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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural products algae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Algae-Based Biofuels: Applications and Co-Products | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Algae-Based Biofuels: Applications and Co-Products Algae-Based Biofuels: Applications and Co-Products Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Algae-Based Biofuels: Applications and Co-Products Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Biomass Topics: Implementation, Technology characterizations Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: www.fao.org/docrep/012/i1704e/i1704e.pdf References: Algae-Based Biofuels [1] Logo: Algae-Based Biofuels: Applications and Co-Products This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. References ↑ "Algae-Based Biofuels" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Algae-Based_Biofuels:_Applications_and_Co-Products&oldid=328382" Categories:

2

Polymer applications for improved biofuel production from algae.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biofuel is a renewable and sustainable energy source with near-neutral carbon footprint. Algae are an ideal feedstock for biofuel production because they reproduce quickly and… (more)

Jones, Jessica Naomi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Development of a novel algae biofilm photobioreactor for biofuel production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Algae are photosynthetic microorganisms that convert carbon dioxide and sunlight into biomass that can be used for biofuel production. Although they are usually cultivated in… (more)

Ozkan, Altan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Micro-algae come of age as a platform for recombinant protein production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in therapeutic protein production in algae Expression levelrecombinant protein production Elizabeth Specht • Shigekirecombinant protein production in Chlamydomonas, including

Specht, Elizabeth; Miyake-Stoner, Shigeki; Mayfield, Stephen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Micro-algae come of age as a platform for recombinant protein production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

et al. 2008), chlorophyta alga Ulva pertusa Table 1 Recentprotein production in algae Expression level achieved010-0326-5 REVIEW Micro-algae come of age as a platform for

Specht, Elizabeth; Miyake-Stoner, Shigeki; Mayfield, Stephen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Algae  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Algae Algae Nature Bulletin No. 556-A March 1, 1975 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation ALGAE These are the most exciting years that mankind has ever known -- the beginnings of the Space Age. Already, earthlings are making definite plans to visit the moon and Mars and even more distant parts of the universe. Because of the enormous amounts of fuel and equipment necessary for each pound of pay load to escape the earth's gravity and return, the supply of food and oxygen for travelers on these fantastically long journeys must be kept to a minimum. One of the suggested answers is to make use of the microscopic alga, Chlorella, which is found commonly in fresh water. In sunlight, like other green plants, it uses carbon dioxide and plant foods to grow and multiply. In the process it releases pure oxygen which could be used for breathing. Furthermore, a crop of excess Chlorella -- rich in food value -- could be harvested to feed the human passengers. They, in turn, produce the carbon dioxide and waste materials necessary to keep the alga growing. Such a miniature world can be imitated in a sealed glass container of water stocked with a bit of alga and a little aquatic animal life. Set near a window, they often survive for years.

7

Designer proton-channel transgenic algae for photobiological hydrogen production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A designer proton-channel transgenic alga for photobiological hydrogen production that is specifically designed for production of molecular hydrogen (H.sub.2) through photosynthetic water splitting. The designer transgenic alga includes proton-conductive channels that are expressed to produce such uncoupler proteins in an amount sufficient to increase the algal H.sub.2 productivity. In one embodiment the designer proton-channel transgene is a nucleic acid construct (300) including a PCR forward primer (302), an externally inducible promoter (304), a transit targeting sequence (306), a designer proton-channel encoding sequence (308), a transcription and translation terminator (310), and a PCR reverse primer (312). In various embodiments, the designer proton-channel transgenic algae are used with a gas-separation system (500) and a gas-products-separation and utilization system (600) for photobiological H.sub.2 production.

Lee, James Weifu (Knoxville, TN)

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

8

Analytical approaches to photobiological hydrogen production in unicellular green algae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

monas reinhardtii (green alga). Planta 214:552–561. doi:adaptation in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Eurhydrogenase from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

Hemschemeier, Anja; Melis, Anastasios; Happe, Thomas

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Zeolite?Based Algae Biofilm Rotating Photobioreactor for Algae and Biomass Production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Alkaline conditions induced by algae growth in wastewater stabilization ponds create deprotonated ammonium ions that result in ammonia gas (NH3) volatilization. If algae are… (more)

Young, Ashton M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Switchable photosystem-II designer algae for photobiological hydrogen production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A switchable photosystem-II designer algae for photobiological hydrogen production. The designer transgenic algae includes at least two transgenes for enhanced photobiological H.sub.2 production wherein a first transgene serves as a genetic switch that can controls photosystem II (PSII) oxygen evolution and a second transgene encodes for creation of free proton channels in the algal photosynthetic membrane. In one embodiment, the algae includes a DNA construct having polymerase chain reaction forward primer (302), a inducible promoter (304), a PSII-iRNA sequence (306), a terminator (308), and a PCR reverse primer (310). In other embodiments, the PSII-iRNA sequence (306) is replaced with a CF.sub.1-iRNA sequence (312), a streptomycin-production gene (314), a targeting sequence (316) followed by a proton-channel producing gene (318), or a PSII-producing gene (320). In one embodiment, a photo-bioreactor and gas-product separation and utilization system produce photobiological H.sub.2 from the switchable PSII designer alga.

Lee, James Weifu (Knoxville, TN)

2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

11

Life-Cycle Greenhouse Gas and Energy Analyses of Algae Biofuels Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Life-Cycle Greenhouse Gas and Energy Analyses of Algae Biofuels Production Transportation Energy The Issue Algae biofuels directly address the Energy Commission's Public Interest Energy Research fuels more carbonintensive than conventional biofuels. Critics of this study argue that alternative

12

Radiant and thermal energy transport in planktonic and benthic algae systems for sustainable biofuel production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biofuel production from microalgal biomass offers a clean and sustainable liquid fuel alternative to fossil fuels. In addition, algae cultivation is advantageous over traditional biofuel… (more)

Murphy, Thomas Eugene

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Photosynthetic hydrogen and oxygen production by green algae  

SciTech Connect

An overview of photosynthetic hydrogen and oxygen production by green algae in the context of its potential as a renewable chemical feed stock and energy carrier is presented. Beginning with its discovery by Gaffron and Rubin in 1942, motivated by curiosity-driven laboratory research, studies were initiated in the early 1970s that focused on photosynthetic hydrogen production from an applied perspective. From a scientific and technical point of view, current research is focused on optimizing net thermodynamic conversion efficiencies represented by the Gibbs Free Energy of molecular hydrogen. The key research questions of maximizing hydrogen and oxygen production by light-activated water splitting in green algae are (1) removing the oxygen sensitivity of algal hydrogenases; (2) linearizing the light saturation curves of photosynthesis throughout the entire range of terrestrial solar irradiance--including the role of bicarbonate and carbon dioxide in optimization of photosynthetic electron transport and (3) the minimum number of light reactions that are required to split water to elemental hydrogen and oxygen. Each of these research topics is being actively addressed by the photobiological hydrogen research community.

Greenbaum, E.; Lee, J.W.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

14

Photosynthetic Hydrogen and Oxygen Production by Green Algae  

SciTech Connect

Photosynthesis research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is focused on hydrogen and oxygen production by green algae in the context of its potential as a renewable fuel and chemical feed stock. Beginning with its discovery by Gaffron and Rubin in 1942, motivated by curiosity-driven laboratory research, studies were initiated in the early 1970s that focused on photosynthetic hydrogen production from an applied perspective. From a scientific and technical point of view, current research is focused on optimizing net thermodynamic conversion efficiencies represented by the Gibbs Free Energy of molecular hydrogen. The key research questions of maximizing hydrogen and oxygen production by light-activated water splitting in green algae are: (1) removing the oxygen sensitivity of algal hydrogenases; (2) linearizing the light saturation curves of hotosynthesis throughout the entire range of terrestrial solar irradiance-including the role of bicarbonate and carbon dioxide in optimization of photosynthetic electron transpor;t and (3) constructing real-world bioreactors, including the generation of hydrogen and oxygen against workable back pressures of the photoproduced gases.

Greenbaum, E.; Lee, J.W.

1999-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

15

Optimal taxation with joint production of agriculture and rural amenities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

production of agriculture and rural amenities 1 Georgesof an agricultural good and rural amenities, the ?rst-besthenceforth use the generic term rural amenities to refer to

Casamatta, Georges; Rausser, Gordon C.; Simon, Leo K.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Derived Fuel Production  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Derived Derived Fuel Production Facility Loan Guarantees to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Derived Fuel Production Facility Loan Guarantees on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Derived Fuel Production Facility Loan Guarantees on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Derived Fuel Production Facility Loan Guarantees on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Derived Fuel Production Facility Loan Guarantees on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Derived Fuel Production Facility Loan Guarantees on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Derived Fuel Production Facility Loan Guarantees on AddThis.com...

17

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculture and Forestry Biofuel Production  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Agriculture and Agriculture and Forestry Biofuel Production Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculture and Forestry Biofuel Production Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculture and Forestry Biofuel Production Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculture and Forestry Biofuel Production Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculture and Forestry Biofuel Production Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculture and Forestry Biofuel Production Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculture and Forestry Biofuel Production Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

18

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th EditionChapter 7 Weed Seeds of Agricultural Importance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th Edition Chapter 7 Weed Seeds of Agricultural Importance Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 7 Weed Seeds of A

19

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th EditionChapter 8 Minerals of Agricultural Importance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th Edition Chapter 8 Minerals of Agricultural Importance Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 8 Minerals of Agric

20

Analytical approaches to photobiological hydrogen production in unicellular green algae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chlamydo- monas reinhardtii (green alga). Planta 214:552–et al. 2008) of different green microalgal species have beenReduction of CO 2 with H 2 in green plants. Nature 143:204–

Hemschemeier, Anja; Melis, Anastasios; Happe, Thomas

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural products algae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Agricultural Investment Risk Relationship to National Domestic Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This empirical case study investigated the uncertainty of agricultural investment schemes in Nigeria and their relationship to national domestic production. Government administrations have invested a substantial amount of money into the agricultural ... Keywords: Agriculture, Bank Credit, Investment, National Domestic Production, Risk, Uncertainty

Alex Ehimare Omankhanlen

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Fuel from wastewater : harnessing a potential energy source in Canada through the co-location of algae biofuel production to sources of effluent, heat and CO2.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories is collaborating with the National Research Council (NRC) Canada and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to develop a decision-support model that will evaluate the tradeoffs associated with high-latitude algae biofuel production co-located with wastewater, CO2, and waste heat. This project helps Canada meet its goal of diversifying fuel sources with algae-based biofuels. The biofuel production will provide a wide range of benefits including wastewater treatment, CO2 reuse and reduction of demand for fossil-based fuels. The higher energy density in algae-based fuels gives them an advantage over crop-based biofuels as the 'production' footprint required is much less, resulting in less water consumed and little, if any conversion of agricultural land from food to fuel production. Besides being a potential source for liquid fuel, algae have the potential to be used to generate electricity through the burning of dried biomass, or anaerobically digested to generate methane for electricity production. Co-locating algae production with waste streams may be crucial for making algae an economically valuable fuel source, and will certainly improve its overall ecological sustainability. The modeling process will address these questions, and others that are important to the use of water for energy production: What are the locations where all resources are co-located, and what volumes of algal biomass and oil can be produced there? In locations where co-location does not occur, what resources should be transported, and how far, while maintaining economic viability? This work is being funded through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Biomass Program Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, and is part of a larger collaborative effort that includes sampling, strain isolation, strain characterization and cultivation being performed by the NREL and Canada's NRC. Results from the NREL / NRC collaboration including specific productivities of selected algal strains will eventually be incorporated into this model.

Passell, Howard David; Whalen, Jake (SmartWhale Consulting, Dartmouth, NS, CA); Pienkos, Philip P. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO); O'Leary, Stephen J. (National Research Council Canada, Institute for Marine Biosciences, Halifax, NS, CA); Roach, Jesse Dillon; Moreland, Barbara D.; Klise, Geoffrey Taylor

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Method to transform algae, materials therefor, and products produced thereby  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a method to transform chlorophyll C-containing algae. The method includes introducing a recombinant molecule comprising a nucleic acid molecule encoding a dominant selectable marker operatively linked to an algal regulatory control sequence into a chlorophyll C-containing alga in such a manner that the marker is produced by the alga. In a preferred embodiment the algal regulatory control sequence is derived from a diatom and preferably Cyclotella cryptica. Also disclosed is a chimeric molecule having one or more regulatory control sequences derived from one or more chlorophyll C-containing algae operatively linked to a nucleic acid molecule encoding a selectable marker, an RNA molecule and/or a protein, wherein the nucleic acid molecule does not normally occur with one or more of the regulatory control sequences. Further, specifically disclosed are molecules pACCNPT10, pACCNPT4.8 and pACCNPT5.1. The methods and materials of the present invention provide the ability to accomplish stable genetic transformation of chlorophyll C-containing algae. 2 figs.

Dunahay, T.G.; Roessler, P.G.; Jarvis, E.E.

1997-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

24

Method to transform algae, materials therefor, and products produced thereby  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a method to transform chlorophyll C-containing algae which includes introducing a recombinant molecule comprising a nucleic acid molecule encoding a dominant selectable marker operatively linked to an algal regulatory control sequence into a chlorophyll C-containing alga in such a manner that the marker is produced by the alga. In a preferred embodiment the algal regulatory control sequence is derived from a diatom and preferably Cyclotella cryptica. Also disclosed is a chimeric molecule having one or more regulatory control sequences derived from one or more chlorophyll C-containing algae operatively linked to a nucleic acid molecule encoding a selectable marker, an RNA molecule and/or a protein, wherein the nucleic acid molecule does not normally occur with one or more of the regulatory control sequences. Further specifically disclosed are molecules pACCNPT10, pACCNPT4.8 and pACCNPT5.1. The methods and materials of the present invention provide the ability to accomplish stable genetic transformation of chlorophyll C-containing algae.

Dunahay, Terri Goodman (2710 Arbor Glen Pl., Boulder, CO 80304); Roessler, Paul G. (15905 Ellsworth Pl., Golden, CO 80401); Jarvis, Eric E. (3720 Smuggler Pl., Boulder, CO 80303)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Based Fuel Production Wage  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Based Based Fuel Production Wage and Salary Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Based Fuel Production Wage and Salary Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Based Fuel Production Wage and Salary Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Based Fuel Production Wage and Salary Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Based Fuel Production Wage and Salary Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Based Fuel Production Wage and Salary Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Based Fuel Production Wage and Salary Tax Credit on AddThis.com...

26

Aridity and Algae: Biodiesel Production in Arizona Jenna Bloxom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

technology could create an algae biofuels industry that is economically competitive with current fuel prices systems for microalgae capable of producing biofuels. Diesel and jet fuels are critical to our nation more biofuel per acre than any other potential source. Under ideal conditions, microalgae theoretically

Cushing, Jim. M.

27

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th EditionChapter 1 Methods of Agricultural Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th Edition Chapter 1 Methods of Agricultural Microscopy Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books 97C1C49A76ADD9BFEBDE5FF95381F911 Press Downloadable pdf...

28

Final technical report [Molecular genetic analysis of biophotolytic hydrogen production in green algae  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The principal objective of this project was to identify genes necessary for biophotolytic hydrogen production in green algae, using Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as an experimental organism. The main strategy was to isolate mutants that are selectively deficient in hydrogen production and to genetically map, physically isolate, and ultimately sequence the affected genes.

Mets, Laurens

2000-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

29

Microscopic Analysis of Agricultural Products, 4th Edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Written for both production staff who need advice on specific problems and development personnel who seek directions. Microscopic Analysis of Agricultural Products, 4th Edition Methods and Analyses Methods - Analyses Books Soft Bound Books Methods - An

30

Acetic acid production from marine algae. Progress report No. 2, September 30--December 31, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Preliminary results on the production of acetic acid from marine algae by anaerobic fermentation indicate that the rate is quite fast. First order rate constants of 0.77 day/sup -1/ were observed. This rate constant gives a half-life of less than one day. In other words, with a properly designed product removal system a five day retention time would yield 98% of theoretical conversion. Determination of the theoretical conversion of marine algae to acetic acid is the subject of much experimentation. The production of one acetic acid molecule (or equivalent in higher organic acids) for each three carbon atoms in the substrate has been achieved; but it is possible that with a mixed culture more than one acetic acid molecule may be produced for each three carbons in the substrate. Work is continuing to improve the yield of acetic acid from marine algae. Marine algae have been found to be rather low in carbon, but the carbon appears to be readily available for fermentation. It, therefore, lends itself to the production of higher value chemicals in relatively expensive equipment, where the rapid conversion rate is particularly cost effective. Fixed packed bed fermenters appear to be desirable for the production of liquid products which are inhibitory to the fermentation from coarse substrates. The inhibitory products may be removed from the fermentation by extraction during recirculation. This technique lends itself to either conventional processing or low capital processing of substrates which require long retention times.

Not Available

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Analytical approaches to photobiological hydrogen production in unicellular green algae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

photosynthesis in renewable energy production. This articlebe applied in renewable energy production. In addition, the

Hemschemeier, Anja; Melis, Anastasios; Happe, Thomas

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Protein from algae  

SciTech Connect

A review considering potential nutrient sources for algal culture, basic requirements for algal production, composition and nutritional value of algae, algae as human food, algal protein for animal feed, and current and future production of microalgae.

Grisanti, N.E.; Oswald, W.J.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Industrial and Agricultural Production Efficiency Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial and Agricultural Production Efficiency Program Industrial and Agricultural Production Efficiency Program Industrial and Agricultural Production Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Industrial Savings Category Other Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Cooling Manufacturing Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Insulation Design & Remodeling Water Heating Maximum Rebate Custom capital projects: $0.25/kWh, up to 50% of cost; $2/Therm, up to 50% of project cost Custom operation and maintenance projects: $0.08/kWh or $0.40/Therm, up to 50% of project cost Lighting projects: custom lighting incentives get 35% of project cost; prescriptive incentives also available. Total incentive capped at

34

Algae Biotecnologia | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Name Algae Biotecnologia Place Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil Product Brazil-based 2nd generation ethanol producer. References Algae...

35

The possibility for micro algae based biofuel production on Bonaire.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Microalgae are a promising alternative source of lipid and biofuel production in the future. Renewable, carbon neutral, transport fuels are necessary for environmental and economic… (more)

Ebbing, A.P.J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Wastes and by-products - alternatives for agricultural use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Top address a growing national problem with generation of wastes and by-products, TVA has been involved for several years with developing and commercializing environmentally responsible practices for eliminating, minimizing, or utilizing various wastes/by-products. In many cases, reducing waste generation is impractical, but the wastes/by-products can be converted into other environmentally sound products. In some instances, conversion of safe, value-added agricultural products in the best or only practical alternative. TVA is currently involved with a diversity of projects converting wastes/by-products into safe, economical, and agriculturally beneficial products. Environmental improvement projects have involved poultry litter, cellulosic wastes, used battery acid, ammonium sulfate fines, lead smelting effluents, deep-welled sulfuric acid/ammonium bisulfate solutions, wood ash, waste magnesium ammonium sulfate slurry from recording tape production, and ammunition plant waste sodium nitrate/ammonium nitrate streams.

Boles, J.L.; Craft, D.J.; Parker, B.R.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

A Realistic Technology and Engineering Assessment of Algae Biofuel Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

microalgae biofuel technologies for both oil and biogas production, provides an initial assessment of the US or wastewater treatment, (2) biofuel outputs--either biogas only or biogas plus oil, and (3) farm size

Quinn, Nigel

38

THE EFFECTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE AND BIOFUEL PRODUCTION ON AGRICULTURAL LAND USE AND BIOMASS PRODUCTION.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This project examines the influence that climate change and biofuel production could have on agricultural land use decisions in Pennsylvania. The first chapter develops a… (more)

Yenerall, Jacqueline

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Updated Cost Analysis of Photobiological Hydrogen Production from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Green Algae: Milestone Completion Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report updates the 1999 economic analysis of NREL's photobiological hydrogen production from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The previous study had looked mainly at incident light intensities, batch cycles and light adsorption without directly attempting to model the saturation effects seen in algal cultures. This study takes a more detailed look at the effects that cell density, light adsorption and light saturation have on algal hydrogen production. Performance estimates based on actual solar data are also included in this study. Based on this analysis, the estimated future selling price of hydrogen produced from algae ranges $0.57/kg to $13.53/kg.

Amos, W. A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

A multidimensional data model and OLAP analysis for agricultural production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the paper a multidimensional data model called CULTEH is built. In the model are defined the dimensions, the hierarchies and the facts. Based on this model an OLAP cube called CUBECTH is built. The OLAP cube accepts queries on several dimensions and ... Keywords: OLAP operations, agricultural production, data cube, multidimensional data model, on-line analytical processing (OLAP)

Constanta Zoie Radulescu; Marius Radulescu; Adrian Turek Rahoveanu

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural products algae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Microbiological Production of Surfactant from Agricultural Residuals for IOR Application  

SciTech Connect

Utilization of surfactants for improved oil recovery (IOR) is an accepted technique with high potential. However, technology application is frequently limited by cost. Biosurfactants (surface-active molecules produced by microorganisms) are not widely utilized in the petroleum industry due to high production costs associated with use of expensive substrates and inefficient product recovery methods. The economics of biosurfactant production could be significantly impacted through use of media optimization and application of inexpensive carbon substrates such as agricultural process residuals. Utilization of biosurfactants produced from agricultural residuals may 1) result in an economic advantage for surfactant production and technology application, and 2) convert a substantial agricultural waste stream to a value-added product for IOR. A biosurfactant with high potential for use is surfactin, a lipopeptide biosurfactant, produced by Bacillus subtilis. Reported here is the production and potential IOR utilization of surfactin produced by Bacillus subtilis (American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) 21332) from starch-based media. Production of surfactants from microbiological growth media based on simple sugars, chemically pure starch medium, simulated liquid and solid potato-process effluent media, a commercially prepared potato starch in mineral salts, and process effluent from a potato processor is discussed. Additionally, the effect of chemical and physical pretreatments on starchy feedstocks is discussed.

Bala, Greg Alan; Bruhn, Debby Fox; Fox, Sandra Lynn; Noah, Karl Scott; Thompson, David Neal

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Closing the gap: global potential for increasing biofuel production through agricultural intensification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Closing the gap: global potential for increasing biofuel production through agricultural: global potential for increasing biofuel production through agricultural intensification Matt Johnston1 and biodiesel feedstock crops. With biofuels coming under increasing pressure to slow or eliminate indirect land

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

43

Algae biofuels in Texas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Texas – the energy center of the world – is emerging as a pioneer in algae biodiesel research and production. There are a number of… (more)

Salpekar, Ashwini

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Information and its management for differentiation of agricultural products: The example of specialty coffee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prices of most of agricultural commodities show a long-term declining trend. Increasingly markets are signaling demand for differentiated products and in order to increase their incomes farmers and traders are looking to higher value options, including ... Keywords: Agricultural product differentiation, Agricultural supply chains, Information management, Internet-based, Specialty coffee

Norbert Niederhauser; Thomas Oberthür; Sibylle Kattnig; James Cock

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Review and evaluation of immobilized algae systems for the production of fuels from microalgae. Final subcontract report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to review and evaluate the use of immobilized algae systems. It was the finding that commercial immobilized algae systems are not in operation at this time but, with research, could certainly become so. The use of immobilized algae will depend on, as in all commercial systems, the economic value of the product. This paper reviews the technical feasibility of immobilization as it applies to algae. Finally, the economics of possible immobilized algal systems that would produce liquid fuels were investigated. It was calculated that an immobilized system would have 8.5 times the capital costs of a conventional microalgae culture system. Operational costs would be about equal, although there would be substantial savings of water with the immobilized system. A major problem with immobilizing algae is the fact that sunlight drives the system. At present, an immobilized algal system to mass produce lipids for use as a liquid fuel does not appear to be economically feasible. The major drawback is developing a low-cost system that obtains the same amount of solar energy as provided to a shallow 3 square mile pond while increasing the culture density by an order of magnitude. R and D to increase light availability and to develop low cost transparent tanks could increase the competitiveness of immobilized algal systems. 44 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

Not Available

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Experimental Studies of Vertical Mixing in an Open Channel Raceway for Algae Biofuel Production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Turbulent mixing plays an important role in the distribution of sunlight, carbon dioxide, and nutrients for algae in the raceway ponds. For large-scale raceway… (more)

Voleti, Ram Sudheer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

* Canola: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume 4 in the AOCS Monograph Series on Oilseeds. * Canola: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Processing agricultural algae algal analytical aocs articles biomass biotechnology By-product Utilization courses detergents division division

48

Acetic acid production from marine algae. Progress report No. 1, July 1--September 30, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported in research designed to develop an economically competitive process for producing acetic acid from biomass for the purpose of sparing petroleum for other uses, to evaluate marine algae as a potential source of biomass, and to document the feasibility of running fermentations in fixed packed bed fermenters. It was demonstrated that marine algae can be fermented to acetic acid. Initial rates of up to 168 meq/1 day were observed. These rates are substantially in excess of the 47 meq/1 day used in the economic projections. Also, when using marine algae as a substrate, acid levels were generated equivalent to the highest reported with other substrates. It was also demonstrated that a 4-foot fixed packet bed fermenter may be operated with marine algae as a substrate at 20 percent solids or 200 meq/1.

Sanderson, J.E.; Augenstein, D.C.; Wise, D.L.

1977-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

49

Single Cell Oils: Microbial and Algal Oils, 2nd EditionChapter 7 Alternative Carbon Sources for Heterotrophic Production of Docosahexaenoic Acid by the Marine Alga Crypthecodinium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Single Cell Oils: Microbial and Algal Oils, 2nd Edition Chapter 7 Alternative Carbon Sources for Heterotrophic Production of Docosahexaenoic Acid by the Marine Alga Crypthecodinium Biofuels and Bioproducts and Biodiesel Biofuels - Bioproduc

50

CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds or bioreactors to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

V. J. Fabry

2003-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

51

CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds or bioreactors to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

V.J. Fabry

2004-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

52

CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHAPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect

Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

V. J.Fabry

2004-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

53

CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect

Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

V.J. Fabry, Ph.D.

2001-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

54

CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect

Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

V.J. Fabry, Ph.D.

2003-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

55

CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect

Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

V.J. Fabry, Ph.D.

2001-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

56

CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect

Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

V.J. Fabry, Ph.D.

2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

57

Calcium Carbonate Production by Coccolithophorid Algae in Long Term, Carbon Dioxide Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

V.J. Fabry

2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

58

CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect

Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

V.J. Fabry, Ph.D.

2002-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

59

Calcium Carbonate Production by Coccolithophorid Algae in Long Term, Carbon Dioxide Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

V. J. Fabry

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

60

CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect

Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

V.J. Fabry, Ph.D.

2002-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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61

CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect

Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids ? single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate ? to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

V. J. Fabry

2005-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

62

CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect

Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

V.J. Fabry

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect

Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

V.J. Fabry, Ph.D.

2002-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

64

Energy Supply- Production of Fuel from Agricultural and Animal Waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Society for Energy and Environmental Research (SEER) was funded in March 2004 by the Department of Energy, under grant DE-FG-36-04GO14268, to produce a study, and oversee construction and implementation, for the thermo-chemical production of fuel from agricultural and animal waste. The grant focuses on the Changing World Technologies (CWT) of West Hempstead, NY, thermal conversion process (TCP), which converts animal residues and industrial food processing biproducts into fuels, and as an additional product, fertilizers. A commercial plant was designed and built by CWT, partially using grant funds, in Carthage, Missouri, to process animal residues from a nearby turkey processing plant. The DOE sponsored program consisted of four tasks. These were: Task 1 Optimization of the CWT Plant in Carthage - This task focused on advancing and optimizing the process plant operated by CWT that converts organic waste to fuel and energy. Task 2 Characterize and Validate Fuels Produced by CWT - This task focused on testing of bio-derived hydrocarbon fuels from the Carthage plant in power generating equipment to determine the regulatory compliance of emissions and overall performance of the fuel. Task 3 Characterize Mixed Waste Streams - This task focused on studies performed at Princeton University to better characterize mixed waste incoming streams from animal and vegetable residues. Task 4 Fundamental Research in Waste Processing Technologies - This task focused on studies performed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) on the chemical reformation reaction of agricultural biomass compounds in a hydrothermal medium. Many of the challenges to optimize, improve and perfect the technology, equipment and processes in order to provide an economically viable means of creating sustainable energy were identified in the DOE Stage Gate Review, whose summary report was issued on July 30, 2004. This summary report appears herein as Appendix 1, and the findings of the report formed the basis for much of the subsequent work under the grant. An explanation of the process is presented as well as the completed work on the four tasks.

Gabriel Miller

2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

65

Agricultural productivity potential assessment by using rainfall contribution index in Sub-Sahara Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Food deficit alleviation is the most important aspect for poverty reduction in the entire Sub-Sahara African (SSA) region. This alleviation can be achieved by increasing agricultural productivity. The deficit is in one way or the other attributed to ... Keywords: agricultural water, effective rainfall, food deficit, planting period, productivity, rainfall contribution index

Yu-Min Wang; Seydou Traore; Willy Namaona; Tienfuan Kerh

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Climate impacts on agriculture: Implications for crop production  

SciTech Connect

Changes in temperature, CO2, and precipitation under the scenarios of climate change for the next 30 years present a challenge to crop production. This review focuses on the impact of temperature, CO2, and ozone on agronomic crops and the implications for crop production. Understanding these implications for agricultural crops is critical for developing cropping systems resilient to stresses induced by climate change. There is variation among crops in their response to CO2, temperature, and precipitation changes and, with the regional differences in predicted climate, a situation is created in which the responses will be further complicated. For example, the temperature effects on soybean could potentially cause yield reductions of 2.4% in the South but an increase of 1.7% in the Midwest. The frequency of years when temperatures exceed thresholds for damage during critical growth stages is likely to increase for some crops and regions. The increase in CO2 contributes significantly to enhanced plant growth and improved water use efficiency; however, there may be a downscaling of these positive impacts due to higher temperatures plants will experience during their growth cycle. A challenge is to understand the interactions of the changing climatic parameters because of the interactions among temperature, CO2, and precipitation on plant growth and development and also on the biotic stresses of weeds, insects, and diseases. Agronomists will have to consider the variations in temperature and precipitation as part of the production system if they are to ensure the food security required by an ever increasing population.

Hatfield, Jerry L.; Boote, Kenneth J.; Kimball, B. A.; Ziska, Lewis A.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Ort, Don; Thomson, Allison M.; Wolfe, David W.

2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

67

The Potential for Biofuels from Algae (Presentation)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Biofuels from Algae Algae Biomass Summit San Francisco, CA November 15, 2007 Philip T. Pienkos, Ph.D. National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Bioenergy Center NREL/PR-510-42414 The Biodiesel Dilemma Triglycerides (TAGs) from current oilseed crops and waste oils cannot come close to meeting U.S. diesel demand (60+ billion gal/yr) * The entire U.S. soybean crop could provide approximately 2.5 billion gallons per year. * Estimated world-wide production of biodiesel would only yield 13 billion gallons per year. * This much agricultural productivity cannot possibly be diverted from the food supply. * TAGs also represent an attractive feedstock for biopetrochemicals meaning less would be available for transportation fuel. Alternative sources of TAGs are needed!

68

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th EditionChapter 5 Detecting Animal Products in Feeds and Feed Ingredients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th Edition Chapter 5 Detecting Animal Products in Feeds and Feed Ingredients Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter

69

Solar Grade Silicon from Agricultural By-products  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this project, Mayaterials developed a low cost, low energy and low temperature method of purifying rice hull ash to high purity (5-6Ns) and converting it by carbothermal reduction to solar grade quality silicon (Sipv) using a self-designed and built electric arc furnace (EAF). Outside evaluation of our process by an independent engineering firm confirms that our technology greatly lowers estimated operating expenses (OPEX) to $5/kg and capital expenses (CAPEX) to $24/kg for Sipv production, which is well below best-in-class plants using a Siemens process approach (OPEX of 14/kg and CAPEX of $87/kg, respectively). The primary limiting factor in the widespread use of photovoltaic (PV) cells is the high cost of manufacturing, compared to more traditional sources to reach 6 g Sipv/watt (with averages closer to 8+g/watt). In 2008, the spot price of Sipv rose to $450/kg. While prices have since dropped to a more reasonable $25/kg; this low price level is not sustainable, meaning the longer-term price will likely return to $35/kg. The 6-8 g Si/watt implies that the Sipv used in a module will cost $0.21-0.28/watt for the best producers (45% of the cost of a traditional solar panel), a major improvement from the cost/wafer driven by the $50/kg Si costs of early 2011, but still a major hindrance in fulfilling DOE goal of lowering the cost of solar energy below $1/watt. The solar cell industry has grown by 40% yearly for the past eight years, increasing the demand for Sipv. As such, future solar silicon price spikes are expected in the next few years. Although industry has invested billions of dollars to meet this ever-increasing demand, the technology to produce Sipv remains largely unchanged requiring the energy intensive, and chlorine dependent Siemens process or variations thereof. While huge improvements have been made, current state-of-the-art industrial plant still use 65 kWh/kg of silicon purified. Our technology offers a key distinction to other technologies as it starts one step upstream from all other Sipv production efforts. Our process starts by producing high purity SiO2/C feedstocks from which Sipv can be produced in a single, chlorine free, final EAF step. Specifically, our unique technology, and the resultant SiO2/C product can serve as high purity feedstocks to existing metallurgical silicon (Simet) producers, allowing them to generate Sipv with existing US manufacturing infrastructure, reducing the overall capital and commissioning schedule. Our low energy, low CAPEX and OPEX process purifies the silica and carbon present in rice hull ash (RHA) at low temperatures (< 200C) to produce high purity (5-6 Ns) feedstock for production of Sipv using furnaces similar to those used to produce Simet. During the course of this project we partnered with Wadham Energy LP (Wadham), who burns 220k ton of rice hulls (RH)/yr generating 200 GWh of electricity/yr and >30k ton/yr RHA. The power generation step produces much more energy (42 kWh/kg of final silicon produced) than required to purify the RHA (5 kWh/kg of Sipv, compared to 65 kWh/kg noted above. Biogenic silica offers three very important foundations for producing high purity silicon. First, wastes from silica accumulating plants, such as rice, corn, many grasses, algae and grains, contain very reactive, amorphous silica from which impurities are easily removed. Second, plants take up only a limited set of, and minimal quantities of the heavy metals present in nature, meaning fewer minerals must be removed. Third, biomass combustion generates a product with intrinsic residual carbon, mixed at nanometer length scales with the SiO2. RHA is 80-90 wt% high surface area (20 m2/g), amorphous SiO2 with some simple mineral content mixed intimately with 5-15 wt% carbon. The mineral content is easily removed by low cost, acid washes using Mayaterials IP, leading to purified rice hull ash (RHAclean) at up to 6N purity. This highly reactive silica is partially extracted from RHAclean at 200 C in an environmentally benign process to adjust SiO2:C ratios to those needed in EA

Richard M. Laine

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

70

Solar Grade Silicon from Agricultural By-products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this project, Mayaterials developed a low cost, low energy and low temperature method of purifying rice hull ash to high purity (5-6Ns) and converting it by carbothermal reduction to solar grade quality silicon (Sipv) using a self-designed and built electric arc furnace (EAF). Outside evaluation of our process by an independent engineering firm confirms that our technology greatly lowers estimated operating expenses (OPEX) to $5/kg and capital expenses (CAPEX) to $24/kg for Sipv production, which is well below best-in-class plants using a Siemens process approach (OPEX of 14/kg and CAPEX of $87/kg, respectively). The primary limiting factor in the widespread use of photovoltaic (PV) cells is the high cost of manufacturing, compared to more traditional sources to reach 6 g Sipv/watt (with averages closer to 8+g/watt). In 2008, the spot price of Sipv rose to $450/kg. While prices have since dropped to a more reasonable $25/kg; this low price level is not sustainable, meaning the longer-term price will likely return to $35/kg. The 6-8 g Si/watt implies that the Sipv used in a module will cost $0.21-0.28/watt for the best producers (45% of the cost of a traditional solar panel), a major improvement from the cost/wafer driven by the $50/kg Si costs of early 2011, but still a major hindrance in fulfilling DOE goal of lowering the cost of solar energy below $1/watt. The solar cell industry has grown by 40% yearly for the past eight years, increasing the demand for Sipv. As such, future solar silicon price spikes are expected in the next few years. Although industry has invested billions of dollars to meet this ever-increasing demand, the technology to produce Sipv remains largely unchanged requiring the energy intensive, and chlorine dependent Siemens process or variations thereof. While huge improvements have been made, current state-of-the-art industrial plant still use 65 kWh/kg of silicon purified. Our technology offers a key distinction to other technologies as it starts one step upstream from all other Sipv production efforts. Our process starts by producing high purity SiO2/C feedstocks from which Sipv can be produced in a single, chlorine free, final EAF step. Specifically, our unique technology, and the resultant SiO2/C product can serve as high purity feedstocks to existing metallurgical silicon (Simet) producers, allowing them to generate Sipv with existing US manufacturing infrastructure, reducing the overall capital and commissioning schedule. Our low energy, low CAPEX and OPEX process purifies the silica and carbon present in rice hull ash (RHA) at low temperatures (30k ton/yr RHA. The power generation step produces much more energy (42 kWh/kg of final silicon produced) than required to purify the RHA (5 kWh/kg of Sipv, compared to 65 kWh/kg noted above. Biogenic silica offers three very important foundations for producing high purity silicon. First, wastes from silica accumulating plants, such as rice, corn, many grasses, algae and grains, contain very reactive, amorphous silica from which impurities are easily removed. Second, plants take up only a limited set of, and minimal quantities of the heavy metals present in nature, meaning fewer minerals must be removed. Third, biomass combustion generates a product with intrinsic residual carbon, mixed at nanometer length scales with the SiO2. RHA is 80-90 wt% high surface area (20 m2/g), amorphous SiO2 with some simple mineral content mixed intimately with 5-15 wt% carbon. The mineral content is easily removed by low cost, acid washes using Mayaterials IP, leading to purified rice hull ash (RHAclean) at up to 6N purity. This highly reactive silica is partially extracted from RHAclean at 200 C in an environmentally benign process to adjust SiO2:C ratios to those needed in EA

Richard M. Laine

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

71

Procedure for the classification and characterization of farms for agricultural production planning: Application in the Northwest of Spain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The agricultural activity in Galicia, NW Spain, is carried out on farms that are characterized by a diversity of land uses and production models, a variety of sizes, and considerable geographical dispersion. Any attempt of agricultural production planning ... Keywords: Agricultural production planning, Farm types, Rural development, Software applications

J. A. Riveiro; M. F. Marey; J. L. Marco; C. J. Alvarez

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

The economic impact of global climate and tropospheric oxone on world agricultural production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of my thesis is to analyze the economic impact on agriculture production from changes in climate and tropospheric ozone, and related policy interventions. The analysis makes use of the Emissions Prediction ...

