus, then, becomes much more equivalent on a per-photon basis. This work will indicate an interesting relationship between two very different algae species, in terms of growth rate, lipid content and composition, and energy efficiency of the overall process. The presentation will indicate that in light-limited growth, it cannot be assumed that either rapid growth rate or lipid production rate can be used as stand-alone indicators of which species-lipid relationships will truly be more effective in algae-to-fuels scenarios.

  2. Green Pacific Biologicals Rapid & stable nuclear genetic engineering of eukaryotic algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · Algae-to-biofuels, big oil, Ag-biotech, High-margin products · Proprietary solutions for higher ­ metabolic engineering High-margin product ­ metabolic engineering 200% higher oils ­ metabolic engineering Partnership/M&A ­ Big oil, Algae biofuel, Ag oil Early Revenue- Strategic Partnership for high margin product

  3. Knowledge Integration to Make Decisions About Complex Systems: Sustainability of Energy Production from Agriculture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Danuso, Francesco [University of Udine, Italy

    2010-01-08

    A major bottleneck for improving the governance of complex systems, rely on our ability to integrate different forms of knowledge into a decision support system (DSS). Preliminary aspects are the classification of different types of knowledge (a priori or general, a posteriori or specific, with uncertainty, numerical, textual, algorithmic, complete/incomplete, etc.), the definition of ontologies for knowledge management and the availability of proper tools like continuous simulation models, event driven models, statistical approaches, computational methods (neural networks, evolutionary optimization, rule based systems etc.) and procedure for textual documentation. Following these views at University of Udine, a computer language (SEMoLa, Simple, Easy Modelling Language) for knowledge integration has been developed.  SEMoLa can handle models, data, metadata and textual knowledge; it implements and extends the system dynamics ontology (Forrester, 1968; Jřrgensen, 1994) in which systems are modelled by the concepts of material, group, state, rate, parameter, internal and external events and driving variables. As an example, a SEMoLa model to improve management and sustainability (economical, energetic, environmental) of the agricultural farms is presented. The model (X-Farm) simulates a farm in which cereal and forage yield, oil seeds, milk, calves and wastes can be sold or reused. X-Farm is composed by integrated modules describing fields (crop and soil), feeds and materials storage, machinery management, manpower  management, animal husbandry, economic and energetic balances, seed oil extraction, manure and wastes management, biogas production from animal wastes and biomasses.

  4. Despite the growth of agriculture and the consumption of forestry resources, these activities represent a continually decreasing percentage of production in Latin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Key messages · Despite the growth of agriculture and the consumption of forestry resources, these activities represent a continually decreasing percentage of production in Latin American countries. · Forest products account for a larger proportion of Latin America's material extraction than would

  5. BRANCHED ALKANES FROM BLUE-GREEN ALGAE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Jerry; Calvin, Melvin.

    2008-01-01

    ALKANES FROM BLUE-GREEN ALGAE RECEIV r -· LAWREW RADIATIONAlkanes From Blue-Green Algae by Jerry Han and Oep~rtment l~alkanes from blue-green algae were separated on a The

  6. Metabolism of Thioctic Acid in Algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grisebach, Hans; Fuller, R.C.; Calvin, M.

    1956-01-01

    METABOLISM OF THlOCTlC ACID IN ALGAE TWO-WEEK LOAN COPY ThisMETABOLISM OF THIOCTIC ACID IN ALGAE Hans Grisebach, R. , C.METABOLISM OF THIOCTIC ACID IN ALGAE Hans Grisebach, R. C.

  7. Development of Green Fuels From Algae - The University of Tulsa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crunkleton, Daniel; Price, Geoffrey; Johannes, Tyler; Cremaschi, Selen

    2012-12-03

    The general public has become increasingly aware of the pitfalls encountered with the continued reliance on fossil fuels in the industrialized world. In response, the scientific community is in the process of developing non-fossil fuel technologies that can supply adequate energy while also being environmentally friendly. In this project, we concentrate on â??green fuelsâ?ť which we define as those capable of being produced from renewable and sustainable resources in a way that is compatible with the current transportation fuel infrastructure. One route to green fuels that has received relatively little attention begins with algae as a feedstock. Algae are a diverse group of aquatic, photosynthetic organisms, generally categorized as either macroalgae (i.e. seaweed) or microalgae. Microalgae constitute a spectacularly diverse group of prokaryotic and eukaryotic unicellular organisms and account for approximately 50% of global organic carbon fixation. The PIâ??s have subdivided the proposed research program into three main research areas, all of which are essential to the development of commercially viable algae fuels compatible with current energy infrastructure. In the fuel development focus, catalytic cracking reactions of algae oils is optimized. In the species development project, genetic engineering is used to create microalgae strains that are capable of high-level hydrocarbon production. For the modeling effort, the construction of multi-scaled models of algae production was prioritized, including integrating small-scale hydrodynamic models of algae production and reactor design and large-scale design optimization models.

  8. Algae to Biofuels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D S TA I N P A T TSorbents forCO 2P R Othe NuMIAlAlgae to

  9. Economic Effect on Agricultural Production of Alternative Energy Input Prices: Texas High Plains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, B. M.; Lacewell, R. D.; Condra, G. D.

    1976-01-01

    The Arab oil embargo of 1973 awakened the world to the reality of energy shortages and higher fuel prices. Agriculture in the United States is highly mechanized and thus energy intensive. This study seeks to develop an evaluative capability...

  10. Agricultural productivity in past societies: Toward an empirically informed model for testing cultural evolutionary hypotheses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    due to changes in climate, technology, or genetics needs tofactors as new technologies and practices or climate change.climate change, genetic improvements due to artificial selection, or improved agricultural techniques and technology.

  11. Oklahoma Agriculture Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    Oklahoma Agriculture Agriculture #12;Oklahoma Agriculture 2011Oklahoma Agriculture 2011 Oklahoma well-being of our communities and the counties in which they are located. Oklahoma State University Resources Oklahoma State University #12;Farm Operations · 86,600 farms; 4th in the nation · Average age

  12. Characterization of the Kootenai River Algae Community and Primary Productivity Before and After Experimental Nutrient Addition, 2004–2007 [Chapter 2, Kootenai River Algal Community Characterization, 2009 KTOI REPORT].

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holderman, Charlie; Anders, Paul; Shafii, Bahman

    2009-07-01

    The Kootenai River ecosystem (spelled Kootenay in Canada) has experienced numerous ecological changes since the early 1900s. Some of the largest impacts to habitat, biological communities, and ecological function resulted from levee construction along the 120 km of river upstream from Kootenay Lake, completed by the 1950s, and the construction and operation of Libby Dam on the river near Libby Montana, completed in 1972. Levee construction isolated tens of thousands of hectares of historic functioning floodplain habitat from the river channel downstream in Idaho and British Columbia (B.C.) severely reducing natural biological productivity and habitat diversity crucial to large river-floodplain ecosystem function. Libby Dam greatly reduces sediment and nutrient transport to downstream river reaches, and dam operations cause large changes in the timing, duration, and magnitude of river flows. These and other changes have contributed to the ecological collapse of the post-development Kootenai River ecosystem and its native biological communities. In response to large scale loss of nutrients, experimental nutrient addition was initiated in the North Arm of Kootenay Lake in 1992, in the South Arm of Kootenay Lake in 2004, and in the Kootenai River at the Idaho-Montana border during 2005. This report characterizes baseline chlorophyll concentration and accrual (primary productivity) rates and diatom and algal community composition and ecological metrics in the Kootenai River for four years, one (2004) before, and three (2005 through 2007) after nutrient addition. The study area encompassed a 325 km river reach from the upper Kootenay River at Wardner, B.C. (river kilometer (rkm) 445) downstream through Montana and Idaho to Kootenay Lake in B.C. (rkm 120). Sampling reaches included an unimpounded reach furthest upstream and four reaches downstream from Libby Dam affected by impoundment: two in the canyon reach (one with and one without nutrient addition), a braided reach, and a meandering reach. The study design included 14 sampling sites: an upstream, unimpounded reference site (KR-14), four control (non-fertilized) canyon sites downstream from Libby Dam, but upstream from nutrient addition (KR-10 through KR-13), two treatment sites referred to collectively as the nutrient addition zone (KR-9 and KR-9.1, located at and 5 km downstream from the nutrient addition site), two braided reach sites (KR-6 and KR-7), and four meander reach sites (KR-1 through KR-4). A series of qualitative evaluations and quantitative analyses were used to assess baseline conditions and effects of experimental nutrient addition treatments on chlorophyll, primary productivity, and taxonomic composition and metric arrays for the diatom and green algae communities. Insufficient density in the samples precluded analyses of bluegreen algae taxa and metrics for pre- and post-nutrient addition periods. Chlorophyll a concentration (mg/m{sup 2}), chlorophyll accrual rate (mg/m{sup 2}/30d), total chlorophyll concentration (chlorophyll a and b) (mg/m{sup 2}), and total chlorophyll accrual rate (mg/m{sup 2}/30d) were calculated. Algal taxa were identified and grouped by taxonomic order as Cyanophyta (blue-greens), Chlorophyta (greens), Bacillariophyta (diatoms), Chrysophyta (goldens), and dominant species from each sample site were identified. Algal densities (number/ml) in periphyton samples were calculated for each sample site and sampling date. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was performed to reduce the dimension of diatom and algae data and to determine which taxonomic groups and metrics were contributing significantly to the observed variation. PCA analyses were tabulated to indicate eigenvalues, proportion, and cumulative percent variation, as well as eigenvectors (loadings) for each of the components. Biplot graphic displays of PCA axes were also generated to characterize the pattern and structure of the underlying variation. Taxonomic data and a series of biological and ecological metrics were used with PCA for diatoms and algae. Algal metrics included

  13. Transgenic algae engineered for higher performance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Unkefer, Pat J; Anderson, Penelope S; Knight, Thomas J

    2014-10-21

    The present disclosure relates to transgenic algae having increased growth characteristics, and methods of increasing growth characteristics of algae. In particular, the disclosure relates to transgenic algae comprising a glutamine phenylpyruvate transaminase transgene and to transgenic algae comprising a glutamine phenylpyruvate transaminase transgene and a glutamine synthetase.

  14. Testing for Toxic Algae By Tadd Barrow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Testing for Toxic Algae By Tadd Barrow UNL Extension Educator, Water Quality Algae is a microscopic plant that occurs in all water. However, only certain conditions bring algae to the surface, making it toxic to animals, especially humans and dogs. Toxic algae often are naturally occurring from high

  15. EA-1829: Phycal Algae Pilot Project, Wahiawa and Kalaeloa, Hawaii

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal, through a cooperative agreement with Phycal, Inc., to partially fund implementing and evaluating new technology for the reuse of Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from industrial sources for green energy products. This project would use CO2 to grow algae for the production of algal oil and subsequent conversion to fuel.

  16. Effect of chronic inhalation of inorganic arsenic on the risk of stillbirth in a community surrounding an agriculture chemical production facility: a hospital-based study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ihrig, Melanie M

    1997-01-01

    EFFECT OF CHRONIC INHALATION OF INORGANIC ARSENIC ON THE RISK OF STILLBIRTH IN A COMMUNITY SURROUNDING AN AGRICULTURE CHEMICAL PRODUCTION FACILITY: A HOSPITAL-BASED STUDY A Thesis by MELANIE M. IHRIG Submitted to the Office of Graduate...

  17. Bio-crude transcriptomics: Gene discovery and metabolic network reconstruction for the biosynthesis of the terpenome of the hydrocarbon oil-producing green alga, Botryococcus braunii race B (Showa)*

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molnár, István; Lopez, David; Wisecaver, Jennifer H.; Devarenne, Timothy P.; Weiss, Taylor L.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Hackett, Jeremiah D.

    2012-10-30

    Microalgae hold promise for yielding a biofuel feedstock that is sustainable, carbon-neutral, distributed, and only minimally disruptive for the production of food and feed by traditional agriculture. Amongst oleaginous eukaryotic algae, the B race of Botryococcus braunii is unique in that it produces large amounts of liquid hydrocarbons of terpenoid origin. These are comparable to fossil crude oil, and are sequestered outside the cells in a communal extracellular polymeric matrix material. The biosynthetic engineering of terpenoid bio-crude production requires identification of genes and reconstruction of metabolic pathways responsible for production of both hydrocarbons and other metabolites of the alga that compete for photosynthetic carbon and energy.

  18. Application of Hedonic Price Modeling to Estimate the Value of Algae Meal 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gogichaishvili, Ilia

    2012-10-19

    High productivity rates, usage of nonproductive land, renewability and recovery of waste nutrients and potential for CO2 emission reduction represent some of the advantages that selected algae species might have over competing products. Many...

  19. Microsoft Word - PhycalAlgaePilotProject_NEPAFinalEA_October2011...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    technology for the reuse of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions from industrial sources for green energy products. This project would use CO 2 to grow algae for the production of...

  20. Common benthic algae and cyanobacteria in southern California tidal wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janousek, Christopher N

    2011-01-01

    Janousek Janousek 2011: Algae and cyanobacteria of southernto the Marine Bluegreen Algae. John Wiley and Sons, NewDistribution of bluegreen algae in a Mississippi gulf coast

  1. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Algae: for a Cleaner and...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Algae: for a Cleaner and Greener Tomorrow BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Algae: for a Cleaner and Greener Tomorrow BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Algae: for a Cleaner...

  2. Microalgae Cultivation using Offshore Membrane Enclosures for Growing Algae (OMEGA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiley, Patrick Edward

    2013-01-01

    enclosures for growing algae (OMEGA). J. Sustainableenclosures for growing algae (OMEGA). Bioresour. Technol.enclosures for growing algae (OMEGA). Journal of Sustainable

  3. Bioenergy Technologies Office Conversion R&D Pathway: Whole Algae...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Bioenergy Technologies Office Conversion R&D Pathway: Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Whole algae hydrothermal liquefaction is one of...

  4. Microalgae Cultivation using Offshore Membrane Enclosures for Growing Algae (OMEGA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiley, Patrick Edward

    2013-01-01

    of biodiesel and biogas from algae: A review of processof Biodiesel and Biogas from Algae: A Review of Processof biodiesel and biogas from algae: A review of process

  5. The Impact of Biofuel and Greenhouse Gas Policies on Land Management, Agricultural Production, and Environmental Quality 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Justin Scott

    2012-10-19

    emissions and mitigation, commodity prices, production, net exports, sectoral economic welfare, and shifts in management practices and intensity. Direct and indirect consequences of RFS2 and carbon policy are highlighted, including regional production...

  6. Impacts of land use change due to biofuel crops on carbon balance, bioenergy production, and agricultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Qianlai

    Impacts of land use change due to biofuel crops on carbon balance, bioenergy production that biofuel crops have much higher net pri- mary production (NPP) than soybean and wheat crops. When food). Global biofuel production has increased dramatically in the last decade, especially in United States

  7. NATIONAL PRESS RELEASE I PARIS I 30 AUGUST 2013 Brown algae contain phlorotannins, aromatic (phenolic) compounds that are unique in the plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canet, Léonie

    NATIONAL PRESS RELEASE I PARIS I 30 AUGUST 2013 Brown algae contain phlorotannins, aromatic elucidated the key step in the production of these compounds in Ectocarpus siliculosus, a small brown alga phlorotannins from brown algae for use in industry was a complex process, and the biosynthesis pathways

  8. Wood products trade and foreign markets: Asian market profile issue, November 1993. Foreign agriculture circular

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    Contents: trade summary; significant developments; status of usda/ccc export credit guarantees for wood products; US global export status; trends in US exports to the pacific rim; market profiles for wood products; pacific rim; europe; commodity/country trade tables; US exports, 1988 - 1st half 1993; US imports, 1988 - 1st half 1993.

  9. Agricultural production in the United States by county: a compilation of information from the 1974 census of agriculture for use in terrestrial food-chain transport and assessment models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shor, R.W.; Baes, C.F. III; Sharp, R.D.

    1982-01-01

    Terrestrial food-chain models that simulate the transport of environmentally released radionuclides incorporate parameters describing agricultural production and practice. Often a single set of default parameters, such as that listed in USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.109, is used in lieu of site-specific information. However, the geographical diversity of agricultural practice in the United States suggests the limitations of a single set of default parameters for assessment models. This report documents default parameters with a county-wide resolution based on analysis of the 1974 US Census of Agriculture for use in terrestrial food chain models. Data reported by county, together with state-based information from the US Department of Agriculture, Economic and Statistics Service, provided the basis for estimates of model input parameters. This report also describes these data bases, their limitations, and lists default parameters by county. Vegetable production is described for four categories: leafy vegetables; vegetables and fruits exposed to airborne material; vegetables, fruits, and nuts protected from airborne materials; and grains. Livestock feeds were analyzed in categories of hay, silage, pasture, and grains. Pasture consumption was estimated from cattle and sheep inventories, their feed requirements, and reported quantities of harvested forage. The results were compared with assumed yields of the pasture areas reported. In addition, non-vegetable food production estimates including milk, beef, pork, lamb, poultry, eggs, goat milk, and honey are described. The agricultural parameters and land use information - in all 47 items - are tabulated in four appendices for each of the 3067 counties of the US reported to the Census of Agriculture, excluding those in Hawaii and Alaska.

  10. Analysis of Land Suitable for Algae State of Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Analysis of Land Suitable for Algae Production State of Hawaii Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Under Award No. DE-FC26-06NT42847 Hawai`i on Bioenergy Analyses By the Hawai`i Natural Energy Institute School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology

  11. United States based agricultural {open_quotes}waste products{close_quotes} as fillers in a polypropylene homopolymer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobson, R.E.; Rowell, R.M.; Caulfield, D.F. [Forest Products Lab., Madison, WI (United States)] [and others

    1995-11-01

    With the advent of modern coupling agents (MAPP or maleic anhydride grafted polypropylene), the potential use of various types of renewable, sustainable agricultural byproducts as fillers in thermoplastics is explored. Over 7.7 billion pounds of fillers were used in the plastics industry in 1993. With sharp price increases in commodity thermoplastics (i.e. approximately 25% in 94`), the amount of fillers in thermoplastic materials will increase throughout the 90`s. Various types of agricultural fibers are evaluated for mechanical properties vs. 50% wood flour and 40% talc filled polypropylene (PP). The fibers included in this study are: kenaf core, oat straw, wheat straw, oat hulls, wood flour (pine), corncob, hard corncob, rice hulls, peanut hulls, corn fiber, soybean hull, residue, and jojoba seed meal. Composite interfaces were modified with MAPP to improve the mechanical properties through increased adhesion between the hydrophilic and polar fibers with the hydrophobic and non-polar matrix. The agro-waste composites had compositions of 50% agro-waste/48% PP/2% MAPP. All of the agricultural waste by-products were granulated through a Wiley mill with a 30 mesh screen and compounded in a high intensity shear-thermo kinetic mixer. The resultant blends were injection molded into ASTM standard samples and tested for tensile, flexural, and impact properties. This paper reports on the mechanical properties of the twelve resultant composites and compares them to wood flour and talc-filled polypropylene composites. The mechanical properties of kenaf core, oat straw, wheat straw, and oat hulls compare favorably to the wood flour and talc-filled PP, which are both commercially available and used in the automotive and furniture markets.

  12. School of Engineering and Science Algae Biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Frank

    School of Engineering and Science Algae Biofuels BY: Alessandro Faldi, Ph.D. Section Head is algae- based biofuels, which we believe could be a meaningful part of the energy mix in the future. Algae biofuels have potential to be an economically viable, low-net carbon transportation fuel

  13. Reduced models of algae growth Heikki Haario,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bardsley, John

    Reduced models of algae growth Heikki Haario, Leonid Kalachev Marko Laine, Lappeenranta University of the phenomena studied. Here, in the case of algae growth modelling, we show how a systematic model reduction may: Algae growth modelling, asymptotic methods, model reduction, MCMC, Adaptive Markov chain Monte Carlo. 1

  14. Economic Contributions of Florida's Agricultural, Natural Resource, Food and Kindred Product Manufacturing and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Manufacturing and Distribution, and Service Industries in 20081 Alan W. Hodges and Mohammad Rahmani2 1 economic sectors for food and kindred product manufacturing, wholesale and retail distribution, input supplies, support services, and nature-based recreation/eco-tourism. In addition to farming, forestry

  15. Economic Contributions of Florida Agriculture, Natural Resources, Food and Kindred Product Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Manufacturing and Distribution, and Service Industries in 20061 Alan W. Hodges, Mohammad Rahmani, and W. David range of other economic sectors for food and kindred products manufacturing, wholesale and retail distribution, input suppliers, support services, and nature-based recreation. In addition to farms, forests

  16. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Possible future trade-offs between agriculture, energy production,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phipps, Steven J.

    and advances in technology that enable deep shales containing oil and gas to be fractured and mined, and sunflowers. In addition, it is the center of a major oil and gas boom made possible by rising oil prices of the major grassland biomes-turned-granaries between resource exploitation and food production on one hand

  17. An aggregate production function for U. S. agriculture: an alternative to the Tyner-Tweeten approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cornforth, Gerald Charles

    1976-01-01

    time? The Tyner and Tweeten decade elasticity estimates were determined independently using distributed-lag factor- share ad)ustment models, whereas ridge regression was used in this study to directly and simultaneously estimate these elasticities.... A Cobb-Douglas production function employing nine input variables [assumed by Tyner and Tweeten (1965, 1966)] was fit using ordinary least squares and ridge regression. The ridge results appeared to be statistically reliable. A time trend model...

  18. College of Agricultural Sciences College of Agricultural Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horticulture Environmental Horticulture Organic Agriculture Plant Health Soil Resources and Conservation Soil and applied research; production and utilization of food and related products; resource use and conservation

  19. Texas Catfish Production in Ponds 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masser, Michael P.; Woods, Peter; Clary, Gregory M.

    2005-03-31

    waste decomposition. ? Excessive bacterial decomposition from algae bloom die-offs and over-feeding. ? Reduced oxygen production from photosyn- thesis because of cloud cover or fog. ? Lack of water agitation from wind. ? Rapid reduction in algae...

  20. Genomic analysis of organismal complexity in the multicellular green alga Volvox carteri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prochnik, Simon E.

    2011-01-01

    in the multicellular green alga Volvox carteri One-sentencegenome reveals that this green alga’s increased organismal16 P. Volvocine algae-specific protein

  1. Economic and Physical Modeling of Land Use in GCAM 3.0 and an Application to Agricultural Productivity, Land, and Terrestrial Carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick; Edmonds, James A.

    2014-09-01

    We explore the impact of changes in agricultural productivity on global land use and terrestrial carbon using the new agriculture and land use modeling approach developed for Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) version 3.0. This approach models economic land use decisions with regional, physical, and technological specificity while maintaining economic and physical integration with the rest of the GCAM model. Physical land characteristics and quantities are tracked explicitly, and crop production practices are modeled discretely to facilitate coupling with physical models. Economic land allocation is modeled with non-linear functions in a market equilibrium rather than through a constrained optimization. In this paper, we explore three scenarios of future agriculture productivity in all regions of the globe over this century, ranging from a high growth to a zero growth level. The higher productivity growth scenario leads to lower crop prices, increased production of crops in developing nations, preservation of global forested lands and lower terrestrial carbon emissions. The scenario with no productivity improvement results in higher crop prices, an expansion of crop production in the developed world, loss of forested lands globally, and higher terrestrial carbon emissions.

  2. Updated Cost Analysis of Photobiological Hydrogen Production...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Analysis of Photobiological Hydrogen Production from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Green Algae: Milestone Completion Report Updated Cost Analysis of Photobiological Hydrogen...

  3. Stochastic Forecasting of Algae Blooms in Lakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Peng; Tartakovsky, Daniel M.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2013-01-15

    We consider the development of harmful algae blooms (HABs) in a lake with uncertain nutrients inflow. Two general frameworks, Fokker-Planck equation and the PDF methods, are developed to quantify the resultant concentration uncertainty of various algae groups, via deriving a deterministic equation of their joint probability density function (PDF). A computational example is examined to study the evolution of cyanobacteria (the blue-green algae) and the impacts of initial concentration and inflow-outflow ratio.

  4. Energy 101 | Algae-to-Fuel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    A behind-the-scenes video of how oil from algae is extracted and refined to create clean, renewable transportation fuel.

  5. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    order for the hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks. Whole Algae Hydrothermal...

  6. Algae as a Feedstock for Biofuels: An Assessment of the State of Technology and Opportunities. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sikes, K.; McGill, R.; Van Walwijk, M.

