National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for agricultural production crops

  1. Robotics in Crop Production Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, University of Illinois at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robotics in Crop Production Tony Grift Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering such as harvesting of citrus fruits, grapes, and raisins. An important part of Automation is the use of robots. Robotics in agriculture is not a new concept; in controlled environments (green houses), it has a his- tory

  2. Using a Decision Support System to Optimize Production of Agricultural Crop Residue Biofeedstock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed L. Hoskinson; Ronald C. Rope; Raymond K. Fink

    2007-04-01

    For several years the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been developing a Decision Support System for Agriculture (DSS4Ag) which determines the economically optimum recipe of various fertilizers to apply at each site in a field to produce a crop, based on the existing soil fertility at each site, as well as historic production information and current prices of fertilizers and the forecast market price of the crop at harvest, for growing a crop such as wheat, potatoes, corn, or cotton. In support of the growing interest in agricultural crop residues as a bioenergy feedstock, we have extended the capability of the DSS4Ag to develop a variable-rate fertilizer recipe for the simultaneous economically optimum production of both grain and straw, and have been conducting field research to test this new DSS4Ag. In this paper we report the results of two years of field research testing and enhancing the DSS4Agís ability to economically optimize the fertilization for the simultaneous production of both grain and its straw, where the straw is an agricultural crop residue that can be used as a biofeedstock.

  3. Impacts of land use change due to biofuel crops on carbon balance, bioenergy production, and agricultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Qianlai

    Impacts of land use change due to biofuel crops on carbon balance, bioenergy production that biofuel crops have much higher net pri- mary production (NPP) than soybean and wheat crops. When food). Global biofuel production has increased dramatically in the last decade, especially in United States

  4. Plant Science 200: Modern Crop Production Instructor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Kuang-Yu

    classification, soil conservation and tillage. Crop classification and morphology (distinguish among the grains Crop Production Introduction Crop Importance Soil Survey/Soil Conservation Crop Classification /Sustainable Agriculture #12;References on Reserve in Chang Library: Forages: An Introduction to Grassland

  5. Risk in agriculture : a study of crop yield distributions and crop insurance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gayam, Narsi Reddy

    2006-01-01

    Agriculture is a business fraught with risk. Crop production depends on climatic, geographical, biological, political, and economic factors, which introduce risks that are quantifiable given the appropriate mathematical ...

  6. Implications of Three Biofuel Crops for Beneficial Arthropods in Agricultural Landscapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landis, Doug

    Implications of Three Biofuel Crops for Beneficial Arthropods in Agricultural Landscapes Mary A Science+Business Media, LLC. 2010 Abstract Production of biofuel feedstocks in agricultural landscapes and generalist natural enemies in three model biofuel crops: corn, switch- grass, and mixed prairie, we tested

  7. The impact of mineral fertilizers on the carbon footprint of crop production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brentrup, Frank

    2009-01-01

    of food, feed and bio-energy. Intensive crop production withfor food, feed and bio-energy. The agricultural contribution

  8. PETRO: Higher Productivity Crops for Biofuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-01

    PETRO Project: The 10 projects that comprise ARPA-Eís PETRO Project, short for ďPlants Engineered to Replace Oil,Ē aim to develop non-food crops that directly produce transportation fuel. These crops can help supply the transportation sector with agriculturally derived fuels that are cost-competitive with petroleum and do not affect U.S. food supply. PETRO aims to redirect the processes for energy and carbon dioxide (CO2) capture in plants toward fuel production. This would create dedicated energy crops that serve as a domestic alternative to petroleum-based fuels and deliver more energy per acre with less processing prior to the pump.

  9. The impact of mineral fertilizers on the carbon footprint of crop production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brentrup, Frank

    2009-01-01

    emissions in fertiliser production. IFS (The InternationalImpact of Agricultural Crop Production using the Life CycleN fertilizer rates in cereal production. Europ. J. Agronomy

  10. Cost Methodology for Biomass Feedstocks: Herbaceous Crops and Agricultural Residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turhollow Jr, Anthony F; Webb, Erin; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine

    2009-12-01

    This report describes a set of procedures and assumptions used to estimate production and logistics costs of bioenergy feedstocks from herbaceous crops and agricultural residues. The engineering-economic analysis discussed here is based on methodologies developed by the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE) and the American Agricultural Economics Association (AAEA). An engineering-economic analysis approach was chosen due to lack of historical cost data for bioenergy feedstocks. Instead, costs are calculated using assumptions for equipment performance, input prices, and yield data derived from equipment manufacturers, research literature, and/or standards. Cost estimates account for fixed and variable costs. Several examples of this costing methodology used to estimate feedstock logistics costs are included at the end of this report.

  11. Water footprint assessment of crop production in Shaanxi, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vellekoop, Michel

    #12;i Water footprint assessment of crop production in Shaanxi, China Bachelor Thesis Civil, Yangling, China Keywords: Agricultural crops, water footprint, Shaanxi province, CROPWAT #12;ii #12;iii ABSTRACT The water footprint, introduced by professor A.Y. Hoekstra, is an indicator of freshwater use

  12. Adding Value to Agricultural Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, David P.; Hanselka, Daniel

    2009-06-01

    You can significantly increase farm income by adding value to agricultural products and marketing those products effectively. This publication explains how to design a value-added product based on consumer preferences and how to build a business...

  13. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa ≠ 2002 The estimated costs of corn, corn silage. They include the annual Iowa Farm Business Association record summaries, production and costs data from and a survey of selected agricultural cooperatives and other input suppliers around the state. These costs

  14. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa ≠ 2000 The estimated costs of corn, corn silage. They include the annual Iowa Farm Business Association record summaries, production and costs data from and a survey of selected agriculture cooperatives around the state. These costs estimates are representative

  15. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa ≠ 2006 The estimated costs of corn, corn silage. They include the annual Iowa Farm Business Association record summaries, production and costs data from and a survey of selected agricultural cooperatives and other input suppliers around the state. These costs

  16. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa ≠ 2005 The estimated costs of corn, corn silage. They include the annual Iowa Farm Business Association record summaries, production and costs data from and a survey of selected agricultural cooperatives and other input suppliers around the state. These costs