Wang, Xiaodu

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th EditionChapter 3 Feed Ingredients of Animal Origin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th Edition Chapter 3 Feed Ingredients of Animal Origin Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books Downloadable pdf of Chapter 3 Feed Ingredients of Animal Or

74

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th EditionChapter 4 Feed Ingredients of Marine Origin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th Edition Chapter 4 Feed Ingredients of Marine Origin Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 4 Feed Ingredients of

75

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th EditionChapter 2 Feed Ingredients of Plant Origin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th Edition Chapter 2 Feed Ingredients of Plant Origin Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 2 Feed Ingredients of

76

Energy use in agriculture and the articulation of modes of production in Zimbabwe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The political economy of energy utilization in Zimbabwe's agricultural sector is analyzed. The geography of agricultural energy use is assessed by tracing the articulation of modes of production through time. It is argued that in the production process, labor mediates between humans and the environment. The level of development of the productive forces indicates the intensity that labor applies energy to a given space. Production relations influence the rate and direction of energy flows. Hence, energy is a fundamental component of a mode of production. The linkage between energy use in farming and the articulation of modes of production is made through the conceptualization of distinct agricultural production systems consisting of social relations and productive forces, the relationship to the state, and access to natural resources. After independence came changes in state-peasant relations and industrialization of African production in high potential reserves. Changing social relations on settler farms has caused a rapid displacement of labor by capital at a time when national job creation is dangerously low. In the absence of significant land transfers, a contradictory distribution of agricultural energy resources will continue. New forms of uneven agricultural development are emerging.

Weiner, D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

The Food and Fiber System and Production Agriculture's Contributions to the Texas Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2001, Texas agriculture generated $14 billion in cash receipts. The production, processing, distribution and consumption of food and fiber products contributes substantially to the economy of Texas. This publication reports the contributions of the food and fiber system and individual commodities.

Nelson, Gene

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Alga Bloom  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

process unvolved when dealing with the adverse effects that may result from blue-green algae blooms. What are some limitations, costs and factors effecting or related too such...

79

Single Cell Oils: Microbial and Algal Oils, 2nd EditionChapter 13 Algae Oils for Biofuels: Chemistry, Physiology, and Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Single Cell Oils: Microbial and Algal Oils, 2nd Edition Chapter 13 Algae Oils for Biofuels: Chemistry, Physiology, and Production Biofuels and Bioproducts and Biodiesel Biofuels - Bioproducts eChapters 42F0779FEFD534382396369A34D3B1B8

80

Comparative Life Cycle Assessments of Lignocellulosic and Algae Biomass Conversion to Various Energy Products through Different Pathways.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Bioenergy has the potential to reduce the world's dependence on fossil fuels, and to decrease the CO2 emissions due to fossil combustion. Lignocellulosic and algae… (more)

Pinilla, Maria Juliana

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural products algae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Biobased Surfactants and Detergents Synthesis, Properties, and ApplicationsChapter 2 Production and Modification of Sophorolipids from Agricultural Feedstocks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biobased Surfactants and Detergents Synthesis, Properties, and Applications Chapter 2 Production and Modification of Sophorolipids from Agricultural Feedstocks Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents Press &

82

Evaluation of Marine Brown Algae and Sponges from Brazil as Anticoagulant and Antiplatelet Products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: The ischemic disorders, in which platelet aggregation and blood coagulation are involved, represent a major cause of disability and death worldwide. The antithrombotic therapy has unsatisfactory performance and may produce side effects. So, there is a need to seek molecules with antithrombotic properties. Marine organisms produce substances with different well defined ecological functions. Moreover, some of these molecules also exhibit pharmacological properties such as antiviral, anticancer, antiophidic and anticoagulant properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate, through in vitro tests, the effect of two extracts of brown algae and ten marine sponges from Brazil on platelet aggregation and blood coagulation. Our results revealed that most of the extracts were capable of inhibiting platelet aggregation and clotting measured by plasma recalcification tests, prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, and fibrinogenolytic activity. On the other hand, five of ten species of sponges induced platelet aggregation. Thus, the marine organisms studied here may have molecules with antithrombotic properties, presenting biotechnological potential to antithrombotic therapy. Further chemical investigation shouldMar. Drugs 2011, 9 1347

Laura De Andrade Moura; Fredy Ortiz-ramirez; Diana Negrao Cavalcanti; Suzi Meneses Ribeiro; Guilherme Muricy; Valeria Laneuville Teixeira; Andre Lopes Fuly

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

A Review of Agricultural and Other Land Application Uses of Flue Gas Desulfurization Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The production of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) products, especially FGD gypsum, is expected to increase substantially over the next ten to twenty years in response to clean air initiatives. There are a large number of agricultural and other land application uses of FGD products that have received previous research and development attention, but only in specific locations of the United States and under limited conditions of crops, climate and soil types. This report discusses current and potential futur...

2006-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

84

Definition: Algae fuel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

fuel fuel Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Algae fuel A specific type of biofuel, made by chemically processing oils from algae.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Algae fuel or Algal biofuel is an alternative to fossil fuel that uses algae as its source of natural deposits. Several companies and government agencies are funding efforts to reduce capital and operating costs and make algae fuel production commercially viable. Harvested algae, like fossil fuel, releases CO2 when burnt but unlike fossil fuel the CO2 is taken out of the atmosphere by the growing of algae and other biofuel sources. The energy crisis and the world food crisis have ignited interest in algaculture (farming algae) for making vegetable oil, biodiesel, bioethanol, biogasoline, biomethanol, biobutanol and other biofuels, using

85

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th EditionChapter 9 Microchemical Spot Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th Edition Chapter 9 Microchemical Spot Tests Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books AOCS 6C2FB81BF33EA47CEF1B98AD0BE2A9CB Press Downloadable pdf...

86

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th EditionChapter 6 Fertilizer Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th Edition Chapter 6 Fertilizer Microscopy Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books AOCS 8C45832E2AA310DD11A6FEA4BDB93C6B Press Downloadable pdf...

87

Utilization of Coal Combustion By-Products in Agriculture and Land Reclamation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A four-year (1994-98) project on using blends of coal combustion by-products (CCBP) and biosolids in agriculture, horticulture, and land reclamation was undertaken to assess agronomic value, environmental safety, and potential economic use of these materials.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

A modelling framework to support farmers in designing agricultural production systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given the new challenges confronting world agriculture, innovative production systems need to be designed at the farm level. As experiments are not easy to conduct at this level, modelling is required to evaluate ex-ante the multiple impacts of proposed ... Keywords: Biophysical system, Conceptual model, Decision system, Farm, Simulation tool, Technical system

P. -Y. Le Gal; A. Merot; C. -H. Moulin; M. Navarrete; J. Wery

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Waste streams for algae cultivation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??ALDIGA, short for “Algae from Waste for Combined Biodiesel and Biogas Pro-duction”, aims to develop a concept for a closed circulation of resources in pro-ducing… (more)

Kautto, Antti

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Climate impacts on agriculture: Implications for forage and rangeland production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Projections of temperature and precipitation patterns across the United States during the next 50 years anticipate a 1.5 to 2°C warming and a slight increase in precipitation as a result of global climate change. There have been relatively few studies of climate change impacts on pasture and rangeland (grazingland) species compared to those on crop species, despite the economic and ecological importance of the former. Here we review the literature on pastureland and rangeland species to rising CO2 and climate change (temperature, and precipitation) and discuss plant and management factors likely to influence pastureland and rangeland responses to change (e.g., community composition, plant competition, perennial growth habit, seasonal productivity, and management methods). Overall, the response of pasture species to increased [CO2] is consistent with the general response of C3 and C4 type vegetation, although significant exceptions exist. Both pastureland and rangeland species should exhibit an acceleration of metabolism and development due to earlier onset of spring green-up and longer growing seasons. However, in the studies reviewed here, C3 pasture species increased their photosynthetic rates by up to 40% while C4 species exhibited no increase in photosynthesis. In general, it is expected that increases in [CO2] and precipitation would enhance rangeland net primary production (NPP) while increased air temperatures would either increase or decrease NPP. Much of this uncertainty in response is due to uncertain future projections of precipitation, both globally and regionally. For example, if annual precipitation changes little or declines, rangeland plant response to warming temperatures and rising [CO2] may be neutral or may decline due to increased water stress. This review reveals the need for comprehensive studies of climate change impacts on the pasture ecosystem including grazing regimes, mutualistic relationships (e.g., plant roots-nematodes; N-fixing organisms), as well as the ecosystem carbon balance, essential nutrients, and water.

Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Thomson, Allison M.; Morgan, Jack; Fay, Philip; Polley, Wayne; Hatfield, Jerry L.

2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

91

BioProcess Algae | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BioProcess Algae BioProcess Algae Jump to: navigation, search Name BioProcess Algae Place Shenandoah, Iowa Sector Biomass Product US-based joint venture created to commercialize advanced photobioreactor technologies for continuous production of algal biomass. References BioProcess Algae[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. BioProcess Algae is a company located in Shenandoah, Iowa . References ↑ "BioProcess Algae" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=BioProcess_Algae&oldid=342867" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

92

A novel framework for information technology based agricultural information dissemination system to improve crop productivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Indian farming community is facing a multitude of problems to maximize crop productivity. In spite of successful research on new agricultural practices concerning crop cultivation, the majority of farmers is not getting upper-bound yield due to several reasons. One of the reasons is that expert/scientific advice regarding crop cultivation is not reaching farming community in a timely manner. It is true that India possesses a valuable agricultural knowledge and expertise. However, a wide information gap exists between the research level and practice. Indian farmers need timely expert advice to make them more productive and competitive. In this paper, we made an effort to present a solution to bridge the information gap by exploiting advances in Information Technology (IT). We propose a framework of a cost-effective agricultural information dissemination system (AgrIDS) to disseminate expert agriculture knowledge to the farming community to improve the crop productivity. Some of the crucial benefits of AgrIDS are as follows. It is a scalable system which can be incrementally developed and extended to cover all the farmers (crops) of India in a cost effective manner. It enables the farmer to cultivate a crop with expertise, as that of an agricultural expert, by disseminating both crop and location specific expert advice in a personalized and timely manner. With AgrIDS, the lag period between research effort to practice can be reduced significantly. Finally, the proposed system assumes a great importance due to the trend of globalization, as it aims to provide expert advice which is crucial to for the Indian farmer to harvest different kinds of crop varieties based on the demand in the world market. 1

P. Krishna Reddy

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

www.mdpi.com/journal/marinedrugs Antioxidant Activity of Hawaiian Marine Algae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Marine algae are known to contain a wide variety of bioactive compounds, many of which have commercial applications in pharmaceutical, medical, cosmetic, nutraceutical, food and agricultural industries. Natural antioxidants, found in many algae, are important bioactive compounds that play an important role against various diseases and ageing processes through protection of cells from oxidative damage. In this respect, relatively little is known about the bioactivity of Hawaiian algae that could be a potential natural source of such antioxidants. The total antioxidant activity of organic extracts of 37 algal samples, comprising of 30 species of Hawaiian algae from 27 different genera was determined. The activity was determined by employing the FRAP (Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power) assays. Of the algae tested, the extract of Turbinaria ornata was found to be the most active. Bioassay-guided fractionation of this extract led to the isolation of a variety of different carotenoids as the active principles. The major bioactive antioxidant compound was identified as the carotenoid fucoxanthin. These results show, for the first time, that numerous Hawaiian algae exhibit significant antioxidant activity, a property that could lead to their application in one of many useful healthcare or related products as well

Dovi Kelman; Ellen Kromkowski Posner; Karla J. Mcdermid; Nicole K. Tab; Patrick R. Wright; Anthony D. Wright

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Cross flow filtration for mixed-culture algae harvesting for municipal wastewater lagoons.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The transesterification of lipids extracted from algae makes up the third generation of biodiesel production. The city of Logan, Utah proposes that the algae… (more)

Wilson, Misheka

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Cross Flow Filtration for Mixed-Culture Algae Harvesting for Municipal Wastewater Lagoons.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The transesterification of lipids extracted from algae makes up the third generation of biodiesel production. The city of Logan, Utah, proposes that the algae… (more)

Wilson, Misheka

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Frĺn alger till biodiesel - Den italienska drömmen?; From Algaes to Bio Diesel - The Italian Dream?.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This project aims to investigate whether algae can be used for biodiesel production in Italy. Algaes are a good option since they are fast… (more)

Andersson, Alexandra

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Using a Decision Support System to Optimize Production of Agricultural Crop Residue Biofeedstock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For several years the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been developing a Decision Support System for Agriculture (DSS4Ag) which determines the economically optimum recipe of various fertilizers to apply at each site in a field to produce a crop, based on the existing soil fertility at each site, as well as historic production information and current prices of fertilizers and the forecast market price of the crop at harvest, for growing a crop such as wheat, potatoes, corn, or cotton. In support of the growing interest in agricultural crop residues as a bioenergy feedstock, we have extended the capability of the DSS4Ag to develop a variable-rate fertilizer recipe for the simultaneous economically optimum production of both grain and straw, and have been conducting field research to test this new DSS4Ag. In this paper we report the results of two years of field research testing and enhancing the DSS4Ag’s ability to economically optimize the fertilization for the simultaneous production of both grain and its straw, where the straw is an agricultural crop residue that can be used as a biofeedstock.

Reed L. Hoskinson; Ronald C. Rope; Raymond K. Fink

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Blue-green algae  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

green algae Name: Renee Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: How much oxygen does green-blue algae produce, and how big are they? Replies: Blue-green algae...

99

Economic Effect on Agricultural Production of Alternative Energy Input Prices: Texas High Plains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Arab oil embargo of 1973 awakened the world to the reality of energy shortages and higher fuel prices. Agriculture in the United States is highly mechanized and thus energy intensive. This study seeks to develop an evaluative capability to readily determine the short-run effect of rising energy prices on agricultural production. The results are measured in terms of demand schedules for each input investigated, net revenue adjustments, cropping pattern shifts, and changes in agricultural output. The High Plains of Texas was selected as a study area due to the heterogeneous nature of agricultural production in the region and highly energy intensive methods of production employed. The region is associated with a diversity in crops and production practices as well as a high degree of mechanization and irrigation, which means agriculture is very dependent upon energy inputs and, in turn, is significantly affected by energy price changes. The study area was defined by the Texas Agricultural Extension subregions of High Plains II, High Plains III, and High Plains IV. The crops chosen for study were cotton, grain sorghum, wheat, corn, and soybeans. The energy and energy-related inputs under investigation were diesel, herbicide, natural gas, nitrogen fertilizer, and water. Mathematical linear programming was used as the analytical technique with parametric programming techniques incorporated into the LP model to evaluate effect of varying input price parameters over a specified range. Thus, demand schedules were estimated. The objective function was constructed using variable costs only; no fixed costs are considered. Therefore, the objective function maximizes net revenue above variable costs and thus limits the study to the short run. The data bases for the model were crop enterprise budgets developed by the Texas Agricultural Extension Service. These budgets were modified to adapt them to the study. Particularly important was the substitution of owner-operated harvesting equipment for custom-harvesting costs. This procedure made possible the delineation of fuel use by crop and production alternative which was necessary information in the accounting of costs. The completed LP model was applied to 16 alternative situations made up of various input and product price combinations which are considered as feasible in the short run future. The results reveal that diesel consumption would change very little in the short run unless commodity prices simultaneously decline below the lowest prices since 1971 or unless diesel price approaches $2.00 per gallon. Under average commodity price conditions, natural gas consumption would not decline appreciably until the price rose above $4.00 per 1000 cubic feet (mcf). Even when using the least product prices since 1971, natural gas would be consumed in substantial amounts as long as the price was below $1.28 per Mcf. The findings regarding nitrogen indicate that present nitrogen prices are within a critical range such that consumption would be immediately affected by nitrogen price increases. Water price was considered as the price a farmer can afford to pay for water above pumping and distribution costs. Application of water was defined as the price that would be paid for imported water. Under average commodity price conditions, the study results show that as water price rises from zero dollars to $22 per acre foot there would be less than a 4 percent reduction in consumption. However, as the price continues to rise, consumption would decline dramatically reaching zero at a water price of $71.75 per acre foot. This study indicates that rising input prices would cause acreage shifts from irrigated to dryland; however, with average commodity prices, these shifts do not occur until diesel reaches $2.69 per gallon, or natural gas sells for $1.92 per Mcf, or nitrogen price is $.41 per pound, or water price reaches $14.69 per acre foot. In general, the first crops that would shift out of production as energy input prices rise woul

Adams, B. M.; Lacewell, R. D.; Condra, G. D.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Fuel From Algae: Scaling and Commercialization of Algae Harvesting Technologies  

SciTech Connect

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Led by CEO Ross Youngs, AVS has patented a cost-effective dewatering technology that separates micro-solids (algae) from water. Separating micro-solids from water traditionally requires a centrifuge, which uses significant energy to spin the water mass and force materials of different densities to separate from one another. In a comparative analysis, dewatering 1 ton of algae in a centrifuge costs around $3,400. AVS’s Solid-Liquid Separation (SLS) system is less energy-intensive and less expensive, costing $1.92 to process 1 ton of algae. The SLS technology uses capillary dewatering with filter media to gently facilitate water separation, leaving behind dewatered algae which can then be used as a source for biofuels and bio-products. The biomimicry of the SLS technology emulates the way plants absorb and spread water to their capillaries.

None

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural products algae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Monitoring changes in soil carbon resulting from intensive production, a non-traditional agricultural methodology.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New Mexico State University and a group of New Mexico farmers are evaluating an innovative agricultural technique they call Intensive Production (IP). In contrast to conventional agricultural practice, IP uses intercropping, green fallowing, application of soil amendments and soil microbial inocula to sequester carbon as plant biomass, resulting in improved soil quality. Sandia National Laboratories role was to identify a non-invasive, cost effective technology to monitor soil carbon changes. A technological review indicated that Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) best met the farmers' objectives. Sandia partnered with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to analyze farmers' test plots using a portable LIBS developed at LANL. Real-time LIBS field sample analysis was conducted and grab samples were collected for laboratory comparison. The field and laboratory results correlated well implying the strong potential for LIBS as an economical field scale analytical tool for analysis of elements such as carbon, nitrogen, and phosphate.

Dwyer, Brian P.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

PetroAlgae formerly Dover Glen Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

32901 Product PetroAlgae is a company attempting to utilise natural strains of micro-algae developed by Arizona State University, and bred selectively over many generations, to...

103

Hydrogen metabolism of photosynthetic bacteria and algae  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The metabolism, metabolic pathways and biochemistry of hydrogen in photosynthetic bacteria and algae are reviewed. Detailed information on the occurrence and measurement of hydrogenase activity is presented. Hydrogen production rates for different species of algae and bacteria are presented. 173 references, 1 figure, 7 tables.

Kumazawa, S.; Mitsui, A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Agricultural and Resource Economics Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Europe. It is producing biodiesel from veg- etable oil, fromsuch as Jatropha, for biodiesel. Some industrial forestsfor the production of biodiesel. The econom- ics of algae as

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Carbon2Algae, LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon2Algae, LLC Carbon2Algae, LLC Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Solutions4CO2 Name Solutions4CO2 Address 2855 Bloor St W., Suite 616 Place Toronto, ON Zip M8X 3A1 Sector Bioenergy, Biofuels, Biomass, Carbon, Renewable energy, Carbon Capture Product Flue Gas CO2 Capture & mass transfer technology Year founded 2007 Number of employees 1-10 Phone number 416-803-9435 Website http://s4co2.com Region Ontario References Solutios4CO2 is an algae-based CO2 solutions companies. Our focus is to Build, Train and Transfer the operation of industrial size algae facilities that will divert large streams of CO2 gas emissions at the stack. Our goal is to be the leading designer of industrial scale high lipid content algae production facilities through the utilization of captured CO2 emissions to produce high quality bio-fuel in all climatic conditions.

106

Algae liquefaction / Hope Baloyi.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The liquefaction of algae for the recovery of bio–oil was studied. Algae oil is a non–edible feedstock and has minimal impact on food security and… (more)

Baloyi, Hope

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Biogeography of Marine Algae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. There are many species that are virtually cosmopolitan (e.g. the green alga Enteromorpha intestinalis, the red

108

Economic and energetic evaluation of alcohol fuel production from agriculture: Yolo County, California  

SciTech Connect

This dissertation reviews the technical aspects of alcohol fuel production and consumption, examines the set of policy-related issues that affect both the private and the public sectors, and investigates the economic and energetic feasibility of small-scale on-farm production on a representative Sacramento Valley field and vegetable crop farm. Candidate feedstocks, including both starch and sugar-rich crops, are: barley, corn, fodder beet, grain sorghum, Jerusalem artichoke, sugar beet, sweet sorghum, tomatoes, and wheat. The leading fuel crops were found to be sweet sorghum, Jerusalem artichoke, corn, fodder beet, and grain sorghum in order of declining preference. With better than average crop yields and the current mix of financial incentives, the breakeven cost of alcohol fuel is $1.03 per gallon when diesel fuel and gasoline prices are $1.30 and $1.46, respectively. Without subsidy, the breakeven cost is $1.62 per gallon. An energy analysis was calculated for each of the feedstocks under consideration. With the exception of sweet sorghum, wheat, and barley, all feedstocks showed a negative net energy balance. The use of agricultural residues as a boiler fuel, however, made a significant difference in the overall energy balance. The role of government in energy policy is reviewed and typical policy instruments are discussed. Although on-farm alcohol fuel production is not currently economically competitive with gasoline and diesel fuel, technological innovation and the return of increasing petroleum prices could alter the situation.

Meo, M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Algae Biodiesel: Commercialization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Inc. PetroAlgae Algae BioFuels Seambiotic Icon Energy LiveFuels Inc Inventure GreenFuel Technologies Biofuels & Technologies OriginOil Kwikpower International Alga Technologies Bio Fuel Systems SQC #12;A Look,Columnist, Biofuels InternationalBiofuels International HQHQ -- Houston, TXHouston, TX #12;BIODIESEL 2020: A GLOBAL

Tullos, Desiree

110

Impacts of Biofuel Production and Navigation Impediments on Agricultural Transportation and Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study investigated the impacts of U.S. biofuel production and barge navigation impediments on agricultural transportation and markets. Both past and future impacts of U.S. biofuel production levels mandated by the Renewable Fuel Standards of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (RFS1) and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (RFS2) were examined. Examination of barge navigations impediments included analysis of the impact of lock failure and low water levels on rivers due to drought, on agricultural transportation, and on consumer welfare. All scenarios were simulated using the International Grain Transportation Model, a price endogenous mathematical programming model. The results showed that RFS-associated (RFS1 and RFS2) U.S. corn ethanol production increased the total corn supply and diverted corn from non-ethanol consumption, reduced regional grain transportation volumes, and contributed to a rise in corn prices. The results of the forward-looking scenarios indicated that grain exports and transport volumes were increased. Exports from Gulf ports increased by 41%, while grain movements by rail increased by 60%. Additional investments in the expansion of the grain handling capacities of Gulf ports and the railroad industry are needed in the near future unless a large increase in biofuel production occurs. The results of navigation impediment scenarios indicated that both lock failures and low water levels on rivers adversely affect U.S. grain exports. The Gulf ports were most negatively impacted, relative to Pacific Northwest and Atlantic ports. Truck and barge freight volume declined while rail freight volume increased. Because trucks deliver grain from grain elevators to barge locations, truck volume also decreased in response to the decline in barge volume. The scenarios imposed welfare losses on society with most accruing to consumers, while the barge industry lost $10-154 million in revenue. The low water levels were more expensive than the lock failures. Major rehabilitation of the locks is needed to avoid lock failures and more dredging of the shallow parts of the river system is required because of frequent droughts.

Ahmedov, Zafarbek

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Formation of algae growth constitutive relations for improved algae modeling.  

SciTech Connect

This SAND report summarizes research conducted as a part of a two year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project to improve our abilities to model algal cultivation. Algae-based biofuels have generated much excitement due to their potentially large oil yield from relatively small land use and without interfering with the food or water supply. Algae mitigate atmospheric CO2 through metabolism. Efficient production of algal biofuels could reduce dependence on foreign oil by providing a domestic renewable energy source. Important factors controlling algal productivity include temperature, nutrient concentrations, salinity, pH, and the light-to-biomass conversion rate. Computational models allow for inexpensive predictions of algae growth kinetics in these non-ideal conditions for various bioreactor sizes and geometries without the need for multiple expensive measurement setups. However, these models need to be calibrated for each algal strain. In this work, we conduct a parametric study of key marine algae strains and apply the findings to a computational model.

Gharagozloo, Patricia E.; Drewry, Jessica L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Energy-related impacts on Great Plains agricultural productivity in the next quarter century, 1976--2000. Great plains agricultural council publication  

SciTech Connect

Contents: The food demand dimension; Agriculture's relationship to national energy goals; Assumptions relating to great plains agriculture; Agricultural energy usage in perspective; The emerging energy usage transition agenda; General energy related agricultural adjustment concepts; Operational and technological adjustments in energy intense components; Agribusiness impacts and adjustments; Forests and energy; Effects of great plains energy resource development on agriculture; Institutional and agency program demands.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

The Impact of Biofuel and Greenhouse Gas Policies on Land Management, Agricultural Production, and Environmental Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation explores the combined effects of biofuel mandates and terrestrial greenhouse gas GHG mitigation incentives on land use, management intensity, commodity markets, welfare, and the full costs of GHG abatement through conceptual and empirical modeling. First, a simple conceptual model of land allocation and management is used to illustrate how bioenergy policies and GHG mitigation incentives could influence market prices, shift the land supply between alternative uses, alter management intensity, and boost equilibrium commodity prices. Later a major empirical modeling section uses the U.S. Forest and Agricultural Sector Optimization Model with Greenhouse Gases (FASOMGHG) to simulate land use and production responses to various biofuel and climate policy scenarios. Simulations are performed to assess the effects of imposing biofuel mandates in the U.S. consistent with the Renewable Fuels Standard of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (RFS2). Simulations are run for several climate mitigation policy scenarios (with varying GHG (CO2) prices and eligibility restrictions for GHG offset activities) with and without conservation land recultivation. Important simulation outputs include time trajectories for land use, GHG emissions and mitigation, commodity prices, production, net exports, sectoral economic welfare, and shifts in management practices and intensity. Direct and indirect consequences of RFS2 and carbon policy are highlighted, including regional production shifts that can influence water consumption and nutrient use in regions already plagued by water scarcity and quality concerns. Results suggest that the potential magnitude of climate mitigation on commodity markets and exports is substantially higher than under biofuel expansion in isolation, raising concerns of international leakage and stimulating the “Food vs. Carbon” debate. Finally, a reduced-form dynamic emissions trading model of the U.S. economy is developed using simulation output from FASOMGHG and the National Energy Modeling System to test the effect of biofuel mandate expansion and domestic offset eligibility restrictions on total economy-wide GHG abatement costs. Findings are that while the RFS2 raises the marginal costs of offsets, full abatement costs depend on a number of policy factors. GHG payment incentives for forest management and non-CO2 agricultural offsets can increase full abatement costs by more than 20%.

Baker, Justin Scott

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Developing Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offsets by Reducing Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Emissions in Agricultural Crop Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Update covers the first year of a three-year-long EPRI research project entitled Developing Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offsets by Reducing Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Emissions in Agricultural Crop Production. The report provides a project overview and explains the preliminary results yielded from the first year of on-farm research.

2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

115

Impacts of renewable fuel regulation and production on agriculture, energy, and welfare.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this dissertation is to study the impact of U.S. federal renewable fuel regulations on energy and agriculture commodity markets and welfare. We… (more)

Mcphail, Lihong Lu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Algae Biofuels Technology | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Algae Biofuels Technology Algae Biofuels Technology Algae Biofuels Technology Algae Biofuels Technology More Documents & Publications Details of the FY 2013 Congressional Budget...

117

Solazyme Developing Cheaper Algae Biofuels, Brings Jobs to Pennsylvania |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solazyme Developing Cheaper Algae Biofuels, Brings Jobs to Solazyme Developing Cheaper Algae Biofuels, Brings Jobs to Pennsylvania Solazyme Developing Cheaper Algae Biofuels, Brings Jobs to Pennsylvania August 6, 2010 - 2:00pm Addthis A $20 million Recovery Act award will help Solazyme take production from tens of thousands of gallons a year of its algae "drop-in" oil to an annual production capacity of over half a million gallons. | Photo courtesy of Solazyme, Inc. | A $20 million Recovery Act award will help Solazyme take production from tens of thousands of gallons a year of its algae "drop-in" oil to an annual production capacity of over half a million gallons. | Photo courtesy of Solazyme, Inc. | Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE Some biotech companies use outdoor ponds to make algae-based biofuels, but

118

Knowledge Integration to Make Decisions About Complex Systems: Sustainability of Energy Production from Agriculture  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A major bottleneck for improving the governance of complex systems, rely on our ability to integrate different forms of knowledge into a decision support system (DSS). Preliminary aspects are the classification of different types of knowledge (a priori or general, a posteriori or specific, with uncertainty, numerical, textual, algorithmic, complete/incomplete, etc.), the definition of ontologies for knowledge management and the availability of proper tools like continuous simulation models, event driven models, statistical approaches, computational methods (neural networks, evolutionary optimization, rule based systems etc.) and procedure for textual documentation. Following these views at University of Udine, a computer language (SEMoLa, Simple, Easy Modelling Language) for knowledge integration has been developed. SEMoLa can handle models, data, metadata and textual knowledge; it implements and extends the system dynamics ontology (Forrester, 1968; Joergensen, 1994) in which systems are modeled by the concepts of material, group, state, rate, parameter, internal and external events and driving variables. As an example, a SEMoLa model to improve management and sustainability (economical, energetic, environmental) of the agricultural farms is presented. The model (X-Farm) simulates a farm in which cereal and forage yield, oil seeds, milk, calves and wastes can be sold or reused. X-Farm is composed by integrated modules describing fields (crop and soil), feeds and materials storage, machinery management, manpower management, animal husbandry, economic and energetic balances, seed oil extraction, manure and wastes management, biogas production from animal wastes and biomasses.

Danuso, Francesco (University of Udine)

2008-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

119

Utilization of agricultural wastes for production of ethanol. Progress report, October 1979-May 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project proposes to develop methods to utilize agricultural wastes, especially cottonseed hulls and peanut shells to produce ethanol. Initial steps will involve development of methods to break down cellulose to a usable form of substrates for chemical or biological digestion. The process of ethanol production will consist of (a) preparatory step to separate fibrous (cellulose) and non-fibrous (non-cellulosic compounds). The non-cellulosic residues which may include grains, fats or other substrates for alcoholic fermentation. The fibrous residues will be first pre-treated to digest cellulose with acid, alkali, and sulfur dioxide gas or other solvents. (b) The altered cellulose will be digested by suitable micro-organisms and cellulose enzymes before alcoholic fermentation. The digester and fermentative unit will be specially designed to develop a prototype for pilot plant for a continuous process. The first phase of the project will be devoted toward screening of a suitable method for cellulose modification, separation of fibrous and non-fibrous residues, the micro-organism and enzyme preparations. Work is in progress on: the effects of various microorganisms on the degree of saccharification; the effects of higher concentrations of acids, alkali, and EDTA on efficiency of microbial degradation; and the effects of chemicals on enzymatic digestion.