    2011-05-15

    The pursuit of a stable, economically-sound, and environmentally-friendly source of transportation fuel has led to extensive research and development (R&D) efforts focused on the conversion of various feedstocks into biofuels. Some feedstocks, such as sugar cane, corn and woody biomass, are targeted because their structures can be broken down into sugars and fermented into alcohols. Other feedstocks, such as vegetable oils, are appealing because they contain considerable amounts of lipids, which can be extracted and converted into biodiesel or other fuels. While significant R&D and commercial strides have been made with each of these feedstocks, technical and market barriers (e.g., cost, scalability, infrastructure requirements, and 'food vs. fuel' debates) currently limit the penetration of the resultant biofuels into the mainstream. Because of algae's ability to potentially address several of these barriers, its use as a feedstock for biofuels has led to much excitement and initiative within the energy industry. Algae are highly diverse, singleor multi-cellular organisms comprised of mostly lipids, protein, and carbohydrates, which may be used to produce a wide variety of biofuels. Algae offer many competitive advantages over other feedstocks, including: 1) Higher potential lipid content than terrestrial plants, sometimes exceeding 50% of the cell's dry biomass (U.S. DOE, May '10; Tornabene et al., 1983) 2) Rapid growth rates that are 20-30 times higher than terrestrial crops (McDill, 2009) and, in some cases, capable of doubling in size with 10 hours 3) Diverse number of species that can collectively thrive in a wide range of environments throughout the world, presenting an overall high overall tolerance for climate, sunlight, nutrient levels, etc. 4) Daily harvesting potential instead of seasonal harvest periods associated with terrestrial crops 5) Potential to redirect CO2 from industry operations to algal cultivation facilities to be used in an algal biofuel cycle before it is released into the atmosphere 6) Ability to be cultivated on land that that is unsuitable for agriculture, so it does not directly compete with farmland Given microalgae's high lipid content and rapid growth rates, maximum oil yields of 20,000--115,000 L/ha/yr (2,140-13,360 gal/ac/yr) have been estimated. xiv 7) Ability to thrive in seawater, wastewater, or other non-potable sources, so it does not directly compete with fresh water resources. In fact, wastewater can provide algae with some essential nutrients, such as nitrogen, so algae may contribute to cleaning up wastewater streams. 8) Non-toxic and biodegradable 9) Co-products that may present high value in other markets, including nutriceuticals and cosmetics Given microalgae's high lipid content and rapid growth rate, maximum oil yields of 20,000 -- 115,000 liters per hectare per year (L/ha/yr) (2,140 -- 13,360 gallons per acre per year) (Baldos, 2009; Wijffels, 2008) have been estimated, which is considerably higher than any other competing feedstock. Although algae species collectively present many strong advantages (although one specific species is unlikely to possess all of the advantages listed), a sustainable algal biofuel industry is at least one or two decades away from maturity, and no commercial scale operations currently exist. Several barriers must first be overcome before algal biofuels can compete with traditional petroleum-based fuels. Production chains with net energy output need to be identified, and continued R&D is needed to reduce the cost in all segments of the production spectrum (e.g., harvesting, dewatering, extracting of oil). Further research to identify strains with high production rates and/or oil yields may also improve competitiveness within the market. Initiatives to seamlessly integrate algal biofuels into the existing transportation infrastructure may increase their convenience level.

  7. Wastewater Reclamation and Biofuel Production Using Algae

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Africa, New Zealand (but not designed for nutrient removal). 9 Typical Electro-Mechanical Treatment Plant 10 Aeration Basins with Air Blowers Sludge Settling Tanks -100,000 0...

  8. RESEARCH ARTICLE Algae production on pig sludge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    . However, there are several other methods of treating liquid manure, such as making compost, biogas

  9. Niche of harmful alga Aureococcus anophagefferens revealed through ecogenomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grigoriev, Igor

    2011-01-01

    Niche of harmful alga Aureococcus anophagefferens revealedc consensus. Harmful Algae 8:3–13. 2. Sunda WG, Graneli E,of the United States. Harmful Algae 8:39–53. 4. Smayda TJ (

  10. FAS4932: ALGAE BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY Instructor: Professor Edward Phlips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    FAS4932: ALGAE BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY Instructor: Professor Edward Phlips Main Office: Program algae, including evolution, classification, structure, photosynthesis, growth, and reproduction. Emphasis on the ecological role of algae in different aquatic ecosystems (e.g. open ocean, estuaries, coral

  11. BOTANICAL BRIEFING Streptophyte algae and the origin of embryophytes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BOTANICAL BRIEFING Streptophyte algae and the origin of embryophytes Burkhard Becker* and Birger March 2009 Background Land plants (embryophytes) evolved from streptophyte green algae, a small group of freshwater algae ranging from scaly, unicellular flagellates (Mesostigma) to complex, filamentous thalli

  12. 7 Systematics of the green algae: conflict of classic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    123 7 Systematics of the green algae: conflict of classic and modern approaches Thomas Pröschold ....................................................................................................................................124 How are green algae classified ....................................................................................................................................144 Biodiversity of green algae based on taxonomic revision using polyphasic approaches

  13. Algae Biotecnologia | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavyAgencyTendoMassachusetts:RenewableIncAlcorn CountyAlgae

  14. Florida Algae | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePowerEdistoWhiskey flats 100k.pdf JumpFlemington, NewFloodplains JumpAlgae

  15. Multi-Scale Characterization of Improved Algae Strains

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office (BETO) 2015 Project Peer Review Multi-Scale Characterization of Improved Algae Strains March 23, 2015 Algae Technology Area Review Dr. Taraka Dale Los Alamos...

  16. Algae-to-Fuel: Integrating Thermochemical Conversion, Nutrient...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Algae-to-Fuel: Integrating Thermochemical Conversion, Nutrient Recycling, and Wastewater Algae-to-Fuel: Integrating Thermochemical Conversion, Nutrient Recycling, and Wastewater...

  17. Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project October 22, 2012 - 3:44pm Addthis Crow Nation...

  18. Nanotechnology and algae biofuels exhibits open July 26 at the...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanotechnology and algae biofuels exhibits open July 26 Nanotechnology and algae biofuels exhibits open July 26 at the Bradbury Science Museum The Bradbury Science Museum is...

  19. BETO Deputy Director Publishes Commentary on Development of Algae...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BETO Deputy Director Publishes Commentary on Development of Algae as Renewable Energy Source BETO Deputy Director Publishes Commentary on Development of Algae as Renewable Energy...

  20. Solazyme Developing Cheaper Algae Biofuels, Brings Jobs to Pennsylvani...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solazyme Developing Cheaper Algae Biofuels, Brings Jobs to Pennsylvania Solazyme Developing Cheaper Algae Biofuels, Brings Jobs to Pennsylvania August 6, 2010 - 2:00pm Addthis A...

  1. Sandia Algae Researchers Cut Costs with Improved Nutrient Recycling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sandia Algae Researchers Cut Costs with Improved Nutrient Recycling Sandia Algae Researchers Cut Costs with Improved Nutrient Recycling October 19, 2015 - 3:40pm Addthis Ryan Davis...

  2. Sandia Algae Researchers Cut Costs with Improved Nutrient Recycling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sandia Algae Researchers Cut Costs with Improved Nutrient Recycling Sandia Algae Researchers Cut Costs with Improved Nutrient Recycling October 5, 2015 - 12:16pm Addthis Ryan Davis...

  3. Flocculation of model algae under shear.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, Flint; Lechman, Jeremy B.

    2010-11-01

    We present results of molecular dynamics simulations of the flocculation of model algae particles under shear. We study the evolution of the cluster size distribution as well as the steady-state distribution as a function of shear rates and algae interaction parameters. Algal interactions are modeled through a DLVO-type potential, a combination of a HS colloid potential (Everaers) and a yukawa/colloid electrostatic potential. The effect of hydrodynamic interactions on aggregation is explored. Cluster strucuture is determined from the algae-algae radial distribution function as well as the structure factor. DLVO parameters including size, salt concentration, surface potential, initial volume fraction, etc. are varied to model different species of algae under a variety of environmental conditions.

  4. ALDUO(TM) Algae Cultivation Technology for Delivering Sustainable Omega-3s, Feed, and Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, Xuemei

    2012-09-24

    * ALDUO(TM) Algae Production Technology Cellana?s Proprietary, Photosynthetic, & Proven * ALDUO(TM) Enables Economic Algae Production Unencumbered by Contamination by Balancing Higher-Cost PBRs with Lower-Cost Open Ponds * ALDUO(TM) Advantages * ALDUO(TM) Today o Large collection of strains for high value co-products o Powerful Mid-scale Screening & Optimization System o Solution to a Conflicting Interest o Split Pond Yield Enhancement o Heterotrophy & mixotrophy as a "finishing step" o CO2 Mitigation-flue Gas Operation o Worldwide Feed Trials with Livestock & Aquatic Species * ALDUO(TM) Technology Summarized

  5. Triassic origin and early radiation of multicellular volvocine algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Triassic origin and early radiation of multicellular volvocine algae Matthew D. Herron1 , Jeremiah-studied ETIs is the origin of multicellularity in the green alga Volvox, a model system for the evolution occurred dozens of times independently, for example in the red algae, brown algae, land plants, animals

  6. HARMFUL ALGAE POSE ADDITIONAL CHALLENGES FOR OYSTER RESTORATION: IMPACTS OF THE HARMFUL ALGAE KARLODINIUM VENEFICUM AND PROROCENTRUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North, Elizabeth W.

    HARMFUL ALGAE POSE ADDITIONAL CHALLENGES FOR OYSTER RESTORATION: IMPACTS OF THE HARMFUL ALGAE deformed within 48 h in one experimental trial, but not in a second trial in which algae were difficult. KEY WORDS: oysters, larvae, harmful algae, HABs, Chesapeake Bay, oyster restoration, Karlodinium

  7. 2011 Biomass Program Platform Peer Review: Algae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Joyce

    2012-02-01

    This document summarizes the recommendations and evaluations provided by an independent external panel of experts at the 2011 U.S. Department of Energy Biomass Program’s Algae Platform Review meeting.

  8. Algae Biomass Summit | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram:Y-12 Beta-3AUDITLeslieAlgae Biomass Summit Algae Biomass Summit

  9. Transcriptional Regulation in Algae, Fungi and Plants: Mating Loci, Splicing, and miRNAs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglass, Stephen Michael

    2014-01-01

    from organisms ranging from algae to fungi and plants. WeTranscriptional Regulation in Algae, Fungi and Plants:Transcriptional Regulation in Algae, Fungi and Plants:

  10. Synthesis and Metabolism of Carbonyl-C14 Pyruvic and Hydroxypyruvic Acids in Algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milhaud, Gerhard; Benson, Andrew A.; Calvin, M.

    1955-01-01

    AND HYDROXYPYRUVIC ACIDS IN ALGAE Cerhard Milhaud, Andrew A.HYDROXYPYRUYIC ACIDS IN ALGAE Gerhard Milhaud, * - Andrew A.AND HYDROXYPYRUVIC ACIDS IN ALGAE Gerhard Milhaud, Andrew A.

  11. The politics of food production: a comparative study of the agricultural development policies of five African nations. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallis, Leslie Jean

    1975-01-01

    , whose life inspired my interest in Africa ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I wish to express my sincere appreciation to my committee chairman~ Dr Kwang Ro, for the idea for my thesis and encouragement in writing it. I also wish to thank Dr, Gary Halter and Dr Henry... OF INCREASING FOOD PRODUCTION One of the most pressing problems facing the world today is the continuously unfavorable relationship between population growth and food production. Food production is Africa's most important activity; yet 20%%d ? 30'X...

  12. This is SLU Alnarp SLU Alnarp is situated in Sweden's most dynamic agricultural, horticultural and food production region,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deals with the entire cultivation chain. This includes production of food, raw materials for industry's growing population with food, clean water, fibres, materials and energy using sus- tainable methods is a research network focused on new or improved crops and food products, materials, pharmaceuticals and energy

  13. Economic evaluation and conceptual design of optimal agricultural systems for production of food and energy. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1982-03-01

    The major technical and economic considerations which determined the scope of the study and the structure of the linear programming (LP) models are discussed. Four models, each representing a typical crop, beef, dairy, or swine farm in conjunction with ethanol facilities are characterized by the same general behavioral and mathematical model structure. Specific activities, constraints, and data for each of the four models are presented. An overview of the model structure is provided in the context of the general scope and background assumptions, and of its LP implementation. Simulated initial conditions and outcomes are reported for typical Illinois farms. Policy implications are discussed as related to agriculture, energy, and inter-industry coordination. (MHR)

  14. Seasonal variations in nitrate reductase activity and internal N pools in intertidal brown algae are correlated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berges, John A.

    suggest that, in contrast to the tight relationship between N and C metabo- lism in many microalgae, N biomass and 95% of productivity (Birkett, Dring & Savidge, unpublished results).The vast majority of the macroalgal biomass in the Lough is fucoid algae (Fucus and Ascophyllum species) and kelps (Laminaria species

  15. Agricultural niche market risk-takers: analysis of production practices and information sources of Texas meat goat producers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coleman, Kelly Lee Ann

    2001-01-01

    auctions; 6) supplemental feed their herds; and 7) graze their herds on native brushy rangeland. Innovativeness of producers and its relationship to demographic, educational, and production variables were examined. The data revealed that more innovative...

  16. Cognome e nome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ALGA 14 novembre 2011 Compitino (2 ore)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robbiano, Lorenzo

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ALGA 14 novembre 2011­ Compitino (2 ore) Giustificare ogni affermazione Salvare il file CoCoA come

  17. Cognome e nome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ALGA 2 febbraio 2012 Compitino (2 ore)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robbiano, Lorenzo

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ALGA 2 febbraio 2012­ Compitino (2 ore) Giustificare ogni affermazione Salvare il file CoCoA come

  18. A golden opportunity: Researchers making progress in understanding toxic algae 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01

    | pg. 20 cientists at three Texas universities investigating golden algae, its explosive growth, and its deadly toxins have dis- covered an apparent competition between golden algae and blue green algae in certain Texas lakes. Understanding... this competition could lead them closer to controlling this harmful algae, the researchers said. ?Our biggest finding so far,? said Dr. Daniel Roelke of Texas AgriLife Research and one of the investigators, ?is that there appears to be a chemical warfare...

  19. Agriculture and Environmental Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    and organic wastes, bioenergy, pesticides, and wetlands. Course Description and Statement of General Education to minimize agricultural pollution and sustain food production adequate for the world's population topics include point and nonpoint source pollution, the Clean Water Act, wetlands, bioenergy, food waste

  20. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Phagotrophy by the picoeukaryotic green alga

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Phagotrophy by the picoeukaryotic green alga Micromonas: implications for Arctic, is well established for most photosynthetic lineages. However, green algae, including prasinophytes, were of Micromonas suggest that these green algae may have significant impact on prokaryote populations in several

  1. Biosorption of Lead and Nickel by Biomass of Marine Algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volesky, Bohumil

    Biosorption of Lead and Nickel by Biomass of Marine Algae Z.R. Holan and B. Volesky" Department 22, 1993 Screening tests of different marine algae biomass types revealed a high passive biosorptive uptake of lead up to 270 mg Pb/g of biomass in some brown marine algae. Members of the order Fucales

  2. Update on Genomic Studies of Algae Paths toward Algal Genomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Update on Genomic Studies of Algae Paths toward Algal Genomics Arthur R. Grossman* The Carnegie the expression of genes. In this introductory manuscript, I discuss select algae and how genomics is impacting our understanding of these organisms. Four algae for which near-full genome information has become

  3. CORALLINE ALGA STANDS THE TEST OF TIME ON SHORELINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martone, Patrick T.

    Inside JEB i CORALLINE ALGA STANDS THE TEST OF TIME ON SHORELINE No one likes getting bashed about, the coralline algae, which have calcified most of their cells and essentially turned themselves into living, and thus most of force, occurring at the small joints (they make up just 15% of the alga), Denny wondered

  4. INHIBITION OF PHOTOSYNTHESIS IN CERTAIN ALGAE BY EXTREME RED LIGHT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govindjee

    INHIBITION OF PHOTOSYNTHESIS IN CERTAIN ALGAE BY EXTREME RED LIGHT GOVINDJEE, EUGENE RABINOWITCH. INTRODUCTION It was shown in preceding papers (9, 10) that when the unicellular red alga Por- phyridium), these algae, when exposed to monochromatic light (bands isolated by a grating monochromator, band half

  5. FAS6176 ALGAE BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY Instructor: Professor Edward Phlips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    FAS6176 ALGAE BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY Instructor: Professor Edward Phlips 7922 NW 71st Street the biology and ecology of aquatic algae, including evolution, classification, structure, photosynthesis, growth, and reproduction. Emphasis on the ecological role of algae in different aquatic ecosystems (e

  6. Sedimentation of algae: relationships with biomass and size distribution1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazumder, Asit

    Sedimentation of algae: relationships with biomass and size distribution1 Isabelle Larocque, A distribution of epilimnetic algae on patterns of algal sedimentation was determined in lake enclosures under the mean length of algae in fish-free enclosures and reduced the mean length in the enclosures to which

  7. Environmental Life Cycle Comparison of Algae to Other Bioenergy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarens, Andres

    Environmental Life Cycle Comparison of Algae to Other Bioenergy Feedstocks A N D R E S F . C L A R December 6, 2009. Accepted December 15, 2009. Algae are an attractive source of biomass energy since. In spite of these advantages, algae cultivation has not yet been compared with conventional crops from

  8. Gille-STPA 35 1 Noxious Algae in Carlsbad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gille, Sarah T.

    Gille-STPA 35 1 Noxious Algae in Carlsbad Spanish explorers of this region came across a lagoon Woodfield Dubbed "killer algae," the alien seaweed Caulerpa taxifolia was discovered in June 2000. Caulerpa taxifolia is a green alga native to tropical waters that typically grows to small size

  9. Global Dynamics of Zooplankton and Harmful Algae in Flowing Habitats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsu, Sze-Bi

    Global Dynamics of Zooplankton and Harmful Algae in Flowing Habitats Sze-Bi Hsu Feng-Bin Wang Xiao from the dynamics of harmful algae and zooplankton in flowing- water habitats where a main channel. For the system modeling the dynamics of algae and their toxin that contains little limiting nutrient, we

  10. Intracellular invasion of green algae in a salamander host

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Intracellular invasion of green algae in a salamander host Ryan Kerneya,1 , Eunsoo Kimb , Roger P) and green algae ("Oophila amblystomatis" Lamber ex Printz) has been considered an ectosymbiotic mutu- alism tracts, consistent with oviductal transmission of algae from one salamander generation to the next

  11. AQU 04 Portable Algae Flow Cytometer Team Members

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soatto, Stefano

    AQU 04 Portable Algae Flow Cytometer Team Members · David Caron, Faculty · Han-Chieh Chang · Yu-Chong Tai, Faculty, PI* * Primary Contact Overview The portable algae flow cytometer is a project that aims to expedite research in algae biology using microfluid-based and state-of-the-art detection

  12. FAS6932: ALGAE BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY Instructor: Professor Edward Phlips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    FAS6932: ALGAE BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY Instructor: Professor Edward Phlips Main Office: Program-mail: phlips@ufl.edu Office Hours: Mondays 4pm-5pm Course Description: The biology and ecology of aquatic algae on the ecological role of algae in different aquatic ecosystems (e.g. open ocean, estuaries, coral reefs, rocky

  13. Seeing Toxic Algae Before it Blooms By Steve Ress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Seeing Toxic Algae Before it Blooms By Steve Ress Researchers at the University of Nebraska of toxic blue-green algae before the bacteria that produce it can grow into a full-scale bloom. Now UNL and monitor in real-time, the water-borne agents that can cause toxic blue- green algae to flourish and become

  14. Algae 2011, 26(2): 181-192 DOI: 10.4490/algae.2011.26.2.181

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    Algae 2011, 26(2): 181-192 DOI: 10.4490/algae.2011.26.2.181 Open Access Research Article Copyright © The Korean Society of Phycology 181 http://e-algae.kr pISSN: 1226-2617 eISSN: 2093-0860 Methods for sampling, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. #12;Algae 2011, 26

  15. Utilization of Agricultural WasteUtilization of Agricultural Waste for Composite Panelsfor Composite Panels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utilization of Agricultural WasteUtilization of Agricultural Waste for Composite Panelsfor. The benefits of utilizing agricultural residues for woodbenefits of utilizing agricultural residues for wood a fiber source that is currentlyadded product from a fiber source that is currently not well utilized

  16. Analysis of factor productivity in agricultural systems in Zimbabwe and application of Geographic Information Systems in soil erosion prediction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mugabe, Phanuel

    1994-01-01

    , variable and fixed costs of production were obtained from Zimbabwe Government publications. These figures were used to calculate rates of return to labor and capital for each of the systems under study. Land use classes of the area delineated from aerial...

  17. Battling Golden Algae: Results suggest preventative lake management approaches 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supercinski, Danielle

    2011-01-01

    stream_source_info Battling Golden Algae.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 10626 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Battling Golden Algae.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 14 tx H2...O Winter 2011 Story by Danielle Supercinski Battling golden algae Results suggest preventative lake management approaches Golden algae blooms, or the explosive growth of algae, are known to be toxic, but recent ?ndings from three university...

  18. Battling golden algae: Results suggest preventative lake managment approaches 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supercinski, Danielle

    2011-01-01

    stream_source_info Battling Golden Algae.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 10626 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Battling Golden Algae.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 14 tx H2...O Winter 2011 Story by Danielle Supercinski Battling golden algae Results suggest preventative lake management approaches Golden algae blooms, or the explosive growth of algae, are known to be toxic, but recent ?ndings from three university...

  19. Individuals Agricultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    , with the highest density in the first year, and no obvious differences between the second and the third year. We in the first year, and the lowest in the third year Though taxa diversity was lower in the third year Yards Mesic Yards Year Yea r 321 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 Agricultural Desert Parks Desert Remnants

  20. Major Nutrient Recycling for Sustained Algal Production

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project Peer Review Major Nutrient Recycling for Sustained Algal Production 3252015 Algae Technology Area Review Todd W. Lane Sandia National Laboratories This presentation...

  1. Maximizing Light Utilization Efficiency and Hydrogen Production...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Progress Report UCB will minimize, or truncate, the chlorophyll antenna size in green algae to maximize photobiological solar conversion efficiency and H2-production....

  2. Impact of demand-enhancing farm policy on the agricultural sector: a firm level simulation of ethanol production subsidies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wasson, Leta Susanne

    1990-01-01

    to a 60 cent per gallon subsidy on each gallon of ethanol blended with gasoline. Other federal incentives include the Crude Oil Windfall Profit Tax of 1980 which gave blenders of ethanol an income tax credit and extended the gasoline tax exemption... subsidies providing for all off- highway uses of diesel fuel and gasoline to be exempt from Federal Excise taxes. Also, the Federal Crop Insurance Corporation has provided insurance against production losses due to weather and other perils at subsidized...

  3. University College Dublin Agriculture, Food Science and Human Nutrition AgriculturAl Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    250 Agricultural Science Dn250AeS Agri-environmental Sciences Dn250AcP Animal and crop Production DnAES Agri-Environmental Sciences DN250ACP Animal and Crop Production DN250ASC Animal Science DN250ENT Agri-Environmental Sciences DN250 AES 2 Animal and Crop Production DN250 ACP 3 Animal Science DN250 ASC

  4. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing ToolInternationalReport FY2014 -Energy Costs by IncreasingWhole Algae Hydrothermal

  5. S u m m e r 2 0 1 5 g r o w 1FOXES, COYOTES AND BADGERS TURF SCIENCE AT WHISTLING STRAITS P, FROM POLLUTANT TO PRODUCT College of Agricultural & Life Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Monica G.

    , FROM POLLUTANT TO PRODUCT College of Agricultural & Life Sciences UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN MADISON of biogas 12 Living Science Horticulture professor Irwin Goldman sparks a love of plants among students from of Energy, has been to realize the grand vision of a biorefinery--the bioenergy version of the petroleum

  6. Factors affecting agricultural journalists and agricultural communicators 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chenault, Edith Anne

    2009-05-15

    Agricultural journalism and agricultural communication have been researched in depth, identifying job skills, job satisfaction, educational backgrounds, and curriculum issues. However, a study examining the spheres ...

  7. Flowing with the Tide:Epiphytic Host-Specificity and Phenotypic Plasticity of the Brown Alga Padina boryana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flynn, Sierra Michelle

    2011-01-01

    PLASTICITY OF THE BROWN ALGA PADINA BORYANA SIERRA M. FLYNN94720 USA Abstract. Epiphytic algae form complex communitiesmacroalgae hosts. The brown alga Padina boryana acts as a

  8. Stable isotopic records of bleaching and endolithic algae blooms in the skeleton of the boulder forming coral Montastraea faveolata

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartmann, A. C.; Carilli, J. E.; Norris, R. D.; Charles, C. D.; Deheyn, D. D.

    2010-01-01

    of bleaching and endolithic algae blooms in the skeleton ofa lesser extent, endolithic algae within the coral skeleton.Endolithic algae produce distinctive green bands in the

  9. RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Origin of land plants: Do conjugating green algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Origin of land plants: Do conjugating green algae hold the key? Sabina (embryophytes) evolved from streptophyte algae, also referred to as charophycean algae. The streptophyte algae are a paraphyletic group of green algae, ranging from unicellular flagellates to morphologically complex forms

  10. Chemical Processing in High-Pressure Aqueous Environments. 9. Process Development for Catalytic Gasification of Algae Feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Hart, Todd R.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Rotness, Leslie J.; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Zacher, Alan H.

    2012-07-26

    Through the use of a metal catalyst, gasification of wet algae slurries can be accomplished with high levels of carbon conversion to gas at relatively low temperature (350 C). In a pressurized-water environment (20 MPa), near-total conversion of the organic structure of the algae to gases has been achieved in the presence of a supported ruthenium metal catalyst. The process is essentially steam reforming, as there is no added oxidizer or reagent other than water. In addition, the gas produced is a medium-heating value gas due to the synthesis of high levels of methane, as dictated by thermodynamic equilibrium. As opposed to earlier work, biomass trace components were removed by processing steps so that they did not cause processing difficulties in the fixed catalyst bed tubular reactor system. As a result, the algae feedstocks, even those with high ash contents, were much more reliably processed. High conversions were obtained even with high slurry concentrations. Consistent catalyst operation in these short-term tests suggested good stability and minimal poisoning effects. High methane content in the product gas was noted with significant carbon dioxide captured in the aqueous byproduct in combination with alkali constituents and the ammonia byproduct derived from proteins in the algae. High conversion of algae to gas products was found with low levels of byproduct water contamination and low to moderate loss of carbon in the mineral separation step.

