Sample records for agricultural products algae

  1. RESEARCH ARTICLE Algae production on pig sludge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Algae production on pig sludge Attila Bai & László Stündl & Péter Bársony & Milán- ied an economical method of algae production on pig sludge that can be operated on animal farms in Hungary with modest levels of investment. We analyzed four algae spe- cies, Chlorella vulgaris

  2. Meats & Products Agricultural Inputs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    Meats & Products Agricultural Inputs Processing Idaho B20 C C B Meats and Livestock Products Index to agriculture? Legend Overall weighted grade Weighted rank Northwest Midwest Southwest East Meats & ProductsProcessingessing Maine B11 B A A Meats & Products Agricultural Inputs Processing New York F49 F F F soductsoducts

  3. Photobiological hydrogen production with switchable photosystem-II designer algae

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, James Weifu

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for enhanced photobiological H.sub.2 production using transgenic alga. The process includes inducing exogenous genes in a transgenic alga by manipulating selected environmental factors. In one embodiment inducing production of an exogenous gene uncouples H.sub.2 production from existing mechanisms that would downregulate H.sub.2 production in the absence of the exogenous gene. In other embodiments inducing an exogenous gene triggers a cascade of metabolic changes that increase H.sub.2 production. In some embodiments the transgenic alga are rendered non-regenerative by inducing exogenous transgenes for proton channel polypeptides that are targeted to specific algal membranes.

  4. A Realistic Technology and Engineering Assessment of Algae Biofuel Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, Nigel

    Creek, California Energy Biosciences Institute University of California Berkeley of microalgae biofuels production through an analysis of five production scenarios. These scenarios, or cases, including raceway ponds for microalgae cultivation, bioflocculation for algae harvesting, and hexane

  5. Micro-algae come of age as a platform for recombinant protein production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Specht, Elizabeth; Miyake-Stoner, Shigeki; Mayfield, Stephen

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    et al. 2008), chlorophyta alga Ulva pertusa Table 1 Recentprotein production in algae Expression level achieved010-0326-5 REVIEW Micro-algae come of age as a platform for

  6. Designer proton-channel transgenic algae for photobiological hydrogen production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, James Weifu (Knoxville, TN)

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A designer proton-channel transgenic alga for photobiological hydrogen production that is specifically designed for production of molecular hydrogen (H.sub.2) through photosynthetic water splitting. The designer transgenic alga includes proton-conductive channels that are expressed to produce such uncoupler proteins in an amount sufficient to increase the algal H.sub.2 productivity. In one embodiment the designer proton-channel transgene is a nucleic acid construct (300) including a PCR forward primer (302), an externally inducible promoter (304), a transit targeting sequence (306), a designer proton-channel encoding sequence (308), a transcription and translation terminator (310), and a PCR reverse primer (312). In various embodiments, the designer proton-channel transgenic algae are used with a gas-separation system (500) and a gas-products-separation and utilization system (600) for photobiological H.sub.2 production.

  7. Aridity and Algae: Biodiesel Production in Arizona Jenna Bloxom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    Aridity and Algae: Biodiesel Production in Arizona Jenna Bloxom Advisor: Dr. Scott Whiteford Center, the world is looking to alternative fuels to eradicate its reliance upon petroleum. While biofuels may represent a fundamental component in the panacea to this global dilemma, their production and application

  8. Analytical approaches to photobiological hydrogen production in unicellular green algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemschemeier, Anja; Melis, Anastasios; Happe, Thomas

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    monas reinhardtii (green alga). Planta 214:552561. doi:adaptation in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Eurhydrogenase from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

  9. Switchable photosystem-II designer algae for photobiological hydrogen production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, James Weifu (Knoxville, TN)

    2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A switchable photosystem-II designer algae for photobiological hydrogen production. The designer transgenic algae includes at least two transgenes for enhanced photobiological H.sub.2 production wherein a first transgene serves as a genetic switch that can controls photosystem II (PSII) oxygen evolution and a second transgene encodes for creation of free proton channels in the algal photosynthetic membrane. In one embodiment, the algae includes a DNA construct having polymerase chain reaction forward primer (302), a inducible promoter (304), a PSII-iRNA sequence (306), a terminator (308), and a PCR reverse primer (310). In other embodiments, the PSII-iRNA sequence (306) is replaced with a CF.sub.1-iRNA sequence (312), a streptomycin-production gene (314), a targeting sequence (316) followed by a proton-channel producing gene (318), or a PSII-producing gene (320). In one embodiment, a photo-bioreactor and gas-product separation and utilization system produce photobiological H.sub.2 from the switchable PSII designer alga.

  10. Demonstration of the feasibility of milking lipids from algae for biodiesel production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coiner, Ryan Lee

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A major challenge to the development of industrial-scale biodiesel production from cultured algae is the identification of energy efficient and cost effective methods of harvesting/dewatering algal cells. Producing 1 gallon of biodiesel from algae...

  11. Life-Cycle Greenhouse Gas and Energy Analyses of Algae Biofuels Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Life-Cycle Greenhouse Gas and Energy Analyses of Algae Biofuels Production Transportation Energy The Issue Algae biofuels directly address the Energy Commission's Public Interest Energy Research fuels more carbonintensive than conventional biofuels. Critics of this study argue that alternative

  12. Agricultural productivity and industrialization: A reformulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Antar

    Agricultural productivity and industrialization: A reformulation Debasis Mondal Sept 20, 2014 Abstract In this paper we examine the role of agricultural productivity on the process of industrialization industrialization by releasing labor from agriculture to industry. In fact, when agriculture is highly productive

  13. A Framework to Report the Production of Renewable Diesel from Algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Framework to Report the Production of Renewable Diesel from Algae Colin M. Beal & Colin H. Smith(s) 2010. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com Abstract Recently, algae have algae are a viable source for renewable diesel, three questions that must be answered are (1) how much

  14. Optimal engineered algae composition for the integrated simultaneous production of bioethanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    1 Optimal engineered algae composition for the integrated simultaneous production of bioethanol of the algae for the simultaneous production of bioethanol and biodiesel. We consider two alternative promising based on previous work, and we coupled biodiesel production from oil with bioethanol production

  15. Chromatin landscaping in algae reveals novel regulation pathway for biofuels production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ngan, Chew Yee; Wong, Chee-Hong; Choi, Cindy; Pratap, Abhishek; Han, James; Wei, Chia-Lin

    2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The diminishing reserve of fossil fuels calls for the development of biofuels. Biofuels are produced from renewable resources, including photosynthetic organisms, generating clean energy. Microalgae is one of the potential feedstock for biofuels production. It grows easily even in waste water, and poses no competition to agricultural crops for arable land. However, little is known about the algae lipid biosynthetic regulatory mechanisms. Most studies relied on the homology to other plant model organisms, in particular Arabidopsis or through low coverage expression analysis to identify key enzymes. This limits the discovery of new components in the biosynthetic pathways, particularly the genetic regulators and effort to maximize the production efficiency of algal biofuels. Here we report an unprecedented and de novo approach to dissect the algal lipid pathways through disclosing the temporal regulations of chromatin states during lipid biosynthesis. We have generated genome wide chromatin maps in chlamydomonas genome using ChIP-seq targeting 7 histone modifications and RNA polymerase II in a time-series manner throughout conditions activating lipid biosynthesis. To our surprise, the combinatory profiles of histone codes uncovered new regulatory mechanism in gene expression in algae. Coupled with matched RNA-seq data, chromatin changes revealed potential novel regulators and candidate genes involved in the activation of lipid accumulations. Genetic perturbation on these candidate regulators further demonstrated the potential to manipulate the regulatory cascade for lipid synthesis efficiency. Exploring epigenetic landscape in microalgae shown here provides powerful tools needed in improving biofuel production and new technology platform for renewable energy generation, global carbon management, and environmental survey.

  16. Fuel from wastewater : harnessing a potential energy source in Canada through the co-location of algae biofuel production to sources of effluent, heat and CO2.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Passell, Howard David; Whalen, Jake (SmartWhale Consulting, Dartmouth, NS, CA); Pienkos, Philip P. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO); O'Leary, Stephen J. (National Research Council Canada, Institute for Marine Biosciences, Halifax, NS, CA); Roach, Jesse Dillon; Moreland, Barbara D.; Klise, Geoffrey Taylor

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories is collaborating with the National Research Council (NRC) Canada and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to develop a decision-support model that will evaluate the tradeoffs associated with high-latitude algae biofuel production co-located with wastewater, CO2, and waste heat. This project helps Canada meet its goal of diversifying fuel sources with algae-based biofuels. The biofuel production will provide a wide range of benefits including wastewater treatment, CO2 reuse and reduction of demand for fossil-based fuels. The higher energy density in algae-based fuels gives them an advantage over crop-based biofuels as the 'production' footprint required is much less, resulting in less water consumed and little, if any conversion of agricultural land from food to fuel production. Besides being a potential source for liquid fuel, algae have the potential to be used to generate electricity through the burning of dried biomass, or anaerobically digested to generate methane for electricity production. Co-locating algae production with waste streams may be crucial for making algae an economically valuable fuel source, and will certainly improve its overall ecological sustainability. The modeling process will address these questions, and others that are important to the use of water for energy production: What are the locations where all resources are co-located, and what volumes of algal biomass and oil can be produced there? In locations where co-location does not occur, what resources should be transported, and how far, while maintaining economic viability? This work is being funded through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Biomass Program Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, and is part of a larger collaborative effort that includes sampling, strain isolation, strain characterization and cultivation being performed by the NREL and Canada's NRC. Results from the NREL / NRC collaboration including specific productivities of selected algal strains will eventually be incorporated into this model.

  17. Method to transform algae, materials therefor, and products produced thereby

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunahay, T.G.; Roessler, P.G.; Jarvis, E.E.

    1997-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a method to transform chlorophyll C-containing algae. The method includes introducing a recombinant molecule comprising a nucleic acid molecule encoding a dominant selectable marker operatively linked to an algal regulatory control sequence into a chlorophyll C-containing alga in such a manner that the marker is produced by the alga. In a preferred embodiment the algal regulatory control sequence is derived from a diatom and preferably Cyclotella cryptica. Also disclosed is a chimeric molecule having one or more regulatory control sequences derived from one or more chlorophyll C-containing algae operatively linked to a nucleic acid molecule encoding a selectable marker, an RNA molecule and/or a protein, wherein the nucleic acid molecule does not normally occur with one or more of the regulatory control sequences. Further, specifically disclosed are molecules pACCNPT10, pACCNPT4.8 and pACCNPT5.1. The methods and materials of the present invention provide the ability to accomplish stable genetic transformation of chlorophyll C-containing algae. 2 figs.

  18. Method to transform algae, materials therefor, and products produced thereby

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunahay, Terri Goodman (2710 Arbor Glen Pl., Boulder, CO 80304); Roessler, Paul G. (15905 Ellsworth Pl., Golden, CO 80401); Jarvis, Eric E. (3720 Smuggler Pl., Boulder, CO 80303)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a method to transform chlorophyll C-containing algae which includes introducing a recombinant molecule comprising a nucleic acid molecule encoding a dominant selectable marker operatively linked to an algal regulatory control sequence into a chlorophyll C-containing alga in such a manner that the marker is produced by the alga. In a preferred embodiment the algal regulatory control sequence is derived from a diatom and preferably Cyclotella cryptica. Also disclosed is a chimeric molecule having one or more regulatory control sequences derived from one or more chlorophyll C-containing algae operatively linked to a nucleic acid molecule encoding a selectable marker, an RNA molecule and/or a protein, wherein the nucleic acid molecule does not normally occur with one or more of the regulatory control sequences. Further specifically disclosed are molecules pACCNPT10, pACCNPT4.8 and pACCNPT5.1. The methods and materials of the present invention provide the ability to accomplish stable genetic transformation of chlorophyll C-containing algae.

  19. Re-utilization of Industrial CO2 for Algae Production Using a Phase Change Material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph, Brian

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of a 36-month Phase II cooperative agreement. Under this project, Touchstone Research Laboratory (Touchstone) investigated the merits of incorporating a Phase Change Material (PCM) into an open-pond algae production system that can capture and re-use the CO2 from a coal-fired flue gas source located in Wooster, OH. The primary objective of the project was to design, construct, and operate a series of open algae ponds that accept a slipstream of flue gas from a coal-fired source and convert a significant portion of the CO2 to liquid biofuels, electricity, and specialty products, while demonstrating the merits of the PCM technology. Construction of the pilot facility and shakedown of the facility in Wooster, OH, was completed during the first two years, and the focus of the last year was on operations and the cultivation of algae. During this Phase II effort a large-scale algae concentration unit from OpenAlgae was installed and utilized to continuously harvest algae from indoor raceways. An Algae Lysing Unit and Oil Recovery Unit were also received and installed. Initial parameters for lysing nanochloropsis were tested. Conditions were established that showed the lysing operation was effective at killing the algae cells. Continuous harvesting activities yielded over 200 kg algae dry weight for Ponds 1, 2 and 4. Studies were conducted to determine the effect of anaerobic digestion effluent as a nutrient source and the resulting lipid productivity of the algae. Lipid content and total fatty acids were unaffected by culture system and nutrient source, indicating that open raceway ponds fed diluted anaerobic digestion effluent can obtain similar lipid productivities to open raceway ponds using commercial nutrients. Data were also collected with respect to the performance of the PCM material on the pilot-scale raceway ponds. Parameters such as evaporative water loss, temperature differences, and growth/productivity were tracked. The pond with the PCM material was consistently 2 to 5C warmer than the control pond. This difference did not seem to increase significantly over time. During phase transitions for the PCM, the magnitude of the difference between the daily minimum and maximum temperatures decreased, resulting in smaller daily temperature fluctuations. A thin layer of PCM material reduced overall water loss by 74% and consistently provided algae densities that were 80% greater than the control pond.

  20. Industrial and Agricultural Production Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Trust of Oregon offers the Industrial and Agricultural Production Efficiency Program to customers of Portland General Electric, Pacific Power, NW Natural and Cascade Natural Gas. In order to...

  1. UWA Institute of Agriculture 1 "Sustaining productive agriculture for a growing world"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobar, Michael

    UWA Institute of Agriculture 1 "Sustaining productive agriculture for a growing world" Agriculture Science graduates show their talents at the Young Professionals in Agriculture Forum Institute of Agriculture photo:MrPeterMaloney The Australian Institute of Agricultural Science and Technology (AIAST

  2. Characterization of the bacterial metagenome in an industrial algae bioenergy production system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Shi [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Fulbright, Scott P [Colorado State University; Zeng, Xiaowei [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Yates, Tracy [Solix Biofuels; Wardle, Greg [Solix Biofuels; Chisholm, Stephen T [Colorado State University; Xu, Jian [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Lammers, Peter [New Mexico State University

    2011-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Cultivation of oleaginous microalgae for fuel generally requires growth of the intended species to the maximum extent supported by available light. The presence of undesired competitors, pathogens and grazers in cultivation systems will create competition for nitrate, phosphate, sulfate, iron and other micronutrients in the growth medium and potentially decrease microalgal triglyceride production by limiting microalgal health or cell density. Pathogenic bacteria may also directly impact the metabolism or survival of individual microalgal cells. Conversely, symbiotic bacteria that enhance microalgal growth may also be present in the system. Finally, the use of agricultural and municipal wastes as nutrient inputs for microalgal production systems may lead to the introduction and proliferation of human pathogens or interfere with the growth of bacteria with beneficial effects on system performance. These considerations underscore the need to understand bacterial community dynamics in microalgal production systems in order to assess microbiome effects on microalgal productivity and pathogen risks. Here we focus on the bacterial component of microalgal production systems and describe a pipeline for metagenomic characterization of bacterial diversity in industrial cultures of an oleaginous alga, Nannochloropsis salina. Environmental DNA was isolated from 12 marine algal cultures grown at Solix Biofuels, a region of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified by PCR, and 16S amplicons were sequenced using a 454 automated pyrosequencer. The approximately 70,000 sequences that passed quality control clustered into 53,950 unique sequences. The majority of sequences belonged to thirteen phyla. At the genus level, sequences from all samples represented 169 different genera. About 52.94% of all sequences could not be identified at the genus level and were classified at the next highest possible resolution level. Of all sequences, 79.92% corresponded to 169 genera and 70 other taxa. We apply a principal component analysis across the initial sample set to draw correlations between sample variables and changes in microbiome populations.

  3. Mass Production of Biodiesel From Algae UROP Summer 2008 Project Proposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    1 Mass Production of Biodiesel From Algae UROP Summer 2008 Project Proposal Steven A. Biorn Faculty at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities campus. The project involves the mass production of biodiesel and other to make biodiesel is well understood, this project offers an alternative to current methods by using

  4. Chromatin landscaping in algae reveals novel regulation pathway for biofuels production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ngan, Chew Yee

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chromatin landscaping in algae reveals novel regulationChromatin landscaping in algae reveals novel regulationis known about the algae lipid biosynthetic regulatory

  5. Analytical approaches to photobiological hydrogen production in unicellular green algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemschemeier, Anja; Melis, Anastasios; Happe, Thomas

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    production activity after a sudden darklight shift. This screening utilizes the characteristics of tungsten

  6. Maximizing (Productivity and Efficiency) in Contemporary Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fixen, Paul

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Paris, France. Dupont. 2009. Agriculture is up to globalFAO. 2008. State of Food and Agriculture (page 62).Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.

  7. U.S. Agricultural Production Affected by Mexican Tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U.S. Agricultural Production Affected by Mexican Tariffs CNAS Issue Brief 2011-02 March 17, 2011 was eliminated. Mexico retaliated on March 18, 2009 by imposing tariffs on selected U.S. agricultural exports 17, 2010, with agricultural goods representing 71 percent of all products under tariff. Tariffs

  8. Alcohol production from agricultural and forestry residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Opilla, R.; Dale, L.; Surles, T.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of carbohydrate sources can be used as raw material for the production of ethanol. Section 1 is a review of technologies available for the production of ethanol from whole corn. Particular emphasis is placed on the environmental aspects of the process, including land utilization and possible air and water pollutants. Suggestions are made for technological changes intended to improve the economics of the process as well as to reduce some of the pollution from by-product disposal. Ethanol may be derived from renewable cellulosic substances by either enzymatic or acid hydrolysis of cellulose to sugar, followed by conventional fermentation and distillation. Section 2 is a review of the use of two agricultural residues - corn stover (field stalks remaining after harvest) and straw from wheat crops - as a cellulosic feedstock. Two processes have been evaluated with regard to environmental impact - a two-stage acid process developed by G.T. Tsao of Purdue University and an enzymatic process based on the laboratory findings of C.R. Wilke of the University of California, Berkeley. Section 3 deals with the environmental residuals expected from the manufacture of methyl and ethyl alcohols from woody biomass. The methanol is produced in a gasification process, whereas ethanol is produced by hydrolysis and fermentation processes similar to those used to derive ethanol from cellulosic materials.

  9. Alcohol production from agricultural and forestry residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, L; Opilla, R; Surles, T

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technologies available for the production of ethanol from whole corn are reviewed. Particular emphasis is placed on the environmental aspects of the process, including land utilization and possible air and water pollutants. Suggestions are made for technological changes intended to improve the economics of the process as well as to reduce some of the pollution from by-product disposal. Ethanol may be derived from renewable cellulosic substances by either enzymatic or acid hydrolysis of cellulose to sugar, followed by conventional fermentation and distillation. The use of two agricultural residues - corn stover (field stalks remaining after harvest) and straw from wheat crops - is reviewed as a cellulosic feedstock. Two processes have been evaluated with regard to environmental impact - a two-stage acid process developed by G.T. Tsao of Purdue University and an enzymatic process based on the laboratory findings of C.R. Wilke of the University of California, Berkeley. The environmental residuals expected from the manufacture of methyl and ethyl alcohols from woody biomass are covered. The methanol is produced in a gasification process, whereas ethanol is produced by hydrolysis and fermentation processes similar to those used to derive ethanol from cellulosic materials.

  10. Integrating agricultural pest biocontrol into forecasts of energy biomass production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gratton, Claudio

    Analysis Integrating agricultural pest biocontrol into forecasts of energy biomass production T), University of Lome, 114 Rue Agbalepedogan, BP: 20679, Lome, Togo e Center for Agricultural & Energy Policy model of potential biomass supply that incorporates the effect of biological control on crop choice

  11. A National-Scale Comparison of Resource and Nutrient Demands for Algae-Based Biofuel Production by Lipid Extraction and Hydrothermal Liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venteris, Erik R.; Skaggs, Richard; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Coleman, Andre M.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Algaes high productivity provides potential resource advantages over other fuel crops. However, demand for land, water, and nutrients must be minimized to avoid impacts on food production. We apply our national-scale, open-pond, growth and resource models to assess several biomass to fuel technological pathways based on Chlorella. We compare resource demands between hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) and lipid extraction (LE) to meet 1.89E+10 and 7.95E+10 L yr-1 biofuel targets. We estimate nutrient demands where post-fuel biomass is consumed as co-products and recycling by anaerobic digestion (AD) or catalytic hydrothermal gasification (CHG). Sites are selected through prioritization based on fuel value relative to a set of site-specific resource costs. The highest priority sites are located along the Gulf of Mexico coast, but potential sites exist nationwide. We find that HTL reduces land and freshwater consumption by up to 46% and saline groundwater by around 70%. Without recycling, nitrogen (N) and phosphorous (P) demand is reduced 33%, but is large relative to current U.S. agricultural consumption. The most nutrient-efficient pathways are LE+CHG for N and HTL+CHG for P (by 42%). Resource gains for HTL+CHG are offset by a 344% increase in N consumption relative to LE+CHG (with potential for further recycling). Nutrient recycling is essential to effective use of alternative nutrient sources. Modeling of utilization availability and costs remains, but we find that for HTL+CHG at the 7.95E+10 L yr-1 production target, municipal sources can offset 17% of N and 40% of P demand and animal manures can generally meet demands.

  12. Microalgae Cultivation using Offshore Membrane Enclosures for Growing Algae (OMEGA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiley, Patrick Edward

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Production of biodiesel and biogas from algae: A review ofProduction of Biodiesel and Biogas from Algae: A Review ofProduction of biodiesel and biogas from algae: A review of

  13. Whole Turf Algae to biofuels-final-sm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Whole Turf Algae Polyculture Biofuels The production and conversion of whole turf algae polyculture maximizes fuels, chemicals and nutrients New Approach to Algal Biomass...

  14. alga fucus vesiculosus: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1986 Clifton, Ken 37 Analysis of Land Suitable for Algae State of Hawaii Renewable Energy Websites Summary: Analysis of Land Suitable for Algae Production State of Hawaii...

  15. algae fucus serratus: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1986 Clifton, Ken 29 Analysis of Land Suitable for Algae State of Hawaii Renewable Energy Websites Summary: Analysis of Land Suitable for Algae Production State of Hawaii...

  16. algae fucus distichus: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1986 Clifton, Ken 28 Analysis of Land Suitable for Algae State of Hawaii Renewable Energy Websites Summary: Analysis of Land Suitable for Algae Production State of Hawaii...

  17. agricultural production: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 61 College of Agriculture, Food and Environment SAG Sustainable Agriculture Physics Websites Summary: College of Agriculture, Food...

  18. agricultural production energeticky: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 61 College of Agriculture, Food and Environment SAG Sustainable Agriculture Physics Websites Summary: College of Agriculture, Food...

  19. agricultural products: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 61 College of Agriculture, Food and Environment SAG Sustainable Agriculture Physics Websites Summary: College of Agriculture, Food...

  20. Analysis of Land Suitable for Algae State of Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Analysis of Land Suitable for Algae Production State of Hawaii Prepared by Mele Chillingworth Scott of Hawaii at Manoa August 2011 #12;i Executive Summary Algae are considered to be a viable crop for biofuel for biofuels has increased interest in growing algae in Hawaii for biofuels. An analysis of algae production

  1. agricultural biotechnology products: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: in France (excluding agriculture waste) 1, the recycling of urban organic waste is a strong environmental, the development of the agricultural recycling of...

  2. alternative agricultural products: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    230W Semester 8 Credits AEE 412 Methods of Teaching Agriculture and Environmental Science 4 AEE 313 School AEE 495 Internship in Agricultural and Extension Education 10 AEE...

  3. BROWN ALGAE Colpomenia sinuosa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Matthew B.

    BROWN ALGAE Colpomenia sinuosa GREEN ALGAE Dictyosphaeria cavernosa Amphiroa fragilissima Gelidiopsis intricata Botryocladia pyriformis RED ALGAE CYANOBACTERIA Oscillitoria acuminata Schizothrix sp. "ALGAE"­ A DIVERSE ASSORTMENT OF LIFE FORMS Photosynthesis is performed by a taxonomically diverse

  4. Productivity and Efficiency Change in the Australian Broadacre Agriculture: Nonparametric Estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Productivity and Efficiency Change in the Australian Broadacre Agriculture: Nonparametric Estimates U1987, Perth, WA 6845, Australia. e-mails: Ruhul.Salim@cbs.curtin.edu.au #12;2 Productivity productivity of Australian broadacre agriculture. Fre- Primont indexes have some distinguishing features

  5. On the Role of Farm Size Distribution in Explaining Cross-Country Variation in Agricultural Productivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Antar

    Productivity Oleg Firsin August 2014 Abstract In this paper, we seek to test a hypothesis regarding sources of international agricultural productivity differences that recently emerged in the literature. In accordance-level taxes and subsidies­account for a large part of the agricultural labor productivity gap between the rich

  6. Chromatin landscaping in algae reveals novel regulation pathway for biofuels production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ngan, Chew Yee

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    regulation pathway for biofuels production Chew Yee Ngan ,regulation pathway for biofuels production Chew Yee Ngan,for the development of biofuels. Biofuels are produced from

  7. algae: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: (2010) analyzed the economics of microalgae as biodiesel and biomass feedstock. The study considered potential yields of algae production...