Singh, B.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Economic Analysis of Energy Crop Production in the U.S. - Location, Quantities, Price, and Impacts on Traditional Agricultural Crops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

POLYSYS is used to estimate US locations where, for any given energy crop price, energy crop production can be economically competitive with conventional crops. POLYSYS is a multi-crop, multi-sector agricultural model developed and maintained by the University of Tennessee and used by the USDA-Economic Research Service. It includes 305 agricultural statistical districts (ASD) which can be aggregated to provide state, regional, and national information. POLYSYS is being modified to include switchgrass, hybrid poplar, and willow on all land suitable for their production. This paper summarizes the preliminary national level results of the POLYSYS analysis for selected energy crop prices for the year 2007 and presents the corresponding maps (for the same prices) of energy crop production locations by ASD. Summarized results include: (1) estimates of energy crop hectares (acres) and quantities (dry Mg, dry tons), (2) identification of traditional crops allocated to energy crop production and calculation of changes in their prices and hectares (acres) of production, and (3) changes in total net farm returns for traditional agricultural crops. The information is useful for identifying areas of the US where large quantities of lowest cost energy crops can most likely be produced.

Walsh, M.E.; De La Torre Ugarte, D.; Slinsky, S.; Graham, R.L.; Shapouri, H.; Ray, D.

1998-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural products algae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Trends in Kenyan agricultural productivity: 1997–2007. Working Paper 31. Tegemeo Institute  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Egerton University with a mandate to undertake empirical research and analysis on contemporary economic and agricultural policy issues in Kenya. The institute is widely recognized as a centre of excellence in policy analysis on the topical agricultural issues of the day, and in its wide dissemination of findings to government and other key stakeholders with a view to influencing policy direction and the decision making process. Tegemeo’s consistently good quality empirically-based analytical work, and its objective stance in reporting and disseminating findings has over the past decade won the acceptance of government, the private sector, civil society, academia and others interested in the performance of Kenya’s agricultural

Betty Kibaara; Joshua Ariga; John Olw; T. S. Jayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

CONCENTRATION OF CESIUM-137 BY ALGAE  

SciTech Connect

The adsorption-absorption of Cs/sup 137/ by algae is of interest because Cs/sup 137/ of the critical fission products in power reactor wastes and atomic weapon fall-out. It is well known that plankton takes up radioactivity in fairly high concentrations. The purpose of this investigation was to study the accumulation of Cs/sup 137/ by fresh water-algae. (A.C.)

Williams, L.G.; Swanson, H.D.

1958-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

123

Agricultural Microscopy Division  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Agricultural Microscopy Division advances visual imaging in discerning the quality and content of ingredients and finished products of the feed, fertilizer, seed, and agri-food sectors. Agricultural Microscopy Division Divisions achievement ag

124

Algae and Cu  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to test algae andor other microorganisms in a pond water mini-environment (a gallon jar that contains pond water and sediment along with various naturally occurring...

125

RESISTANCE OF ALGAE TO RADIATION  

SciTech Connect

Data are tabulated on the radiosensitivity of eight algae. The influence of nuclear cytology on radioresistance of some algae is discussed. (C.H.)

Godward, M.B.E.

1960-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Integrated description of agricultural field experiments and production: The ICASA Version 2.0 data standards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agricultural research increasingly seeks to quantify complex interactions of processes for a wide range of environmental conditions and crop management scenarios, leading to investigation where multiple sets of experimental data are examined using tools ... Keywords: ACE, ASCII, AgMIP, Climate change, Crop modeling, DSSAT, Data management, Databases, IBSNAT, ICASA, JSON, NASA/POWER, Software, WISE, XML

Jeffrey W. White, L. A. Hunt, Kenneth J. Boote, James W. Jones, Jawoo Koo, Soonho Kim, Cheryl H. Porter, Paul W. Wilkens, Gerrit Hoogenboom

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Method and apparatus for lysing and processing algae  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus for processing algae are described in which a hydrophilic ionic liquid is used to lyse algae cells at lower temperatures than existing algae processing methods. A salt or salt solution is used as a separation agent and to remove water from the ionic liquid, allowing the ionic liquid to be reused. The used salt may be dried or concentrated and reused. The relatively low lysis temperatures and recycling of the ionic liquid and salt reduce the environmental impact of the algae processing while providing biofuels and other useful products.

Chew, Geoffrey; Reich, Alton J.; Dykes, Jr., H. Waite H.; Di Salvo, Roberto

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

128

Empirical support for global integrated assessment modeling: Productivity trends and technological change in developing countries' agriculture and electric power sectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrated assessment (IA) modeling of climate policy is increasingly global in nature, with models incorporating regional disaggregation. The existing empirical basis for IA modeling, however, largely arises from research on industrialized economies. Given the growing importance of developing countries in determining long-term global energy and carbon emissions trends, filling this gap with improved statistical information on developing countries' energy and carbon-emissions characteristics is an important priority for enhancing IA modeling. Earlier research at LBNL on this topic has focused on assembling and analyzing statistical data on productivity trends and technological change in the energy-intensive manufacturing sectors of five developing countries, India, Brazil, Mexico, Indonesia, and South Korea. The proposed work will extend this analysis to the agriculture and electric power sectors in India, South Korea, and two other developing countries. They will also examine the impact of alternative model specifications on estimates of productivity growth and technological change for each of the three sectors, and estimate the contribution of various capital inputs--imported vs. indigenous, rigid vs. malleable-- in contributing to productivity growth and technological change. The project has already produced a data resource on the manufacturing sector which is being shared with IA modelers. This will be extended to the agriculture and electric power sectors, which would also be made accessible to IA modeling groups seeking to enhance the empirical descriptions of developing country characteristics. The project will entail basic statistical and econometric analysis of productivity and energy trends in these developing country sectors, with parameter estimates also made available to modeling groups. The parameter estimates will be developed using alternative model specifications that could be directly utilized by the existing IAMs for the manufacturing, agriculture, and electric power sectors.

Sathaye, Jayant A.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Method and apparatus using an active ionic liquid for algae biofuel harvest and extraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The invention relates to use of an active ionic liquid to dissolve algae cell walls. The ionic liquid is used to, in an energy efficient manner, dissolve and/or lyse an algae cell walls, which releases algae constituents used in the creation of energy, fuel, and/or cosmetic components. The ionic liquids include ionic salts having multiple charge centers, low, very low, and ultra low melting point ionic liquids, and combinations of ionic liquids. An algae treatment system is described, which processes wet algae in a lysing reactor, separates out algae constituent products, and optionally recovers the ionic liquid in an energy efficient manner.

Salvo, Roberto Di; Reich, Alton; Dykes, Jr., H. Waite H.; Teixeira, Rodrigo

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

130

Algae for Oxygen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Algae for Oxygen Algae for Oxygen Name: Pam Burkardt Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Hi, I am Pam Burkardt, a seventh grader at Fox Chapel School. I have a question on algae. I read somewhere that someday people might take bath tubs full of algae onto spaceships to provide oxygen for the crew. How much oxygen does algae give off, is this really possible? Replies: I think that most of the oxygen in the atmosphere comes in fact from one-celled plants in the oceans, like algae. They are likely to produce a lot of oxygen per unit weight because they don't have non-photosynthesizing bark, roots, branches, etc., nor (I think) a major dormant period like temperate-zone plants. The cost of space travel at present is dominated by the expense of heaving weight up into Earth orbit (it costs very little extra to send it to the Moon, for example, or Mars). For missions of short duration the weight of the compressed oxygen you need to carry is less than the weight of algae, water and extra plumbing you'd need to carry if you relied on algae to produce your oxygen. The important use of green plants would be in very long duration space flight (years) or permanent inhabitation of worlds like the Moon, where you need an unlimited supply of oxygen. Now if you want to fantasize, Venus' atmosphere is almost all carbon dioxide. Suppose you dropped a whole lot of specially gene-tailored one-celled plants into the atmosphere (not the surface, it's too hot). Why then they might eat up all the carbon dioxide and produce a breathable atmosphere. The "greenhouse effect" would go away, and Venus would become a nice habitable if tropical world only 50 million miles away.

131

Algae Biomass Summit | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Algae Biomass Summit Algae Biomass Summit September 30, 2013 12:00PM EDT to October 3, 2013 12:00PM EDT Algae Biomass Summit...

132

Developing New Alternative Energy in Virginia: Bio-Diesel from Algae  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this study was to select chemical processing equipment, install and operate that equipment to directly convert algae to biodiesel via a reaction patented by Old Dominion University (Pat. No. US 8,080,679B2). This reaction is a high temperature (250- 330{degrees}C) methylation reaction utilizing tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) to produce biodiesel. As originally envisioned, algal biomass could be treated with TMAH in methanol without the need to separately extract triacylglycerides (TAG). The reactor temperature allows volatilization and condensation of the methyl esters whereas the spent algae solids can be utilized as a high-value fertilizer because they are minimally charred. During the course of this work and immediately prior to commencing, we discovered that glycerol, a major by-product of the conventional transesterification reaction for biofuels, is not formed but rather three methoxylated glycerol derivatives are produced. These derivatives are high-value specialty green chemicals that strongly upgrade the economics of the process, rendering this approach as one that now values the biofuel only as a by-product, the main value products being the methoxylated glycerols. A horizontal agitated thin-film evaporator (one square foot heat transfer area) proved effective as the primary reactor facilitating the reaction and vaporization of the products, and subsequent discharge of the spent algae solids that are suitable for supplementing petrochemicalbased fertilizers for agriculture. Because of the size chosen for the reactor, we encountered problems with delivery of the algal feed to the reaction zone, but envision that this problem could easily disappear upon scale-up or can be replaced economically by incorporating an extraction process. The objective for production of biodiesel from algae in quantities that could be tested could not be met, but we implemented use of soybean oil as a surrogate TAG feed to overcome this limitation. The positive economics of this process are influenced by the following: 1. the weight percent of dry algae in suspension that can be fed into the evaporator, 2. the alga species’ ability to produce a higher yield of biodiesel, 3. the isolation of valuable methoxylated by-products, 4. recycling and regeneration of methanol and TMAH, and 5. the market value of biodiesel, commercial agricultural fertilizer, and the three methoxylated by-products. The negative economics of the process are the following: 1. the cost of producing dried, ground algae, 2. the capital cost of the equipment required for feedstock mixing, reaction, separation and recovery of products, and reactant recycling, and 3. the electrical cost and other utilities. In this report, the economic factors and results are assembled to predict the commercialization cost and its viability. This direct conversion process and equipment discussed herein can be adapted for various feedstocks including: other algal species, vegetable oil, jatropha oil, peanut oil, sunflower oil, and other TAG containing raw materials as a renewable energy resource.

Hatcher, Patrick [Old Dominion University

2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

133

Declining global per capita agricultural production and warming oceans threaten food security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

per capita production levels in 2030 similar to those of theby 14% between 2008 and 2030. Climate change is likely tocereal production by 2030. If done sustainably, raising

Funk, Chris C.; Brown, Molly E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Agricultural production in the United States by county: a compilation of information from the 1974 census of agriculture for use in terrestrial food-chain transport and assessment models  

SciTech Connect

Terrestrial food-chain models that simulate the transport of environmentally released radionuclides incorporate parameters describing agricultural production and practice. Often a single set of default parameters, such as that listed in USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.109, is used in lieu of site-specific information. However, the geographical diversity of agricultural practice in the United States suggests the limitations of a single set of default parameters for assessment models. This report documents default parameters with a county-wide resolution based on analysis of the 1974 US Census of Agriculture for use in terrestrial food chain models. Data reported by county, together with state-based information from the US Department of Agriculture, Economic and Statistics Service, provided the basis for estimates of model input parameters. This report also describes these data bases, their limitations, and lists default parameters by county. Vegetable production is described for four categories: leafy vegetables; vegetables and fruits exposed to airborne material; vegetables, fruits, and nuts protected from airborne materials; and grains. Livestock feeds were analyzed in categories of hay, silage, pasture, and grains. Pasture consumption was estimated from cattle and sheep inventories, their feed requirements, and reported quantities of harvested forage. The results were compared with assumed yields of the pasture areas reported. In addition, non-vegetable food production estimates including milk, beef, pork, lamb, poultry, eggs, goat milk, and honey are described. The agricultural parameters and land use information - in all 47 items - are tabulated in four appendices for each of the 3067 counties of the US reported to the Census of Agriculture, excluding those in Hawaii and Alaska.

Shor, R.W.; Baes, C.F. III; Sharp, R.D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Potential for Biofuels from Algae (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation on the potential for biofuels from algae presented at the 2007 Algae Biomass Summit in San Francisco, CA.

Pienkos, P. T.

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

136

Modifications of the metabolic pathways of lipid and triglyceride production in microalgae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the utility of algae as a biofuel feedstock. Algae cells canon algae as a next generation feedstock for biofuel pro-bene- fits for future biofuel production. Algae, the world’s

Yu, Wei-Luen; Ansari, William; Schoepp, Nathan G; Hannon, Michael J; Mayfield, Stephen P; Burkart, Michael D

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Optimization-based trade-off analysis of biodiesel crop production for managing an agricultural catchment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Political agendas worldwide include increased production of biofuel, which multiplies the trade-offs among conflicting objectives, including food and fodder production, water quantity, water quality, biodiversity, and ecosystem services. Quantification ... Keywords: Bioenergy, Crop rotation schemes, Genetic algorithm, Land use, River basin management, Water quality

Sven Lautenbach, Martin Volk, Michael Strauch, Gerald Whittaker, Ralf Seppelt

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

The Predicting of Reservoir Algae Viscosity Based on Independent Component Analysis and Back Propagation Artificial Neural Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the rapid development of industry and agriculture, an increasing of nitrogen phosphorus and other nutrient emission has accelerated the eutrophication process and stimulated the abnormal reproduction of algae. Frequent outbreaks of algal bloom in ... Keywords: algal bloom, algae concentration prediction, independent component analysis, BP neural network, Songshan Lake reservoir

Chang Xu; Hongliang Zhou; Hongjian Zhang

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Photophysiology and cellular composition of sea ice algae  

SciTech Connect

The productivity of sea ice algae depends on their physiological capabilities and the environmental conditions within various microhabitats. Pack ice is the dominant form of sea ice, but the photosynthetic activity of associated algae has rarely been studied. Biomass and photosynthetic rates of ice algae of the Weddell-Scotia Sea were investigated during autumn and winter, the period when ice cover grows from its minimum to maximum. Biomass-specific photosynthetic rates typically ranged from 0.3 to 3.0 {mu}g C {center dot} {mu}g chl{sup {minus}1} {center dot} h{sup {minus}1} higher than land-fast ice algae but similar to Antarctic phytoplankton. Primary production in the pack ice during winter may be minor compared to annual phytoplankton production, but could represent a vital seasonal contribution to the Antarctic ecosystem. Nutrient supply may limit the productivity of ice algae. In McMurdo Sound, congelation ice algae appeared to be more nutrient deficient than underlying platelet ice algae based on: lower nitrogen:carbon, chlorophyll:carbon, and protein:carbohydrate; and {sup 14}C-photosynthate distribution to proteins and phospholipids was lower, while distribution to polysaccharides and neutral lipids was higher. Depletion of nitrate led to decreased nitrogen:carbon, chlorophyll:carbon, protein:carbohydrate, and {sup 14}C-photosynthate to proteins. Studied were conducted during the spring bloom; therefore, nutrient limitation may only apply to dense ice algal communities. Growth limiting conditions may be alleviated when algae are released into seawater during the seasonal recession of the ice cover. To continue growth, algae must adapt to the variable light field encountered in a mixed water column. Photoadaptation was studied in surface ice communities and in bottom ice communities.

Lizotte, M.P.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Predicting Agricultural Management Influence on Long-Term Soil Organic Carbon Dynamics: Implications for Biofuel Production  

SciTech Connect

Long-term field experiments (LTE) are ideal for predicting the influence of agricultural management on soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics and examining biofuel crop residue removal policy questions. Our objectives were (i) to simulate SOC dynamics in LTE soils under various climates, crop rotations, fertilizer or organic amendments, and crop residue managements using the CQESTR model and (ii) to predict the potential of no-tillage (NT) management to maintain SOC stocks while removing crop residue. Classical LTEs at Champaign, IL (1876), Columbia, MO (1888), Lethbridge, AB (1911), Breton, AB (1930), and Pendleton, OR (1931) were selected for their documented history of management practice and periodic soil organic matter (SOM) measurements. Management practices ranged from monoculture to 2- or 3-yr crop rotations, manure, no fertilizer or fertilizer additions, and crop residue returned, burned, or harvested. Measured and CQESTR predicted SOC stocks under diverse agronomic practices, mean annual temperature (2.1 19 C), precipitation (402 973 mm), and SOC (5.89 33.58 g SOC kg 1) at the LTE sites were significantly related (r 2 = 0.94, n = 186, P < 0.0001) with a slope not significantly different than 1. The simulation results indicated that the quantities of crop residue that can be sustainably harvested without jeopardizing SOC stocks were influenced by initial SOC stocks, crop rotation intensity, tillage practices, crop yield, and climate. Manure or a cover crop/intensified crop rotation under NT are options to mitigate loss of crop residue C, as using fertilizer alone is insufficient to overcome residue removal impact on SOC stocks

Gollany, H. T. [USDA ARS; Rickman, R. W. [USDA ARS; Albrecht, S. L. [USDA ARS; Liang, Y. [University of Arkansas; Kang, Shujiang [ORNL; Machado, S. [Oregon State University, Corvallis

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural products algae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Cultivation of macroscopic marine algae  

SciTech Connect

The red alga Gracilaria tikvahiae may be grown outdoors year-round in central Florida with yields averaging 35.5 g dry wt/m/sup 2/.day, greater than the most productive terrestrial plants. This occurs only when the plants are in a suspended culture, with vigorous aeration and an exchange of 25 or more culture volumes of enriched seawater per day, which is not cost-effective. A culture system was designed in which Gracilaria, stocked at a density of 2 kg wet wt/m/sup 2/, grows to double its biomass in one to two weeks; it is then harvested to its starting density, and anaerobically digested to methane. The biomass is soaked for 6 hours in the digester residue, storing enough nutrients for two weeks' growth in unenriched seawater. The methane is combusted for energy and the waste gas is fed to the culture to provide mixing and CO/sub 2/, eliminating the need for aeration and seawater exchange. The green alga Ulva lactuca, unlike Gracilaria, uses bicarbonate as a photosynthesis carbon source, and can grow at high pH, with little or no free CO/sub 2/. It can therefore produce higher yields than Gracilaria in low water exchange conditions. It is also more efficiently converted to methane than is Gracilaria, but cannot tolerate Florida's summer temperatures so cannot be grown year-round. Attempts are being made to locate or produce a high-temperature tolerant strain.

Ryther, J.H.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Publications Agricultural Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. (2012). Economics of IPM Decisions. Stored Product Protection (1- 9). Manhattan, KS: Kansas State (1-11). Manhattan, KS: Kansas State. http://entomology.k-state.edu/doc/finished- chapters/s156-ch-27 of Food and Agriculture­ Conservation Effects Assessment Project. How to Build Better Agricultural

143

Application of Hedonic Price Modeling to Estimate the Value of Algae Meal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High productivity rates, usage of nonproductive land, renewability and recovery of waste nutrients and potential for CO2 emission reduction represent some of the advantages that selected algae species might have over competing products. Many research studies have investigated potential usage of algae for different purposes, such as cosmetics or aquaculture; however most of the research studies have focused on the feasibility of algae as a source of second generation biodiesel and feed meal. Because of its high costs of production, using algae only for the purpose of biodiesel production might not be profitable. Thus, for global scale algae commercialization it is important that it be used as a feed meal along with being marketed to the biodiesel industry. One of the major problems faced by economists when attempting to analyze the feasibility of algae is the absence of a market for algae-based fuel and meal. Given that no market exists, prices for algae cannot be observed and realistic investment analysis becomes difficult to perform in this sector. The objective of this study is to estimate a potential price of algae meal using hedonic pricing techniques. For that purpose, twenty two different feed meals commonly having the same usage as Post Extracted Algae Residue (PEAR) are decomposed into their chemical constituents in order to calculate the market value of each characteristic. Calculated prices of these characteristics are then used to estimate the price of algae meal and compare it to different feed meals. Results suggest that algae prices are strictly variable to its chemical components across different algae types. Besides, PEAR represents a sustainable source of financial value and might be considered one of the cornerstones in making algae commercialization a feasible and profitable option.

Gogichaishvili, Ilia

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Land Application of Coal Combustion By-Products: Use in Agriculture and Land Reclamation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land application of coal combustion by-products (CCBP) can prove beneficial for a number of reasons. The data presented in this survey provide a basis for optimizing the rates and timing of CCBP applications, selecting proper target soils and crops, and minimizing adverse effects on soil properties, plant responses, and groundwater quality.

1997-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

145

Long-term climate change impacts on agricultural productivity in eastern China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations are expected to induce significant climate change over the next century and beyond, but the impacts on society remain highly uncertain. This work examines potential climate change impacts on the productivity of five major crops in northeastern China: canola, corn, potato, rice, and winter wheat. In addition to determining domain-wide trends, the objective is to identify vulnerable and emergent regions under future climate conditions, defined as having a greater than 10% decrease and increase in productivity, respectively. Data from the ICTP RegCM3 regional climate model for baseline (1961-1990) and future (2071-2100) periods under A2 scenario conditions are used as input in the EPIC agro-ecosystem simulation model in the domain [30şN, 108şE] to [42şN, 123şE]. Simulations are performed with and without the enhanced CO2 fertilization effect. Results indicate that aggregate potential productivity (i.e. if the crop is grown everywhere) increases 6.5% for rice, 8.3% for canola, 18.6% for corn, 22.9% for potato, and 24.9% for winter wheat, although with significant spatial variability for each crop. However, absent the enhanced CO2 fertilization effect, potential productivity declines in all cases ranging from 2.5-12%. Interannual yield variability remains constant or declines in all cases except rice. Climate variables are found to be more significant drivers of simulated yield changes than changes in soil properties, except in the case of potato production in the northwest where the effects of wind erosion are more significant. Overall, in the future period corn and winter wheat benefit significantly in the North China Plain, rice remains dominant in the southeast and emerges in the northeast, potato and corn yields become viable in the northwest, and potato yields suffer in the southwest with no other crop emerging as a clear beneficiary from among those simulated in this study.

Chavas, Daniel R.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Thomson, Allison M.; Gao, Xuejie

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

146

Overall Energy Considerations for Algae Species Comparison and Selection in Algae-to-Fuels Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The controlled growth of microalgae as a feedstock for alternative transportation fuel continues to receive much attention. Microalgae have the characteristics of rapid growth rate, high oil (lipid) content, and ability to be grown in unconventional scenarios. Algae have also been touted as beneficial for CO{sub 2} reuse, as algae can be grown using CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil-based energy generation. Moreover, algae does not compete in the food chain, lessening the 'food versus fuel' debate. Most often, it is assumed that either rapid production rate or high oii content should be the primary factor in algae selection for algae-to-fuels production systems. However, many important characteristics of algae growth and lipid production must be considered for species selection, growth condition, and scale-up. Under light limited, high density, photoautotrophic conditions, the inherent growth rate of an organism does not affect biomass productivity, carbon fixation rate, and energy fixation rate. However, the oil productivity is organism dependent, due to physiological differences in how the organisms allocate captured photons for growth and oil production and due to the differing conditions under which organisms accumulate oils. Therefore, many different factors must be considered when assessing the overall energy efficiency of fuel production for a given algae species. Two species, Chlorella vulgaris and Botryococcus braunii, are popular choices when discussing algae-to-fuels systems. Chlorella is a very robust species, often outcompeting other species in mixed-culture systems, and produces a lipid that is composed primarily of free fatty acids and glycerides. Botryococcus is regarded as a slower growing species, and the lipid that it produces is characterized by high hydrocarbon content, primarily C28-C34 botryococcenes. The difference in growth rates is often considered to be an advantage oiChlorella. However, the total energy captured by each algal species in the same photobioreactor system should be similar at light limited growth conditions based on photon flux. It is how the algae 'allocate' this energy captured that will vary: Data will be presented that shows that Botryococcus invests greater energy in oil production than Chlorella under these growth conditions. In essence, the Chlorella can grow 'fast and lean' or can be slowed to grow 'slow and fat'. The overall energy potential between the Chlorella and Botryococcus, then, becomes much more equivalent on a per-photon basis. This work will indicate an interesting relationship between two very different algae species, in terms of growth rate, lipid content and composition, and energy efficiency of the overall process. The presentation will indicate that in light-limited growth, it cannot be assumed that either rapid growth rate or lipid production rate can be used as stand-alone indicators of which species-lipid relationships will truly be more effective in algae-to-fuels scenarios.

Link, D.; Kail, B.; Curtis, W.; Tuerk,A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Production of Hydrogen from Peanut Shells The goal of this project is the production of renewable hydrogen from agricultural  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to existing methane reforming technologies. The hydrogen produced will be blended with CNG and used to power activated carbon. The vapor by-products from the first step can be steam reformed into hydrogen. NREL has developed the technology for bio- oil to hydrogen via catalytic steam reforming and shift conversion

148

EA-1829: Phycal Algae Pilot Project, Wahiawa and Kalaeloa, Hawaii |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1829: Phycal Algae Pilot Project, Wahiawa and Kalaeloa, Hawaii 1829: Phycal Algae Pilot Project, Wahiawa and Kalaeloa, Hawaii EA-1829: Phycal Algae Pilot Project, Wahiawa and Kalaeloa, Hawaii Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal, through a cooperative agreement with Phycal, Inc. to partially fund implementing and evaluating new technology for the reuse of Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from industrial sources for green energy products. This project would use CO2 to grow algae for the production of algal oil and subsequent conversion to fuel. The project would generate reliable cost information and test data to access its viability for implementation at a future commercial scale. If approved, DOE would provide approximately 80 percent of the funding for the project. Public Comment Opportunities

149

Definition: Algae | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Algae Algae Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Algae Photosynthetic, plant-like organisms containing chlorophyll. Often fast growing and able to live in freshwater, seawater, or damp oils. May be unicellular and microscopic or very large, as in the giant kelps. Can be used as a source for biofuels, and has been engineered to produce ethanol, oil and even diesel.[1][2][3][4] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Related Terms Biofuels, Algae fuel, bioenergy, sustainability References ↑ http://www.nrel.gov/biomass/glossary.html ↑ http://www.soil.ncsu.edu/publications/BMPs/glossary.html ↑ http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/26/business/energy-environment/26algae.html ↑ http://abcnews.go.com/International/algae-solve-worlds-fuel-crisis/story?id=14181088 Retrie

150

Development of Green Fuels From Algae - The University of Tulsa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The general public has become increasingly aware of the pitfalls encountered with the continued reliance on fossil fuels in the industrialized world. In response, the scientific community is in the process of developing non-fossil fuel technologies that can supply adequate energy while also being environmentally friendly. In this project, we concentrate on â??green fuelsâ?ť which we define as those capable of being produced from renewable and sustainable resources in a way that is compatible with the current transportation fuel infrastructure. One route to green fuels that has received relatively little attention begins with algae as a feedstock. Algae are a diverse group of aquatic, photosynthetic organisms, generally categorized as either macroalgae (i.e. seaweed) or microalgae. Microalgae constitute a spectacularly diverse group of prokaryotic and eukaryotic unicellular organisms and account for approximately 50% of global organic carbon fixation. The PIâ??s have subdivided the proposed research program into three main research areas, all of which are essential to the development of commercially viable algae fuels compatible with current energy infrastructure. In the fuel development focus, catalytic cracking reactions of algae oils is optimized. In the species development project, genetic engineering is used to create microalgae strains that are capable of high-level hydrocarbon production. For the modeling effort, the construction of multi-scaled models of algae production was prioritized, including integrating small-scale hydrodynamic models of algae production and reactor design and large-scale design optimization models.

Crunkleton, Daniel; Price, Geoffrey; Johannes, Tyler; Cremaschi, Selen

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

151

Metabolism of Thioctic Acid in Algae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

METABOLISM OF THlOCTlC ACID IN ALGAE TWO-WEEK LOAN COPY ThisMETABOLISM OF THIOCTIC ACID IN ALGAE Hans Grisebach, R. , C.METABOLISM OF THIOCTIC ACID IN ALGAE Hans Grisebach, R. C.

Grisebach, Hans; Fuller, R.C.; Calvin, M.

1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

BRANCHED ALKANES FROM BLUE-GREEN ALGAE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ALKANES FROM BLUE-GREEN ALGAE RECEIV r -· LAWREW RADIATIONAlkanes From Blue-Green Algae by Jerry Han and Oep~rtment l~alkanes from blue-green algae were separated on a The

Han, Jerry; Calvin, Melvin.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Commercializing algae—challenges and opportunities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The promise of algae provides much motivation for research and investment for the widespread deployment of algae as a feedstock. Commercializing algae—challenges and opportunities Processing Biofuels and Bioproducts and Biodiesel Inform Magazine Inform

154

Empirical support for global integrated assessment modeling: Productivity trends and technological change in developing countries' agriculture and electric power sectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Countries' Agriculture and Electric Power Sectors Jayant A.of scale in the U.S. electric power sector was a study byof Scale in U.S. Electric Power Generation", in Journal of

Sathaye, Jayant A.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Characterization of the Kootenai River Algae Community and Primary Productivity Before and After Experimental Nutrient Addition, 2004–2007 [Chapter 2, Kootenai River Algal Community Characterization, 2009 KTOI REPORT].  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Kootenai River ecosystem (spelled Kootenay in Canada) has experienced numerous ecological changes since the early 1900s. Some of the largest impacts to habitat, biological communities, and ecological function resulted from levee construction along the 120 km of river upstream from Kootenay Lake, completed by the 1950s, and the construction and operation of Libby Dam on the river near Libby Montana, completed in 1972. Levee construction isolated tens of thousands of hectares of historic functioning floodplain habitat from the river channel downstream in Idaho and British Columbia (B.C.) severely reducing natural biological productivity and habitat diversity crucial to large river-floodplain ecosystem function. Libby Dam greatly reduces sediment and nutrient transport to downstream river reaches, and dam operations cause large changes in the timing, duration, and magnitude of river flows. These and other changes have contributed to the ecological collapse of the post-development Kootenai River ecosystem and its native biological communities. In response to large scale loss of nutrients, experimental nutrient addition was initiated in the North Arm of Kootenay Lake in 1992, in the South Arm of Kootenay Lake in 2004, and in the Kootenai River at the Idaho-Montana border during 2005. This report characterizes baseline chlorophyll concentration and accrual (primary productivity) rates and diatom and algal community composition and ecological metrics in the Kootenai River for four years, one (2004) before, and three (2005 through 2007) after nutrient addition. The study area encompassed a 325 km river reach from the upper Kootenay River at Wardner, B.C. (river kilometer (rkm) 445) downstream through Montana and Idaho to Kootenay Lake in B.C. (rkm 120). Sampling reaches included an unimpounded reach furthest upstream and four reaches downstream from Libby Dam affected by impoundment: two in the canyon reach (one with and one without nutrient addition), a braided reach, and a meandering reach. The study design included 14 sampling sites: an upstream, unimpounded reference site (KR-14), four control (non-fertilized) canyon sites downstream from Libby Dam, but upstream from nutrient addition (KR-10 through KR-13), two treatment sites referred to collectively as the nutrient addition zone (KR-9 and KR-9.1, located at and 5 km downstream from the nutrient addition site), two braided reach sites (KR-6 and KR-7), and four meander reach sites (KR-1 through KR-4). A series of qualitative evaluations and quantitative analyses were used to assess baseline conditions and effects of experimental nutrient addition treatments on chlorophyll, primary productivity, and taxonomic composition and metric arrays for the diatom and green algae communities. Insufficient density in the samples precluded analyses of bluegreen algae taxa and metrics for pre- and post-nutrient addition periods. Chlorophyll a concentration (mg/m{sup 2}), chlorophyll accrual rate (mg/m{sup 2}/30d), total chlorophyll concentration (chlorophyll a and b) (mg/m{sup 2}), and total chlorophyll accrual rate (mg/m{sup 2}/30d) were calculated. Algal taxa were identified and grouped by taxonomic order as Cyanophyta (blue-greens), Chlorophyta (greens), Bacillariophyta (diatoms), Chrysophyta (goldens), and dominant species from each sample site were identified. Algal densities (number/ml) in periphyton samples were calculated for each sample site and sampling date. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was performed to reduce the dimension of diatom and algae data and to determine which taxonomic groups and metrics were contributing significantly to the observed variation. PCA analyses were tabulated to indicate eigenvalues, proportion, and cumulative percent variation, as well as eigenvectors (loadings) for each of the components. Biplot graphic displays of PCA axes were also generated to characterize the pattern and structure of the underlying variation. Taxonomic data and a series of biological and ecological metrics were used with PCA for diatoms and algae. Algal metrics included

Holderman, Charlie [Kootenai Tribe of Idaho; Bonners Ferry, ID; Anders, Paul [Cramer Fish Sciences; Moscow, ID; Shafii, Bahman [Statistical Consulting Services; Clarkston, WA

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Nitrogen Fertilizer Management for Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Mitigation in Intensive Corn (Maize) Production: An Emissions Reduction Proto col for US Midwest Agriculture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Status: Published Citation: Millar, N; Robertson, GP; Grace, PR; Gehl, RJ; and Hoben, JP. 2010. Nitrogen Fertilizer Management for Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Mitigation in Intensive Corn (Maize) Production: An Emissions Reduction Protocol for US Midwest Agriculture. In Journal of Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change,Volume 15, Number 2, 2010, pp. 185-204. Link to Journal Publication: See Journal of Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change.

2010-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

157

Nitrogen Fertilizer Management for Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Mitigation in Intensive Corn (Maize) Production: An Emissions Redu ction Protocol for U.S. Midwest Agriculture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Status: Published Citation: Millar, N; Robertson, GP; Grace, PR; Gehl, RJ; and Hoben; JP. 2010. Nitrogen Fertilizer Management for Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Mitigation in Intensive Corn (Maize) Production: An Emissions Reduction Protocol for U.S. Midwest Agriculture. In Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Volume 15, Number 2, 2010, pp. 185-204. A peer-reviewed journal article that identifies, describes and analyzes socio-economic factors that may encourage or inhibit farmers from participat...

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

158

Survey of Hydrogenase Activity in Algae: Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The capacity for hydrogen gas production was examined in nearly 100 strains of Eukaryotic algae. Each strain was assessed for rate of H2 production in darkness, at compensating light intensity and at saturating Tight intensity. Maximum H2 yield on illumination and sensitivity to molecular oxygen were also measured.