  11. Using CO2 & Algae to Treat Wastewater and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Arturo A.

    Using CO2 & Algae to Treat Wastewater and Produce Biofuel Feedstock Tryg Lundquist Cal Poly State of the Industry and Growth · Algae's Role in WW Treatment · CO2's New Role · Research at Cal Poly · Future Work/MG 0.3 MGD average flow per facility #12;Reclaimed Algae Bacteria O2 CO2 N Organics N P CO2 P CO2 Waste

  12. Method for producing hydrogen and oxygen by use of algae

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenbaum, Elias (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1984-01-01

    Efficiency of process for producing H.sub.2 by subjecting algae in an aqueous phase to light irradiation is increased by culturing algae which has been bleached during a first period of irradiation in a culture medium in an aerobic atmosphere until it has regained color and then subjecting this algae to a second period of irradiation wherein hydrogen is produced at an enhanced rate.

  13. Method for producing hydrogen and oxygen by use of algae

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenbaum, E.

    1982-06-16

    Efficiency of process for producing H/sub 2/ by subjecting algae in an aqueous phase to light irradiation is increased by culturing algae which has been bleached during a first period of irradiation in a culture medium in an aerobic atmosphere until it has regained color and then subjecting this algae to a second period of irradiation wherein hydrogen is produced at an enhanced rate.

  14. Algae to Bio-Crude in Less Than 60 Minutes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Doug

    2013-12-17

    Engineers have created a chemical process that produces useful crude oil just minutes after engineers pour in harvested algae -- a verdant green paste with the consistency of pea soup. The PNNL team combined several chemical steps into one continuous process that starts with an algae slurry that contains as much as 80 to 90 percent water. Most current processes require the algae to be dried -- an expensive process that takes a lot of energy. The research has been licensed by Genifuel Corp.

  15. Algae to Bio-Crude in Less Than 60 Minutes

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Elliott, Doug

    2014-06-02

    Engineers have created a chemical process that produces useful crude oil just minutes after engineers pour in harvested algae -- a verdant green paste with the consistency of pea soup. The PNNL team combined several chemical steps into one continuous process that starts with an algae slurry that contains as much as 80 to 90 percent water. Most current processes require the algae to be dried -- an expensive process that takes a lot of energy. The research has been licensed by Genifuel Corp.

  16. Toxic and deadly: Working to manage algae in Lake Granbury 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2011-01-01

    Working to manage algae in Lake Granbury Lake Granbury, located about 33 miles southwest of Fort Worth, is a recreation haven for water enthusiasts. In recent years, however, bacteria and golden algae have threatened the lake?s water quality.... Educating citizens about water quality issues affecting Lake Granbury and determining ways to manage the deadly algae are the focus of two Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI) projects. Lake Granbury, a critical water supply in North Central Texas...

  17. Toxic and deadly: Working to manage algae in Lake Granbury 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    Working to manage algae in Lake Granbury Lake Granbury, located about 33 miles southwest of Fort Worth, is a recreation haven for water enthusiasts. In recent years, however, bacteria and golden algae have threatened the lake?s water quality.... Educating citizens about water quality issues affecting Lake Granbury and determining ways to manage the deadly algae are the focus of two Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI) projects. Lake Granbury, a critical water supply in North Central Texas...

  18. Real Time Diagnostics for Algae-final-sm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratories is developing a suite of complementary technologies to help the emerging algae industry detect and quickly recover from algal pond crashes, an obstacle to...

  19. Sandia Energy - The National Algae Testbed Public-Private Partnership...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The National Algae Testbed Public-Private Partnership Kick-Off Meeting at Arizona State University Home Renewable Energy Energy Biofuels Partnership News News & Events Systems...

  20. The Algae Foundation Announces New DOE Funded Education Initiative...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    industry through research, education, and outreach, announced plans at the 2015 Algae Biomass Organization Summit to develop an innovative formal degree program. The Department of...

  1. Streptophyte Algae and the Origin of Land Plants Revisited Using Heterogeneous Models with Three New Algal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Charles

    Letter Streptophyte Algae and the Origin of Land Plants Revisited Using Heterogeneous Models algae, but different lineages of streptophytes have been suggested to be the sister group of land plants chloroplast genomes from streptophyte algae: Coleochaetae orbicularis (Coleochaetales), Nitella hookeri

  2. Field Study of Growth and Calcification Rates of Three Species of Articulated Coralline Algae in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martone, Patrick T.

    Field Study of Growth and Calcification Rates of Three Species of Articulated Coralline Algae of coralline algae. Decreases in coralline abundance may have cascading effects on marine ecosys- tems- mon species of articulated coralline algae (Bossiella plu- mosa, Calliarthron tuberculosum

  3. Parachloroidium gen. nov. (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta), a novel genus of coccoid green algae from subaerial corticolous biofilms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parachloroidium gen. nov. (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta), a novel genus of coccoid green algae. Parachloroidium gen. nov. (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta), a novel genus of coccoid green algae from subaerial the Parachloroidium strains from other similar green algae. However, ultrastructural characteristics and molecular

  4. CONTRIBUTION TO THE KNOWLEDGE OF SOIL ALGAE OF TWO ABANDONED INDUSTRIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONTRIBUTION TO THE KNOWLEDGE OF SOIL ALGAE OF TWO ABANDONED INDUSTRIAL SEDIMENTATION BASINS Sixty three species of soil algae and Cyanoprocaryota were recovered from eight investigated sites sites in Chvaletice suggests soil toxicity of these biotopes. Keywords Soil algae, Chlorophyta

  5. Commercial Algae Management | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower Ventures Jump to:Information9176632°,Information SWIR andAlgae

  6. Process Development for Hydrothermal Liquefaction of Algae Feedstocks in a Continuous-Flow Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Hart, Todd R.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Rotness, Leslie J.; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Zacher, Alan H.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Hallen, Richard T.; Holladay, Johnathan E.

    2013-10-01

    Wet algae slurries can be converted into an upgradeable biocrude by hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL). High levels of carbon conversion to gravity-separable biocrude product were accomplished at relatively low temperature (350 ?C) in a continuous-flow, pressurized (sub-critical liquid water) environment (20 MPa). As opposed to earlier work in batch reactors reported by others, direct oil recovery was achieved without the use of a solvent and biomass trace components were removed by processing steps so that they did not cause process difficulties. High conversions were obtained even with high slurry concentrations of up to 35 wt% of dry solids. Catalytic hydrotreating was effectively applied for hydrodeoxygenation, hydrodenitrogenation, and hydrodesulfurization of the biocrude to form liquid hydrocarbon fuel. Catalytic hydrothermal gasification was effectively applied for HTL byproduct water cleanup and fuel gas production from water soluble organics, allowing the water to be considered for recycle of nutrients to the algae growth ponds. As a result, high conversion of algae to liquid hydrocarbon and gas products was found with low levels of organic contamination in the byproduct water. All three process steps were accomplished in bench-scale, continuous-flow reactor systems such that design data for process scale-up was generated.

  7. U.S. Agriculture and International Trade 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCorkle, Dean; Benson, Geoffrey A.; Marchant, Mary; Rosson, C. Parr

    1999-06-23

    International markets are important for many U.S. farm products and greatly affect U.S. agriculture. This publication discusses the causes of import change, the export product mix, major markets, and markets of the future....

  8. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Algal Biomass to Hydrocarbons: Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction and Upgrading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua; Anderson, Daniel B.; Hallen, Richard T.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Hart, Todd R.; Butcher, Mark G.; Drennan, Corinne; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Davis, Ryan; Kinchin, Christopher

    2014-03-20

    This report provides a preliminary analysis of the costs associated with converting whole wet algal biomass into primarily diesel fuel. Hydrothermal liquefaction converts the whole algae into an oil that is then hydrotreated and distilled. The secondary aqueous product containing significant organic material is converted to a medium btu gas via catalytic hydrothermal gasification.

  9. Unique Regulation of the Calvin Cycle in the Ultrasmall Green Alga Ostreococcus Steven Robbens,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gent, Universiteit

    , Germany 4 De´ partement de Biochimie, Universite´ de Montre´ al, C.P. 6128, Montreal, Canada 5 Laboratoire and algae transform light energy into ATP and NADPH. This chemical energy fuels the Calvin cycle, where anabolic and catabolic metabolism exemplified by starch production and degradation. A general metabolic

  10. Update on Genomic Studies of Algae Paths toward Algal Genomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Update on Genomic Studies of Algae Paths toward Algal Genomics Arthur R. Grossman* The Carnegie of genomic information that is being used to help researchers understand the gene content of organisms, how the expression of genes. In this introductory manuscript, I discuss select algae and how genomics is impacting

  11. Polymer Coated Urea: Effect on Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Potato Agriculture Irrigated potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) production requires significant inputs of fertilizer N for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Abstract: Polymer Coated Urea: Effect on Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Potato Agriculture Irrigated-textured, well-drained soils where potatoes are commonly grown. Polymer coated controlled-release ureas (PCU

  12. Agricultural and Food Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) #12;86 Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) Undergraduate Catalogue 2014­15 Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) Officers in agriculture was initiated in 1956. #12;87Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) Undergraduate

  13. Radiation Characteristics of Botryococcus braunii, Chlorococcum littorale, and Chlorella sp. Used For CO2 Fixation and Biofuel Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berberoglu, Halil; Gomez, Pedro; Pilon, Laurent

    2009-01-01

    For CO 2 Fixation and Biofuel Production Halil Berberoglufor CO 2 mitigation and biofuel productions namely (i)this technology”, (2) culture of biofuel producing algae is

  14. Agriculture, technology, and conflict 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zilverberg, Cody John

    2009-05-15

    Conflict and agriculture have a long, shared history. The purpose of this research is to look at the relationships between agriculture, agricultural technologies, and conflict during current and recent conflicts, large scale and localized...

  15. 1. AGRICULTURE BUILDING 2. AGRICULTURE GREENHOUSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Keith

    1. AGRICULTURE BUILDING 2. AGRICULTURE GREENHOUSE 3. AGRICULTURE MECHANICS SHOP 4. ALUMNI ASSOCIATION (TRACIE D. PEARMAN) 5. APARTMENTS (UNIVERSITY WOODS) 6. ART BUILDING 7. ART STUDIO 8. AUSTIN BUILDING 9. BIOLOGY GREENHOUSE 10. BOYNTON BUILDING 11. BUSINESS BUILDING (R. E. MCGEE) 12. CHEMISTRY

  16. Isoprenoid biosynthesis in eukaryotic phototrophs: A spotlight on algae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lohr M.; Schwender J.; Polle, J. E. W.

    2012-04-01

    Isoprenoids are one of the largest groups of natural compounds and have a variety of important functions in the primary metabolism of land plants and algae. In recent years, our understanding of the numerous facets of isoprenoid metabolism in land plants has been rapidly increasing, while knowledge on the metabolic network of isoprenoids in algae still lags behind. Here, current views on the biochemistry and genetics of the core isoprenoid metabolism in land plants and in the major algal phyla are compared and some of the most pressing open questions are highlighted. Based on the different evolutionary histories of the various groups of eukaryotic phototrophs, we discuss the distribution and regulation of the mevalonate (MVA) and the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathways in land plants and algae and the potential consequences of the loss of the MVA pathway in groups such as the green algae. For the prenyltransferases, serving as gatekeepers to the various branches of terpenoid biosynthesis in land plants and algae, we explore the minimal inventory necessary for the formation of primary isoprenoids and present a preliminary analysis of their occurrence and phylogeny in algae with primary and secondary plastids. The review concludes with some perspectives on genetic engineering of the isoprenoid metabolism in algae.

  17. SEN 02 Portable Algae Flow Cytometer SEN 02.1 Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soatto, Stefano

    SEN 02 Portable Algae Flow Cytometer SEN 02.1 Overview The portable algae flow cytometer is a project that aims to expedite research in algae biology using microfluid-based and state is to develop a portable flow cytometer that is suitable for on-field monitoring of algae population and reduce

  18. LIFETIME OF THE EXCITED STATE IN VIVO I. CHLOROPHYLL a IN ALGAE, AT ROOM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govindjee

    LIFETIME OF THE EXCITED STATE IN VIVO I. CHLOROPHYLL a IN ALGAE, AT ROOM AND AT LIQUID NITROGEN decay of chloro- phyll (Chl) a in the green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa, the red alga Porphyridium cruentum, and the blue-green alga Anacystis nidulans was measured by the phase- shift method under

  19. Plant & CellPhysiol. 14: 1081-1097 (1973) Photophosphorylation in intact algae: Effects of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govindjee

    1973-01-01

    Plant & CellPhysiol. 14: 1081-1097 (1973) Photophosphorylation in intact algae: Effects alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa and of the blue-green alga Anacystis nidulans. A few measurements in extracts from intact cells of the green alga Chlorella in the early 1950's (3, 4), few workers measured

  20. MID-LATE DEVONIAN CALCIFIED MARINE ALGAE AND CYANOBACTERIA, SOUTH CHINA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riding, Robert

    MID-LATE DEVONIAN CALCIFIED MARINE ALGAE AND CYANOBACTERIA, SOUTH CHINA QI FENG,1 YI-MING GONG,1 contain microfossils generally regarded as calcified algae and cyanobacteria. These are present in 61 out with differing degrees of confidence, and placed in algae, cyanobacteria or microproblematica. Algae: Halysis

  1. Phylogeny of ulotrichalean algae from extreme high-altitude and high-latitude ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    Phylogeny of ulotrichalean algae from extreme high-altitude and high-latitude ecosystems S. K the terrestrial algae that are found in these systems. Here, we show that terrestrial algae in the Ulotrichales and the high Himalayas. We further show that these ulotrichalean algae are closely related (using 18S, ITS/5.8S

  2. Evaluation of defatted and whole algae as feed ingredients for the marine shrimp, litopenaeus vannamei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, J. L.; Patnaik, S.; Gatlin, III, D. M.; Lawrence, A. L.

    2012-06-13

    Evaluation of defatted and whole algae as feed ingredients for the marine shrimp, litopenaeus vannamei

  3. UnitedStates of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of tropical forests for products and energy; forest and wildlife management, the South Pacific Forestry, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; 88 p. The 17 of the USDA Forest Service's tropical forestry research, forestry research in Asia and the Pacific, management

  4. Genetic Engineering for Modern Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blumwald, Eduardo

    reserved 1543-5008/10/0602-0443$20.00 Key Words abiotic stress, climate change, field conditions, global warming, stress combination, stress tolerance, transgenic crops Abstract Abiotic stress conditions such as drought, heat, or salinity cause exten- sive losses to agricultural production worldwide. Progress

  5. Roadmap for Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buckel, Jeffrey A.

    A Science Roadmap for Food and Agriculture A Science Roadmap for Food and Agriculture Prepared and Policy (ESCOP)-- Science and Technology Committee November 2010 #12;2 pA Science Roadmap for Food and Agriculture #12;A Science Roadmap for Food and Agriculture p i About this Publication To reference

  6. ATP3 Algae Testbed Public-Private Partnership

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Breakout Session 3B—Integration of Supply Chains III: Algal Biofuels Strategy ATP3 Algae Testbed Public-Private Partnership John A. McGowen, Director of Operations and Program, Arizona State University, AzCATI and ATP3

  7. Devonian Fungi: Interactions with the Green Alga Palaeonitella

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Thomas N.; Hass, Hagen; Remy, Winfried

    1992-11-01

    This paper describes three new taxa of fossil aquatic fungi preserved in 400-million-year-old Lower Devonian Rhynie Chert. All of the fungal morphotypes are attached to cells of the green alga Palaeonitella cranii. Milleromyces rhyniensis...

  8. Algae culture for cattle feed and water purification. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varani, F.T.; Schellenbach, S.; Veatch, M.; Grover, P.; Benemann, J.

    1980-05-16

    The feasibility of algae growth on centrate from anaerobic digester effluent and the refeed of both effluent solids and the algae to feedlot cattle were investigated. The digester was operated with dirt feedlot manure. The study serves as a supplement for the work to design a utility sized digester for the City of Lamar to convert local feedlot manure into a fuel gas. The biogas produced would power the electrical generation plant already in service. Previous studies have established techniques of digester operation and the nutritional value for effluent solids as fed to cattle. The inclusion of a single-strain of algae, Chlorella pyrenidosa in the process was evaluated here for its capability (1) to be grown in both open and closed ponds of the discharge water from the solids separation part of the process, (2) to purify the discharge water, and (3) to act as a growth stimulant for cattle feed consumption and conversion when fed at a rate of 6 grams per head per day. Although it was found that the algae could be cultured and grown on the discharge water in the laboratory, the study was unable to show that algae could accomplish the other objectives successfully. However, the study yielded supplementary information useful to the overall process design of the utility plant. This was (1) measurement of undried digester solids fed to cattle in a silage finishing ration (without algae) at an economic value of $74.99 per dry ton based on nutritional qualities, (2) development of a centrate treatment system to decolorize and disinfect centrate to allow optimum algae growth, and (3) information on ionic and mass balances for the digestion system. It is the recommendation of this study that algae not be used in the process in the Lamar bioconversion plant.

  9. Analytical approaches to photobiological hydrogen production in unicellular green algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemschemeier, Anja; Melis, Anastasios; Happe, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Cournac, Gilles Peltier, De partment d’Ecophysiologie Vege345–378 Cournac L, Guedeney G, Peltier G, Vignais PM (2004)Pruvost J, Legrand J, Happe T, Peltier G, Cournac L (2005)

  10. Enzyme Fusions Optimize Photosynthetic Hydrogen Production in Algae (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-04-01

    Research at NREL is demonstrating that engineering enzymes has the potential to improve efficiencies.

  11. Analytical approaches to photobiological hydrogen production in unicellular green algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemschemeier, Anja; Melis, Anastasios; Happe, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    E, Melis A (2000) Microalgae: a green source of renewable Hmany species of green microalgae. Moreover, it has attractedutili- zation of green microalgae and the process of

  12. Resource Evaluation and Site Selection for Microalgae Production in India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milbrandt, A.; Jarvis, E.

    2010-09-01

    The study evaluates climate conditions, availability of CO2 and other nutrients, water resources, and land characteristics to identify areas in India suitable for algae production. The purpose is to provide an understanding of the resource potential in India for algae biofuels production and to assist policymakers, investors, and industry developers in their future strategic decisions.

  13. Impacts of Tighter Credit in Agriculture 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klose, Steven; Klinefelter, Danny A.; Hogan, Robert J.

    2009-03-26

    The availability of credit is critical to agricultural production. In the current tight credit situation, it is important for borrowers to understand the sources of credit and the nature of credit markets. This publications examines various sources...

  14. Salinity controls on trophic interactions among invertebrates and algae of solar evaporation ponds in the Mojave Desert and relation to shorebird foraging and selenium risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbst, David B

    2006-01-01

    AMONG INVERTEBRATES AND ALGAE OF SOLAR EVAPORATION PONDS INplanktonic invertebrates and algae present along with avianof invertebrates and algae, and avian foraging were examined

  15. Biogas production from anaerobic digestion of Spirulina maxima algal biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samson, R.; LeDuy, A.

    1982-08-01

    The photosynthetic spectrum of solar energy could be exploited for the production of chemical energy of methane through the combined algal-bacterial process. In this process, the algae are mass produced from light and from carbon in the first step. The algal biomass is then used as a nutrient for feeding the anaerobic digester, in the second step, for the production of methane by anaerobic bacteria. The carbon source for the production of algal biomass could be either organic carbon from wastewaters (for eucaryotic algae), or carbon dioxide from the atmosphere or from the combustion exhaust gases (for both prokaryotic and eukaryotic algae). The technical feasibility data on the anaerobic digestion of algal biomass have been reported for many species of algae including macroscopic algae and microscopic algae. Research being conducted in the authors' laboratory consists of using the semimicroscopic blue-green alga Spirulina maxima as the sole substrate for this combined algal-bacterial process. This species of alga is very attractive for the process because of its capability of using the atmospheric carbon dioxide as carbon source and its simple harvesting methods. Furthermore, it appeared that the fermentability of S. maxima is significantly higher than other microscopic algae. This communication presents the results on the anaerobic inoculum development by the adaptation technique. This inoculum was then used for the semicontinuous anaerobic digestion of S. maxima algal biomass. The evolutions of biogas production and composition, biogas yield, total volatile fatty acids, alkalinity, ammonia nitrogen, pH, and electrode potential were followed.

  16. Large-Scale Production of Marine Microalgae for Fuel and Feeds

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Review Large-Scale Production of Marine Microalgae for Fuel and Feeds March 24, 2015 Algae Platform Review Mark Huntley Cornell Marine Algal Biofuels Consortium This...

  17. Roadmap for Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    A Science Roadmap for Agriculture Prepared by the National Association of State Universities Force on Building a Science Roadmap #12;#12;A Science Roadmap for Agriculture Prepared by the National on Organization and Policy (ESCOP) Task Force on Building a Science Roadmap for Agriculture NOVEMBER 2001 #12

  18. USDA Agricultural Conservation Easement Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA's) Agricultural Conservation Easement Program (ACEP) provides financial and technical assistance to help conserve agricultural lands, wetlands, and their related benefits.

  19. Climate-Smart Agriculture: Policies, Practices and Financing...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and responding to climate change. Projections based on population growth and food consumption patterns indicate that agricultural production will need to increase by at...

  20. The Tropical Brown Alga Lobophora variegata (Lamouroux) Womersley: A Prospective Bioindicator for Ag Contamination in Tropical Coastal Waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The Tropical Brown Alga Lobophora variegata (Lamouroux) Womersley: A Prospective Bioindicator determined in the brown alga Lobophora variegata, using radiotracer techniques. Results indicate that this widely distributed alga could be a useful bioindicator species for surveying silver contamination

  1. The Competition between Calcification and Photosynthesis in Coccolithophorid Algae Conditions Their Response to Past and Future CO2 Changes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Einat, Aharonov

    The Competition between Calcification and Photosynthesis in Coccolithophorid Algae Conditions Their Response to Past and Future CO2 Changes H. Stoll University of Oviedo The marine calcifying algae

  2. Hydrodynamic Synchronization and Metachronal Waves on the Surface of the Colonial Alga Volvox carteri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Raymond E.

    Hydrodynamic Synchronization and Metachronal Waves on the Surface of the Colonial Alga Volvox of metachronal waves on the surface of the colonial alga Volvox carteri, whose large size and ease

  3. "The Promise and Challenge of Algae as Renewable Sources of Biofuels...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    "The Promise and Challenge of Algae as Renewable Sources of Biofuels" 9-8-2010 - Transcript "The Promise and Challenge of Algae as Renewable Sources of Biofuels" 9-8-2010 -...

  4. Florida company looks to put algae in your gas tank | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Florida company looks to put algae in your gas tank Florida company looks to put algae in your gas tank January 5, 2010 - 4:02pm Addthis What will the project do? As a result of...

  5. How ATP3 is Addressing the Challenges of Scale-up in Algae Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    How ATP3 is Addressing the Challenges of Scale-up in Algae Technology R&D How ATP3 is Addressing the Challenges of Scale-up in Algae Technology R&D Breakout Session 2-A: The Future...

  6. BETO-Funded Algae Project at NREL Named a Finalist for 2015 R...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    You are here Home BETO-Funded Algae Project at NREL Named a Finalist for 2015 R&D 100 Awards BETO-Funded Algae Project at NREL Named a Finalist for 2015 R&D 100 Awards August...

  7. Second Generation Biofuels: High-Efficiency Microalgae for Biodiesel Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kudela, Raphael M.

    range of feedstocks for the production of biodiesel, bioethanol, biomethane and biohydrogen. Biodiesel production systems using microalgae. Keywords Algae . Carbon sequestration . Biofuel . Biogas . Biohydrogen . Biomethane . Bioreactor. Lipid . Oil . Raceway pond . Triacylglycerides . Review Abbreviations BTL biomass

  8. Cognome e nome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ALGA 11 luglio 2012 Compito di esame (2.5 ore)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robbiano, Lorenzo

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ALGA 11 luglio 2012­ Compito di esame (2.5 ore) Giustificare ogni affermazione Salvare il file Co

  9. PHYLOGENETIC DIVERSITY OF TRENTEPOHLIALEAN ALGAE ASSOCIATED WITH LICHEN-FORMING FUNGI1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PHYLOGENETIC DIVERSITY OF TRENTEPOHLIALEAN ALGAE ASSOCIATED WITH LICHEN-FORMING FUNGI1 Matthew P 60605-2496, USA Nearly one-fourth of the lichen-forming fungi asso- ciate with trentepohlialean algae algae has provided a phy- logenetic context within which questions regarding the lichenization

  10. Hierarchical Silica Nanostructures Inspired by Diatom Algae Yield Superior Deformability, Toughness, and Strength

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehler, Markus J.