  8. Economic effect on agricultural production of alternative energy input prices: Texas High Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Benjamin Michael

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ECONOMIC EFFECT ON AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION OF ALTERNATIYE ENERGy INPUT PRICES: TEXAS HIGH PLAlNS A Thesis by BENJAMIN MICHAEL ADAMS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1975 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics ECONOMIC EFFECT ON AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION OF ALTERNATIVE ENERGY INPUT PRICES: TEXAS HIGH PLAINS A Thesis by BENJAMIN MICHAEL ADAMS Approved as to style and content...

  9. Impacts of Biofuel Production and Navigation Impediments on Agricultural Transportation and Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmedov, Zafarbek

    2013-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigated the impacts of U.S. biofuel production and barge navigation impediments on agricultural transportation and markets. Both past and future impacts of U.S. biofuel production levels mandated by the Renewable Fuel Standards...

  10. Climate impacts on agriculture: Implications for crop production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatfield, Jerry L.; Boote, Kenneth J.; Kimball, B. A.; Ziska, Lewis A.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Ort, Don; Thomson, Allison M.; Wolfe, David W.

    2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Changes in temperature, CO2, and precipitation under the scenarios of climate change for the next 30 years present a challenge to crop production. This review focuses on the impact of temperature, CO2, and ozone on agronomic crops and the implications for crop production. Understanding these implications for agricultural crops is critical for developing cropping systems resilient to stresses induced by climate change. There is variation among crops in their response to CO2, temperature, and precipitation changes and, with the regional differences in predicted climate, a situation is created in which the responses will be further complicated. For example, the temperature effects on soybean could potentially cause yield reductions of 2.4% in the South but an increase of 1.7% in the Midwest. The frequency of years when temperatures exceed thresholds for damage during critical growth stages is likely to increase for some crops and regions. The increase in CO2 contributes significantly to enhanced plant growth and improved water use efficiency; however, there may be a downscaling of these positive impacts due to higher temperatures plants will experience during their growth cycle. A challenge is to understand the interactions of the changing climatic parameters because of the interactions among temperature, CO2, and precipitation on plant growth and development and also on the biotic stresses of weeds, insects, and diseases. Agronomists will have to consider the variations in temperature and precipitation as part of the production system if they are to ensure the food security required by an ever increasing population.

  11. Energy Supply- Production of Fuel from Agricultural and Animal Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gabriel Miller

    2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Society for Energy and Environmental Research (SEER) was funded in March 2004 by the Department of Energy, under grant DE-FG-36-04GO14268, to produce a study, and oversee construction and implementation, for the thermo-chemical production of fuel from agricultural and animal waste. The grant focuses on the Changing World Technologies (CWT) of West Hempstead, NY, thermal conversion process (TCP), which converts animal residues and industrial food processing biproducts into fuels, and as an additional product, fertilizers. A commercial plant was designed and built by CWT, partially using grant funds, in Carthage, Missouri, to process animal residues from a nearby turkey processing plant. The DOE sponsored program consisted of four tasks. These were: Task 1 Optimization of the CWT Plant in Carthage - This task focused on advancing and optimizing the process plant operated by CWT that converts organic waste to fuel and energy. Task 2 Characterize and Validate Fuels Produced by CWT - This task focused on testing of bio-derived hydrocarbon fuels from the Carthage plant in power generating equipment to determine the regulatory compliance of emissions and overall performance of the fuel. Task 3 Characterize Mixed Waste Streams - This task focused on studies performed at Princeton University to better characterize mixed waste incoming streams from animal and vegetable residues. Task 4 Fundamental Research in Waste Processing Technologies - This task focused on studies performed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) on the chemical reformation reaction of agricultural biomass compounds in a hydrothermal medium. Many of the challenges to optimize, improve and perfect the technology, equipment and processes in order to provide an economically viable means of creating sustainable energy were identified in the DOE Stage Gate Review, whose summary report was issued on July 30, 2004. This summary report appears herein as Appendix 1, and the findings of the report formed the basis for much of the subsequent work under the grant. An explanation of the process is presented as well as the completed work on the four tasks.

  12. agricultural production landscapes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    decline. Productivist and (more) Ampt, Peter 2013-01-01 4 Wildlife Habitat Use in Agriculture-Dominated Landscapes. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ?? Conservation...

  13. Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Robert M. Kerr Food & Agricultural Products Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    . Sterilizing food containers (for example, by irradiation) without cleaning them eliminates biological hazards Resources FAPC-165 Robert M. Kerr Food & Agricultural Products Center FOOD TECHNOLOGY FACT SHEET 405-744-6071 · www.fapc.bizAdding Value to Oklahoma f a p c Timothy J. Bowser Food Processing Engineer Introduction

  14. Solar Grade Silicon from Agricultural By-products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard M. Laine

    2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this project, Mayaterials developed a low cost, low energy and low temperature method of purifying rice hull ash to high purity (5-6Ns) and converting it by carbothermal reduction to solar grade quality silicon (Sipv) using a self-designed and built electric arc furnace (EAF). Outside evaluation of our process by an independent engineering firm confirms that our technology greatly lowers estimated operating expenses (OPEX) to $5/kg and capital expenses (CAPEX) to $24/kg for Sipv production, which is well below best-in-class plants using a Siemens process approach (OPEX of 14/kg and CAPEX of $87/kg, respectively). The primary limiting factor in the widespread use of photovoltaic (PV) cells is the high cost of manufacturing, compared to more traditional sources to reach 6 g Sipv/watt (with averages closer to 8+g/watt). In 2008, the spot price of Sipv rose to $450/kg. While prices have since dropped to a more reasonable $25/kg; this low price level is not sustainable, meaning the longer-term price will likely return to $35/kg. The 6-8 g Si/watt implies that the Sipv used in a module will cost $0.21-0.28/watt for the best producers (45% of the cost of a traditional solar panel), a major improvement from the cost/wafer driven by the $50/kg Si costs of early 2011, but still a major hindrance in fulfilling DOE goal of lowering the cost of solar energy below $1/watt. The solar cell industry has grown by 40% yearly for the past eight years, increasing the demand for Sipv. As such, future solar silicon price spikes are expected in the next few years. Although industry has invested billions of dollars to meet this ever-increasing demand, the technology to produce Sipv remains largely unchanged requiring the energy intensive, and chlorine dependent Siemens process or variations thereof. While huge improvements have been made, current state-of-the-art industrial plant still use 65 kWh/kg of silicon purified. Our technology offers a key distinction to other technologies as it starts one step upstream from all other Sipv production efforts. Our process starts by producing high purity SiO2/C feedstocks from which Sipv can be produced in a single, chlorine free, final EAF step. Specifically, our unique technology, and the resultant SiO2/C product can serve as high purity feedstocks to existing metallurgical silicon (Simet) producers, allowing them to generate Sipv with existing US manufacturing infrastructure, reducing the overall capital and commissioning schedule. Our low energy, low CAPEX and OPEX process purifies the silica and carbon present in rice hull ash (RHA) at low temperatures (< 200C) to produce high purity (5-6 Ns) feedstock for production of Sipv using furnaces similar to those used to produce Simet. During the course of this project we partnered with Wadham Energy LP (Wadham), who burns 220k ton of rice hulls (RH)/yr generating 200 GWh of electricity/yr and >30k ton/yr RHA. The power generation step produces much more energy (42 kWh/kg of final silicon produced) than required to purify the RHA (5 kWh/kg of Sipv, compared to 65 kWh/kg noted above. Biogenic silica offers three very important foundations for producing high purity silicon. First, wastes from silica accumulating plants, such as rice, corn, many grasses, algae and grains, contain very reactive, amorphous silica from which impurities are easily removed. Second, plants take up only a limited set of, and minimal quantities of the heavy metals present in nature, meaning fewer minerals must be removed. Third, biomass combustion generates a product with intrinsic residual carbon, mixed at nanometer length scales with the SiO2. RHA is 80-90 wt% high surface area (20 m2/g), amorphous SiO2 with some simple mineral content mixed intimately with 5-15 wt% carbon. The mineral content is easily removed by low cost, acid washes using Mayaterials IP, leading to purified rice hull ash (RHAclean) at up to 6N purity. This highly reactive silica is partially extracted from RHAclean at 200 C in an environmentally benign process to adjust SiO2:C ratios to those needed in EA

  15. Fuel From Algae: Scaling and Commercialization of Algae Harvesting Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Led by CEO Ross Youngs, AVS has patented a cost-effective dewatering technology that separates micro-solids (algae) from water. Separating micro-solids from water traditionally requires a centrifuge, which uses significant energy to spin the water mass and force materials of different densities to separate from one another. In a comparative analysis, dewatering 1 ton of algae in a centrifuge costs around $3,400. AVSs Solid-Liquid Separation (SLS) system is less energy-intensive and less expensive, costing $1.92 to process 1 ton of algae. The SLS technology uses capillary dewatering with filter media to gently facilitate water separation, leaving behind dewatered algae which can then be used as a source for biofuels and bio-products. The biomimicry of the SLS technology emulates the way plants absorb and spread water to their capillaries.

  16. Production

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Algae production R&D focuses on exploring resource use and availability, algal biomass development and improvements, characterizing algal biomass components, and the ecology and engineering of...

  17. Investigating citizens' preferences for recycling Residual Organic Products in agriculture: a choice experiment approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    in France (excluding agriculture waste) [1], the recycling of urban organic waste is a strong environmentalInvestigating citizens' preferences for recycling Residual Organic Products in agriculture or mineral fertilizers. The paper addresses in particular 3 environmental effects: the organic waste

  18. Robotics in Crop Production Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, University of Illinois at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robotics in Crop Production Tony Grift Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering such as harvesting of citrus fruits, grapes, and raisins. An important part of Automation is the use of robots. Robotics in agriculture is not a new concept; in controlled environments (green houses), it has a his- tory

  19. Algae Biotechnology

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of1Albuquerque, NM - BuildinginauguralAlexandria Clark About UsAlgae

  20. Analysis of Land Suitable for Algae State of Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Analysis of Land Suitable for Algae Production State of Hawaii Prepared for the U.S. Department agency thereof. #12;Analysis of Land Suitable for Algae Production State of Hawaii Prepared by Mele University of Hawaii at Manoa August 2011 #12;i Executive Summary Algae are considered to be a viable crop

  1. The economic impact of global climate and tropospheric oxone on world agricultural production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaodu

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of my thesis is to analyze the economic impact on agriculture production from changes in climate and tropospheric ozone, and related policy interventions. The analysis makes use of the Emissions Prediction ...

  2. Transportation Security Evaluation & Planning for Farmers, Ranchers & Production Agricultural Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Robert M.

    nitrate; and fuels like gasoline, diesel, and propane. Examples of Types of Materials Requiring Placards) Ammonium nitrate fertilizer (Division 5.1) Pesticides or herbicides that bear a DOT poison label (Division in a single shipment Diesel fuel (Class 3) More than 119 gallons in a single container To assist agricultural

  3. Microalgae Cultivation using Offshore Membrane Enclosures for Growing Algae (OMEGA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiley, Patrick Edward

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2011). Production of biodiesel and biogas from algae: A2007). Y. Chisti, Biodiesel from microalgae. Biotechnologyas a potential source for biodiesel production. Applied

  4. AgriculturAl lAnd ApplicAtion of Biosolids in VirginiA: production And chArActeristics of Biosolids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    AgriculturAl lAnd ApplicAtion of Biosolids in VirginiA: production And chArActeristics of Biosolids to permit these materials to be safely land-applied. The term was introduced by the wastewater treatment treatment of domestic wastewater. Biosolids comprise the solids that are removed from the wastewater

  5. Agricultural

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973 1BP-14Scriptinglandfill14-15,7,Deposit

  6. Agricultural

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973 1BP-14Scriptinglandfill14-15,7,Depositagricultural

  7. agricultural productivity symposium: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    inputs per acre on plots controlled by men. These results contradict the Pareto efficiency of resource allocation within the household. Production function estimates...

  8. agricultural productivity growth: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    inputs per acre on plots controlled by men. These results contradict the Pareto efficiency of resource allocation within the household. Production function estimates...

  9. adapting agricultural production: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    inputs per acre on plots controlled by men. These results contradict the Pareto efficiency of resource allocation within the household. Production function estimates...

  10. THE POTENTIAL FOR MICRO-ALGAE AND OTHER "MICRO-CROPS" TO PRODUCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Paul N.

    THE POTENTIAL FOR MICRO-ALGAE AND OTHER "MICRO-CROPS" TO PRODUCE SUSTAINABLE BIOFUELS A REVIEW INTRODUCTION Biofuel derived from algae and other micro-crops has been proposed as an environmentally benign transportation fuel. Algae can be cultivated on low productivity lands using low quality water. Interest in algae

  11. Biogeography of Marine Algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biogeography of Marine Algae David J Garbary, St Francis Xavier University, Antigonish, Nova Scotia and vicariance in establishing distributions and as factors associated with speciation. Since eukaryotic algae. There are many species that are virtually cosmopolitan (e.g. the green alga Enteromorpha intestinalis, the red

  12. Algae Biodiesel: Commercialization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Algae Biodiesel: A Path to Commercialization Algae Biodiesel: A Path to Commercialization Center conservation and biomonitoring · Algae biodiesel is largest CEHMM project #12;Project Overview: The Missing Piece of the Biodiesel Puzzle Project Overview: The Missing Piece of the Biodiesel Puzzle · Began

  13. Formation of algae growth constitutive relations for improved algae modeling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gharagozloo, Patricia E.; Drewry, Jessica L.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This SAND report summarizes research conducted as a part of a two year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project to improve our abilities to model algal cultivation. Algae-based biofuels have generated much excitement due to their potentially large oil yield from relatively small land use and without interfering with the food or water supply. Algae mitigate atmospheric CO2 through metabolism. Efficient production of algal biofuels could reduce dependence on foreign oil by providing a domestic renewable energy source. Important factors controlling algal productivity include temperature, nutrient concentrations, salinity, pH, and the light-to-biomass conversion rate. Computational models allow for inexpensive predictions of algae growth kinetics in these non-ideal conditions for various bioreactor sizes and geometries without the need for multiple expensive measurement setups. However, these models need to be calibrated for each algal strain. In this work, we conduct a parametric study of key marine algae strains and apply the findings to a computational model.

  14. algae furcellaria lumbricalis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: (2010) analyzed the economics of microalgae as biodiesel and biomass feedstock. The study considered potential yields of algae production...

  15. alga nostoc commune: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: (2010) analyzed the economics of microalgae as biodiesel and biomass feedstock. The study considered potential yields of algae production...

  16. alga scenedesmus quadricauda: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: (2010) analyzed the economics of microalgae as biodiesel and biomass feedstock. The study considered potential yields of algae production...

  17. alga ectocarpus siliculosus: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: (2010) analyzed the economics of microalgae as biodiesel and biomass feedstock. The study considered potential yields of algae production...

  18. alga furcellaria lumbricalis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: (2010) analyzed the economics of microalgae as biodiesel and biomass feedstock. The study considered potential yields of algae production...

  19. alga spirulina platensis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: (2010) analyzed the economics of microalgae as biodiesel and biomass feedstock. The study considered potential yields of algae production...

  20. alga sphaerococcus coronopifolius: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: (2010) analyzed the economics of microalgae as biodiesel and biomass feedstock. The study considered potential yields of algae production...

  1. acuosas mediante algas: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: (2010) analyzed the economics of microalgae as biodiesel and biomass feedstock. The study considered potential yields of algae production...

  2. algae ectocarpus siliculosus: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: (2010) analyzed the economics of microalgae as biodiesel and biomass feedstock. The study considered potential yields of algae production...

  3. alga pycnococcus provasolii: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: (2010) analyzed the economics of microalgae as biodiesel and biomass feedstock. The study considered potential yields of algae production...

  4. alga dictyopteris divaricata: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: (2010) analyzed the economics of microalgae as biodiesel and biomass feedstock. The study considered potential yields of algae production...

  5. alga bostrychia tenella: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: (2010) analyzed the economics of microalgae as biodiesel and biomass feedstock. The study considered potential yields of algae production...

  6. alga galdieria sulphuraria: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: (2010) analyzed the economics of microalgae as biodiesel and biomass feedstock. The study considered potential yields of algae production...

  7. alga dunaliella tertiolecta: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: (2010) analyzed the economics of microalgae as biodiesel and biomass feedstock. The study considered potential yields of algae production...

  8. algae spirulina platensis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: (2010) analyzed the economics of microalgae as biodiesel and biomass feedstock. The study considered potential yields of algae production...

  9. alga aureococcus anophagefferens: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: (2010) analyzed the economics of microalgae as biodiesel and biomass feedstock. The study considered potential yields of algae production...

  10. algae lithothamnion calcareum: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: (2010) analyzed the economics of microalgae as biodiesel and biomass feedstock. The study considered potential yields of algae production...

  11. alga pterocladiella capillacea: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: (2010) analyzed the economics of microalgae as biodiesel and biomass feedstock. The study considered potential yields of algae production...

  12. algae scenedesmus obliquus: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: (2010) analyzed the economics of microalgae as biodiesel and biomass feedstock. The study considered potential yields of algae production...

  13. alga micrasterias denticulata: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: (2010) analyzed the economics of microalgae as biodiesel and biomass feedstock. The study considered potential yields of algae production...

  14. alga corallina pilulifera: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: (2010) analyzed the economics of microalgae as biodiesel and biomass feedstock. The study considered potential yields of algae production...

  15. algae ulva linza: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: (2010) analyzed the economics of microalgae as biodiesel and biomass feedstock. The study considered potential yields of algae production...

  16. alga lobophora variegata: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: (2010) analyzed the economics of microalgae as biodiesel and biomass feedstock. The study considered potential yields of algae production...

  17. alga nitella hookeri: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: (2010) analyzed the economics of microalgae as biodiesel and biomass feedstock. The study considered potential yields of algae production...

  18. alga selenastrum capricornutum: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: (2010) analyzed the economics of microalgae as biodiesel and biomass feedstock. The study considered potential yields of algae production...

  19. alga haematococcus pluvialis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: (2010) analyzed the economics of microalgae as biodiesel and biomass feedstock. The study considered potential yields of algae production...

  20. alga porphyridium cruentum: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: (2010) analyzed the economics of microalgae as biodiesel and biomass feedstock. The study considered potential yields of algae production...

  1. alga scenedesmus obliquus: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: (2010) analyzed the economics of microalgae as biodiesel and biomass feedstock. The study considered potential yields of algae production...

  2. algae trebouxia erici: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: (2010) analyzed the economics of microalgae as biodiesel and biomass feedstock. The study considered potential yields of algae production...

  3. alga oedogonium cardiacum: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: (2010) analyzed the economics of microalgae as biodiesel and biomass feedstock. The study considered potential yields of algae production...

  4. ancient algae natural: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    production to biofuel by photosynthesis would avoid the unnecessary expenditure of energy to create and destroy Cai, Long 2 Green-Algae CiteSeer Summary: Chloroplasts...

  5. The Food and Fiber System and Production Agriculture's Contributions to the Texas Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Food and Fiber System and Production Agriculture's Contributions to the Texas Economy contributing to the state's economy. The food and fiber system in Texas is evolving and changing. The structure in state and local economies. Of particular interest is the relationship between the food and fiber system

  6. Bio-crude transcriptomics: Gene discovery and metabolic network reconstruction for the biosynthesis of the terpenome of the hydrocarbon oil-producing green alga, Botryococcus braunii race B (Showa)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Molnr, Istvn; Lopez, David; Wisecaver, Jennifer H.; Devarenne, Timothy P.; Weiss, Taylor L.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Hackett, Jeremiah D.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microalgae hold promise for yielding a biofuel feedstock that is sustainable, carbon-neutral, distributed, and only minimally disruptive for the production of food and feed by traditional agriculture. Amongst oleaginous eukaryotic algae, the B race of Botryococcus braunii is unique in that it produces large amounts of liquid hydrocarbons of terpenoid origin. These are comparable to fossil crude oil, and are sequestered outside the cells in a communal extracellular polymeric matrix material. Biosynthetic engineering of terpenoid bio-crude production requires identification of genes and reconstruction of metabolic pathways responsible for production of both hydrocarbons and other metabolites of the alga that competemorefor photosynthetic carbon and energy.less

  7. Bio-crude transcriptomics: Gene discovery and metabolic network reconstruction for the biosynthesis of the terpenome of the hydrocarbon oil-producing green alga, Botryococcus braunii race B (Showa)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Molnr, Istvn [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Natural Products Center and Bio5 Institute; Lopez, David [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology; Wisecaver, Jennifer H. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; Devarenne, Timothy P. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Biophysics; Weiss, Taylor L. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Biophysics; Pellegrini, Matteo [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology; Hackett, Jeremiah D. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Bio5 Institute and Dept. of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microalgae hold promise for yielding a biofuel feedstock that is sustainable, carbon-neutral, distributed, and only minimally disruptive for the production of food and feed by traditional agriculture. Amongst oleaginous eukaryotic algae, the B race of Botryococcus braunii is unique in that it produces large amounts of liquid hydrocarbons of terpenoid origin. These are comparable to fossil crude oil, and are sequestered outside the cells in a communal extracellular polymeric matrix material. Biosynthetic engineering of terpenoid bio-crude production requires identification of genes and reconstruction of metabolic pathways responsible for production of both hydrocarbons and other metabolites of the alga that compete for photosynthetic carbon and energy.

  8. Human Appropriation of Net Primary Productivity (HANPP) in Texas: A Statewide Analysis of Sustainability in the Agricultural and Timber Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graff, Christopher P.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The sustainability of the Texas agricultural and timber sectors is measured using the ratio of human appropriation of net primary productivity (HANPP) to available net primary productivity (NPP) on a county-by-county basis for the entire state...

  9. The mission of the Research Centers is to serve the specific needs of the clientele in local production areas and the broader needs of Montana agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    production areas and the broader needs of Montana agriculture in general through applied research directed to the problems and impacts of agricultural production. New knowledge generated by Agricultural Research Center programs benefits Montana agriculture and the scientific community at local, state and national levels

  10. Method and apparatus for processing algae

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chew, Geoffrey; Reich, Alton J.; Dykes, Jr., H. Waite; Di Salvo, Roberto

    2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus for processing algae are described in which a hydrophilic ionic liquid is used to lyse algae cells. The lysate separates into at least two layers including a lipid-containing hydrophobic layer and an ionic liquid-containing hydrophilic layer. A salt or salt solution may be used to remove water from the ionic liquid-containing layer before the ionic liquid is reused. The used salt may also be dried and/or concentrated and reused. The method can operate at relatively low lysis, processing, and recycling temperatures, which minimizes the environmental impact of algae processing while providing reusable biofuels and other useful products.

  11. Climate impacts on agriculture: Implications for forage and rangeland production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Thomson, Allison M.; Morgan, Jack; Fay, Philip; Polley, Wayne; Hatfield, Jerry L.

    2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Projections of temperature and precipitation patterns across the United States during the next 50 years anticipate a 1.5 to 2C warming and a slight increase in precipitation as a result of global climate change. There have been relatively few studies of climate change impacts on pasture and rangeland (grazingland) species compared to those on crop species, despite the economic and ecological importance of the former. Here we review the literature on pastureland and rangeland species to rising CO2 and climate change (temperature, and precipitation) and discuss plant and management factors likely to influence pastureland and rangeland responses to change (e.g., community composition, plant competition, perennial growth habit, seasonal productivity, and management methods). Overall, the response of pasture species to increased [CO2] is consistent with the general response of C3 and C4 type vegetation, although significant exceptions exist. Both pastureland and rangeland species should exhibit an acceleration of metabolism and development due to earlier onset of spring green-up and longer growing seasons. However, in the studies reviewed here, C3 pasture species increased their photosynthetic rates by up to 40% while C4 species exhibited no increase in photosynthesis. In general, it is expected that increases in [CO2] and precipitation would enhance rangeland net primary production (NPP) while increased air temperatures would either increase or decrease NPP. Much of this uncertainty in response is due to uncertain future projections of precipitation, both globally and regionally. For example, if annual precipitation changes little or declines, rangeland plant response to warming temperatures and rising [CO2] may be neutral or may decline due to increased water stress. This review reveals the need for comprehensive studies of climate change impacts on the pasture ecosystem including grazing regimes, mutualistic relationships (e.g., plant roots-nematodes; N-fixing organisms), as well as the ecosystem carbon balance, essential nutrients, and water.

  12. Production

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Algae production R&D focuses on exploring resource use and availability, algal biomass development and improvements, characterizing algal biomass components, and the ecology and engineering of cultivation systems.

  13. Siting algae cultivation facilities for biofuel production in the United States: trade-offs between growth rate, site constructability, water availability, and infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venteris, Erik R.; McBride, Robert; Coleman, Andre M.; Skaggs, Richard; Wigmosta, Mark S.

    2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Locating sites for new algae cultivation facilities is a complex task. The climate must support high growth rates, and cultivation ponds require appropriate land and water resources as well as key utility and transportation infrastructure. We employ our spatiotemporal Biomass Assessment Tool (BAT) to select promising locations based on the open-pond cultivation of Arthrospira sp. and a strain of the order Desmidiales. 64,000 potential sites across the southern United States were evaluated. We progressively apply a range of screening criteria and track their impact on the number of selected sites, geographic location, and biomass productivity. Both strains demonstrate maximum productivity along the Gulf of Mexico coast, with the highest values on the Florida peninsula. In contrast, sites meeting all selection criteria for Arthrospira were located along the southern coast of Texas and for Desmidiales were located in Louisiana and southern Arkansas. Site selection was driven mainly by the lack of oil pipeline access in Florida and elevated groundwater salinity in southern Texas. The requirement for low salinity freshwater (<400 mg L-1) constrained Desmidiales locations; siting flexibility is greater for salt-tolerant species such as Arthrospira. Combined siting factors can result in significant departures from regions of maximum productivity but are within the expected range of site-specific process improvements.

  14. Agriculture INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    1 Agriculture INTRODUCTION 1.1 Although its share in Gross Domestic Product (GDP) has declined from over half at Independence to less than one-fifth currently, agriculture remains the predominant sector in it as the principal occupation. Agriculture still contributes significantly to export earnings and is an important

  15. Analysis of factor productivity in agricultural systems in Zimbabwe and application of Geographic Information Systems in soil erosion prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mugabe, Phanuel

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    photographs were digitized into an Arc/Info GIS. This was used to determine the area under crops and grazing. Range forage production figures in kilograms per hectare for the area were obtained from Agricultural Technical and Extension Services inventories...