  17. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa ≠ 2001 The estimated costs of corn, corn silage. They include the annual Iowa Farm Business Association record summaries, production and costs data from and a survey of selected agriculture cooperatives around the state. These costs estimates are representative

  18. Important driving forces in livestock production and agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Archer, Steven R.

    global shifts in consumption, marketing, production and trade: Rising incomes. Demographic shifts#12;Important driving forces in livestock production and agriculture are responsible for major the past four decades, but increasing trends due to changes in land use and crop production shifting from

  19. Determine metrics and set targets for soil quality on agriculture residue and energy crop pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian Bonner; David Muth

    2013-09-01

    There are three objectives for this project: 1) support OBP in meeting MYPP stated performance goals for the Sustainability Platform, 2) develop integrated feedstock production system designs that increase total productivity of the land, decrease delivered feedstock cost to the conversion facilities, and increase environmental performance of the production system, and 3) deliver to the bioenergy community robust datasets and flexible analysis tools for establishing sustainable and viable use of agricultural residues and dedicated energy crops. The key project outcome to date has been the development and deployment of a sustainable agricultural residue removal decision support framework. The modeling framework has been used to produce a revised national assessment of sustainable residue removal potential. The national assessment datasets are being used to update national resource assessment supply curves using POLYSIS. The residue removal modeling framework has also been enhanced to support high fidelity sub-field scale sustainable removal analyses. The framework has been deployed through a web application and a mobile application. The mobile application is being used extensively in the field with industry, research, and USDA NRCS partners to support and validate sustainable residue removal decisions. The results detailed in this report have set targets for increasing soil sustainability by focusing on primary soil quality indicators (total organic carbon and erosion) in two agricultural residue management pathways and a dedicated energy crop pathway. The two residue pathway targets were set to, 1) increase residue removal by 50% while maintaining soil quality, and 2) increase soil quality by 5% as measured by Soil Management Assessment Framework indicators. The energy crop pathway was set to increase soil quality by 10% using these same indicators. To demonstrate the feasibility and impact of each of these targets, seven case studies spanning the US are presented. The analysis has shown that the feedstock production systems are capable of simultaneously increasing productivity and soil sustainability.

  20. Ozone impacts on the productivity of selected crops. [Corn, wheat, soybean and peanut crops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heck, W.W.; Cure, W.W.; Shriner, D.S.; Olson, R.J.; Heagle, A.S.

    1982-01-01

    The regional impacts of ozone on corn, wheat, soybean, and peanut crops are estimated by using dose-response functions to relate ambient maximum 7 h/d seasonal ozone concentrations to crop productivity data. Linear dose-response functions were developed from open-top field chamber studies. It was assumed that the limited number of cultivars and growing conditions available for the analysis were representative of major agricultural regions. Hourly ozone data were selected to represent rural concentrations and used to calculate maximum 7-h/d average values. Seasonal ozone averages for counties were extrapolated from approximately 300 monitoring sites. Results must be interpreted with knowledge of these assumptions and sources of uncertainty. Impacts are calculated for county units for the conterminous United States with maps showing patterns and tables summarizing the potential magnitude of ozone effects on selected crop yields. The assessment estimates that approximately three billion dollars of productivity could be gained if current maximum 7 hour per day ozone levels were reduced from present levels to below 25 parts per billion. Dollar values are based on 1978 crop prices, without accounting for price effects, to provide an overall estimate of the impact. Of the estimated economic impact, soybean represents 64%, corn 17%, wheat 12%, and peanuts 7%.

  1. ALTERNATIVE AGRICULTURAL ENTERPRISES PRODUCTION, MANAGEMENT & MARKETING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Laughlin, Jay

    ALTERNATIVE AGRICULTURAL ENTERPRISES PRODUCTION, MANAGEMENT & MARKETING Cooperative Extension directly. Otherwise, backtrack to their suppliers, in person or by telephone. For the first few years

  2. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa -2014 File A1-20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa - 2014 File A1-20 T he estimated costs of corn, corn. They include the annual Iowa Farm Busi- ness Association record summaries, production and costs data from, and a survey of selected agricultural cooperatives and other input suppliers around the state. These cost

  3. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa -2011 File A1-20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa - 2011 File A1-20 T heestimatedcostsofcorn the annual Iowa Farm Business Association record summaries, production and costs data from the Departments of selected agricultural coop- eratives and other input suppliers around the state. These costs estimates

  4. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa -2012 File A1-20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa - 2012 File A1-20 T he estimated costs of corn, corn. They include the annual Iowa Farm Business Asso- ciation record summaries, production and costs data from and a survey of selected agricultural cooperatives and other input suppliers around the state. These costs

  5. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa -2013 File A1-20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa - 2013 File A1-20 T he estimated costs of corn, corn. They include the annual Iowa Farm Busi- ness Association record summaries, production and costs data from and a survey of selected agricultural cooperatives and other input suppliers around the state. These cost

  6. Agriculture, Forest Products and Commercial Fishing ECONOMICENGINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Agriculture, Forest Products and Commercial Fishing ECONOMICENGINE NORTHEAST #12;Dear Reader, We and Commercial Fishing. This report confirms what we all know, but sometimes take for granted. Agriculture, commercial fishing and the forest products industries are all important contributors to the Northeast economy

  7. Increasing corn for biofuel production reduces biocontrol services in agricultural landscapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landis, Doug

    Increasing corn for biofuel production reduces biocontrol services in agricultural landscapes-fold expansion of biofuel production (4), which will likely drive further expansion of corn area crops that compete with corn for land. Increased corn acreage for biofuel production has raised con

  8. Improving Crop Yield and Water Productivity by Ecological Sanitation and Water Harvesting in South Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    Improving Crop Yield and Water Productivity by Ecological Sanitation and Water Harvesting in South and fertility constraints in rain- fed smallholder agriculture in South Africa, namely in situ water harvesting, is to use water harvesting and conservation technologies (WH).9 The principal hydrological functions of WH

  9. 2 SPRAY OILS--BEYOND 2000 Modern use of petroleum-derived oils as agricultural crop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agnello, Arthur M.