    Hierarchical Silica Nanostructures Inspired by Diatom Algae Yield Superior Deformability, Toughness algae that is mainly composed of amorphous silica, which features a hierarchical structure that ranges in diatom algae as a basis to study a bioinspired nanoporous material implemented in crystalline silica. We

  11. DESICCATION PROTECTION AND DISRUPTION: A TRADE-OFF FOR AN INTERTIDAL MARINE ALGA1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denny, Mark

    DESICCATION PROTECTION AND DISRUPTION: A TRADE-OFF FOR AN INTERTIDAL MARINE ALGA1 Luke J. H. Hunt2, California 93950, USA For marine algae, the benefits of drying out are often overshadowed by the stresses of desiccation in the intertidal turf alga Endocladia muricata (Endlichter) J. Agardh. Laboratory experiments

  12. Red Algae Lose Key Mitochondrial Genes in Response to Becoming Parasitic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lane, Chris

    Red Algae Lose Key Mitochondrial Genes in Response to Becoming Parasitic Lillian Hancock1 , Lynda independently evolved hundreds of times among the floridiophyte red algae. Much is known about the life history class of red algae, Plocamiocolax puvinata, has lost the atp8 gene entirely, indicating that this gene

  13. HOLARCTIC ECOLOGY 4: 201-207. Copenhagen 1981 Microcommunities of algae on a Sphagnum mat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Notre Dame, University of

    HOLARCTIC ECOLOGY 4: 201-207. Copenhagen 1981 Microcommunities of algae on a Sphagnum mat Celia A. Hooper Hooper, C, A, 1981, Microcommunities of algae on a Sphagnum mat, - Holarct, Ecol, 4: 201 and nutrient parameters, with lower, moister plots having more algae, higher algal diver- sity, and lower

  14. Xylochloris irregularis gen. et sp. nov. (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta), a novel subaerial coccoid green alga

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    green alga JIR I´ NEUSTUPA 1 *, MAREK ELIA´ S1 , PAVEL SKALOUD 1 , YVONNE NE MCOVA´ 1 AND LENKA irregularis gen. et sp. nov. (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta), a novel subaerial coccoid green alga. Phycologia 50: 57­66. DOI: 10.2216/08-64.1 The phylogenetic diversity of subaerial coccoid green algae remains

  15. Energy From Algae Using Microbial Fuel Cells Sharon B. Velasquez-Orta,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ARTICLE Energy From Algae Using Microbial Fuel Cells Sharon B. Velasquez-Orta,1 Tom P. Curtis,1 with the two algae (as powders), obtaining differences in energy recovery, degradation efficiency, and power to the type of bioprocess used. These results demonstrate that algae can in principle, be used as a renewable

  16. PHYSIOLOGICAL PERFORMANCE OF INTERTIDAL CORALLINE ALGAE DURING A SIMULATED TIDAL CYCLE1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martone, Patrick T.

    PHYSIOLOGICAL PERFORMANCE OF INTERTIDAL CORALLINE ALGAE DURING A SIMULATED TIDAL CYCLE1 Rebecca J, Lobban and Harrison 1997, Helmuth and Hofmann 2001). During high tide, intertidal algae are underwater algae may be emerged and exposed to increased light stress, elevated air tem- peratures, and increased

  17. 428 BIOCHIMICAET BIOPHYSICAACTA pH CONTROL OF THE CHLOROPHYLL a FLUORESCENCE IN ALGAE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govindjee

    428 BIOCHIMICAET BIOPHYSICAACTA BBA 46126 pH CONTROL OF THE CHLOROPHYLL a FLUORESCENCE IN ALGAE on the "slow" (min) time course of Chlorophyll a fluorescence yield in the green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa and in the blue-green alga Anacystis nidulans. In Chlorella, the decay of fluorescence yield, in the I- to 5-rain

  18. GENOMIC DNA ISOLATION FROM GREEN AND BROWN ALGAE (CAULERPALES AND FUCALES) FOR MICROSATELLITE LIBRARY CONSTRUCTION1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borges, Rita

    NOTE GENOMIC DNA ISOLATION FROM GREEN AND BROWN ALGAE (CAULERPALES AND FUCALES) FOR MICROSATELLITE A method for isolating high-quality DNA is pre- sented for the green algae Caulerpa sp. (C. racemosa, C. prolifera, and C. taxifolia) and the brown alga Sargassum muticum. These are introduced, and in- vasive

  19. Kalinella bambusicola gen. et sp. nov. (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta), a novel coccoid Chlorella-like subaerial alga

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -like subaerial alga from Southeast Asiapre_534 159..169 Jirí Neustupa,* Yvonne Nemcová, Marek Eliás and Pavel, Czech Republic SUMMARY The traditional green algal genus Chlorella, which com- prised coccoid algae lineage of the trebouxiophycean Watanabea clade, dissimilar from other members of this group. The alga has

  20. Phylogeny and Nucleomorph Karyotype Diversity of Chlorarachniophyte Algae TIA D. SILVER,a,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Archibald, John

    Phylogeny and Nucleomorph Karyotype Diversity of Chlorarachniophyte Algae TIA D. SILVER,a,1 SAYAKA/or reticulopod-forming marine algae with chlorophyll a- and b-containing plastids of secondary endosymbiotic. THE chlorarachniophytes are an enigmatic group of unicellular marine algae with diverse morphologies and a widespread

  1. Formation of Radioactive Citrulline During Photosynthetic C14O2-Fixation by Blue-Green Algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linko, Pekka; Holm-Hansen, O.; Bassham, J.A.; Calvin, M.

    1956-01-01

    ClTRULLlNE BY BLUE-GREEN ALGAE TWO-WEEK LOAN COPY This is aC~~O~-FIXATION BLUE-GREEN ALGAE Pekka Linko, 0. Holm-Hansen,C~~O~-FIXATION BLUE-GREEN ALGAE BY Pelcka Linlc~,'~ Holm-

  2. Ghana: Western Ghana's Fisherfolk Starve Amid Algae Infestation BY JESSICA MCDIARMID, 18 APRIL 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Ghana: Western Ghana's Fisherfolk Starve Amid Algae Infestation BY JESSICA MCDIARMID, 18 APRIL 2012 not to continue fishing." Sargassum is the algae after which the Sargasso Sea - an elongated region in the middle down while tonnes of the algae were removed. In some areas people were warned not to swim due

  3. Dancing Volvox: Hydrodynamic Bound States of Swimming Algae Knut Drescher,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Raymond E.

    Dancing Volvox: Hydrodynamic Bound States of Swimming Algae Knut Drescher,1 Kyriacos C. Leptos,1 April 2009) The spherical alga Volvox swims by means of flagella on thousands of surface somatic cells marvels [1]. This was the freshwater alga which, years later, in the very last entry of his great work

  4. Early Cretaceous benthic associations (foraminifera and calcareous algae) of a shallow tropical-water platform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Husinec, Antun

    Early Cretaceous benthic associations (foraminifera and calcareous algae) of a shallow tropical of benthic foraminifera and calcareous algae in order to establish a precise, combined benthic biozonation species of calcareous algae, distributed among 11 genera, were recovered from the Lower Cretaceous shallow

  5. Optical microplates for high-throughput screening of photosynthesis in lipid-producing algae{,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basu, Amar S.

    Optical microplates for high-throughput screening of photosynthesis in lipid- producing algae-producing algae of interest in 2nd generation biofuels. By conducting 96 experiments in parallel, photoirradiance the study of photosynthesis in algae. Societal challenges in energy sustainability have renewed interest

  6. Micro-Raman Spectroscopy of Algae: Composition Analysis and Fluorescence Background Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ARTICLE Micro-Raman Spectroscopy of Algae: Composition Analysis and Fluorescence Background performed using Stokes Raman scattering for compositional analysis of algae. Two algal species, Chlorella while acquiring Raman signals from the algae. The time dependence of fluorescence background is char

  7. INTRODUCTION Cryptomonad algae are postulated to be a chimaera of two

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFadden, Geoff

    INTRODUCTION Cryptomonad algae are postulated to be a chimaera of two different eukaryotic cells incorporating cryptomonad endosymbiont gene sequences ally them loosely with red algae (Douglas et al., 1991a that the endosymbiont was an early evolutionary intermediate that pre-dates the red algae (Cavalier-Smith, 1992

  8. Photoprotection in the brown alga Macrocystis pyrifera: Evolutionary implications Ernesto Garcia-Mendoza a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govindjee

    Photoprotection in the brown alga Macrocystis pyrifera: Evolutionary implications Ernesto Garcia xxxx Keywords: Brown algae Evolution Macrocystis pyrifera Non-photochemical quenching Photoprotection-photochemical quenching, NPQ) in the brown alga Macrocystis pyrifera with that of Ficus sp., a higher plant to examine

  9. Red Algae Respond to Waves: Morphological and Mechanical Variation in Mastocarpus papillatus Along

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denny, Mark

    Red Algae Respond to Waves: Morphological and Mechanical Variation in Mastocarpus papillatus Along Grove, California, 93950 Abstract. Intertidal algae are exposed to the potentially severe drag forces generated by crashing waves, and several species of brown algae respond, in part, by varying the strength

  10. Impact of Benthic Algae on Dissolved Organic Nitrogen in a Temperate, Coastal Lagoon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Deborah

    Impact of Benthic Algae on Dissolved Organic Nitrogen in a Temperate, Coastal Lagoon Anna Christina-released to the water column on short time scales (minutes-hours). Benthic algae thus clearly influence benthic Introduction: Impact of benthic algae on dissolved organic nitrogen dynamics in temperate, coastal lagoons

  11. BIOCHIMICA ET BIOPHYSICA ACTA 213 ACTION OF HYDROXYLAMINE IN THE RED ALGA PORPHYRIDIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govindjee

    BIOCHIMICA ET BIOPHYSICA ACTA 213 BBA 46182 ACTION OF HYDROXYLAMINE IN THE RED ALGA PORPHYRIDIUM CR and fluorescence transient studies, made with the intact cells of red alga Porphyridium cruentum, suggest earlier with spinach chloroplasts and green alga Chlorella by other workers. Fluorescence transient data

  12. FAS6932: BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY OF ALGAE Instructor: Professor Edward Phlips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    FAS6932: BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY OF ALGAE Instructor: Professor Edward Phlips Main Office: Program-mail: phlips@ufl.edu Office Hours: 2-4 PM Thursdays Course Description: Biology and ecology of algae in aquatic in different aquatic ecosystems, and impacts (e.g. toxic algae). Prerequisites: Undergraduate course in biology

  13. Hylodesmus singaporensis gen. et sp. nov., a new autosporic subaerial green alga (Scenedesmaceae,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hylodesmus singaporensis gen. et sp. nov., a new autosporic subaerial green alga (Scenedesmaceae characterization of an autosporic coccoid green alga isolated from decaying wood in a natural forest in Singapore. Depending on culture conditions, this alga formed globular to irregularly oval solitary cells

  14. Investigation of Flow Characteristics in an Airlift-Driven Raceway Reactor for Algae Cultivation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Investigation of Flow Characteristics in an Airlift-Driven Raceway Reactor for Algae Cultivation are the most common choice for outdoor algae cultivation due to their low cost relative to enclosed. Algae require adequate mixing in order to maximize exposure to essential nutrients for growth

  15. Complex Patterns of Plastid 16S rRNA Gene Evolution in Nonphotosynthetic Green Algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nedelcu, Aurora M.

    Complex Patterns of Plastid 16S rRNA Gene Evolution in Nonphotosynthetic Green Algae Aurora M AT values are increased in nonphotosynthetic green algae compared to their closest photosynthetic relatives "green plants," both land plants and green algae, are known. Among such lineages are the parasitic

  16. Effect of non-ageing and ageing ceria nanoparticles suspensions on fresh water micro-algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Effect of non-ageing and ageing ceria nanoparticles suspensions on fresh water micro-algae Manier nanoparticle (nCeO2) suspensions, towards freshwater micro-algae assessing the effect nCeO2 suspensions microscopy (TEM). In addition, the interaction between NPs and algae were investigated using flow

  17. Observations on the measurement of total antimony and antimony species in algae, plant and animal tissuesw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canberra, University of

    Observations on the measurement of total antimony and antimony species in algae, plant and animal of total antimony and antimony speciation in algae, plant and animal tissues. Digestion with nitric acid.g. some plants and algae, the addition of tetrafluorboric acid is required to dissolve silica as some

  18. ACARYOCHLORIS EXPLAINING THE RIDDLE OF CHLOROPHYLL D IN RED ALGAE AND EXPANDING PAR FOR OXYGENIC PHOTOSYNTHESIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    ACARYOCHLORIS ­ EXPLAINING THE RIDDLE OF CHLOROPHYLL D IN RED ALGAE AND EXPANDING PAR FOR OXYGENIC strain is shown to live epi- phytically on the red alga Gelidium caulacantheum, which itself is harvested by the red alga. Availability of far red light, however, is relatively unaffected by DOM or red

  19. Are Algae Relevant to the Detritus-Based Food Web in Tank-Bromeliads?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Are Algae Relevant to the Detritus-Based Food Web in Tank-Bromeliads? Olivier Brouard1 , Anne, Universite´ Paul Sabatier, UMR CNRS 5245, Toulouse, France Abstract We assessed the occurrence of algae and with regard to the structure of other aquatic microbial communities held in the tanks. Algae were retrieved

  20. The Seattle Times: Nation & World: Algae gives professor a taste of immortality Home delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeong, Hae Jin

    The Seattle Times: Nation & World: Algae gives professor a taste of immortality Home delivery, 2005 - Page updated at 12:00 AM Algae gives professor a taste of immortality By David A. Fahrenthold The Washington Post E-mail article Print view Search Most e-mailed Most read RSS Sometimes, algae can

  1. Author's personal copy A novel ocean color index to detect oating algae in the global oceans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    Author's personal copy A novel ocean color index to detect oating algae in the global oceans December 2008 Received in revised form 15 May 2009 Accepted 23 May 2009 Keywords: Floating Algae Index (FAI Remote sensing Ocean color Climate data record Various types of oating algae have been reported in open

  2. Biomass from Cyanobacteria:Opportunities for the Proposed Algae Biotechnology and Biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Biomass from Cyanobacteria:Opportunities for the Proposed Algae Biotechnology and Biofuels CLOSED DUE TO ALGAE BLOOM AND GENERAL ADVISORY REMAINS FOR HILLS CREEK RESERVOIR August 2, 2002 Larison. For the entire Reservoir, one should avoid high con centrations of blue-green algae both on the water surface

  3. FL47CH15-Goldstein ARI 25 November 2014 9:45 Green Algae as Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Raymond E.

    FL47CH15-Goldstein ARI 25 November 2014 9:45 Green Algae as Model Organisms for Biological Fluid green algae, spanning from the unicellular Chlamydomonas to multicellular Volvox, have emerged as model of flagellar synchronization. Green algae are well suited to the study of such problems because of their range

  4. Photosynthetic and growth responses of three freshwater algae to phosphorus limitation and daylength

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bossard, Peter

    Photosynthetic and growth responses of three freshwater algae to phosphorus limitation., green alga Sphaerocystis schroeteri and cyanobacterium Phormidium luridum, were grown under contrasting of the green alga S. schroeteri decreased the most (ca. sixfold) under P limitation compared with the other two

  5. HoustonChronicle.com -Tiny honor a big deal for algae scientist HoustonChronicle.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeong, Hae Jin

    HoustonChronicle.com - Tiny honor a big deal for algae scientist HoustonChronicle. com Section-mail this story June 18, 2005, 5:48PM Tiny honor a big deal for algae scientist By DAVID A. FAHRENTHOLD Washington Post Sometimes, algae can be the highest form of flattery. ADVERTISEMENTSo it was for Diane K. Stoecker

  6. Toward Systems Biology in Brown Algae to Explore Acclimation and Adaptation to the Shore Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Toward Systems Biology in Brown Algae to Explore Acclimation and Adaptation to the Shore,2 Catherine Boyen,1,2 and Anne Siegel4,5 Abstract Brown algae belong to a phylogenetic lineage distantly siliculosus as a model organism for brown algae has represented a framework in which several omics techniques

  7. One-Two-Three Punch Clobbers Toxic Algae, Restores Fremont Lake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    One-Two-Three Punch Clobbers Toxic Algae, Restores Fremont Lake Final Report Fremont Lake #20 Water-two-three punch to knockout toxic algae and restore water quality in Nebraska's numerous sandpit lakes. "It seems to help rid the too-often toxic algae prone Fremont State Lakes of the oily green scum that can close them

  8. The central role of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in revealing the mechanism of state transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The central role of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in revealing the mechanism of state Abstract This review focuses on the essential role played by the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii of the two photo- systems with changes in the spectral composition of light. In plants and green algae, state

  9. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station General scientist with the Station's Wildland Recreation and Urban Cultures Research Unit, 4955 Canyon Crest Drive

  10. Chile, 2009 HYDRAULIC MANAGEMENT OF FILAMENTOUS ALGAE IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    7 th ISE & 8 th HIC Chile, 2009 HYDRAULIC MANAGEMENT OF FILAMENTOUS ALGAE IN OPEN-CHANNEL NETWORKS channels which are specific eco-systems for many reasons. Firstly, they have to fulfill hydraulic, artificial channels have a relatively simple geometry and their hydraulic variables are easier to monitor

  11. Introduction slide 2 Biofuels and Algae Markets, Systems,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Algae Market Potential US Military is #1 Consumer of Diesel Fuel in The World Industrial Diesel Markets · Traditional use of waste vegetable oil · Plans for bigger plants using non-food sources such as jatropha, recycled waste and sewage feedstock · China is Installing Two 500 MW Coal-Fired Power Plants

  12. BACTERIA, FUNGI, AND UNICELLULAR ALGAE Blank page retained for pagination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHAPTER VI BACTERIA, FUNGI, AND UNICELLULAR ALGAE #12;Blank page retained for pagination #12;MARINE BACTERIA AND FUNGI IN THE GULF OF MEXICO I By CLAUDE E. ZOBELL, Scripps lrutitution of Oceano; Bavendamm 1932), there are very few published reports on bacteria and fungi in the nearby Gulf of Mexico

  13. P3.2. Climate change and agricultural production risks PI: P. Calanca1), J. Fuhrer (Deputy PI)1), Co-PI: B. Lehmann2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    residues, soils may turn from a C sink to a source of atmospheric CO2. SOM stabilization depends on residue directly by more frequent and persistent dry spells and high temperatures, and indirectly through shifts (frequency/persistence) increase crop production risks by affecting physical and chemical properties

  14. Soil erosion and agricultural sustainability David R. Montgomery*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, David R.

    Soil erosion and agricultural sustainability David R. Montgomery* Department of Earth and Space conventionally plowed agricultural fields average 1­2 orders of magnitude greater than rates of soil production indicates that, considered globally, hill- slope soil production and erosion evolve to balance geologic

  15. Biofuels and Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Biofuels and Agriculture Biofuels and Agriculture A Factsheet for Farmers American farmers have "biofuels" like ethanol and biodiesel mean that new markets are opening up. These can provide extra farm as growing markets for other biofuels like biodiesel. What are biofuels? Biofuels (short for "biomass fuels

  16. Modeling and control of algae detachment in regulated canal networks Ophelie Fovet, Xavier Litrico and Gilles Belaud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Modeling and control of algae detachment in regulated canal networks Ophelie Fovet, Xavier Litrico and Gilles Belaud Abstract-- Algae development in open-channel networks in- duce major disturbances because these algae developments consists in flushing the fixed algae. The flush is carried out by increasing

  17. Carnets de Gologie / Notebooks on Geology -Article 2006/03 (CG2006_A03) Are the green algae (phylum Viridiplantae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Carnets de Géologie / Notebooks on Geology - Article 2006/03 (CG2006_A03) 1 Are the green algae planet, A.H. KNOLL states that the first documented fossils of green algae date back 750 Ma. However" and of a primitive clade of green algae, the Pyramimonadales. A paraphyletic group of unicellular green algae, named

  18. Project EARTH-11-RR2: Co-evolution of iodine antioxidant mechanism in marine algae and Earth-surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    Project EARTH-11-RR2: Co-evolution of iodine antioxidant mechanism in marine algae and Earth algae (yet they are lacking in green algae) ­ but the phylogenetic distribution of iodine accumulation haloperoxidases. The first appearance and important divergence of brown algae occurred within the last 200 myr

  19. Green Algae as Model Organisms for Biological Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Raymond E

    2014-01-01

    In the past decade the volvocine green algae, spanning from the unicellular $Chlamydomonas$ to multicellular $Volvox$, have emerged as model organisms for a number of problems in biological fluid dynamics. These include flagellar propulsion, nutrient uptake by swimming organisms, hydrodynamic interactions mediated by walls, collective dynamics and transport within suspensions of microswimmers, the mechanism of phototaxis, and the stochastic dynamics of flagellar synchronization. Green algae are well suited to the study of such problems because of their range of sizes (from 10 $\\mu$m to several millimetres), their geometric regularity, the ease with which they can be cultured and the availability of many mutants that allow for connections between molecular details and organism-level behavior. This review summarizes these recent developments and highlights promising future directions in the study of biological fluid dynamics, especially in the context of evolutionary biology, that can take advantage of these re...

  20. Green Algae as Model Organisms for Biological Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raymond E. Goldstein

    2014-09-08

    In the past decade the volvocine green algae, spanning from the unicellular $Chlamydomonas$ to multicellular $Volvox$, have emerged as model organisms for a number of problems in biological fluid dynamics. These include flagellar propulsion, nutrient uptake by swimming organisms, hydrodynamic interactions mediated by walls, collective dynamics and transport within suspensions of microswimmers, the mechanism of phototaxis, and the stochastic dynamics of flagellar synchronization. Green algae are well suited to the study of such problems because of their range of sizes (from 10 $\\mu$m to several millimetres), their geometric regularity, the ease with which they can be cultured and the availability of many mutants that allow for connections between molecular details and organism-level behavior. This review summarizes these recent developments and highlights promising future directions in the study of biological fluid dynamics, especially in the context of evolutionary biology, that can take advantage of these remarkable organisms.

  1. CORNELL QUARTERLY Agricultural Wastes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    on fossil fuels, points out Donald R. Price, associate professor of agricultural engineering. Natural petroleum, and for the use of ethanol as liquid fuel, are discussed by Robert K. Finn, professor of chemical

  2. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture DESIGN: A Program to Create Data Forest Service Entry Research Work Unit at the Station's Forest Fire Laboratory, 4955 Canyon Crest Drive, Riverside, CA 92507

  3. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station General Observatory in Stinson Beach, Calif. Thomas E. Martin is Assistant Unit Leader--Wildlife at the U.S. Fish

  4. Overshooting of agricultural prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stamoulis, Kostas G.; Rausser, Gordon C.

    1987-01-01

    Rotenberg, Julio J. , "Sticky Prices in the United States,"Monetary Policy on United States Agriculture. A Fix-Price,Flex-Price Approach," Unpublished Ph.D. Disser- tation,

  5. Observations on European Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1911-01-01

    AS ACKICUL-I-uRAL EXPE RIMENT STATIONS bLLETIN No. 14-1 DECEMBER, 1911 Division of Chemistry Observations on European Agriculture BY G. S. FRAPS, Chemist 0 Postoffice : CULLEGE STATION; TEXAS AUSTIN. TEXAS I AUSTIN PRINTING CO:. PRINTERS... ............................................... and Conclusions 35 [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] rrvations on European Agriculture By C. S. FRAPS ie object of this Bulletin is to present such abservadons on :ulture in Europe as may offer suggestions of value to Texas - :ulturists. The writer...

  6. Faculty of Agricultural Sciences Department of Agricultural Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krivobokova, Tatyana

    Faculty of Agricultural Sciences Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development Platz-4823 Doctoral researcher in Agricultural and Experimental Economics The Collaborative Research Center (CRC to join the Chair of International Agricultural Economics (Jun.Prof. Dr. M. Wollni) of the University

  7. Montana State University 1 College of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barge, Marcy

    , livestock production, and soil and water conservation. Soil Science Minor (http://catalog-majors with fundamental soils courses in preparation for natural resource careers. Water Resources Minor (http://catalog for professional training in veterinary medicine. · B.S. in Agricultural Business (http://catalog

  8. Solar radiation management impacts on agriculture in China: A case study in the Geoengineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    Solar radiation management impacts on agriculture in China: A case study in the Geoengineering-Earth Science and Technology, Yokohama, Japan Abstract Geoengineering via solar radiation management could affect agricultural productivity due to changes in temperature, precipitation, and solar radiation

  9. Climate change and agriculture : global and regional effects using an economic model of international trade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reilly, John M.

    1993-01-01

    Empirical estimates of the economic welfare implications of the impact of climate change on global agricultural production are made. Agricultural yield changes resulting from climate scenarios associated with a doubling ...

  10. GroBot : an open-source model for controlled environment agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feshbach, Emma (Emma Elizabeth)

    2015-01-01

    The growing demand for food challenges our current farming methods, motivating the search for new paradigms for agricultural production. In this work, the GroBot is presented as an open-source model for the fourth agricultural ...

  11. Brazos River Bottom cotton producers' knowledge, attitudes and practices of sustainable agriculture 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thigpen, Laura Langham

    1994-01-01

    the production of agricultural commodities and the natural environment is undergoing profound changes. Due to an increase in environmental and food safety concerns, many changes in United States agricultural policy are taking place. The objective of the study...