Brand, J. J.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Investigation of Flow Characteristics in an Airlift-Driven Raceway Reactor for Algae Cultivation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are the most common choice for outdoor algae cultivation due to their low cost relative to enclosed commercial viability has been restricted mostly to high-value strains such as Spirulina for health food from algae is promising, the high cost of production compared to the relatively low price of fuels

160

Agriculture, technology, and conflict  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conflict and agriculture have a long, shared history. The purpose of this research is to look at the relationships between agriculture, agricultural technologies, and conflict during current and recent conflicts, large scale and localized. Agriculture and its related technologies are often affected by conflict, but rarely acknowledged as a cause or solution to conflict. Literature reviews in six topic areas illustrate various facets of the relationship between agriculture and conflict. Research conducted in Santa Cruz del Quiché, Guatemala illustrates the ways farmers were impacted by the country’s civil war. It also examines farmer survival strategies during the war, and reveals the presence of minor localized conflict over water resources. Conflict over land is not a major concern at present. Market access for inputs and outputs are shown to have been a problem for a number of farmers during the civil war. The poverty of Santa Cruz farmers indicates that much could be gained by rural development. Research is unable to support the hypotheses that agricultural technologies have prevented or caused conflict in Santa Cruz del Quiché, or that they have played a large role in recovery from the country’s civil war. The author recommends that future research be undertaken in regions with a diverse set of agricultural technologies, and/or a recent history of significant technological change in agriculture. Policy recommendations include providing secure access to markets during war time, increasing capacity for home-based rural production, and continuing research into resilient crops. Finally, the author suggests that the responsible decision to develop, adopt, or introduce an agricultural technology must take into account the social consequences of that decision, including how the new technology may alleviate or contribute to conflict.

Zilverberg, Cody John

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural products algae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Method and apparatus for lysing and processing algae - Energy ...  

Methods and apparatus for processing algae are described in which a hydrophilic ionic liquid is used to lyse algae cells at lower temperatures than existing algae ...

162

Common benthic algae and cyanobacteria in southern California tidal wetlands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Janousek Janousek 2011: Algae and cyanobacteria of southernto the Marine Bluegreen Algae. John Wiley and Sons, NewDistribution of bluegreen algae in a Mississippi gulf coast

Janousek, Christopher N

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Agricultural Progress in Cameroon, Mali and Ghana: Why it Happened...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

both domestically and internationally. Analysis of agricultural performance focused on trends in output, factor use, and productivity. Analysis of agricultural policy featured...

164

Agriculture and Energy Departments Announce New Investments to...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agriculture and Energy Departments Announce New Investments to Drive Innovations in Biofuels and Biobased Products Agriculture and Energy Departments Announce New Investments to...

165

Agriculture Residues Recycling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Saudi Arabia, as well as other countries in the Near East region, is characterized by erratic weather conditions, limited area of fertile arable lands, and with acute water shortage. Although agricultural residues (AGR) production in the region is huge (more than 440 million tons), most of these residues are either burned in the field or utilized in an inefficient way. Utilization of AGR as compost may contribute to expansion of arable lands through its use for reclamation of soil and reduce irrigation requirements. This study was conducted at Al Khalidiah farm, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia to assess compost production at large commercial scale using several types of agricultural and animal by-products with addition of a BZT®Compost Activator (based mainly on microorganism, enzymes and yeast). In this study, two types of compost piles were made at the farm. The first pile of compost was made of different agriculture residues, namely: animal wastes (quail, goat and sheep manure), brownian agricultural wastes (windbreaks residues, date trees, citrus and olive trees pruning) and green landscape grasses (50%, 25 % and 25%, respectively) and was treated with a tested compost activator. The same agriculture residues combination was also made for the second pile as traditional compost

M. W. Sadik; H. M. El Shaer; H. M. Yakot

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Agriculture Information at NIST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Agriculture Information at NIST. Agriculture Information at NIST. CCQM BAWG - P113, Relative Quantification ...

2010-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

167

Why Sequence Algae from Acidic Waters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sequence Algae from Acidic Waters? Strains of green algae from isolated acidic waters are being sequenced to understand how they adapt to variable levels of carbon dioxide, as well...

168

Dark algae, life on Mars?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dark algae, life on Mars? Dark algae, life on Mars? Name: Jungle Fever Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I'm probably writing this is vain since my numerous other notes weren't answered, but here goes. Does anyone out there know anything about the dark algae found in Siberia (or Antarctica, I don't remember which) or the primitive microbes found by Chris McKay that were revived by a drop of water? Also, can this concept be applied to the possibility of life on Mars? I'd also appreciate any information on extraterrestrial microorganisms or life forms. Much thanks. Replies: I don't know specifically about the algae that you mention. However, I do know that there are several kinds of algae that go into a sexual reproductive state in response to adverse conditions often including high temperatures or lack of moisture. This sexual phase results in formation of a fertilized zygote which becomes dormant until conditions are optimum for growth. This usually involves water - so a drop of water could initiate growth of the new alga, and it could reproduce asexually quite rapidly, until conditions trigger the sexual phase again. I see no reason why such a growth pattern couldn't apply to life on Mars or anywhere else. There isn't much information, as far as I'm aware, regarding extraterrestrial life. So far, none has been found, but it is likely, statistically, that there is some out there, somewhere. The SETI program (Search for extraterrestrial intelligence), funded in part by the Planetary Society, is trying to find higher forms of life by doing radio searches.

169

Predicting Future Climate Using Algae Sedimentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biologists have shown that algae are the first to be implicated in climate changes and vice versa. The goal of this research effort is to predict the future climate using algae species living in a lake in the past. On performing age depth profile analysis ... Keywords: Marine Organisms, Algae Sedimentation, Climate, Extrapolation, Neural Networks, Regression Analysis, ID3

Jasdeep Natt; Ray Hashemi; Azita Bahrami; Mahmood Bahar; Nicholas Tyler; Jay Hodgson

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Are algae really feasible as fuel?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Great effort—-and lots of money—-is being expended to develop algae as a feedstock for transportation fuel. There doesn’t seem to be a clear answer yet, however, as to whether algae will ever be economically viable for this purpose. Are algae really feasib

171

School of Engineering and Science Algae Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

School of Engineering and Science Algae Biofuels BY: Alessandro Faldi, Ph.D. Section Head is algae- based biofuels, which we believe could be a meaningful part of the energy mix in the future. Algae biofuels have potential to be an economically viable, low-net carbon transportation fuel

Fisher, Frank

172

Agriculture | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agriculture Agriculture Dataset Summary Description The Energy Statistics Database contains comprehensive energy statistics on the production, trade, conversion and final consumption of primary and secondary; conventional and non-conventional; and new and renewable sources of energy. The Energy Statistics dataset, covering the period from 1990 on, is available at UNdata. This dataset relates to the consumption of alcohol by the transportation industry. Source United Nations (UN) Date Released December 09th, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Agriculture Alcohol consumption transportation industry UN Data application/xml icon UN Data: consumption by transportation industry XML (xml, 95 KiB) text/csv icon UN Data: consumption by transportation industry XLS (csv, 21.6 KiB)

173

Agricultural Microscopy Division Of Interest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agricultural Microscopy, Reports, Journals, Websites Agricultural Microscopy Division Of Interest Agricultural Microscopy agri-food sector agricultural Agricultural Microscopy analytical aocs articles biotechnology courses detergents division divisions f

174

Agricultural and Resource Economics Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

econom- ics of algae as a source of biofuel is dependent onThe future of algae as a source of biofuel will depend on

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Genomic analysis of organismal complexity in the multicellular green alga Volvox carteri  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the multicellular green alga Volvox carteri One-sentencegenome reveals that this green alga’s increased organismal16 P. Volvocine algae-specific protein

Prochnik, Simon E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

AGRICULTURAL REPORT SPECIAL ISSUE, JULY 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Secure America's energy future through renewable biofuels 5. Mitigate and adapt agriculture to variations will harvestprocessor will harvest and process theand process the product for wholesaleproduct for wholesale

177

Algae as a Feedstock for Biofuels: An Assessment of the State of Technology and Opportunities. Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The pursuit of a stable, economically-sound, and environmentally-friendly source of transportation fuel has led to extensive research and development (R&D) efforts focused on the conversion of various feedstocks into biofuels. Some feedstocks, such as sugar cane, corn and woody biomass, are targeted because their structures can be broken down into sugars and fermented into alcohols. Other feedstocks, such as vegetable oils, are appealing because they contain considerable amounts of lipids, which can be extracted and converted into biodiesel or other fuels. While significant R&D and commercial strides have been made with each of these feedstocks, technical and market barriers (e.g., cost, scalability, infrastructure requirements, and 'food vs. fuel' debates) currently limit the penetration of the resultant biofuels into the mainstream. Because of algae's ability to potentially address several of these barriers, its use as a feedstock for biofuels has led to much excitement and initiative within the energy industry. Algae are highly diverse, singleor multi-cellular organisms comprised of mostly lipids, protein, and carbohydrates, which may be used to produce a wide variety of biofuels. Algae offer many competitive advantages over other feedstocks, including: 1) Higher potential lipid content than terrestrial plants, sometimes exceeding 50% of the cell's dry biomass (U.S. DOE, May '10; Tornabene et al., 1983) 2) Rapid growth rates that are 20-30 times higher than terrestrial crops (McDill, 2009) and, in some cases, capable of doubling in size with 10 hours 3) Diverse number of species that can collectively thrive in a wide range of environments throughout the world, presenting an overall high overall tolerance for climate, sunlight, nutrient levels, etc. 4) Daily harvesting potential instead of seasonal harvest periods associated with terrestrial crops 5) Potential to redirect CO2 from industry operations to algal cultivation facilities to be used in an algal biofuel cycle before it is released into the atmosphere 6) Ability to be cultivated on land that that is unsuitable for agriculture, so it does not directly compete with farmland Given microalgae's high lipid content and rapid growth rates, maximum oil yields of 20,000--115,000 L/ha/yr (2,140-13,360 gal/ac/yr) have been estimated. xiv 7) Ability to thrive in seawater, wastewater, or other non-potable sources, so it does not directly compete with fresh water resources. In fact, wastewater can provide algae with some essential nutrients, such as nitrogen, so algae may contribute to cleaning up wastewater streams. 8) Non-toxic and biodegradable 9) Co-products that may present high value in other markets, including nutriceuticals and cosmetics Given microalgae's high lipid content and rapid growth rate, maximum oil yields of 20,000 -- 115,000 liters per hectare per year (L/ha/yr) (2,140 -- 13,360 gallons per acre per year) (Baldos, 2009; Wijffels, 2008) have been estimated, which is considerably higher than any other competing feedstock. Although algae species collectively present many strong advantages (although one specific species is unlikely to possess all of the advantages listed), a sustainable algal biofuel industry is at least one or two decades away from maturity, and no commercial scale operations currently exist. Several barriers must first be overcome before algal biofuels can compete with traditional petroleum-based fuels. Production chains with net energy output need to be identified, and continued R&D is needed to reduce the cost in all segments of the production spectrum (e.g., harvesting, dewatering, extracting of oil). Further research to identify strains with high production rates and/or oil yields may also improve competitiveness within the market. Initiatives to seamlessly integrate algal biofuels into the existing transportation infrastructure may increase their convenience level.

Sikes, K.; McGill, R. [Sentech, Inc. (United States); Van Walwijk, M. [Independent Consultant (France)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

Algae as a Feedstock for Biofuels: An Assessment of the State of Technology and Opportunities. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The pursuit of a stable, economically-sound, and environmentally-friendly source of transportation fuel has led to extensive research and development (R&D) efforts focused on the conversion of various feedstocks into biofuels. Some feedstocks, such as sugar cane, corn and woody biomass, are targeted because their structures can be broken down into sugars and fermented into alcohols. Other feedstocks, such as vegetable oils, are appealing because they contain considerable amounts of lipids, which can be extracted and converted into biodiesel or other fuels. While significant R&D and commercial strides have been made with each of these feedstocks, technical and market barriers (e.g., cost, scalability, infrastructure requirements, and 'food vs. fuel' debates) currently limit the penetration of the resultant biofuels into the mainstream. Because of algae's ability to potentially address several of these barriers, its use as a feedstock for biofuels has led to much excitement and initiative within the energy industry. Algae are highly diverse, singleor multi-cellular organisms comprised of mostly lipids, protein, and carbohydrates, which may be used to produce a wide variety of biofuels. Algae offer many competitive advantages over other feedstocks, including: 1) Higher potential lipid content than terrestrial plants, sometimes exceeding 50% of the cell's dry biomass (U.S. DOE, May '10; Tornabene et al., 1983) 2) Rapid growth rates that are 20-30 times higher than terrestrial crops (McDill, 2009) and, in some cases, capable of doubling in size with 10 hours 3) Diverse number of species that can collectively thrive in a wide range of environments throughout the world, presenting an overall high overall tolerance for climate, sunlight, nutrient levels, etc. 4) Daily harvesting potential instead of seasonal harvest periods associated with terrestrial crops 5) Potential to redirect CO2 from industry operations to algal cultivation facilities to be used in an algal biofuel cycle before it is released into the atmosphere 6) Ability to be cultivated on land that that is unsuitable for agriculture, so it does not directly compete with farmland Given microalgae's high lipid content and rapid growth rates, maximum oil yields of 20,000--115,000 L/ha/yr (2,140-13,360 gal/ac/yr) have been estimated. xiv 7) Ability to thrive in seawater, wastewater, or other non-potable sources, so it does not directly compete with fresh water resources. In fact, wastewater can provide algae with some essential nutrients, such as nitrogen, so algae may contribute to cleaning up wastewater streams. 8) Non-toxic and biodegradable 9) Co-products that may present high value in other markets, including nutriceuticals and cosmetics Given microalgae's high lipid content and rapid growth rate, maximum oil yields of 20,000 -- 115,000 liters per hectare per year (L/ha/yr) (2,140 -- 13,360 gallons per acre per year) (Baldos, 2009; Wijffels, 2008) have been estimated, which is considerably higher than any other competing feedstock. Although algae species collectively present many strong advantages (although one specific species is unlikely to possess all of the advantages listed), a sustainable algal biofuel industry is at least one or two decades away from maturity, and no commercial scale operations currently exist. Several barriers must first be overcome before algal biofuels can compete with traditional petroleum-based fuels. Production chains with net energy output need to be identified, and continued R&D is needed to reduce the cost in all segments of the production spectrum (e.g., harvesting, dewatering, extracting of oil). Further research to identify strains with high production rates and/or oil yields may also improve competitiveness within the market. Initiatives to seamlessly integrate algal biofuels into the existing transportation infrastructure may increase their convenience level.

Sikes, K.; McGill, R. [Sentech, Inc. (United States); Van Walwijk, M. [Independent Consultant (France)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

179

Empirical support for global integrated assessment modeling: Productivity trends and technological change in developing countries' agriculture and electric power sectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Council on Energy and Environment, for Mexico, the NationalMexico, Brazil, and Indonesia), examining long-run trends in productivity, technological change, energy andenergy-intensive manufacturing sectors of five developing countries, India, Brazil, Mexico,

Sathaye, Jayant A.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Algae control for hydrogeneration canals  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was to assess and develop control practices for nuisance algae growth in power canal that delivers water to hydro-generation facilities. This growth results in expenditures related not only to lost generation but also labor and materials costs associated with implementing remediation procedures. On an industry-wide basis these costs associated with nuisance algal growth are estimated to be several million dollars per year.

Grahovac, P.

1997-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural products algae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

EcoAgriculture Biofuels Capital Initiative (ecoABC) (Canada)...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

provides repayable contributions for the construction or expansion of transportation biofuel production facilities. Funding is conditional upon agricultural producer investment...

182

Agriculture and the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

This article discusses research of the US Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service and the US Department of Energy's Carbon Dioxide Research Division to anticipate the effects of increased atmospheric carbon dioxide on American agriculture. Experiments involving exposure of plants to elevated CO/sub 2/ and attempts to model the productivity of crops as atmospheric CO/sub 2/ increases are described. The scientists quoted in the article are optimistic, emphasizing the beneficial effects of the elevated CO/sub 2/ on crops and speculating that problems caused by associated climate changes can be accommodated by movement of crop regions and by introduction of new varieties.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Why sequence arctic algae for alternative energy?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

arctic algae for alternative energy? Five different protists representing different algal classes isolated from the Arctic Ocean are being investigated for adaptation to perennial...

184

Effect of Pretreatment on the Properties of Agricultural Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agricultural waste disposal is becoming a problem due to its increasing production and potential pollution. As a kind of biomass, agricultural waste can be used as a sustainable and renewable source of energy. Agricultural waste disposal is of great ... Keywords: agricultural waste, animal manure, acid washing, pyrolysis

Zhang Shouyu; Wang Jian; Wang Xiu-Jun; Peng Dingmao; Takayuki Takarada

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Niche of harmful alga Aureococcus anophagefferens revealed through ecogenomics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Niche of harmful alga Aureococcus anophagefferens revealedc consensus. Harmful Algae 8:3–13. 2. Sunda WG, Graneli E,of the United States. Harmful Algae 8:39–53. 4. Smayda TJ (

Grigoriev, Igor

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Optimal Operation of Large Agricultural Watersheds with Water Quality Restraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improved technology is needed for use in properly managing large agricultural watersheds. Proper watershed management means selecting land uses that are appropriate for each subarea, using erosion control measures where necessary, and applying fertilizers at rates that maximize agricultural production without polluting the environment. Watershed runoff and industrial and municipal effluents pollute streams and reservoirs. Point source pollution (industries and municipalities) can be monitored. Nonpoint-source pollution (watersheds) is widely dispersed and not easily measured. Mathematical models are needed to predict nonpoint-source pollution as affected by watershed characteristics, land use, conservation practices, chemical fertilizers, and climatic variables. Routing models are needed to determine the quality of water as it flows from nonpoint sources through streams and valleys to rivers and large reservoirs. Models are also needed to determine optimal strategies for planning land use, conservation practices, and fertilizer application to maximize agricultural production subject to water quality constraints. Three of the most important agricultural pollutants are suspended sediment, phosphorus, and nitrogen. Robinson [1971] pointed out that sediment is the greatest pollutant of water in terms of volume. Sediment also transports other pollutants, like phosphorus and nitrogen. These two elements are principally involved in lake eutrophication. Frequently algae blooms develop in nutrient-laden water and cause it to have an off-taste and an unpleasant odor. The odor of decaying plants becomes offensive; fish are killed because of reduced dissolved oxygen in the water, and recreation is deterred. The objective of this research was to develop models for use in managing large agricultural watersheds to obtain maximum agricultural production and to maintain water quality standards. The models were designed to: 1. Simulate daily runoff, and sediment, phosphorus, and nitrogen yields from small watersheds (areas land owners and operators) for planning land use, fertilizer application, and conservation practices on subwatersheds. 4. Determine the optimal strategy for each subwatershed to maximize agricultural production for the entire watershed subject to water quality constraints. Generally, water-quality models are developed by adding chemical modeling components to existing runoff and sediment models because runoff and sediment provide transportation for chemicals. Several conceptual models for predicting chemical yields from small watersheds have been presented [Crawford and Donigian, 1973; Donigian and Crawford, 1976; Frere, et al., 1975; Hagin and Amberger, 1974; Kling, 1974; Johnson and Straub, 1971]. However, these models are not applicable to large watersheds because they have no routing mechanism. For this reason, runoff, sediment, and nutrient models were refined and developed here for application to large watersheds. Probably, the most widely used and accepted model for predicting runoff volume is the Soil Conservation Service (SCS) curve number system [U.S. Soil Conservation Service, 1972]. The SCS model was modified by adding a soil-moisture-index accounting procedure [Williams and Laseur, 1976]. The modified water yield model is considerably more accurate than the original SCS model. On a watershed near Riesel, Texas, the modified model explained 95% of the variation in monthly runoff as compared with 65% for the original model. The water-yield model was refined here by replacing the climatic index (lake evaporation) with daily consumptive water use for individual crops.

Williams, J. R.; Hann, R. W.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Field Algae Measurements Using Empirical Correlations at Deer Creek Reservoir.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Deer Creek Reservoir in Utah has a history of high algae concentrations. Despite recent nutrient reduction efforts, seasonal algae continue to present problems. Cost effective,… (more)

Stephens, Ryan A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

EVALUATION OF ALGAE CONCENTRATION IN MANURE BASED MEDIA.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Algae can be used to treat wastewater and manure while producing a feedstock for renewable energy. Algae require nutrients to achieve their maximum growth and… (more)

Pecegueiro do Amaral, Maira Freire

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Evaluation of physicochemical properties of modified algae protein adhesives.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Algae proteins have similar amino acid compositions as conventional plant proteins, and are comparatively richer in the essential amino acids. Algae protein has the potential… (more)

Borgen, Kelly

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

ALGAE: RADIOACTIVITY UPTAKE AND IRRADIATION EFFECTS. A Literature Search  

SciTech Connect

Twenty-seven references are included on the uptake of radioisotopes by algae and the biological effects of external or internal irradiation of algae. (C.H.)

Smith, L.L.

1961-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

191

Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project October 22, 2012 - 3:44pm Addthis Crow Nation...

192

Nanotechnology and algae biofuels exhibits open July 26 at the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanotechnology and algae biofuels exhibits open July 26 Nanotechnology and algae biofuels exhibits open July 26 at the Bradbury Science Museum The Bradbury Science Museum is...

193

Short Course Agricultural Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Short Course in Agricultural Microscopy. Fargo North Dakota held June 13-16 2011. Sponsored by the Agricultural Microscopy Division of AOCS and the Great Plains Institute of Food Safety. Short Course Agricultural Microscopy Short Courses ...

194

Effect of Dead Algae on Soil Permeability  

SciTech Connect

Since existing basins support heavy growths of unicellular green algae which may be killed by temperature variation or by inadvertent pH changes in waste and then deposited on the basin floor, information on the effects of dead algae on soil permeability was needed. This study was designed to show the effects of successive algal kills on the permeability of laboratory soil columns.

Harvey, R.S.

2003-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

195

CYTOCHEMICAL STUDIES ON DEUTERATED GREEN ALGAE  

SciTech Connect

S>Distinct differences were demonstrated in the morphology and in the amounts and distribution of nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates in deuterated green algae as compared to ordinary algae. Cytochemical methods used in the study are described. Possible reasons for the differences found are discussed. (C.H.)

Flaumenhaft, E.; Conrad, S.M.; Katz, J.J.

1960-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

196

CHLOROPLAST PIGMENTS OF DEUTERATED GREEN ALGAE  

SciTech Connect

No new bands were found in chromatograms of chloroplasts from deuterated algae, and none of the usual bands were absent. The infrared spectra of pigments obtained from deuterated algae show essentially all the hydrogen positions occupied by deuterium. The deuterated pigments were determined to be effective in photosynthesis. (C.H.)

Strain, H.H.; Crespi, H.L.; Katz, J.J.

1959-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

197

Wind Powering America: Agricultural Podcasts  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

agricultural/podcasts.asp A series of agricultural/podcasts.asp A series of radio interviews on wind energy aimed at a rural stakeholder audience produced by Wind Powering America and the National Association of Farm Broadcasters. en-us julie.jones@nrel.gov (Julie Jones) http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/images/wpa_logo_sm.jpg Wind Powering America: Agricultural Podcasts http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/agricultural/podcasts.asp Wind Energy Forum Enhances Positives of Wind Production http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/filter_detail.asp?itemid=4043 http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/filter_detail.asp?itemid=4043 Thu, 14 Nov 2013 00:00:00 MST Rural Communities Benefit from Wind Energy's Continued Success http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/filter_detail.asp?itemid=4021 http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/filter_detail.asp?itemid=4021 Tue, 29

198

Fermentative production of butanol from sorghum molasses as a potential agricultural fuel. Final report, June 26, 1981-September 25, 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A strain, Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 4259, suitable for butanol-acetone fermentation of sorghum molasses was selected from several strains of the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC). It was cultivated in the composition-optimized sorghum molasses medium. The microbial growth and sugar consumption pattern in the sorghum molasses medium exhibited a typical diauxie phenomenon. The results strongly suggest that the difficulty encountered by the Weizmann type of organisms in butanol-acetone fermentation of molasses is due to the diauxie phenomenon causing a significant decrease in the solvent production rate. Acid hydrolysis of sorghum molasses minimizes the occurrence of the phenomenon, thereby remarkably increasing the solvent yield. The final solvent concentrations in the inverted molasses medium were butanol, 1.0% (w/v); acetone, 0.37% (w/v); ethanol, 0.18% (w/v); and total solvent, 1.55% (w/v). The total solvent yield in the inverted sorghum molasses medium was 30.3% based on the weight of sugar consumed. Effects of the temperature, agitation and heat-shocking were also investigated.

Fan, L.T.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Flocculation of model algae under shear.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present results of molecular dynamics simulations of the flocculation of model algae particles under shear. We study the evolution of the cluster size distribution as well as the steady-state distribution as a function of shear rates and algae interaction parameters. Algal interactions are modeled through a DLVO-type potential, a combination of a HS colloid potential (Everaers) and a yukawa/colloid electrostatic potential. The effect of hydrodynamic interactions on aggregation is explored. Cluster strucuture is determined from the algae-algae radial distribution function as well as the structure factor. DLVO parameters including size, salt concentration, surface potential, initial volume fraction, etc. are varied to model different species of algae under a variety of environmental conditions.

Pierce, Flint; Lechman, Jeremy B.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Agricultural Improvement Loan Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Agricultural Improvement Loan Program is administered by the Minnesota Department of Agriculture through the Minnesota Rural Finance Authority (RFA) and provides loans to farmers for...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural products algae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Agricultural Industrial Relations Bibliography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Relations Act: Report. Sacramento, CA: Office of the AuditorLabor Relations Law. Sacramento, CA: California Agricultural1975-76 and 1976-77. Sacramento, CA: California Agricultural

Brown, Cheryl L.; Dote, Grace; Edmonds, Christopher M.; Perloff, Jeffrey M.; Rosenberg, Howard R.; Xiong, Nanyan

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Energy 101: Algae-to-Fuel | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Algae-to-Fuel Algae-to-Fuel Energy 101: Algae-to-Fuel Addthis Below is the text version for the Energy 101: Algae-to-Fuel video: The video opens with "Energy 101: Algae-to-Fuel." Shots of vehicles driving on highways. We all need fuel to get around. And as America takes steps to improve our energy security, homegrown fuel sources are more important than ever. Close-up shots of algae, followed by a shots of an algae farm and raceway ponds. The Energy Department is researching one of the fuel sources of the future found here: in algae. Have a look at this algae farm. These large, man-made ponds are called raceways, and they cultivate a new crop of algae every few weeks. Various shots of algae in raceway ponds. Text appears on screen: "Microalgae - Up to 60X Oil of Land-Based Plants."

203

SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and improve the efficiency an energy consumptive system or determine the best utilization of an energy and economic foundations. Energy utilization-global and national. Sectoral analysis of energy consumption. Relationship of energy consumption and production to economic growth and environment. Technology for energy

Beresnev, Igor

204

Agricultural Economists  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anaerobic digestion of dairy manure produces biogas that can be captured and used for fuel while offering environmental benefits. Dairy farmer use of anaerobic digesters is not widespread due to various challenges, including high costs and inadequate return. A cooperative approach could address the challenges through improved negotiating strength; technical assistance for digester design, installation, and operation; management and marketing services; and/or financial guidance and assistance. Cooperative efforts may allow milk producers to remain focused on milk production

Carolyn Betts Liebr; K. Charles Ling

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

USDA Global Agricultural Information Network (GAIN) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

USDA Global Agricultural Information Network (GAIN) USDA Global Agricultural Information Network (GAIN) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: USDA Global Agricultural Information Network (GAIN) Agency/Company /Organization: United States Department of Agriculture Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Co-benefits assessment, GHG inventory, Market analysis Resource Type: Dataset Website: gain.fas.usda.gov/Pages/Default.aspx USDA Global Agricultural Information Network (GAIN) Screenshot References: GAIN[1] Overview "USDA'S Global Agriculture Information Network (GAIN) provides timely information on the agricultural economy, products and issues in foreign countries since 1995 that are likely to have an impact on United States agricultural production and trade. U.S. Foreign Service officers working at

206

Synthesis and Metabolism of Carbonyl-C14 Pyruvic and Hydroxypyruvic Acids in Algae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AND HYDROXYPYRUVIC ACIDS IN ALGAE Cerhard Milhaud, Andrew A.HYDROXYPYRUYIC ACIDS IN ALGAE Gerhard Milhaud, * - Andrew A.AND HYDROXYPYRUVIC ACIDS IN ALGAE Gerhard Milhaud, Andrew A.

Milhaud, Gerhard; Benson, Andrew A.; Calvin, M.

1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Microsoft Word - PhycalAlgaePilotProject_NEPAFinalEA_October2011.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Phycal Algae Pilot Project DOE/EA-1829 Phycal Algae Pilot Project DOE/EA-1829 Phycal, Inc. November 2011 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Cover Sheet Proposed Action: The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) proposes, through a cooperative agreement with Phycal, Inc. (Phycal), to partially fund implementing and evaluating new technology for the reuse of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions from industrial sources for green energy products. This project would use CO 2 to grow algae for the production of algal oil and subsequent conversion to fuel. The project would generate reliable cost information and test data to assess its viability for future implementation at commercial scale. If approved, DOE would provide approximately 80 percent of the funding for the project.

208

The Annual Agricultural Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Sman shad agriculture 1.WAV Length of track 00:44:03 Related tracks (include description/relationship if appropriate) Title of track The Annual Agricultural Cycle Translation of title Description (to be used in archive entry...

Zla ba sgrol ma

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

209

Look Back at the U.S. Department of Energy's Aquatic Species Program: Biodiesel from Algae; Close-Out Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Aquatic Species Program was a relatively small research effort intended to look at the use of aquatic plants as sources of energy. Its history dates back to 1978, but much of the research from 1978 to 1982 focused on using algae to produce hydrogen. The program switched emphasis to other transportation fuels, particularly biodiesel, beginning in the early 1980's. This report summarizes the research activities carried out from 1980 to 1996, with an emphasis on algae for biodiesel production.

Sheehan, J.; Dunahay, T.; Benemann, J.; Roessler, P.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Mitigation of Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Project Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Mitigation of Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Project Agency/Company /Organization Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.fao.org/climatechan Program Start 2010 References Mitigation of Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Project[1] "The main goal of this project is to support efforts to mitigate climate change through agriculture in developing countries and move towards carbon friendly agricultural practices. The aim of the project is to help realise the substantial mitigation potential of agriculture, especially that of smallholders in developing countries. If the right changes are implemented in production systems,

211

PYOMELANIN IS PRODUCED BY SHEWANELLA ALGAE BRY AND EFFECTED BY EXOGENOUS IRON  

SciTech Connect

Melanin production by S. algae BrY occurred during late/post-exponential growth in lactate-basal-salts liquid medium supplemented with tyrosine or phenylalanine. The antioxidant ascorbate inhibited melanin production, but not production of the melanin precursor, homogentisic acid. In the absence of ascorbate, melanin production was inhibited by the 4-hydroxyplenylpyruvate dioxygenase inhibitor, sulcotrione and Fe(II) (>0.2mM). These data support the hypothesis that pigment production by S. algae BrY was a result the conversion of tyrosine or phenylalanine to homogentisic acid which was excreted, auto-oxidized and self-polymerized to form pyomelanin. The inverse relationship between Fe(II) concentration and pyomelanin production has implications that pyomelanin may play a role in iron assimilation under Fe(II) limiting conditions.

Turick, C; Frank Caccavo, F; Jr., J; Louis S. Tisa, L

2006-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

212

Modifications of the metabolic pathways of lipid and triglyceride production in microalgae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as feedstocks for biofuel production: perspectives andmore useful for biofuel production. Our discussion rangesbene- fits for future biofuel production. Algae, the world’s

Yu, Wei-Luen; Ansari, William; Schoepp, Nathan G; Hannon, Michael J; Mayfield, Stephen P; Burkart, Michael D

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Program on Technology Innovation: Utility-Connected Algae Systems--Analysis and Decision Tools  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric utility power plants have supplies of CO2, impaired water, and low-grade heat that are useful inputs for growth of microalgae (algae), which itself can be biomass feedstock for the production of fuels and chemicals. Because modern algae cultivation requires a source of CO2, growing algal biomass is thus a potential scenario for lowering net power plant CO2 emissions. At present, microalgal growth is still an unproven technology on a large scale for any purpose other than creating specialty neutr...

2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

214

Toxicity of shale oil to freshwater algae: comparisons with petroleum and coal-derived oils  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The toxicities of various water-soluble fractions of Paraho/SOHIO shale oils and coal liquefaction products to the algae Selenastrum capricornutum and Microcystis aeruginosa are investigated. Photosynthetic inhibition is the criterion of toxicity. A secondary objective of the algal bioassay is determination of the range of toxic concentrations. (ACR)

Giddings, J.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Applying Innovation System Concept in Agricultural Research for...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and impact orientation need to be integrated into the agricultural research process. The R&D system should think in terms of contributing to innovation. The Improving Productivity...

216

THE RADIOACTIVITY OF A NUMBER OF THE HIGHER ALGAE IN THE REGION OF THEODOSIA  

SciTech Connect

Samples of algae were ashed, and the radioactivity in the ash was determined by counting on a MST-17 end-window counter. A potassium standard was used to convert relative activities to absolute values. The potassium in the ash was determined quantitatively by the cobalt-nitrite method. It was found that the radioactivity in Cystoseira barbata significantly exceeded the natural activity due to potassium. Aluminum absorption studies on the ash of this algae indicated the existence of Sr/sup 90/-Y/sup 90/ in the ash. A sample of Cystoseira barbata gathered in 1953 was secured from a local museum and analyzed. It showed only the presence of K/sup 40/. Other samples of Cystoseira barbata from the Sevastopol Biological Station which were gathered in 1939 and 1949 indicated the absence of fission products in the ash. The radioactivity in the ash of the other algae present was due to the presence of K/sup 40/. (TTT)

Mironov, O.G.

1961-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

217

Freshwater algae of the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Fifty-two species of freshwater algae were identified in samples collected from the eight known natural springs of the Nevada Test Site. Although several species were widespread, 29 species were site specific. Diatoms provided the greatest variety of species at each spring. Three-fifths of all algal species encountered were diatoms. Well-developed mats of filamentous green algae (Chlorophyta) were common in many of the water tanks associated with the springs and accounted for most of the algal biomass. Major nutrients were adequate, if not abundant, in most spring waters - growth being limited primarily by light and physical habitat. There was some evidence of cesium-137 bioconcentration by algae at several of the springs.

Taylor, W.D.; Giles, K.R.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Algae control problems and practices workshop  

SciTech Connect

Western water resources are continuously facing increased demand from industry and the public. Consequently, many of these resources are required to perform multiple tasks as they cycle through the ecosystem. Many plants and animals depend upon these resources for growth. Algae are one group of plants associated with nutrient and energy cycles in many aquatic ecosystems. Although most freshwater algae are microscopic in size, they are capable of dominating and proliferating to the extent that the value of the water resource for both industrial and domestic needs is compromised. There is a great diversity of aquatic environments and systems in which algae may be found, and there are many varieties of treatment and control techniques available to reduce the impacts of excessive growth. This workshop was organized to exchange information about these control problems and practices.

Pryfogle, P.A. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ghio, G. [Pacific Gas and Electric Co., San Francisco, CA (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Changes related to "BioProcess Algae" | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

page Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "BioProcess Algae" BioProcess Algae Jump to: navigation, search This is a list of changes made...