    2 SPRAY OILS--BEYOND 2000 Abstract Modern use of petroleum-derived oils as agricultural crop,buttheseweretoophytotoxic.Eventually, researchersconcentratedondistillatesintherangebetween kerosene and lubricating oils.Three basic classes of carbon structures present in petroleum oils (aromatics and other un- saturated components) in oils that were removable with sulfuric acid; the remainder

  10. Faculty of Landscape Architecture, Horticulture and Crop Production Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faculty of Landscape Architecture, Horticulture and Crop Production Science Agroecology 2 years science. Among the subjects covered are:Agronomy with ecological and conservation awareness; Integrated - Environmental Issues in Crop Production, 15 credits - Project Based Research Training, 15 credits - or other

  11. 1973 projections of consumption, production, prices and crop values for Texas winter lettuce and early spring onions†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furrh, Samuel Roger

    1970-01-01

    1973 PROJECTIONS OF CONSUMPTION, PRODUCTION, PRICES AND CROP VALUES FOR TEXAS WINTER LETTUCE AND EARLY SPRING ONIONS A Thesis by SAMUEL ROGER FURRH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Augus t, l 9 70 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics 1973 PROJECTIONS OF CONSUMPTION, PRODUCTION, PRICES AND CROP VALUES FOR TEXAS WINTER LETTUCE AND EARLY SPRING ONIONS A Thesis SAMUEL ROGER FURRH Ap...

  12. Fuel alcohol production from agricultural lignocellulosic feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farina, G.E.; Barrier, J.W.; Forsythe, M.L. )

    1988-01-01

    A two-stage, low-temperature, ambient pressure, acid hydrolysis process that utilizes separate unit operations to convert hemicellulose and cellulose in agricultural residues and crops to fermentable sugars is being developed and tested. Based on the results of the bench-scale tests, an acid hydrolysis experimental plant to demonstrate the concepts of low-temperature acid hydrolysis on a much larger scale was built. Plant tests using corn stover have been conducted for more that a year and conversion efficiences have equaled those achieved in the laboratory. Laboratory tests to determine the potential for low-temperature acid hydrolysis of other feedstocks - including red clover, alfalfa, kobe lespedeza, winter rape, and rye grass - are being conducted. Where applicable, process modifications to include extraction before or after hydrolysis also are being studied. This paper describes the experimental plant and process, results obtained in the plant, results of alternative feedstocks testing in the laboratory, and a plan for an integrated system that will produce other fuels, feed, and food from crops grown on marginal land.

  13. Agricultural Productivity Growth in China: Farm Level versus National Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Colin A.; Chen, Jing; Chu, Baojin

    1999-01-01

    bias any measurement of agricultural productivity, becauseProductivity Growth in China: Farm Level versus National MeasurementProductivity Growth in China: Farm Level versus National Measurement

  14. Wavelet analysis of MODIS time series to detect expansion and intensification of row-crop agriculture in Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    and agriculture, including changes in carbon and nitrogen storage, trace gas emissions, quality of surface water from natural vegetation and pastures to row-crop agricultural with the potential to affect regional changed. Today, pastures and areas of natural vegetation are being converted to large-scale croplands

  15. Density derived estimates of standing crop and net primary production in the giant kelp Macrocystis pyrifera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Daniel; Rassweiler, Andrew; Arkema, Katie

    2009-01-01

    1991) Production and standing stocks of the kelp MacrocystisDensity derived estimates of standing crop and net primarycult to measure variables of standing crop and net primary

  16. GM Crops Are Not Containable: so what? E. Ann Clark, Plant Agriculture, University of Guelph (eaclark@uoguelph.ca) 2005 E. Ann Clark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, E. Ann

    GM Crops Are Not Containable: so what? E. Ann Clark, Plant Agriculture, University of Guelph years of commercial experience with GM crops allow us to explore two theses: 1. that the premise that GM field crops can co-exist without contaminating weedy relatives as well as non-GM crops is inconsistent

  17. Can Organic Crop Production Feed the World? Holger Kirchmann1, Lars Bergstrm1, Thomas Ktterer1, Olof Andrn1 and Rune Andersson2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . This chapter examines the question of whether organic agriculture can produce enough food to meet future demand1 Chapter 3 Can Organic Crop Production Feed the World? Holger Kirchmann1, Lars BergstrŲm1, Thomas of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7014, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden 2 Department of Food Science, Swedish University

  18. University College Dublin Agriculture, Food Science and Human Nutrition AgriculturAl Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    250 Agricultural Science Dn250AeS Agri-environmental Sciences Dn250AcP Animal and crop Production DnAES Agri-Environmental Sciences DN250ACP Animal and Crop Production DN250ASC Animal Science DN250ENT Agri-Environmental Sciences DN250 AES 2 Animal and Crop Production DN250 ACP 3 Animal Science DN250 ASC

  19. Naturally occurring radionuclides in agricultural products: An overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanlon, E.A.

    1994-07-01

    Low levels of naturally occurring radionuclides exist in phosphatic clays, a by-product of phosphatic mining and beneficiation processes. Concerns about these radionuclides entering the human food chain were an immediate research priority before the phosphate clays could be reclaimed for intensive agricultural purposes. Efforts included the assembly of a large body of data from both sons and plants, part of which were produced by the Polk County (Florida) Mined Lands Agricultural Research/Demonstration Project MLAR/DP. Additional detailed studies involving dairy and beef cattle (Bos taurus) were conducted by researchers working with the MLAR/DP. A national symposium was conducted in which data concerning the MLAR/DP work and other research projects also dealing with naturally occurring radionuclides in agriculture could be discussed. The symposium included invited review papers dealing with the identification of radionuclide geological origins, the geochemistry and movement of radionuclides within the environment, mechanisms of plant uptake, entry points into the food chain, and evaluation of dose and risk assessment to the consumer of low levels of radionuclides. The risk to human health of an individual obtaining 0.1 of his or her dietary intake from crops produced on phosphatic clays increased by 1 in 5 x 10{sup 6}/yr above a control individual consuming no food grown on phosphatic clays. Leaf tissues were found to be generally higher than fruit, grain, or root tissues. The natural range in radionuclide content among various food types was greater than the difference in radionuclides content between the same food produced on phosphatic clays vs. natural soils. 19 refs.

  20. Boy's Agricultural Club Work: Suggestions To Club Members Concerning Crop Growing.†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williamson, H. H.