  12. Cognome e nome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ALGA 18 giugno 2012 Esame (2.5 ore)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robbiano, Lorenzo

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ALGA 18 giugno 2012­ Esame (2.5 ore) Giustificare ogni affermazione Salvare il file CoCoA come cognome

  13. Hierarchical and size dependent mechanical properties of silica and silicon nanostructures inspired by diatom algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    García, Andre Phillipé

    2010-01-01

    Biology implements fundamental principles that allow for attractive mechanical properties, as observed in biomineralized structures. For example, diatom algae contain nanoporous hierarchical silicified shells that provide ...

  14. Cognome e nome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ALGA 7 luglio 2011 Compito di esame (2 ore)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robbiano, Lorenzo

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ALGA 7 luglio 2011­ Compito di esame (2 ore) Giustificare ogni affermazione Salvare il file CoCoA come

  15. Cognome e nome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ALGA 19 aprile 2011 Compito di esame (2 ore)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robbiano, Lorenzo

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ALGA 19 aprile 2011­ Compito di esame (2 ore) Giustificare ogni affermazione Salvare il file CoCoA come

  16. Cognome e nome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ALGA 16 giugno 2011 Compito di esame (2 ore)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robbiano, Lorenzo

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ALGA 16 giugno 2011­ Compito di esame (2 ore) Giustificare ogni affermazione Salvare il file CoCoA come

  17. Algae-to-Fuel: Integrating Thermochemical Conversion, Nutrient Recycling, and Wastewater

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 2-C: Biogas and Beyond: Challenges and Opportunities for Advanced Biofuels from Wet-Waste FeedstocksAlgae-to-Fuel: Integrating Thermochemical Conversion, Nutrient Recycling, and...

  18. How ATP3 is Addressing the Challenges of Scale-up in Algae Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cal Poly Tryg Lundquist Braden Crowe Eric Nicolai Commercial Algae Management Albert Vitale Robert Vitale Georgia Tech Yongsheng Chen Steven Van Ginkel Thomas Igou Zixuan Hu ASU...

  19. DISCUSSION: ECONOMIES OF SCALE AND SCOPE IN AGRICULTURAL BIOTECHNOLOGY RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foltz, Jeremy D.

    incentives for research, new avenues of rents for firms and the public sector in agriculture, and new types and applied research or product development) as well as between dif- ferent types of research organizationsDISCUSSION: ECONOMIES OF SCALE AND SCOPE IN AGRICULTURAL BIOTECHNOLOGY RESEARCH JEREMY D. FOLTZ

  20. Riding, R. 2005. Secular variations in abundance of calcified algae and cyanobacteria: how biomineralization can reflect global changes in temperature and water chemistry.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riding, Robert

    Riding, R. 2005. Secular variations in abundance of calcified algae and cyanobacteria: how: 312. Secular variations in abundance of calcified algae and bacteria: how biomineralization can algae and cyanobacteria, cellular site and mineralogy of calcification, together with biogeographic

  1. THE EFFECT OF HERBIVORY BY THE LONG-SPINED SEA URCHIN, DIADEMA SAVIGNYI, ON ALGAE GROWTH IN THE CORAL REEFS OF MOOREA, FRENCH POLYNESIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoey, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    between corals and algae on coral reefs: a review of4: 16-24. Wilder, R.M. Algae-Herbivore Interactions on theURCHIN, DIADEMA SAVIGNYI, ON ALGAE GROWTH IN THE CORAL REEFS

  2. ORGANIC GEOCHEMICAL STUDIES. II. THE DISTRIBUTION OF ALIPHATIC HYDROCARBONS IN ALGAE, BACTERIA, AND IN A RECENT LAKE SEDIMENT: A PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Jerry; McCarthy, E.D.; Van Hoeven Jr., William; Calvin, Melvin; Bradley, W. H.

    2008-01-01

    ALIPHATIC HYDROCARBONS IN ALGAE, BACTERIA, AND IN A RECENTH F A PRELIMINARY REPORT IN ALGAE, BACTERIA, AKD IN A RECENTrests on the finding that algae have less cellulose and a

  3. Measuring Oscillatory Velocity Fields Due to Swimming Algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guasto, Jeffrey S; Gollub, J P

    2010-01-01

    In this fluid dynamics video, we present the first time-resolved measurements of the oscillatory velocity field induced by swimming unicellular microorganisms. Confinement of the green alga C. reinhardtii in stabilized thin liquid films allows simultaneous tracking of cells and tracer particles. The measured velocity field reveals complex time-dependent flow structures, and scales inversely with distance. The instantaneous mechanical power generated by the cells is measured from the velocity fields and peaks at 15 fW. The dissipation per cycle is more than four times what steady swimming would require.

  4. Dancing Volvox: Hydrodynamic Bound States of Swimming Algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knut Drescher; Kyriacos C. Leptos; Idan Tuval; Takuji Ishikawa; Timothy J. Pedley; Raymond E. Goldstein

    2009-01-14

    The spherical alga Volvox swims by means of flagella on thousands of surface somatic cells. This geometry and its large size make it a model organism for studying the fluid dynamics of multicellularity. Remarkably, when two nearby Volvox swim close to a solid surface, they attract one another and can form stable bound states in which they "waltz" or "minuet" around each other. A surface-mediated hydrodynamic attraction combined with lubrication forces between spinning, bottom-heavy Volvox explains the formation, stability and dynamics of the bound states. These phenomena are suggested to underlie observed clustering of Volvox at surfaces.

  5. Multi-scale Characterization of Improved Algae Strains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Taraka T.

    2015-04-01

    This report relays the important role biofuels such as algae could have in the energy market. The report cites that problem of crude oil becoming less abundant while the demand for energy continues to rise. There are many benefits of producing energy with biofuels such as fewer carbon emissions as well as less land area to produce the same amount of energy compared to other sources of renewable fuels. One challenge that faces biofuels right now is the cost to produce it is high.

  6. Potential consequences of GM algae escape on ecosystem services

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool Fits theCommitteeCrystalline SiliconofDepartment of EnergyGM algae; a

  7. Energy 101: Algae-to-Fuel | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas NuclearElectronic StructureElyElectro NitrationEnergetics |Algae-to-Fuel

  8. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Algae Biofuel | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram:Y-12Power, Inc | DepartmentPeer20InsulatedofBEST OFFERJuneAlgae Biofuel

  9. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Algae Biofuel | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergy Webinar:I DueBETO Quiz - Interactive Content BETOEnergyAlgae

  10. Credit Constraints and Productivity in Peruvian Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boucher, Stephen; Guirkinger, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    are factored in. Second, lenders may require borrowers torationing derives from lenders’ unwillingness to raise theor quality of collateral the lender requires to overcome the

  11. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , evaluation, monitoring, point counts, sampling of populations, standards of censusing Technical Editors: C Technical Report PSW-GTR-149 #12;Publisher: Albany, California Mailing address: PO Box 245. Berkeley CA 9470 of Agriculture Abstract Ralph, C. John; Sauer, John R.; Droege, Sam, technical editors. 1995. Monitoring Bird

  12. ADDRESS SERVICE REQUESTED AGRICULTURAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    much of the state's manufacturing, shipping and tourism offerings. Water is necessary for life -- every Endowed Chair in Water Research, said that access to safe drinking water is one of the most serious public is a vital component of so many industries -- agriculture, manufac- turing and tourism, just to name a few

  13. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Intermountain Research Station Research Research Station's Riparian-Stream Ecology and Management Research Work Unit at Boise, ID. He re- ceived with the Intermountain Research Station's Riparian-Stream Ecology and Man- agement Research Work Unit at the Forestry

  14. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station General,000 xylem resin samples of pine (Pinus) species and hybrids--largely from the western United States locations in the eastern and southern United States. Cover Image: Chapter 6, Figure 6-2. #12;Xylem

  15. AGRICULTURAL SUMMER 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MICHIGAN AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION SUMMER 2005 VOL. 23 NO. 2 futures #12;2 | FUTURES Asthma, cystic fibrosis, Lyme disease, pre- mature birth, campylobacteriosis and dis- eases caused by West Nile research projects is searching for the genes responsi- ble for human asthma. Her long-term goal

  16. Agriculture and Life Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Responsibility 7 Virginia Tech Principles of Community 7 STUDENTS ARE ~ 8 University/College Policy and Procedures 9 Absences 9 Personal Illness: 9 Death/Illness in the Family 9 Attendance of a Professional of Agriculture and Life Sciences that advising is a collaborative effort between the student and faculty advisor

  17. Weather Effects on European Agricultural Output 1850-1913

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solomou, Solomos; Wu, Weike

    2004-06-16

    This paper compares the effects of weather shocks on agricultural production in Britain, France and Germany during the late nineteenth century. Using semi- parametric models to estimate the non-linear agro-weather relationship, we find...

  18. Communication Factors Affecting African Policymakers' Decisions about Agricultural Biotechnology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Begashaw, Belay Ejigu

    2010-10-12

    The purpose of this study was to develop a model for impacting decisions on agricultural biotechnology practices in food production among African policymakers. The research focused on three African countries, namely, South Africa, Malawi and Ghana...

  19. The economic potential of producing energy from agricultural biomass 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerko, Christine

    1996-01-01

    fuels; hence, are largely unable to be supplied at a competitive price. This study examined how forcing increased biomass energy generation, along with improvements in biomass production technology, will impact agricultural feedstock prices...

  20. Chromista is a major eukaryotic kingdom comprising algae and former protozoa that is evolutionarily entirely distinct from the kingdoms Plantae and Protozoa (Cavalier-Smith 2007). Chromist chloroplasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldschmidt, Christina

    1 Chromista is a major eukaryotic kingdom comprising algae and former protozoa chloroplasts were acquired secondarily by enslavement of a red alga, itself a member of kingdom Plantae

  1. Manipulating RuBisCO accumulation in the green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manipulating RuBisCO accumulation in the green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Xenie Johnson in algal mrl1 mutants leads to a complete absence of RuBisCO large subunit protein and thus a lack of accu between green algae (Chlamydomonas X. Johnson (&) Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Unite

  2. Food & Agriculture Policy Issues for the 1980s. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anonymous

    1980-01-01

    to urban development, highways and other nonfarm uses. This conversion of 2.5 to 3.0 million acres annually is reducing this basic resource for food pro duction and may also have environmental effects in local areas. Policy questions raised by the land... conversion issue include: Should federal, state and local government policies be developed to preserve agri cultural land for food and fiber production? If so, what type of policies are needed? Energy and Agriculture American agriculture production...

  3. Marine algae and land plants share conserved phytochrome signaling systems

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Duanmu, Deqiang; Bachy, Charles; Sudek, Sebastian; Wong, Chee -Hong; Jimenez, Valeria; Rockwell, Nathan C.; Martin, Shelley S.; Ngan, Chew Yee; Reistetter, Emily N.; van Baren, Marijke J.; et al

    2014-09-29

    Phytochrome photosensors control a vast gene network in streptophyte plants, acting as master regulators of diverse growth and developmental processes throughout the life cycle. In contrast with their absence in known chlorophyte algal genomes and most sequenced prasinophyte algal genomes, a phytochrome is found in Micromonas pusilla, a widely distributed marine picoprasinophyte (more »phytochrome in the common progenitor of green algae and land plants. These analyses reveal a monophyletic clade containing streptophyte, prasinophyte, cryptophyte, and glaucophyte phytochromes implying an origin in the eukaryotic ancestor of the Archaeplastida. Transcriptomic measurements reveal diurnal regulation of phytochrome and bilin chromophore biosynthetic genes in Micromonas. The expression of these genes precedes both light-mediated phytochrome redistribution from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and increased expression of photosynthesis-associated genes. Prasinophyte phytochromes perceive wavelengths of light transmitted farther through seawater than the red/far-red light sensed by land plant phytochromes. Prasinophyte phytochromes also retain light-regulated histidine kinase activity lost in the streptophyte phytochrome lineage. Our studies demonstrate that light-mediated nuclear translocation of phytochrome predates the emergence of land plants and likely represents a widespread signaling mechanism in unicellular algae.« less

  4. Marine algae and land plants share conserved phytochrome signaling systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duanmu, Deqiang; Bachy, Charles; Sudek, Sebastian; Wong, Chee -Hong; Jimenez, Valeria; Rockwell, Nathan C.; Martin, Shelley S.; Ngan, Chew Yee; Reistetter, Emily N.; van Baren, Marijke J.; Price, Dana C.; Wei, Chia -Lin; Reyes-Prieto, Adrian; Lagarias, J. Clark; Worden, Alexandra Z.

    2014-09-29

    Phytochrome photosensors control a vast gene network in streptophyte plants, acting as master regulators of diverse growth and developmental processes throughout the life cycle. In contrast with their absence in known chlorophyte algal genomes and most sequenced prasinophyte algal genomes, a phytochrome is found in Micromonas pusilla, a widely distributed marine picoprasinophyte (<2 µm cell diameter). Together with phytochromes identified from other prasinophyte lineages, we establish that prasinophyte and streptophyte phytochromes share core light-input and signaling-output domain architectures except for the loss of C-terminal response regulator receiver domains in the streptophyte phytochrome lineage. Phylogenetic reconstructions robustly support the presence of phytochrome in the common progenitor of green algae and land plants. These analyses reveal a monophyletic clade containing streptophyte, prasinophyte, cryptophyte, and glaucophyte phytochromes implying an origin in the eukaryotic ancestor of the Archaeplastida. Transcriptomic measurements reveal diurnal regulation of phytochrome and bilin chromophore biosynthetic genes in Micromonas. The expression of these genes precedes both light-mediated phytochrome redistribution from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and increased expression of photosynthesis-associated genes. Prasinophyte phytochromes perceive wavelengths of light transmitted farther through seawater than the red/far-red light sensed by land plant phytochromes. Prasinophyte phytochromes also retain light-regulated histidine kinase activity lost in the streptophyte phytochrome lineage. Our studies demonstrate that light-mediated nuclear translocation of phytochrome predates the emergence of land plants and likely represents a widespread signaling mechanism in unicellular algae.

  5. Discrete Event Modeling of Algae Cultivation and Harvesting at Commercial Scale: Capital Costs, Operating Costs, and System Bottlenecks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lacey, Ph.D, P.E., Ronald E.

    2012-07-16

    Discrete Event Modeling of Algae Cultivation and Harvesting at Commercial Scale: Capital Costs, Operating Costs, and System Bottlenecks

  6. MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF THE ASSIMILATORY NITRATE REDUCTASE GENE AND ITS EXPRESSION IN THE MARINE GREEN ALGA DUNALIELLA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Bess

    IN THE MARINE GREEN ALGA DUNALIELLA TERTIOLECTA (CHLOROPHYCEAE)1 Bongkeun Song2 and Bess B. Ward Department from a marine phytoplankton, the green alga Dunaliella tertiolecta Butcher. Its sequence is very similar to that of the other green algae, but its intron structure and transcriptional regulation differ

  7. JENUFA GEN. NOV.: A NEW GENUS OF COCCOID GREEN ALGAE (CHLOROPHYCEAE, INCERTAE SEDIS) PREVIOUSLY RECORDED BY ENVIRONMENTAL SEQUENCING1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JENUFA GEN. NOV.: A NEW GENUS OF COCCOID GREEN ALGAE (CHLOROPHYCEAE, INCERTAE SEDIS) PREVIOUSLY of unicellular green algae from algal biofilms growing on tree bark in a Southeast Asian tropical rainforest: AU, approximately unbiased; BBM, Bold basal medium; CAUP, Culture Collection of algae at Charles

  8. DISTINCT PATTERNS OF NITRATE REDUCTASE ACTIVITY IN BROWN ALGAE: LIGHT AND AMMONIUM SENSITIVITY IN LAMINARIA DIGITATA IS ABSENT IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berges, John A.

    DISTINCT PATTERNS OF NITRATE REDUCTASE ACTIVITY IN BROWN ALGAE: LIGHT AND AMMONIUM SENSITIVITY and lowest in summer. This is the first report of NR activity in any alga that is not strongly regulated the regulation of NR by light that has been observed in other algae and higher plants. Key index words: ammonium

  9. Inhibition of Photosynthesis in Some Algae by Extreme-Red Light Author(s): Eugene Rabinowitch, Govindjee, Jan B. Thomas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govindjee

    Inhibition of Photosynthesis in Some Algae by Extreme-Red Light Author(s): Eugene Rabinowitch://www.jstor.org #12;Inhibition of Photosynthesis in Some Algae by Extreme"Red Light Abstract. Photosynthesis produced by far-red light (about 700 m,b) is reversibly inhibited in some algae by extreme-red light ( 750 m

  10. International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology (2001), 51, 737749 Printed in Great Britain Phylogenetic relationships among algae based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gent, Universiteit

    2001-01-01

    in Great Britain Phylogenetic relationships among algae based on complete large-subunit rRNA sequences 1 of the different groups of algae, and in particular to study the relationships among the different classes of heterokont algae. In LSU rRNA phylogenies, the chlorarachniophytes, cryptomonads and haptophytes seem to form

  11. Hyperbolic chemotaxis Hyperbolic chemotaxis on networks Models for biofilms Models for algae Some issues in the modeling of movement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribot, Magali

    Hyperbolic chemotaxis Hyperbolic chemotaxis on networks Models for biofilms Models for algae Some issues in the modeling of movement of cells : chemotaxis, biofilms, algae, etc... Magali Ribot;Hyperbolic chemotaxis Hyperbolic chemotaxis on networks Models for biofilms Models for algae Hyperbolic

  12. SYMBIOSIS (2008) 46, 153160 2008 Balaban, Philadelphia/Rehovot ISSN 0334-5114 Changes in chloroplast structure in lichenized algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    in chloroplast structure in lichenized algae Ond ej Peksa1,2* and Pavel kaloud2 1 The West Bohemian Museum in the systematic classification of trebouxioid algae. However, in different ontogenetic, physiological the lichen thallus. Keywords: Confocal laser scanning microscopy, green algae, isolation, Lecanorales

  13. Modulation of Light-Enhancement to Symbiotic Algae by Light-Scattering in Corals and Evolutionary Trends in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ottino, Julio M.

    Modulation of Light-Enhancement to Symbiotic Algae by Light-Scattering in Corals and Evolutionary that the cost of enhancing light-amplification to the algae is revealed in decreased resilience) Modulation of Light-Enhancement to Symbiotic Algae by Light-Scattering in Corals and Evolutionary Trends

  14. The Abundance, Habitat Selection, and Feeding Behavior of the Brittle Star, Ophioderma brevispinum, in Eelgrass-vs. Algae-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    , in Eelgrass- vs. Algae- Dominated Habitats in a Nutrient Enriched Estuary Amanda Keledjian Grinnell College to a shift from pristine eelgrass meadows to drifting algae mats that induce episodic hypoxia. To understand the lifestyle and role of this elusive animal, I sampled the abundance within eelgrass, algae, mud, and sandy

  15. Fottea 8(2): 133146, 2008 133 Epipelic cyanobacteria and algae: a case study from Czech ponds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fottea 8(2): 133­146, 2008 133 Epipelic cyanobacteria and algae: a case study from Czech ponds Petr and algae (particularly desmids). Altogether 45 sediment samples were taken at ponds covering a p and various protozoa, feeding on epipelic algae (Amoeba, Urceolus cyclostomus). Key words: epipelon

  16. D-Amino Acid Utilization in Algae Jennifer Meoni1, Farrah Moazeni2, Gaosen Zhang, Ph.D.2,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    D-Amino Acid Utilization in Algae Jennifer Meoni1, Farrah Moazeni2, Gaosen Zhang, Ph.D.2, Henry Sun are derived primarily from cell wall (peptidoglycan) remnants of bacteria. Algae, which are composed environment so that we are not exposed. However, racemases are not known to be present in algae. So

  17. Agricultural biotechnology and Indian newspapers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sivakumar, Gayathri

    2004-11-15

    This study is designed to look into how agricultural biotechnology is covered by Indian newspapers. A through study of the literature showed that agricultural biotechnology is a much debated topic and there is a vast difference between the concerns...

  18. United States Department of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    United States Department of Agriculture Keys to Soil Taxonomy Ninth Edition, 2003 #12;#12;Keys to Soil Taxonomy By Soil Survey Staff United States Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service Ninth Edition, 2003 #12;The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits

  19. AGRICULTURAL INVENTORY LOWER FRASER VALLEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inventory Estimates 8 #12;- ii - LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1 Agricultural Waste Management Zones 2 Figure 2 4 Livestock Mass Distribution by Waste Management Zone 10 Figure 5 Agricultural Land Distribution by Waste Management Zone 10 Figure 6 Livestock Mass to Agricultural Land Ratio by Waste Management Zone 11

  20. Production of bioenergy and biochemicals from industrial and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    and agricultural wastewater, includ- ing methanogenic anaerobic digestion, biological hydro- gen production material in industrial and agricultural wastewater Methanogenic anaerobic digestion of organic material

  1. Risk in agriculture : a study of crop yield distributions and crop insurance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gayam, Narsi Reddy

    2006-01-01

    Agriculture is a business fraught with risk. Crop production depends on climatic, geographical, biological, political, and economic factors, which introduce risks that are quantifiable given the appropriate mathematical ...

  2. Characterization of Hydrogen Metabolism in the Multicellular Green Alga Volvox carteri

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cornish, Adam J.; Green, Robin; Gärtner, Katrin; Mason, Saundra; Hegg, Eric L.; Umen, James G.

    2015-04-30

    Hydrogen gas functions as a key component in the metabolism of a wide variety of microorganisms, often acting as either a fermentative end-product or an energy source. The number of organisms reported to utilize hydrogen continues to grow, contributing to and expanding our knowledge of biological hydrogen processes. Here we demonstrate that Volvox carteri f. nagariensis, a multicellular green alga with differentiated cells, evolves H2 both when supplied with an abiotic electron donor and under physiological conditions. The genome of Volvox carteri contains two genes encoding putative [FeFe]-hydrogenases (HYDA1 and HYDA2), and the transcripts for these genes accumulate under anaerobic conditions. The HYDA1 and HYDA2 gene products were cloned, expressed, and purified, and both are functional [FeFe]-hydrogenases. Additionally, within the genome the HYDA1 and HYDA2 genes cluster with two putative genes which encode hydrogenase maturation proteins. This gene cluster resembles operon-like structures found within bacterial genomes and may provide further insight into evolutionary relationships between bacterial and algal [FeFe]-hydrogenase genes.

  3. Characterization of Hydrogen Metabolism in the Multicellular Green Alga Volvox carteri

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cornish, Adam J.; Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI; Green, Robin; Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI; Gärtner, Katrin; Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI; Mason, Saundra; Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI; Hegg, Eric L.; Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI

    2015-04-30

    Hydrogen gas functions as a key component in the metabolism of a wide variety of microorganisms, often acting as either a fermentative end-product or an energy source. The number of organisms reported to utilize hydrogen continues to grow, contributing to and expanding our knowledge of biological hydrogen processes. Here we demonstrate that Volvox carteri f. nagariensis, a multicellular green alga with differentiated cells, evolves H2 both when supplied with an abiotic electron donor and under physiological conditions. The genome of Volvox carteri contains two genes encoding putative [FeFe]-hydrogenases (HYDA1 and HYDA2), and the transcripts for these genes accumulate under anaerobicmore »conditions. The HYDA1 and HYDA2 gene products were cloned, expressed, and purified, and both are functional [FeFe]-hydrogenases. Additionally, within the genome the HYDA1 and HYDA2 genes cluster with two putative genes which encode hydrogenase maturation proteins. This gene cluster resembles operon-like structures found within bacterial genomes and may provide further insight into evolutionary relationships between bacterial and algal [FeFe]-hydrogenase genes.« less

  4. Training agricultural scientists at the International Center for the Improvement of Maize and Wheat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cote?, Michael E.

    1986-01-01

    agricultural production" (World Food Conference, 1974). At a meeting of the Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) of the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR) held at CIMMYT in Mexico during October, 1975, the consensus of those...TRAINING AGRICULTURAL SCIENTISTS AT THE INTERNATIONAL CENTER FOR THE IMPROVEMENT OF MAIZE AND WHEAT A PROFESSIONAL PAPER by Michael E. Cote Submitted to the College of Agriculture of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  5. Stream ecological processes are modeled through a simple predator-prey model, which reproduces benthic algae and macro-invertebrates dynamics.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    reproduces benthic algae and macro-invertebrates dynamics. Algae biomass = growth - death loss - predation influences on algae and macro-invertebrates dynamics will be introduced in the predator-prey model: - at increasing flow velocity high nutrient availability, algae erosion and macro-invertebrate drag

  6. Florida Sea Grant College Program http://www.flseagrant.org SGEF155 March 2009 rev. CAN WE STOP "KILLER ALGAE" FROM INVADING FLORIDA?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    STOP "KILLER ALGAE" FROM INVADING FLORIDA? by Charles Jacoby 1 and Linda Walters 2 What is "killer algae"? The Mediterranean strain of Caulerpa taxifolia earned the name "killer algae" because of its devastating effects on the Mediterranean coast. The story of this algae or seaweed represents one of the best

  7. Essays on the Effect of Biofuels on Agricultural Markets 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maisashvili, Aleksandre

    2014-04-23

    sectors in the future. The second part of the research employs an application of hedonic pricing model for whole algae and post-extracted algae residue meal for aquaculture. Prices and nutritional characteristics of commonly applied aquaculture feed...

  8. Agricultural Biomass and Landfill Diversion Incentive (Texas...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Landfill Diversion Incentive (Texas) Agricultural Biomass and Landfill Diversion Incentive (Texas) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor...

  9. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Metabolic Pathway Analysis for Biohydrogen Production under Non-Steady State Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Dongda; Vassiliadis, Vassilios S.