220

Energy 101: Algae-to-Fuel | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

oils. Under the right conditions, algae can make a lot of oil that can be converted into biofuels. Text appears on screen: "Microalgae - Up to 60X Oil of Land-Based Plants." Algae...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural products algae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Metabolism of Thioctic Acid in Algae  

SciTech Connect

Thioctic acid labeled with sulfur-35 has been prepared and i t s metabolism b y algae has been studied. It i s converted by the algae into a number of forms, all of which upon hydrolysis yield either the disulfide o r i t s sulfoxide. One of these constituted the major portion of the labeled material in the chloroplasts. Aerobic metabolism for some minutes i s required to produce this form. Preliminary studies of the chemical nature of this form suggest i t to be esterified on the carboxyl group with a moiety of very high lipid solubility.

Grisebach, Hans; Fuller, R.C.; Calvin, M.

1956-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

222

CAESIUM-137 LABELLED ALGAE FOR FILTRATION STUDIES  

SciTech Connect

ABS>A method is described whereby the green algae Chlorella and Scenedesmus were cultured in a growth medium containing Cs/sup 137/. These radioactive algae were used as a suspension in water passing through a column of filter sand. The distributions of the algal cells retained in the filter were measured with a scintillation counter mounted externally to the column. Calibrations of the shielded scintillation counter for the amount of activity per algal cell and for the geometry of the filter column are described. (auth)

Ives, K.J.

1960-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

FAO Climate-Smart Agriculture | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FAO Climate-Smart Agriculture FAO Climate-Smart Agriculture Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: FAO Climate-Smart Agriculture Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Policies/deployment programs Website: www.fao.org/climatechange/climatesmart/en/ Program Start: 2010 References: Climate-Smart Agriculture[1] Logo: FAO Climate-Smart Agriculture Overview "Food security and climate change can be addressed together by transforming agriculture and adopting practices that are "climate-smart" A number of production systems are already being used by farmers and food producers to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, adapt to climate change, and reduce vulnerability. This website provides examples of many of these

224

Sustainable Agriculture Loan Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Minnesota Sustainable Agriculture Loan program will provide loans to Minnesota residents actively engaged in farming for capital expenditures which enhance the environmental and economic...

225

BRANCHED ALKANES FROM BLUE-GREEN ALGAE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Branched alkanes from blue-green algae were separated on a 750 feet high resolution capillary gas chromatographic column. The mixture was found to be 90% of 1:1 ratio 7-methyl, and 8-methyl-heptadecane, and 10% of 6-methylheptadecane. An optical rotation of +2.5 {+-} 0.5 was obtained on a 5 mg of mixture.

Han, Jerry; Calvin, Melvin.

1970-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing volumes of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum will become available for agricultural use as more utilities install forced oxidation scrubbers and the wallboard market for the resulting gypsum becomes saturated. This interim report describes work performed in 2007 and 2008 to develop a national research network to gain data and experience to support the beneficial uses of FGD products, especially FGD gypsum, in agriculture and other land applications.

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

227

Energy 101: Algae-to-Fuel | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Algae-to-Fuel Algae-to-Fuel Energy 101: Algae-to-Fuel August 13, 2013 - 2:53pm Addthis Learn about algae, a fast-growing, renewable resource that holds great promise to become a reliable, homegrown fuel source to reduce our nation's reliance on foreign oil. Algae are a diverse group of primarily aquatic organisms that are capable of using photosynthesis to generate biomass. This biomass can be used as feedstock for transportation fuels. In the near term, algae may also mitigate the effects of carbon dioxide from sources such as power plants - and in the future, they may be used to capture and reuse fossil-fuel-generated carbon dioxide directly from the atmosphere. This edition of Energy 101 shares the benefits of an algae-fueled future. For more information on algal biofuels from the Office of Energy Efficiency

228

Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project October 22, 2012 - 3:44pm Addthis Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project Thanks in part to DOE funding and technical support, student interns from the Crow Tribe in Montana had the opportunity to participate in an algae biomass research project that could help prepare them for cleantech jobs and pave the way for their Tribe to produce clean, renewable energy. The Cultivation and Characterization of Oil Producing Algae Internship placed students in a laboratory alongside established researchers to study local algae samples and evaluate their possible use in energy applications. The project focused on an integrated coal-to-liquid (ICTL) technology

229

Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project October 22, 2012 - 3:44pm Addthis Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project Thanks in part to DOE funding and technical support, student interns from the Crow Tribe in Montana had the opportunity to participate in an algae biomass research project that could help prepare them for cleantech jobs and pave the way for their Tribe to produce clean, renewable energy. The Cultivation and Characterization of Oil Producing Algae Internship placed students in a laboratory alongside established researchers to study local algae samples and evaluate their possible use in energy applications. The project focused on an integrated coal-to-liquid (ICTL) technology

230

Integrated Agricultural Technologies Demonstrations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Major challenges currently face California's agricultural community. Increasingly stringent environmental and regulatory controls mandate changes in the use and disposal of agricultural chemicals, require the more aggressive management of farm wastes, and impose new responsibilities for water use. This program demonstrated a number of energy efficient and environmentally friendly technologies designed to address these issues.

2002-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

231

Agricultural Microscopy Division List  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Name AffiliationCity, State, CountryAgricultural Microscopy Division2013 Members72 Members as of October 1, 2013Ajbani, RutviInstitute of Chemical TechnologyMumbai, MH, IndiaAlonso, CarmenPuerto Rico Dept ofAgricultureDorado, Puerto RicoArmbrust, KevinLoui

232

College of Agriculture Departments and Degree Programs Agricultural  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agricultural Education Animal & Range Sciences Land Resources & Environmental Sciences Immunology & Infectious Diseases Multi Disciplinary Agricultural Business Agricultural Education Animal Science Natural Resources & Rangeland Ecology Environmental Sciences Pre-Vet Program (non-degree) Biotechnology Sustainable Foods

Lawrence, Rick L.

233

Greenhouse gases and agriculture. Book chapter  

SciTech Connect

Agriculture ranks third in its contribution to Earth's anthropogenically enhanced greenhouse effect. (Energy use and production and chlorofluorocarbons are ranked first and second, respectively.) Specifically, greenhouse gas sources and sinks are increased, and sinks are decreased, by conversion of land to agricultural use, using fertilizers, cultivating paddy rice, producing other plant and animal crops, and by creating and managing animal and plant wastes. However, some of these same activities increase greenhouse gas sinks and decrease greenhouse gas sources so the net effects are not obvious. The paper identifies the agricultural inputs, outputs, and wastes that alter atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxides, and discusses agriculture's net impact on greenhouse gas fluxes.

Jackson, R.B.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

1981 Winter Meeting - American Society of Agricultural Engineers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 13 volumes contain 372 papers presented at the meeting. Subjects covered include agricultural machinery developments and applications, irrigation, drainage, water supply, water pollution control, farm buildings, energy conservation, agricultural wastes management, biogas and other biomass fuels production, food products and good products plants, grain drying, solar energy applications, engineering economics, crop yield studies, agronomy, agrometeorology, livestock production and management, computer applications, field and laboratory studies, engineering education, and others. 108 papers are abstracted separately.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Stable isotopic records of bleaching and endolithic algae blooms in the skeleton of the boulder forming coral Montastraea faveolata  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of bleaching and endolithic algae blooms in the skeleton ofa lesser extent, endolithic algae within the coral skeleton.Endolithic algae produce distinctive green bands in the

Hartmann, A. C.; Carilli, J. E.; Norris, R. D.; Charles, C. D.; Deheyn, D. D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Whole-Cell Sensing for a Harmful Bloom-Forming Microscopic Alga by Measuring Antibody-Antigen Forces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fawley, “Diversity of coccoid algae in shallow lakes duringof small coccoid green algae from Lake Itasca, Minnesota,BLOOM-FORMING MICROSCOPIC ALGA BY MEASURING ANTIBODY–

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Flowing with the Tide:Epiphytic Host-Specificity and Phenotypic Plasticity of the Brown Alga Padina boryana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PLASTICITY OF THE BROWN ALGA PADINA BORYANA SIERRA M. FLYNN94720 USA Abstract. Epiphytic algae form complex communitiesmacroalgae hosts. The brown alga Padina boryana acts as a

Flynn, Sierra Michelle

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing Countries Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Resource assessment, Background analysis Website: www.fao.org/climatechange/micca/en/ References: FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing Countries[1] "The aim of the project is to help realise the substantial mitigation potential of agriculture, especially that of smallholders in developing countries. If the right changes are implemented in production systems, emissions can be reduced and sinks created in biomass and soils while

239

Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are serious concerns about the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, energy and nutrient and water use efficiency of large-scale, first generation bio-energy feedstocks currently in use. A major question is whether biofuels obtained from these feedstocks are effective in combating climate change and what impact they will have on soil and water resources. Another fundamental issue relates to the magnitude and nature of their impact on food prices and ultimately on the livelihoods of the poor. A possible solution to overcome the current potentially large negative effects of large-scale biofuel production is developing second and third generation conversion techniques from agricultural residues and wastes and step up the scientific research efforts to achieve sustainable biofuel production practices. Until such sustainable techniques are available governments should scale back their support for and promotion of biofuels. Multipurpose feedstocks should be investigated making use of the bio-refinery concept (bio-based economy). At the same time, the further development of non-commercial, small scale

Science Council Secretariat

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Chemical Processing in High-Pressure Aqueous Environments. 9. Process Development for Catalytic Gasification of Algae Feedstocks  

SciTech Connect

Through the use of a metal catalyst, gasification of wet algae slurries can be accomplished with high levels of carbon conversion to gas at relatively low temperature (350 C). In a pressurized-water environment (20 MPa), near-total conversion of the organic structure of the algae to gases has been achieved in the presence of a supported ruthenium metal catalyst. The process is essentially steam reforming, as there is no added oxidizer or reagent other than water. In addition, the gas produced is a medium-heating value gas due to the synthesis of high levels of methane, as dictated by thermodynamic equilibrium. As opposed to earlier work, biomass trace components were removed by processing steps so that they did not cause processing difficulties in the fixed catalyst bed tubular reactor system. As a result, the algae feedstocks, even those with high ash contents, were much more reliably processed. High conversions were obtained even with high slurry concentrations. Consistent catalyst operation in these short-term tests suggested good stability and minimal poisoning effects. High methane content in the product gas was noted with significant carbon dioxide captured in the aqueous byproduct in combination with alkali constituents and the ammonia byproduct derived from proteins in the algae. High conversion of algae to gas products was found with low levels of byproduct water contamination and low to moderate loss of carbon in the mineral separation step.

Elliott, Douglas C.; Hart, Todd R.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Rotness, Leslie J.; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Zacher, Alan H.

2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural products algae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Analysis of Markets for Coal Combustion By-Products Use in Agriculture and Land Reclamation: Summary Report of Four Regional Marketi ng Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sites for the disposal of coal combustion by-products (CCBP) are becoming more difficult to acquire, license, and develop. Since CCBP production may increase in the foreseeable future, reducing the reliance on disposal makes economic and environmental sense. This report summarizes the findings of four regional marketing studies, which examined barriers--both economic and regulatory-- to the land application of CCBP.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Energy 101 | Algae-to-Fuel | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

101 | Algae-to-Fuel 101 | Algae-to-Fuel Energy 101 | Algae-to-Fuel September 5, 2012 - 5:11pm Addthis How Energy Department scientists and researchers produce clean, renewable fuel -- from algae. Erin R. Pierce Erin R. Pierce Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Where Can I Watch More Energy 101 Videos? For more energy basics, check out our Energy 101 YouTube Playlist. When you think of algae - what immediately comes to mind? Perhaps it's the color green, or maybe an image of a curious-looking underwater species. Whatever your immediate thought, most likely, it is not related to fuel. But that's exactly what Energy Department scientists and researchers are exploring right now - strategies to produce clean, renewable biofuel from algae. In this edition of our Energy 101 video series, we're taking a

243

Overshooting of agricultural prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rotenberg, Julio J. , "Sticky Prices in the United States,"Monetary Policy on United States Agriculture. A Fix-Price,Flex-Price Approach," Unpublished Ph.D. Disser- tation,

Stamoulis, Kostas G.; Rausser, Gordon C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Agricultural Meteorology in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During nearly five weeks in China (May–June 1981), the author visited scientific institutions and experiment stations engaged in agricultural meterology and climatology research and teaching. The facilities, studies, and research programs at each ...

Norman J. Rosenberg

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Method for producing hydrogen and oxygen by use of algae  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Efficiency of process for producing H.sub.2 by subjecting algae in an aqueous phase to light irradiation is increased by culturing algae which has been bleached during a first period of irradiation in a culture medium in an aerobic atmosphere until it has regained color and then subjecting this algae to a second period of irradiation wherein hydrogen is produced at an enhanced rate.

Greenbaum, Elias (Oak Ridge, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Method for producing hydrogen and oxygen by use of algae  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Efficiency of process for producing H/sub 2/ by subjecting algae in an aqueous phase to light irradiation is increased by culturing algae which has been bleached during a first period of irradiation in a culture medium in an aerobic atmosphere until it has regained color and then subjecting this algae to a second period of irradiation wherein hydrogen is produced at an enhanced rate.

Greenbaum, E.

1982-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

247

Look Back at the U.S. Department of Energy's Aquatic Species Program: Biodiesel from Algae; Close-Out Report  

SciTech Connect

The Aquatic Species Program was a relatively small research effort intended to look at the use of aquatic plants as sources of energy. Its history dates back to 1978, but much of the research from 1978 to 1982 focused on using algae to produce hydrogen. The program switched emphasis to other transportation fuels, particularly biodiesel, beginning in the early 1980's. This report summarizes the research activities carried out from 1980 to 1996, with an emphasis on algae for biodiesel production.

Sheehan, J.; Dunahay, T.; Benemann, J.; Roessler, P.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

How Algae Use a "Sulfate Trap" to Selectively Biomineralize Strontium...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

| 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed How Algae Use a "Sulfate Trap" to Selectively Biomineralize Strontium OCTOBER 20, 2011 Bookmark...

249

Treatment of Wastewater from Mineral Processing by using Algae.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Nowadays, the utilisation of algae in industrial processes to produce useful compounds or to treat waste streams is of great interest. Industrial wastewaters such as… (more)

Sprock, Stefan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Accumulation of uranium at low concentration by the green alga ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

by Scenedesmus obliquus 34 was rapid and energy-independent and the biosorption of. UO2+ ... by the green algaScenedesmus obliquus34 is described here.

251

Climate change and agriculture : global and regional effects using an economic model of international trade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Empirical estimates of the economic welfare implications of the impact of climate change on global agricultural production are made. Agricultural yield changes resulting from climate scenarios associated with a doubling ...

Reilly, John M.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Identifying Options for Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Transportation: Meeting an 80% Reduction Goal in 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

algae, agricultural and forest residues, and so on) and production processes (fermentation, trans-esterification, cellulosic hydrolysis/fermentation, gasification,

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Biomass Energy Production Incentive | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Production Incentive Biomass Energy Production Incentive Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Savings For Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying &...

254

Radiation Characteristics of Botryococcus braunii, Chlorococcum littorale, and Chlorella sp. Used For CO2 Fixation and Biofuel Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For CO 2 Fixation and Biofuel Production Halil Berberoglufor CO 2 mitigation and biofuel productions namely (i)this technology”, (2) culture of biofuel producing algae is

Berberoglu, Halil; Gomez, Pedro; Pilon, Laurent

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Low energy method of manufacturing high-grade protein using blue-green algae of the genus Spirulina  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Algae are well suited to replace many conventional sources of protein because of their efficient use of energy, land, and raw materials. The most promising genus, Spirulina, is compared with conventional protein sources on the bases of energy efficiency, land usage, and production costs.

Leesley, M.E.; Newsom, T.M.; Burleson, J.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Algae Biofuels and Future Engineers Kimberley Ogden is UAs principal investigator on a $44million DOE biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Algae Biofuels and Future Engineers Kimberley Ogden is UAs principal investigator on a $44million DOE biofuels project and an NSF-funded STEM educator. The National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels totaling more than $44 million for algal Biofuels And bio products research and development. Kim Ogden

Wong, Pak Kin

257

Integration of agricultural and energy system models for biofuel assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a coupled modeling framework to capture the dynamic linkages between agricultural and energy markets that have been enhanced through the expansion of biofuel production, as well as the environmental impacts resulting from this expansion. ... Keywords: Agricultural markets, Biofuels, Energy systems, Environment, Modeling

A. Elobeid, S. Tokgoz, R. Dodder, T. Johnson, O. Kaplan, L. Kurkalova, S. Secchi

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Indian Agriculture and Foods  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agriculture and Foods Agriculture and Foods Nature Bulletin No. 387-A September 19, 1970 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation INDIAN AGRICULTURE AND FOODS Most of the Indian tribes east of the Great Plains were part-time farmers. Some of them cultivated sunflowers, giant ragweed, canary grass and pigweed for their seeds, which they used as food. Many grew tobacco. But corn, beans and squash -- wherever the climate permitted - - were the principal crops. There were several varieties of beans. They ate both the seeds and rinds of some dozens of kinds of squash and pumpkin. When game was not abundant there was a wealth of wild fruits, berries, and many kinds of wild plants with edible leaves, seeds, or roots. Corn, however, was the ' staff of life" and they depended on corn, beans and squash -- "the three sisters" -- for year-round food.

259

Blue-green algae: why they become dominant  

SciTech Connect

The injection of carbon dioxide and the addition of nitrogen and phosphorus to a lake population dominated by blue-green algae results in a rapid shift to dominance by green algae. The basis for the change and its implications are discussed.

Shapiro, J.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Investigation of contamination bearing algae in the Columbia River  

SciTech Connect

Recent discussions in the group have given rise to the problem of determining whether the beta contamination found in the Columbia River is carried by the algae which are found in the retention basin. The algae accumulate in the basin and apparently remain there longer than the retained water, and thus may be contaminated to a greater extent than the water itself.

Paas, H.J.

1947-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural products algae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

CEC-500-2010-FS-001 Algae OMEGA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

infrastructure system. · Enhance the supply and affordability of future transportation fuel choicesCEC-500-2010-FS-001 Algae OMEGA (Offshore Membrane Enclosures For Growing Algae) TRANSPORTATION ENERGY RESEARCH PIER Transportation Research www.energy.ca.gov/research/ transportation/ March 2010

262

Climate Change and China's Agricultural Sector: An Overview of Impacts,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

China's Agricultural Sector: An Overview of Impacts, China's Agricultural Sector: An Overview of Impacts, Adaptation and Mitigation Jump to: navigation, search Name Climate Change and China's Agricultural Sector: An Overview of Impacts, Adaptation and Mitigation Agency/Company /Organization International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development Sector Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Co-benefits assessment Resource Type Publications Website http://ictsd.org/downloads/201 Country China UN Region Eastern Asia References China's Ag Impacts [1] Climate Change and China's Agricultural Sector: An Overview of Impacts, Adaptation and Mitigation Screenshot "The overall goal of this paper is to review and document the likely impacts of climate change on China's agricultural production, efforts

263

Action Plan Agricultural Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lines, and becoming an international benchmark in some of them. Incentives will be given to those (elimination of wastes genera- ted by society, decontamination of soils, clean agriculture, etc change, energy or water). Institutes and Centres that comprise the Area The Area comprises a total of 17

Fitze, Patrick

264

Agriculture: Tendencies & Deficiencies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agriculture: Tendencies & Deficiencies Tad Patzek, Petroleum & Geosystems Engineering, UT Austin of Conclusions, cntd. The main energy crops I have looked at are maize, sugarcane, soybeans, and oil palms are witnessing a global move away from food to energy crops. Diverting more land to pure energy crops

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

265

Energy for agriculture. A computerized information retrieval system  

SciTech Connect

Energy may come from the sun or the earth or be the product of plant materials or agricultural wastes. Whatever its source, energy is indispensable to our way of life, beginning with the production, processing, and distribution of abundant, high quality food and fiber supplies. This specialized bibliography on the subject of energy for agriculture contains 2613 citations to the literature for 1973 through May 1979. Originally issued by Michigan State University (MSU), it is being reprinted and distributed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The literature citations will be incorporated into AGRICOLA (Agricultural On-Line Access), the comprehensive bibliographic data base maintained by Technical Information Systems (TIS), a component of USDA's Science and Education Administration (SEA). The citations and the listing of research projects will be combined with other relevant references to provide a continuously updated source of information on energy programs in the agricultural field. No abstracts are included.

Stout, B.A.; Myers, C.A. (comps.)

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Agricultural sector impacts of making ethanol from grain  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a model of the effects on the agricultural sector of producing ethanol from corn in the United States between 1979 and 1983. The model is aggregated at the national level, and results are given for all of the major food and feed crops, ethanol joint products, farm income, government payment, and agricultural exports. A stochastic simulation was performed to ascertain the impacts of yield and demand variations on aggregate performance figures. Results indicate minimal impacts on the agricultural sector for production levels of less than 1 billion gallons of ethanol per year. For higher production levels, corn prices will rise sharply, the agricultural sector will be more vulnerable to variations in yields and demands, and joint-product values will fall. Possibilities for ameliorating such effects are discussed, and such concepts as net energy and the biomass refinery are explored.

Hertzmark, D.; Ray, D.; Parvin, G.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Agricultural Microscopy Division Newsletter September 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Read the latest news from the Agricultural Microscopy division. Agricultural Microscopy Division Newsletter September 2013 Agricultural Microscopy Division Newsletter September 2013 ...

268

Agricultural Microscopy Newsletter March 11  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS Agricultural Microscopy Division Newsletter March 2011 Greetings from the Chairperson The Agricultural Microscopy Division would like to take this opportunity to express our sincere sympathy to the family and friends of George Liepa who rece

269

Improved hydrogen photoproduction from photosynthetic bacteria and green algae  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Photosynthetic bacteria evolve hydrogen at much higher rates than do other classes of photosynthetic microorganisms. In addition, they tolerate harsh environments, grow rapidly, and utilize both visible and near infrared light in photosynthesis. They do not split water, but this does not necessarily eliminate their potential use in future applied systems. They are easily manipulated genetically, and thus might be modified to metabolize common biomass waste materials in place of expensive defined organic substrates. Furthermore, the potential for increasing hydrogen photoproduction via genetic techniques is promising. Strains that partially degrade cellulose, have high photoproduction rates, or contain very large amounts of the enzymes associated with hydrogen metabolism have been isolated. Green algae also produce hydrogen but are capable of using water as a substrate. For example, C. reinhardi can evolve hydrogen and oxygen at a molar ratio approaching 2:1. Based upon effect of dichlorophenyl dimethylurea (a specific inhibitor of photosystem II, PSII) on hydrogen photoproduction in the wild type strain and upon results obtained with PSII mutants, one can demonstrate that water is the major source of electrons for hydrogen production. The potential efficiency of in vivo coupling between hydrogenase and the photosynthetic electron transport system is high. Up to 76% of the reductants generated by the electron transport system can be channeled directly to the enzyme for in vivo hydrogen production. Rates exceeding 170 ..mu..moles of H/sub 2/ mg Chl/sup -1/ hr/sup -1/ have been observed.

Weaver, P.F.; Lien, S.; Seibert, M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Wind energy applications in agriculture  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Separate abstract are included for each of the papers presented concerning the use of wind turbines in agriculture.

Kluter, H.H.; Soderholm, L.H. (eds.)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Isoprenoid biosynthesis in eukaryotic phototrophs: A spotlight on algae  

SciTech Connect

Isoprenoids are one of the largest groups of natural compounds and have a variety of important functions in the primary metabolism of land plants and algae. In recent years, our understanding of the numerous facets of isoprenoid metabolism in land plants has been rapidly increasing, while knowledge on the metabolic network of isoprenoids in algae still lags behind. Here, current views on the biochemistry and genetics of the core isoprenoid metabolism in land plants and in the major algal phyla are compared and some of the most pressing open questions are highlighted. Based on the different evolutionary histories of the various groups of eukaryotic phototrophs, we discuss the distribution and regulation of the mevalonate (MVA) and the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathways in land plants and algae and the potential consequences of the loss of the MVA pathway in groups such as the green algae. For the prenyltransferases, serving as gatekeepers to the various branches of terpenoid biosynthesis in land plants and algae, we explore the minimal inventory necessary for the formation of primary isoprenoids and present a preliminary analysis of their occurrence and phylogeny in algae with primary and secondary plastids. The review concludes with some perspectives on genetic engineering of the isoprenoid metabolism in algae.

Lohr M.; Schwender J.; Polle, J. E. W.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

An integrated model for assessment of sustainable agricultural residue removal limits for bioenergy systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agricultural residues have been identified as a significant potential resource for bioenergy production, but serious questions remain about the sustainability of harvesting residues. Agricultural residues play an important role in limiting soil erosion ... Keywords: Agricultural residues, Bioenergy, Model integration, Soil erosion, Soil organic carbon

D. J. Muth, Jr.; K. M. Bryden

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Resource Evaluation and Site Selection for Microalgae Production in India  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The study evaluates climate conditions, availability of CO2 and other nutrients, water resources, and land characteristics to identify areas in India suitable for algae production. The purpose is to provide an understanding of the resource potential in India for algae biofuels production and to assist policymakers, investors, and industry developers in their future strategic decisions.

Milbrandt, A.; Jarvis, E.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Viable Cyanobacteria and Green Algae from the Permafrost Darkness  

SciTech Connect

This review represents an overview of the existence, distribution and abundance of the photoautotrophic microorganisms in the deep subsurface permafrost of the Northeast Russia and McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. The morphology, growth rate, spectral properties, phylogenetic position of the viable permafrost green algae and cyanobacteria have been studied. Viable photoautotrophs were represented by unicellular green algae and filamentous cyanobacteria with low growth rate. Spectral studies of ancient cyanobacteria and green algae did not reveal any significant differences between them and their contemporary relatives. Phylogenetic analyses have shown that permafrost photoautotrophs were closely related to strains and more often to uncultured environmental clones from cold regions.

Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network: Indiana Kingman Research Station (Corn and Soybeans)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) is an excellent source of gypsum (CaSO4•2H2O) that is created when sulfur dioxide is removed from the exhaust gases during the combustion of coal for energy production. Research on FGDG has been conducted as part of the Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network program sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute in collaboration with individual utilities, the U.S. EPA, the United States Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural ...

2013-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

276

Agriculture and Energy Departments Announce New Investments to Drive  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agriculture and Energy Departments Announce New Investments to Agriculture and Energy Departments Announce New Investments to Drive Innovations in Biofuels and Biobased Products Agriculture and Energy Departments Announce New Investments to Drive Innovations in Biofuels and Biobased Products July 25, 2012 - 1:37pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - As part of the Obama Administration's all-of-the-above strategy to enhance U.S. energy security, reduce America's reliance on imported oil and leverage our domestic energy supply, while also supporting rural economies, the U.S. Departments of Agriculture (USDA) and Energy today announced a $41 million investment in 13 projects that will drive more efficient biofuels production and feedstock improvements. "If we want to develop affordable alternatives for oil and gasoline that

277

Agriculture and Energy Departments Announce New Investments to Drive  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agriculture and Energy Departments Announce New Investments to Agriculture and Energy Departments Announce New Investments to Drive Innovations in Biofuels and Biobased Products Agriculture and Energy Departments Announce New Investments to Drive Innovations in Biofuels and Biobased Products July 25, 2012 - 1:37pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - As part of the Obama Administration's all-of-the-above strategy to enhance U.S. energy security, reduce America's reliance on imported oil and leverage our domestic energy supply, while also supporting rural economies, the U.S. Departments of Agriculture (USDA) and Energy today announced a $41 million investment in 13 projects that will drive more efficient biofuels production and feedstock improvements. "If we want to develop affordable alternatives for oil and gasoline that

278

Barron Electric Cooperative - Commercial, Industrial, and Agricultural...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial, and Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Barron Electric Cooperative - Commercial, Industrial, and Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate Program...

279

Risk in agriculture : a study of crop yield distributions and crop insurance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agriculture is a business fraught with risk. Crop production depends on climatic, geographical, biological, political, and economic factors, which introduce risks that are quantifiable given the appropriate mathematical ...

Gayam, Narsi Reddy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Lipid Extraction from Wet-Algae for Biofuel Production  

There is a growing interest in algal biofuels; however, current methods of a thermal separation process for solvent mixtures involve concomitant ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural products algae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Assessment of wastewater algae for use in biofuel production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Although new technologies have allowed the attainment of previously untapped fossil fuels these practises are unsustainable and harmful to the environment. Part of the solution… (more)

Stemmler, Kevin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Enzyme Fusions Optimize Photosynthetic Hydrogen Production in Algae (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research at NREL is demonstrating that engineering enzymes has the potential to improve efficiencies.

Not Available

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Algae Based Carbon Capture and Utilization feasibility study.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This pre-feasibility study was taken out by the co-operation with Zhejiang University, the CEU lab in Zhejiang University is taking researches of the algae… (more)

Sen, Cong

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Royal Agricultural and Horticultural Society of South Australia | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Horticultural Society of South Australia and Horticultural Society of South Australia Jump to: navigation, search Name Royal Agricultural and Horticultural Society of South Australia Place South Australia, Australia Zip SA 5034 Sector Buildings, Solar Product South-Australia-based agricultural and horticultural society. The society is installing 1MW solar power systems on six separate buildings. References Royal Agricultural and Horticultural Society of South Australia[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Royal Agricultural and Horticultural Society of South Australia is a company located in South Australia, Australia . References ↑ "Royal Agricultural and Horticultural Society of South

285

Algae culture for cattle feed and water purification. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility of algae growth on centrate from anaerobic digester effluent and the refeed of both effluent solids and the algae to feedlot cattle were investigated. The digester was operated with dirt feedlot manure. The study serves as a supplement for the work to design a utility sized digester for the City of Lamar to convert local feedlot manure into a fuel gas. The biogas produced would power the electrical generation plant already in service. Previous studies have established techniques of digester operation and the nutritional value for effluent solids as fed to cattle. The inclusion of a single-strain of algae, Chlorella pyrenidosa in the process was evaluated here for its capability (1) to be grown in both open and closed ponds of the discharge water from the solids separation part of the process, (2) to purify the discharge water, and (3) to act as a growth stimulant for cattle feed consumption and conversion when fed at a rate of 6 grams per head per day. Although it was found that the algae could be cultured and grown on the discharge water in the laboratory, the study was unable to show that algae could accomplish the other objectives successfully. However, the study yielded supplementary information useful to the overall process design of the utility plant. This was (1) measurement of undried digester solids fed to cattle in a silage finishing ration (without algae) at an economic value of $74.99 per dry ton based on nutritional qualities, (2) development of a centrate treatment system to decolorize and disinfect centrate to allow optimum algae growth, and (3) information on ionic and mass balances for the digestion system. It is the recommendation of this study that algae not be used in the process in the Lamar bioconversion plant.

Varani, F.T.; Schellenbach, S.; Veatch, M.; Grover, P.; Benemann, J.

1980-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

286

World Production, Markets, and Trade Reports | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

World Production, Markets, and Trade Reports Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov Communities ...

287

LIGHT-INDUCED EFFICIENCY AND PIGMENT ALTERATIONS IN RED ALGAE*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The low photosynthetic efficiency of chlorophyll in freshly collected red algae, can, in the case of Porphyra perforata, P. nereocystis, and Porpkyridium cruentum, be inercased by growing the algae for 10 days in red or blue light. Exposure to darkness or to green light maintains the algae in their originally low efficiency with respect to chlorophyll, while retaining the high efficiency of phycobilins. Red- or blue-adapted algae are rapidly reversed by exposure to green light, the chlorophyll efficiency dropping to low values again in a few hours. This is assumed to account for the action spectrum of freshly gathered plants. Some pigment changes were observed, but not in the direction of "chromatic adaptation; " and the carotenoid pigments were not activated, even by blue light, but remained as photosynthetically inactive shading filters. The higher red algae (Florideae) did not show activation of chlorophyll by red or blue light. Chlorophyll a of freshly collected marine red algae sensitizes photosynthesis with an efficiency of about 0.04 molecule oxygen liberated per absorbed quantum.

C. S. Yocum; L. R. Blinks

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Salinity controls on trophic interactions among invertebrates and algae of solar evaporation ponds in the Mojave Desert and relation to shorebird foraging and selenium risk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AMONG INVERTEBRATES AND ALGAE OF SOLAR EVAPORATION PONDS INplanktonic invertebrates and algae present along with avianof invertebrates and algae, and avian foraging were examined

Herbst, David B

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Resolving the agriculture-petroleum conflict: the experience of cacao smallholders in Mexico  

SciTech Connect

In 1972, PEMEX, the Mexican national oil company, discovered huge reserves of oil and natural gas along the Gulf Coast, and began intensive exploitation in Tabasco and northern Chiapas states. Severe conflict between PEMEX and the agricultural economy of Tabasco seemed certain. But despite problems of labor scarcity, inflation, migration, pollution, agricultural production 1974 to 1979 increased for the state's major products - cacao, coconut, beef, and bananas. This study analyzes how agriculture-petroleum conflicts have been resolved in Tabasco, and how relevant its experience is to other agricultural areas undergoing rapid large-scale industrial development. Cacao farming was chosen as a case study. Detailed farm budget, family employment, and technical production data were used to document farm production strategies. Research results suggest that resolution of agriculture-petroleum conflicts depends on: demographic conditions, employment conditions, agricultural prices, petroleum company flexibility, government development policy, and farmer political strength. Support for the campesino sector is critical.

Scherr, S.J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

California Agriculture: Dimensions and Issues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agriculture 1959. California, Vol. 1, Part 48. ----------.of Population, California, Vol. 1, Part 6. ----------. 1990Vol. 12, No. 67, 1888. California Committee to Survey the

Siebert,, Jerome Editor

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

CRC handbook of agricultural energy potential of developing countries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book provides background information on the agroenergetic potential of 65 countries and offers summaries of major crops planted, total area planted, yield per hectare, and total production. Total land area is categorized as to agriculture, forest, and woodland, and is discussed with demographic statistics for each country. The potential for agricultural by-products and biomass to contribute to energy availability is explored, with reference to each major crop. Vegetation and/or economic activity, or soil maps are presented for most countries, as are climatic data, with crop yields and residues which are compared with production elsewhere.