  16. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Europe. It is producing biodiesel from veg- etable oil, fromsuch as Jatropha, for biodiesel. Some industrial forestsfor the production of biodiesel. The econom- ics of algae as

  17. Monitoring changes in soil carbon resulting from intensive production, a non-traditional agricultural methodology.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dwyer, Brian P.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New Mexico State University and a group of New Mexico farmers are evaluating an innovative agricultural technique they call Intensive Production (IP). In contrast to conventional agricultural practice, IP uses intercropping, green fallowing, application of soil amendments and soil microbial inocula to sequester carbon as plant biomass, resulting in improved soil quality. Sandia National Laboratories role was to identify a non-invasive, cost effective technology to monitor soil carbon changes. A technological review indicated that Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) best met the farmers' objectives. Sandia partnered with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to analyze farmers' test plots using a portable LIBS developed at LANL. Real-time LIBS field sample analysis was conducted and grab samples were collected for laboratory comparison. The field and laboratory results correlated well implying the strong potential for LIBS as an economical field scale analytical tool for analysis of elements such as carbon, nitrogen, and phosphate.

  18. Turning Algae into Energy in New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sayre, Richard; Olivares, Jose; Lammers, Peter

    2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos National Laboratory, as part of the New Mexico Consortium - comprised of New Mexico's major research universities, the Lab, and key industry partners - is conducting research into using algae as a feed stock for a renewable source of fuels, and other products. There are hundreds of thousands of different algae species on Earth. They account for approximately half of the net photosynthesis on the planet, yet they have not been used in any kind of a large scale by humanity, with just a few exceptions. And yet, the biomass is easy to transform into useful products, including fuels, and they contain many other natural products that have high value. In this video Los Alamos and New Mexico State University scientists outline the opportunities and challenges of using science to turn algae into energy.

  19. Turning Algae into Energy in New Mexico

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Sayre, Richard; Olivares, Jose; Lammers, Peter

    2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos National Laboratory, as part of the New Mexico Consortium - comprised of New Mexico's major research universities, the Lab, and key industry partners - is conducting research into using algae as a feed stock for a renewable source of fuels, and other products. There are hundreds of thousands of different algae species on Earth. They account for approximately half of the net photosynthesis on the planet, yet they have not been used in any kind of a large scale by humanity, with just a few exceptions. And yet, the biomass is easy to transform into useful products, including fuels, and they contain many other natural products that have high value. In this video Los Alamos and New Mexico State University scientists outline the opportunities and challenges of using science to turn algae into energy.

  20. Method and apparatus for lysing and processing algae

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chew, Geoffrey; Reich, Alton J.; Dykes, Jr., H. Waite H.; Di Salvo, Roberto

    2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus for processing algae are described in which a hydrophilic ionic liquid is used to lyse algae cells at lower temperatures than existing algae processing methods. A salt or salt solution is used as a separation agent and to remove water from the ionic liquid, allowing the ionic liquid to be reused. The used salt may be dried or concentrated and reused. The relatively low lysis temperatures and recycling of the ionic liquid and salt reduce the environmental impact of the algae processing while providing biofuels and other useful products.

  1. Method and apparatus using an active ionic liquid for algae biofuel harvest and extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salvo, Roberto Di; Reich, Alton; Dykes, Jr., H. Waite H.; Teixeira, Rodrigo

    2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to use of an active ionic liquid to dissolve algae cell walls. The ionic liquid is used to, in an energy efficient manner, dissolve and/or lyse an algae cell walls, which releases algae constituents used in the creation of energy, fuel, and/or cosmetic components. The ionic liquids include ionic salts having multiple charge centers, low, very low, and ultra low melting point ionic liquids, and combinations of ionic liquids. An algae treatment system is described, which processes wet algae in a lysing reactor, separates out algae constituent products, and optionally recovers the ionic liquid in an energy efficient manner.

  2. 1128 volume 27 number 12 december 2009 nature biotechnology square meter per day of algae containing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    1128 volume 27 number 12 december 2009 nature biotechnology square meter per day of algae, such as triglycerides from algae or cellulosic biomass from higher plants, as feedstocks for biofuel production. The algal program sought to develop high-oil-content algae that grow at very fast rates. In our report

  3. Climate implications of algae-based bioenergy systems Andres Clarens, PhD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Climate implications of algae-based bioenergy systems Andres Clarens, PhD Assistant Professor Civil of algae and other nonconventional feedstocks, are being developed. This talk will explore several systems priorities. This is an especially challenging problem for algae-based biofuels because production pathways

  4. Green Pacific Biologicals Rapid & stable nuclear genetic engineering of eukaryotic algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to Investors · Rapid & stable nuclear genetic engineering of eukaryotic algae · WW exclusive license Max Planck · Algae-to-biofuels, big oil, Ag-biotech, High-margin products · Proprietary solutions for higher + no large capital investments Seed-stage algae-to-biofuels start-up #12;Green Pacific Biologicals Problem

  5. Developing New Alternative Energy in Virginia: Bio-Diesel from Algae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatcher, Patrick [Old Dominion University

    2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this study was to select chemical processing equipment, install and operate that equipment to directly convert algae to biodiesel via a reaction patented by Old Dominion University (Pat. No. US 8,080,679B2). This reaction is a high temperature (250- 330{degrees}C) methylation reaction utilizing tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) to produce biodiesel. As originally envisioned, algal biomass could be treated with TMAH in methanol without the need to separately extract triacylglycerides (TAG). The reactor temperature allows volatilization and condensation of the methyl esters whereas the spent algae solids can be utilized as a high-value fertilizer because they are minimally charred. During the course of this work and immediately prior to commencing, we discovered that glycerol, a major by-product of the conventional transesterification reaction for biofuels, is not formed but rather three methoxylated glycerol derivatives are produced. These derivatives are high-value specialty green chemicals that strongly upgrade the economics of the process, rendering this approach as one that now values the biofuel only as a by-product, the main value products being the methoxylated glycerols. A horizontal agitated thin-film evaporator (one square foot heat transfer area) proved effective as the primary reactor facilitating the reaction and vaporization of the products, and subsequent discharge of the spent algae solids that are suitable for supplementing petrochemicalbased fertilizers for agriculture. Because of the size chosen for the reactor, we encountered problems with delivery of the algal feed to the reaction zone, but envision that this problem could easily disappear upon scale-up or can be replaced economically by incorporating an extraction process. The objective for production of biodiesel from algae in quantities that could be tested could not be met, but we implemented use of soybean oil as a surrogate TAG feed to overcome this limitation. The positive economics of this process are influenced by the following: 1. the weight percent of dry algae in suspension that can be fed into the evaporator, 2. the alga species ability to produce a higher yield of biodiesel, 3. the isolation of valuable methoxylated by-products, 4. recycling and regeneration of methanol and TMAH, and 5. the market value of biodiesel, commercial agricultural fertilizer, and the three methoxylated by-products. The negative economics of the process are the following: 1. the cost of producing dried, ground algae, 2. the capital cost of the equipment required for feedstock mixing, reaction, separation and recovery of products, and reactant recycling, and 3. the electrical cost and other utilities. In this report, the economic factors and results are assembled to predict the commercialization cost and its viability. This direct conversion process and equipment discussed herein can be adapted for various feedstocks including: other algal species, vegetable oil, jatropha oil, peanut oil, sunflower oil, and other TAG containing raw materials as a renewable energy resource.

  6. Radionuclide concentrations in agricultural products near the Hanford Site, 1982 through 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antonio, E.J.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory reviewed monitoring data for agricultural products collected from 1982 through 1992 near the Hanford Site to determine radionuclide concentration trends. While samples were collected and analyzed, and results reported annual in Hanford Site environmental reports, an 11-year data set was reviewed for this report to increase the ability to assess trends and potential Hanford effects. Products reviewed included milk, chicken, eggs, beef, vegetables, fruit, wine, wheat, and alfalfa. To determine which radionuclides were detected sufficiently often to permit analysis for trends and effects, each radionuclide concentration and its associated uncertainty were ratioed. Radionuclides were considered routinely detectable if more than 50% of the ratios were between zero and one. Data for these radionuclides were then analyzed statistically, using analyses of variance. The statistical analyses indicated the following: for the most part, there were no measurable effects for Hanford operations; radionuclide concentrations in all products reviewed remained relatively low when compared to concentrations that would result in a 1-mrem effective dose equivalent to an individual; radionuclide concentrations are decreasing in general; however, {sup 90}Sr concentrations in all media and {sup 129}I in milk increased from 1982 to 1986, then decreased gradually for the remainder of the review period. The {sup 129}I concentrations may be correlated with processing of irradiated reactor fuel at the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant.

  7. alga cyanidioschizon merolae1w: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: (2010) analyzed the economics of microalgae as biodiesel and biomass feedstock. The study considered potential yields of algae production...

  8. Overall Energy Considerations for Algae Species Comparison and Selection in Algae-to-Fuels Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Link, D.; Kail, B.; Curtis, W.; Tuerk,A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The controlled growth of microalgae as a feedstock for alternative transportation fuel continues to receive much attention. Microalgae have the characteristics of rapid growth rate, high oil (lipid) content, and ability to be grown in unconventional scenarios. Algae have also been touted as beneficial for CO{sub 2} reuse, as algae can be grown using CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil-based energy generation. Moreover, algae does not compete in the food chain, lessening the 'food versus fuel' debate. Most often, it is assumed that either rapid production rate or high oii content should be the primary factor in algae selection for algae-to-fuels production systems. However, many important characteristics of algae growth and lipid production must be considered for species selection, growth condition, and scale-up. Under light limited, high density, photoautotrophic conditions, the inherent growth rate of an organism does not affect biomass productivity, carbon fixation rate, and energy fixation rate. However, the oil productivity is organism dependent, due to physiological differences in how the organisms allocate captured photons for growth and oil production and due to the differing conditions under which organisms accumulate oils. Therefore, many different factors must be considered when assessing the overall energy efficiency of fuel production for a given algae species. Two species, Chlorella vulgaris and Botryococcus braunii, are popular choices when discussing algae-to-fuels systems. Chlorella is a very robust species, often outcompeting other species in mixed-culture systems, and produces a lipid that is composed primarily of free fatty acids and glycerides. Botryococcus is regarded as a slower growing species, and the lipid that it produces is characterized by high hydrocarbon content, primarily C28-C34 botryococcenes. The difference in growth rates is often considered to be an advantage oiChlorella. However, the total energy captured by each algal species in the same photobioreactor system should be similar at light limited growth conditions based on photon flux. It is how the algae 'allocate' this energy captured that will vary: Data will be presented that shows that Botryococcus invests greater energy in oil production than Chlorella under these growth conditions. In essence, the Chlorella can grow 'fast and lean' or can be slowed to grow 'slow and fat'. The overall energy potential between the Chlorella and Botryococcus, then, becomes much more equivalent on a per-photon basis. This work will indicate an interesting relationship between two very different algae species, in terms of growth rate, lipid content and composition, and energy efficiency of the overall process. The presentation will indicate that in light-limited growth, it cannot be assumed that either rapid growth rate or lipid production rate can be used as stand-alone indicators of which species-lipid relationships will truly be more effective in algae-to-fuels scenarios.

  9. Knowledge Integration to Make Decisions About Complex Systems: Sustainability of Energy Production from Agriculture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Francesco Danuso

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A major bottleneck for improving the governance of complex systems, rely on our ability to integrate different forms of knowledge into a decision support system (DSS). Preliminary aspects are the classification of different types of knowledge (a priori or general, a posteriori or specific, with uncertainty, numerical, textual, algorithmic, complete/incomplete, etc.), the definition of ontologies for knowledge management and the availability of proper tools like continuous simulation models, event driven models, statistical approaches, computational methods (neural networks, evolutionary optimization, rule based systems etc.) and procedure for textual documentation. Following these views at University of Udine, a computer language (SEMoLa, Simple, Easy Modelling Language) for knowledge integration has been developed. SEMoLa can handle models, data, metadata and textual knowledge; it implements and extends the system dynamics ontology (Forrester, 1968; Jrgensen, 1994) in which systems are modelled by the concepts of material, group, state, rate, parameter, internal and external events and driving variables. As an example, a SEMoLa model to improve management and sustainability (economical, energetic, environmental) of the agricultural farms is presented. The model (X-Farm) simulates a farm in which cereal and forage yield, oil seeds, milk, calves and wastes can be sold or reused. X-Farm is composed by integrated modules describing fields (crop and soil), feeds and materials storage, machinery management, manpower management, animal husbandry, economic and energetic balances, seed oil extraction, manure and wastes management, biogas production from animal wastes and biomasses.

  10. Utilization of agricultural wastes for production of ethanol. Progress report, October 1979-May 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, B.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The project proposes to develop methods to utilize agricultural wastes, especially cottonseed hulls and peanut shells to produce ethanol. Initial steps will involve development of methods to break down cellulose to a usable form of substrates for chemical or biological digestion. The process of ethanol production will consist of (a) preparatory step to separate fibrous (cellulose) and non-fibrous (non-cellulosic compounds). The non-cellulosic residues which may include grains, fats or other substrates for alcoholic fermentation. The fibrous residues will be first pre-treated to digest cellulose with acid, alkali, and sulfur dioxide gas or other solvents. (b) The altered cellulose will be digested by suitable micro-organisms and cellulose enzymes before alcoholic fermentation. The digester and fermentative unit will be specially designed to develop a prototype for pilot plant for a continuous process. The first phase of the project will be devoted toward screening of a suitable method for cellulose modification, separation of fibrous and non-fibrous residues, the micro-organism and enzyme preparations. Work is in progress on: the effects of various microorganisms on the degree of saccharification; the effects of higher concentrations of acids, alkali, and EDTA on efficiency of microbial degradation; and the effects of chemicals on enzymatic digestion.

  11. Knowledge Integration to Make Decisions About Complex Systems: Sustainability of Energy Production from Agriculture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danuso, Francesco (University of Udine) [University of Udine

    2008-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A major bottleneck for improving the governance of complex systems, rely on our ability to integrate different forms of knowledge into a decision support system (DSS). Preliminary aspects are the classification of different types of knowledge (a priori or general, a posteriori or specific, with uncertainty, numerical, textual, algorithmic, complete/incomplete, etc.), the definition of ontologies for knowledge management and the availability of proper tools like continuous simulation models, event driven models, statistical approaches, computational methods (neural networks, evolutionary optimization, rule based systems etc.) and procedure for textual documentation. Following these views at University of Udine, a computer language (SEMoLa, Simple, Easy Modelling Language) for knowledge integration has been developed. SEMoLa can handle models, data, metadata and textual knowledge; it implements and extends the system dynamics ontology (Forrester, 1968; Joergensen, 1994) in which systems are modeled by the concepts of material, group, state, rate, parameter, internal and external events and driving variables. As an example, a SEMoLa model to improve management and sustainability (economical, energetic, environmental) of the agricultural farms is presented. The model (X-Farm) simulates a farm in which cereal and forage yield, oil seeds, milk, calves and wastes can be sold or reused. X-Farm is composed by integrated modules describing fields (crop and soil), feeds and materials storage, machinery management, manpower management, animal husbandry, economic and energetic balances, seed oil extraction, manure and wastes management, biogas production from animal wastes and biomasses.

  12. Knowledge Integration to Make Decisions About Complex Systems: Sustainability of Energy Production from Agriculture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francesco Danuso

    2008-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A major bottleneck for improving the governance of complex systems, rely on our ability to integrate different forms of knowledge into a decision support system (DSS). Preliminary aspects are the classification of different types of knowledge (a priori or general, a posteriori or specific, with uncertainty, numerical, textual, algorithmic, complete/incomplete, etc.), the definition of ontologies for knowledge management and the availability of proper tools like continuous simulation models, event driven models, statistical approaches, computational methods (neural networks, evolutionary optimization, rule based systems etc.) and procedure for textual documentation. Following these views at University of Udine, a computer language (SEMoLa, Simple, Easy Modelling Language) for knowledge integration has been developed. SEMoLa can handle models, data, metadata and textual knowledge; it implements and extends the system dynamics ontology (Forrester, 1968; Jrgensen, 1994) in which systems are modelled by the concepts of material, group, state, rate, parameter, internal and external events and driving variables. As an example, a SEMoLa model to improve management and sustainability (economical, energetic, environmental) of the agricultural farms is presented. The model (X-Farm) simulates a farm in which cereal and forage yield, oil seeds, milk, calves and wastes can be sold or reused. X-Farm is composed by integrated modules describing fields (crop and soil), feeds and materials storage, machinery management, manpower management, animal husbandry, economic and energetic balances, seed oil extraction, manure and wastes management, biogas production from animal wastes and biomasses.

  13. Development of Green Fuels From Algae - The University of Tulsa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crunkleton, Daniel; Price, Geoffrey; Johannes, Tyler; Cremaschi, Selen

    2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The general public has become increasingly aware of the pitfalls encountered with the continued reliance on fossil fuels in the industrialized world. In response, the scientific community is in the process of developing non-fossil fuel technologies that can supply adequate energy while also being environmentally friendly. In this project, we concentrate on ??green fuels? which we define as those capable of being produced from renewable and sustainable resources in a way that is compatible with the current transportation fuel infrastructure. One route to green fuels that has received relatively little attention begins with algae as a feedstock. Algae are a diverse group of aquatic, photosynthetic organisms, generally categorized as either macroalgae (i.e. seaweed) or microalgae. Microalgae constitute a spectacularly diverse group of prokaryotic and eukaryotic unicellular organisms and account for approximately 50% of global organic carbon fixation. The PI??s have subdivided the proposed research program into three main research areas, all of which are essential to the development of commercially viable algae fuels compatible with current energy infrastructure. In the fuel development focus, catalytic cracking reactions of algae oils is optimized. In the species development project, genetic engineering is used to create microalgae strains that are capable of high-level hydrocarbon production. For the modeling effort, the construction of multi-scaled models of algae production was prioritized, including integrating small-scale hydrodynamic models of algae production and reactor design and large-scale design optimization models.

  14. Metabolism of Thioctic Acid in Algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grisebach, Hans; Fuller, R.C.; Calvin, M.

    1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    METABOLISM OF THlOCTlC ACID IN ALGAE TWO-WEEK LOAN COPY ThisMETABOLISM OF THIOCTIC ACID IN ALGAE Hans Grisebach, R. , C.METABOLISM OF THIOCTIC ACID IN ALGAE Hans Grisebach, R. C.

  15. BRANCHED ALKANES FROM BLUE-GREEN ALGAE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Jerry; Calvin, Melvin.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ALKANES FROM BLUE-GREEN ALGAE RECEIV r - LAWREW RADIATIONAlkanes From Blue-Green Algae by Jerry Han and Oep~rtment l~alkanes from blue-green algae were separated on a The

  16. BRANCHED ALKANES FROM BLUE-GREEN ALGAE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Jerry; Calvin, Melvin.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~ BRANCHED ALKANES FROM BLUE-GREEN ALGAE RECEIV r - LAWREWBranched Alkanes From Blue-Green Algae by Jerry Han and Oep~Branched alkanes from blue-green algae were separated on a

  17. Impact of demand-enhancing farm policy on the agricultural sector: a firm level simulation of ethanol production subsidies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wasson, Leta Susanne

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U. S. Fuel Ethanol Production 2. 4 Dry Milling Process 2. 5 Wet Milling Process 22 27 29 30 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION A ricultural Polic Sett'n Agriculture has long been an industry of instability. Commodity surpluses along with low prices... of reducing stocks. Arguments against demand enhancement state that this sort of policy will do nothing more than increase the already large U. S. stocks of commodities. Proponents of demand enhancement see such policies as a means of reducing surpluses...

  18. Sandia National Laboratories: commercializing algae biofuels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    commercializing algae biofuels The National Algae Testbed Public-Private Partnership Kick-Off Meeting at Arizona State University On July 25, 2013, in Biofuels, Energy, News, News...

  19. Climate Change Impacts for the Conterminous USA: An Integrated Assessment Part 5. Irrigated Agriculture and National Grain Crop Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, Allison M.; Rosenberg, Norman J.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Brown, Robert A.

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the next century global warming will lead to changes in weather patterns, affecting many aspects of our environment. In the United States, the one sector of the economy most likely to be directly impacted by the changes in climate is agriculture. We have examined potential changes in dryland agriculture (Part 2) and in water resources necessary for crop production (Part 3). Here we assess to what extent, under a set of climate change scenarios, water supplies will be sufficient to meet the irrigation requirement of major grain crops in the U.S. In addition, we assess the overall impacts of changes in water supply on national grain production. We applied 12 climate change scenarios based on the predictions of General Circulation Models to a water resources model and a crop growth simulator for the conterminous United States. We calculate national production in current crop growing regions by applying irrigation where it is necessary and water is available. Irrigation declines under all climate change scenarios employed in this study. In certain regions and scenarios, precipitation declines so much that water supplies are too limited; in other regions it plentiful enough that little value is derived from irrigation. Total crop production is greater when irrigation is applied, but corn and soybean production declines under most scenarios. Winter wheat production responds significantly to elevated atmospheric CO2 and appears likely to increase under climate change.

  20. A study of the effects of natural fertility, weather and productive inputs in Chinese agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eckaus, Richard S.; Tso, Katherine Kit-Yan.

    This paper presents an investigation of the relations in China between farm output, the natural fertility of agricultural land, and the use of anthropogenic farm inputs. The methodology is presented as a potential increment ...

  1. Economic Effect on Agricultural Production of Alternative Energy Input Prices: Texas High Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, B. M.; Lacewell, R. D.; Condra, G. D.

    The Arab oil embargo of 1973 awakened the world to the reality of energy shortages and higher fuel prices. Agriculture in the United States is highly mechanized and thus energy intensive. This study seeks to develop an evaluative capability...

  2. Managing Rangeland Watersheds for Agricultural Production, Water Quality, and Food Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tate, Kenneth

    raw food always safe Salinas River riparian corridors wildlife habitat water quality Juxtaposition of plant agriculture and grazed rangeland Salinas Valley example Chaparral wildlife habitat Year Food flows, retention basins, constructed wetlands, etc. 2012 technical reports on waterborne pathogens

  3. Miocene Coralline algae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bosence, D.W.J.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The coralline algae (Order Corallinales) were sedimentologically and ecologically important during the Miocene, a period when they were particularly abundant. The many poorly described and illustrated species and the lack of quantitative data in coralline thalli make specific determinations particularly difficult, but some species are well known and widespread in the Tethyan area. The sedimentologic importance of the Miocene coralline algae is reflected in the abundance of in-situ coralline buildups, rhodoliths, and coralline debris facies at Malta and Spain; similar sequences are known throughout the Tethyan Miocene. In-situ buildups vary from leafy crustose biostromes to walled reefs with dense coralline crusts and branches. Growth forms are apparently related to hydraulic energy. Rhodoliths vary from leafy, crustose, and open-branched forms in muddy sediments to dense, crustose, and radial-branching forms in coarse grainstones. Rhodolith form and internal structure correlate closely with hydraulic energy. Coralline genera are conservative and, as such, are useful in paleoenvironmental analysis. Of particular interest are the restricted depth ranges of recent coralline genera. More research is needed on the sedimentology, paleoecology, and systematics of the Cenozoic corallines, as they have particular value in paleoenvironmental analysis.

  4. AgriculturAl Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 SLU Global AgriculturAl ScienceS for globAl Development -- Slu's contribution #12;2 the mission of the Swedish university of Agricultural Sciences (Slu) is "to develop the understanding, management for global Development (pgu). research capacity building provision of expertise Agricultural Sciences

  5. Oklahoma Agriculture Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    Oklahoma Agriculture Agriculture #12;Oklahoma Agriculture 2011Oklahoma Agriculture 2011 Oklahoma well-being of our communities and the counties in which they are located. Oklahoma State University Resources Oklahoma State University #12;Farm Operations 86,600 farms; 4th in the nation Average age

  6. Effect of chronic inhalation of inorganic arsenic on the risk of stillbirth in a community surrounding an agriculture chemical production facility: a hospital-based study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ihrig, Melanie M

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECT OF CHRONIC INHALATION OF INORGANIC ARSENIC ON THE RISK OF STILLBIRTH IN A COMMUNITY SURROUNDING AN AGRICULTURE CHEMICAL PRODUCTION FACILITY: A HOSPITAL-BASED STUDY A Thesis by MELANIE M. IHRIG Submitted to the Office of Graduate...

  7. How to reconcile product standardization and diversity of agricultural practices? A challenge for research-action in partnership: the case of farmers' organizations in Costa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    .) with high level risks related to price variations in international markets. Farmers' organizations play standards. In Costa Rica three stakeholders; a farmers' organization MNC (Mesa Nacional CaHow to reconcile product standardization and diversity of agricultural practices? A challenge

  8. AGRICULTURE, 2001 Current Wisconsin Farm Financial Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radeloff, Volker C.

    STATUS OF WISCONSIN AGRICULTURE, 2001 Current Wisconsin Farm Financial Conditions Situation and Outlook for Farm Products and Inputs Special Articles Outlook for the National Economy and Agricultural Policies Smart Growth and Wisconsin Agriculture The Wisconsin Agricultural Economy: A Broader

  9. University College Dublin Agriculture, Food Science and Human Nutrition AgriculturAl Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    1 University College Dublin Agriculture, Food Science and Human Nutrition AgriculturAl Science DN250 Agricultural Science Dn250AeS Agri-environmental Sciences Dn250AcP Animal and crop Production Dn Engineering Technology DN250FAM Food and Agribusiness Management #12;1 Contents Agricultural Science DN250 1

  10. EA-1829: Phycal Algae Pilot Project, Wahiawa and Kalaeloa, Hawaii

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal, through a cooperative agreement with Phycal, Inc., to partially fund implementing and evaluating new technology for the reuse of Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from industrial sources for green energy products. This project would use CO2 to grow algae for the production of algal oil and subsequent conversion to fuel.