    2015-10-06

    This paper presents a novel structured dynamic model to simulate the metabolic reaction network of green algae hydrogen production from aerobic condition to anaerobic condition, which has not been addressed in the open literature to this date...

  10. Resolving the agriculture-petroleum conflict: the experience of cacao smallholders in Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scherr, S.J.

    1983-01-01

    In 1972, PEMEX, the Mexican national oil company, discovered huge reserves of oil and natural gas along the Gulf Coast, and began intensive exploitation in Tabasco and northern Chiapas states. Severe conflict between PEMEX and the agricultural economy of Tabasco seemed certain. But despite problems of labor scarcity, inflation, migration, pollution, agricultural production 1974 to 1979 increased for the state's major products - cacao, coconut, beef, and bananas. This study analyzes how agriculture-petroleum conflicts have been resolved in Tabasco, and how relevant its experience is to other agricultural areas undergoing rapid large-scale industrial development. Cacao farming was chosen as a case study. Detailed farm budget, family employment, and technical production data were used to document farm production strategies. Research results suggest that resolution of agriculture-petroleum conflicts depends on: demographic conditions, employment conditions, agricultural prices, petroleum company flexibility, government development policy, and farmer political strength. Support for the campesino sector is critical.

  11. Top Five Things You Should Know About Algae | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    agent for ice cream, pastries, and other desserts, as well as a clarifying agent for brewing beer. Algae are an ingredient in several cosmetics, as well as sustainable animal...

  12. National Microalgae Biofuel Production Potential and Resource Demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wigmosta, Mark S.; Coleman, Andre M.; Skaggs, Richard; Huesemann, Michael H.; Lane, Leonard J.

    2011-04-14

    Microalgae continue to receive global attention as a potential sustainable "energy crop" for biofuel production. An important step to realizing the potential of algae is quantifying the demands commercial-scale algal biofuel production will place on water and land resources. We present a high-resolution national resource and oil production assessment that brings to bear fundamental research questions of where open pond microalgae production can occur, how much land and water resource is required, and how much energy is produced. Our study suggests under current technology microalgae have the potential to generate 220 billion liters/year of oil, equivalent to 48% of current U.S. petroleum imports for transportation fuels. However, this level of production would require 5.5% of the land area in the conterminous U.S., and nearly three times the volume of water currently used for irrigated agriculture, averaging 1,421 L water per L of oil. Optimizing the selection of locations for microalgae production based on water use efficiency can greatly reduce total water demand. For example, focusing on locations along the Gulf Coast, Southeastern Seaboard, and areas adjacent to the Great Lakes, shows a 75% reduction in water demand to 350 L per L of oil produced with a 67% reduction in land use. These optimized locations have the potential to generate an oil volume equivalent to 17% of imports for transportation fuels, equal to the Energy Independence and Security Act year 2022 "advanced biofuels" production target, and utilizing some 25% of the current irrigation consumptive water demand for the U. S. These results suggest that, with proper planning, adequate land and water are available to meet a significant portion of the U.S. renewable fuel goals.

  13. Optimization and heat and water integration for biodiesel production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    1 Optimization and heat and water integration for biodiesel production from cooking oil is to simultaneously optimize and heat integrate the production of biodiesel from each of the different oil sources in the design. When using algae oil, the optimal process employs alkali as catalyst with a production cost of 0

  14. More soft-bodied animals and algae from the Middle Cambrian of Utah and British Columbia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conway Morris, S.; Robison, Richard A.

    1988-12-29

    THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS PALEONTOLOGICAL CONTRIBUTIONS December 29, 1988 Paper 122 MORE SOFT-BODIED ANIMALS AND ALGAE FROM THE MIDDLE CAMBRIAN OF UTAH AND BRITISH COLUMBIA' Simon Conway Morris and R. A. Robison Department of Earth Sciences..., University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EQ, and Department of Geology, The University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas 66045 Abstract—Remains of noncalcareous algae and soft-bodied metazoans from Middle Cambrian strata of Utah (Spence, Wheeler...

  15. Chemical Fixation of CO2 in Coal Combustion Products and Recycling through Biosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Henry Copeland; Paul Pier; Samantha Whitehead; David Behel

    2002-09-30

    This Annual Technical Progress Report presents the principal results in enhanced growth of algae using coal combustion products as a catalyst to increase bicarbonate levels in solution. Optimal production of biomass depends on a number of factors. These factors include pH management, harvesting, and impact of auxiliary operations on the algae population. A number of experiments are presented which attempt to identify and characterize the impact of these factors.

  16. Disaggregated greenhouse gas emission inventories from agriculture via a coupled economic-ecosystem model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    systems in the federal state of Baden-Wu¨rttemberg, Southwest Germany. EFEM is an economic farm production-ecosystem model; Agricultural production systems; Stocking rates 1. Introduction In Germany, agriculture Kaltschmitt a , Ju¨rgen Zeddies b a Institute for Energy and Environment, Torgauer Str. 116, D-04347 Leipzig

  17. Niche of harmful alga Aureococcus anophagefferens revealed through ecogenomics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gobler, C J; Grigoriev, I V; Berry, D L; Dyhrman, S T; Wilhelm, S W; Salamov, A; Lobanov, A V; Zhang, Y; Collier, J L; Wurch, L L; Kustka, A B; Dill, B D; Shah, M; VerBerkomes, N C; Kuo, A; Terry, A; Pangilinan, J; Lindquist, E A; Lucas, S; Paulsen, I; Hattenrath-Lehmann, T K; Talmage, S; Walker, E A; Koch, F; Burson, A M; Marcoval, M A; Tang, Y; LeCleir, G R; Coyne, K J; Berg, G M; Bertrand, E M; Saito, M A; Gladyshev, V N

    2011-03-02

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) cause significant economic and ecological damage worldwide. Despite considerable efforts, a comprehensive understanding of the factors that promote these blooms has been lacking because the biochemical pathways that facilitate their dominance relative to other phytoplankton within specific environments have not been identified. Here, biogeochemical measurements demonstrated that the harmful alga Aureococcus anophagefferens outcompeted co-occurring phytoplankton in estuaries with elevated levels of dissolved organic matter and turbidity and low levels of dissolved inorganic nitrogen. We subsequently sequenced the first HAB genome (A. anophagefferens) and compared its gene complement to those of six competing phytoplankton species identified via metaproteomics. Using an ecogenomic approach, we specifically focused on the gene sets that may facilitate dominance within the environmental conditions present during blooms. A. anophagefferens possesses a larger genome (56 mbp) and more genes involved in light harvesting, organic carbon and nitrogen utilization, and encoding selenium- and metal-requiring enzymes than competing phytoplankton. Genes for the synthesis of microbial deterrents likely permit the proliferation of this species with reduced mortality losses during blooms. Collectively, these findings suggest that anthropogenic activities resulting in elevated levels of turbidity, organic matter, and metals have opened a niche within coastal ecosystems that ideally suits the unique genetic capacity of A. anophagefferens and thus has facilitated the proliferation of this and potentially other HABs.

  18. Niche of harmful alga Aureococcus anophagefferens revealed through ecogenomics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grigoriev, Igor; Gobler, Christopher; Salamov, Asaf; Kuo, Alan; Terry, Astrid; Pangillian, Jasmyn; Lindquist, Erika; Lucas, Susan; Berry, Dianna; Dyhrman, Sonya; Wilhelm, Steven; Lobanov, Alexei; Zhang, Yan; Collier, Jackie; Wurch, Louie; Kusta, Adam; Dill, Brian; Shsh, Manesh; VerBerkmoes, Nathan; Paulsen, Ian; Hattenrath-Lehmann, Theresa; Talmage, Stephanie; Walker, Elyse; Koch, Florian; Burson, Amanda; Marcoval, Maria; Tang, Yin-Zhong; LeCleir, Gary; Coyne, Kathyrn; Berg, Gry; Bertrand, Erin; Saito, Mak; Gladyshev, Vadim

    2011-02-18

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) cause significant economic and ecological damage worldwide. Despite considerable efforts, a comprehensive understanding of the factors that promote these blooms has been lacking, because the biochemical pathways that facilitate their dominance relative to other phytoplankton within specific environments have not been identified. Here, biogeochemical measurements showed that the harmful alga Aureococcus anophagefferens outcompeted co-occurring phytoplankton in estuaries with elevated levels of dissolved organic matter and turbidity and low levels of dissolved inorganic nitrogen. We subsequently sequenced the genome of A. anophagefferens and compared its gene complement with those of six competing phytoplankton species identified through metaproteomics. Using an ecogenomic approach, we specifically focused on gene sets that may facilitate dominance within the environmental conditions present during blooms. A. anophagefferens possesses a larger genome (56 Mbp) and has more genes involved in light harvesting, organic carbon and nitrogen use, and encoding selenium- and metal-requiring enzymes than competing phytoplankton. Genes for the synthesis of microbial deterrents likely permit the proliferation of this species, with reduced mortality losses during blooms. Collectively, these findings suggest that anthropogenic activities resulting in elevated levels of turbidity, organic matter, and metals have opened a niche within coastal ecosystems that ideally suits the unique genetic capacity of A. anophagefferens and thus, has facilitated the proliferation of this and potentially other HABs.

  19. Molecular and Biochemical Characterization of Hydrocarbon Production in the Green Microalga Botryococcus braunii 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiss, Taylor Leigh

    2012-10-19

    .................................................................................................... xiv CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION ................................................................................ 1 Algae biofuels ................................................................................ 1 Algae... ........................................................................ 39 viii CHAPTER Page Culturing of algae ........................................................................... 42...

  20. IRRIGATION WATER QUALITY FOR AGRICULTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radcliffe, David

    IRRIGATION WATER QUALITY FOR AGRICULTURE Irrigation Water Background In the past, there were minor of irrigation water in Georgia. This is because only a small amount of acreage under irrigated agriculture utilized potable (suitable for drinking) quality water. Thus, quality of irrigation water was not closely

  1. AGRICULTURAL WINTER/SPRING 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    animal agriculture and the impact of air and water quality on human health. Powers also heads the new MSU agriculture on air quality through a number of projects. "The manure won't go away," Powers says regulations to ensure that air and water quality are preserved." In her air quality research, Powers

  2. Agricultural Waste Management System Component Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    Agricultural Waste Management System Component Design Chapter 10 Part 651 Agricultural Waste Management Field Handbook 10­1(210-vi-AWMFH, rev. 1, July 1996) Chapter 10 Agricultural Waste Management....................................................................................................10­70 10­i #12;Chapter 10 Agricultural Waste Management System Component Design Part 651 Agricultural

  3. Students' Perceptions of International Agriculture After an International Agricultural Experience 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Kasey Lynn

    2012-02-14

    Study abroad and internship experiences are the best ways for students to globalize their education. The purpose of this study was to identify students' perceptions of international agriculture before and after they ...

  4. Towards the optimal integrated production of biodiesel with internal recycling of methanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    the use of autoreforming for a production cost 0f $0.61/gal, 3.34MJ/gal of energy consumption and 0.79gal1 Towards the optimal integrated production of biodiesel with internal recycling of methanol of the production methanol from glycerol and its integration in the production of biodiesel from algae. We propose

  5. The concept of a sustainable agriculture 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kriewaldt, David Mark

    1993-01-01

    The concept of a sustainable agriculture varies much with writers: some see it as the preservation of agricultural resources or as the reduction of agricultural contamination of the environment or both. Other authors focus on economic viability...

  6. Multiplex detection of agricultural pathogens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McBride, Mary Teresa (Brentwood, CA); Slezak, Thomas Richard (Livermore, CA); Messenger, Sharon Lee (Kensington, CA)

    2010-09-14

    Described are kits and methods useful for detection of seven agricultural pathogens (BPSV; BHV; BVD; FMDV; BTV; SVD; and VESV) in a sample. Genomic sequence information from 7 agricultural pathogens was analyzed to identify signature sequences, e.g., polynucleotide sequences useful for confirming the presence or absence of a pathogen in a sample. Primer and probe sets were designed and optimized for use in a PCR based, multiplexed Luminex assay to successfully identify the presence or absence of pathogens in a sample.

  7. Multiplex detection of agricultural pathogens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siezak, Thomas R.; Gardner, Shea; Torres, Clinton; Vitalis, Elizabeth; Lenhoff, Raymond J.

    2013-01-15

    Described are kits and methods useful for detection of agricultural pathogens in a sample. Genomic sequence information from agricultural pathogens was analyzed to identify signature sequences, e.g., polynucleotide sequences useful for confirming the presence or absence of a pathogen in a sample. Primer and probe sets were designed and optimized for use in a PCR based, multiplexed Luminex assay and/or an array assay to successfully identify the presence or absence of pathogens in a sample.

  8. Press Conference Call Tomorrow: Agriculture Secretary Vilsack...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Press Conference Call Tomorrow: Agriculture Secretary Vilsack and Energy Secretary Chu to Discuss Efforts to Reduce U.S. Oil Dependence Press Conference Call Tomorrow: Agriculture...

  9. Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature...

  10. Biofuels from Microalgae: Review of Products, Processes and Potential, with Special Focus on Dunaliella sp.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huesemann, Michael H.; Benemann, John R.

    2009-12-31

    There is currently great interest in using microalgae for the production of biofuels, mainly due to the fact that microalgae can produce biofuels at a much higher productivity than conventional plants and that they can be cultivated using water, in particular seawater, and land not competing for resources with conventional agriculture. However, at present such microalgae-based technologies are not yet developed and the economics of such processes are uncertain. We review power generation by direct combustion, production of hydrogen and other fuel gases and liquids by gasification and pyrolysis, methane generation by anaerobic digestion, ethanol fermentations, and hydrogen production by dark and light-driven metabolism. We in particular discuss the production of lipids, vegetable oils and hydrocarbons, which could be converted to biodiesel. Direct combustion for power generation has two major disadvantages in that the high N-content of algal biomass causes unacceptably high NOx emissions and losses of nitrogen fertilizer. Thus, the use of sun-dried microalgal biomass would not be cost-competitive with other solid fuels such as coal and wood. Thermochemical conversion processes such as gasification and pyrolysis have been successfully demonstrated in the laboratory but will be difficult to scale up commercially and suffers from similar, though sometimes not as stringent, limitations as combustion. Anaerobic digestion of microalgal cells yields only about 0.3 L methane per g volatile solids destroyed, about half of the maximum achievable, but yields can be increased by adding carbon rich substrates to circumvent ammonia toxicity caused by the N-rich algal biomass. Anaerobic digestion would be best suited for the treatment of algal biomass waste after value-added products have been separated. Algae can also be grown to accumulate starches or similar fermentable products, and ethanol or similar (e.g., butanol) fermentations could be applied to such biomass, but research is required on increasing solvent yields. Dark fermentation of algal biomass can also produce hydrogen, but, as for other fermentations, only at low yields. Hydrogen can also be generated by algae in the light, however, this process has not yet been demonstrated in any way that could be scaled up and, in any event, Dunaliella, is not known to produce hydrogen. In response to nutrient deficiency (nitrogen or silicon), some microalgae accumulate neutral lipids which, after physical extraction, could be converted, via transesterification with methanol, to biodiesel. Nitrogen-limitation does not appear to increase either cellular lipid content or lipid productivity in Dunaliella. Results from life cycle energy analyses indicate that cultivation of microalgal biomass in open raceway ponds has a positive energy output ratio (EOR), approaching up to 10 (i.e., the caloric energy output from the algae is 10 times greater than the fossil energy inputs), but EOR are less than 1 for biomass grown in engineered photobioreactors. Thus, from both an energetic as well as economic perspective, only open ponds systems can be considered. Significant long-term R&D will be required to make microalgal biofuels processes economically competitive. Specifically, future research should focus on (a) the improvement of biomass productivities (i.e., maximizing solar conversion efficiencies), (b) the selection and isolation of algal strains that can be mass cultured and maintained stably for long periods, (c) the production of algal biomass with a high content of lipids, carbohydrates, and co-products, at high productivity, (d) the low cost harvesting of the biomass, and (e) the extraction and conversion processes to actually derive the biofuels. For Dunaliella specifically, the highest potential is in the co-production of biofuels with high-value animal feeds based on their carotenoid content.

  11. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    in Europe. Current biofuel production in Brazil cannot meetthat expansion of biofuel production will expand defores-attributes to support biofuel production. The challenge is

  12. Women: the key to successful development policies for subsistence agriculture in sub-Saharan Africa 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Kathie Elaine

    1971-01-01

    fulfillment of the requirement for the deSree of IIASTER OF SCIERCE December 1971 Major Subject: Economics NOMEN: THE KEY TO SUCCESSFUL DEVELOPMENT POLICIES FOR SUBSISTENCE AGRICULTURE IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA A Thesis KATHIE ELAINE RYAN Approved... Africa 10 Western. Afric- Southern Africa 12 Need for Fzpanded Stu. dy Overall Economic Efficiency 13 18 II. THE SITUAT ON IN AGRICULTURE 21 Nature of Subsistence Agriculture Traditional Production Practices 21 23 Traditional Roles 26...

  13. THE GREEN ALGA CHLAMYDOMONAS REINHARDTII: A NEW MODEL SYSTEM TO UNRAVEL THE ASSEMBLY PROCESS OF RESPIRATORY COMPLEXES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamel, Patrice

    THE GREEN ALGA CHLAMYDOMONAS REINHARDTII: A NEW MODEL SYSTEM TO UNRAVEL THE ASSEMBLY PROCESS process. I propose to use the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a novel model system to carry out thoughts with a warm cup of tea (I should also extend my gratitude to Birgit Alber, our scientific tea chat

  14. Fact Sheet on Toxic Blue-green Algae Carole A. Lembi Department of Botany and Plant Pathology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fact Sheet on Toxic Blue-green Algae Carole A. Lembi Department of Botany and Plant Pathology Purdue University What are blue-green algae? Blue-greens are very primitive organisms that are not really as "cyanobacteria" to acknowledge that they are bacteria. "Cyan" means "blue", which refers to the fact

  15. Electrolytic Methods as a Cost and Energy Effective Alternative of Harvesting Algae for Biofuel 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrison, Taylor 1986-

    2012-08-30

    METHODS AS A COST AND ENERGY EFFECTIVE ALTERNATIVE OF HARVESTING ALGAE FOR BIOFUEL A Thesis by TAYLOR LEE MORRISON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of Energy through the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts. The Texas A&M campus facilities available were Dr. Ron Lacey?s micro-algae lab, Dr. Nikolov?s bio-separations lab and Dr. Karthi?s water quality lab. The offsite facility...

  16. The structure of agriculture in metropolitan and nonmetropolitan America 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Michelle L

    2003-01-01

    the following questions: (1) What was the structure of U.S. agricultural production systems in 1992 and had this structure changed by 1997? (2) What was the relationship between metropolitan proximity and U.S. agristructure and its changes from 1992 to 1997...

  17. Effects of federal risk management programs on investment, production, and contract design under uncertainty 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Sangtaek

    2006-04-12

    Agricultural producers face uncertain agricultural production and market conditions. Much of the uncertainty faced by agricultural producers cannot be controlled by the producer, but can be managed. Several risk management programs are available...

  18. PhotochemisfvondPhofobiology. 1971 . Vol. 14,pp. 667-682. PergamonPress. Printed in Great Britain FLUORESCENCE INDUCTION IN THE RED ALGA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govindjee

    FLUORESCENCE INDUCTION IN THE RED ALGA PORPHYRIDIUM CRUENTUM P. MOHANTY, G. PAPAGEORGIOU* and GOVINDJEE in the red alga Porphyridium cruentum. Both the fast and the slow fluorescence yield changes are affected algae both in the fast (sec) and in the slow (min) region (see Refs. [l-31). Characteristic points

  19. Antagonist effect between violaxanthin and de-epoxidated pigments in nonphotochemical quenching induction in the qE deficient brown alga

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govindjee

    induction in the qE deficient brown alga Macrocystis pyrifera Héctor Ocampo-Alvarez a , Ernesto GarcíaZ) De-epoxidation rate control Brown alga Macrocystis pyrifera Nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ quenching (qE), is not present in this alga. In contrast to higher plants, NPQ in this organism is much more

  20. In Vivo Characterization of the Electrochemical Proton Gradient Generated in Darkness in Green Algae and Its Kinetic Effects on Cytochrome b6f Turnover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Algae and Its Kinetic Effects on Cytochrome b6f Turnover Giovanni Finazzi*, and Fabrice Rappaport CNRSV) fits well with estimations based on the ATP/ADP ratio measured in green algae under the same conditions dark incubation of algae, the electrochemical transmembrane potential is determined only

  1. The tropical brown alga Lobophora variegata as a bioindicator of mining1 contamination in the New Caledonia lagoon: a field transplantation study2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 The tropical brown alga Lobophora variegata as a bioindicator of mining1 contamination in the New field and laboratory studies have identified the alga Lobophora variegata as a good21 candidate key contaminants, i.e. Ag, As, Cd, Co, Cr,25 Cu, Mn, Ni and Zn. Algae from clean and contaminated

  2. Supplemental Feeding of Clam Seed in Land-based Nurseries Shellfish Algae Diet is a commercially available, super-concentrated mix of four marine micro-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Supplemental Feeding of Clam Seed in Land-based Nurseries Shellfish Algae Diet is a commercially available, super-concentrated mix of four marine micro- algae that provide a nutritional profile for shellfish. Although the algal cells are intact, the algae are not alive. The diet does not contain

  3. Practical Training in Microalgae Utilization with Key Industry Engineering Group Key Industry Engineering Group s.r.o. has developed a biotechnology for the production of an animal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Practical Training in Microalgae Utilization with Key Industry Engineering Group Key Industry on a suspension of Planktochlorella microalgae. The product consists of a suspension of algae in the growing

  4. What is Different About Ag-Biotech? An Investigation of University Agricultural Patenting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foltz, Jeremy D.

    What is Different About Ag-Biotech? An Investigation of University Agricultural Patenting Jeremy D the question: is ag- biotech different from other agricultural research in terms of patent production or patent quality? It does so by estimating count data models of the difference (if any) between ag- biotech patents

  5. Integrating Agricultural and Forestry GHG Mitigation Response into General Economy Frameworks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    for characterizing potential responses to greenhouse gas mitigation policies by the agriculture and forestry can be achieved through AF efforts by employing sink strategies, biofuel production or emissions management relative to carbon, methane (CH4) or nitrous oxide (N2O). Agricultural and forestry participation

  6. A Special Issue of JA&WMA on Agricultural Air Quality: State of the Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aneja, Viney P.

    or disproportionate in- crease in demand for agricultural commodities--both crop and animal. Without scientific- cal concentration of animal-feeding operations and agri- cultural crop production are increasing,2,4 There are no nationwide monitoring networks in the United States to quantify agricultural emissions of green- house gases

  7. Implications of Three Biofuel Crops for Beneficial Arthropods in Agricultural Landscapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landis, Doug

    Implications of Three Biofuel Crops for Beneficial Arthropods in Agricultural Landscapes Mary A Science+Business Media, LLC. 2010 Abstract Production of biofuel feedstocks in agricultural landscapes and generalist natural enemies in three model biofuel crops: corn, switch- grass, and mixed prairie, we tested

  8. Agricultural and Biological Engineering College of Agricultural Sciences Cooperative Extension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    solar energy or "green sunshine" derived from the solar- powered photosynthesis process during the growth and development phases of plant materials. Utilizing Biomass Energy The four methods in which, and Pennsylvania Counties Cooperating Biomass Energy Dennis E. Buffington, Professor, Agricultural and Biological

  9. Algae: The Source of Reliable, Scalable, and Sustainable Liquid Transportation Fuels

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the February 12, 2009 joint Web conference of DOE's Biomass and Clean Cities programs, Brian Goodall (Sapphire Energy) spoke on Continental Airlines’ January 7th Biofuels Test. The flight was fueled, in part, by Sapphire’s algae-based jet fuel.

  10. Change in biomass of benthic and planktonic algae along a disturbance gradient for 24 Great

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMaster University

    Change in biomass of benthic and planktonic algae along a disturbance gradient for 24 Great Lakes. The PC1 site score was significantly related to both periphyton and phytoplankton biomass, respectively accounted for 18% of the variation in epiphyton biomass. Periphytic and epiphytic biomass were negatively

  11. Hydrogen isotope fractionation in freshwater algae: I. Variations among lipids and species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sachs, Julian P.

    Hydrogen isotope fractionation in freshwater algae: I. Variations among lipids and species Zhaohui in media containing different concentrations of deuterium. The hydrogen isotopic ratios of lipids that lipid dD values can be used to determine water dD values, hydrogen isotope fractionation was found

  12. Hydrogen isotope fractionation in freshwater and marine algae: II. Temperature and nitrogen limited growth rate effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sachs, Julian P.

    Hydrogen isotope fractionation in freshwater and marine algae: II. Temperature and nitrogen limited Accepted 7 November 2008 Available online 17 November 2008 a b s t r a c t Zhang and Sachs [Hydrogen. Introduction Hydrogen isotope ratios in plant and algal lipids from sediments are increasingly used

  13. Algae Biofuels Collaborative Project: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-371

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    French, R. J.