    1916-01-01

    in Agr i cu l ture and H o m e E c o n o m i c s , Agr i cu l tura l and Mechanical Col lege o f Texas and U. S. Dept . o f Agr i cu l ture Co-operat ing . January , 1916. Bulletin No . B16. Agricultural Club Work BLANK PAGE IN ORIGINAL... SUGGESTIONS TO CLUB MEMBERS CON- CERNING CROP G R O W I N G . H . H. W i l l i a m s o n , Ass i s tant State A g e n t in C h a r g e o f B o y s ' A g r i c u l t u r a l C lub W o r k . S u g g e s t i o n s have b e e n p r e v i o u s l y g i v e n c...

  1. Faculty of Landscape Architecture, Horticulture and Crop Production Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    farm production with ecosystem management;Agricultural sociology. Once graduated, our Students information can be found at www.slu.se/utbildning or www.slu.se/en/education/ SLU's Alnarp campus is situatedīs University Library at Campus Alnarp, be- sides offering education and tuition in Information Management

  2. Dr. Carlo Fezzi Valuing production: the agricultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateman, Ian J.

    impact of adaptation 2040 Changes #12;Adaptation and environmental policy 2040 Changes Woodland planting) The environmental impact of climate change adaptation on land use and water quality, Nature Climate Change, vol. 5 Climate change impacts Climate change #12;Agriculture Climate change impacts Climate change Environment

  3. Essays on U.S. agricultural policy : subsidies, crop insurance, and environmental auctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirwan, Barrett E., 1974-

    2005-01-01

    This thesis investigates the unintended consequences of government policy, specifically policy meant to benefit agricultural producers. The first chapter asks how agricultural subsidies affect farmland rental rates. Chapter ...

  4. Biernbaum, Production Costs, HRT 322, 1998, pg 1 Greenhouse Crop Production: Counting the Costs and Making Cents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    Biernbaum, Production Costs, HRT 322, 1998, pg 1 Greenhouse Crop Production: Counting the Costs are the cost of production and the profitability of a crop calculated? What are variable and fixed costs? What of production and the income generated from sales meets your personal goal. A financial prospectus or estimate

  5. The impact of mineral fertilizers on the carbon footprint of crop production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brentrup, Frank

    2009-01-01

    the GHG emissions (ďcarbon footprintĒ) of crop production inMaterials and methods Ė ďcarbon footprintĒ calculation basedLCA) principles A carbon footprint is ďthe total set of

  6. Economic and Physical Modeling of Land Use in GCAM 3.0 and an Application to Agricultural Productivity, Land, and Terrestrial Carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick; Edmonds, James A.

    2014-09-01

    We explore the impact of changes in agricultural productivity on global land use and terrestrial carbon using the new agriculture and land use modeling approach developed for Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) version 3.0. This approach models economic land use decisions with regional, physical, and technological specificity while maintaining economic and physical integration with the rest of the GCAM model. Physical land characteristics and quantities are tracked explicitly, and crop production practices are modeled discretely to facilitate coupling with physical models. Economic land allocation is modeled with non-linear functions in a market equilibrium rather than through a constrained optimization. In this paper, we explore three scenarios of future agriculture productivity in all regions of the globe over this century, ranging from a high growth to a zero growth level. The higher productivity growth scenario leads to lower crop prices, increased production of crops in developing nations, preservation of global forested lands and lower terrestrial carbon emissions. The scenario with no productivity improvement results in higher crop prices, an expansion of crop production in the developed world, loss of forested lands globally, and higher terrestrial carbon emissions.

  7. An integrative modeling framework to evaluate the productivity and sustainability of biofuel crop production systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, X [University of Maryland; Izaurralde, R. C. [University of Maryland; Manowitz, D. [University of Maryland; West, T. O. [University of Maryland; Thomson, A. M. [University of Maryland; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Bandaru, Vara Prasad [ORNL; Nichols, Jeff [ORNL; Williams, J. [AgriLIFE, Temple, TX

    2010-10-01

    The potential expansion of biofuel production raises food, energy, and environmental challenges that require careful assessment of the impact of biofuel production on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, soil erosion, nutrient loading, and water quality. In this study, we describe a spatially explicit integrative modeling framework (SEIMF) to understand and quantify the environmental impacts of different biomass cropping systems. This SEIMF consists of three major components: (1) a geographic information system (GIS)-based data analysis system to define spatial modeling units with resolution of 56 m to address spatial variability, (2) the biophysical and biogeochemical model Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) applied in a spatially-explicit way to predict biomass yield, GHG emissions, and other environmental impacts of different biofuel crops production systems, and (3) an evolutionary multiobjective optimization algorithm for exploring the trade-offs between biofuel energy production and unintended ecosystem-service responses. Simple examples illustrate the major functions of the SEIMF when applied to a nine-county Regional Intensive Modeling Area (RIMA) in SW Michigan to (1) simulate biofuel crop production, (2) compare impacts of management practices and local ecosystem settings, and (3) optimize the spatial configuration of different biofuel production systems by balancing energy production and other ecosystem-service variables. Potential applications of the SEIMF to support life cycle analysis and provide information on biodiversity evaluation and marginal-land identification are also discussed. The SEIMF developed in this study is expected to provide a useful tool for scientists and decision makers to understand sustainability issues associated with the production of biofuels at local, regional, and national scales.

  8. An Integrative Modeling Framework to Evaluate the Productivity and Sustainability of Biofuel Crop Production Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xuesong; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Manowitz, David H.; West, T. O.; Post, W. M.; Thomson, Allison M.; Bandaru, V. P.; Nichols, J.; Williams, J.R.

    2010-09-08

    The potential expansion of biofuel production raises food, energy, and environmental challenges that require careful assessment of the impact of biofuel production on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, soil erosion, nutrient loading, and water quality. In this study, we describe a spatially-explicit integrative modeling framework (SEIMF) to understand and quantify the environmental impacts of different biomass cropping systems. This SEIMF consists of three major components: 1) a geographic information system (GIS)-based data analysis system to define spatial modeling units with resolution of 56 m to address spatial variability, 2) the biophysical and biogeochemical model EPIC (Environmental Policy Integrated Climate) applied in a spatially-explicit way to predict biomass yield, GHG emissions, and other environmental impacts of different biofuel crops production systems, and 3) an evolutionary multi-objective optimization algorithm for exploring the trade-offs between biofuel energy production and unintended ecosystem-service responses. Simple examples illustrate the major functions of the SEIMF when applied to a 9-county Regional Intensive Modeling Area (RIMA) in SW Michigan to 1) simulate biofuel crop production, 2) compare impacts of management practices and local ecosystem settings, and 3) optimize the spatial configuration of different biofuel production systems by balancing energy production and other ecosystem-service variables. Potential applications of the SEIMF to support life cycle analysis and provide information on biodiversity evaluation and marginal-land identification are also discussed. The SEIMF developed in this study is expected to provide a useful tool for scientists and decision makers to understand sustainability issues associated with the production of biofuels at local, regional, and national scales.