  11. Testing for Toxic Algae By Tadd Barrow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Testing for Toxic Algae By Tadd Barrow UNL Extension Educator, Water Quality Algae is a microscopic plant that occurs in all water. However, only certain conditions bring algae to the surface, making it toxic to animals, especially humans and dogs. Toxic algae often are naturally occurring from high

  12. Transgenic algae engineered for higher performance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Unkefer, Pat J; Anderson, Penelope S; Knight, Thomas J

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The present disclosure relates to transgenic algae having increased growth characteristics, and methods of increasing growth characteristics of algae. In particular, the disclosure relates to transgenic algae comprising a glutamine phenylpyruvate transaminase transgene and to transgenic algae comprising a glutamine phenylpyruvate transaminase transgene and a glutamine synthetase.

  13. Microsoft Word - PhycalAlgaePilotProject_NEPAFinalEA_October2011...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    technology for the reuse of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions from industrial sources for green energy products. This project would use CO 2 to grow algae for the production of...

  14. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Algae: for a Cleaner and...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Algae: for a Cleaner and Greener Tomorrow BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Algae: for a Cleaner and Greener Tomorrow BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Algae: for a Cleaner...

  15. Common benthic algae and cyanobacteria in southern California tidal wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janousek, Christopher N

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Janousek Janousek 2011: Algae and cyanobacteria of southernto the Marine Bluegreen Algae. John Wiley and Sons, NewDistribution of bluegreen algae in a Mississippi gulf coast

  16. Microalgae Cultivation using Offshore Membrane Enclosures for Growing Algae (OMEGA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiley, Patrick Edward

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    enclosures for growing algae (OMEGA). J. Sustainableenclosures for growing algae (OMEGA). Bioresour. Technol.enclosures for growing algae (OMEGA). Journal of Sustainable

  17. Bioenergy Technologies Office Conversion R&D Pathway: Whole Algae...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Bioenergy Technologies Office Conversion R&D Pathway: Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Whole algae hydrothermal liquefaction is one of...

  18. NATIONAL PRESS RELEASE I PARIS I 30 AUGUST 2013 Brown algae contain phlorotannins, aromatic (phenolic) compounds that are unique in the plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canet, Léonie

    NATIONAL PRESS RELEASE I PARIS I 30 AUGUST 2013 Brown algae contain phlorotannins, aromatic elucidated the key step in the production of these compounds in Ectocarpus siliculosus, a small brown alga phlorotannins from brown algae for use in industry was a complex process, and the biosynthesis pathways

  19. Peace Corps | Agriculture Agriculture Volunteers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaminsky, Werner

    Peace Corps | Agriculture Agriculture Volunteers Agriculture is the primary economic activity Volunteers contribute sustain- able solutions to a community's agricultural issues and help preserve natural resources. Programs and Sample Projects Agriculture and Forestry Extension Collaborate with farmers

  20. Agricultural production in the United States by county: a compilation of information from the 1974 census of agriculture for use in terrestrial food-chain transport and assessment models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shor, R.W.; Baes, C.F. III; Sharp, R.D.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Terrestrial food-chain models that simulate the transport of environmentally released radionuclides incorporate parameters describing agricultural production and practice. Often a single set of default parameters, such as that listed in USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.109, is used in lieu of site-specific information. However, the geographical diversity of agricultural practice in the United States suggests the limitations of a single set of default parameters for assessment models. This report documents default parameters with a county-wide resolution based on analysis of the 1974 US Census of Agriculture for use in terrestrial food chain models. Data reported by county, together with state-based information from the US Department of Agriculture, Economic and Statistics Service, provided the basis for estimates of model input parameters. This report also describes these data bases, their limitations, and lists default parameters by county. Vegetable production is described for four categories: leafy vegetables; vegetables and fruits exposed to airborne material; vegetables, fruits, and nuts protected from airborne materials; and grains. Livestock feeds were analyzed in categories of hay, silage, pasture, and grains. Pasture consumption was estimated from cattle and sheep inventories, their feed requirements, and reported quantities of harvested forage. The results were compared with assumed yields of the pasture areas reported. In addition, non-vegetable food production estimates including milk, beef, pork, lamb, poultry, eggs, goat milk, and honey are described. The agricultural parameters and land use information - in all 47 items - are tabulated in four appendices for each of the 3067 counties of the US reported to the Census of Agriculture, excluding those in Hawaii and Alaska.

  1. Suppression of Tla1 gene expression for improved solar conversion efficiency and photosynthetic productivity in plants and algae

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Melis, Anastasios; Mitra, Mautusi

    2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides method and compositions to minimize the chlorophyll antenna size of photosynthesis by decreasing TLA1 gene expression, thereby improving solar conversion efficiencies and photosynthetic productivity in plants, e.g., green microalgae, under bright sunlight conditions.

  2. Development of a Nuclear Transformation System for Oleaginous Green Alga Lobosphaera (Parietochloris)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Development of a Nuclear Transformation System for Oleaginous Green Alga Lobosphaera Associates Institute for Agriculture and Biotechnology of Drylands, J. Blaustein Institutes for Desert: Zorin B, Grundman O, Khozin-Goldberg I, Leu S, Shapira M, et al. (2014) Development of a Nuclear

  3. Reduced models of algae growth Heikki Haario,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bardsley, John

    Reduced models of algae growth Heikki Haario, Leonid Kalachev Marko Laine, Lappeenranta University of the phenomena studied. Here, in the case of algae growth modelling, we show how a systematic model reduction may: Algae growth modelling, asymptotic methods, model reduction, MCMC, Adaptive Markov chain Monte Carlo. 1

  4. School of Engineering and Science Algae Biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Frank

    School of Engineering and Science Algae Biofuels BY: Alessandro Faldi, Ph.D. Section Head is algae- based biofuels, which we believe could be a meaningful part of the energy mix in the future. Algae biofuels have potential to be an economically viable, low-net carbon transportation fuel

  5. Application of Hedonic Price Modeling to Estimate the Value of Algae Meal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gogichaishvili, Ilia

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    to bioethanol. The research study showed that crop-derived biodiesel does not present a sustainable source of energy as it adversely affects the supply of food. Chmapisti concluded that the productivity of microalgae strictly outperforms the productivity... 1 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION 1.1 General Overview Algae is one of the fastest growing plants in the world and its importance for energy security could be important. Algae transfers energy from the sun and absorbs nutrients from water, making...

  6. Updated Cost Analysis of Photobiological Hydrogen Production...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Analysis of Photobiological Hydrogen Production from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Green Algae: Milestone Completion Report Updated Cost Analysis of Photobiological Hydrogen...

  7. Introduction Agriculture/Agricultural Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banbara, Mutsunori

    38 Introduction Guide Entrance Life Career Inquiries Agriculture/Agricultural Science Mission and goal of the Graduate School of Agricultural Science The mission of agricultural science organization which aims to realize this agricultural ideal, the Graduate School of Agricultural Science's basic

  8. The Value Chain of Colorado Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S. agricultural policy, on the global food system, and on technological change in agricultural production. Greg. Thilmany's specialty is in the economics of value-added market differentiation of food products, such as local, organic, and specialty products. At CSU she teaches courses on agricultural finance, agricultural

  9. Production of Hydrogen from Peanut Shells The goal of this project is the production of renewable hydrogen from agricultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a bus in Albany, GA. Our strategy is to produce hydrogen from biomass pyrolysis oils in conjunction: (1) slow pyrolysis of biomass to produce charcoal, and (2) high temperature processing to form rate of 4.4 million Nm3 , the selling price of hydrogen is estimated to be $9.50/GJ. The production

  10. Economic and Physical Modeling of Land Use in GCAM 3.0 and an Application to Agricultural Productivity, Land, and Terrestrial Carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick; Edmonds, James A.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the impact of changes in agricultural productivity on global land use and terrestrial carbon using the new agriculture and land use modeling approach developed for Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) version 3.0. This approach models economic land use decisions with regional, physical, and technological specificity while maintaining economic and physical integration with the rest of the GCAM model. Physical land characteristics and quantities are tracked explicitly, and crop production practices are modeled discretely to facilitate coupling with physical models. Economic land allocation is modeled with non-linear functions in a market equilibrium rather than through a constrained optimization. In this paper, we explore three scenarios of future agriculture productivity in all regions of the globe over this century, ranging from a high growth to a zero growth level. The higher productivity growth scenario leads to lower crop prices, increased production of crops in developing nations, preservation of global forested lands and lower terrestrial carbon emissions. The scenario with no productivity improvement results in higher crop prices, an expansion of crop production in the developed world, loss of forested lands globally, and higher terrestrial carbon emissions.

  11. Conservation Agriculture and its Role in Soil Health, Sustainable Food Production and Food Security. A topical lunch on October 4th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    Conservation Agriculture and its Role in Soil Health, Sustainable Food Production and Food Security community more involved in the larger picture of sustainable land management to meet future food security Management will need involvement of soil science, agronomy, plant pathology, natural resource management

  12. Economic Contributions of Florida's Agricultural, Natural Resource, Food and Kindred Product Manufacturing and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Manufacturing and Distribution, and Service Industries in 20081 Alan W. Hodges and Mohammad Rahmani2 1 economic sectors for food and kindred product manufacturing, wholesale and retail distribution, input supplies, support services, and nature-based recreation/eco-tourism. In addition to farming, forestry

  13. Economic Contributions of Florida Agriculture, Natural Resources, Food and Kindred Product Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Manufacturing and Distribution, and Service Industries in 20061 Alan W. Hodges, Mohammad Rahmani, and W. David range of other economic sectors for food and kindred products manufacturing, wholesale and retail distribution, input suppliers, support services, and nature-based recreation. In addition to farms, forests

  14. Increasing corn for biofuel production reduces biocontrol services in agricultural landscapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landis, Doug

    November 5, 2008 (received for review May 22, 2008) Increased demand for corn grain as an ethanol feedstock of cellulosic ethanol production processes that use a variety of feedstocks could foster increased diversity has driven a rapid expansion of the corn ethanol industry in the United States. Continuing growth

  15. Long-term climate change impacts on agricultural productivity in eastern China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chavas, Daniel R.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Thomson, Allison M.; Gao, Xuejie

    2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations are expected to induce significant climate change over the next century and beyond, but the impacts on society remain highly uncertain. This work examines potential climate change impacts on the productivity of five major crops in northeastern China: canola, corn, potato, rice, and winter wheat. In addition to determining domain-wide trends, the objective is to identify vulnerable and emergent regions under future climate conditions, defined as having a greater than 10% decrease and increase in productivity, respectively. Data from the ICTP RegCM3 regional climate model for baseline (1961-1990) and future (2071-2100) periods under A2 scenario conditions are used as input in the EPIC agro-ecosystem simulation model in the domain [30N, 108E] to [42N, 123E]. Simulations are performed with and without the enhanced CO2 fertilization effect. Results indicate that aggregate potential productivity (i.e. if the crop is grown everywhere) increases 6.5% for rice, 8.3% for canola, 18.6% for corn, 22.9% for potato, and 24.9% for winter wheat, although with significant spatial variability for each crop. However, absent the enhanced CO2 fertilization effect, potential productivity declines in all cases ranging from 2.5-12%. Interannual yield variability remains constant or declines in all cases except rice. Climate variables are found to be more significant drivers of simulated yield changes than changes in soil properties, except in the case of potato production in the northwest where the effects of wind erosion are more significant. Overall, in the future period corn and winter wheat benefit significantly in the North China Plain, rice remains dominant in the southeast and emerges in the northeast, potato and corn yields become viable in the northwest, and potato yields suffer in the southwest with no other crop emerging as a clear beneficiary from among those simulated in this study.

  16. MODERN AGRICULTURAL DIGITAL MANAGEMENT NETWORK INFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MODERN AGRICULTURAL DIGITAL MANAGEMENT NETWORK INFORMATION SYSTEM OF HEILONGJIANG RECLAMATION AREA@126.com Abstract: To meet the need of agriculture management modernization of Heilongjiang reclamation area, further boost large-scale integration level of modern agriculture production and boost management

  17. Agricultural Research for Development Scales & Diversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agricultural Research for Development Scales & Diversity SLU, Uppsala 28-29 September 2011 28th September 2011 (morning) Agricultural Investments ..... Shenggen Fan, IFPRI Livestock production Global and local importance and development John McDermott, ILRI Smallholder agricultural intensification means

  18. Plant Breeding Program COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradford, Kent

    Plant Breeding Program COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES Office of the Dean Cereal Breeding Program 51 Acknowlegements 51 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES Office in production agriculture, which included plant breeding, was necessary for California farmers to thrive

  19. An aggregate production function for U. S. agriculture: an alternative to the Tyner-Tweeten approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cornforth, Gerald Charles

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    time? The Tyner and Tweeten decade elasticity estimates were determined independently using distributed-lag factor- share ad)ustment models, whereas ridge regression was used in this study to directly and simultaneously estimate these elasticities.... A Cobb-Douglas production function employing nine input variables [assumed by Tyner and Tweeten (1965, 1966)] was fit using ordinary least squares and ridge regression. The ridge results appeared to be statistically reliable. A time trend model...

  20. Algae as a Feedstock for Biofuels: An Assessment of the State of Technology and Opportunities. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sikes, K.; McGill, R. [Sentech, Inc. (United States); Van Walwijk, M. [Independent Consultant (France)

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The pursuit of a stable, economically-sound, and environmentally-friendly source of transportation fuel has led to extensive research and development (R&D) efforts focused on the conversion of various feedstocks into biofuels. Some feedstocks, such as sugar cane, corn and woody biomass, are targeted because their structures can be broken down into sugars and fermented into alcohols. Other feedstocks, such as vegetable oils, are appealing because they contain considerable amounts of lipids, which can be extracted and converted into biodiesel or other fuels. While significant R&D and commercial strides have been made with each of these feedstocks, technical and market barriers (e.g., cost, scalability, infrastructure requirements, and 'food vs. fuel' debates) currently limit the penetration of the resultant biofuels into the mainstream. Because of algae's ability to potentially address several of these barriers, its use as a feedstock for biofuels has led to much excitement and initiative within the energy industry. Algae are highly diverse, singleor multi-cellular organisms comprised of mostly lipids, protein, and carbohydrates, which may be used to produce a wide variety of biofuels. Algae offer many competitive advantages over other feedstocks, including: 1) Higher potential lipid content than terrestrial plants, sometimes exceeding 50% of the cell's dry biomass (U.S. DOE, May '10; Tornabene et al., 1983) 2) Rapid growth rates that are 20-30 times higher than terrestrial crops (McDill, 2009) and, in some cases, capable of doubling in size with 10 hours 3) Diverse number of species that can collectively thrive in a wide range of environments throughout the world, presenting an overall high overall tolerance for climate, sunlight, nutrient levels, etc. 4) Daily harvesting potential instead of seasonal harvest periods associated with terrestrial crops 5) Potential to redirect CO2 from industry operations to algal cultivation facilities to be used in an algal biofuel cycle before it is released into the atmosphere 6) Ability to be cultivated on land that that is unsuitable for agriculture, so it does not directly compete with farmland Given microalgae's high lipid content and rapid growth rates, maximum oil yields of 20,000--115,000 L/ha/yr (2,140-13,360 gal/ac/yr) have been estimated. xiv 7) Ability to thrive in seawater, wastewater, or other non-potable sources, so it does not directly compete with fresh water resources. In fact, wastewater can provide algae with some essential nutrients, such as nitrogen, so algae may contribute to cleaning up wastewater streams. 8) Non-toxic and biodegradable 9) Co-products that may present high value in other markets, including nutriceuticals and cosmetics Given microalgae's high lipid content and rapid growth rate, maximum oil yields of 20,000 -- 115,000 liters per hectare per year (L/ha/yr) (2,140 -- 13,360 gallons per acre per year) (Baldos, 2009; Wijffels, 2008) have been estimated, which is considerably higher than any other competing feedstock. Although algae species collectively present many strong advantages (although one specific species is unlikely to possess all of the advantages listed), a sustainable algal biofuel industry is at least one or two decades away from maturity, and no commercial scale operations currently exist. Several barriers must first be overcome before algal biofuels can compete with traditional petroleum-based fuels. Production chains with net energy output need to be identified, and continued R&D is needed to reduce the cost in all segments of the production spectrum (e.g., harvesting, dewatering, extracting of oil). Further research to identify strains with high production rates and/or oil yields may also improve competitiveness within the market. Initiatives to seamlessly integrate algal biofuels into the existing transportation infrastructure may increase their convenience level.

  1. Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University College of Agriculture & Life Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University College of Agriculture & Life Sciences l Business Management and Entrepreneurship Marketing Ag. Products Agricultural Law Advanced Agribusiness Marketing Agricultural Financial Management Agricultural Management and Problem Solving Monetary and Global

  2. Algae to Biofuels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973ManagedStrategic| NationalAlexander

  3. Stochastic Forecasting of Algae Blooms in Lakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Peng; Tartakovsky, Daniel M.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the development of harmful algae blooms (HABs) in a lake with uncertain nutrients inflow. Two general frameworks, Fokker-Planck equation and the PDF methods, are developed to quantify the resultant concentration uncertainty of various algae groups, via deriving a deterministic equation of their joint probability density function (PDF). A computational example is examined to study the evolution of cyanobacteria (the blue-green algae) and the impacts of initial concentration and inflow-outflow ratio.

  4. Energy 101: Algae-to-Fuel

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    One of the fuel sources of the future is algae, small aquatic organisms that convert sunlight into energy and store it in the form of oil. S

  5. Energy 101 | Algae-to-Fuel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    A behind-the-scenes video of how oil from algae is extracted and refined to create clean, renewable transportation fuel.

  6. Soil and Plant Responses to Lipid-Extracted Algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Katie

    2014-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    . ................................................. 149 xv LIST OF TABLES Page Table 1.1. Comparison of oil yields from biomass feedstocks . ........................................ 5 Table 2.1. Soil, LEA, and WS chemical characteristics ................................................... 25....1. Comparison of oil yields from biomass feedstocks . Although algae feedstocks have qualities favorable for sustainable biofuel production, several research and development challenges have not yet been met. The oil crisis in the 1970s prompted the U...

  7. Soil and Plant Responses to Lipid-Extracted Algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Katie

    2014-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    . ................................................. 149 xv LIST OF TABLES Page Table 1.1. Comparison of oil yields from biomass feedstocks . ........................................ 5 Table 2.1. Soil, LEA, and WS chemical characteristics ................................................... 25....1. Comparison of oil yields from biomass feedstocks . Although algae feedstocks have qualities favorable for sustainable biofuel production, several research and development challenges have not yet been met. The oil crisis in the 1970s prompted the U...

  8. FAS4932: ALGAE BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY Instructor: Professor Edward Phlips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    FAS4932: ALGAE BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY Instructor: Professor Edward Phlips Main Office: Program algae, including evolution, classification, structure, photosynthesis, growth, and reproduction. Emphasis on the ecological role of algae in different aquatic ecosystems (e.g. open ocean, estuaries, coral

  9. BOTANICAL BRIEFING Streptophyte algae and the origin of embryophytes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BOTANICAL BRIEFING Streptophyte algae and the origin of embryophytes Burkhard Becker* and Birger March 2009 Background Land plants (embryophytes) evolved from streptophyte green algae, a small group of freshwater algae ranging from scaly, unicellular flagellates (Mesostigma) to complex, filamentous thalli

  10. Niche of harmful alga Aureococcus anophagefferens revealed through ecogenomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grigoriev, Igor

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Niche of harmful alga Aureococcus anophagefferens revealedc consensus. Harmful Algae 8:313. 2. Sunda WG, Graneli E,of the United States. Harmful Algae 8:3953. 4. Smayda TJ (

  11. EFFECTS OF CHANGES IN U.S. ETHANOL PRODUCTION FROM CORN GRAIN, CORN STOVER, AND SWITCHGRASS ON WORLD AGRICULTURAL MARKETS AND TRADE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campiche, Jody L.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    biofuel technologies in a CGE framework. However, most of these studies do not include both an explicit sector for agricultural biomass feedstocks and allow for joint products. The specific methods of this dissertation include: ii. Incorporate...% more energy than is produced. The net energy balance of biofuels is highly dependent on the particular biomass feedstock used to produce the biofuel. However, it is important to note that cellulosic ethanol is not currently produced on a large...

  12. EFFECTS OF CHANGES IN U.S. ETHANOL PRODUCTION FROM CORN GRAIN, CORN STOVER, AND SWITCHGRASS ON WORLD AGRICULTURAL MARKETS AND TRADE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campiche, Jody L.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    biofuel technologies in a CGE framework. However, most of these studies do not include both an explicit sector for agricultural biomass feedstocks and allow for joint products. The specific methods of this dissertation include: ii. Incorporate...% more energy than is produced. The net energy balance of biofuels is highly dependent on the particular biomass feedstock used to produce the biofuel. However, it is important to note that cellulosic ethanol is not currently produced on a large...

  13. Nanotechnology and algae biofuels exhibits open July 26 at the...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanotechnology and algae biofuels exhibits open July 26 Nanotechnology and algae biofuels exhibits open July 26 at the Bradbury Science Museum The Bradbury Science Museum is...

  14. Algae Biotecnologia | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCaliforniaWeifangwikiAgouraAlbatech srl Jump to:AlcornAlgae

  15. ALDUO(TM) Algae Cultivation Technology for Delivering Sustainable Omega-3s, Feed, and Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, Xuemei [Cellana LLC

    2012-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    * ALDUO(TM) Algae Production Technology Cellana?s Proprietary, Photosynthetic, & Proven * ALDUO(TM) Enables Economic Algae Production Unencumbered by Contamination by Balancing Higher-Cost PBRs with Lower-Cost Open Ponds * ALDUO(TM) Advantages * ALDUO(TM) Today o Large collection of strains for high value co-products o Powerful Mid-scale Screening & Optimization System o Solution to a Conflicting Interest o Split Pond Yield Enhancement o Heterotrophy & mixotrophy as a "finishing step" o CO2 Mitigation-flue Gas Operation o Worldwide Feed Trials with Livestock & Aquatic Species * ALDUO(TM) Technology Summarized

  16. The Value Chain of Colorado Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S. agricultural policy, on the global food system, and on technological change in agricultural production. Greg University. Dr. Thilmany's specialty is in the economics of value-added market differentiation of food products, such as local, organic, and specialty products. At CSU she teaches courses on agricultural

  17. Three Essays on the Impact of Climate Change and Weather Extremes on the United States' Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Le, Phu Viet

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Changes on California Agriculture, California ClimateProductivity Growth in U.S. Agriculture, Economic BriefClimate, Water, and Agriculture, Land Economics, Vol.79(3),

  18. Agricultural Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agricultural Policy / Environmental eXtender Model Theoretical Documentation Version 0806 December 2012 #12;2 Agricultural Policy/Environmental eXtender Model Theoretical Documentation Version 0806 J............................................................................................................................. 11 Air Temperature and Solar Radiation

  19. Agricultural Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agricultural Policy / Environmental eXtender Model Theoretical Documentation Version 0604 BREC Report # 2008-17 June 2008 #12;2 Agricultural Policy/Environmental eXtender Model Theoretical............................................................................................................................. 11 Air Temperature and Solar Radiation

  20. 2014-2015Series College of Agriculture,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacAdam, Keith

    2014-2015Series College of Agriculture, Food and Environment University of Kentucky is accredited of University of Kentucky. Agricultural Economics The Agricultural Economics program enables graduates to pursue and production. Opportunities are also available in public policy for agriculture and rural America

  1. Agricultural&Life Sciences UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSINMADISON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    College of Agricultural&Life Sciences UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSINMADISON 2012-2014 128th year #12;Farm Reunion, back cover 1 The College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, home of the Farm and Industry Short in agriculture for individuals planning careers in production agriculture and related agribusinesses." Objectives

  2. Triassic origin and early radiation of multicellular volvocine algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Triassic origin and early radiation of multicellular volvocine algae Matthew D. Herron1 , Jeremiah-studied ETIs is the origin of multicellularity in the green alga Volvox, a model system for the evolution occurred dozens of times independently, for example in the red algae, brown algae, land plants, animals

  3. Abstract: Design and Demonstration of an Advanced Agricultural...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of an Advanced Agricultural Feedstock Supply System for Lignocellulosic Bioenergy Production Abstract: Design and Demonstration of an Advanced Agricultural Feedstock Supply...

  4. Climate Change and China's Agricultural Sector: An Overview of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    from agriculture, and analyze how these efforts would in turn impact agricultural productivity and trade. In order to realize this goal, we have the following specific...

  5. Agricultural Progress in Cameroon, Mali and Ghana: Why it Happened...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Analysis of agricultural performance focused on trends in output, factor use, and productivity. Analysis of agricultural policy featured measurement of domestic and international...

  6. agricultural landscapes challenges: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Three Biofuel Crops for Beneficial Arthropods in Agricultural Landscapes Mary A Science+Business Media, LLC. 2010 Abstract Production of biofuel feedstocks in agricultural...

  7. College of Agriculture & Life Sciences Agricultural Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    College of Agriculture & Life Sciences Agricultural Technology Applied Agricultural Management Option Checksheet for Students Graduating in Calendar Year 2013 Associate of Agriculture Degree Required Agricultural Technology Core Courses (31 credits) 3 AT 0104 Computer Applications 3 AT 0114 Applied

  8. Transcriptional Regulation in Algae, Fungi and Plants: Mating Loci, Splicing, and miRNAs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglass, Stephen Michael

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from organisms ranging from algae to fungi and plants. WeTranscriptional Regulation in Algae, Fungi and Plants:Transcriptional Regulation in Algae, Fungi and Plants:

  9. Synthesis and Metabolism of Carbonyl-C14 Pyruvic and Hydroxypyruvic Acids in Algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milhaud, Gerhard; Benson, Andrew A.; Calvin, M.

    1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AND HYDROXYPYRUVIC ACIDS IN ALGAE Cerhard Milhaud, Andrew A.HYDROXYPYRUYIC ACIDS IN ALGAE Gerhard Milhaud, * - Andrew A.AND HYDROXYPYRUVIC ACIDS IN ALGAE Gerhard Milhaud, Andrew A.