Duke, J.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Influence of algae on photolysis rates of chemicals in water  

SciTech Connect

Sunlight-induced algal transformations of 22 nonionic organic chemicals were studied in order to provide kinetic results and equations concerning the influence of algae on the behavior of pollutants in freshwater environments. Screening studies indicated that green and blue-green algae, at concentrations of 1-10 mg of chlorophyll a/L, accelerate photoreaction of certain polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons, organophosphorus compounds, and anilines in water. The rate of change in aniline concentration, (P), in the aniline-Chlamydomonas photoreaction can be described by the following expression: rate = A(1 + B/(P))-1. At low substrate concentrations, the reaction rate is first order with respect to both algae and substrate concentration. Methyl parathion and parathion photoreacted 390 times more rapidly when sorbed by algae than in distilled water, and aniline and m-toluidine reacted over 12000 times faster, indicating that light-induced algal transformations of certain pollutants may be significant. Other results indicated that reaction rates are unaffected by heat-killing the algae. 27 references

Zepp, R.G.; Schlotzhauer, P.F.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

IMPROVING THE REPRESENTATION OF AGRICULTURAL MANAGEMENT IN LAND SURFACE MODELS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the challenging task of increasing food production to keep up with growing population, growing per-capita consumption and the use of agricultural products as biofuels. Climate change, and the associated increases and energy. I estimated that the trend to longer-season corn cultivars over the last three decades can

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

294

Holding algae against the light: The overlooked link between photosynthetic performance and algal distribution on coral reefs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??High abundances of benthic algae on coral reefs are a potential threat to coral reef health. The organic carbon produced by these algae is consumed… (more)

Zande, R.M. van der

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Interactions of carbon and nitrogen metabolism with changing light intensity in natural populations and cultures of planktonic blue-green algae  

SciTech Connect

This study dealt with the factors contributing to the occurrence of blue-green algae in the plankton of lakes. Blue-green algal populations were examined in two different aquatic systems, moderately productive Lawrence Lake and hypereutrophic Wintergreen Lake, with regard to inorganic nitrogen source, light intensity and regime, and species of blue-green algae present. In order to understand the relationship between light and nitrogen source better among natural populations, representative species of blue-green algae, including isolates of Aphanizomenon flos-aquae, Microcystis aeruginosa, and Anabaena flos-aquae, were grown in laboratory cultures under continuously high, variable, and continuously low light at intensities similar to those in the lakes.

Ward, A.K.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Algae from the arid southwestern United States: an annotated bibliography  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Desert algae are attractive biomass producers for capturing solar energy through photosynthesis of organic matter. They are probably capable of higher yields and efficiencies of light utilization than higher plants, and are already adapted to extremes of sunlight intensity, salinity and temperature such as are found in the desert. This report consists of an annotated bibliography of the literature on algae from the arid southwestern United States. It was prepared in anticipation of efforts to isolate desert algae and study their yields in the laboratory. These steps are necessary prior to setting up outdoor algal culture ponds. Desert areas are attractive for such applications because land, sunlight, and, to some extent, water resources are abundant there. References are sorted by state.

Thomas, W.H.; Gaines, S.R.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Top Five Things You Should Know About Algae | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Top Five Things You Should Know About Algae Top Five Things You Should Know About Algae Top Five Things You Should Know About Algae November 6, 2013 - 2:40pm Addthis National Renewable Energy Laboratory researcher Lee Elliott collects samples of algae at a creek in Golden, Colorado. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Renewable Energy Laboratory researcher Lee Elliott collects samples of algae at a creek in Golden, Colorado. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Christy Sterner Algae Technology Manager, Bioenergy Technologies Office 1. Where It Grows There are thousands of different kinds of algae that grow in a variety of colors and forms, and can be found everywhere on the planet -- even on snow and ice. When some people think of algae, they picture green film on ponds

298

Top Five Things You Should Know About Algae | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Top Five Things You Should Know About Algae Top Five Things You Should Know About Algae Top Five Things You Should Know About Algae November 6, 2013 - 2:40pm Addthis National Renewable Energy Laboratory researcher Lee Elliott collects samples of algae at a creek in Golden, Colorado. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Renewable Energy Laboratory researcher Lee Elliott collects samples of algae at a creek in Golden, Colorado. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Christy Sterner Algae Technology Manager, Bioenergy Technologies Office 1. Where It Grows There are thousands of different kinds of algae that grow in a variety of colors and forms, and can be found everywhere on the planet -- even on snow and ice. When some people think of algae, they picture green film on ponds

299

Mathematical Modelling and Numerical Simulation of Marine Ecosystems With Applications to Ice Algae.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Sea-ice ecosystem modelling is a novel field of research. In this thesis, the main organism studied is sea-ice algae. A basic introduction to algae and… (more)

Wickramage, Shyamila Iroshi Perera

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Pages that link to "BioProcess Algae" | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "BioProcess Algae" BioProcess Algae Jump to: navigation, search What links here Page: BioProcess...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural products algae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Solix Biofuels uses a Colorado State lab to test its algae-based formulas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solix Biofuels uses a Colorado State lab to test its algae-based formulas. SAVE THIS | EMAIL. In the classic model, scientists #12;Growing bags produce algae for Solix Biofuels' EECL-based research

Ferrara, Katherine W.

302

Florida company looks to put algae in your gas tank | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Freeport pilot-site are ideal for growing blue-green algae, Paul says. During photosynthesis, algae absorb carbon dioxide, producing bio-oils that Algenol will convert into...

303

Agriculture, land use, and commercial biomass energy  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we have considered commercial biomass energy in the context of overall agriculture and land-use change. We have described a model of energy, agriculture, and land-use and employed that model to examine the implications of commercial biomass energy or both energy sector and land-use change carbon emissions. In general we find that the introduction of biomass energy has a negative effect on the extent of unmanaged ecosystems. Commercial biomass introduces a major new land use which raises land rental rates, and provides an incentive to bring more land into production, increasing the rate of incursion into unmanaged ecosystems. But while the emergence of a commercial biomass industry may increase land-use change emissions, the overall effect is strongly to reduce total anthropogenic carbon emissions. Further, the higher the rate of commercial biomass energy productivity, the lower net emissions. Higher commercial biomass energy productivity, while leading to higher land-use change emissions, has a far stronger effect on fossil fuel carbon emissions. Highly productive and inexpensive commercial biomass energy technologies appear to have a substantial depressing effect on total anthropogenic carbon emissions, though their introduction raises the rental rate on land, providing incentives for greater rates of deforestation than in the reference case.

Edmonds, J.A.; Wise, M.A.; Sands, R.D.; Brown, R.A.; Kheshgi, H.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Memorandum of Understanding Between the Department of Agriculture and the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Memorandum of Understanding Between the Department of Agriculture Memorandum of Understanding Between the Department of Agriculture and the Department of Energy and the National Development and Reform Commission of the People's Republic of China on Cooperation in the Development of Biofuels Memorandum of Understanding Between the Department of Agriculture and the Department of Energy and the National Development and Reform Commission of the People's Republic of China on Cooperation in the Development of Biofuels This is the text of the Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Energy and the National Department and Reform Commission of the People's Republic of China. It outlines an agreement between the two countries to share information and promote the production of biomass technologies and biofuel development.

305

Memorandum of Understanding Between the Department of Agriculture and the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Agriculture Department of Agriculture and the Department of Energy and the National Development and Reform Commission of the People's Republic of China on Cooperation in the Development of Biofuels Memorandum of Understanding Between the Department of Agriculture and the Department of Energy and the National Development and Reform Commission of the People's Republic of China on Cooperation in the Development of Biofuels This is the text of the Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Energy and the National Department and Reform Commission of the People's Republic of China. It outlines an agreement between the two countries to share information and promote the production of biomass technologies and biofuel development. chinamou.pdf

306

Formation of Radioactive Citrulline During Photosynthetic C14O2-Fixation by Blue-Green Algae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ClTRULLlNE BY BLUE-GREEN ALGAE TWO-WEEK LOAN COPY This is aC~~O~-FIXATION BLUE-GREEN ALGAE Pekka Linko, 0. Holm-Hansen,C~~O~-FIXATION BLUE-GREEN ALGAE BY Pelcka Linlc~,'~ Holm-

Linko, Pekka; Holm-Hansen, O.; Bassham, J.A.; Calvin, M.

1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Key Words: Shewanella algae; Fasciitis, Necrotizing; Primary Bacteremia Address for correspondence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shewanella algae infections are rare in humans. Previously reported cases of S. algae have mainly been associated with direct contact with seawater. We report a case of primary S. algae bacteremia occurring after the ingestion of raw seafood in a patient with liver cirrhosis that presented a fulminent course of necrotizing fasciitis.

Primary Shewanella; Bacteremia Mimicking; Vibrio Septicemia; Dae Seong Myung; Young-sun Jung; Seung-ji Kang; Young A Song; Kyung-hwa Park; Sook-in Jung; Soo Hyun Kim; Jong-hee Shin; Sook-in Jung M. D

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Biomass from Cyanobacteria:Opportunities for the Proposed Algae Biotechnology and Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using CO2 & Algae to Treat Wastewater and Produce Biofuel Feedstock Tryg Lundquist Cal Poly State ­ Biofuel feedstock · CO2 addition may: ­ Improve nutrient uptake ­ Accelerate treatment ­ Decrease algae of the Industry and Growth · Algae's Role in WW Treatment · CO2's New Role · Research at Cal Poly · Future Work

Tullos, Desiree

309

Three ACE awards for California Agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Editor Janet White accepted the awards during the 2012 ACEa noxious weed. Three ACE awards for California AgricultureAgriculture team has won three awards from the Association

Editors, by

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Press Conference Call Tomorrow: Agriculture Secretary Vilsack...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Press Conference Call Tomorrow: Agriculture Secretary Vilsack and Energy Secretary Chu to Discuss Efforts to Reduce U.S. Oil Dependence Press Conference Call Tomorrow: Agriculture...

311

Sustainable Agriculture Network | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

"Sustainable Agriculture Network" Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleSustainableAgricultureNetwork&oldid312235" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations...

312

Energy Secretary Chu, Agriculture Secretary Vilsack Announce...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chu, Agriculture Secretary Vilsack Announce 6.3 million for Biofuels Research Energy Secretary Chu, Agriculture Secretary Vilsack Announce 6.3 million for Biofuels Research July...

313

Renewable Agricultural Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Renewable Agricultural Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Renewable Agricultural Energy...

314

Solar Photovoltaics for Sustainable Agriculture and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar photovoltaic (PV) systems have shown their potential in rural electrification projects around the world, especially concerning Solar Home Systems. With continuing price decreases of PV systems, other applications are becoming economically attractive and growing experience is gained with the use of PV in such areas as social and communal services, agriculture and other productive activities, which can have a significant impact on rural development. There is still a lack of information, however, on the potential and limitations of such PV applications. The main aim of this study is, therefore, to contribute to a better understanding of the potential impact and of the limitations of PV systems on sustainable agriculture and rural development (SARD), especially concerning income-generating activities. It is, in fact, of paramount importance to identify the potential contribution of PV to rural development in order to gain further financial and political commitment for PV projects and programmes and to design appropriate PV projects. One of the main lessons learnt through this study is that success of PV programmes is significantly enhanced when an integrated strategy is followed. Solar photovoltaic systems, through their flexibility in use, offer unique chances for the energy sector to provide “packages ” of energy services to remote rural areas such as for rural health care, education, communication, agriculture, lighting and water supply. It is hoped that this document contributes to the generation of ideas and discussions among the different institutions involved in providing these services to rural areas and thereby to an "informed " decision on the PV technology option.

B. Van Campen; D. Guidi; G. Best

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

The economic potential of producing energy from agricultural biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agricultural biomass is a substitute for fossil fuels, which could provide a sustained energy feedstock and possibly reduce further accumulations of greenhouse gases. However, these feedstocks currently face a market dominated by low cost fossil fuels; hence, are largely unable to be supplied at a competitive price. This study examined how forcing increased biomass energy generation, along with improvements in biomass production technology, will impact agricultural feedstock prices and economically impact the well-being of the agricultural sector. An U.S. agricultural sector model, a dynamic, nonlinear, mathematical program, determined the economic effects of using increased supplies of agricultural biomass for energy. The model incorporated production and use of potential biomass energy feedstocks, such as switchgrass and short rotation poplar. Also, the model introduced future biomass technologies, based on current research involving more productive biomass crops and more efficient conversion activities which produce ethanol and biomass electricity. The forced supply of new biomass crops, along with corn, involves several levels of energy production. This forced supply was based on projected ethanol demands and land capability for biomass production. The model determined the optimal mix of corn and energy crops to meet the biomass feedstock goals for energies. The resultant model appraises the effects of increasing biomass feedstocks for the years 1990, 2000, 2010, and 2020. The results show that initially, fuel prices using biomass feedstocks may be as much as 50 % greater than equivalent fossil fuel supplied energy. But due to technology the price of biomass feedstocks decreases over time. The analysis predicts that the agricultural feedstock price and the price of fossil fuels may equalize between the years 201 0 and 2020. The forced production of agricultural energy crops changes cropping patterns and prices for conventional crops as well. The agricultural energy crops and corn receive a greater allocation of farm land to meet the forced biomass energy supplies. Most conventional crop prices rise and all biomass feedstock prices rise with increasing feedstock production. As a consequence, farmers receive increased profits. Consumers, however, experience a loss in well-being due to the higher cost of energy feedstock and food products. National well-being experiences a net loss.

Jerko, Christine

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Agriculture USA  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Clean Agriculture USA Clean Agriculture USA to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Agriculture USA on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Agriculture USA on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Agriculture USA on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Agriculture USA on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Agriculture USA on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Agriculture USA on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Clean Agriculture USA Clean Agriculture USA is a voluntary program that promotes the reduction of diesel exhaust emissions from agricultural equipment and vehicles by encouraging proper operations and maintenance by farmers, ranchers, and

317

Agricultural Carbon Mitigation in Europe  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agricultural Carbon Mitigation in Europe Agricultural Carbon Mitigation in Europe Agricultural Carbon Mitigation in Europe Smith P, Powlson DS, Smith JU, Falloon P, and Coleman K. 2000. Meeting Europe's climate change commitments: Quantitative estimates of the potential for carbon mitigation by agriculture. Global Climate Change 6:525-539. Abstract Under the Kyoto Protocol, the European Union is committed to a reduction in CO2 emissions to 92% of baseline (1990) levels during the first commitment period (2008-2012). The Kyoto Protocol allows carbon emissions to be offset by demonstrable removal of carbon from the atmosphere. Thus, land-use / land-management change and forestry activities that are shown to reduce atmospheric CO2 levels can be included in the Kyoto targets. These activities include afforestation, reforestation and deforestation (article

318

Multiplex detection of agricultural pathogens  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Described are kits and methods useful for detection of agricultural pathogens in a sample. Genomic sequence information from agricultural pathogens was analyzed to identify signature sequences, e.g., polynucleotide sequences useful for confirming the presence or absence of a pathogen in a sample. Primer and probe sets were designed and optimized for use in a PCR based, multiplexed Luminex assay and/or an array assay to successfully identify the presence or absence of pathogens in a sample.

Siezak, Thomas R.; Gardner, Shea; Torres, Clinton; Vitalis, Elizabeth; Lenhoff, Raymond J.

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

319

Multiplex detection of agricultural pathogens  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Described are kits and methods useful for detection of seven agricultural pathogens (BPSV; BHV; BVD; FMDV; BTV; SVD; and VESV) in a sample. Genomic sequence information from 7 agricultural pathogens was analyzed to identify signature sequences, e.g., polynucleotide sequences useful for confirming the presence or absence of a pathogen in a sample. Primer and probe sets were designed and optimized for use in a PCR based, multiplexed Luminex assay to successfully identify the presence or absence of pathogens in a sample.

McBride, Mary Teresa (Brentwood, CA); Slezak, Thomas Richard (Livermore, CA); Messenger, Sharon Lee (Kensington, CA)

2010-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

320

Modeling Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal at the Subfield Scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study developed a computational strategy that utilizes data inputs from multiple spatial scales to investigate how variability within individual fields can impact sustainable residue removal for bioenergy production. Sustainable use of agricultural residues for bioenergy production requires consideration of the important role that residues play in limiting soil erosion and maintaining soil C, health, and productivity. Increased availability of subfield-scale data sets such as grain yield data, high-fidelity digital elevation models, and soil characteristic data provides an opportunity to investigate the impacts of subfield-scale variability on sustainable agricultural residue removal. Using three representative fields in Iowa, this study contrasted the results of current NRCS conservation management planning analysis with subfield-scale analysis for rake-and-bale removal of agricultural residue. The results of the comparison show that the field-average assumptions used in NRCS conservation management planning may lead to unsustainable residue removal decisions for significant portions of some fields. This highlights the need for additional research on subfield-scale sustainable agricultural residue removal including the development of real-time variable removal technologies for agricultural residue.

Muth, D.J.; McCorkle, D.S.; Koch, J.B.; Bryden, K.M.

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural products algae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Agricultural scientists cut alcohol fuel costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scientists at the US Department of Agriculture have succeeded in lowering the cost of making alcohol from corn by 15 cents to $1.64 per gallon. The cost of drying distillers' solubles dropped because at the end of each cooking/fermenting/distilling run, the solubles are used for cooking, cooling and fermenting in the next run. One evaporation of solubles is required after 10 runs, so energy cost is cut from 17 cents to 1.7 cents. The protein by-products recovered, can be used as swine and poultry feeds and as human food.

Not Available

1981-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

322

Energy and US agriculture: 1974 and 1978  

SciTech Connect

Agricultural production used approximately 8.5 billion gallons of liquified fuel in 1978. This was up from the nearly 8 billion gallons in 1974. Fuel oil and liquified petroleum (LP) gas usage remained relatively constant between 1974 and 1978. The most dramatic changes were in diesel and gasoline usage. Gasoline use dropped about 0.2 billion gallons and diesel fuel use increased almost 0.7 billion gallons, accounting for the net 0.5 billion gallon increase in liquid fuel usage. On farm business use of natural gas and electricity showed virtually no change between 1974 and 1978.

Torgerson, D.; Cooper, H.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Autonomous farming: modelling and control of agricultural machinery in a unified framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are significant challenges faced by the farming industry, including a reduced labour workforce and a corporate style of farming. Such factors demand an increase in farming efficiency and productivity. This paper describes future autonomous farming ... Keywords: agricultural machinery, agricultural robotics, agronomy data, articulated farm vehicles, autonomous farming, autonomous robots, autonomous vehicles, intelligent systems, precision agriculture, precision farming, tracking control, trajectory tracking, uncertainty, vehicle control, vehicle modelling

Ray Eaton; Jay Katupitiya; Kheng Wah Siew; Blair Howarth

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Gas Production Tax (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Production Tax (Texas) Gas Production Tax (Texas) Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction MunicipalPublic Utility Local...

325

Florida company looks to put algae in your gas tank | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Florida company looks to put algae in your gas tank Florida company looks to put algae in your gas tank Florida company looks to put algae in your gas tank January 5, 2010 - 4:02pm Addthis What will the project do? As a result of the stimulus funding, Algenol also has the potential to create hundreds of new jobs. You may never have thought about putting algae in your gas tank, but companies harnessing breakthrough technologies have discovered ways to transform algae into transportation fuels. Now that sounds green. Algenol Biofuels Inc., a Florida-based algae-to-ethanol company, has received a $25 million grant from the U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Recovery Act. The grant will aid Algenol in developing a pilot-scale integrated biorefinery in Freeport, Texas, to make ethanol from algae. As a result of the stimulus funding, Algenol also has the potential to

326

Long-Term Trends in Air Temperature Distribution and Extremes, Growing Degree?Days, and Spring and Fall Frosts for Climate Impact Assessments on Agricultural Practices in Nebraska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air temperature influences agricultural practices and production outcomes, making detailed quantifications of temperature changes necessary for potential positive and negative effects on agricultural management practices to be exploited or ...

Kari E. Skaggs; Suat Irmak

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Microalgae Production from Power Plant Flue Gas: Environmental Implications on a Life Cycle Basis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Power-plant flue gas can serve as a source of CO{sub 2} for microalgae cultivation, and the algae can be cofired with coal. This life cycle assessment (LCA) compared the environmental impacts of electricity production via coal firing versus coal/algae cofiring. The LCA results demonstrated lower net values for the algae cofiring scenario for the following using the direct injection process (in which the flue gas is directly transported to the algae ponds): SOx, NOx, particulates, carbon dioxide, methane, and fossil energy consumption. Carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons emissions were statistically unchanged. Lower values for the algae cofiring scenario, when compared to the burning scenario, were observed for greenhouse potential and air acidification potential. However, impact assessment for depletion of natural resources and eutrophication potential showed much higher values. This LCA gives us an overall picture of impacts across different environmental boundaries, and hence, can help in the decision-making process for implementation of the algae scenario.

Kadam, K. L.

2001-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

328

Definition and analysis of new agricultural farm energetic indicators using spatial OLAP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agricultural energy consumption is an important environmental and social issue. Several diagnoses have been proposed to define indicators for analyzing energy consumption at large scale of agricultural farm activities (year, farm, family of production, ... Keywords: energetic indicators, spatial OLAP, spatial data warehouses

Sandro Bimonte; Kamal Boulil; Jean-Pierre Chanet; Marilys Pradel

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Implications of Three Biofuel Crops for Beneficial Arthropods in Agricultural Landscapes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Implications of Three Biofuel Crops for Beneficial Arthropods in Agricultural Landscapes Mary A Science+Business Media, LLC. 2010 Abstract Production of biofuel feedstocks in agricultural landscapes and generalist natural enemies in three model biofuel crops: corn, switch- grass, and mixed prairie, we tested

Landis, Doug

330

First look at cellulose's early production could hold keys to...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cellulose's early production could hold keys to bacteria-free medical devices, better biofuel By Jared Sagoff * May 14, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint Produced by plants as well as algae...

331

Energy for agriculture: a computerized information retrieval system  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography contains 2613 citations to the literature for 1973 through May 1979. Some of the subjects covered include: accounting, agriculture, animal production, conservation, drying, fertilizer, food processing, greenhouses, home, international, irrigation, organic, solar, storage, tillage, and wind. Author and keyword indexes are included. (MHR)

Stout, B A; Myers, C A [comp.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

University of Wisconsin-Madison Department of Agricultural & Applied Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of environmentally friendly and renewable energy sources, and 3) promoting industrial uses of agricultural products service). Renderers who filter out the solids and remove enough moisture to meet industry specifications soybean oil, yellow grease and fats recycled from the restaurant industry, and rendered animal fats

Radeloff, Volker C.

333

Agriculture - Sustainable biofuels Redux  

SciTech Connect

Last May's passage of the 2008 Farm Bill raises the stakes for biofuel sustainability: A substantial subsidy for the production of cellulosic ethanol starts the United States again down a path with uncertain environmental consequences. This time, however, the subsidy is for both the refiners ($1.01 per gallon) and the growers ($45 per ton of biomass), which will rapidly accelerate adoption and place hard-to-manage pressures on efforts to design and implement sustainable production practices - as will a 2007 legislative mandate for 16 billion gallons of cellulosic ethanol per year by 2022. Similar directives elsewhere, e.g., the European Union's mandate that 10% of all transport fuel in Europe be from renewable sources by 2020, make this a global issue. The European Union's current reconsideration of this target places even more emphasis on cellulosic feedstocks (1). The need for knowledge- and science-based policy is urgent. Biofuel sustainability has environmental, economic, and social facets that all interconnect. Tradeoffs among them vary widely by types of fuels and where they are grown and, thus, need to be explicitly considered by using a framework that allows the outcomes of alternative systems to be consistently evaluated and compared. A cellulosic biofuels industry could have many positive social and environmental attributes, but it could also suffer from many of the sustainability issues that hobble grain-based biofuels, if not implemented the right way.

Robertson, G. Phillip [W.K. Kellogg Biological Station and Great Lakes Bioenergy Research; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Doering, Otto C. [Purdue University; Hamburg, Steven P [Brown University; Melillo, Jerry M [ORNL; Wander, Michele M [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Parton, William [Colorado State University, Fort Collins

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Agricultural and Biological Engineering College of Agricultural Sciences Cooperative Extension  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that this trend will continue, especially if the prices for fossil fuels continue to increase. Other direct, and Pennsylvania Counties Cooperating Biomass Energy Dennis E. Buffington, Professor, Agricultural and Biological iomass energy is energy derived from organic matter of recent biological origin. Common forms of biomass

Lee, Dongwon

335

Chemical Fixation of CO2 in Coal Combustion Products and Recycling through Biosystems  

SciTech Connect

This Annual Technical Progress Report presents the principle results in enhanced growth of algae using coal combustion products as a catalyst to increase bicarbonate levels in solution. A co-current reactor is present that increases the gas phase to bicarbonate transfer rate by a factor of five to nine. The bicarbonate concentration at a given pH is approximately double that obtained using a control column of similar construction. Algae growth experiments were performed under laboratory conditions to obtain baseline production rates and to perfect experimental methods. The final product of this initial phase in algae production is presented.

C. Henry Copeland; Paul Pier; Samantha Whitehead; David Behel

2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

336

Uptake and distribution of technetium in several marine algae  

SciTech Connect

The uptake or chemical form of technetium in different marine algae (Acetabularia, Cystoseira, Fucus) has been examined and a simple model to explain the uptake of technetium in the unicellular alga, Acetabularia, has been conceptualized. At low concentrations in the external medium, Acetabularia can rapidly concentrate technetium. Concentration factors in excess of 400 can be attained after a time of about 3 weeks. At higher mass concentrations in the medium, uptake of technetium by Acetabularia becomes saturated resulting in a decreased concentration factor (approximately 10 after 4 weeks). Approximately 69% of the total radioactivity present in /sup 95m/Tc labelled Acetabularia is found in the cell cytosol. In Fucus vesiculosus, labelled with /sup 95m/Tc, a high percentage of technetium is present in soluble ionic forms while approximately 40% is bound, in this brown alga, in proteins and polysaccharides associated with cell walls. In the algal cytosol of Fucus vesiculosus, about 45% of the /sup 95m/Tc appears to be present as anionic TcO/sup -//sub 4/ and the remainder is bound to small molecules. 8 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

Bonotto, S.; Gerber, G.B.; Garten, C.T. Jr.; Vandecasteele, C.M.; Myttenaere, C.; Van Baelen, J.; Cogneau, M.; van der Ben, D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Food and Agriculture Organization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International cereal prices (in US dollar terms) have been increasing since 2003, but it is domestic prices that affect food consumption and production. This paper analyzes, for seven large Asian countries, the extent to which domestic prices have increased since 2003 and presents several conclusions. First, the data show that the increases in world cereal prices have been accompanied by a real depreciation of the US dollar. For many countries (but not all), this depreciation has neutralized a substantial proportion of the increase in world prices. Second, domestic commodity specific policies in several of these Asian countries have further stabilized domestic prices relative to the change in world prices. This has been especially true for rice, the main staple food in the region, but it is also true for wheat. On average, through the end of 2007, the increase in real domestic rice prices was about onethird of the increase in real US dollar world market rice prices. Third, for the specific cases analyzed here, producer or farmgate prices have changed by approximately the same percentage as consumer prices. Thus, in these Asian countries, domestic markets seem to be transmitting price changes between farmers and consumers rather efficiently. Fourth, the

David Dawe; Of The United Nations; David Dawe

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Selling Texas: an internship at the Texas Department of Agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"SELLING TEXAS," an overview of the Texas Department of Agriculture and its Marketing and Agribusiness Division, takes a look at how the organization promotes Texas as the best of the best, and considers what would make the campaign better. Enriched by abundant resources and industrious people, Texas is a modem worldwide leader in the export of many raw and processed agricultural products ... Your market is our market ... Supply, quality and diversity--that's Texas agriculture" (TDA, 1996a). The Texas Department of Agriculture's Marketing and Agribusiness Development Division has a unique opportunity to encourage businesses to locate in Texas (and thereby boost the Texas economy) as a result of the State's mystique. For instance, the number of brand names including "Texas" places it in the top five-among other U.S. states in terms of popularity as an advertising tool. "Savor all the flavors of Texas ... Bred to survive and flourish in the unique Texas climate ... The vast ranges and fertile soils of Texas produce the world's finest fibers..." (TDA, 1996c). The division's BLJY TEXAS cwnpaign also promotes Texas products to its residents with whom Texas pride and loyalty are an arguable second only to American patriotism. The BUY TEXAS initiative is an umbrella consumer marketing effort that "encourages ocnsumers to seek and purchase products grown, sewn, and processed in Texas" (Marketing and Agribusiness Development, 1996) including Taste of Texas foods, Vintage Texas wines, TEXAS GROAN plants, and Naturally TEXAS apparel.

Cross, Kelly D.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Biomass Energy and Agricultural Sustainability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass Energy and Agricultural Sustainability Stephen Kaffka Department of Plant Sciences University of California, Davis & California Biomass Collaborative February 2008 #12;E x p e c t e d d u r 9 ) ---------Biomass era----------- --?????????? #12;By 2025, every source of energy

California at Davis, University of

340

Cost Methodology for Biomass Feedstocks: Herbaceous Crops and Agricultural Residues  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a set of procedures and assumptions used to estimate production and logistics costs of bioenergy feedstocks from herbaceous crops and agricultural residues. The engineering-economic analysis discussed here is based on methodologies developed by the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE) and the American Agricultural Economics Association (AAEA). An engineering-economic analysis approach was chosen due to lack of historical cost data for bioenergy feedstocks. Instead, costs are calculated using assumptions for equipment performance, input prices, and yield data derived from equipment manufacturers, research literature, and/or standards. Cost estimates account for fixed and variable costs. Several examples of this costing methodology used to estimate feedstock logistics costs are included at the end of this report.

Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL; Webb, Erin [ORNL; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural products algae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Agricultural Management Decision Aids Driven by Real-Time Satellite Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a NASA-sponsored program entitled "Use of Earth and Space Science Data Over the Internet," scientists at the University of Wisconsin—Madison have developed a suite of products for agriculture that are based in satellite and conventional ...

George R. Diak; Martha C. Anderson; William L. Bland; John M. Norman; John M. Mecikalski; Robert M. Aune

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Agricultural and Resource Economics Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Europe. Current biofuel production in Brazil cannot meetthat expansion of biofuel production will expand defores-attributes to support biofuel production. The challenge is

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Climate policy implications for agricultural water demand  

SciTech Connect

Energy, water and land are scarce resources, critical to humans. Developments in each affect the availability and cost of the others, and consequently human prosperity. Measures to limit greenhouse gas concentrations will inevitably exact dramatic changes on energy and land systems and in turn alter the character, magnitude and geographic distribution of human claims on water resources. We employ the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), an integrated assessment model to explore the interactions of energy, land and water systems in the context of alternative policies to limit climate change to three alternative levels: 2.5 Wm-2 (445 ppm CO2-e), 3.5 Wm-2 (535 ppm CO2-e) and 4.5 Wm-2 (645 ppm CO2-e). We explore the effects of two alternative land-use emissions mitigation policy options—one which taxes terrestrial carbon emissions equally with fossil fuel and industrial emissions, and an alternative which only taxes fossil fuel and industrial emissions but places no penalty on land-use change emissions. We find that increasing populations and economic growth could be anticipated to almost triple demand for water for agricultural systems across the century even in the absence of climate policy. In general policies to mitigate climate change increase agricultural demands for water still further, though the largest changes occur in the second half of the century, under both policy regimes. The two policies examined profoundly affected both the sources and magnitudes of the increase in irrigation water demands. The largest increases in agricultural irrigation water demand occurred in scenarios where only fossil fuel emissions were priced (but not land-use change emission) and were primarily driven by rapid expansion in bioenergy production. In these scenarios water demands were large relative to present-day total available water, calling into question whether it would be physically possible to produce the associated biomass energy. We explored the potential of improved water delivery and irrigation system efficiencies. These could potentially reduce demands substantially. However, overall demands remained high under our fossil-fuel-only tax policy. In contrast, when all carbon was priced, increases in agricultural water demands were smaller than under the fossil-fuel-only policy and were driven primarily by increased demands for water by non-biomass crops such as rice. Finally we estimate the geospatial pattern of water demands and find that regions such as China, India and other countries in south and east Asia might be expected to experience greatest increases in water demands.?

Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

344

Before the Senate Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry Before the Senate Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry Before the Senate Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry By: Richard Newell, Administrator...

345

Fish kill mechanisms and toxins exploration for the harmful alga Chattonella marina.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

???The marine alga Chattonella marina (Raphidophyceae) has long attracted global attention for its association with massive mortality in wild and cultured fish worldwide. Respiratory disorder… (more)

Shen, Min ( ??)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Hierarchical and size dependent mechanical properties of silica and silicon nanostructures inspired by diatom algae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biology implements fundamental principles that allow for attractive mechanical properties, as observed in biomineralized structures. For example, diatom algae contain nanoporous hierarchical silicified shells that provide ...

García, Andre Phillipé

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

The ecology of chemical defence in a filamentous marine red alga.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??I investigated the ecological functions of halogenated secondary metabolites from the red alga Asparagopsis armata, their localisation in specialised cells and also their cost of… (more)

Paul, Nicholas Andrew

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Investigation of microalgae cultivation and anaerobic codigestion of algae and sewage sludge for wastewater treatment facilities.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The main goals of this research are to investigate the anaerobic digestibility of algae and to investigate the effects of growth media on the growth… (more)

Wang, Meng

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Biosorption of heavy metal ions to brown algae, Macrocystis pyrifera, Kjellmaniella crassiforia, and Undaria pinnatifida  

SciTech Connect

A fundamental study of the application of brown algae to the aqueous-phase separation of toxic heavy metals was carried out. The biosorption characteristics of cadmium and lead ions were determined with brown algae, Macrocystis pyrifera, Kjellmaniella crassiforia, and Undaria pinnatifida. A metal binding model proposed by the authors was used for the description of metal binding data. The results showed that the biosorption of bivalent metal ions to brown algae was due to bivalent binding to carboxylic groups on alginic acid in brown algae.

Seki, Hideshi; Suzuki, Akira [Hokkaido Univ., Hakodate (Japan)

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

GROSS BETA RADIOACTIVITY OF THE ALGAE AT ENIWETOK ATOLL, 1954-1956  

SciTech Connect

A study was made to determine the amounts of radioactivity in marine algae, water, and lagoon bottom sand collected at Eniwetok Atoll during the period April 1954 to April 1956. The highest levels of beta radioactivity of algae collected after the detonation of a nuclear device (Nectar) were in algae from those islands closest to the site of detonation and in the downwind path of the fallout. With time after detonation, the decline of radioactivity in the algae at Belle Island was faster than can be accounted for on the basis of physical decay alone. In March 1955, algae and bottom sand collected in the deeper waters (20 to 140 feet) of the lagoon, one half to two miles offshore, contained as much or more radioactivity than samples collected in the shallow water near shore. The radioactive decay rates of algae samples collected from Leroy and Henry Islands were greater than those of algae from other islands, indicating that there was less residual contamination from previous detonations at these two islands. Study of the radioactive decay rates of the algae at Belle Island showed that the radioactivity was decaying at a relatively low rate, which became slower with samples collected late in the survey. These observations indicate that the longer-lived isotopes were being taken up by the algae. (auth)

Palumbo, R.F.

1959-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

351

The Optimization of Growth Rate and Lipid Content from Select Algae Strains.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Algae are a favorable biofuel source because of the potential high oil content and fast generation of the biomass. However, one challenge of this technology… (more)

Csavina, Janae L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

The Potential for Micro-Algae and other "Micro-Crops" to Produce Sustainable Biofuels.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Interest in algae biofuels has increased in recent years due to government funding, industry investment, environmental pressures and renewable fuels policy. Although some analysis has… (more)

Assman, Aaron; Southard, Sean; John, Siddharth; Lei, Antony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Anaerobic Digesters in the Agricultural Sector: A Distributed Energy Resources Market Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regulatory pressure is creating a need for agricultural animal operations to better handle animal organic waste products. One option available to dairies, hog farms, and other operations to address these challenges is to develop anaerobic digesters. A by-product of anaerobic digesters is a methane rich gas that can be used for electric power generation and/or meeting thermal needs. This report explores the market potential for anaerobic digesters in the agricultural sector, and the role that electric pow...