  9. Crop Production Variability and U.S. Ethanol Mandates†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Jason P.

    2014-07-08

    . Second, the short-run economic impact of RFS relaxation alternatives is investigated using an optimization modeling framework where crop mix and livestock breeding herds are held fixed. Third, the long-run implications of RFS relaxation are investigated...

  10. Recursive Programming Model for Crop Production on the Texas High Plains†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reneau, D. R.; Lacewell, R. D.; Ellis, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    A flexible, recursive programming model of crop production on the Texas High Plains was developed. Besides the linear programming (LP) Optimization routine and recursive feedback section, the model also includes a matrix generator and report writer...

  11. Constraints and potentials of future irrigation water availability on agricultural production under

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    | hydrology | uncertainty Alack of available water for agricultural production, energy projects, other formsConstraints and potentials of future irrigation water availability on agricultural production under, United Kingdom; e Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, 14473 Potsdam, Germany; f Department

  12. Increasing global agricultural production by reducing ozone damages via methane emission controls and ozone-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauzerall, Denise

    Increasing global agricultural production by reducing ozone damages via methane emission controls demonstrate the significant potential to sustainably improve global agricultural production by decreasing O3 degradation poses a major challenge for agricultural production. Because surface ozone (O3) has a significant

  13. Simulating a storage-production system with three oilseed crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Figer, Luiz

    2012-01-01

    This work developed a simulation model that is intended to be used for strategic investment decisions by a company that operates in a wide range of activities in the agriculture business in Brazil. Mostly, it is a tool ...

  14. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa -2007 File A1-20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa - 2007 File A1-20 T he estimated costs of corn, corn sources. They include the annual Iowa Farm Business Asso- ciation record summaries, production and costs the state. These costs estimates are representative of average costs for farms in Iowa. Very large or small

  15. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa -2010 File A1-20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa - 2010 File A1-20 T heestimatedcostsofcorn Farm Business Association record summaries, production and costs data from the De- partments. Thesecostsestimatesarerepresentativeofaveragecosts for farms in Iowa. Very large or small farms may have lower or higher fixed costs per acre. Due

  16. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa -2009 File A1-20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa - 2009 File A1-20 T he estimated costs of corn, corn sources. They include the annual Iowa Farm Business Asso- ciation record summaries, production and costs the state. These costs estimates are representative of average costs for farms in Iowa. Very large or small

  17. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa -2008 File A1-20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa - 2008 File A1-20 T he estimated costs of corn, corn sources. They include the annual Iowa Farm Business Asso- ciation record summaries, production and costs the state. These costs estimates are representative of average costs for farms in Iowa. Very large or small

  18. Texas Crop Profile: Watermelon†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Kent D.; Holloway, Rodney L.; Smith, Dudley

    2000-04-12

    .? Texas Agricultural Extension Service. B-5022, ?Weed Control in Vegetable, Fruit and Nut Crops.? Texas Agricultural Extension Service. National Agricultural Pesticide Impact Assessment Program Web Site http://ipmwww.ncsu.edu/opmppiap/. Texas A...

  19. A National Assessment of Promising Areas for Switchgrass, Hybrid Poplar, or Willow Energy Crop Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, R.L.; Walsh, M.E.

    1999-02-01

    The objective of this paper is to systematically assess the cropland acreage that could support energy crops and the expected farm gate and delivered prices of energy crops. The assessment is based on output from two modeling approaches: (1) the Oak Ridge County-Level Energy Crop (ORECCL) database (1996 version) and (2) the Oak Ridge Integrated Bioenergy Analysis System (ORIBAS). The former provides county-level estimates of suitable acres, yields, and farmgate prices of energy crops (switchgrass, hybrid poplar, willow) for all fifty states. The latter estimates delivered feedstock prices and quantities within a state at a fine resolution (1 km2) and considers the interplay between transportation costs, farmgate prices, cropland density, and facility demand. It can be used to look at any type of feedstock given the appropriate input parameters. For the purposes of this assessment, ORIBAS has been used to estimate farmgate and delivered switchgrass prices in 11 states (AL, FL, GA, IA, M N, MO, ND, NE, SC, SD, and TN). Because the potential for energy crop production can be considered from several perspectives, and is evolving as policies, economics and our basic understanding of energy crop yields and production costs change, this assessment should be viewed as a snapshot in time.

  20. Opportunities for Energy Crop Production Based on Subfield Scale Distribution of Profitability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian Bonner; Kara Cafferty; David Muth Jr.; Mark Tomer

    2014-10-01

    Incorporation of dedicated herbaceous energy crops into row crop landscapes is a promising means to supply an expanding biofuel industry while increasing biomass yields, benefiting soil and water quality, and increasing biodiversity. Despite these positive traits energy crops remain largely unaccepted due to concerns over their practicality and cost of implementation. This paper presents a case study on Hardin County, Iowa to demonstrate how subfield decision making can be used to target candidate areas for conversion to energy crop production. The strategy presented integrates switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) into subfield landscape positions where corn (Zea mays L.) grain is modeled to operate at a net economic loss. The results of this analysis show that switchgrass integration has the potential to increase sustainable biomass production from 48 to 99% (depending on the rigor of conservation practices applied to corn stover collection) while also improving field level profitability. Candidate land area is highly sensitive to grain price (0.18 to 0.26 US$ kg-1) and dependent on the acceptable net profit for corn production (ranging from 0 to -1,000 US$ ha-1). This work presents the case that switchgrass can be economically implemented into row crop production landscapes when management decisions are applied at a subfield scale and compete against areas of the field operating at a negative net profit.