  10. Agriculture Taxes in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Lonnie L.; Stallmann, Judith I.

    2002-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    farmers, ranchers and agribusiness firms, including: a73 Exemption from state and local sales and use taxes on purchased farm inputs and products. a73 The provision for local property tax pro- ductivity valuation for open space land. a73 Exemption from... and local level and the provision for open space productivity valuation of land used in agriculture, timber or wildlife production. Sales tax exemptions Farmers and ranchers are exempt from state and local sales taxes for several items, including most...

  11. Sustainable agriculture: possible trajectories from mutualistic symbiosis and plant neodomestication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Sustainable agriculture: possible trajectories from mutualistic symbiosis and plant. Based on recent findings, new trajectories for agriculture and plant breeding which take into account symbiosis in an innovative ecologically intensive agriculture. A sustainable food production ? Feeding

  12. PYOMELANIN IS PRODUCED BY SHEWANELLA ALGAE BRY AND EFFECTED BY EXOGENOUS IRON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turick, C; Frank Caccavo, F; Jr., J; Louis S. Tisa, L

    2006-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Melanin production by S. algae BrY occurred during late/post-exponential growth in lactate-basal-salts liquid medium supplemented with tyrosine or phenylalanine. The antioxidant ascorbate inhibited melanin production, but not production of the melanin precursor, homogentisic acid. In the absence of ascorbate, melanin production was inhibited by the 4-hydroxyplenylpyruvate dioxygenase inhibitor, sulcotrione and Fe(II) (>0.2mM). These data support the hypothesis that pigment production by S. algae BrY was a result the conversion of tyrosine or phenylalanine to homogentisic acid which was excreted, auto-oxidized and self-polymerized to form pyomelanin. The inverse relationship between Fe(II) concentration and pyomelanin production has implications that pyomelanin may play a role in iron assimilation under Fe(II) limiting conditions.

  13. Seasonal variations in nitrate reductase activity and internal N pools in intertidal brown algae are correlated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berges, John A.

    of primary production in many coastal regions and dominating near-shore nutrient cycling (Duggins, Simenstad of the macroalgal biomass in the Lough is fucoid algae (Fucus and Ascophyllum species) and kelps (Laminaria species, irradiance and nutrient concentration that impose con- straints on their physiology. Furthermore, variations

  14. Framtidens lantbruk / Future Agriculture Future Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Framtidens lantbruk / Future Agriculture Future Agriculture Livestock, Crops and Land Use Report from a multidisciplinary research platform. Phase I (2009 2012) #12;Future Agriculture Livestock Waldenstrm Utgivningsr: 2012, Uppsala Utgivare: SLU, Framtidens lantbruk/Future Agriculture Layout: Pelle

  15. Agricultural Centers AGRICULTURAL CENTER PROGRAM OBJECTIVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    Agricultural Centers AGRICULTURAL CENTER PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: Conduct research related to the prevention of occu- pational disease and injury of agricultural workers and their families. Develop, implement, and evaluate educational and outreach programs for promoting health and safety for agricultural

  16. Organic agriculture cannot replace conventional agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolokolnikov, Theodore

    Organic agriculture cannot replace conventional agriculture Sina Adl , David Iron and Theodore Agriculture | Pathogen Dispersal Introduction Organic farming [1, 2] is gaining in popularity in Eu- rope, because or- ganic agriculture avoids using environmentally harmful chem- icals that pollute soil

  17. Maximizing Light Utilization Efficiency and Hydrogen Production...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Progress Report UCB will minimize, or truncate, the chlorophyll antenna size in green algae to maximize photobiological solar conversion efficiency and H2-production....

  18. Chile, 2009 HYDRAULIC MANAGEMENT OF FILAMENTOUS ALGAE IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    7 th ISE & 8 th HIC Chile, 2009 HYDRAULIC MANAGEMENT OF FILAMENTOUS ALGAE IN OPEN-CHANNEL NETWORKS mechanical interventions to avoid overflows. Moreover, drifting algae cells increase water turbidity

  19. Introduction slide 2 Biofuels and Algae Markets, Systems,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Introduction slide 2 Biofuels and Algae Markets, Systems, Players and Commercialization Outlook http://www.emerging-markets.com Consultant, Global Biofuels Business Development Author, Biodiesel 2020: A Global Market Survey (2008) Algae 2020: Biofuels Commercialization Outlook (2009) Columnist, Biofuels

  20. AGRICULTURAL REPORT MAY 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    supply will shape the future of the agricultural industry. We will discuss each in turn. Ethanol and energy Ethanol will be using almost 30% of the U.S. corn crop by 2009 with total ethanol production reaching almost 14 billion gallons. Numerous analysts have suggested that total demand for ethanol longer

  1. AGRICULTURAL REPORT OCTOBER 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as Indiana agriculture enters the energy business in a big way. The advent of four new Indiana ethanol plants. Ethanol means theres a monstrous increase in the need for corn production in 2007, and beyond. Acres have of the process to produce ethanol from cellulose (plant material). Indiana biofuels are both ethanol (corn

  2. Economic evaluation and conceptual design of optimal agricultural systems for production of food and energy. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The major technical and economic considerations which determined the scope of the study and the structure of the linear programming (LP) models are discussed. Four models, each representing a typical crop, beef, dairy, or swine farm in conjunction with ethanol facilities are characterized by the same general behavioral and mathematical model structure. Specific activities, constraints, and data for each of the four models are presented. An overview of the model structure is provided in the context of the general scope and background assumptions, and of its LP implementation. Simulated initial conditions and outcomes are reported for typical Illinois farms. Policy implications are discussed as related to agriculture, energy, and inter-industry coordination. (MHR)

  3. A golden opportunity: Researchers making progress in understanding toxic algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tx H2O | pg. 20 cientists at three Texas universities investigating golden algae, its explosive growth, and its deadly toxins have dis- covered an apparent competition between golden algae and blue green algae in certain Texas lakes.... Understanding this competition could lead them closer to controlling this harmful algae, the researchers said. ?Our biggest finding so far,? said Dr. Daniel Roelke of Texas AgriLife Research and one of the investigators, ?is that there appears to be a...

  4. Cognome e nome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ALGA 2 febbraio 2012 Compitino (2 ore)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robbiano, Lorenzo

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ALGA 2 febbraio 2012­ Compitino (2 ore) Giustificare ogni affermazione Salvare il file CoCoA come

  5. Cognome e nome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ALGA 14 novembre 2011 Compitino (2 ore)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robbiano, Lorenzo

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ALGA 14 novembre 2011­ Compitino (2 ore) Giustificare ogni affermazione Salvare il file CoCoA come

  6. Battling Golden Algae: Results suggest preventative lake management approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supercinski, Danielle

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    14 tx H2O Winter 2011 Story by Danielle Supercinski Battling golden algae Results suggest preventative lake management approaches Golden algae blooms, or the explosive growth of algae, are known to be toxic, but recent #28;ndings from.... Bryan Brooks at Baylor University, working jointly, recently completed the Lake Granbury and Lake Whitney Assessment Initiative project studying the biology and ecology of golden algae (Prymnesium parvum) in Texas lakes. First appearing in Texas...

  7. Battling golden algae: Results suggest preventative lake managment approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supercinski, Danielle

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    14 tx H2O Winter 2011 Story by Danielle Supercinski Battling golden algae Results suggest preventative lake management approaches Golden algae blooms, or the explosive growth of algae, are known to be toxic, but recent #28;ndings from.... Bryan Brooks at Baylor University, working jointly, recently completed the Lake Granbury and Lake Whitney Assessment Initiative project studying the biology and ecology of golden algae (Prymnesium parvum) in Texas lakes. First appearing in Texas...

  8. Global Dynamics of Zooplankton and Harmful Algae in Flowing Habitats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsu, Sze-Bi

    Global Dynamics of Zooplankton and Harmful Algae in Flowing Habitats Sze-Bi Hsu Feng-Bin Wang Xiao from the dynamics of harmful algae and zooplankton in flowing- water habitats where a main channel. For the system modeling the dynamics of algae and their toxin that contains little limiting nutrient, we

  9. Intracellular invasion of green algae in a salamander host

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Intracellular invasion of green algae in a salamander host Ryan Kerneya,1 , Eunsoo Kimb , Roger P) and green algae ("Oophila amblystomatis" Lamber ex Printz) has been considered an ectosymbiotic mutu- alism tracts, consistent with oviductal transmission of algae from one salamander generation to the next

  10. CORALLINE ALGA STANDS THE TEST OF TIME ON SHORELINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martone, Patrick T.

    Inside JEB i CORALLINE ALGA STANDS THE TEST OF TIME ON SHORELINE No one likes getting bashed about, the coralline algae, which have calcified most of their cells and essentially turned themselves into living, and thus most of force, occurring at the small joints (they make up just 15% of the alga), Denny wondered

  11. Sedimentation of algae: relationships with biomass and size distribution1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazumder, Asit

    Sedimentation of algae: relationships with biomass and size distribution1 Isabelle Larocque, A distribution of epilimnetic algae on patterns of algal sedimentation was determined in lake enclosures under the mean length of algae in fish-free enclosures and reduced the mean length in the enclosures to which

  12. INHIBITION OF PHOTOSYNTHESIS IN CERTAIN ALGAE BY EXTREME RED LIGHT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govindjee

    INHIBITION OF PHOTOSYNTHESIS IN CERTAIN ALGAE BY EXTREME RED LIGHT GOVINDJEE, EUGENE RABINOWITCH. INTRODUCTION It was shown in preceding papers (9, 10) that when the unicellular red alga Por- phyridium), these algae, when exposed to monochromatic light (bands isolated by a grating monochromator, band half

  13. AQU 04 Portable Algae Flow Cytometer Team Members

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    AQU 04 Portable Algae Flow Cytometer Team Members · David Caron, Faculty · Han-Chieh Chang · Yu-Chong Tai, Faculty, PI* * Primary Contact Overview The portable algae flow cytometer is a project that aims to expedite research in algae biology using microfluid-based and state-of-the-art detection

  14. Biosorption of Lead and Nickel by Biomass of Marine Algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volesky, Bohumil

    Biosorption of Lead and Nickel by Biomass of Marine Algae Z.R. Holan and B. Volesky" Department 22, 1993 Screening tests of different marine algae biomass types revealed a high passive biosorptive uptake of lead up to 270 mg Pb/g of biomass in some brown marine algae. Members of the order Fucales

  15. Environmental Life Cycle Comparison of Algae to Other Bioenergy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarens, Andres

    Environmental Life Cycle Comparison of Algae to Other Bioenergy Feedstocks A N D R E S F . C L A R December 6, 2009. Accepted December 15, 2009. Algae are an attractive source of biomass energy since. In spite of these advantages, algae cultivation has not yet been compared with conventional crops from

  16. FAS6932: ALGAE BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY Instructor: Professor Edward Phlips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    FAS6932: ALGAE BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY Instructor: Professor Edward Phlips Main Office: Program-mail: phlips@ufl.edu Office Hours: Mondays 4pm-5pm Course Description: The biology and ecology of aquatic algae on the ecological role of algae in different aquatic ecosystems (e.g. open ocean, estuaries, coral reefs, rocky

  17. Seeing Toxic Algae Before it Blooms By Steve Ress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Seeing Toxic Algae Before it Blooms By Steve Ress Researchers at the University of Nebraska of toxic blue-green algae before the bacteria that produce it can grow into a full-scale bloom. Now UNL and monitor in real-time, the water-borne agents that can cause toxic blue- green algae to flourish and become

  18. Gille-STPA 35 1 Noxious Algae in Carlsbad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gille, Sarah T.

    Gille-STPA 35 1 Noxious Algae in Carlsbad Spanish explorers of this region came across a lagoon Woodfield Dubbed "killer algae," the alien seaweed Caulerpa taxifolia was discovered in June 2000. Caulerpa taxifolia is a green alga native to tropical waters that typically grows to small size

  19. Wisconsin Agriculture SPECIAL ARTICLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radeloff, Volker C.

    STATUS OF Wisconsin Agriculture 2009 SPECIAL ARTICLE: Bioenergy and Agriculture in Wisconsin Economy Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics College of Agricultural and Life Sciences of Wisconsin Agriculture, 2009 An annual report by the University of Wisconsin-Madison Department

  20. Algae 2011, 26(2): 181-192 DOI: 10.4490/algae.2011.26.2.181

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    Algae 2011, 26(2): 181-192 DOI: 10.4490/algae.2011.26.2.181 Open Access Research Article Copyright © The Korean Society of Phycology 181 http://e-algae.kr pISSN: 1226-2617 eISSN: 2093-0860 Methods for sampling, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. #12;Algae 2011, 26

  1. Satellite Observations towards the Agriculture applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satellite Observations towards the Agriculture applications Osamu Ochiai Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency #12;7/30/2006 IGARSS_2006 Integrated Systems for Agriculture 2 Convergence of Evidence, All Gov't Policy Makers Reference Model: USDA Foreign Agricultural Service PECAD:Production Estimates

  2. Improving the Methane Production in the Co-Digestion of Microalgae and Cattle Manure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantu, Matthew Scott

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    algae were 71170 L and 87715 L, respectively. Based on volatile solids, the highest production in the control groups was0.36 (L CH_(4))/(g VS), while the production rates in the algae and pretreated algae mixtures were 0.22 (L CH_(4))/(g VS) and 0.44 (L...

  3. Integrated Assessment of Hadley Centre (HadCM2) Climate-Change Impacts on Agricultural Productivity and Irrigation Water Supply in the Conterminous United States. Part II. Regional Agricultural Production in 2030 and 2095.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Rosenberg, Norman J.; Brown, Robert A.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This study used scenarios of the HadCM2 GCM and the EPIC agroecosystem model to evaluate climate change impacts on crop yields and ecosystem processes. Baseline climate data were obtained from records for 1961-1990. The scenario runs for 2025-2034 and 2090-2099 were extracted from a HadCM2 run. EPIC was run on 204 representative farms under current climate and two 10-y periods centered on 2030 and 2095, each at CO2 concentrations of 365 and 560 ppm. Texas, New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, Arizona, and California are projected to experience significant temperature increases by 2030. Slight cooling is expected by 2030 in Alabama, Florida, Maine, Montana, Idaho, and Utah. Larger areas are projected to experience increased warming by 2095. Uniform precipitation increases are expected by 2030 in the NE. These increases are predicted to expand to the eastern half of the country by 2095. EPIC simulated yield increases for the Great Lakes, Corn Belt and Northeast regions. Simulated yields of irrigated corn yields were predicted to increase in almost all regions. Soybean yields could decrease in the Northern and Southern Plains, the Corn Belt, Delta, Appalachian, and Southeast regions and increase in the Lakes and Northeast regions. Simulated wheat yields exhibited upward yield trends under scenarios of climate change. National corn production in 2030 and 2095 could be affected by changes in three major producing regions. In 2030, corn production could increase in the Corn Belt and Lakes regions but decrease in the Northern Plains leading to an overall decrease in national production. National wheat production is expected to increase during both future periods. A proxy indicator was developed to provide a sense of where in the country, and when water would be available to satisfy change in irrigation demand for corn and alfalfa production as these are influenced by the HadCM2 scenarios and CO2-fertilization.

  4. About California Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Editors, The

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Form 3579 to California Agriculture at the address above. Submissions. California Agriculture manages the peer reviewour Writing CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURE VOLUME 66 , NUMBER 4

  5. About California Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Editor, The

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Submissions. California Agriculture manages the peer reviewread our CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURE VOLUME 67 , NUMBER 2Carol Lovatt California Agriculture (ISSN 0008-0845, print,

  6. About California Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Editor, The

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Submissions. California Agriculture manages the peer reviewread our CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURE VOLUME 67 , NUMBER 1Carol Lovatt California Agriculture (ISSN 0008-0845, print,

  7. Pennsylvania Agricultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guiltinan, Mark

    - mental regulations cover industrial pollution as well as pollution controls for agriculture. Two of PA but must be kept on the farm and made available upon request. Plans NPDES Permits The National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit is a requirement for construction activities that disturb 1 acre

  8. Stable isotopic records of bleaching and endolithic algae blooms in the skeleton of the boulder forming coral Montastraea faveolata

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartmann, A. C.; Carilli, J. E.; Norris, R. D.; Charles, C. D.; Deheyn, D. D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of bleaching and endolithic algae blooms in the skeleton ofa lesser extent, endolithic algae within the coral skeleton.Endolithic algae produce distinctive green bands in the

  9. AGRICULTURE, 2004 Status of the Wisconsin Farm Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radeloff, Volker C.

    STATUS OF WISCONSIN AGRICULTURE, 2004 Status of the Wisconsin Farm Economy Situation and Outlook Situation: Implications for U.S. Agriculture The Evolution and Current Status of Livestock Production and Meat Processing in Wisconsin Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics College of Agricultural

  10. Economic Value of Agricultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economic Value of Agricultural Research Public Investment in Texas Agricultural Research Yields Significant Economic Returns #12;Texas agricultural producers and especially consumers benefit directly from public investment in agricultural research. According to a 2006 study (Huffman and Evenson), the overall

  11. Chemical Processing in High-Pressure Aqueous Environments. 9. Process Development for Catalytic Gasification of Algae Feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Hart, Todd R.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Rotness, Leslie J.; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Zacher, Alan H.

    2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Through the use of a metal catalyst, gasification of wet algae slurries can be accomplished with high levels of carbon conversion to gas at relatively low temperature (350 C). In a pressurized-water environment (20 MPa), near-total conversion of the organic structure of the algae to gases has been achieved in the presence of a supported ruthenium metal catalyst. The process is essentially steam reforming, as there is no added oxidizer or reagent other than water. In addition, the gas produced is a medium-heating value gas due to the synthesis of high levels of methane, as dictated by thermodynamic equilibrium. As opposed to earlier work, biomass trace components were removed by processing steps so that they did not cause processing difficulties in the fixed catalyst bed tubular reactor system. As a result, the algae feedstocks, even those with high ash contents, were much more reliably processed. High conversions were obtained even with high slurry concentrations. Consistent catalyst operation in these short-term tests suggested good stability and minimal poisoning effects. High methane content in the product gas was noted with significant carbon dioxide captured in the aqueous byproduct in combination with alkali constituents and the ammonia byproduct derived from proteins in the algae. High conversion of algae to gas products was found with low levels of byproduct water contamination and low to moderate loss of carbon in the mineral separation step.

  12. RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Origin of land plants: Do conjugating green algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Origin of land plants: Do conjugating green algae hold the key? Sabina (embryophytes) evolved from streptophyte algae, also referred to as charophycean algae. The streptophyte algae are a paraphyletic group of green algae, ranging from unicellular flagellates to morphologically complex forms

  13. Climate-Smart Agriculture: Policies, Practices and Financing...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Most estimates also indicate that climate change is likely to reduce agricultural productivity, production stability and incomes in some areas that already have high levels of...

  14. Agriculture and the greenhouse effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article discusses research of the US Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service and the US Department of Energy's Carbon Dioxide Research Division to anticipate the effects of increased atmospheric carbon dioxide on American agriculture. Experiments involving exposure of plants to elevated CO/sub 2/ and attempts to model the productivity of crops as atmospheric CO/sub 2/ increases are described. The scientists quoted in the article are optimistic, emphasizing the beneficial effects of the elevated CO/sub 2/ on crops and speculating that problems caused by associated climate changes can be accommodated by movement of crop regions and by introduction of new varieties.

  15. Algae to Bio-Crude in Less Than 60 Minutes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Doug

    2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineers have created a chemical process that produces useful crude oil just minutes after engineers pour in harvested algae -- a verdant green paste with the consistency of pea soup. The PNNL team combined several chemical steps into one continuous process that starts with an algae slurry that contains as much as 80 to 90 percent water. Most current processes require the algae to be dried -- an expensive process that takes a lot of energy. The research has been licensed by Genifuel Corp.

  16. Using CO2 & Algae to Treat Wastewater and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Arturo A.

    Using CO2 & Algae to Treat Wastewater and Produce Biofuel Feedstock Tryg Lundquist Cal Poly State of the Industry and Growth · Algae's Role in WW Treatment · CO2's New Role · Research at Cal Poly · Future Work/MG 0.3 MGD average flow per facility #12;Reclaimed Algae Bacteria O2 CO2 N Organics N P CO2 P CO2 Waste

  17. Toxic and deadly: Working to manage algae in Lake Granbury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Toxic and deadly Working to manage algae in Lake Granbury Lake Granbury, located about 33 miles southwest of Fort Worth, is a recreation haven for water enthusiasts. In recent years, however, bacteria and golden algae have threatened the lake...?s water quality. Educating citizens about water quality issues affecting Lake Granbury and determining ways to manage the deadly algae are the focus of two Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI) projects. Lake Granbury, a critical water supply...

  18. Method for producing hydrogen and oxygen by use of algae

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenbaum, Elias (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficiency of process for producing H.sub.2 by subjecting algae in an aqueous phase to light irradiation is increased by culturing algae which has been bleached during a first period of irradiation in a culture medium in an aerobic atmosphere until it has regained color and then subjecting this algae to a second period of irradiation wherein hydrogen is produced at an enhanced rate.

  19. Toxic and deadly: Working to manage algae in Lake Granbury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Toxic and deadly Working to manage algae in Lake Granbury Lake Granbury, located about 33 miles southwest of Fort Worth, is a recreation haven for water enthusiasts. In recent years, however, bacteria and golden algae have threatened the lake...?s water quality. Educating citizens about water quality issues affecting Lake Granbury and determining ways to manage the deadly algae are the focus of two Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI) projects. Lake Granbury, a critical water supply...

  20. Method for producing hydrogen and oxygen by use of algae

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenbaum, E.

    1982-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficiency of process for producing H/sub 2/ by subjecting algae in an aqueous phase to light irradiation is increased by culturing algae which has been bleached during a first period of irradiation in a culture medium in an aerobic atmosphere until it has regained color and then subjecting this algae to a second period of irradiation wherein hydrogen is produced at an enhanced rate.

  1. A golden opportunity: Researchers making progress in understanding toxic algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Researchers making progress in understanding toxic algae A golden opportunity tx H2O | pg. 21 have examined the organism in coastal, saline environments. ?Our research team represents one of the few in the world that is focused on the dynamics... throughout Texas. Although it can exist in waters without being harmful, the algae has caused major fish kills in five of the state?s river systems. When this algae has explosive increases in its population, called ?blooms,? it secretes toxic chemicals...

  2. Toxic and deadly: Working to manage algae in Lake Granbury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Toxic and deadly Working to manage algae in Lake Granbury Lake Granbury, located about 33 miles southwest of Fort Worth, is a recreation haven for water enthusiasts. In recent years, however, bacteria and golden algae have threatened the lake... of water and the presence of pathogens. These E. coli sources can be from sewage overflows, polluted stormwater runoff, or malfunctioning septic systems. Toxic golden algae blooms have killed fish in Lake Granbury and Lake Whitney, downstream...

  3. Toxic and deadly: Working to manage algae in Lake Granbury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Toxic and deadly Working to manage algae in Lake Granbury Lake Granbury, located about 33 miles southwest of Fort Worth, is a recreation haven for water enthusiasts. In recent years, however, bacteria and golden algae have threatened the lake... of water and the presence of pathogens. These E. coli sources can be from sewage overflows, polluted stormwater runoff, or malfunctioning septic systems. Toxic golden algae blooms have killed fish in Lake Granbury and Lake Whitney, downstream...

  4. Algae to Bio-Crude in Less Than 60 Minutes

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Elliott, Doug

    2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineers have created a chemical process that produces useful crude oil just minutes after engineers pour in harvested algae -- a verdant green paste with the consistency of pea soup. The PNNL team combined several chemical steps into one continuous process that starts with an algae slurry that contains as much as 80 to 90 percent water. Most current processes require the algae to be dried -- an expensive process that takes a lot of energy. The research has been licensed by Genifuel Corp.

  5. algae suspensions online: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and arborescent algae) and the density of benthic herbivorous invertebrates and fish. A relationship between Boudouresque, Charles F. 30 Introduction slide 2 Biofuels and...

  6. Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project Thanks in part to DOE funding and technical support, student interns from the Crow Tribe in Montana had the...

  7. Real Time Diagnostics for Algae-final-sm

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    Laboratories is developing a suite of complementary technologies to help the emerging algae industry detect and quickly recover from algal pond crashes, an obstacle to...

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: and algae-based biofuels

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    and algae-based biofuels Renewables, Other Energy Issues To Be Focus of Enhanced Sandia-SINTEF Collaboration On May 28, 2014, in Biofuels, CRF, Distribution Grid Integration,...

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: The National Algae Testbed Public...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Algae Testbed Public-Private Partnership * Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy * open ponds * PBR * processing autotrophic microalgae * SAND2013-6108P Comments...

  10. alga dunaliella salina: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    19 Neuroprotective effects of marine algae CiteSeer Summary: Abstract: The marine environment is known as a rich source of chemical structures with numerous beneficial health...

  11. alga sargassum fulvellum: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B. 15 Neuroprotective effects of marine algae CiteSeer Summary: Abstract: The marine environment is known as a rich source of chemical structures with numerous beneficial health...

  12. alga anabaena variabilis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    17 Neuroprotective effects of marine algae CiteSeer Summary: Abstract: The marine environment is known as a rich source of chemical structures with numerous beneficial health...

  13. algae dunaliella salina: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    19 Neuroprotective effects of marine algae CiteSeer Summary: Abstract: The marine environment is known as a rich source of chemical structures with numerous beneficial health...

  14. alga sargassum muticum: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B. 17 Neuroprotective effects of marine algae CiteSeer Summary: Abstract: The marine environment is known as a rich source of chemical structures with numerous beneficial health...

  15. alga sargassum micracanthum: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B. 15 Neuroprotective effects of marine algae CiteSeer Summary: Abstract: The marine environment is known as a rich source of chemical structures with numerous beneficial health...