2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

354

ORGANIC GEOCHEMICAL STUDIES. II. THE DISTRIBUTION OF ALIPHATIC HYDROCARBONS IN ALGAE, BACTERIA, AND IN A RECENT LAKE SEDIMENT: A PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ALIPHATIC HYDROCARBONS IN ALGAE, BACTERIA, AND IN A RECENTH F A PRELIMINARY REPORT IN ALGAE, BACTERIA, AKD IN A RECENTrests on the finding that algae have less cellulose and a

Han, Jerry; McCarthy, E.D.; Van Hoeven Jr., William; Calvin, Melvin; Bradley, W. H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

THE EFFECT OF HERBIVORY BY THE LONG-SPINED SEA URCHIN, DIADEMA SAVIGNYI, ON ALGAE GROWTH IN THE CORAL REEFS OF MOOREA, FRENCH POLYNESIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

between corals and algae on coral reefs: a review of4: 16-24. Wilder, R.M. Algae-Herbivore Interactions on theURCHIN, DIADEMA SAVIGNYI, ON ALGAE GROWTH IN THE CORAL REEFS

Hoey, Jennifer

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

National Microalgae Biofuel Production Potential and Resource Demand  

SciTech Connect

Microalgae continue to receive global attention as a potential sustainable "energy crop" for biofuel production. An important step to realizing the potential of algae is quantifying the demands commercial-scale algal biofuel production will place on water and land resources. We present a high-resolution national resource and oil production assessment that brings to bear fundamental research questions of where open pond microalgae production can occur, how much land and water resource is required, and how much energy is produced. Our study suggests under current technology microalgae have the potential to generate 220 billion liters/year of oil, equivalent to 48% of current U.S. petroleum imports for transportation fuels. However, this level of production would require 5.5% of the land area in the conterminous U.S., and nearly three times the volume of water currently used for irrigated agriculture, averaging 1,421 L water per L of oil. Optimizing the selection of locations for microalgae production based on water use efficiency can greatly reduce total water demand. For example, focusing on locations along the Gulf Coast, Southeastern Seaboard, and areas adjacent to the Great Lakes, shows a 75% reduction in water demand to 350 L per L of oil produced with a 67% reduction in land use. These optimized locations have the potential to generate an oil volume equivalent to 17% of imports for transportation fuels, equal to the Energy Independence and Security Act year 2022 "advanced biofuels" production target, and utilizing some 25% of the current irrigation consumptive water demand for the U. S. These results suggest that, with proper planning, adequate land and water are available to meet a significant portion of the U.S. renewable fuel goals.

Wigmosta, Mark S.; Coleman, Andre M.; Skaggs, Richard; Huesemann, Michael H.; Lane, Leonard J.

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

357

Slide 1 of 19NCA -Agriculture with a California Focus Agriculture with a California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Slide 1 of 19NCA - Agriculture with a California Focus Agriculture with a California Focus (NCA Draft Findings) Richard Grotjahn Professor of Climate Dynamics University of California, Davis 6 March 2013 #12;Slide 2 of 19NCA - Agriculture with a California Focus Authors of Chapter 6: Agriculture

Grotjahn, Richard

358

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Agricultural Podcasts  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Information Information Resources Printable Version Bookmark and Share Publications Success Stories Webinars Podcasts Videos Stakeholder Interviews Lessons Learned Wind Working Groups Economic Impact Studies Wind Turbine Ordinances Agricultural Podcasts Wind Powering America Podcasts Handout Wind Powering America provides this printable postcard as an outreach tool. Wind Powering America and the National Association of Farm Broadcasters produces a series of radio interviews on wind energy aimed at a rural stakeholder audience. To subscribe, click on the PODCAST button below to open up the feed. Copy the URL from your browser's address bar into your podcast subscription software. For a list of podcast software, see Podcasting News' list of podcast software clients. Podcast Title: Wind Energy Forum Enhances Positives of Wind Production

359

Research on Agricultural Information Service Platform Based on Information Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For exiting problems of information technology in agriculture, modern information technologies are used to make agricultural information service platform, which can integrate information resources, then agricultural network information service sharing ... Keywords: modern information technology, agricultural information, service platform

Zhang Yubin; Liu Zhiguo; Lin Lizhong

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Radioactivity in consumer products  

SciTech Connect

Papers presented at the conference dealt with regulations and standards; general and biological risks; radioluminous materials; mining, agricultural, and construction materials containing radioactivity; and various products containing radioactive sources.

Moghissi, A.A.; Paras, P.; Carter, M.W.; Barker, R.F. (eds.)

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural products algae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Dancing Volvox: Hydrodynamic Bound States of Swimming Algae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The spherical alga Volvox swims by means of flagella on thousands of surface somatic cells. This geometry and its large size make it a model organism for studying the fluid dynamics of multicellularity. Remarkably, when two nearby Volvox swim close to a solid surface, they attract one another and can form stable bound states in which they "waltz" or "minuet" around each other. A surface-mediated hydrodynamic attraction combined with lubrication forces between spinning, bottom-heavy Volvox explains the formation, stability and dynamics of the bound states. These phenomena are suggested to underlie observed clustering of Volvox at surfaces.

Knut Drescher; Kyriacos C. Leptos; Idan Tuval; Takuji Ishikawa; Timothy J. Pedley; Raymond E. Goldstein

2009-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

362

Missouri Agricultural and Energy Saving Team - A Revolutionary...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agricultural and Energy Saving Team - A Revolutionary Opportunity (MAESTRO) Missouri Agricultural and Energy Saving Team - A Revolutionary Opportunity (MAESTRO) Eligibility...

363

Emissions Of Greenhouse Gases From Rice Agriculture  

SciTech Connect

This project produced detailed data on the processes that affect methane and nitrous oxide emissions from rice agriculture and their inter-relationships. It defines the shifting roles and potential future of these gases in causing global warming and the benefits and tradeoffs of reducing emissions. The major results include: 1). Mechanisms and Processes Leading to Methane Emissions are Delineated. Our experiments have tested the standard model of methane emissions from rice fields and found new results on the processes that control the flux. A mathematical mass balance model was used to unravel the production, oxidation and transport of methane from rice. The results suggested that when large amounts of organic matter are applied, the additional flux that is observed is due to both greater production and reduced oxidation of methane. 2). Methane Emissions From China Have Been Decreasing Over the Last Two Decades. We have calculated that methane emissions from rice fields have been falling in recent decades. This decrease is particularly large in China. While some of this is due to reduced area of rice agriculture, the bigger effect is from the reduction in the emission factor which is the annual amount of methane emitted per hectare of rice. The two most important changes that cause this decreasing emission from China are the reduced use of organic amendments which have been replaced by commercial nitrogen fertilizers, and the increased practice of intermittent flooding as greater demands are placed on water resources. 3). Global Methane Emissions Have Been Constant For More Than 20 Years. While the concentrations of methane in the atmosphere have been leveling off in recent years, our studies show that this is caused by a near constant total global source of methane for the last 20 years or more. This is probably because as some anthropogenic sources have increased, others, such as the rice agriculture source, have fallen. Changes in natural emissions appear small. 4). Nitrous Oxide Emissions From Rice Fields Increase as Methane Emissions Drop. Inundated conditions favor anaerobic methane production with high emission rates and de-nitrification resulting in modest nitrous oxide emissions. Under drier conditions such as intermittent flooding, methane emissions fall and nitrous oxide emissions increase. Increased nitrogen fertilizer use increases nitrous oxide emissions and is usually accompanied by reduced organic matter applications which decreases methane emissions. These mechanisms cause a generally inverse relationship between methane and nitrous oxide emissions. Reduction of methane from rice agriculture to control global warming comes with tradeoffs with increased nitrous oxide emissions. 5). High Spatial Resolution Maps of Emissions Produced. Maps of methane and nitrous oxide emissions at a resolution of 5 min × 5 min have been produced based on the composite results of this research. These maps are necessary for both scientific and policy uses.

M. Aslam K. Khalil

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

364

Sustainable agricultural residue removal for bioenergy: A spatially comprehensive US national assessment  

SciTech Connect

This study provides a spatially comprehensive assessment of sustainable agricultural residue removal potential across the United States for bioenergy production. Earlier assessments determining the quantity of agricultural residue that could be sustainably removed for bioenergy production at the regional and national scale faced a number of computational limitations. These limitations included the number of environmental factors, the number of land management scenarios, and the spatial fidelity and spatial extent of the assessment. This study utilizes integrated multi-factor environmental process modeling and high fidelity land use datasets to perform the sustainable agricultural residue removal assessment. Soil type represents the base spatial unit for this study and is modeled using a national soil survey database at the 10–100 m scale. Current crop rotation practices are identified by processing land cover data available from the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service Cropland Data Layer database. Land management and residue removal scenarios are identified for each unique crop rotation and crop management zone. Estimates of county averages and state totals of sustainably available agricultural residues are provided. The results of the assessment show that in 2011 over 150 million metric tons of agricultural residues could have been sustainably removed across the United States. Projecting crop yields and land management practices to 2030, the assessment determines that over 207 million metric tons of agricultural residues will be able to be sustainably removed for bioenergy production at that time. This biomass resource has the potential for producing over 68 billion liters of cellulosic biofuels.

Muth, David J. [Idaho National Laboratory; Bryden, Kenneth Mark [Ames L; Nelson, R. G. [Kansas State University

2012-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

365

On Farm Energy Efficiency & Production Grants | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

On Farm Energy Efficiency & Production Grants On Farm Energy Efficiency & Production Grants Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Savings For Other Heating & Cooling Commercial...

366

Wind Energy Production Tax Credit (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Production Tax Credit (Iowa) Wind Energy Production Tax Credit (Iowa) Eligibility Agricultural Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government MunicipalPublic Utility Rural...

367

Energy from Microbial Fuel Cells Constructed of Algae from Lake Taihu  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) generate electricity using bacteria to degrade something and produce current, which have gained much attention. Harmful algae blooms(HABs) in lakes and rivers are on the increase all over the world, which becomes a more and ... Keywords: MFCs, HABs, algae, Lake Taihu

Yang Fei; Qiu Yejing; Wu Wei; Rong Fei; Liu Lin; Wang Keshu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Green Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 5 Algae Drying and Extraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Green Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 5 Algae Drying and Extraction Processing eChapters Processing 88DDAD55B737C030383E11F3785E5D6C AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 5 Algae Drying and Extraction fr

369

Demo: SmartLake: lightweight sensing and optimizing cleanup of algae blooms on Taihu Lake  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Facing the still unclear growth regularity of blooms, we propose rapid lightweight estimating method for the discovery of algae blooms. An application-specific approximate algorithm for timely dispatching salvaging boats is designed to minimize the total ... Keywords: algae blooms sensing, schedule algorithm

Dong Li; Zijiang Wang; Chenda Hou; Le Zhang; Ze Zhao; Li Cui

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

CULTURE OF ALGAE AND OTHER MICRO-ORGANISMS IN DEUTERIUM OXIDE  

SciTech Connect

Three species of green algae were successfully adapted to growth in 99.6% deuterium oxide. Escherichia coli, yeast, and paramecium were also grown in deuterium oxide. Procedures are described. Fully deuterated glucose, chlorophylls, and carotenoids were isolated from the deuterated algae. ( C.H.)

Crespi, H.L.; Archer, S.M.; Katz, J.J.

1959-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

371

Agricultural and Resource Economics Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Quality Shale Gas Growth in Shale Gas Production In2000, shale gas production accounted for only 1.7% of U.S.driven by the boom in shale gas production will put downward

Carter, Colin A.; Novan, Kevin; Rausser, Gordon; Iho, Antti; Parker, Doug; Zilberman, David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Study: Algae Could Replace 17% of U.S. Oil Imports | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Study: Algae Could Replace 17% of U.S. Oil Imports Study: Algae Could Replace 17% of U.S. Oil Imports Study: Algae Could Replace 17% of U.S. Oil Imports April 13, 2011 - 6:30pm Addthis Algae samples back at the NREL lab, ready to be analyzed and run through the Fluorescent-Activated Cell Sorter, or FACS, which separates the cells. | Credit: NREL Staff Photographer Dennis Schroeder. Algae samples back at the NREL lab, ready to be analyzed and run through the Fluorescent-Activated Cell Sorter, or FACS, which separates the cells. | Credit: NREL Staff Photographer Dennis Schroeder. Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Every day, the United States spends about $1 billion to import foreign oil, money that we could be investing in American energy and the American economy. President Obama recently announced an ambitious but achievable

373

UPTAKE OF RADIOSTRONTIUM BY AN ALGA, AND THE INFLUENCE OF CALCIUM ION IN THE WATER  

SciTech Connect

The uptake of radiostrontium by the algae Rhizoclonium hieroglyphicum was studied with respect to the effects of Ca/sup 2+/ ions in the water. Equilibrium between the algae and the water (pH 5.8) was found to be reached in ~10 days. The Sr and Ca results for the algae are presented as plots of the logarithm of the concentration factor of Sr or Ca in the algae vs the logarithm of the Ca/sup 2+/ concentration in water ( mu M/g), and the curves are fitted by the equations log CF/sub Sr/ = 2.17 - 1.05 log (Ca/sup 2+/,) and log CF/sub Ca/c 0.935 log STACa/sup 2+/!. The calculated discrimination factor (Sr/Ca) shows that the algae discriminates in favor of Sr at low Ca/sup 2+/ concentrations. (D.L.C.)

Pickering, D.C.; Lucas, J.W.

1962-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

374

The impact of mineral fertilizers on the carbon footprint of crop production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emissions in fertiliser production. IFS (The InternationalImpact of Agricultural Crop Production using the Life CycleN fertilizer rates in cereal production. Europ. J. Agronomy

Brentrup, Frank

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Agricultural and Resource Economics Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cellulosic Ethanol Production Costs Other Other Feedstockand cellulosic ethanol. The role of feedstock providers

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agricultural Research and Development Center Agricultural Research and Development Center Jump to: navigation, search Name Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center Place Wooster, Ohio Zip OH 44691-4096 Product Its mission is to enhance the well-being of the people of Ohio, the nation and world through research on foods, agriculture, family and the environment. Coordinates 40.80566°, -81.934379° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.80566,"lon":-81.934379,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

377

Agriculture-related radiation dose calculations  

SciTech Connect

Estimates of radiation dose to the public must be made at each stage in the identification and qualification process leading to siting a high-level nuclear waste repository. Specifically considering the ingestion pathway, this paper examines questions of reliability and adequacy of dose calculations in relation to five stages of data availability (geologic province, region, area, location, and mass balance) and three methods of calculation (population, population/food production, and food production driven). Calculations were done using the model PABLM with data for the Permian and Palo Duro Basins and the Deaf Smith County area. Extra effort expended in gathering agricultural data at succeeding environmental characterization levels does not appear justified, since dose estimates do not differ greatly; that effort would be better spent determining usage of food types that contribute most to the total dose; and that consumption rate and the air dispersion factor are critical to assessment of radiation dose via the ingestion pathway. 17 refs., 9 figs., 32 tabs.

Furr, J.M.; Mayberry, J.J.; Waite, D.A.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Algal Harvesting for Biodiesel Production: Comparing Centrifugation and Electrocoagulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrocoagulation was compared to centrifugation at pilot scale for harvesting Nannochloris oculata and Nannochloropsis salina for biodiesel production. The pilot scale testing is a proof of concept and no optimization was conducted. Testing used the KASELCO commercial electrocoagulation system. The KASELCO electrocoagulation system successfully coagulated microalgae in laboratory testing. Aluminum and stainless steel electrodes successfully recovered algae in laboratory testing. Electricity consumed was lowest using aluminum electrodes in laboratory testing, but inconsistently coagulated microalgae at the pilot scale. Stainless steel electrodes consistently recovered algae and were selected as the primary electrode to treat microalgae at the pilot scale. Scaling power settings to pilot testing using laboratory data was successful following KASELCO’s proprietary guidelines. The KASELCO electrocoagulation system showed an electrical reduction in pilot scale operational cost for harvesting. Economic analysis using the Algae Income Simulation Model concluded that the KASELCO electrocoagulation system increase net present value of a commercial algae farm by $56,139,609 using a discount factor of 0.04. The KASELCO electrocoagulation system was calculated to use 26 kWh/ton at a commercial algae farm. However, cultivation and extraction processes are energy intensive, resulting in minimal electrical savings for the algae farm. The increase in net present value reduced production costs at the algae farm by 1%. The probability of success for the microalgae farm was zero for all scenarios analyzed. While a reduction in capital and operational costs were observed, several improvements, including harvesting using electrocoagulation, in cultivation, extraction, and conversion are necessary for economic success for biodiesel production using algae farms.

Kovalcik, Derek John

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research on flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) has been conducted under the auspices of the Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network program sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in collaboration with individual utilities, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service, and universities. This report describes work conducted in northwestern New Mexico in 2008–2012 as part of that effort. Two separate ...

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

380

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Photobiological Hydrogen Production from  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photobiological Hydrogen Production from Green Algae Cost Analysis Photobiological Hydrogen Production from Green Algae Cost Analysis Project Summary Full Title: Updated Cost Analysis of Photobiological Hydrogen Production from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Green Algae: Milestone Completion Report Project ID: 110 Principal Investigator: Wade Amos Purpose This report updates the 1999 economic analysis of NREL's photobiological hydrogen production from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The previous study had looked mainly at incident light intensities, batch cycles and light adsorption without directly attempting to model the saturation effects seen in algal cultures. This study takes a more detailed look at the effects that cell density, light adsorption and light saturation have on algal hydrogen production. Performance estimates based on actual solar data are

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural products algae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Trace metals in fucoid algae and purple sea urchins near a high arctic lead/zinc ore deposit  

SciTech Connect

Trace metal concentrations in fucoid algae and in purple sea urchins from the vicinity of a metal mining district on North Baffin Island were determined. Higher concentrations of iron and zinc were present in algae and urchins collected nearer the mining area than in those collected further away. Concentrations of copper, iron, and zinc in algae increased with tissue age; arsenic and cadmium were lowest in intermediate-age algae tissues. Tissue distributions of iron and zinc in urchins and algae illustrate the food chain relationship between these species. 7 references, 2 tables.

Bohn, A.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Agricultural Lighting and Equipment Rebate Program (Vermont)...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Agricultural Lighting and Equipment Rebate Program (Vermont) This is the approved revision of this page, as...

383

Integrated Ingredients Dehydrated Agricultural Drying Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Integrated Ingredients Dehydrated Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump...

384

Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to:...

385

Charles County - Agricultural Preservation Districts - Renewable...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Type Siting & Permitting Charles County provides that producing energy "from solar, wind, biomass, and farm waste and residue crops" is a permitted agricultural use in areas...

386

Estimating Mitigation Potential of Agricultural Projects: an...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tool (EX-ACT) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Brazil-Estimating Mitigation Potential of Agricultural Projects: an Application of the...

387

Bioenergy development from agricultural waste on Northern ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Summary This project will convert agricultural waste, including food waste, rice straw, and other organic farm waste to bioethanol through bacterial ...

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

388

Agricultural Improvement Loan Program (Minnesota) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Loan Program Applicable Sector Agricultural Eligible Technologies Anaerobic Digestion, Biomass, Wind Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector StateTerritory Energy Category...

389

Growth Through Agriculture (GTA) Program (Montana) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

policies and priorities, and awarding loans or grants that have a short-term or long-term ability to stimulate agriculture development and diversification in rural, urban,...

390

Agricultural and Resource Economics Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

V. 16 no. 3 • Jan/Feb 2013 Shale Gas Boom: Implications forRegulation and Transboundary Water Quality Shale Gas Growthin Shale Gas Production In 2000, shale gas production

Carter, Colin A.; Novan, Kevin; Rausser, Gordon; Iho, Antti; Parker, Doug; Zilberman, David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Agricultural and Resource Economics Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

V. 16 no. 3 • Jan/Feb 2013 Shale Gas Boom: Implications forWaste Regulation and Transboundary Water Quality Shale GasGrowth in Shale Gas Production In 2000, shale gas production

Carter, Colin A.; Novan, Kevin; Rausser, Gordon; Iho, Antti; Parker, Doug; Zilberman, David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Agricultural and Resource Economics Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chain to provide more access to biofuel products. Ide-R&D will result in new biofuel products that can be mixedthe period of relatively low biofuel prices faced financial

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Chemical Fixation of CO2 in Coal Combustion Products and Recycling through Biosystems  

SciTech Connect

This Annual Technical Progress Report presents the principal results in enhanced growth of algae using coal combustion products as a catalyst to increase bicarbonate levels in solution. Optimal production of biomass depends on a number of factors. These factors include pH management, harvesting, and impact of auxiliary operations on the algae population. A number of experiments are presented which attempt to identify and characterize the impact of these factors.

C. Henry Copeland; Paul Pier; Samantha Whitehead; David Behel

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

394

Carrot Production Texas ranks 5th in U.S. production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carrot Production · Texas ranks 5th in U.S. production. · 9,400 acres are grown in Texas; annual or alternativesfordichloropropeneandoxamylfornematodecontrol. Carrots in Texas Crop Brief on Production, Pests, & Pesticides TheAgricultureProgram The Texas A by The Agriculture Program of the Texas A&M University System on critical pest problems and pesticide needs for Texas

Wilkins, Neal

395

List of Agricultural Equipment Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agricultural Equipment Incentives Agricultural Equipment Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 90 Agricultural Equipment Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 90) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Agricultural Energy Efficiency Program (New York) State Rebate Program New York Agricultural Agricultural Equipment Boilers Chillers Custom/Others pending approval Dishwasher Furnaces Heat pumps Heat recovery Lighting Lighting Controls/Sensors Motor VFDs Motors Water Heaters Commercial Cooking Equipment Commercial Refrigeration Equipment Food Service Equipment Yes Agricultural Lighting and Equipment Rebate Program (Vermont) State Rebate Program Vermont Agricultural Agricultural Equipment Custom/Others pending approval Lighting

396

Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics in Agricultural Soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics in Agricultural Soils Model Applications at Different Scales in Time Print: SLU Service/Repro, Uppsala 2012 #12;Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics in Agricultural Soils. Model Applications at Different Scales in Time and Space Abstract An understanding of soil organic carbon (C

397

Agricultural Trade Liberalization and Poverty in Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

agricultural research centers that receive principal funding from governments, private foundations, and international and regional organizations, most of which are members of the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR). FINANCIAL CONTRIBUTORS AND PARTNERS IFPRI’s research, capacity strengthening, and communications work is made possible by its financial contributors and partners. IFPRI gratefully acknowledges generous unrestricted funding from Australia,

Joachim Bento; Souza Ferreira Filho; Joaquim Bento; Souza Ferreira Filho

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Making Algal Biofuel Production More Efficient, Less Expensive | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Making Algal Biofuel Production More Efficient, Less Expensive Making Algal Biofuel Production More Efficient, Less Expensive Making Algal Biofuel Production More Efficient, Less Expensive January 10, 2014 - 1:08pm Addthis Researchers at the Energy Department's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have developed an innovative process that turns algae into bio-crude in less than 60 minutes. Watch the video above to see how the process works. | Video courtesy of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Colleen Ruddick Senior Technical Research Analyst Neil Rossmeissl General Engineer Daniel B. Fishman Technology Manager MORE RESOURCES Learn more about the Energy Department's Algae Program Attend the upcoming Algal Biofuels Strategy Workshop this spring Watch Sapphire Energy's Green Crude oil production process, which produces green crude oil from algae biomass that is cultivated and

399

Agricultural and Resource Economics Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

corn, soybeans, cotton, canola, sugarbeets, alfalfa, papaya,processed products such as canola oil, produced with GMing. In contrast, the same canola oil would have to bear a

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Identifying the requirements of an agricultural robot for sensing and adjusting soil nutrient and pH levels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nutrient requirements of soils using in agriculture for crop production were examined to determine the needs of a robotic system used to detect and regulate the nutrition levels of the soil. Nitrogen, phosphorus, and ...

Teague, Nicole (Nicole Dawn)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural products algae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

ON THE MOVE! The New Jersey Department of Agriculture Division of Animal Health and Animal Health Di-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Public Health, Environmental, and Agricultural Laboratories (NJPHEAL) facility, located in Ewing, New residues. All Division Staff will now be located at the NJPHEAL. The Animal Health Diagnostic Laboratory provides diagnostic services to support disease control programs, health management, and productivity

Delgado, Mauricio

402

Removal of CO{sub 2} from flue gases by algae. Final technical report, September 1, 1992--August 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research program is to determine the feasibility of the alga Botryococcus braunii as a biocatalyst for the photosynthetic conversion of flue gas CO{sub 2} to hydrocarbons. Free and immobilized cells of Botryococcus braunii were grown in aqueous medium supplemented with nitrogen, phosphorus and mineral nutrients. Air and CO{sub 2} enriched air [10% to 15% (V/V) CO{sub 2}] in the gas phase and 0.2% to 2% NaHCO{sub 3} in the liquid medium served as the carbon source. Growth and hydrocarbon formation characteristics of free and immobilized cultures of Botryococcus braunii were determined in bench-scale photobioreactors. Technical and economic feasibility of the conversion of flue gas CO{sub 2} to hydrocarbons by Botryococcus braunii culture systems was evaluated. In free cell systems, the hexane extractable oil productivity was about 15 to 37 grams of oil per 100 grams of cell dry weight. In immobilized cell systems, the oil production ranged between 5% and 47% at different immobilization systems and immobilized surface locations, with an average of 19% of cell biomass dry weight. The feasibility and economic evaluation estimated the cost of oil produced from flue gas CO{sub 2} by algae to range between $45 and $75 per barrel assuming that a hydrocarbon yield of about 50% of the biomass weight is achievable and a credit of $60 per ton of carbon removed is available. A future research program leading to development of a multistage process, consisting of closed systems for heavy inoculum buildup followed by lower cost open systems for oil production is recommended.

Akin, C.; Maka, A.; Patel, S.; Conrad, J. [Inst. of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Benemann, J.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

403

Statistical analysis of microspectroscopy signals for algae classification and phylogenetic comparison  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We performed microspectroscopic evaluation of the pigment composition of the photosynthetic compartments of algae belonging to different taxonomic divisions and higher plants. In [11], a supervised Gaussian bands decompositions was performed for the ...

Anna Tonazzini; Primo Coltelli; Paolo Gualtieri

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Chalking up a Marine Blooming Alga: Genome Fills a Gap in the Tree of Life  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

June 12, 2013 June 12, 2013 Chalking up a Marine Blooming Alga: Genome Fills a Gap in the Tree of Life To World War II soldiers, "The White Cliffs of Dover" was a morale-boosting song that lifted spirits in dark times. To geographers, the white cliffs mark the point at which England is closest to continental Europe. To scientists, the white cliffs are towering structures made of the chalky, white shells that envelop the single-celled photosynthetic alga known as Emiliania huxleyi. "Ehux" is a coccolithophore, with an exoskeleton made of calcium carbonate. Even though the process by which the alga's "armor" forms releases carbon dioxide, Ehux can trap as much as 20 percent of organic carbon, derived from CO2, in some marine ecosystems. The white cliffs of Dover are composed of the chalky, white shells that envelop the single-celled photosynthetic alga known as Emiliania huxleyi.

405

THE GROWTH OF ALGAE IN D$sub 2$O DEUTERIUM OXIDE  

SciTech Connect

The experiments described indicate that algae grow and divide in a medium containing more than 99% D/sub 2/O. After an inhibition period both Chlorella and Scenedesmus grew and divided, and after growth was established showed only a small percentage of abnormally large cells. The development of improved nutrient media for deuterated organisms is discussed. Deuterated compounds other than sugars were isolated from algae. It may be possible to use deuterated algae as such as a substrate for the growth of organisms that would give high yields of speclfic compounds such as amino acids, mucleic acids, and antibiotics. Simultaneous labeling with C/sup 14/ could also be aecomplished. With the successful culture of algae in deuterated medla the way is open for a considerable variety of experiments involving deuterium and its biological effects. (auth)

Chorney, W.; Scully, N.J.; Crespi, H.L.; Katz, J.J.

1960-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

406

Differential elimination of phenol by diatoms and other unicellular algae from low concentrations  

SciTech Connect

The differential efficiency of unicellular algae in the elimination of phenol from low concentrations was determined. Non-axenic cultures at 20/sup 0/C in liquid phase with light-thermostats were used.

Werner, D.; Pawlitz, H.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

CARBON DIOXIDE UPTAKE STUDIES IN ALGAE GROWN IN WATER AND DEUTERIUM OXIDE  

SciTech Connect

A procedure is described for studying carbon dioxide uptake in algae using C/sup 14/-labeled sodium bicarbonate as the source of carbon dioxide, Actively dividing, water grown and deuterium oxide adapted, Scenedesmus obliquus and Chlorella vulgaris were employed in the studies. Uptake comparisons were made over pH range 6 to 9 using appropriate buffer systems. Uptake was fairly constant in the range pH 6 to 8 for both the aqueous and deuterated algae. Above pH 8 uptake dropped markedly. In general, the deuterated algae showed between 1O and 30% lower uptake than ordinary algae. Greater chlorophyll content is associated with higher carbon dioxide uptake. (auth)

Blake, M.I.; Kaganove, A.S.; Katz, J.J.

1962-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Evaluation of the contamination of marine algae (seaweed) from the St. Lawrence River and likely to be consumed by humans  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the study was to assess the contamination of marine algae (seaweeds) growing in the St. Lawrence River estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence and to evaluate the risks to human health from the consumption of these algae. Algae were collected by hand at low tide. A total of 10 sites on the north and south shores of the St. Lawrence as well as in Baie des Chaleurs were sampled. The most frequently collected species of algae were Fucus vesiculosus, Ascophyllum nodosum, Laminaria Longicruris, Palmaria palmata, Ulva lactuca, and Fucus distichus. Alga samples were analyzed for metals iodine, and organochlorines. A risk assessment was performed using risk factors. In general, concentrations in St. Lawrence algae were not very high. Consequently, health risks associated with these compounds in St. Lawrence algae were very low. Iodine concentration, on the other hand, could be of concern with regard to human health. Regular consumption of algae, especially of Laminaria sp., could result in levels of iodine sufficient to cause thyroid problems. For regular consumers, it would be preferable to choose species with low iodine concentrations, such as U. lactuca and P. palmata, in order to prevent potential problems. Furthermore, it would also be important to assess whether preparation for consumption or cooking affects the iodine content of algae. Algae consumption may also have beneficial health effects. Scientific literature has shown that it is a good source of fiber and vitamins, especially vitamin B{sub 12}.

Phaneuf, D.; Cote, I.; Dumas, P.; Ferron, L.A.; LeBlanc, A. [CHUQ, Sainte-Foy, Quebec (Canada). Centre de Toxicologie du Quebec

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Program on Technology Innovation: A Case Study of Seambiotic's Research on Utility-Connected Algae Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes Seambiotic Ltd.s pilot facility for the cultivation of marine microalgae located at the Israel Electric Corporations (IEC) Rutenberg coal-fired power station, close to the city of Ashkelon, Israel. The algae are cultivated in open ponds using flue gas from the power station, which provides intensive CO2 enrichment for the algae. Significant experience was acquired during the design, construction, and successful operation of the facility, including experimentation with various strain...

2010-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

410

U.S. Agriculture: structure and change from 1982 to 1992  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this study, U.S. agriculture is viewed as a multidimensional phenomenon varying along three distinct axes of measurement: corporate-commercial agriculture, fanning-firm agriculture, and small-farm agriculture. Data were obtained from the U.S. Census of Agriculture for the years 1982 to 1992, and transformed to improve symmetry. Multiple-indicators of the structure of agriculture were used to replicate and extend the previous work of Wimberley (I 987). Oblique principal-axis factor analysis produced pattern matrices consistent with expected dimensional structures. Factor-scores were used to estimate scales that had high reliabilities (omega coefficients > .9) and strong inter-temporal correlations for each scale across years were observed. Although the content of each scale was consistent across the three years, structural shifts in U.S. agristructure occur-red at the county level during the 1980s. Because farming is also affected by technological and environmental elements, the relationships between farm program participation, production systems, agrochemical inputs, and geographic regions with agristructure were investigated. Bivariate correlations indicated that to accurately measure agristructure, farm program participation, production systems, agrochemical inputs, and regional variations should be considered in future studies.

Wang, Ge

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Energy Secretary Chu, Agriculture Secretary Vilsack Announce $6.3 million  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chu, Agriculture Secretary Vilsack Announce $6.3 Chu, Agriculture Secretary Vilsack Announce $6.3 million for Biofuels Research Energy Secretary Chu, Agriculture Secretary Vilsack Announce $6.3 million for Biofuels Research July 22, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu and U.S. Department of Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced today the joint selection of awards of up to $6.3 million towards fundamental genomics-enabled research leading to the improved use of plant feedstocks for biofuel production. The seven projects announced today follow the green jobs and renewable energy Rural Tour event hosted last weekend by the two cabinet Secretaries in Virginia. These investments will further the Obama Administration's efforts to broaden the nation's energy portfolio

412

U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Energy Announce Funding for Biomass  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agriculture and Energy Announce Funding for Agriculture and Energy Announce Funding for Biomass Research and Development Initiative U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Energy Announce Funding for Biomass Research and Development Initiative April 15, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, April 15, 2011- To support President Obama's goal of reducing America's oil imports by one-third by 2025, the U.S. Departments of Agriculture (USDA) and Energy (DOE) today jointly announced up to $30 million over three to four years that will support research and development in advanced biofuels, bioenergy and high-value biobased products. The projects funded through the Biomass Research and Development Initiative (BRDI) will help create a diverse group of economically and environmentally sustainable sources of renewable biomass and increase the availability of

413

Identification of Low Emissions Agricultural Pathways and Priorities for  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Identification of Low Emissions Agricultural Pathways and Priorities for Identification of Low Emissions Agricultural Pathways and Priorities for Mitigation in Agricultural Landscapes using Integrated Assessment Modeling and Scenarios Jump to: navigation, search Name Identification of Low Emissions Agricultural Pathways and Priorities for Mitigation in Agricultural Landscapes using Integrated Assessment Modeling and Scenarios Agency/Company /Organization CGIAR's Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), the Danish International Development Agency (DANIDA), the European Union, International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) Partner International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) Sector Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Background analysis, Baseline projection, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs

414

Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy Impacts in Less Developed...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy Impacts in Less Developed Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy Impacts in Less...

415

Partial Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Agricultural Solar Power...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Partial Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Agricultural Solar Power Facilities (California) Partial Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Agricultural Solar Power Facilities (California)...

416

Identification of Low Emissions Agricultural Pathways and Priorities...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Identification of Low Emissions Agricultural Pathways and Priorities for Mitigation in Agricultural Landscapes using Integrated Assessment Modeling and Scenarios Jump to:...