  1. Industrial Crops and Products 43 (2013) 802811 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Saad A.

    2013-01-01

    and environmental and waste management concerns due to non-biodegradability of conventional plastics have thusIndustrial Crops and Products 43 (2013) 802≠811 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect Industrial Crops and Products journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/indcrop Production

  2. Agricultural Productivity and Mortality: Evidence from Kagera, Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ikegami, Munenobu

    2009-01-01

    and seminar participants at ďAgriculture for Development in Sub-Saharan AfricaĒ or- ganized by African Economic Research

  3. Global Simulation of Bioenergy Crop Productivity: Analytical framework and Case Study for Switchgrass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nair, S. Surendran [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Nichols, Jeff A. {Cyber Sciences} [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL] [ORNL; Wang, Dali [ORNL] [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL] [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL] [ORNL; Wei, Yaxing [ORNL] [ORNL; Singh, Nagendra [ORNL] [ORNL; Kang, Shujiang [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary global assessments of the deployment potential and sustainability aspects of biofuel crops lack quantitative details. This paper describes an analytical framework capable of meeting the challenges associated with global scale agro-ecosystem modeling. We designed a modeling platform for bioenergy crops, consisting of five major components: (i) standardized global natural resources and management data sets, (ii) global simulation unit and management scenarios, (iii) model calibration and validation, (iv) high-performance computing (HPC) modeling, and (v) simulation output processing and analysis. A case study with the HPC- Environmental Policy Integrated Climate model (HPC-EPIC) to simulate a perennial bioenergy crop, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) and global biomass feedstock analysis on grassland demonstrates the application of this platform. The results illustrate biomass feedstock variability of switchgrass and provide insights on how the modeling platform can be expanded to better assess sustainable production criteria and other biomass crops. Feedstock potentials on global grasslands and within different countries are also shown. Future efforts involve developing databases of productivity, implementing global simulations for other bioenergy crops (e.g. miscanthus, energycane and agave), and assessing environmental impacts under various management regimes. We anticipated this platform will provide an exemplary tool and assessment data for international communities to conduct global analysis of biofuel biomass feedstocks and sustainability.

  4. Water and energy footprints of bioenergy crop production on marginal lands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    of Zoology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA Abstract Water and energy demandsWater and energy footprints of bioenergy crop production on marginal lands A . K . B H A R D WA J and S . K . H A M I LT O N *w} *Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, Michigan State University, East

  5. Energy Supply- Production of Fuel from Agricultural and Animal Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gabriel Miller

    2009-03-25

    The Society for Energy and Environmental Research (SEER) was funded in March 2004 by the Department of Energy, under grant DE-FG-36-04GO14268, to produce a study, and oversee construction and implementation, for the thermo-chemical production of fuel from agricultural and animal waste. The grant focuses on the Changing World Technologies (CWT) of West Hempstead, NY, thermal conversion process (TCP), which converts animal residues and industrial food processing biproducts into fuels, and as an additional product, fertilizers. A commercial plant was designed and built by CWT, partially using grant funds, in Carthage, Missouri, to process animal residues from a nearby turkey processing plant. The DOE sponsored program consisted of four tasks. These were: Task 1 Optimization of the CWT Plant in Carthage - This task focused on advancing and optimizing the process plant operated by CWT that converts organic waste to fuel and energy. Task 2 Characterize and Validate Fuels Produced by CWT - This task focused on testing of bio-derived hydrocarbon fuels from the Carthage plant in power generating equipment to determine the regulatory compliance of emissions and overall performance of the fuel. Task 3 Characterize Mixed Waste Streams - This task focused on studies performed at Princeton University to better characterize mixed waste incoming streams from animal and vegetable residues. Task 4 Fundamental Research in Waste Processing Technologies - This task focused on studies performed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) on the chemical reformation reaction of agricultural biomass compounds in a hydrothermal medium. Many of the challenges to optimize, improve and perfect the technology, equipment and processes in order to provide an economically viable means of creating sustainable energy were identified in the DOE Stage Gate Review, whose summary report was issued on July 30, 2004. This summary report appears herein as Appendix 1, and the findings of the report formed the basis for much of the subsequent work under the grant. An explanation of the process is presented as well as the completed work on the four tasks.

  6. Benefits of supplementing an industrial waste anaerobic digester with energy crops for increased biogas production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nges, Ivo Achu, E-mail: Nges.Ivo_Achu@biotek.lu.se [Department of Biotechnology, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE 221 00 Lund (Sweden); Escobar, Federico; Fu Xinmei; Bjoernsson, Lovisa [Department of Biotechnology, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE 221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study demonstrates the feasibility of co-digestion food industrial waste with energy crops. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Laboratory batch co-digestion led to improved methane yield and carbon to nitrogen ratio as compared to mono-digestion of industrial waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-digestion was also seen as a means of degrading energy crops with nutrients addition as crops are poor in nutrients. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Batch co-digestion methane yields were used to predict co-digestion methane yield in full scale operation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It was concluded that co-digestion led an over all economically viable process and ensured a constant supply of feedstock. - Abstract: Currently, there is increasing competition for waste as feedstock for the growing number of biogas plants. This has led to fluctuation in feedstock supply and biogas plants being operated below maximum capacity. The feasibility of supplementing a protein/lipid-rich industrial waste (pig manure, slaughterhouse waste, food processing and poultry waste) mesophilic anaerobic digester with carbohydrate-rich energy crops (hemp, maize and triticale) was therefore studied in laboratory scale batch and continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTR) with a view to scale-up to a commercial biogas process. Co-digesting industrial waste and crops led to significant improvement in methane yield per ton of feedstock and carbon-to-nitrogen ratio as compared to digestion of the industrial waste alone. Biogas production from crops in combination with industrial waste also avoids the need for micronutrients normally required in crop digestion. The batch co-digestion methane yields were used to predict co-digestion methane yield in full scale operation. This was done based on the ratio of methane yields observed for laboratory batch and CSTR experiments compared to full scale CSTR digestion of industrial waste. The economy of crop-based biogas production is limited under Swedish conditions; therefore, adding crops to existing industrial waste digestion could be a viable alternative to ensure a constant/reliable supply of feedstock to the anaerobic digester.