  16. CONTRIBUTION TO THE KNOWLEDGE OF SOIL ALGAE OF TWO ABANDONED INDUSTRIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONTRIBUTION TO THE KNOWLEDGE OF SOIL ALGAE OF TWO ABANDONED INDUSTRIAL SEDIMENTATION BASINS Sixty three species of soil algae and Cyanoprocaryota were recovered from eight investigated sites sites in Chvaletice suggests soil toxicity of these biotopes. Keywords Soil algae, Chlorophyta

  17. Change in biomass of benthic and planktonic algae along a disturbance gradient for 24 Great

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMaster University

    Change in biomass of benthic and planktonic algae along a disturbance gradient for 24 Great Lakes a content of planktonic algae and benthic algae in periphyton on acrylic rods and in epiphyton growing

  18. Field Study of Growth and Calcification Rates of Three Species of Articulated Coralline Algae in

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    Martone, Patrick T.

    Field Study of Growth and Calcification Rates of Three Species of Articulated Coralline Algae of coralline algae. Decreases in coralline abundance may have cascading effects on marine ecosys- tems- mon species of articulated coralline algae (Bossiella plu- mosa, Calliarthron tuberculosum

  19. Parachloroidium gen. nov. (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta), a novel genus of coccoid green algae from subaerial corticolous biofilms

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    Parachloroidium gen. nov. (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta), a novel genus of coccoid green algae. Parachloroidium gen. nov. (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta), a novel genus of coccoid green algae from subaerial the Parachloroidium strains from other similar green algae. However, ultrastructural characteristics and molecular

  20. Hydrogen isotope fractionation in freshwater algae: I. Variations among lipids and species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sachs, Julian P.

    Hydrogen isotope fractionation in freshwater algae: I. Variations among lipids and species Zhaohui Abstract Five species of freshwater green algae, including three strains of Botryococcus braunii (two in the algae, including alkadienes, botryococcenes, heptadecenes, fatty acids, and phytadiene, were measured

  1. College of Agricultural Sciences College of Agricultural Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    College of Agricultural Sciences _______________ 2.5 Page 1 College of Agricultural Sciences Office UNDERGRADUATE MAJORS Agricultural Business Agricultural Economics Agricultural Education Animal Science Equine UNDERGRADUATE MINORS Agricultural and Resource Economics Entomology Horticulture Environmental Horticulture

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    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    College of Agricultural Sciences College of Agricultural Sciences Office in Shepardson Building MAJORS Agricultural Business Agricultural Education Animal Science Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences UNDERGRADUATE MINORS Agricultural and Resource Economics Agricultural Literacy Entomology

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    College of Agricultural Sciences _______________ 2.5 Page 1 College of Agricultural Sciences Office for Research UNDERGRADUATE MAJORS Agricultural Business Agricultural Economics Agricultural Education Animal Sciences UNDERGRADUATE MINORS Agricultural and Resource Economics Entomology Environmental Horticulture

  4. Radiation Characteristics of Botryococcus braunii, Chlorococcum littorale, and Chlorella sp. Used For CO2 Fixation and Biofuel Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berberoglu, Halil; Gomez, Pedro; Pilon, Laurent

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For CO 2 Fixation and Biofuel Production Halil Berberoglufor CO 2 mitigation and biofuel productions namely (i)this technology, (2) culture of biofuel producing algae is

  5. Status and Trends of Irrigated Agriculture in Texas

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    and available water. As shown in Figure 4, most agricultural irrigation is in West and South Texas, far fromStatus and Trends of Irrigated Agriculture in Texas Irrigation is critical to our food production and food security and is a vital component of Texas' productive agricultural economy.Texas ranks third

  6. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Algal Biomass to Hydrocarbons: Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction and Upgrading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua; Anderson, Daniel B.; Hallen, Richard T.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Hart, Todd R.; Butcher, Mark G.; Drennan, Corinne; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Davis, Ryan; Kinchin, Christopher

    2014-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a preliminary analysis of the costs associated with converting whole wet algal biomass into primarily diesel fuel. Hydrothermal liquefaction converts the whole algae into an oil that is then hydrotreated and distilled. The secondary aqueous product containing significant organic material is converted to a medium btu gas via catalytic hydrothermal gasification.

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - alga botryococcus braunii Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    version Organic Geochemistry 22, 1023-1027, 1994. Summary: -alkane, n-alkene, Pula oil shale, Botryococcus braunii, alga, plant, waxes, sediment. INTRODUCTION n... extant alga...

  8. Algae Biofuels Technology | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform is alwaysISOSource Heat Pump BasicsAlexander Dane About UsAlgae

  9. Sustainable Development of Algae for Biofuel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic Safety GoalsEnergyComplianceSuspect/CounterfeitNateAlgae

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    McCarl, Bruce A.

    February 6, 2001 GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE AND ITS IMPACT ON AGRICULTURE Bruce A McCarl, Texas A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2. Agriculture and Climate Change . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2.1 Climate Change Effects on Agricultural Productivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2

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    Ray, David

    Updated November 1, 2013 Division of Agriculture, Forestry, and Veterinary Medicine Administrative, & Aquaculture Dr. Eric Dibble (Interim) Forest Products Dr. Rubin Shmulsky Forestry Dr. Andrew Ezell Associate Turner Assistant Dean Vacant Director, Agricultural & Forestry Experiment Station Dr. George Hopper

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    STATUS OF Wisconsin Agriculture 2010 · Status of the Wisconsin Farm Economy · Current Outlook: Farm Products, Farm Inputs and the General Economy · Framing the Financial Crisis for Wisconsin Agriculture Farm Economy . . . . . . 1 II. Current Outlook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

  13. Measures of the effects of agricultural practices on ecosystem services

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    Minnesota, University of

    Measures of the effects of agricultural practices on ecosystem services Virginia H. Dalea,, Stephen of ecosystem services, including water quality, pollination, nutrient cycling, soil retention, carbon sequestration, and biodiversity conservation. In turn, ecosystem services affect agricultural productivity

  14. Update on Genomic Studies of Algae Paths toward Algal Genomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Update on Genomic Studies of Algae Paths toward Algal Genomics Arthur R. Grossman* The Carnegie of genomic information that is being used to help researchers understand the gene content of organisms, how the expression of genes. In this introductory manuscript, I discuss select algae and how genomics is impacting

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, David P.; Hanselka, Daniel

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and some of the viscera into menudo or tripas. Booker Packing Company, Caviness Packing Company and J&B Foods are some of the compa- nies adding value to meat successfully in spite of processing costs. A recent survey of such companies indicated...

  16. Missouri Agriculture Outlook Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, James S.

    Missouri Agriculture Outlook Conference Conference Information This conference will discuss the drivers of Missouri agricultural and bio-fuel markets and the implications for Missouri farmsDr.JonHagler, DirectoroftheMissouriDepartment ofAgriculture. Outlookpresentationsderivedfrom thelatestbaselineresultsof

  17. Agricultural Leadership, Education, & Communications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agricultural Leadership, Education, & Communications ALEC 102 Fall 2006 Course Title: Critical Issues in Agricultural Leadership and Education Credit: 1 Hour Instructors: Ms. Summer Felton; 119A! This introductory course is designed for students entering in the Agricultural Leadership & Development degree

  18. Genetic Engineering for Modern Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blumwald, Eduardo

    reserved 1543-5008/10/0602-0443$20.00 Key Words abiotic stress, climate change, field conditions, global warming, stress combination, stress tolerance, transgenic crops Abstract Abiotic stress conditions such as drought, heat, or salinity cause exten- sive losses to agricultural production worldwide. Progress

  19. Evaluation of defatted and whole algae as feed ingredients for the marine shrimp, litopenaeus vannamei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, J. L. [Texas A& M University; Patnaik, S. [Texas A& M University; Gatlin, III, D. M. [Texas A& M University; Lawrence, A. L. [Texas A& M University

    2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation of defatted and whole algae as feed ingredients for the marine shrimp, litopenaeus vannamei

  20. LIFETIME OF THE EXCITED STATE IN VIVO I. CHLOROPHYLL a IN ALGAE, AT ROOM

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    Govindjee

    LIFETIME OF THE EXCITED STATE IN VIVO I. CHLOROPHYLL a IN ALGAE, AT ROOM AND AT LIQUID NITROGEN decay of chloro- phyll (Chl) a in the green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa, the red alga Porphyridium cruentum, and the blue-green alga Anacystis nidulans was measured by the phase- shift method under

  1. SEN 02 Portable Algae Flow Cytometer SEN 02.1 Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    SEN 02 Portable Algae Flow Cytometer SEN 02.1 Overview The portable algae flow cytometer is a project that aims to expedite research in algae biology using microfluid-based and state is to develop a portable flow cytometer that is suitable for on-field monitoring of algae population and reduce

  2. Plant & CellPhysiol. 14: 1081-1097 (1973) Photophosphorylation in intact algae: Effects of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govindjee

    Plant & CellPhysiol. 14: 1081-1097 (1973) Photophosphorylation in intact algae: Effects alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa and of the blue-green alga Anacystis nidulans. A few measurements in extracts from intact cells of the green alga Chlorella in the early 1950's (3, 4), few workers measured

  3. MID-LATE DEVONIAN CALCIFIED MARINE ALGAE AND CYANOBACTERIA, SOUTH CHINA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riding, Robert

    MID-LATE DEVONIAN CALCIFIED MARINE ALGAE AND CYANOBACTERIA, SOUTH CHINA QI FENG,1 YI-MING GONG,1 contain microfossils generally regarded as calcified algae and cyanobacteria. These are present in 61 out with differing degrees of confidence, and placed in algae, cyanobacteria or microproblematica. Algae: Halysis

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    Stuart, Steven J.

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  5. Resource Evaluation and Site Selection for Microalgae Production in India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milbrandt, A.; Jarvis, E.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study evaluates climate conditions, availability of CO2 and other nutrients, water resources, and land characteristics to identify areas in India suitable for algae production. The purpose is to provide an understanding of the resource potential in India for algae biofuels production and to assist policymakers, investors, and industry developers in their future strategic decisions.

  6. Essays on the Effect of Biofuels on Agricultural Markets

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    Maisashvili, Aleksandre

    2014-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    . The results also indicate that post extracted algae residue will have value lower than that of soybean meal and menhaden fishmeal. The third part of this research estimates the economic feasibility of biofuel production and high value squalene from a tobacco...

  7. Essays on the Effect of Biofuels on Agricultural Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maisashvili, Aleksandre

    2014-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    . The results also indicate that post extracted algae residue will have value lower than that of soybean meal and menhaden fishmeal. The third part of this research estimates the economic feasibility of biofuel production and high value squalene from a tobacco...

  8. Light transfer in bubble sparged photobioreactors for H2 production and CO2 mitigation

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    Berberoglu, Halil; Yin, Juan; Pilon, Laurent

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    carbon dioxide mitigation, ge- netically modi?ed bacteria, reduced pigment, algae, cyanobacteria, bubblebubble sparged photobioreac- tor in order to maximize hydrogen production and carbon

  9. Food sovereignty and agricultural trade policy commitments

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    Boyer, Edmond

    in Agricultural, Food and Bioenergy Trade (AGFOODTRADE)" (Grant Agreement No. 212036) research project, funded production with enough barrier protection to shelter it from world price fluctuations and unfair trading

  10. Roadmap for Agriculture

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    Buckel, Jeffrey A.

    A Science Roadmap for Food and Agriculture A Science Roadmap for Food and Agriculture Prepared and Policy (ESCOP)-- Science and Technology Committee November 2010 #12;2 pA Science Roadmap for Food and Agriculture #12;A Science Roadmap for Food and Agriculture p i About this Publication To reference

  11. Agricultural and Food Sciences

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    Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) #12;88 Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) Graduate Catalogue 201314 Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) Officers aims to offer specialized training in a variety of fields in food and agriculture, and to prepare

  12. environment and agriculture

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    environment and agriculture environmentagriculture.curtin.edu.au Bachelor of Science - majorS in agriculture, environmental Biology or coaStal Zone management Science and engineering #12;t he department of environment and agriculture caters for students who are passionate about agriculture, biology, conserving

  13. Agricultural and Food Sciences

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    Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) #12;86 Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) Undergraduate Catalogue 201415 Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) Officers-level courses in agriculture were offered by the School of Arts and Sciences at AUB as early as 1914. Between

  14. Agriculture and Environmental Quality

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    Ma, Lena

    ALS 3133 Agriculture and Environmental Quality 3 credits Spring 2014 Instructor Susan Curry scurry://lss.at.ufl.edu Overview: Analysis of the effects of agriculture on environmental quality with emphasis on agricultural wastes and practices, the potential for using agricultural systems for disposal of other wastes

  15. Agriculture and Environmental Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    ALS 3133 Agriculture and Environmental Quality 3 credits Spring 2014 Instructor Susan Curry scurry Website is through E-Learning: http://lss.at.ufl.edu Overview: Analysis of the effects of agriculture on environmental quality with emphasis on agricultural wastes and practices, the potential for using agricultural

  16. BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Series

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    Pedersen, Tom

    BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Series Grain & Oilseed Production Peace Region snapshot report #12;published March 2012 by the British Columbia Agriculture & Food Climate Action Initiative www.BCAgClimateAction.ca project funding provided by Agriculture and Agri

  17. Solano and Yolo County Agriculture Current Basis for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    and production What counties can do to support agriculture in Solano and Yolo Counties Climate Change Change Project Title: Agricultural Mitigation and Adaptation to Climate Change in Yolo County, CA Agricultural profiles of Yolo County and Solano Counties Trends and anticipated changes in land use

  18. Undergraduate Education The College of Agricultural Sciences will provide undergraduate degrees in Agricultural Business, Agricultural Economics,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Undergraduate Education The College of Agricultural Sciences will provide undergraduate degrees in Agricultural Business, Agricultural Economics, Agricultural Education, Animal Sciences, Equine Sciences, economics, business, and communications. The program in Agricultural Education recently has been renovated

  19. air laut algae: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and toxic. The waste cooking oil, such as sunflower, canola, soybean, coconut, corn oil, fish oil, rice bran, chicken fat, and algae can be used for preparation of Bio diesel, by...

  20. Profitable Biodiesel Potential from Increased Agricultural Yields Country Name

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    Profitable Biodiesel Potential from Increased Agricultural Yields Country Name Production Cost ($/liter) Potential Biodiesel Volume (liters) Total Export Profits ($) HDI Rank GDP/ cap Corrupt Rank FDI

  1. agricultural commodities opportunities: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2012). Water is a key production input for irrigated Hill, Jeffrey E. 4 Opportunities for Demand Response in California Agricultural Irrigation: A Energy Storage, Conversion and...

  2. Salinity controls on trophic interactions among invertebrates and algae of solar evaporation ponds in the Mojave Desert and relation to shorebird foraging and selenium risk

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    Herbst, David B

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AMONG INVERTEBRATES AND ALGAE OF SOLAR EVAPORATION PONDS INplanktonic invertebrates and algae present along with avianof invertebrates and algae, and avian foraging were examined

  3. Analytical approaches to photobiological hydrogen production in unicellular green algae

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    Hemschemeier, Anja; Melis, Anastasios; Happe, Thomas

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    E, Melis A (2000) Microalgae: a green source of renewable Hmany species of green microalgae. Moreover, it has attractedutili- zation of green microalgae and the process of

  4. Analytical approaches to photobiological hydrogen production in unicellular green algae

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    Hemschemeier, Anja; Melis, Anastasios; Happe, Thomas

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Peltier G, Cournac L (2005) Autotrophic and mixotrophic hydrogen photoproduction in sulfur-deprived Chla- mydomonas cells.

  5. algae natural products: Topics by E-print Network

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    in small farms. Huge pig sludge amounts produced using actual methods in large-scale pig breeding farms is a major issue due to the lack of disposal options and potential...

  6. Enzyme Fusions Optimize Photosynthetic Hydrogen Production in Algae (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research at NREL is demonstrating that engineering enzymes has the potential to improve efficiencies.

  7. Structural Reforms and Agricultural Export Performance: An Empirical Analysis Dwi Susanto, C. Parr Rosson, and Rafael Costa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

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  8. Simulation and Life Cycle Assessment of Algae Gasification Process in Dual Fluidized Bed Gasifiers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azadi, Pooya; Brownbridge, George; Mosbach, Sebastian; Inderwildi, Oliver; Kraft, Markus

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The biomass conversion pathways based on the former strategy al- low for the direct production of liquid hydrocarbons (e.g. C5 C20) from targeted fractions at high selectivity 1 but typically produce a large quantity of byproducts from the other frac- tions... encountered. A recent thermogravimetric study has re- vealed that the algae char can be converted at a rate of 2.5 wt%/min at 850?C with a steam concentration of 5 vol.%7. Beside conventional gasification which can only handle dried biomass an alternative...

  9. USDA Agricultural Conservation Easement Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

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  10. Immigration reform and California agriculture

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    Martin, Philip

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reform and California agriculture Philip Martin Professor,proposals for California agriculture. Immigration reformCenter. 196 CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURE VOLUME 67 , NUMBER 4

  11. Networks, Local Institutions and Agriculture

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    Udry, Chris

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Working Paper Series Agriculture for Development Paper No.Institutions and Agriculture. Chris Udry Yale UniversityMay 2009 Conference on Agriculture for Development in Sub-

  12. Climate Change and Agriculture Reconsidered

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Anthony

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2009 Paper 1080 Climate Change and Agriculture Reconsideredby author(s). Climate Change and Agriculture Reconsideredimpact of climate change on agriculture, there still exists

  13. Russell Ranch Sustainable Agriculture Facility Agricultural Sustainability Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacAdam, Keith

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    European Commission Agriculture and Rural Development Good practice guidance on the sustainable. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 5. Sustainable mobilisation of wood: good practices Commission (EC) DG Agriculture and Rural Development 130, Rue de la Loi B 1049 Brussels, Belgium Phone: +32

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The Tropical Brown Alga Lobophora variegata (Lamouroux) Womersley: A Prospective Bioindicator determined in the brown alga Lobophora variegata, using radiotracer techniques. Results indicate that this widely distributed alga could be a useful bioindicator species for surveying silver contamination

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    Montana State University 1 College of Agriculture Graduate Programs Available Agricultural Education Program (http:// catalog.montana.edu/graduate/agriculture/agricultural- education) M.S. in Agricultural Education (http://catalog.montana.edu/graduate/ agriculture/agricultural-education) Department

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    International Programs in Agriculture MessagefromtheDirector Staying Ahead of Globalization and more prosperous place for all. Fortunately, Purdue International Programs in Agriculture (IPIA) has natural disasters caution us to remember the power of nature. The United Nations Food and Agriculture

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, James S.

    Missouri Agriculture Outlook Conference Conference Information Join us to discuss the drivers of Missouri agricultural and bio-fuels markets and participate in a special review of international policy implications for Missouri agriculture. Registration Deadline To guarantee space availability, please register

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    Gilbert, Matthew

    AGRICULTURAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM Prepare... yourself for a career in integrating life and engineering for systems in agriculture, food, environment, and energy, and to contribute to the world's largest industry. COLLEGE OF ACES COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING #12;AGRICULTURAL AND BIOLOGICAL

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    Program Overview Growing Hawaii's agriculture industry, one business at a time Website: http-3547 agincubator@ctahr.hawaii.edu Grow Your Business If you are looking to start an agriculture-related business with our program Positively impact the agriculture industry in Hawaii with their success

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boas, Harold P.

    t t t t t t t . ~ t Process Manual Biological & Agricultural Engineering MANUAL FOR THE BIOLOGICAL AND AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT TexasA&MUniversity Article I. NAME The name ofthis organization shall be the Biological and Agricultural Engineering Department (abbreviated

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    Harms, Kyle E.

    COLLEGE OF Agriculture KENNETH L. KOONCE Dean M. E. GARRISON Associate Dean JACQUELINE M. MALLET BAKER Recruitment Coordinator 104 Agricultural Administration Building 225/578-2362 FAX 225/578-2526 Student Services 138 Agricultural Administration Building 225/578-2065 FAX 225/578-2526 The College

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Funding Source General Research Agricultural Experiment Station Instruction Public Service,145,610$ 3,716,162DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE $ 1,799,873 $ 8,322,303 $ 30,128,910 $ 0$ 85,000$ 2,127 $ 0$ 4,920,977$ 0US DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE / HATCH $ 0 $ 0 $ 4,920,977 $ 15,348,823FOUNDATION

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    CPD 2, 485518, 2006 Agricultural sustainability F. Hole Title Page Abstract Introduction Discussions is the access reviewed discussion forum of Climate of the Past Agricultural sustainability (frank.hole@yale.edu) 485 #12;CPD 2, 485518, 2006 Agricultural sustainability F. Hole Title Page

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    Barnes, Elizabeth A.

    Session Title Climate Smart Agriculture Session Date Khosla (moderator) Professor, Soil and Crop Sciences College of Agricultural Climate Smart Agriculture is a multi-disciplinary approach to practice agriculture

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    Carter, Colin A.; Novan, Kevin; Rausser, Gordon; Iho, Antti; Parker, Doug; Zilberman, David

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Agricultural Economics University of California Animal WasteAgricultural and Food Markets Gordon Rausser..4 Animal Waste

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    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    forecasting drought effects on agriculture based on waterEffects of 2009 Drought on San Joaquin Valley Agriculture

  14. Soil erosion and agricultural sustainability David R. Montgomery*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, David R.

    Soil erosion and agricultural sustainability David R. Montgomery* Department of Earth and Space conventionally plowed agricultural fields average 12 orders of magnitude greater than rates of soil production indicates that, considered globally, hill- slope soil production and erosion evolve to balance geologic

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    Climate Change, Agriculture and Poverty Vulnerabilityand Poverty Vulnerability Presentation by-Medium-High productivity Implications for agricultural production, trade and poverty The issue of climate volatility Impact of extreme climate events on poverty #12;Climate Science Debate Detection: - Little doubt about

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    Simon, Emmanuel

    The Competition between Calcification and Photosynthesis in Coccolithophorid Algae Conditions Their Response to Past and Future CO2 Changes H. Stoll University of Oviedo The marine calcifying algae

  17. On relating physical limits to the carbon: nitrogen ratio of unicellular algae and benthic plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baird, Mark

    Abstract Unicellular algae such as phytoplankton and benthic microalgae have an elemental ratio of carbon) by photosynthetic benthic communities. Unicellular algae and benthic plants use light energy to fix carbon (C

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    , PhD (University of Missouri) Teaching Areas: Marketing; Ag. Policy; Sustainable Agriculture ResearchD (University of Tennessee) Teaching Areas: Beef Production, Nutrition, Meat Science Research Interests: Energy and mineral nutrition of grazing cow/calf pairs and its impact on milk production and conception rates; visual

  19. Formation of Radioactive Citrulline During Photosynthetic C14O2-Fixation by Blue-Green Algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linko, Pekka; Holm-Hansen, O.; Bassham, J.A.; Calvin, M.

    1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ClTRULLlNE BY BLUE-GREEN ALGAE TWO-WEEK LOAN COPY This is aC~~O~-FIXATION BLUE-GREEN ALGAE Pekka Linko, 0. Holm-Hansen,C~~O~-FIXATION BLUE-GREEN ALGAE BY Pelcka Linlc~,'~ Holm-

  20. One-Two-Three Punch Clobbers Toxic Algae, Restores Fremont Lake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    One-Two-Three Punch Clobbers Toxic Algae, Restores Fremont Lake Final Report Fremont Lake #20 Water-two-three punch to knockout toxic algae and restore water quality in Nebraska's numerous sandpit lakes. "It seems to help rid the too-often toxic algae prone Fremont State Lakes of the oily green scum that can close them

  1. PHYLOGENETIC DIVERSITY OF TRENTEPOHLIALEAN ALGAE ASSOCIATED WITH LICHEN-FORMING FUNGI1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PHYLOGENETIC DIVERSITY OF TRENTEPOHLIALEAN ALGAE ASSOCIATED WITH LICHEN-FORMING FUNGI1 Matthew P 60605-2496, USA Nearly one-fourth of the lichen-forming fungi asso- ciate with trentepohlialean algae algae has provided a phy- logenetic context within which questions regarding the lichenization

  2. FL47CH15-Goldstein ARI 25 November 2014 9:45 Green Algae as Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Raymond E.