    2012-04-01

    The goal of this project is to advance biofuels research on algal feedstocks and NREL's role in the project is to explore novel liquid extraction methods, gasification and pyrolysis as means to produce fuels from algae. To that end several different extraction methods were evaluated and numerous gasification and pyrolysis conditions were explored. It was found that mild hydrothermal treatment is a promising means to improve the extraction and conversion of lipids from algae over those produced by standard extraction methods. The algae were essentially found to gasify completely at a fairly low temperature of 750 degrees C in the presence of oxygen. Pyrolysis from 300-550 degrees C showed sequential release of phytene hydrocarbons, glycerides, and aromatics as temperature was increased. It appears that this has potential to release the glycerides from the non-fatty acid groups present in the polar lipids to produce a cleaner lipid. Further research is needed to quantify the pyrolysis and gasification yields, analyze the liquids produced and to test strategies for removing organic-nitrogen byproducts produced because of the high protein content of the feed. Possible strategies include use of high-lipid/low-protein algae or the use of catalytic pyrolysis.

  14. Development of a Nuclear Transformation System for Oleaginous Green Alga Lobosphaera (Parietochloris)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , progress in transformation and metabolic engineering of this high value alga could be exploited a platform for the successful genetic engineering of L. incisa and its long-chain PUFA metabolism. Citation of a Mutant Strain, Deficient in Arachidonic Acid Biosynthesis. PLoS ONE 9(8): e105223. doi:10. 1371/journal

  15. Harmful algae and their potential impacts on desalination operations off southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caron, David

    Harmful algae and their potential impacts on desalination operations off southern California David Available online 30 June 2009 Keywords: Harmful algal blooms Desalination Red tides Phytoplankton Phytotoxins a b s t r a c t Seawater desalination by reverse osmosis (RO) is a reliable method for augmenting

  16. A Model for Signal Transduction during Gamete Release in the Fucoid Alga Pelvetia compressa1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borges, Rita

    ., 1996]). Natural populations of fucoid algae release gametes into SW in the light during periods of low addition of excess inorganic carbon to SW under calm conditions blocked gamete release; conversely, gamete release occurred in in- organic carbon-free SW independently of the hydrody- namic conditions (Pearson et

  17. An original adaptation of photosynthesis in the marine green alga Ostreococcus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An original adaptation of photosynthesis in the marine green alga Ostreococcus Pierre Cardol, 2008 (received for review December 15, 2007) Adaptation of photosynthesis in marine environment has and nonphotochemical quenching when RCC809 cells are exposed to excess excitation energy. We propose that the diver

  18. Hydrogen production from water: Recent advances in photosynthesis research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenbaum, E.; Lee, J.W.

    1997-12-31

    The great potential of hydrogen production by microalgal water splitting is predicated on quantitative measurement of the algae`s hydrogen-producing capability, which is based on the following: (1) the photosynthetic unit size of hydrogen production; (2) the turnover time of photosynthetic hydrogen production; (3) thermodynamic efficiencies of conversion of light energy into the Gibbs free energy of molecular hydrogen; (4) photosynthetic hydrogen production from sea water using marine algae; (5) the potential for research advances using modern methods of molecular biology and genetic engineering to maximize hydrogen production. ORNL has shown that sustained simultaneous photoevolution of molecular hydrogen and oxygen can be performed with mutants of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that lack a detectable level of the Photosystem I light reaction. This result is surprising in view of the standard two-light reaction model of photosynthesis and has interesting scientific and technological implications. This ORNL discovery also has potentially important implications for maximum thermodynamic conversion efficiency of light energy into chemical energy by green plant photosynthesis. Hydrogen production performed by a single light reaction, as opposed to two, implies a doubling of the theoretically maximum thermodynamic conversion efficiency from {approx}10% to {approx}20%.

  19. The impact of mineral fertilizers on the carbon footprint of crop production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brentrup, Frank

    2009-01-01

    emissions in fertiliser production. IFS (The InternationalImpact of Agricultural Crop Production using the Life CycleN fertilizer rates in cereal production. Europ. J. Agronomy

  20. Demonstration of the feasibility of milking lipids from algae for biodiesel production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coiner, Ryan Lee

    2011-12-31

    . The propidium iodide (PI) staining procedure involved dosing 2 mL of algal suspension with 4 µL of PI (PI final concentration: 2 13 µg/mL). After 10 min of exposure, the suspensions were centrifuged at 4000 rpm (3,220 g) for 10 min, decanted, washed... with WC media and then centrifuged and decanted again. All samples were frozen at -20°C until counting was performed; cells were resuspended in media at the time of counting. PI was excited at 540–550 nm and the emission was measured at 590 nm...

  1. Micro-algae come of age as a platform for recombinant protein production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Specht, Elizabeth; Miyake-Stoner, Shigeki; Mayfield, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Extraction of bio-oils from microalgae. Sep Purif Rev 38:vol 616: transgenic microalgae as green cell factories.of foreign genes in microalgae. Transgenic Microalgae as

  2. Algae-Based Biofuels: Applications and Co-Products | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavyAgencyTendoMassachusetts:RenewableIncAlcorn

  3. Lipid Extraction from Wet-Algae for Biofuel Production - Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and-E C H2015TrayDevices -Portal Biomass

  4. FISHING PERMIT Eastern Shore Agricultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISHING PERMIT Eastern Shore Agricultural Research and Extension Center If all fields are not filled out, you do NOT have permission to fish! Name: ____________________________________________ Fishing Permit is valid for ONE YEAR. In return for this privilege, I agree to: 1. ABSOLVE the Eastern

  5. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    examination. Global production of olive oil increased fromon country of production of the oil (for example, if it is1. World Production and Exports of Olive Oil (1,000 tons),

  6. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hyunok; Sumner, Daniel A.; Martin, Philip; Hochman, Gal; Rajagopal, Deepak; Zilberman, David

    2011-01-01

    oil reserve and produce 42% of the crude-oil production. Thefuel prices and crude-oil production but increase overallpower to control production and pricing of oil with varying

  7. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hyunok; Sumner, Daniel A.; Martin, Philip; Hochman, Gal; Rajagopal, Deepak; Zilberman, David

    2011-01-01

    produce 42% of the crude-oil production. The organizationfuel prices and crude-oil production but increase overallcrude oil during the same period. Although prices more than qua- drupled, OPEC production

  8. Experimental Substantiation of the Possibility of Developing Selenium- and Iodine-Containing Pharmaceuticals Based on Blue-Green Algae Spirulina Platensis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mosulishvili, L M; Belokobylsky, A I; Khisanishvili, L A; Frontasyeva, M V; Pavlov, C C; Gundorina, S F

    2001-01-01

    The great potential of using blue-green algae Spirulina platensis as a matrix for the production of selenium- and iodine-containing pharmaceuticals is shown experimentally. The background levels of 31 major, minor and trace elements (Na, Mg, Al, Cl, K, Ca, Sc, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni (using -reaction), As, Br, Zn, Rb, Mo, Ag, Sb, I, Ba, Sm, Tb, Tm, Hf, Ta, W, Au, Hg, Th) in Spirulina platensis biomass were determined by means of epithermal neutron activation analysis. The dependence of selenium and iodine accumulation in spirulina biomass on a nutrient medium loding of the above elements was characterised. To demonstrate the possibilities of determining toxic element intake by spirulina biomass, mercury was selected. The technological parameters for production of iodinated treatment-and-prophylactic pills are developed.

  9. Essays on the Effect of Climate Change over Agriculture and Forestry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villavicencio Cordova, Xavier A.

    2010-07-14

    In this dissertation, I study the effects of climate change on agricultural total factor productivity and crop yields and their variability. In addition, an examination was conducted on the value of select climate change ...

  10. !ncredible Kerala? A Political Ecological Analysis of Organic Agriculture in the "Model for Development"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thottathil, Sapna

    2012-01-01

    3.1. Introduction 3.2. Rice 3.3. Coconut 3.4. Arecanut 3.5.Plantains Cashewnut Tapioca Coconut Coffee Tea Rubber 2009-agricultural products – such as coconut oil and pepper – in

  11. Report to the New Jersey State Board of Agriculture September 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Robert M.

    over bare ground and black plastic production. It was found shredded leaf mulch application yields agriculture for a changing climate." Shredded leaf mulch application is a worthwhile cultural practice

  12. Strain selection, biomass to biofuel conversion, and resource colocation have strong impacts on the economic performance of algae cultivation sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venteris, Erik R.; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Coleman, Andre M.; Skaggs, Richard

    2014-09-16

    Decisions involving strain selection, biomass to biofuel technology, and the location of cultivation facilities can strongly influence the economic viability of an algae-based biofuel enterprise. In this contribution we summarize our past results in a new analysis to explore the relative economic impact of these design choices. We present strain-specific growth model results from two saline strains (Nannocloropsis salina, Arthrospira sp.), a fresh to brackish strain (Chlorella sp., DOE strain 1412), and a freshwater strain of the order Sphaeropleales. Biomass to biofuel conversion is compared between lipid extraction (LE) and hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) technologies. National-scale models of water, CO2 (as flue gas), land acquisition, site leveling, construction of connecting roads, and transport of HTL oil to existing refineries are used in conjunction with estimates of fuel value (from HTL) to prioritize and select from 88,692 unit farms (UF, 405 ha in pond area), a number sufficient to produce 136E+9 L yr-1 of renewable diesel (36 billion gallons yr-1, BGY). Strain selection and choice of conversion technology have large economic impacts, with differences between combinations of strains and biomass to biofuel technologies being up to $10 million dollars yr-1 UF-1. Results based on the most productive species, HTL-based fuel conversion, and resource costs show that the economic potential between geographic locations within the selection can differ by up to $4 million yr-1 UF-1, with 2.0 BGY of production possible from the most cost-effective sites. The local spatial variability in site rank is extreme, with very high and low rank sites within 10s of km of each other. Colocation with flue gas sources has a strong influence on site rank, but the most costly resource component varies from site to site. The highest rank sites are located predominantly in Florida and Texas, but most states south of 37°N latitude contain promising locations. Keywords: algae, biofuels, resource assessment, geographic information systems, techno-economics

  13. Cost Methodology for Biomass Feedstocks: Herbaceous Crops and Agricultural Residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turhollow Jr, Anthony F; Webb, Erin; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine

    2009-12-01

    This report describes a set of procedures and assumptions used to estimate production and logistics costs of bioenergy feedstocks from herbaceous crops and agricultural residues. The engineering-economic analysis discussed here is based on methodologies developed by the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE) and the American Agricultural Economics Association (AAEA). An engineering-economic analysis approach was chosen due to lack of historical cost data for bioenergy feedstocks. Instead, costs are calculated using assumptions for equipment performance, input prices, and yield data derived from equipment manufacturers, research literature, and/or standards. Cost estimates account for fixed and variable costs. Several examples of this costing methodology used to estimate feedstock logistics costs are included at the end of this report.

  14. Climate policy implications for agricultural water demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2013-03-28

    Energy, water and land are scarce resources, critical to humans. Developments in each affect the availability and cost of the others, and consequently human prosperity. Measures to limit greenhouse gas concentrations will inevitably exact dramatic changes on energy and land systems and in turn alter the character, magnitude and geographic distribution of human claims on water resources. We employ the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), an integrated assessment model to explore the interactions of energy, land and water systems in the context of alternative policies to limit climate change to three alternative levels: 2.5 Wm-2 (445 ppm CO2-e), 3.5 Wm-2 (535 ppm CO2-e) and 4.5 Wm-2 (645 ppm CO2-e). We explore the effects of two alternative land-use emissions mitigation policy options—one which taxes terrestrial carbon emissions equally with fossil fuel and industrial emissions, and an alternative which only taxes fossil fuel and industrial emissions but places no penalty on land-use change emissions. We find that increasing populations and economic growth could be anticipated to almost triple demand for water for agricultural systems across the century even in the absence of climate policy. In general policies to mitigate climate change increase agricultural demands for water still further, though the largest changes occur in the second half of the century, under both policy regimes. The two policies examined profoundly affected both the sources and magnitudes of the increase in irrigation water demands. The largest increases in agricultural irrigation water demand occurred in scenarios where only fossil fuel emissions were priced (but not land-use change emission) and were primarily driven by rapid expansion in bioenergy production. In these scenarios water demands were large relative to present-day total available water, calling into question whether it would be physically possible to produce the associated biomass energy. We explored the potential of improved water delivery and irrigation system efficiencies. These could potentially reduce demands substantially. However, overall demands remained high under our fossil-fuel-only tax policy. In contrast, when all carbon was priced, increases in agricultural water demands were smaller than under the fossil-fuel-only policy and were driven primarily by increased demands for water by non-biomass crops such as rice. Finally we estimate the geospatial pattern of water demands and find that regions such as China, India and other countries in south and east Asia might be expected to experience greatest increases in water demands.?

  15. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology 182183 (2013) 112 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    2013-01-01

    , even when renewable energy production was included as a fossil fuel carbon offset. The most productive. To account for C removed in harvestable biomass we calculated adjusted Net Ecosystem Production (NEPadj; g C recommendations for future establishment of biofuels feedstock and row agriculture systems with different

  16. Recent Agricultural Ergonomics Research at UC Davis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    Davis, Berkeley and San Francisco · Focus on labor-intensive agriculture Agricultural Ergonomics effects of prolonged exposure to musculoskeletal disorders risk factors- Manual weeding Focus on basic exposure to musculoskeletal disorders risk factors- Manual weeding Recent Research Projects Fatigue

  17. Randolph EMC- Agricultural Efficient Lighting Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Agricultural members of Randolph EMC (REMC) who upgrade to energy-efficient CFL bulbs in agricultural facilities are eligible for an incentive to help cover the initial cost of installation. The...

  18. Global trends in agriculture and food systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    development * Corresponding author: Danish Research Centre for Organic Food and Farming (DARCOF), P.O. Box 501 Global trends in agriculture and food systems Marie Trydeman Knudsen*, Niels Halberg, Jřrgen E .................................................................................16 Global trends in organic agriculture

  19. Child Labor in Texas Agriculture 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, David

    2005-04-28

    percent of all work fatalities. Farm hazards include machinery, confined spaces, animals and live- stock, chemicals, respiratory irritants, toxic gases and extreme environmental conditions. Children working in agriculture may be hired employees, labor... contractor employees or farm family members. Child labor laws exist to ensure that a child is not employed in an occupation or manner that can harm him or her. However, these laws do not cover workers under age 16 who work on their parent?s or guardian?s...

  20. Agriculture intensifies soil moisture decline in Northern China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Yaling; Pan, Zhihua; Zhuang, Qianlai; Miralles, Diego; Teuling, Adriann; Zhang, Tonglin; An, Pingli; Dong, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Jingting; He, Di; Wang, Liwei; Pan, Xuebiao; Bai, Wei; Niyogi, Dev

    2015-07-09

    Northern China is one of the most densely populated regions in the world. Agricultural activities have intensified since the 1980s to provide food security to the country. However, this intensification has likely contributed to an increasing scarcity in water resources, which may in turn be endangering food security. Based on in-situ measurements of soil moisture collected in agricultural plots during 1983–2012, we find that topsoil (0–50 cm) volumetric water content during the growing season has declined significantly (p<0.01), with a trend of -0.011 to -0.015 m3 m-3 per decade. Observed discharge declines for the three large river basins are consistent with the effects of agricultural intensification, although other factors (e.g. dam constructions) likely have contributed to these trends. Practices like fertilizer application have favoured biomass growth and increased transpiration rates, thus reducing available soil water. In addition, the rapid proliferation of water-expensive crops (e.g., maize) and the expansion of the area dedicated to food production have also contributed to soil drying. Adoption of alternative agricultural practices that can meet the immediate food demand without compromising future water resources seem critical for the sustainability of the food production system.

  1. Agriculture intensifies soil moisture decline in Northern China

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Yaling; Pan, Zhihua; Zhuang, Qianlai; Miralles, Diego; Teuling, Adriann; Zhang, Tonglin; An, Pingli; Dong, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Jingting; He, Di; et al

    2015-07-09

    Northern China is one of the most densely populated regions in the world. Agricultural activities have intensified since the 1980s to provide food security to the country. However, this intensification has likely contributed to an increasing scarcity in water resources, which may in turn be endangering food security. Based on in-situ measurements of soil moisture collected in agricultural plots during 1983–2012, we find that topsoil (0–50 cm) volumetric water content during the growing season has declined significantly (pmore »with the effects of agricultural intensification, although other factors (e.g. dam constructions) likely have contributed to these trends. Practices like fertilizer application have favoured biomass growth and increased transpiration rates, thus reducing available soil water. In addition, the rapid proliferation of water-expensive crops (e.g., maize) and the expansion of the area dedicated to food production have also contributed to soil drying. Adoption of alternative agricultural practices that can meet the immediate food demand without compromising future water resources seem critical for the sustainability of the food production system.« less

  2. OTEC- Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Oregon Trail Electric Consumers Cooperative (OTEC) offers programs to agricultural customers.  Interested customers should contact a local OTEC office.

  3. Emissions Of Greenhouse Gases From Rice Agriculture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Aslam K. Khalil

    2009-07-16

    This project produced detailed data on the processes that affect methane and nitrous oxide emissions from rice agriculture and their inter-relationships. It defines the shifting roles and potential future of these gases in causing global warming and the benefits and tradeoffs of reducing emissions. The major results include: 1). Mechanisms and Processes Leading to Methane Emissions are Delineated. Our experiments have tested the standard model of methane emissions from rice fields and found new results on the processes that control the flux. A mathematical mass balance model was used to unravel the production, oxidation and transport of methane from rice. The results suggested that when large amounts of organic matter are applied, the additional flux that is observed is due to both greater production and reduced oxidation of methane. 2). Methane Emissions From China Have Been Decreasing Over the Last Two Decades. We have calculated that methane emissions from rice fields have been falling in recent decades. This decrease is particularly large in China. While some of this is due to reduced area of rice agriculture, the bigger effect is from the reduction in the emission factor which is the annual amount of methane emitted per hectare of rice. The two most important changes that cause this decreasing emission from China are the reduced use of organic amendments which have been replaced by commercial nitrogen fertilizers, and the increased practice of intermittent flooding as greater demands are placed on water resources. 3). Global Methane Emissions Have Been Constant For More Than 20 Years. While the concentrations of methane in the atmosphere have been leveling off in recent years, our studies show that this is caused by a near constant total global source of methane for the last 20 years or more. This is probably because as some anthropogenic sources have increased, others, such as the rice agriculture source, have fallen. Changes in natural emissions appear small. 4). Nitrous Oxide Emissions From Rice Fields Increase as Methane Emissions Drop. Inundated conditions favor anaerobic methane production with high emission rates and de-nitrification resulting in modest nitrous oxide emissions. Under drier conditions such as intermittent flooding, methane emissions fall and nitrous oxide emissions increase. Increased nitrogen fertilizer use increases nitrous oxide emissions and is usually accompanied by reduced organic matter applications which decreases methane emissions. These mechanisms cause a generally inverse relationship between methane and nitrous oxide emissions. Reduction of methane from rice agriculture to control global warming comes with tradeoffs with increased nitrous oxide emissions. 5). High Spatial Resolution Maps of Emissions Produced. Maps of methane and nitrous oxide emissions at a resolution of 5 min × 5 min have been produced based on the composite results of this research. These maps are necessary for both scientific and policy uses.

  4. Dietary supplementation of marine algae and the modification of thrombocyte aggregation parameters in avian pulmonary hypertension syndrome 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carpenter, Amy Renee

    1999-01-01

    Studies were conducted to investigate the effects of dietary supplementation with marine algae (MA) as a source of omega-3 fatty acids on thrombocyte aggregation and the incidence of pulmonary hypertension syndrome (PHS) in the broiler chicken...

  5. UF in Brazil Urban, Medical, & Agricultural Entomology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    UF in Brazil Urban, Medical, & Agricultural Entomology Summer B: August 9 - 21, 2015 Explore aspects in Brazil and the United States. Course Information College of Agricultural and Life Sciences: Urban, Medical and Agricultural Entomology in Brazil Total Number of Credits Offered: 3 About

  6. Agricultural & Environmental Sciences eap.ucop.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernes, Peter J.

    Agricultural & Environmental Sciences eap.ucop.edu #12;UC Education Abroad Program Special Focus Pilot Program in Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Wageningen University and Research Centre This special-focus pilot program is available only to UC Davis College of Agricultural and Environmental

  7. MANAGEMENT OF AGRICULTURAL WASTES LOWER FRASER VALLEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;MANAGEMENT OF AGRICULTURAL WASTES IN THE LOWER FRASER VALLEY SUMMARY REPORT - A WORKING DOCUMENT Presented on Behalf of: The Management of Agricultural Wastes in the Lower Fraser Valley Program of the Agricultural Nutrient Management in the Lower Fraser Valley program. The ideas and opinions expressed herein do

  8. Optimal biodiesel production using bioethanol: Towards process integration.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Optimal biodiesel production using bioethanol: Towards process integration. Kristen Severson using bioethanol from algae following four different transesterification paths: alkali, enzymatic@cmu.edu (I.E. Grossmann) #12;1.-Introduction. Biodiesel and bioethanol are the most important liquid biofuels

  9. L\\'evy Fluctuations and Tracer Diffusion in Dilute Suspensions of Algae and Bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaid, Irwin M; Yeomans, Julia M

    2010-01-01

    Swimming microorganisms rely on effective mixing strategies to achieve efficient nutrient influx. Recent experiments, probing the mixing capability of unicellular biflagellates, revealed that passive tracer particles exhibit anomalous non-Gaussian diffusion when immersed in a dilute suspension of self-motile Chlamydomonas reinhardtii algae. Qualitatively, this observation can be explained by the fact that the algae induce a fluid flow that may occasionally accelerate the colloidal tracers to relatively large velocities. A satisfactory quantitative theory of enhanced mixing in dilute active suspensions, however, is lacking at present. In particular, it is unclear how non-Gaussian signatures in the tracers' position distribution are linked to the self-propulsion mechanism of a microorganism. Here, we develop a systematic theoretical description of anomalous tracer diffusion in active suspensions, based on a simplified tracer-swimmer interaction model that captures the typical distance scaling of a microswimmer'...

  10. FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing Countries AgencyCompany Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture...

  11. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    highly processed products such as canola oil, produced withanimal products, soya sauce and veg- etable oils (Japanproducts are labeled “Natural” or “All-Natural” and they contain corn, corn meal, canola oil

  12. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Colin A.; Novan, Kevin; Rausser, Gordon; Iho, Antti; Parker, Doug; Zilberman, David

    2013-01-01

    V. 16 no. 3 • Jan/Feb 2013 Shale Gas Boom: Implications forRegulation and Transboundary Water Quality Shale Gas Growthin Shale Gas Production In 2000, shale gas production

  13. Extensive horizontal gene transfer, duplication, and loss of chlorophyll synthesis genes in the algae

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hunsperger, Heather M.; Randhawa, Tejinder; Cattolico, Rose Ann

    2015-02-10

    Two non-homologous, isofunctional enzymes catalyze the penultimate step of chlorophyll a synthesis in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms such as cyanobacteria, eukaryotic algae and land plants: the light independent (LIPOR) and light-dependent (POR) protochlorophyllide oxidoreductases. Whereas the distribution of these enzymes in cyanobacteria and land plants is well understood, the presence, loss, duplication, and replacement of these genes have not been surveyed in the polyphyletic and remarkably diverse eukaryotic algal lineages.

  14. Extensive horizontal gene transfer, duplication, and loss of chlorophyll synthesis genes in the algae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunsperger, Heather M. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Randhawa, Tejinder [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Cattolico, Rose Ann [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Two non-homologous, isofunctional enzymes catalyze the penultimate step of chlorophyll a synthesis in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms such as cyanobacteria, eukaryotic algae and land plants: the light independent (LIPOR) and light-dependent (POR) protochlorophyllide oxidoreductases. Whereas the distribution of these enzymes in cyanobacteria and land plants is well understood, the presence, loss, duplication, and replacement of these genes have not been surveyed in the polyphyletic and remarkably diverse eukaryotic algal lineages.

  15. Photocatalytic Inhibition of Algae Growth Using TiO2, WO3, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ouellette, Anthony J. A.

    Photocatalytic Inhibition of Algae Growth Using TiO2, WO3, and Cocatalyst Modifications C L O V I Road, Cocoa, Florida 32922-5703 TiO2 and WO3, with and without noble metal cocatalysts, were employed structures. Introduction Wide band gap metal oxides such as TiO2 and WO3 (Eg ) 3.1 and 2.7 eV, respectively

  16. Cultivation of macroscopic marine algae and fresh water aquatic weeds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryther, J.H.

    1982-02-01

    The ORCA clone of the red seaweed Gracilaria tikvahiae has been in culture continuously for over two years. Yield for the past year has averaged 12 g ash-free dry wt/m/sup 2/ .day (17.5 t/a.y) in suspended 2600-1 aluminum tank cultures with four exchanges of enriched seawater per day and continuous aeration. Yields from nonintensive pond-bottom culture, similar to commercial Gracilaria culture methods in Taiwan, averaged 3 g afdw/m/sup 2/.day in preliminary experiments. Rope and spray cultures were not successful. Yields of water hyacinths from March 1978 to March 1979 averaged 25 g afdw/m/sup 2/.day (37 t/a.y). Season, nutrient availability (form and quantity) and stand density were found to affect the relative proportions of structural and nonstructural tissue in water hyacinths and thereby significantly affect digestibility of and methane production by the plants. Pennywort (Hydrocotyle) grew poorly in winter and its annual yield averaged only one-third that of water hyacinth. Water lettuce (Pistia) appears more comparable to hyacinths in preliminary studies and its yields will be monitored throughout a complete year. Stable, continuous anaerobic digestion of both water hyacinths and Gracilaria has been maintained with an average gas production from both species of 0.4 1/g volatile solids at 60% methane.