  7. Economic effect on agricultural production of alternative energy input prices: Texas High Plains†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Benjamin Michael

    1975-01-01

    ECONOMIC EFFECT ON AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION OF ALTERNATIYE ENERGy INPUT PRICES: TEXAS HIGH PLAlNS A Thesis by BENJAMIN MICHAEL ADAMS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1975 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics ECONOMIC EFFECT ON AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION OF ALTERNATIVE ENERGY INPUT PRICES: TEXAS HIGH PLAINS A Thesis by BENJAMIN MICHAEL ADAMS Approved as to style and content...

  8. Novel enabling technologies of gene isolation and plant transformation for improved crop protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torok, Tamas

    2013-02-04

    Meeting the needs of agricultural producers requires the continued development of improved transgenic crop protection products. The completed project focused on developing novel enabling technologies of gene discovery and plant transformation to facilitate the generation of such products.

  9. Agricultural

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D S TA I N P A T T E R N A NABPA'sDepositAgricultural Sign

  10. Agricultural

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D S TA I N P A T T E R N A NABPA'sDepositAgricultural

  11. Knowledge Integration to Make Decisions About Complex Systems: Sustainability of Energy Production from Agriculture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Danuso, Francesco [University of Udine, Italy

    2010-01-08

    A major bottleneck for improving the governance of complex systems, rely on our ability to integrate different forms of knowledge into a decision support system (DSS). Preliminary aspects are the classification of different types of knowledge (a priori or general, a posteriori or specific, with uncertainty, numerical, textual, algorithmic, complete/incomplete, etc.), the definition of ontologies for knowledge management and the availability of proper tools like continuous simulation models, event driven models, statistical approaches, computational methods (neural networks, evolutionary optimization, rule based systems etc.) and procedure for textual documentation. Following these views at University of Udine, a computer language (SEMoLa, Simple, Easy Modelling Language) for knowledge integration has been developed.† SEMoLa can handle models, data, metadata and textual knowledge; it implements and extends the system dynamics ontology (Forrester, 1968; JÝrgensen, 1994) in which systems are modelled by the concepts of material, group, state, rate, parameter, internal and external events and driving variables. As an example, a SEMoLa model to improve management and sustainability (economical, energetic, environmental) of the agricultural farms is presented. The model (X-Farm) simulates a farm in which cereal and forage yield, oil seeds, milk, calves and wastes can be sold or reused. X-Farm is composed by integrated modules describing fields (crop and soil), feeds and materials storage, machinery management, manpower† management, animal husbandry, economic and energetic balances, seed oil extraction, manure and wastes management, biogas production from animal wastes and biomasses.

  12. Production Methods and New Markets for Texas Florist Crops.†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorensen, H. B.; DeWerth, A.F.; Jensen, E. R.

    1958-01-01

    and elsewhere indicated that there was no appreciable market for flowers for use in the home and little industry effort was being directed toward developing the market, this project was designed to study the potential market for flow- ers for home use... for small, high-quality plants for this mar- ket. Mass market outlets that will absorb these new type plants designed for mass production can be especially important to flower growers. A large part of greenhouse operational costs is fixed and can...

  13. Three Essays on Climate Variability, Water and Agricultural Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Jinxiu

    2014-07-23

    examine the implications of increasing drought frequency in the Edwards Aquifer (EA) region of Texas on municipal, industrial, and agricultural water; land allocation; environmental flows; and welfare. To carry out this study we expand a regional...

  14. Development and application of WRF3.3-CLM4crop to study of agriculture - climate interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Yaqiong

    2013-01-01

    Energy balance closure at FLUXNET sites, Agricultural and ForestFor the evergreen forest sites, the energy flux simulationsalters the energy budget when converting between forest and

  15. A Special Issue of JA&WMA on Agricultural Air Quality: State of the Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aneja, Viney P.

    or disproportionate in- crease in demand for agricultural commodities--both crop and animal. Without scientific- cal concentration of animal-feeding operations and agri- cultural crop production are increasing,2,4 There are no nationwide monitoring networks in the United States to quantify agricultural emissions of green- house gases

  16. Crop physiology calibration in the CLM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bilionis, I.; Drewniak, B. A.; Constantinescu, E. M.

    2015-04-15

    Farming is using more of the land surface, as population increases and agriculture is increasingly applied for non-nutritional purposes such as biofuel production. This agricultural expansion exerts an increasing impact on the terrestrial carbon cycle. In order to understand the impact of such processes, the Community Land Model (CLM) has been augmented with a CLM-Crop extension that simulates the development of three crop types: maize, soybean, and spring wheat. The CLM-Crop model is a complex system that relies on a suite of parametric inputs that govern plant growth under a given atmospheric forcing and available resources. CLM-Crop development used measurements of gross primary productivity (GPP) and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) from AmeriFlux sites to choose parameter values that optimize crop productivity in the model. In this paper, we calibrate these parameters for one crop type, soybean, in order to provide a faithful projection in terms of both plant development and net carbon exchange. Calibration is performed in a Bayesian framework by developing a scalable and adaptive scheme based on sequential Monte Carlo (SMC). The model showed significant improvement of crop productivity with the new calibrated parameters. We demonstrate that the calibrated parameters are applicable across alternative years and different sites.

  17. Crop physiology calibration in the CLM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bilionis, I. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Mathematics and Computer Science Div.; Drewniak, B. A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Science Div.; Constantinescu, E. M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Mathematics and Computer Science Div.

    2015-01-01

    Farming is using more of the land surface, as population increases and agriculture is increasingly applied for non-nutritional purposes such as biofuel production. This agricultural expansion exerts an increasing impact on the terrestrial carbon cycle. In order to understand the impact of such processes, the Community Land Model (CLM) has been augmented with a CLM-Crop extension that simulates the development of three crop types: maize, soybean, and spring wheat. The CLM-Crop model is a complex system that relies on a suite of parametric inputs that govern plant growth under a given atmospheric forcing and available resources. CLM-Crop development used measurements of gross primary productivity (GPP) and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) from AmeriFlux sites to choose parameter values that optimize crop productivity in the model. In this paper, we calibrate these parameters for one crop type, soybean, in order to provide a faithful projection in terms of both plant development and net carbon exchange. Calibration is performed in a Bayesian framework by developing a scalable and adaptive scheme based on sequential Monte Carlo (SMC). The model showed significant improvement of crop productivity with the new calibrated parameters. We demonstrate that the calibrated parameters are applicable across alternative years and different sites.