    FL47CH15-Goldstein ARI 25 November 2014 9:45 Green Algae as Model Organisms for Biological Fluid green algae, spanning from the unicellular Chlamydomonas to multicellular Volvox, have emerged as model of flagellar synchronization. Green algae are well suited to the study of such problems because of their range

  3. Phylogeny and Nucleomorph Karyotype Diversity of Chlorarachniophyte Algae TIA D. SILVER,a,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Archibald, John

    Phylogeny and Nucleomorph Karyotype Diversity of Chlorarachniophyte Algae TIA D. SILVER,a,1 SAYAKA/or reticulopod-forming marine algae with chlorophyll a- and b-containing plastids of secondary endosymbiotic. THE chlorarachniophytes are an enigmatic group of unicellular marine algae with diverse morphologies and a widespread

  4. Investigation of Flow Characteristics in an Airlift-Driven Raceway Reactor for Algae Cultivation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Investigation of Flow Characteristics in an Airlift-Driven Raceway Reactor for Algae Cultivation are the most common choice for outdoor algae cultivation due to their low cost relative to enclosed. Algae require adequate mixing in order to maximize exposure to essential nutrients for growth

  5. INTRODUCTION Cryptomonad algae are postulated to be a chimaera of two

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFadden, Geoff

    INTRODUCTION Cryptomonad algae are postulated to be a chimaera of two different eukaryotic cells incorporating cryptomonad endosymbiont gene sequences ally them loosely with red algae (Douglas et al., 1991a that the endosymbiont was an early evolutionary intermediate that pre-dates the red algae (Cavalier-Smith, 1992

  6. Biomass from Cyanobacteria:Opportunities for the Proposed Algae Biotechnology and Biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Biomass from Cyanobacteria:Opportunities for the Proposed Algae Biotechnology and Biofuels CLOSED DUE TO ALGAE BLOOM AND GENERAL ADVISORY REMAINS FOR HILLS CREEK RESERVOIR August 2, 2002 Larison. For the entire Reservoir, one should avoid high con centrations of blue-green algae both on the water surface

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Are Algae Relevant to the Detritus-Based Food Web in Tank-Bromeliads? Olivier Brouard1 , Anne, Universite´ Paul Sabatier, UMR CNRS 5245, Toulouse, France Abstract We assessed the occurrence of algae and with regard to the structure of other aquatic microbial communities held in the tanks. Algae were retrieved

  8. HoustonChronicle.com -Tiny honor a big deal for algae scientist HoustonChronicle.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeong, Hae Jin

    HoustonChronicle.com - Tiny honor a big deal for algae scientist HoustonChronicle. com Section-mail this story June 18, 2005, 5:48PM Tiny honor a big deal for algae scientist By DAVID A. FAHRENTHOLD Washington Post Sometimes, algae can be the highest form of flattery. ADVERTISEMENTSo it was for Diane K. Stoecker

  9. 428 BIOCHIMICAET BIOPHYSICAACTA pH CONTROL OF THE CHLOROPHYLL a FLUORESCENCE IN ALGAE

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    Govindjee

    428 BIOCHIMICAET BIOPHYSICAACTA BBA 46126 pH CONTROL OF THE CHLOROPHYLL a FLUORESCENCE IN ALGAE on the "slow" (min) time course of Chlorophyll a fluorescence yield in the green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa and in the blue-green alga Anacystis nidulans. In Chlorella, the decay of fluorescence yield, in the I- to 5-rain

  10. Author's personal copy A novel ocean color index to detect oating algae in the global oceans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    Author's personal copy A novel ocean color index to detect oating algae in the global oceans December 2008 Received in revised form 15 May 2009 Accepted 23 May 2009 Keywords: Floating Algae Index (FAI Remote sensing Ocean color Climate data record Various types of oating algae have been reported in open

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ARTICLE Micro-Raman Spectroscopy of Algae: Composition Analysis and Fluorescence Background performed using Stokes Raman scattering for compositional analysis of algae. Two algal species, Chlorella while acquiring Raman signals from the algae. The time dependence of fluorescence background is char

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basu, Amar S.

    Optical microplates for high-throughput screening of photosynthesis in lipid- producing algae-producing algae of interest in 2nd generation biofuels. By conducting 96 experiments in parallel, photoirradiance the study of photosynthesis in algae. Societal challenges in energy sustainability have renewed interest

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bossard, Peter

    Photosynthetic and growth responses of three freshwater algae to phosphorus limitation., green alga Sphaerocystis schroeteri and cyanobacterium Phormidium luridum, were grown under contrasting of the green alga S. schroeteri decreased the most (ca. sixfold) under P limitation compared with the other two

  14. Hydrogen isotope fractionation in freshwater and marine algae: II. Temperature and nitrogen limited growth rate effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sachs, Julian P.

    Hydrogen isotope fractionation in freshwater and marine algae: II. Temperature and nitrogen limited isotope fractionation in freshwater algae: I. Variations among lipids and spe- cies. Organic Geochemistry. Two species of freshwater green algae, Eudorina unicocca and Volvox aureus, were grown in batch

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denny, Mark

    DESICCATION PROTECTION AND DISRUPTION: A TRADE-OFF FOR AN INTERTIDAL MARINE ALGA1 Luke J. H. Hunt2, California 93950, USA For marine algae, the benefits of drying out are often overshadowed by the stresses of desiccation in the intertidal turf alga Endocladia muricata (Endlichter) J. Agardh. Laboratory experiments

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Husinec, Antun

    Early Cretaceous benthic associations (foraminifera and calcareous algae) of a shallow tropical of benthic foraminifera and calcareous algae in order to establish a precise, combined benthic biozonation species of calcareous algae, distributed among 11 genera, were recovered from the Lower Cretaceous shallow

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -like subaerial alga from Southeast Asiapre_534 159..169 Jirí Neustupa,* Yvonne Nemcová, Marek Eliás and Pavel, Czech Republic SUMMARY The traditional green algal genus Chlorella, which com- prised coccoid algae lineage of the trebouxiophycean Watanabea clade, dissimilar from other members of this group. The alga has

  18. Energy From Algae Using Microbial Fuel Cells Sharon B. Velasquez-Orta,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ARTICLE Energy From Algae Using Microbial Fuel Cells Sharon B. Velasquez-Orta,1 Tom P. Curtis,1 with the two algae (as powders), obtaining differences in energy recovery, degradation efficiency, and power to the type of bioprocess used. These results demonstrate that algae can in principle, be used as a renewable

  19. Effect of non-ageing and ageing ceria nanoparticles suspensions on fresh water micro-algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Effect of non-ageing and ageing ceria nanoparticles suspensions on fresh water micro-algae Manier nanoparticle (nCeO2) suspensions, towards freshwater micro-algae assessing the effect nCeO2 suspensions microscopy (TEM). In addition, the interaction between NPs and algae were investigated using flow

  20. Ghana: Western Ghana's Fisherfolk Starve Amid Algae Infestation BY JESSICA MCDIARMID, 18 APRIL 2012

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    Belogay, Eugene A.

    Ghana: Western Ghana's Fisherfolk Starve Amid Algae Infestation BY JESSICA MCDIARMID, 18 APRIL 2012 not to continue fishing." Sargassum is the algae after which the Sargasso Sea - an elongated region in the middle down while tonnes of the algae were removed. In some areas people were warned not to swim due

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denny, Mark

    Red Algae Respond to Waves: Morphological and Mechanical Variation in Mastocarpus papillatus Along Grove, California, 93950 Abstract. Intertidal algae are exposed to the potentially severe drag forces generated by crashing waves, and several species of brown algae respond, in part, by varying the strength

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martone, Patrick T.

    PHYSIOLOGICAL PERFORMANCE OF INTERTIDAL CORALLINE ALGAE DURING A SIMULATED TIDAL CYCLE1 Rebecca J, Lobban and Harrison 1997, Helmuth and Hofmann 2001). During high tide, intertidal algae are underwater algae may be emerged and exposed to increased light stress, elevated air tem- peratures, and increased

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canberra, University of

    Observations on the measurement of total antimony and antimony species in algae, plant and animal of total antimony and antimony speciation in algae, plant and animal tissues. Digestion with nitric acid.g. some plants and algae, the addition of tetrafluorboric acid is required to dissolve silica as some

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    green alga JIR I´ NEUSTUPA 1 *, MAREK ELIA´ S1 , PAVEL SKALOUD 1 , YVONNE NE MCOVA´ 1 AND LENKA irregularis gen. et sp. nov. (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta), a novel subaerial coccoid green alga. Phycologia 50: 57­66. DOI: 10.2216/08-64.1 The phylogenetic diversity of subaerial coccoid green algae remains

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehler, Markus J.

    Hierarchical Silica Nanostructures Inspired by Diatom Algae Yield Superior Deformability, Toughness algae that is mainly composed of amorphous silica, which features a hierarchical structure that ranges in diatom algae as a basis to study a bioinspired nanoporous material implemented in crystalline silica. We

  6. Red Algae Lose Key Mitochondrial Genes in Response to Becoming Parasitic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lane, Chris

    Red Algae Lose Key Mitochondrial Genes in Response to Becoming Parasitic Lillian Hancock1 , Lynda independently evolved hundreds of times among the floridiophyte red algae. Much is known about the life history class of red algae, Plocamiocolax puvinata, has lost the atp8 gene entirely, indicating that this gene

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    ACARYOCHLORIS ­ EXPLAINING THE RIDDLE OF CHLOROPHYLL D IN RED ALGAE AND EXPANDING PAR FOR OXYGENIC strain is shown to live epi- phytically on the red alga Gelidium caulacantheum, which itself is harvested by the red alga. Availability of far red light, however, is relatively unaffected by DOM or red

  8. Toward Systems Biology in Brown Algae to Explore Acclimation and Adaptation to the Shore Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Toward Systems Biology in Brown Algae to Explore Acclimation and Adaptation to the Shore,2 Catherine Boyen,1,2 and Anne Siegel4,5 Abstract Brown algae belong to a phylogenetic lineage distantly siliculosus as a model organism for brown algae has represented a framework in which several omics techniques

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Notre Dame, University of

    HOLARCTIC ECOLOGY 4: 201-207. Copenhagen 1981 Microcommunities of algae on a Sphagnum mat Celia A. Hooper Hooper, C, A, 1981, Microcommunities of algae on a Sphagnum mat, - Holarct, Ecol, 4: 201 and nutrient parameters, with lower, moister plots having more algae, higher algal diver- sity, and lower

  10. The Seattle Times: Nation & World: Algae gives professor a taste of immortality Home delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeong, Hae Jin

    The Seattle Times: Nation & World: Algae gives professor a taste of immortality Home delivery, 2005 - Page updated at 12:00 AM Algae gives professor a taste of immortality By David A. Fahrenthold The Washington Post E-mail article Print view Search Most e-mailed Most read RSS Sometimes, algae can

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    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Green Mountain Power Corporation (GMP), Vermont's largest electric utility, offers a production incentive to farmers who own systems utilizing anaerobic digestion of agricultural products,...

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radeloff, Volker C.

    Wisconsin Agriculture 2012 STATUS OF Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics StatusExtension College of Agricultural & Life Sciences UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSINMADISON #12;#12;Status of Wisconsin Agriculture, 2012 An annual report by the Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics, UW

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    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Minnesota Sustainable Agriculture Loan program will provide loans to Minnesota residents actively engaged in farming for capital expenditures which enhance the environmental and economic...

  14. Essays on Agricultural Adaptation to Climate Change and Ethanol Market Integration in the U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aisabokhae, Ruth 1980-

    2012-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    to reduce the current and future extent of climate change. Biofuels production, for instance, expands agricultures role in climate change mitigation. This dissertation encompasses adaptation and mitigation strategies as a response to climate change...

  15. Climate change and agriculture : global and regional effects using an economic model of international trade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reilly, John M.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Empirical estimates of the economic welfare implications of the impact of climate change on global agricultural production are made. Agricultural yield changes resulting from climate scenarios associated with a doubling ...

  16. Solar radiation management impacts on agriculture in China: A case study in the Geoengineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    Solar radiation management impacts on agriculture in China: A case study in the Geoengineering-Earth Science and Technology, Yokohama, Japan Abstract Geoengineering via solar radiation management could affect agricultural productivity due to changes in temperature, precipitation, and solar radiation

  17. Impact of HIV/AIDS on the Agricultural Sector in Northern Namibia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Charles Russell

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In agrarian societies, HIV/AIDS extends far beyond the realm of healthcare into agricultural production and food security as well. Namibia is a developing country with a large portion of its population involved in agriculture; the average HIV...

  18. Greenhouse gases and agriculture. Book chapter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, R.B.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Agriculture ranks third in its contribution to Earth's anthropogenically enhanced greenhouse effect. (Energy use and production and chlorofluorocarbons are ranked first and second, respectively.) Specifically, greenhouse gas sources and sinks are increased, and sinks are decreased, by conversion of land to agricultural use, using fertilizers, cultivating paddy rice, producing other plant and animal crops, and by creating and managing animal and plant wastes. However, some of these same activities increase greenhouse gas sinks and decrease greenhouse gas sources so the net effects are not obvious. The paper identifies the agricultural inputs, outputs, and wastes that alter atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxides, and discusses agriculture's net impact on greenhouse gas fluxes.

  19. Fact Sheet on Toxic Blue-green Algae Carole A. Lembi Department of Botany and Plant Pathology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fact Sheet on Toxic Blue-green Algae Carole A. Lembi Department of Botany and Plant Pathology Purdue University What are blue-green algae? Blue-greens are very primitive organisms that are not really algae. They photosynthesize like algae, but they are actually bacteria. Scientists refer to them

  20. Carnets de Gologie / Notebooks on Geology -Article 2006/03 (CG2006_A03) Are the green algae (phylum Viridiplantae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Carnets de Géologie / Notebooks on Geology - Article 2006/03 (CG2006_A03) 1 Are the green algae planet, A.H. KNOLL states that the first documented fossils of green algae date back 750 Ma. However" and of a primitive clade of green algae, the Pyramimonadales. A paraphyletic group of unicellular green algae, named

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    Project EARTH-11-RR2: Co-evolution of iodine antioxidant mechanism in marine algae and Earth algae (yet they are lacking in green algae) ­ but the phylogenetic distribution of iodine accumulation haloperoxidases. The first appearance and important divergence of brown algae occurred within the last 200 myr

  2. Modeling and control of algae detachment in regulated canal networks Ophelie Fovet, Xavier Litrico and Gilles Belaud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Modeling and control of algae detachment in regulated canal networks Ophelie Fovet, Xavier Litrico and Gilles Belaud Abstract-- Algae development in open-channel networks in- duce major disturbances because these algae developments consists in flushing the fixed algae. The flush is carried out by increasing

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    residues, soils may turn from a C sink to a source of atmospheric CO2. SOM stabilization depends on residue directly by more frequent and persistent dry spells and high temperatures, and indirectly through shifts (frequency/persistence) increase crop production risks by affecting physical and chemical properties

  4. Administration ....................................................................................................................................3 School of Agriculture Faculty ............................................................................

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ....................................................................................................................................3 School of Agriculture Faculty .............................................................................................................4 Agricultural and Biological Engineering ­ ABE Agricultural Economics ­ AG ECON Agronomy ­ AGRY .............................................................................................................17 Research Projects School of Agriculture

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ....................................................................................................................................3 School of Agriculture Faculty.............................................................................................................4 Agricultural and Biological Engineering ­ ABE Agricultural Economics ­ AG ECON Agronomy ­ AGRY .............................................................................................................17 Research Projects School of Agriculture

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ....................................................................................................................................3 School of Agriculture Faculty.............................................................................................................4 Agricultural and Biological Engineering ­ ABE Agricultural Economics ­ AG ECON Agronomy ­ AGRY .............................................................................................................18 Research Projects School of Agriculture

  7. Administration ............................................................................................................2 School of Agriculture Faculty .........................................................................................3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ............................................................................................................2 School of Agriculture Faculty .........................................................................................3 Agricultural and Biological Engineering ­ ABE Agricultural Economics ­ AG ECON Agronomy ­ AGRY Research Projects School of Agriculture

  8. Essays on Development, Ownership Structure, and Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moorthy, Aravind

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of climate change on Indian agriculture. Manuscript,study of climate change impacts on Indian agriculture hasclimate change on agricultural output, because of the relevance of agriculture

  9. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Intermountain Research Station General. in the aircraft nuclear propulsion department at the National Reactor Testing Station in Idaho. In 1961 Rothermel.S. Department of Agriculture, Fire Laboratory at Missoula was conceived in the aftermath of the Mann Gulch fire

  10. agriculture agricultural knowledge: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: May 2011 New Challenges in Agricultural Modeling: Relating Enegy and Farm of Education, Office of Civil Rights. 12;1 New Challenges in Agricultural...

  11. Public Parking > Agriculture Building Parkade**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Engineering Poultry Science Kirk Hall Agriculture Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada SCIENCE PLACE VETERINARY > Agriculture Building Parkade** > Pay Parking Lots** > Stadium Parkade** > Diefenbaker Lot > Health Sciences Parkade** Disabled Persons' Parking* Motorcyle Parking* Faculty & Sta Parking Lots* Student Parking Lots

  12. Oregon Agriculture and the Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Oregon Agriculture and the Economy: An Update Oregon State University Extension Service Rural Analyst Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics Oregon State University #12;Contents ...........................................................................................................................................12 Agricultural Support Services, Wholesale Trade, Transportation and Warehousing, Retail Trade

  13. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Faculty of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of Crop production Ecology Treatment and utilization of pulp industry residues using Short Resources and Agricultural Sciences Department of Crop production Ecology #12; Treatment and utilization and paper, mining and metal processing, food processing industry and communal sewage plants. Paper industry

  14. Microalgae Production from Power Plant Flue Gas: Environmental Implications on a Life Cycle Basis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kadam, K. L.

    2001-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Power-plant flue gas can serve as a source of CO{sub 2} for microalgae cultivation, and the algae can be cofired with coal. This life cycle assessment (LCA) compared the environmental impacts of electricity production via coal firing versus coal/algae cofiring. The LCA results demonstrated lower net values for the algae cofiring scenario for the following using the direct injection process (in which the flue gas is directly transported to the algae ponds): SOx, NOx, particulates, carbon dioxide, methane, and fossil energy consumption. Carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons emissions were statistically unchanged. Lower values for the algae cofiring scenario, when compared to the burning scenario, were observed for greenhouse potential and air acidification potential. However, impact assessment for depletion of natural resources and eutrophication potential showed much higher values. This LCA gives us an overall picture of impacts across different environmental boundaries, and hence, can help in the decision-making process for implementation of the algae scenario.

  15. MSU at Work in Africa: Food and Agricultural Export

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MSU at Work in Africa: Food and Agricultural Export Value Chain Development The Challenge Global, and other high-value export products, small- and medium-scale producers have struggled to access these markets. Paving the way for these producers to supply high-value food and agricultural export markets

  16. Richard N. Arnold College Professor, Agricultural Science Center at Farmington,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    establishment, and erosion control in the intermountain region of northwestern New Mexico; the use of coalRichard N. Arnold College Professor, Agricultural Science Center at Farmington, New Mexico State-1979 Experience: Technical Service Director for the Navajo Agricultural Products Industry, Farmington, New Mexico

  17. Green Algae as Model Organisms for Biological Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Raymond E

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past decade the volvocine green algae, spanning from the unicellular $Chlamydomonas$ to multicellular $Volvox$, have emerged as model organisms for a number of problems in biological fluid dynamics. These include flagellar propulsion, nutrient uptake by swimming organisms, hydrodynamic interactions mediated by walls, collective dynamics and transport within suspensions of microswimmers, the mechanism of phototaxis, and the stochastic dynamics of flagellar synchronization. Green algae are well suited to the study of such problems because of their range of sizes (from 10 $\\mu$m to several millimetres), their geometric regularity, the ease with which they can be cultured and the availability of many mutants that allow for connections between molecular details and organism-level behavior. This review summarizes these recent developments and highlights promising future directions in the study of biological fluid dynamics, especially in the context of evolutionary biology, that can take advantage of these re...

  18. Green Algae as Model Organisms for Biological Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raymond E. Goldstein

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past decade the volvocine green algae, spanning from the unicellular $Chlamydomonas$ to multicellular $Volvox$, have emerged as model organisms for a number of problems in biological fluid dynamics. These include flagellar propulsion, nutrient uptake by swimming organisms, hydrodynamic interactions mediated by walls, collective dynamics and transport within suspensions of microswimmers, the mechanism of phototaxis, and the stochastic dynamics of flagellar synchronization. Green algae are well suited to the study of such problems because of their range of sizes (from 10 $\\mu$m to several millimetres), their geometric regularity, the ease with which they can be cultured and the availability of many mutants that allow for connections between molecular details and organism-level behavior. This review summarizes these recent developments and highlights promising future directions in the study of biological fluid dynamics, especially in the context of evolutionary biology, that can take advantage of these remarkable organisms.

  19. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Algae: for a Cleaner and Greener

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergyDepartmentWind Siting ArticlesAugustBETO Monthly NewsAlgae

  20. FACULTY OF AGRICULTURAL AND FOOD SCIENCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihadeh, Alan

    ;EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Research funds and income from service contracts amounted to 3,885,726 US$. Research funds)/Initiative for Biodiversity Studies in Arid Regions (IBSAR) at AUB, Service Contracts and International Agencies accounted and wild life. Service contracts involved agricultural extension, crop production, dairy stock improvement

  1. College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    40 College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences 40 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND LIFE SCIENCES The mission of the College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences is to provide teaching, research, and service in agriculture, forestry, and life sciences that will benefit the citizens

  2. College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    43 College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND LIFE SCIENCES The College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Scienc- es (CAFLS) supports Clemson University's land-grant mission to provide education, research and service to the public. The College of Agriculture

  3. ABT Agricultural Biotechnology College of Agriculture, Food and Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacAdam, Keith

    ABT Agricultural Biotechnology College of Agriculture, Food and Environment KEY: # = new course or first semester transfer students in Agricultural Biotechnology. ABT 120 GENETICS AND SOCIETY. (3 with the common experimental methods used in agricultural biotechnology. Students will be presented with several

  4. College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    46 College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences 46 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND LIFE SCIENCES The College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sci- ences offers graduate programs in 17 traditional disciplines in agriculture, forestry, and a wide variety of biological sciences, from

  5. College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    44 College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences 44 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND LIFE SCIENCES The College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sci- ences offers graduate programs in 17 traditional disciplines in agriculture, forestry, and a wide variety of biological sciences, from

  6. College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    42 College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND LIFE SCIENCES The mission of the College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences is to provide teaching, research, and service in agriculture, forestry, and life sciences that will benefit the citizens of South

  7. College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolding, M. Chad

    College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND LIFE SCIENCES The mission of the College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences is to provide teaching, research and service in agriculture, forestry and life sciences that will benefit the citizens of South

  8. College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    39 College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND LIFE SCIENCES The College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sci- ences (www.clemson.edu/CAFLS) offers a broad. The undergraduate academic programs include Agricultural and Applied Economics with a Community and Economic

  9. College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    20 College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences 20 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND LIFE SCIENCES The mission of the College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences is to provide teaching, research and service in agriculture, forestry and life sciences that will benefit the citizens of South

  10. College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolding, M. Chad

    40 College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences 40 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND LIFE SCIENCES The mission of the College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences is to provide teaching, research, and service in agriculture, forestry, and life sciences that will benefit the citizens of South

  11. College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    41 College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND LIFE SCIENCES The mission of the College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences is to provide teaching, research, and service in agriculture, forestry, and life sciences that will benefit the citizens of South

  12. College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    20 College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences 20 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND LIFE SCIENCES The mission of the College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences is to provide teaching, research, and service in agriculture, forestry, and life sciences that will benefit the citizens

  13. College of Agriculture, Food and Environment AEN Agricultural Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacAdam, Keith

    College of Agriculture, Food and Environment AEN Agricultural Engineering KEY: # = new course of engineering systems, earthwork computations, and introduction to boundary surveys for Agriculture students in the College of Agriculture and/or consent of instructor. AEN 220 FARM TRACTORS AND ENGINES. (3) Principles

  14. Kentucky Department of Agriculture

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the August 7, 2008 quarterly joint Web conference of DOE's Biomass and Clean Cities programs, Wilbur Frye (Office of Consumer & Environmental Protection, Kentucky Department of Agriculture) described Biofuel Quality Testing in Kentucky.

  15. AGRICULTURE, 2003 Current Wisconsin Farm Financial Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radeloff, Volker C.

    STATUS OF WISCONSIN AGRICULTURE, 2003 Current Wisconsin Farm Financial Conditions Situation and Challenges Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics College of Agricultural and Life Sciences OF WISCONSIN AGRICULTURE, 2003 An Annual Report by: Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics College

  16. Communication Factors Affecting African Policymakers' Decisions about Agricultural Biotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Begashaw, Belay Ejigu

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to develop a model for impacting decisions on agricultural biotechnology practices in food production among African policymakers. The research focused on three African countries, namely, South ...

  17. AGRICULTURE, 2005 Status of the Wisconsin Farm Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radeloff, Volker C.

    STATUS OF WISCONSIN AGRICULTURE, 2005 Status of the Wisconsin Farm Economy Situation and Outlook: Farm Products, Farm Inputs and the General Economy Special Articles · Expansion, Modernization..............................................................................................................................v I. Status of the Wisconsin Farm Economy

  18. Post-DiplomaBachelorofArts AgriculturalStudies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seldin, Jonathan P.

    Management: Production, Finance, and Marketing Animal Health Technology EnvironmentalHorticulture:Arboricultureand Grande Prairie Regional College Animal Health Technology Lakeland College Agri-Business Agro-Environmental train in the interrelationships among agricultural, social, economic and environmental systems. Approved

  19. Post-DiplomaBachelorofArts AgriculturalStudies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seldin, Jonathan P.

    Health Technology Lakeland College Agri-Business Agro-Environmental Technology Animal Health Technology train in the interrelationships among agricultural, social, economic and environmental systems. Approved Animal Science Technology Crop Technology Diversified Livestock Production (prior to 2004) Herd Health

  20. BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Provincial Report executive summary #12;published March 2012 by the British Columbia Agriculture & Food Climate Action Initiative www.BCAgClimateAction.ca project funding provided by Agriculture and Agri-food Canada BC Ministry of Agriculture BC Ministry

  1. BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Provincial Report #12;published March 2012 by the British Columbia Agriculture & Food Climate Action Initiative www.BCAgClimateAction.ca project funding provided by Agriculture and Agri-food Canada BC Ministry of Agriculture BC Ministry

  2. Purdue Agriculture Annual Statistical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purdue Agriculture Research Works Annual Statistical Report 2005-2006 Purdue AGrICuLTure Read the full report on the Web www.ag.purdue.edu/arp/stat_report_05-06 #12;Purdue AGrICuLTure Purdue Agriculture Research Works Here's why. We are riding the wave of revolutionary changes brought about

  3. Cognome e nome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ALGA 18 giugno 2012 Esame (2.5 ore)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robbiano, Lorenzo

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ALGA 18 giugno 2012­ Esame (2.5 ore) Giustificare ogni affermazione Salvare il file CoCoA come cognome

  4. Hierarchical and size dependent mechanical properties of silica and silicon nanostructures inspired by diatom algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garca, Andre Phillip

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biology implements fundamental principles that allow for attractive mechanical properties, as observed in biomineralized structures. For example, diatom algae contain nanoporous hierarchical silicified shells that provide ...

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - alga ostreococcus tauri Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Universiteit - Department of Plant Systems Biology, Bioinformatics and Evolutionary Genomics Division Collection: Biology and Medicine 2 The ultrasmall green alga Ostreococcus...