  17. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    oil in Malaysia, and from rapeseed in Europe. Current biofuel production in Brazil cannot meet domestic demand

  18. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    energy production technologies, such as petroleum-like hydroprocess- ing and direct solar-to-fuel processes, and their potential

  19. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    oil prices affect the price of local and non-local milk products.oil prices lead to larger price increases for non-local goods than they do for local milk products.products. The monetary costs of transporting food reached new heights in 2008 when oil

  20. Biotechnology research in Nigeria: A socio-economic analysis of the organication of agricultural research system's response to biotechnology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duru, G.C.

    1988-01-01

    Many agricultural development experts and social scientists argue that a lack of appropriate technology was a limiting factor in the efforts by developing countries to expand their agricultural productivity. Biotechnology is now advanced as a technology that could meet these needs. Agricultural and social scientists maintain that the new biotechnology, if realistically applied, could assist a developing nation such as Nigeria to solve its agricultural problems. But one concern is the private character of biotechnology which limits its transferability to the LDCs. This situation will impose unusual constraints on national agricultural development programs and increase dependence if national research capability is weak. The basic finding of this field research was that the Nigerian national agricultural research system was weak, which meant that the potentials and promises of biotechnology will elude the country's desire to improve its agriculture in the immediate future. The primary weakness rested in inadequate funding and infrastructural deficiencies.

  1. Agriculture-related radiation dose calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furr, J.M.; Mayberry, J.J.; Waite, D.A.

    1987-10-01

    Estimates of radiation dose to the public must be made at each stage in the identification and qualification process leading to siting a high-level nuclear waste repository. Specifically considering the ingestion pathway, this paper examines questions of reliability and adequacy of dose calculations in relation to five stages of data availability (geologic province, region, area, location, and mass balance) and three methods of calculation (population, population/food production, and food production driven). Calculations were done using the model PABLM with data for the Permian and Palo Duro Basins and the Deaf Smith County area. Extra effort expended in gathering agricultural data at succeeding environmental characterization levels does not appear justified, since dose estimates do not differ greatly; that effort would be better spent determining usage of food types that contribute most to the total dose; and that consumption rate and the air dispersion factor are critical to assessment of radiation dose via the ingestion pathway. 17 refs., 9 figs., 32 tabs.

  2. The impact of mineral fertilizers on the carbon footprint of crop production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brentrup, Frank

    2009-01-01

    of food, feed and bio-energy. Intensive crop production withfor food, feed and bio-energy. The agricultural contribution

  3. Missouri Agricultural Energy Saving Team-A Revolutionary Opportunity (MAESTRO)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntosh, Jane; Schumacher, Leon

    2014-10-23

    The Missouri Agricultural Energy Saving Team-A Revolutionary Opportunity (MAESTRO) program brought together a team of representatives from government, academia, and private industry to enhance the availability of energy efficiency services for small livestock producers in the State of Missouri. The Missouri Department of Agriculture (MDA) managed the project via a subcontract with the University of Missouri (MU), College of Agriculture Food and Natural Resources, MU Extension, the MU College of Human Environmental Sciences, the MU College of Engineering, and the Missouri Agricultural and Small Business Development Authority (MASBDA). MU teamed with EnSave, Inc, a nationally-recognized expert in agricultural energy efficiency to assist with marketing, outreach, provision of farm energy audits and customer service. MU also teamed with independent home contractors to facilitate energy audits of the farm buildings and homes of these livestock producers. The goals of the project were to: (1) improve the environment by reducing fossil fuel emissions and reducing the total energy used on small animal farms; (2) stimulate the economy of local and regional communities by creating or retaining jobs; and (3) improve the profitability of Missouri livestock producers by reducing their energy expenditures. Historically, Missouri scientists/engineers conducted programs on energy use in agriculture, such as in equipment, grain handling and tillage practices. The MAESTRO program was the first to focus strictly on energy efficiency associated with livestock production systems in Missouri and to investigate the applicability and potential of addressing energy efficiency in animal production from a building efficiency perspective. A. Project Objectives The goal of the MAESTRO program was to strengthen the financial viability and environmental soundness of Missouri's small animal farms by helping them implement energy efficient technologies for the production facility, farm buildings, and the homes on these farms. The expected measurable outcomes of the project were to improve the environment and stimulate the economy by: • Reducing annual fossil fuel emissions by 1,942 metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent, reducing the total annual energy use on at least 323 small animal farms and 100 farm homes by at least 8,000 kWh and 2,343 therms per farm. • Stimulating the economy by creating or retaining at least 69 jobs, and saving small animal farmers an average of $2,071 per farm in annual energy expenditures. B. Project Scope The MAESTRO team chose the target population of small farms because while all agriculture is traditionally underserved in energy efficiency programs, small farms were particularly underserved because they lack the financial resources and access to energy efficiency technologies that larger farms deploy. The MAESTRO team reasoned that energy conservation, financial and educational programs developed while serving the agricultural community could serve as a national model for other states and their agricultural sectors. The target population was approximately 2,365 small animal farm operations in Missouri, specifically those farms that were not by definition a confined animal feeding operation (CAFO). The program was designed to create jobs by training Missouri contractors and Missouri University Extension staff how to conduct farm audits. The local economy would be stimulated by an increase in construction activity and an increasing demand for energy efficient farm equipment. Additionally, the energy savings were deemed critical in keeping Missouri farms in business. This project leveraged funds using a combination of funds from the Missouri Department of Natural Resources’ Missouri Energy Center and its Soil and Water Conservation Program, from the state's Linked Deposits, MASBDA's agricultural loan guarantee programs, and through the in-kind contribution of faculty and staff time to the project from these agencies and MU. Several hundred Missouri livestock producers were contacted during the MAESTRO project. Of the

  4. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Aaron; Zilberman, David; Saitone, Tina; Sexton, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    fact, voluntary labeling of GMO-free products can meet thespecific traits. Obviously, GMO technologies are still inR&D Associated with European GMO Restrictions of 1999

  5. A Comparative SWOT Analysis of the National Agricultural Extension Program Organization to Determine Best-Fit Program Model: A Case Study of the North West and South West Regions of Cameroon. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nyambi, Gwendoline

    2012-07-16

    Agriculture is crucial to the economic and social wellbeing of the Republic of Cameroon. A national need for increased productivity, farm incomes, food security and rural development requires more effective agricultural ...

  6. ORGANIC GEOCHEMICAL STUDIES. II. THE DISTRIBUTION OF ALIPHATIC HYDROCARBONS IN ALGAE, BACTERIA, AND IN A RECENT LAKE SEDIMENT: A PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Jerry; McCarthy, E.D.; Van Hoeven Jr., William; Calvin, Melvin; Bradley, W. H.

    2008-01-01

    significantly to the hydrocarbons of higher molecular weightDISTRIBUTION OF ALIPHATIC HYDROCARBONS IN ALGAE, BACTERIA,T E DISTRIBUTION O ALIPHATIC HYDROCARBONS H F A PRELIMINARY

  7. ARGENTINA AGRICULTURE: THE DEVELOPING CRISIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horrell, Carl Michael

    2014-12-31

    not understand how to put in place the most efficient and productive political-economic systems to promote the most efficient production of food, fiber, and fuel. Nature has blessed few countries in the world as it has Argentina with fertile land and climate...

  8. International Conference on Machine Control & Guidance 2008 1 Integrated Controls for Agricultural Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and energy production is rising with a growing world population. Today, GNSS sensors are widely used-konzept GmbH, Germany Abstract Naturally, most agricultural operations are undertaken in the space domain and change the environment for plant and animal production. Hence, appropriate information on current

  9. Global Climate Change and Agriculture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izaurralde, Roberto C.

    2009-01-01

    The Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released in 2007 significantly increased our confidence about the role that humans play in forcing climate change. There is now a high degree of confidence that the (a) current atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) far exceed those of the pre-industrial era, (b) global increases in CO2 arise mainly from fossil fuel use and land use change while those of CH4 and N2O originate primarily from agricultural activities, and (c) the net effect of human activities since 1750 has led to a warming of the lower layers of the atmosphere, with an increased radiative forcing of 1.6 W m-2. Depending on the scenario of human population growth and global development, mean global temperatures could rise between 1.8 and 4.0 °C by the end of the 21st century.

  10. ORISE: Multiple research appointments available through Agricultural...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Multiple research appointments available through Agricultural Research Service Postdoctoral Research Program Selected candidates participate in USDA research for one to four years...

  11. Estimating Mitigation Potential of Agricultural Projects: an...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tool (EX-ACT) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Brazil-Estimating Mitigation Potential of Agricultural Projects: an Application of the...

  12. WINDExchange: Agricultural and Rural Resources and Tools

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    Rural Communities Printable Version Bookmark and Share Wind for Homeowners, Farmers, & Businesses Resources & Tools Agricultural and Rural Resources and Tools This page lists...

  13. INTEGRATED COCKROACH (DICTYOPTERA, BLATTELLIDAE) MANAGEMENT IN CONFINED SWINE PRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    183 INTEGRATED COCKROACH (DICTYOPTERA, BLATTELLIDAE) MANAGEMENT IN CONFINED SWINE PRODUCTION-7613, U.S.A. Abstract - Swine production is an important component of North Carolina's agricultural economy. Cockroaches have long been recognized as important pests in swine production and severe

  14. Perceptions Of Texas Agricultural Education Teachers Regarding Diversity Inclusion In Secondary Agricultural Education Programs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lavergne, Douglas D.

    2010-01-14

    of this study was to explore and analyze Texas secondary agricultural education teachers' attitudes toward diversity inclusion in Texas secondary agricultural education programs. Using a web-based questionnaire, the researcher employed a nonproportional...

  15. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hyunok; Sumner, Daniel A.; Martin, Philip; Hochman, Gal; Rajagopal, Deepak; Zilberman, David

    2011-01-01

    countries increased while crude-oil prices grew by more thanproduce 42% of the crude-oil production. The organizationin global demand for crude oil from 2000 to 2008, associated

  16. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Colin A.; Novan, Kevin; Rausser, Gordon; Iho, Antti; Parker, Doug; Zilberman, David

    2013-01-01

    Border Price) Japan Japan (LNG Import Price) Europe U.S.into liquefied natural gas (LNG) before it can be exportedSecond, with expan­ sions in LNG production capacity, the

  17. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hyunok; Sumner, Daniel A.; Martin, Philip; Hochman, Gal; Rajagopal, Deepak; Zilberman, David

    2011-01-01

    countries increased while crude-oil prices grew by more thana rapid increase in the price of crude oil during the samewill reduce fuel prices and crude-oil production but

  18. Surface complexation of neptunium (V) onto whole cells and cell componets of Shewanella alga

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, Donald Timothy; Deo, Randhir P; Rittmann, Bruce E; Songkasiri, Warinthorn

    2008-01-01

    We systematically quantified surface complexation of neptunium(V) onto whole cells of Shewanella alga strain BrY and onto cell wall and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of S. alga. We first performed acid and base titrations and used the mathematical model FITEQL with constant-capacitance surface-complexation to determine the concentrations and deprotonation constants of specific surface functional groups. Deprotonation constants most likely corresponded to a carboxyl site associated with amino acids (pK{sub a} {approx} 2.4), a carboxyl group not associated with amino acids (pK{sub a} {approx} 5), a phosphoryl site (pK{sub a} {approx} 7.2), and an amine site (pK{sub a} > 10). We then carried out batch sorption experiments with Np(V) and each of the S. alga components at different pHs. Results show that solution pH influenced the speciation of Np(V) and each of the surface functional groups. We used the speciation sub-model of the biogeochemical model CCBATCH to compute the stability constants for Np(V) complexation to each surface functional group. The stability constants were similar for each functional group on S. alga bacterial whole cells, cell walls, and EPS, and they explain the complicated sorption patterns when they are combined with the aqueous-phase speciation of Np(V). For pH < 8, NpO{sub 2}{sup +} was the dominant form of Np(V), and its log K values for the low-pK{sub a} carboxyl, other carboxyl, and phosphoryl groups were 1.75, 1.75, and 2.5 to 3.1, respectively. For pH greater than 8, the key surface ligand was amine >XNH3+, which complexed with NpO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 5-}. The log K for NpO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 5-} complexed onto the amine groups was 3.1 to 3.6. All of the log K values are similar to those of Np(V) complexes with aqueous carboxyl and N-containing carboxyl ligands. These results point towards the important role of surface complexation in defining key actinide-microbiological interactions in the subsurface.

  19. Study: Algae Could Replace 17% of U.S. Oil Imports | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLEStatutory Authority for anStudy: Algae Could Replace 17% of U.S. Oil

  20. Measuring Abatement Potentials When Multiple Change is Present: The Case of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation in U.S. Agriculture and Forestry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    can also offset greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by increasing production of energy crops, which can Professor Department of Agricultural Economics Texas A&M University Hamburg, Germany April 2003 1 #12 with conventional agricultural production. Competition among practices is examined under a wide range

  1. Agricultural Productivity and Mortality: Evidence from Kagera, Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ikegami, Munenobu

    2009-01-01

    Mortality: Evidence from Kagera, Tanzania Munenobu IkegamiEvidence from Kagera, Tanzania. CEGA Working Paper SeriesEvidence from Kagera, Tanzania ? Munenobu Ikegami † August

  2. Agricultural labor productivity in the Lower South, 1720-1800

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenbloom, Joshua L.; Mancall, Peter C.; Weiss, Thomas

    2002-10-01

    an even more reliable source of irrigation as early as the 1730s. But adoption of tidal irrigation was slow proceeded slowly until the 1780s, reflecting the large sunk cost of planters investments in existing irrigation systems. During the Revolution..., many planters were unable to maintain these systems, however, and after the war they chose to invest in newer tidal irrigation methods, rather than in the replace older irrigation investments. 3 The more regular availability of water substantially...

  3. Nitrate Leaching from Intensive Fiber Production on Abandoned Agricultural Land

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, T.M.

    1999-01-01

    Paper outlines nitrate leaching results of loblolly pine and sweet gum that were grown with irrigation, continuous fertilization and insect pest control on a year old abandoned peanut field. Wells and tension lysimeters were used to measure nitrate in soil moisture and groundwater on three replicate transects for two years. Groundwater nitrate concentration beneath the minimum treatment was much higher than the maximum treatment and old field. All three treatments often exceeded the drinking water standard. Forest and lake edge had low levels while the soil moisture nitrate concentrations in the two plantation treatments were much higher than the old field.

  4. Industrial and Agricultural Production Efficiency Program | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nA Guide toIMPROVEMENT OFBarriers to Industrial EnergyThe ThomasEnergy

  5. Climate change effects on agriculture: Economic responses to biophysical shocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Gerald; Valin, Hugo; Sands, Ronald; Havlik, Petr; Ahammad, Helal; Deryng, Delphine; Elliott, Joshua; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Heyhoe, Edwina; Kyle, G. Page; von Lampe, Martin; Lotze-Campen, Hermann; Mason d'Croz, Daniel; van Meijl, Hans; van der Mensbrugghe, Dominique; Mueller, C.; Popp, Alexander; Robertson, Richard; Robinson, Sherman; Schmid, E.; Schmitz, Christoph; Tabeau, Andrzej; Willenbockel, Dirk

    2013-12-16

    Agricultural production is sensitive to weather and will thus be directly affected by climate change. Plausible estimates of these climate change impacts require combined use of climate, crop, and economic models. Results from previous studies vary substantially due to differences in models, scenarios, and data. This paper is part of a collective effort to systematically integrate these three types of models. We focus on the economic component of the assessment, investigating how nine global economic models of agriculture represent endogenous responses to seven standardized climate change scenarios produced by two climate and five crop models. These responses include adjustments in yields, area, consumption, and international trade. We apply biophysical shocks derived from the IPCC’s Representative Concentration Pathway that result in end-of-century radiative forcing of 8.5 watts per square meter. The mean biophysical impact on crop yield with no incremental CO2 fertilization is a 17 percent reduction globally by 2050 relative to a scenario with unchanging climate. Endogenous economic responses reduce yield loss to 11 percent, increase area of major crops by 12 percent, and reduce consumption by 2 percent. Agricultural production, cropland area, trade, and prices show the greatest degree of variability in response to climate change, and consumption the lowest. The sources of these differences includes model structure and specification; in particular, model assumptions about ease of land use conversion, intensification, and trade. This study identifies where models disagree on the relative responses to climate shocks and highlights research activities needed to improve the representation of agricultural adaptation responses to climate change.

  6. Technical specifications for mechanical recycling of agricultural plastic waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Briassoulis, D. Hiskakis, M.; Babou, E.

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: • Technical specifications for agricultural plastic wastes (APWs) recycling proposed. • Specifications are the base for best economical and environmental APW valorisation. • Analysis of APW reveals inherent characteristics and constraints of APW streams. • Thorough survey on mechanical recycling processes and industry as it applies to APW. • Specifications for APW recycling tested, adjusted and verified through pilot trials. - Abstract: Technical specifications appropriate for the recycling of agricultural plastic wastes (APWs), widely accepted by the recycling industry were developed. The specifications establish quality standards to be met by the agricultural plastics producers, users and the agricultural plastic waste management chain. They constitute the base for the best economical and environmental valorisation of the APW. The analysis of the APW streams conducted across Europe in the framework of the European project “LabelAgriWaste” revealed the inherent characteristics of the APW streams and the inherent constraints (technical or economical) of the APW. The APW stream properties related to its recycling potential and measured during pilot trials are presented and a subsequent universally accepted simplified and expanded list of APW recycling technical specifications is proposed and justified. The list includes two sets of specifications, applied to two different quality categories of recyclable APW: one for pellet production process (“Quality I”) and another one for plastic profile production process (“Quality II”). Parameters that are taken into consideration in the specifications include the APW physical characteristics, contamination, composition and degradation. The proposed specifications are focused on polyethylene based APW that represents the vast majority of the APW stream. However, the specifications can be adjusted to cover also APW of different materials (e.g. PP or PVC) that are found in very small quantities in protected cultivations in Europe. The adoption of the proposed specifications could transform this waste stream into a labelled commodity traded freely in the market and will constitute the base for the best economical and environmental valorisation of the APW.

  7. Teaching Organic Farming and Gardening: Resources for Instructors, 3rd Edition. Part 3 - Social and Environmental Issues in Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    2011, 36 million tons of food waste were created, with onlyAgriculture System 5. Waste a) Food is one of the primaryfood production—then proceeding through processing, distribution, consumption, and then to the waste

  8. Agricultural Management, Water Quality and Phosphorus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agricultural Management, Water Quality and Phosphorus: The Long and Winding Road Andrew Sharpley #12;In the beginning Agriculture and water quality Targeted watershed P management Linking ecosystem Adaptive management How can our research help farmers ? #12;Discovery Farms concept Core farms

  9. Public Parking Lots > Agriculture Building Parkade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Farm Residences Crop Science Seed Barn Rayner Dairy Research & Teaching Facility Poultry Centre Engineering Poultry Science Kirk Hall Agriculture Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada SCIENCE PLACE VETERINARY PerformanceCentre Environment Canada Canadian Wildlife Service CANADIANWILDLIFECRT Field #9 Field #10 Tennis

  10. Public Parking Lots > Agriculture Building Parkade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Farm Residences Crop Science Seed Barn Rayner Dairy Research & Teaching Facility Poultry Centre Spinks Engineering Poultry Science Kirk Hall Agriculture Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada SCIENCE PLACE PerformanceCentre Environment Canada Canadian Wildlife Service CANADIANWILDLIFECRT Field #9 Field #10 Tennis

  11. Agricultural Opportunities in the Pacific Rim

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Todd, Brian

    Agricultural Opportunities in the Pacific Rim American Society of Farm Managers and Rural and objectives · Objective: Better understand how agricultural export opportunities in the Pacific Rim and Mexico) are top export destinations and they count as Pacific Rim · Of course, we also import from Canada

  12. Climate Change and Agriculture in Vermont INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    Climate Change and Agriculture in Vermont INTRODUCTION Climate change is impacting Northeastern trends in Vermont, 2) the most up-to-date modeled projections available, and 3) potential impacts on Vermont agriculture. OBSERVED It is getting wetter. There has been a 9" increase in average annual

  13. Agricultural and Biological Engineering College of Agricultural Sciences Cooperative Extension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    College H 80 Introduction Biodiesel is a renewable biomass alternative to petro- leum-based diesel fuel-grade Biodiesel Water Raw Biodiesel Wash WaterGlycerol Washer Biodiesel works very well as fuel for any diesel degrades when in contact with biodiesel. Biodiesel production is growing due to fuel prices, a desire

  14. Lévy Fluctuations and Tracer Diffusion in Dilute Suspensions of Algae and Bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irwin M. Zaid; Jörn Dunkel; Julia M. Yeomans

    2010-09-20

    Swimming microorganisms rely on effective mixing strategies to achieve efficient nutrient influx. Recent experiments, probing the mixing capability of unicellular biflagellates, revealed that passive tracer particles exhibit anomalous non-Gaussian diffusion when immersed in a dilute suspension of self-motile Chlamydomonas reinhardtii algae. Qualitatively, this observation can be explained by the fact that the algae induce a fluid flow that may occasionally accelerate the colloidal tracers to relatively large velocities. A satisfactory quantitative theory of enhanced mixing in dilute active suspensions, however, is lacking at present. In particular, it is unclear how non-Gaussian signatures in the tracers' position distribution are linked to the self-propulsion mechanism of a microorganism. Here, we develop a systematic theoretical description of anomalous tracer diffusion in active suspensions, based on a simplified tracer-swimmer interaction model that captures the typical distance scaling of a microswimmer's flow field. We show that the experimentally observed non-Gaussian tails are generic and arise due to a combination of truncated L\\'evy statistics for the velocity field and algebraically decaying time correlations in the fluid. Our analytical considerations are illustrated through extensive simulations, implemented on graphics processing units to achieve the large sample sizes required for analyzing the tails of the tracer distributions.

  15. Structure and scintillation yield of Ce-doped Al–Ga substituted yttrium garnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sidletskiy, Oleg; Kononets, Valerii; Lebbou, Kheirreddine; Neicheva, Svetlana; Voloshina, Olesya; Bondar, Valerii; Baumer, Vyacheslav; Belikov, Konstantin; Gektin, Alexander; Grinyov, Boris; Joubert, Marie-France

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: ? Range of Y{sub 3}(Al{sub 1?x}Ga{sub x}){sub 5}O{sub 12}:Ce solid solution crystals are grown from melt by the Czochralski method. ? Light yield of mixed crystals reaches 130% of the YAG:Ce value at x ? 0.4. ? ?1% of antisite defects is formed in YGG:Ce, but no evidence of this is obtained for the rest of crystals. -- Abstract: Structure and scintillation yield of Y{sub 3}(Al{sub 1?x}Ga{sub x}){sub 5}O{sub 12}:Ce solid solution crystals are studied. Crystals are grown from melt by the Czochralski method. Distribution of host cations in crystal lattice is determined. Quantity of antisite defects in crystals is evaluated using XRD and atomic emission spectroscopy data. Trend of light output at Al/Ga substitution in Y{sub 3}(Al{sub 1?x}Ga{sub x}){sub 5}O{sub 12}:Ce is determined for the first time. Light output in mixed crystals reaches 130% comparative to Ce-doped yttrium–aluminum garnet. Luminescence properties at Al/Ga substitution are evaluated.

  16. The concept of "Green" has always been understood as expensive and not competitive. The new technologies that allow the efficient use of carbon atoms from inexpensive biomasses, even before the utilization of algae,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandoghdar, Vahid

    the utilization of algae, have provided the opportunity to be "green and competitive" for the first time

  17. Forecasting Agriculturally Driven Global Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    production doubled, greatly reducing food shortages, but at high environ- mental cost (1­5). In addition climate change in environ- mental and societal impacts (2, 8). Population size and per capita consumption capita 1 Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior, Uni- versity of Minnesota, 1987 Upper Buford

  18. Report on Abatement Activities Related to Agriculture and Waste Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Report on Abatement Activities Related to Agriculture and Waste Management in the Lower Fraser Guidelines for Producers 9 2.3 Best Agricultural Waste Management Plans (BAWMPs) 9 3.0 AGRICULTURAL PRACTICES Agricultural Waste management Zones Used in the management of Agricultural Wastes in the Lower Fraser Valley

  19. GCAM 3.0 Agriculture and Land Use: Data Sources and Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick; Calvin, Katherine V.; Emanuel, William R.; Nathan, Mayda; Zhou, Yuyu

    2011-12-12

    This report presents the data processing methods used in the GCAM 3.0 agriculture and land use component, starting from all source data used, and detailing all calculations and assumptions made in generating the model inputs. The report starts with a brief introduction to modeling of agriculture and land use in GCAM 3.0, and then provides documentation of the data and methods used for generating the base-year dataset and future scenario parameters assumed in the model input files. Specifically, the report addresses primary commodity production, secondary (animal) commodity production, disposition of commodities, land allocation, land carbon contents, and land values.

  20. Communication among Agricultural Policy Influencers: A Delphi Study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salazar, Victor Kingsley

    2015-05-12

    Agricultural policy affects the agricultural industry in its entirety. It affects everything from the type of food that is grown to how it is processed and distributed. Agricultural policy influencers impact the development of the policy...