417

Before the Committee on Agriculture Subcommittee on General Farm...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Before the Committee on Agriculture Subcommittee on General Farm Commodities and Risk Management Before the Committee on Agriculture Subcommittee on General Farm Commodities and...

418

IDB-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Jump to: navigation, search Logo: IDB-Argentina-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Name...

419

Event:Second Global Conference on Agriculture, Food Security...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Conference on Agriculture, Food Security and Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png Second Global Conference on Agriculture, Food Security and Climate Change: on...

420

Developer Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

20 Next (20 | 50 | 100 | 250 | 500) A Conceptual Framework for Progressing Towards Sustainability in the Agriculture and Food Sector + A Synthesis of Agricultural Policies in...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural products algae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation...

422

Charles County- Agricultural Preservation Districts- Renewable Generation Allowed  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Charles County provides that producing energy "from solar, wind, biomass, and farm waste and residue crops" is a permitted agricultural use in areas zoned as Agricultural Preservation Districts.

423

Climate-Smart Agriculture: Policies, Practices and Financing...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Smart Agriculture: Policies, Practices and Financing for Food Security, Adaptation and Mitigation Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Climate-Smart Agriculture Agency...

424

Barron Electric Cooperative - Commercial, Industrial, and Agricultural  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Barron Electric Cooperative - Commercial, Industrial, and Barron Electric Cooperative - Commercial, Industrial, and Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Barron Electric Cooperative - Commercial, Industrial, and Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Savings Category Other Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Maximum Rebate $10,000 per account, not to exceed 20% of cost Scroll Refrigeration Compressors: $500 Variable Speed/Frequency Drive Motor: $500 Variable Speed Compressed Air Motor: $500 Energy Audit: One in Five Years Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Audit: Free General Lighting: $1 - $15/unit LED Lamps: $2/bulb

425

SOLERAS: Rural/agricultural project technical overview  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Rural and Agricultural Solar Applications Projects is to enhance the quality of rural life in hot, arid climates by providing systems that use renewable or regenerable energy sources for domestic or communal, agricultural, and local industrial applications. These systems must provide domestic services such as hot water, heat for cooking, and electric power for lighting, communications, and refrigeration. In addition, agricultural applications such as water desalination, irrigation pumping, and heat and electricity for crop or food processing and local industrial functions, can become the basis for improving the villagers' standard of living. 29 refs., 82 figs., 23 tabs.

Huraib, F.S.; Adcock, J.P.; Knect, R.D.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Agricultural and Resource Economics Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

countries increased while crude-oil prices grew by more thanproduce 42% of the crude-oil production. The organizationin global demand for crude oil from 2000 to 2008, associated

Lee, Hyunok; Sumner, Daniel A.; Martin, Philip; Hochman, Gal; Rajagopal, Deepak; Zilberman, David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Agricultural and Resource Economics Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

have encouraged the expansion of corn-based production andis in doubt. At this time, corn ethanol dominates the U.S.mass ethanol, relative to corn ethanol produced from the

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Agricultural and Resource Economics Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in 2011. So why did the corn-ethanol lobby let it expireUnder the expanded RFS, corn ethanol now comprises 10% ofwas used in U.S. corn- ethanol production. One-third of this

Smith, Aaron; Zilberman, David; Saitone, Tina; Sexton, Richard J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

New Challenges in Agricultural Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction to biofuels. Raw materials, transformation processes Biodiesel production technologies plant: EHN (SangĂĽesa) Efficiency determination (I) Biofuels Management: prevention and protection: Combustion tests (continuation) Exam module 2 Module Title Term Titel Liquid Biofuels Summer

Noble, James S.

430

Niche of harmful alga Aureococcus anophagefferens revealed through ecogenomics  

SciTech Connect

Harmful algal blooms (HABs) cause significant economic and ecological damage worldwide. Despite considerable efforts, a comprehensive understanding of the factors that promote these blooms has been lacking because the biochemical pathways that facilitate their dominance relative to other phytoplankton within specific environments have not been identified. Here, biogeochemical measurements demonstrated that the harmful alga Aureococcus anophagefferens outcompeted co-occurring phytoplankton in estuaries with elevated levels of dissolved organic matter and turbidity and low levels of dissolved inorganic nitrogen. We subsequently sequenced the first HAB genome (A. anophagefferens) and compared its gene complement to those of six competing phytoplankton species identified via metaproteomics. Using an ecogenomic approach, we specifically focused on the gene sets that may facilitate dominance within the environmental conditions present during blooms. A. anophagefferens possesses a larger genome (56 mbp) and more genes involved in light harvesting, organic carbon and nitrogen utilization, and encoding selenium- and metal-requiring enzymes than competing phytoplankton. Genes for the synthesis of microbial deterrents likely permit the proliferation of this species with reduced mortality losses during blooms. Collectively, these findings suggest that anthropogenic activities resulting in elevated levels of turbidity, organic matter, and metals have opened a niche within coastal ecosystems that ideally suits the unique genetic capacity of A. anophagefferens and thus has facilitated the proliferation of this and potentially other HABs.

Gobler, C J; Grigoriev, I V; Berry, D L; Dyhrman, S T; Wilhelm, S W; Salamov, A; Lobanov, A V; Zhang, Y; Collier, J L; Wurch, L L; Kustka, A B; Dill, B D; Shah, M; VerBerkomes, N C; Kuo, A; Terry, A; Pangilinan, J; Lindquist, E A; Lucas, S; Paulsen, I; Hattenrath-Lehmann, T K; Talmage, S; Walker, E A; Koch, F; Burson, A M; Marcoval, M A; Tang, Y; LeCleir, G R; Coyne, K J; Berg, G M; Bertrand, E M; Saito, M A; Gladyshev, V N

2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

431

EVALUATION OF ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITY OF POLYPHENOLIC COMPOUNDS FROM MARINE ALGAE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

La formación de radicales libres mediante procesos naturales conduce a la oxidación de biomoléculas, dando lugar a diversas enfermedades. Los organismos fotosintéticos están expuestos a ambientes muy oxidativos, por lo que poseen un sistema antioxidante muy eficaz. Presentamos en este trabajo un sencillo método para la extracción y evaluación de la actividad antioxidante de los polifenoles de algas marinas. La concentración de polifenoles se determina siguiendo el método de Folin-Ciocalteu, y la medición de la actividad antioxidante se realiza por el método del DPPH. INTRODUCCIÓN La excesiva oxidación de biomoléculas da lugar a diversos dańos en el organismo (1). Así, un exceso de radicales libres se ha relacionado con una mayor incidencia de diversas enfermedades degenerativas (1) como cáncer, enfermedades cardiacas, inflamación, artritis, disfunción cerebral, aceleración del envejecimiento (2), etc. El mecanismo por el que los radicales libres producen sus efectos transcurre mediante una reacción radicalaria, en la que se forman especias reactivas oxigenadas, que son los que producen los efectos nocivos. Este proceso se ve favorecido por la presencia de oxígeno y de luz

Evaluación De; La Actividad; Antioxidante De; Polifenoles De; Argimiro Rivero Rosales; Juana Rosa; Betancort Rodríguez

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Modeling algae growth in an open-channel raceway.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cost-effective implementation of microalgae as a solar-to-chemical energy conversion platform requires extensive system optimization; computer modeling can bring this to bear. This work uses modified versions of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC) in conjunction with the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers water-quality code (CE-QUAL) to simulate hydrodynamics coupled to growth kinetics of algae (Phaeodactylum tricornutum) in open-channel raceways. The model allows the flexibility to manipulate a host of variables associated with raceway-design, algal-growth, water-quality, hydrodynamic, and atmospheric conditions. The model provides realistic results wherein growth rates follow the diurnal fluctuation of solar irradiation and temperature. The greatest benefit that numerical simulation of the flow system offers is the ability to design the raceway before construction, saving considerable cost and time. Moreover, experiment operators can evaluate the impacts of various changes to system conditions (e.g., depth, temperature, flow speeds) without risking the algal biomass under study.

James, Scott Carlton

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

GCAM 3.0 Agriculture and Land Use: Data Sources and Methods  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the data processing methods used in the GCAM 3.0 agriculture and land use component, starting from all source data used, and detailing all calculations and assumptions made in generating the model inputs. The report starts with a brief introduction to modeling of agriculture and land use in GCAM 3.0, and then provides documentation of the data and methods used for generating the base-year dataset and future scenario parameters assumed in the model input files. Specifically, the report addresses primary commodity production, secondary (animal) commodity production, disposition of commodities, land allocation, land carbon contents, and land values.

Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick; Calvin, Katherine V.; Emanuel, William R.; Nathan, Mayda; Zhou, Yuyu

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

434

Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network: Wisconsin Arlington Research Station Fields 295 and 27 (Alfalfa)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes field research in Wisconsin as part of the Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum (FGDG) Agricultural Network. The objective of this study, conducted during 2009-2010, was to evaluate potential beneficial agricultural uses of FGDG as a soil amendment to improve alfalfa production. FGDG was compared to a commercially available gypsum product (C-GYP) widely sold in the U.S. Midwest and other areas. A study was established in two fields (Field 295 in 2009/2010 and Field 27 in 2010) at ...

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

435

Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network: North Dakota Sites 3, 4, and 5 (Canola)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) is a very pure form of gypsum that is a by-product from the combustion of coal for energy production. This report describes 2008-2009 work to evaluate potential beneficial agricultural uses of FGDG at three sites near Langdon, North Dakota. This work was part of a national research network evaluating beneficial uses of FGDG in agriculture, in this case, fertilization of dryland canola by FGDG. The objectives of this research were to 1) determine the influence of FGD...

2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

436

Environmental effects of growing short-rotation woody crops on former agricultural lands  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Field-scale studies in the Southeast have been addressing the environmental effects of converting agricultural lands to biomass crop production since 1994. Erosion, surface water quality and quantity and subsurface movement of water and nutrients from woody crops, switchgrass and agricultural crops are being compared. Nutrient cycling, soil physical changes and crop productivity are also being monitored at the three sites. Maximum sediment losses occurred in the spring and fall. Losses were greater from sweetgum planted without a cover crop than with a cover crop. Nutrient losses of N and P in runoff and subsurface water occurred primarily after spring fertilizer application.

Tolbert, V.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Thornton, F.C.; Joslin, J.D. [Tennessee Valley Authority, Muscle Shoals, AL (United States). Atmospheric Sciences Div.] [and others

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

EXISTING YAKAMA FOREST PRODUCTS TO DEKKER SERVICE LINE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

L USDA Soils Information L USDA Soils Information United States Department of Agriculture A product of the National Cooperative Soil Survey, a joint effort of the United States Department of Agriculture and other Federal agencies, State agencies including the Agricultural Experiment Stations, and local participants Custom Soil Resource Report for Yakama Nation Irrigated Area, Washington, Part of Yakima County WIP Drop 4 Vicinity

438

28 / AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS 2006-2007 AGRICULTURAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

........................................................................3 ANSC 303, Livestock, Meat, and Wool Evaluation, or both ANSC 265 and ANSC 355, Horse Judging...............................................................................................3 BIOL 111G/111L, Natural History of Life or BIOL 211G/211L, Cell and Organismal Biology ...........................................................................................................3 ANSC 414, Sheep and Wool Production

Castillo, Steven P.

439

Agricultural Research/October 19962 6 Agricultural Pests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are controlled effectively with minimal impact on people, nontarget species, and the environment. Pesticide Crop Production Recordkeeping System PPP-19 Annual Field Records PPP-20 Pesticides & Personal Safety Pesticide Programs JOE BECOVITZ Pesticide Investigator Office of the Indiana State Chemist ARLENE BLESSING

Liskiewicz, Maciej

440

Groundwater and Wastewater Remediation Using Agricultural Oils  

agricultural oils to stimulate endogenous microbes which accelerates the cleanup.  The oils tested include canola oil, grapeseed oil, coconut oil, corn oil, cottonseed oil, olive oil, palm oil, palm kernel oil, peanut oil, ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural products algae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Integrated Ingredients Dehydrated Agricultural Drying Low Temperature  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ingredients Dehydrated Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Ingredients Dehydrated Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Integrated Ingredients Dehydrated Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Integrated Ingredients Dehydrated Sector Geothermal energy Type Agricultural Drying Location Empire, Nevada Coordinates 40.5757352°, -119.34213° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

442

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Agricultural Outreach Articles  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Outreach Articles Outreach Articles Electricity from the Wind series of articles was designed to support agricultural outreach efforts. The articles explore wind energy issues as they relate to the rural/agricultural community. These articles are available to media outlets in your state, especially agricultural media outlets. The articles may also be used as handouts when attending agricultural group meetings. Electricity from the Wind: A New Lesson for Schools Electricity from the Wind: What Landowners Should Know Electricity from the Wind: The New Cash Crop Electricity from the Wind: Wind Energy and the Natural Gas Crisis Electricity from the Wind: Economic Development for Rural Communities Electricity from the Wind: USDA Farm Bill Section 9006 Provides Funding for Farm and Ranch Wind Projects

443

Agricultural Biomass and Landfill Diversion Incentive (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This law provides a grant of a minimum $20 per bone-dry ton of qualified agricultural biomass, forest wood waste, urban wood waste, co-firing biomass, or storm-generated biomass that is provided to...

444

Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum is a solid produced by wet FGD systems with forced air oxidation and is chemically similar to mined gypsum. These gypsums, used as beneficial agricultural amendments, were evaluated for their effects on earthworm populations and trace element concentrations in soils and earthworms at four field sites (Ohio, Indiana, Alabama, and Wisconsin). These sites are part of a network study on agricultural uses of FGD gypsum conducted at sites across the United States. ...

2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

445

Renewable hydrogen production for fossil fuel processing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this mission-oriented research program is the production of renewable hydrogen for fossil fuel processing. This program will build upon promising results that have been obtained in the Chemical Technology Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory on the utilization of intact microalgae for photosynthetic water splitting. In this process, specially adapted algae are used to perform the light-activated cleavage of water into its elemental constituents, molecular hydrogen and oxygen. The great potential of hydrogen production by microalgal water splitting is predicated on quantitative measurement of their hydrogen-producing capability. These are: (1) the photosynthetic unit size of hydrogen production; (2) the turnover time of photosynthetic hydrogen production; (3) thermodynamic efficiencies of conversion of light energy into the Gibbs free energy of molecular hydrogen; (4) photosynthetic hydrogen production from sea water using marine algae; (5) the original development of an evacuated photobiological reactor for real-world engineering applications; (6) the potential for using modern methods of molecular biology and genetic engineering to maximize hydrogen production. The significance of each of these points in the context of a practical system for hydrogen production is discussed. This program will be enhanced by collaborative research between Oak Ridge National Laboratory and senior faculty members at Duke University, the University of Chicago, and Iowa State University. The special contribution that these organizations and faculty members will make is access to strains and mutants of unicellular algae that will potentially have useful properties for hydrogen production by microalgal water splitting.

Greenbaum, E.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Nearshore Dispersal and Reproductive Viability of Intertidal Fucoid Algae : how effective is drift in local to regional dispersal?.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The ecological importance of drifting will depend on the abundance of drifting algae and whether it is reproductively viable. However, the ability of adult plants… (more)

Hawes, Nicola Ann

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Biofuel potential, nitrogen utilization, and growth rates of two green algae isolated from a wastewater treatment facility.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Nitrogen removal from wastewater by algae provides the additional benefit of producing lipids for biofuel and biomass for anaerobic digestion. As ammonium is the renewable… (more)

Eustance, Everett O'Brien.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

WEDNESDAY JANUARY 26 REGISTRATION & COFFEE [VOLVOFOAJN, RUNAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emissions and then to harvest the algae as feedstock to our renewable energy gasification plant, so it can a Solena Group gasification process based on a feedstock of biomass, green wastes, and agricultural wastes plants) in our patented algae production process. This enables us to grow the algae based on the GHG

Almgren, Magnus

449

Applying Innovation System Concept in Agricultural Research for  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Applying Innovation System Concept in Agricultural Research for Applying Innovation System Concept in Agricultural Research for Development: A learning module Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Applying Innovation System Concept in Agricultural Research for Development: A learning module Agency/Company /Organization: International Livestock Research Institute Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Training materials Website: mahider.ilri.org/bitstream/10568/167/1/Innovation_System_Agric_LM.pdf Applying Innovation System Concept in Agricultural Research for Development: A learning module Screenshot References: Applying Innovation System Concept in Agricultural Research for Development: A learning module[1] Preface "Sustained agricultural growth requires, among others, increased

450

EC-LEDS in the Agriculture Sector | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the Agriculture Sector the Agriculture Sector Jump to: navigation, search Name EC-LEDS in the Agriculture Sector Agency/Company /Organization United States Department of Agriculture, United States Department of State Partner Ministry of Agriculture, Ministry of Environment Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Agriculture, Economic Development, Greenhouse Gas, Land Use Topics Adaptation, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Policies/deployment programs Program Start 2011 Program End 2013 Country Costa Rica, Kenya, Mexico, Vietnam Central America, Eastern Africa, Central America, South-Eastern Asia References Land Use Assessment Toolkit - Agriculture Resources[1] Overview Progress and Outcomes Capacity building activities include strengthening implementation of

451

Evaluation of different agricultural biomass for bioethanol production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In our study, five different bioenergy crops: wheat straw (Triticum aestivum), forage sorghum stover (sorghum bicolor), switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), miscanthus (Miscanthus giganteus) and sweet sorghum… (more)

Bansal, Sunil

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Expanded production of labor-intensive crops increases agricultural employment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Specialist, Labor Market Information Division, Cali- forniaResearch Manager, Labor Market Information Di- vision, EDD.CES). Labor Market Information Division, Sacramento, CA.

Khan, Akhtar; Martin, Philip; Hardiman, Phil

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Pretreaments of Chinese Agricultural residues to increase biogas production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Development of biological conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to biogas is one approach to utilize straw comprehensively. However, high lignin contents of lignocellulosic materials results… (more)

Wang, Yu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Ingestion, assimilation, survival, and reproduction by Daphnia pulex fed seven species of bluegreen algae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Daphnia p&x (Crustacea, Cladocera) was fed the blue-green algae (Cyanophyceae) Anacystis nidulans, Synechococcus elongata, S. cedrorum, Merismopedia sp., Anabaena flosaquae, Synechocystis sp., and Gloeocapsa alpicola. The green algae ( Chlorophyceae) Ankistrodesmus falcatus and Chlorella uulgaris were used for comparison. Direct observations were made of D. pulex feeding in depression slides filled with the test food. Food labeled with 14C was usccl to determine ingestion and assimilation. Life tables were constructed for cohorts fed blue-greens, greens, and no food, and survivorship (L), net reproductive rate ( R”), median age of death, and intrinsic rate of natural increase ( r) were calculated. In all casts, ingestion, assimilation, survivorship, and reproduction of D. pulex fed bluegreen algae were lower than of those fed green algae, although there were differences among the blue-greens in their efFccts on these parameters. Anacystis nidulans, Merismopedia sp., and Synechocystis sp. showed some toxicity or inhibition towards D. pulex. Although some blue-green algae can be ingested and assimilated by D. pulex, few if any of those tested provide sufficient nutrition to support a population that does not have other food available.

Dean E. Arnold

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

www.mdpi.com/journal/marinedrugs Anti-Phytopathogenic Activities of Macro-Algae Extracts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Aqueous and ethanolic extracts obtained from nine Chilean marine macro-algae collected at different seasons were examined in vitro and in vivo for properties that reduce the growth of plant pathogens or decrease the injury severity of plant foliar tissues following pathogen infection. Particular crude aqueous or organic extracts showed effects on the growth of pathogenic bacteria whereas others displayed important effects against pathogenic fungi or viruses, either by inhibiting fungal mycelia growth or by reducing the disease symptoms in leaves caused by pathogen challenge. Organic extracts obtained from the brown-alga Lessonia trabeculata inhibited bacterial growth and reduced both the number and size of the necrotic lesion in tomato leaves following infection with Botrytis cinerea. Aqueous and ethanolic extracts from the red-alga Gracillaria chilensis prevent the growth of Phytophthora cinnamomi, showing a response which depends on doses and collecting-time. Similarly, aqueous and ethanolic extracts from the brown-alga Durvillaea antarctica were able to diminish the damage caused by tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in tobacco leaves, and the aqueous procedure is, in addition, more effective and seasonally independent. These results suggest that macro-algae contain compounds with

Edra Jiménez; O Dorta; Cristian Medina; Alberto Ramírez; Ingrid Ramírez; Hugo Peńa-cortés

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

IISD Climate Change and Agriculture Research | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IISD Climate Change and Agriculture Research IISD Climate Change and Agriculture Research Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: IISD Climate Change and Agriculture Research Agency/Company /Organization: International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Publications References: IISD Climate Change and Agriculture Research[1] "IISD's work related to climate change and agriculture has been supported by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada." It include the two following publications: Expanding Agriculture's Role in a Post-2012 Regime (PDF - 712 kb) and Climate Change Mitigation through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry Sectors References ↑ "IISD Climate Change and Agriculture Research"

457

California and U S AgriculturalCalifornia and U.S. Agricultural Trade Prospects with a KORUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California and U S AgriculturalCalifornia and U.S. Agricultural Trade Prospects with a KORUS Trade Agreement December 15, 2010 Daniel A. Sumner University of California Agricultural Issues Center d th UC D i · Korea has been a large and diversified export destination for US and California agriculture · With more

Hammock, Bruce D.

458

An Investigation into Delta Wing Vortex Generators as a Means of Increasing Algae Biofuel Raceway Vertical Mixing Including an Analysis of the Resulting Turbulence Characteristics.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Algae-derived biodiesel is currently under investigation as a suitable alternative to traditional fossil-fuels. Though it possesses many favorable characteristics, algae remains prohibitively expensive to… (more)

Godfrey, Aaron H.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Essays on Agricultural Adaptation to Climate Change and Ethanol Market Integration in the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate factors like precipitation and temperature, being closely intertwined with agriculture, make a changing climate a big concern for the entire human race and its basic survival. Adaptation to climate is a long-running characteristic of agriculture evidenced by the varying types and forms of agricultural enterprises associated with differing climatic conditions. Nevertheless climate change poses a substantial, additional adaptation challenge for agriculture. Mitigation encompasses efforts to reduce the current and future extent of climate change. Biofuels production, for instance, expands agriculture’s role in climate change mitigation. This dissertation encompasses adaptation and mitigation strategies as a response to climate change in the U.S. by examining comprehensively scientific findings on agricultural adaptation to climate change; developing information on the costs and benefits of select adaptations to examine what adaptations are most desirable, for which society can further devote its resources; and studying how ethanol prices are interrelated across, and transmitted within the U.S., and the markets that play an important role in these dynamics. Quantitative analysis using the Forestry and Agricultural Sector Optimization Model (FASOM) shows adaptation to be highly beneficial to agriculture. On-farm varietal and other adaptations contributions outweigh a mix shift northwards significantly, implying progressive technical change and significant returns to adaptation research and investment focused on farm management and varietal adaptations could be quite beneficial over time. Northward shift of corn-acre weighted centroids observed indicates that substantial production potential may shift across regions with the possibility of less production in the South, and more in the North, and thereby, potential redistribution of income. Time series techniques employed to study ethanol price dynamics show that the markets studied are co-integrated and strongly related, with the observable high levels of interaction between all nine cities. Information is transmitted rapidly between these markets. Price seems to be discovered (where shocks originate from) in regions of high demand and perhaps shortages, like Los Angeles and Chicago (metropolitan population centers). The Maximum Likelihood approach following Spiller and Huang’s model however shows cities may not belong to the same economic market and the possibility of arbitrage does not exist between all markets.

Aisabokhae, Ruth 1980-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Life Cycle Environmental and Cost Impacts of Dairy Wastewater Treatment Using Algae Brendan Higgins, Dr. Alissa Kendall  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

displacement. The cost of wastewater treatment using the ATS was estimated to be $1.23 per m3 wastewater Wastewater Processing Algae Processing Biogas Processing Equipment and Material Data Sources Fixed filmLife Cycle Environmental and Cost Impacts of Dairy Wastewater Treatment Using Algae Brendan Higgins

California at Davis, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural products algae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Catalytic Hydrothermal Gasification of Lignin-Rich Biorefinery Residues and Algae Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the results of the work performed by PNNL using feedstock materials provided by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, KL Energy and Lignol lignocellulosic ethanol pilot plants. Test results with algae feedstocks provided by Genifuel, which provided in-kind cost share to the project, are also included. The work conducted during this project involved developing and demonstrating on the bench-scale process technology at PNNL for catalytic hydrothermal gasification of lignin-rich biorefinery residues and algae. A technoeconomic assessment evaluated the use of the technology for energy recovery in a lignocellulosic ethanol plant.

Elliott, Douglas C.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Hart, Todd R.; Rotness, Leslie J.; Zacher, Alan H.; Santosa, Daniel M.; Valkenburg, Corinne; Jones, Susanne B.; Tjokro Rahardjo, Sandra A.

2009-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

462

ORGANIC GEOCHEMICAL STUDIES. II. THE DISTRIBUTION OF ALIPHATICHYDROCARBONS IN ALGAE, BACTERIA, AND IN A RECENT LAKE SEDIMENT: APRELIMINARY REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The theory that algal oozes could give rise to oil shales is not a recent one. Evidence for this theory rests on the finding that algae have less cellulose and a correspondingly greater proportion of lipids than most plant material. In addition, the contemporary alga Botyrococcus is present in microscopic remains in some organic oozes. Since the algal ooze precursor theory rests primarily on geological and paleobotanical evidence, they have sought to complement this evidence by making a study of the constitutents of various genera of algae at the molecular level and comparing them with the organic constituents isolated and identified in the algal ooze from a Florida lake. They have analyzed the hydrocarbon constituents of four species of algae: the blue-greens, Nostoc and Anacystis, the green algae, Spirogyra and Chlorella.

Han, Jerry; McCarthy, E.D.; Van Hoeven Jr., William; Calvin,Melvin; Bradley, W. H.

1967-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.fao.org/climatechange/67148/en/ RelatedTo: Mitigation of Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Project Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Screenshot References: AFOLU Mitigation Database[1] Global Survey of Agricultural Mitigation Projects Paper[2] "The AFOLU MP database endeavors to gather information on all mitigation activities currently ongoing within the agricultural and forestry sectors

464

JGI - Green Alga Genome Project Catalogs Carbon Capture Machinery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

opportunities for improving efficiencies for this conversion process and ultimately biofuels production. "Chlamy's code helps us describe the ancient ancestor of plants and...

465

Purdue Farm Energy Production & Innovation Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and engineering approaches to convert wind, solar, and agricultural resources/wastes into energy ! Utilize broad " Environmental impact of alternative energy modules such as wind turbines on wildlife and domestic animals, wastePurdue Farm Energy Production & Innovation Center Sonny Ramaswamy Director of Agricultural Research

466

On Farm Energy Efficiency and Production Grants | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

On Farm Energy Efficiency and Production Grants On Farm Energy Efficiency and Production Grants On Farm Energy Efficiency and Production Grants < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Savings Category Other Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Construction Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Windows, Doors, & Skylights Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Insulation Water Heating Bioenergy Solar Program Info State Kentucky Program Type State Grant Program Provider Governor's Office of Agricultural Policy Under the County Agricultural Investment Program (CAIP), the Office of Agricultural Policy (OAP) offers grants for farms that incorporate energy efficiency into their operations, produce alternative energy for on-farm

467

Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Agency/Company /Organization: Colorado State University Partner: United States Agency for International Development, United States Forest Service, United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.nrel.colostate.edu/projects/ghgtool/index.php Cost: Free Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Screenshot References: Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software[1]

468

Biological Production of Hydrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biological Techniques Environmental Sampling: Microbial Communities Applications: Algae Ponds Source: Frank Dazzo, Center for Microbial Ecology, Michigan State University...

469

Evaluation of the Strategic Alliance for Agricultural  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

local entrepreneurship, agribusiness cluster formation and the development of competitive value chains Evaluation of the Strategic Alliance for Agricultural Development in Africa (SAADA program) 2006-20092 | SAADA Evaluation 2006-2009Local entrepreneurship, agribusiness cluster formation and the development of competitive value chains

Moussiliou Alidou; Marjolein Lem; Ted Schrader; Fons De Zeeuw; Moussiliou Alidou; Marjolein Lem; Ted Schrader; Fons De Zeeuw

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Agricultural Waste Management System Component Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Management Field Handbook 10­1(210-vi-AWMFH, rev. 1, July 1996) Chapter 10 Agricultural Waste Management..............................................................................................10­67 (b) Gravity flow pipes Waste Management Field Handbook 10­2 (210-vi-AWMFH, rev. 1, July 1996) 651.1006 Utilization 10­71 (a

Mukhtar, Saqib

471

Cooperative ExtensionTHE ECONOMIC IMPACTS OF AGRICULTURE IN WISCONSIN COUNTIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Wisconsin, policy makers are exploring ways to unleash the private sector to stimulate the economy with an emphasis on job creation. Historically agriculture has been an important part of the Wisconsin economy, but over the years the relative importance of agriculture in the economy has diminished as the service sector employment, such as recreation and tourism, became more predominant. With the loss of many manufacturing jobs and the recent recession, there is renewed interest in agriculture in terms of employment and as a potential source of new employment opportunities. But is this renewed interest justified? Is the agricultural sector one that can have a larger or stimulative role in the Wisconsin economy? How should local and state policy makers consider an “old ” industry that seems to again have relevance? In an original study by Deller (2004), the contributions of agriculture to the Wisconsin economy were documented and more recently re-examined by Deller and Williams in 2009. In both of these studies agriculture was defined to include on-farm production and food processing. Using 2007 data, Wisconsin agriculture was found to contribute $59.16 billion to total business sales (about 12.5 percent of the Wisconsin total); 353,991 jobs (10 percent of total employment) and $20.2 billion of total income (about nine percent of the Wisconsin total). For the first time, the 2009 study also used “clustering analysis ” to examine changes (2001 to 2007) in subsectors of on-farm and food processing to identify strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of the

Steven Deller; David Williams; Steven C. Deller; David Williams

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Cultivation of algae on highly concentrated municipal wastewater as an energy crop for biodiesel production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??University of Minnesota Ph.D. dissertation. June 2012. Major: Bioproducts/Biosystems Science Engineering and Management. Advisor:Dr. Roger Ruan. 1 computer file (PDF); x, 181 pages. There has… (more)

Li, Yecong

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Extraction of oil from algae for biofuel production by thermochemical liquefaction / Anro Barnard.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The extraction of oil from microalgae was investigated. The study focused on the hydrothermal liquefaction of the microalgae Microcystis aeruginosa, Cyclotella meneghinia and Nitzschia pusilla.… (more)

Barnard, Anro

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Improving algal biofuel production through nutrient recycling and characterization of photosynthetic anomalies in mutant algae species.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Continued use of fossil fuels is now widely recognized as unsustainable because of diminishing supplies and the contribution of these fuels to the increased carbon… (more)

Zhou, Yan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Lipid Productivity of Algae Grown on Dairy Wastewater as a Possible Feedstock for Biodiesel.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this thesis is to develop a biological wastewater treatment system that utilizes algal growth to simultaneously create renewable energy in the form… (more)

Woertz, Ian C

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Optimal engineered algae composition for the integrated simultaneous production of bioethanol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

@usal.es; grossmann@cmu.edu #12;2 INTRODUCTION Biofuels are typically classified by the raw material to overcome these drawbacks, the second generation of biofuels comprises those raw material that are not used they use. Thus, corn, vegetable oil and sugar cane are the raw material for what has been called as first

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

477

Evaluation of the Potential for Agricultural Development at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

By 2050, when cleanup of the Hanford Site is expected to be completed, large worldwide demands to increase the global production of animal and fish protein, food, and fiber are anticipated, despite advancements in crop breeding, genetic engineering, and other technologies. The most likely large areas for expanded irrigation in the Pacific Northwest are the undeveloped East High areas of the Columbia Basin Project and non-restricted areas within the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. The area known as the Hanford Site has all the components that favor successful irrigated farming. Constraints to agricultural development of the Hanford Site are political and social, not economic or technical. Obtaining adequate water rights for any irrigated development will be a major issue. Numerous anticipated future advances in irrigation and resource conservation techniques such as precision agriculture techniques, improved irrigation systems, and irrigation system controls will greatly minimize the negative environmental impacts of agricultural activities.

Evans, Robert G.; Hattendorf, Mary J.; Kincaid, Charles T.

2000-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

478

Research on Algae Removal by Electro-flotation/Photo-catalytic Oxidization Combined Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The lake-type raw water was treated in Photo-catalytic Oxidization reactor. Under the condition of the inflow discharge control in 15L/h, the padding packing compares 2/5, UV lamp 30W, added no chemicals, pH 7.35, use the electro-flotation to treat it ... Keywords: algae, Electro-flotation, photo-catalytic oxidization

Wang Liping; Jiang Weijuan; Gao Naiyun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Algae Biofuels Collaborative Project: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-371  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to advance biofuels research on algal feedstocks and NREL's role in the project is to explore novel liquid extraction methods, gasification and pyrolysis as means to produce fuels from algae. To that end several different extraction methods were evaluated and numerous gasification and pyrolysis conditions were explored. It was found that mild hydrothermal treatment is a promising means to improve the extraction and conversion of lipids from algae over those produced by standard extraction methods. The algae were essentially found to gasify completely at a fairly low temperature of 750 degrees C in the presence of oxygen. Pyrolysis from 300-550 degrees C showed sequential release of phytene hydrocarbons, glycerides, and aromatics as temperature was increased. It appears that this has potential to release the glycerides from the non-fatty acid groups present in the polar lipids to produce a cleaner lipid. Further research is needed to quantify the pyrolysis and gasification yields, analyze the liquids produced and to test strategies for removing organic-nitrogen byproducts produced because of the high protein content of the feed. Possible strategies include use of high-lipid/low-protein algae or the use of catalytic pyrolysis.

French, R. J.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Expulsion of Symbiotic Algae during Feeding by the Green Hydra – a Mechanism for Regulating Symbiont Density?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: Algal-cnidarian symbiosis is one of the main factors contributing to the success of cnidarians, and is crucial for the maintenance of coral reefs. While loss of the symbionts (such as in coral bleaching) may cause the death of the cnidarian host, over-proliferation of the algae may also harm the host. Thus, there is a need for the host to regulate the population density of its symbionts. In the green hydra, Chlorohydra viridissima, the density of symbiotic algae may be controlled through host modulation of the algal cell cycle. Alternatively, Chlorohydra may actively expel their endosymbionts, although this phenomenon has only been observed under experimentally contrived stress conditions. Principal Findings: We show, using light and electron microscopy, that Chlorohydra actively expel endosymbiotic algal cells during predatory feeding on Artemia. This expulsion occurs as part of the apocrine mode of secretion from the endodermal digestive cells, but may also occur via an independent exocytotic mechanism. Significance: Our results demonstrate, for the first time, active expulsion of endosymbiotic algae from cnidarians under natural conditions. We suggest this phenomenon may represent a mechanism whereby cnidarians can expel excess symbiotic algae when an alternative form of nutrition is available in the form of prey.

Yelena Fishman; Eliahu Zlotkin; Daniel Sher

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural products algae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.