  6. Selenium Biotransformations in an Engineered Aquatic Ecosystem for Bioremediation of Agricultural Wastewater via Brine Shrimp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selenium Biotransformations in an Engineered Aquatic Ecosystem for Bioremediation of Agricultural Wastewater via Brine Shrimp Production Radomir Schmidt,, Prapakorn Tantoyotai, Sirine C. Fakra, Matthew A, Saskatchewan S7N 5E2, Canada United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, SJVASC

  7. July 26, 2010 The Global Supply and Demand for Agricultural Land in 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    new #12;source of industrial demand in agricultural markets (Energy Information Agency 2010). To compound matters, water, a key input into agricultural production, is rapidly diminishing in availabilityJuly 26, 2010 The Global Supply and Demand for Agricultural Land in 2050: A Perfect Storm

  8. The Role and Use of Water in Agriculture in the Western Balkans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and understand the interaction between agriculture and the other sectors, an environmental input-output model sectors (other mining, food and beverages, and energy production). It is confirmed that the agriculturalThe Role and Use of Water in Agriculture in the Western Balkans: The Case of Macedonia Jordan

  9. Roshna Maharjan Climate Change and its Impacts on Agriculture: Farmers' Perception and Adaptation Measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Roshna Maharjan Climate Change and its Impacts on Agriculture: Farmers' Perception and Adaptation Measures Climate Change and its Impacts on Agriculture: Farmers' Perception and Adaptation Measures A Case in agricultural production. 4. Respondents are aware about the change in climate and they have been adopting

  10. Draft for Public Comment Chapter 6 Agriculture (v. 11 Jan 2013)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grotjahn, Richard

    climate change.30 6. Climate change effects on agriculture will have consequences for food security both31 increasing pressures from pests37 and pathogens that will benefit from a changing climate. Agriculture and efficiency of production across the U.S.2 Climate change poses a major challenge to U.S. agriculture, because

  11. The Economic Impact from the Extension of Unemployment Insurance to Texas Agriculture.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritsch, Conrad F.; Ruesink, David C.; Nergart, Karen J.

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    here. 1) Agricultural employers with agricultural product sales of $40,000 or more in 1969, paid out two-thirds of the total agricultural wages. These employers were less than one-third of the total agricultural employers in the state and about 6... percent of all farmers. 2) Livestock operations paid out 30 percent of total agricultural wages in 1969, cash grain operations 27 percent and cotton operations 19 percent. 3) Legislation bringing agricultural employers with 4 or more workers for 20...

  12. THE EFFECT OF HERBIVORY BY THE LONG-SPINED SEA URCHIN, DIADEMA SAVIGNYI, ON ALGAE GROWTH IN THE CORAL REEFS OF MOOREA, FRENCH POLYNESIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoey, Jennifer

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    between corals and algae on coral reefs: a review of4: 16-24. Wilder, R.M. Algae-Herbivore Interactions on theURCHIN, DIADEMA SAVIGNYI, ON ALGAE GROWTH IN THE CORAL REEFS

  13. ORGANIC GEOCHEMICAL STUDIES. II. THE DISTRIBUTION OF ALIPHATIC HYDROCARBONS IN ALGAE, BACTERIA, AND IN A RECENT LAKE SEDIMENT: A PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Jerry; McCarthy, E.D.; Van Hoeven Jr., William; Calvin, Melvin; Bradley, W. H.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ALIPHATIC HYDROCARBONS IN ALGAE, BACTERIA, AND IN A RECENTH F A PRELIMINARY REPORT IN ALGAE, BACTERIA, AKD IN A RECENTrests on the finding that algae have less cellulose and a

  14. Risk in agriculture : a study of crop yield distributions and crop insurance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gayam, Narsi Reddy

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Agriculture is a business fraught with risk. Crop production depends on climatic, geographical, biological, political, and economic factors, which introduce risks that are quantifiable given the appropriate mathematical ...

  15. Training agricultural scientists at the International Center for the Improvement of Maize and Wheat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cote?, Michael E.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    agricultural production" (World Food Conference, 1974). At a meeting of the Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) of the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR) held at CIMMYT in Mexico during October, 1975, the consensus of those...TRAINING AGRICULTURAL SCIENTISTS AT THE INTERNATIONAL CENTER FOR THE IMPROVEMENT OF MAIZE AND WHEAT A PROFESSIONAL PAPER by Michael E. Cote Submitted to the College of Agriculture of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  16. Creating a Consortium to Increase minority and Low-Income Community Participation in Alternative Energy Development, Production and Management Melinda Downing, United States Department of Energy Geraldine Herring, United States Department of Agriculture John Rosenthall, Environmental Justice Conference, Inc

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downing, M. [Company United States Department of Energy (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    America's desire for energy independence places a new demand on alternative fuel production. Additional interest and emphasis are being placed on alternatives such as solar, wind, biofuels and nuclear energy. The nuclear fuel production option brings a new look at risk and residual waste management for a number of communities that have traditionally remained outside the energy debate. With the Federal requirements for environmental justice and public participation in energy and environmental decision-making, proponents of alternative energy production facilities will find themselves participating in discussions of risk, production, storage and disposal of hazardous materials and waste matters with low income and minority members in communities where these facilities are located or wish to locate. The fundamental principal of environmental justice is that all residents should have meaningful and intelligent participation in all aspects of environmental decision-making that could affect their community. Impacted communities must have the resources and ability to effectively marshall data and other information in order to make informed and intelligent decisions. Traditionally, many low-income and minority communities have lacked access to the required information, decision-makers and technical advisers to make informed decisions with respect to various risks that accompany alternative energy production, hazardous materials storage and nuclear waste management. In order to provide the necessary assistance to these communities, the Departments of Energy and Agriculture have teamed with others to cerate the Alternative Energy Consortium. The Alternative Energy Consortium is a collaboration of non-profit organizations, Federal agencies, Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Minority Serving Institutions (HBCU/MSIs), and private sector corporations (energy industry specialists) designed to explore and develop opportunities that empower minorities to own and work in all aspects of the field of alternative energy. The Consortium's primary objectives are to find ways to: - Include minorities in the development and ownership of infrastructure in the alternative energy industry; - Promote research and education programs to inform the public about risks and benefits of various forms of alternative energy; - Build a Mentor/Protege Program between HBCU/MSIs and industry leaders to enhance minority participation in ownership and career success in alternative energy production and distribution. The Consortium will work together to create a process whereby minorities and low income individuals will be recruited, educated, and mentored to maximize alternative energy ownership and job opportunities. Industry specialists and government representatives will work with academicians and others to: 1. research areas and methods where minorities and rural communities can engage in the industry; 2. invest in minorities by serving as mentors to minority serving institutions by offering hands-on experience through apprenticeships; 3. work to identify ownership opportunities for minorities; and 4. work to develop legislation that supports economic development and participation for minorities and rural communities in the industry. To accomplish this goal, the Consortium has set out a three-phase plan. Phase I organized a meeting of professionals to discuss the concept, explore the fundamentals, identify key players, and draft next steps. The group took a critical look at the energy industry: 1) trends, 2) economics, 3) limited number of minorities; and 4) infrastructure. Through that process the group identified four areas that would greatly impact economic development for minorities and rural communities: I Energy; II Broadband Communications; III Education; IV Labor Resources. Phase II presented a roundtable panel discussion that continued to refine the Consortium. The goal of these discussions is to produce a well-balanced Consortium committed to working together to produce effective solutions that bridge the gap between alternative energy

  17. Chromista is a major eukaryotic kingdom comprising algae and former protozoa that is evolutionarily entirely distinct from the kingdoms Plantae and Protozoa (Cavalier-Smith 2007). Chromist chloroplasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldschmidt, Christina

    1 Chromista is a major eukaryotic kingdom comprising algae and former protozoa chloroplasts were acquired secondarily by enslavement of a red alga, itself a member of kingdom Plantae

  18. Measuring Oscillatory Velocity Fields Due to Swimming Algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guasto, Jeffrey S; Gollub, J P

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this fluid dynamics video, we present the first time-resolved measurements of the oscillatory velocity field induced by swimming unicellular microorganisms. Confinement of the green alga C. reinhardtii in stabilized thin liquid films allows simultaneous tracking of cells and tracer particles. The measured velocity field reveals complex time-dependent flow structures, and scales inversely with distance. The instantaneous mechanical power generated by the cells is measured from the velocity fields and peaks at 15 fW. The dissipation per cycle is more than four times what steady swimming would require.

  19. Dancing Volvox: Hydrodynamic Bound States of Swimming Algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knut Drescher; Kyriacos C. Leptos; Idan Tuval; Takuji Ishikawa; Timothy J. Pedley; Raymond E. Goldstein

    2009-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The spherical alga Volvox swims by means of flagella on thousands of surface somatic cells. This geometry and its large size make it a model organism for studying the fluid dynamics of multicellularity. Remarkably, when two nearby Volvox swim close to a solid surface, they attract one another and can form stable bound states in which they "waltz" or "minuet" around each other. A surface-mediated hydrodynamic attraction combined with lubrication forces between spinning, bottom-heavy Volvox explains the formation, stability and dynamics of the bound states. These phenomena are suggested to underlie observed clustering of Volvox at surfaces.

  20. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Algae Biofuel | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergyDepartmentWind Siting ArticlesAugustBETO Monthly NewsAlgae Biofuel

  1. Whole Turf Algae to biofuels-final-sm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsingWhat is a “Shut-down”Whole Algae HydrothermalWhole

  2. Students' Perceptions of International Agriculture After an International Agricultural Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Kasey Lynn

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    /schedule, language, safety and health, and time away from home; finally, benefits included experience in international agriculture and natural resources, culture, international travel, global perspective, and education. This study found that international agriculture...

  3. CHANGES IN QUANTUM YIELD OF PHOTOSYNTHESIS IN THE RED ALGA Porphyridium cruentum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govindjee

    CHANGES IN QUANTUM YIELD OF PHOTOSYNTHESIS IN THE RED ALGA Porphyridium cruentum CAUSED BY STEPWISE From the Photosynthesis Research Laboratory, Botany Department, University of Illinois, Urbana. Dr of photosynthesis in the red alga Porphyridium cruentum, and the spectral compo- sition of light, changed

  4. Biosynthesis and Distribution of Chlorophyll among the Photosystems during Recovery of the Green Alga

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polle, Jrgen

    Alga Dunaliella salina from Irradiance Stress1 Tatsuru Masuda2 , Jurgen E.W. Polle, and Anastasios of Dunaliella salina, we investigated the regulation of expression of the Chl a oxygenase (CAO) and light of the unicellular green alga Dunaliella salina Teod. under high irradiance (high light [HL]; 2,200 mol photons m 2

  5. College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Alumni Organization With a special presentation. Agricultural Research and Extension Center With updates from: Alan Grant, Dean, College of Agriculture and Life

  6. Essays on Development, Ownership Structure, and Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moorthy, Aravind

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    change on Indian agriculture. Manuscript, Department ofJ. Parikh. Indian agriculture and climate sensitivity. 3):353368, 1979. Food and Agriculture Organization of the

  7. Farm Workers and Unions in California Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Unions in California Agriculture Philip Martin June 30,unions and immigration in California agriculture 2. scanningbargaining agreements signed in CA agriculture (http://

  8. Three ACE awards for California Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Editors, by

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2012): Can Cali- fornia Agriculture disprove the allegedweed. Three ACE awards for California Agriculture TheCalifornia Agriculture team has won three awards from the

  9. Enzymes with agriculture and biofuel applications | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enzymes with agriculture and biofuel applications Enzymes with agriculture and biofuel applications Released: November 20, 2014 Enzyme insights may help agriculture, biofuels Plant...

  10. Discrete Event Modeling of Algae Cultivation and Harvesting at Commercial Scale: Capital Costs, Operating Costs, and System Bottlenecks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lacey, Ph.D, P.E., Ronald E. [Texas A& M University

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Discrete Event Modeling of Algae Cultivation and Harvesting at Commercial Scale: Capital Costs, Operating Costs, and System Bottlenecks

  11. Science & Research Agriculture & Food

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Science & Research Agriculture & Food Climate & Environment Consumers EU Priorities 2020 EU Treaty for nuclear fusion project ITER | EurActiv http://www.euractiv.com/en/science/funding-crisis-for-nuclear for nuclear fusion project ITER A multi-billion euro international research project has run into deep

  12. AGRICULTURAL REPORT FEBRUARY 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    trading framework. The largest GHG market in the world is the European Union-Emissions Trading Scheme' sulfur diox- ide (SO2) emissions trading program Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offsets from Agriculture and states have enacted policies individually or in cooperation to reduce GHG emissions through an emissions

  13. 2012 Annual Report Agricultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Robert M.

    Covered iii Funding Sources; Expenditure Breakdown Commercial Agriculture 1 Putting New Jersey Vintages for Librarians Economic Development 25 Food Industry Gateway 26 New Jersey Clean Energy Resource Network counties: Rutgers Cooperative Extension Statistics NJAES plays a significant role in the state's economic

  14. Agriculture Residential College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Architecture Students Design Build Solar Pavilion in Old South Baton Rouge Louisiana Sustainable BuildingAgriculture Residential College LSU Sustainability Denise Newell LSU Planning, Design-year institutions Denise S. Newell, PE LEED AP Sustainability Manager scribner@lsu.edu Contact Info "If you had

  15. futuresMICHIGAN AGRICULTURAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that Michigan's climate has been following a global trend toward warming. Other MAES scientists are studying how this warming trend will affect agricultural crops, weeds, insects and diseases. One component of global warming Leadership Council to study and identify trends, causes and consequences of urban sprawl, and to provide

  16. DISTINCT PATTERNS OF NITRATE REDUCTASE ACTIVITY IN BROWN ALGAE: LIGHT AND AMMONIUM SENSITIVITY IN LAMINARIA DIGITATA IS ABSENT IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berges, John A.

    DISTINCT PATTERNS OF NITRATE REDUCTASE ACTIVITY IN BROWN ALGAE: LIGHT AND AMMONIUM SENSITIVITY and lowest in summer. This is the first report of NR activity in any alga that is not strongly regulated the regulation of NR by light that has been observed in other algae and higher plants. Key index words: ammonium

  17. MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF THE ASSIMILATORY NITRATE REDUCTASE GENE AND ITS EXPRESSION IN THE MARINE GREEN ALGA DUNALIELLA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Bess

    IN THE MARINE GREEN ALGA DUNALIELLA TERTIOLECTA (CHLOROPHYCEAE)1 Bongkeun Song2 and Bess B. Ward Department from a marine phytoplankton, the green alga Dunaliella tertiolecta Butcher. Its sequence is very similar to that of the other green algae, but its intron structure and transcriptional regulation differ

  18. JENUFA GEN. NOV.: A NEW GENUS OF COCCOID GREEN ALGAE (CHLOROPHYCEAE, INCERTAE SEDIS) PREVIOUSLY RECORDED BY ENVIRONMENTAL SEQUENCING1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JENUFA GEN. NOV.: A NEW GENUS OF COCCOID GREEN ALGAE (CHLOROPHYCEAE, INCERTAE SEDIS) PREVIOUSLY of unicellular green algae from algal biofilms growing on tree bark in a Southeast Asian tropical rainforest: AU, approximately unbiased; BBM, Bold basal medium; CAUP, Culture Collection of algae at Charles

  19. Modulation of Light-Enhancement to Symbiotic Algae by Light-Scattering in Corals and Evolutionary Trends in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ottino, Julio M.

    Modulation of Light-Enhancement to Symbiotic Algae by Light-Scattering in Corals and Evolutionary that the cost of enhancing light-amplification to the algae is revealed in decreased resilience) Modulation of Light-Enhancement to Symbiotic Algae by Light-Scattering in Corals and Evolutionary Trends

  20. Fottea 8(2): 133146, 2008 133 Epipelic cyanobacteria and algae: a case study from Czech ponds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fottea 8(2): 133­146, 2008 133 Epipelic cyanobacteria and algae: a case study from Czech ponds Petr and algae (particularly desmids). Altogether 45 sediment samples were taken at ponds covering a p and various protozoa, feeding on epipelic algae (Amoeba, Urceolus cyclostomus). Key words: epipelon

  1. SYMBIOSIS (2008) 46, 153160 2008 Balaban, Philadelphia/Rehovot ISSN 0334-5114 Changes in chloroplast structure in lichenized algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in chloroplast structure in lichenized algae Ond ej Peksa1,2* and Pavel kaloud2 1 The West Bohemian Museum in the systematic classification of trebouxioid algae. However, in different ontogenetic, physiological the lichen thallus. Keywords: Confocal laser scanning microscopy, green algae, isolation, Lecanorales

  2. D-Amino Acid Utilization in Algae Jennifer Meoni1, Farrah Moazeni2, Gaosen Zhang, Ph.D.2,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    D-Amino Acid Utilization in Algae Jennifer Meoni1, Farrah Moazeni2, Gaosen Zhang, Ph.D.2, Henry Sun are derived primarily from cell wall (peptidoglycan) remnants of bacteria. Algae, which are composed environment so that we are not exposed. However, racemases are not known to be present in algae. So

  3. The Abundance, Habitat Selection, and Feeding Behavior of the Brittle Star, Ophioderma brevispinum, in Eelgrass-vs. Algae-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    , in Eelgrass- vs. Algae- Dominated Habitats in a Nutrient Enriched Estuary Amanda Keledjian Grinnell College to a shift from pristine eelgrass meadows to drifting algae mats that induce episodic hypoxia. To understand the lifestyle and role of this elusive animal, I sampled the abundance within eelgrass, algae, mud, and sandy

  4. International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology (2001), 51, 737749 Printed in Great Britain Phylogenetic relationships among algae based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gent, Universiteit

    in Great Britain Phylogenetic relationships among algae based on complete large-subunit rRNA sequences 1 of the different groups of algae, and in particular to study the relationships among the different classes of heterokont algae. In LSU rRNA phylogenies, the chlorarachniophytes, cryptomonads and haptophytes seem to form

  5. Hyperbolic chemotaxis Hyperbolic chemotaxis on networks Models for biofilms Models for algae Some issues in the modeling of movement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribot, Magali

    Hyperbolic chemotaxis Hyperbolic chemotaxis on networks Models for biofilms Models for algae Some issues in the modeling of movement of cells : chemotaxis, biofilms, algae, etc... Magali Ribot;Hyperbolic chemotaxis Hyperbolic chemotaxis on networks Models for biofilms Models for algae Hyperbolic

  6. Inhibition of Photosynthesis in Some Algae by Extreme-Red Light Author(s): Eugene Rabinowitch, Govindjee, Jan B. Thomas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govindjee

    Inhibition of Photosynthesis in Some Algae by Extreme-Red Light Author(s): Eugene Rabinowitch://www.jstor.org #12;Inhibition of Photosynthesis in Some Algae by Extreme"Red Light Abstract. Photosynthesis produced by far-red light (about 700 m,b) is reversibly inhibited in some algae by extreme-red light ( 750 m

  7. Agricultural biotechnology and Indian newspapers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sivakumar, Gayathri

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study is designed to look into how agricultural biotechnology is covered by Indian newspapers. A through study of the literature showed that agricultural biotechnology is a much debated topic and there is a vast difference between the concerns...

  8. Assistant Professor Agricultural Systems Modeler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    Assistant Professor Agricultural Systems Modeler Department of Plant and Soil Sciences Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Stillwater, Oklahoma POSITION DESCRIPTION The Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, Oklahoma State University is seeking applicants

  9. National Microalgae Biofuel Production Potential and Resource Demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wigmosta, Mark S.; Coleman, Andre M.; Skaggs, Richard; Huesemann, Michael H.; Lane, Leonard J.

    2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Microalgae continue to receive global attention as a potential sustainable "energy crop" for biofuel production. An important step to realizing the potential of algae is quantifying the demands commercial-scale algal biofuel production will place on water and land resources. We present a high-resolution national resource and oil production assessment that brings to bear fundamental research questions of where open pond microalgae production can occur, how much land and water resource is required, and how much energy is produced. Our study suggests under current technology microalgae have the potential to generate 220 billion liters/year of oil, equivalent to 48% of current U.S. petroleum imports for transportation fuels. However, this level of production would require 5.5% of the land area in the conterminous U.S., and nearly three times the volume of water currently used for irrigated agriculture, averaging 1,421 L water per L of oil. Optimizing the selection of locations for microalgae production based on water use efficiency can greatly reduce total water demand. For example, focusing on locations along the Gulf Coast, Southeastern Seaboard, and areas adjacent to the Great Lakes, shows a 75% reduction in water demand to 350 L per L of oil produced with a 67% reduction in land use. These optimized locations have the potential to generate an oil volume equivalent to 17% of imports for transportation fuels, equal to the Energy Independence and Security Act year 2022 "advanced biofuels" production target, and utilizing some 25% of the current irrigation consumptive water demand for the U. S. These results suggest that, with proper planning, adequate land and water are available to meet a significant portion of the U.S. renewable fuel goals.

  10. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Colin A.; Novan, Kevin; Rausser, Gordon; Iho, Antti; Parker, Doug; Zilberman, David

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    despite globalization tendencies elsewhere in the economy.globalization in the non-agricultural sectors of the world economy.

  11. Sponsorship includes: Agriculture in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Sponsorship includes: · Agriculture in the Classroom · Douglas County Farm Bureau · Gifford Farm · University of Nebraska Agricultural Research and Development Center · University of Nebraska- Lincoln Awareness Coalition is to help youth, primarily from urban communities, become aware of agriculture

  12. The research programme Future Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The research programme Future Agriculture livestock, crops and land use Welcome to a lunch.slu.se/futureagriculture For questions, please contact KatarinaVrede (katarina.vrede@slu.se) About Future Agriculture livestock, crops and land use The changes and challenges facing agriculture in the future will be substantial, not only

  13. Agricultural Sciences for Global Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agricultural Sciences for Global Development SLU's contribution Research Capacity building Provision of expertise The mission of the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU) is "to develop in rural areas, and agriculture plays an essential role in their livelihoods. Nevertheless, FAO estimates

  14. A Guide to Brazil's Agricultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perkins, Richard A.

    to the preparation of technical regulations, in 2007, Brazil adopted the Guide of Good Regulatory Practices, whichA Guide to Brazil's Agricultural Machinery Compliance Requirements #12;A Guide to Brazil's Agricultural Machinery Compliance Requirements July 2012 #12;1 A Guide to Importing Agricultural Machinery

  15. Statistical Review of California's Organic Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Katherine W.

    Statistical Review of California's Organic Agriculture 2005 2009 Karen Klonsky Kurt Richter Agricultural Issues Center University of California March 2011 #12;Statistical Review of California's Organic Agriculture 2005 2009 Karen Klonsky Extension Specialist Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics

  16. Agricultural Mitigation and Offsets: Policy Issues, Progress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agricultural Mitigation and Offsets: Policy Issues, Progress Purdue Climate Change Research Center, 2010 #12;Agricultural Mitigation and Offsets: Policy Issues, Progress Presentation Overview: Global Climate Change...and Agriculture Policy Landscape: US and International Agricultural Offsets and Policy

  17. REALIZATION OF THE REGIONAL ADVANTAGEOUS AGRICULTURAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    REALIZATION OF THE REGIONAL ADVANTAGEOUS AGRICULTURAL INDUSTRIES ANALYSIS SYSTEM Kaimeng Sun Institute of Agricultural Information, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing,P. R. China 100081 Abstract: In this paper, a system for analyzing the strategic adjustment of regional agricultural

  18. CURRENT SITUATION AND COUNTERMEASURES OF AGRICULTURAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    CURRENT SITUATION AND COUNTERMEASURES OF AGRICULTURAL INFORMATION CONSTRUCTION IN JIAMUSI AREA of agricultural information construction in Jiamusi area, the achievements obtained from agricultural information, the existing problems of agricultural information construction are found. The reasons of these problems

  19. Characterization of Hydrogen Metabolism in the Multicellular Green Alga Volvox carteri

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cornish, Adam J.; Green, Robin; Grtner, Katrin; Mason, Saundra; Hegg, Eric L.; Umen, James G.

    2015-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen gas functions as a key component in the metabolism of a wide variety of microorganisms, often acting as either a fermentative end-product or an energy source. The number of organisms reported to utilize hydrogen continues to grow, contributing to and expanding our knowledge of biological hydrogen processes. Here we demonstrate that Volvox carteri f. nagariensis, a multicellular green alga with differentiated cells, evolves H2 both when supplied with an abiotic electron donor and under physiological conditions. The genome of Volvox carteri contains two genes encoding putative [FeFe]-hydrogenases (HYDA1 and HYDA2), and the transcripts for these genes accumulate under anaerobicmoreconditions. The HYDA1 and HYDA2 gene products were cloned, expressed, and purified, and both are functional [FeFe]-hydrogenases. Additionally, within the genome the HYDA1 and HYDA2 genes cluster with two putative genes which encode hydrogenase maturation proteins. This gene cluster resembles operon-like structures found within bacterial genomes and may provide further insight into evolutionary relationships between bacterial and algal [FeFe]-hydrogenase genes.less

  20. Characterization of Hydrogen Metabolism in the Multicellular Green Alga Volvox carteri

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cornish, Adam J.; Green, Robin; Grtner, Katrin; Mason, Saundra; Hegg, Eric L.; Umen, James G.

    2015-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen gas functions as a key component in the metabolism of a wide variety of microorganisms, often acting as either a fermentative end-product or an energy source. The number of organisms reported to utilize hydrogen continues to grow, contributing to and expanding our knowledge of biological hydrogen processes. Here we demonstrate that Volvox carteri f. nagariensis, a multicellular green alga with differentiated cells, evolves H2 both when supplied with an abiotic electron donor and under physiological conditions. The genome of Volvox carteri contains two genes encoding putative [FeFe]-hydrogenases (HYDA1 and HYDA2), and the transcripts for these genes accumulate under anaerobic conditions. The HYDA1 and HYDA2 gene products were cloned, expressed, and purified, and both are functional [FeFe]-hydrogenases. Additionally, within the genome the HYDA1 and HYDA2 genes cluster with two putative genes which encode hydrogenase maturation proteins. This gene cluster resembles operon-like structures found within bacterial genomes and may provide further insight into evolutionary relationships between bacterial and algal [FeFe]-hydrogenase genes.