  18. Crop physiology calibration in the CLM

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bilionis, I.; Drewniak, B. A.; Constantinescu, E. M.

    2015-04-15

    Farming is using more of the land surface, as population increases and agriculture is increasingly applied for non-nutritional purposes such as biofuel production. This agricultural expansion exerts an increasing impact on the terrestrial carbon cycle. In order to understand the impact of such processes, the Community Land Model (CLM) has been augmented with a CLM-Crop extension that simulates the development of three crop types: maize, soybean, and spring wheat. The CLM-Crop model is a complex system that relies on a suite of parametric inputs that govern plant growth under a given atmospheric forcing and available resources. CLM-Crop development used measurementsmore†Ľof gross primary productivity (GPP) and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) from AmeriFlux sites to choose parameter values that optimize crop productivity in the model. In this paper, we calibrate these parameters for one crop type, soybean, in order to provide a faithful projection in terms of both plant development and net carbon exchange. Calibration is performed in a Bayesian framework by developing a scalable and adaptive scheme based on sequential Monte Carlo (SMC). The model showed significant improvement of crop productivity with the new calibrated parameters. We demonstrate that the calibrated parameters are applicable across alternative years and different sites.ę†less

  19. Multi-factor impact analysis of agricultural production in Bangladesh with climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multi-factor impact analysis of agricultural production in Bangladesh with climate change Alex C, Washington, DC, United States d Bangladesh Centre for Advanced Studies (BCAS), Dhaka, Bangladesh e Bangladesh Agricultural Research Council (BARC), Dhaka, Bangladesh f Institute of Water Modelling (IWM), Dhaka, Bangladesh

  20. 554 WWW.CROPS.ORG CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 49, MARCHAPRIL 2009 Agriculture is an integrated biological production system,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gepts, Paul

    in the Lerma≠Santiago Basin of Mexico Myounghai Kwak, James A. Kami, and Paul Gepts* ABSTRACT Mesoamerican food- posed in the Balsas River basin in west-cen- tral Mexico, raising the question whether the Balsas basin≠Rio Grande de Santiago basin in west-central Mexico, dis- tinct from the Balsas basin. Although wild maize

  1. The economic impact of global climate and tropospheric oxone on world agricultural production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaodu

    2005-01-01

    The objective of my thesis is to analyze the economic impact on agriculture production from changes in climate and tropospheric ozone, and related policy interventions. The analysis makes use of the Emissions Prediction ...

  2. Genetic Engineering for Modern Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blumwald, Eduardo

    reserved 1543-5008/10/0602-0443$20.00 Key Words abiotic stress, climate change, field conditions, global warming, stress combination, stress tolerance, transgenic crops Abstract Abiotic stress conditions such as drought, heat, or salinity cause exten- sive losses to agricultural production worldwide. Progress

  3. The effects of agricultural land use patterns on pollutant runoff from watersheds: rangeland/pastureland and row cropping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayne, Andrew A.

    1995-01-01

    was compiled for testing/monitoring. This list was based on two components, nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P), of agricultural fertilizers which are typically a combination of nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and sulfur (N, P, K, S) and sometimes chelated micro...

  4. Crop Protection 26 (2007) 894902 Integrated approaches to understanding and managing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neher, Deborah A.

    2007-01-01

    . Dudeke a College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824) in question, (ii) the effects of past and current crop production system practices on nematode behaviour

  5. Grazing Strategies for Beef Production Escalating energy costs and alternative cropping systems for biofuels production have

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for biofuels production have dramatically increased costs of fertilizer, seed, and feed grains. These increased

  6. Vegetable Oil from Leaves and Stems: Vegetative Production of Oil in a C4 Crop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-01

    PETRO Project: Arcadia Biosciences, in collaboration with the University of California-Davis, is developing plants that produce vegetable oil in their leaves and stems. Ordinarily, these oils are produced in seeds, but Arcadia Biosciences is turning parts of the plant that are not usually harvested into a source of concentrated energy. Vegetable oil is a concentrated source of energy that plants naturally produce and is easily separated after harvest. Arcadia Biosciences will isolate traits that control oil production in seeds and transfer them into leaves and stems so that all parts of the plants are oil-rich at harvest time. After demonstrating these traits in a fast-growing model plant, Arcadia Biosciences will incorporate them into a variety of dedicated biofuel crops that can be grown on land not typically suited for food production

  7. Modeling the profitability of power production from short-rotation woody crops in Sub-Saharan Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    should focus on SRWC productivity and energy life cycle analysis. ™ 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rightsModeling the profitability of power production from short-rotation woody crops in Sub, USA b UNIQUE Forestry and Land Use GmbH, SchnewlinstraŖe 10, 79098 Freiburg, Germany c Centre

  8. Novel Techniques and Their Wide Applications to Health Foods, Medical and Agricultural Biotechnology in Relation to Policy Making on Genetically Modified Crops and Foods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baianu, I C; Lozano, P; Lin, H C

    2004-01-01

    Selected applications of novel techniques in Agricultural Biotechnology, Health Food formulations and Medical Biotechnology are being reviewed with the aim of unraveling future developments and policy changes that are likely to open new markets for Biotechnology and prevent the shrinking or closing of existing ones. Amongst the selected novel techniques with applications in both Agricultural and Medical Biotechnology are: immobilized bacterial cells and enzymes, microencapsulation and liposome production, genetic manipulation of microorganisms, development of novel vaccines from plants, epigenomics of mammalian cells and organisms, and biocomputational tools for molecular modeling related to disease and Bioinformatics. Both fundamental and applied aspects of the emerging new techniques are being discussed in relation to their anticipated, marked impact on future markets and present policy changes that are needed for success in either Agricultural or Medical Biotechnology. The novel techniques are illustrated ...

  9. 16 Louisiana Agriculture, Summer 2005 ice production in the United

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -added applications is so far limited. Trans- forming the straw fiber resources into high quality panel products provides a prospective solution to the straw disposal problem. Straw-based compos- ites offer potential). The samples were cleaned with water at room temperature and subse- quently conditioned for two weeks

  10. Industrial Crops and Products 33 (2011) 504513 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    online 5 January 2011 Keywords: Bioenergy Energy crops Specific energy consumption Mechanical size sizes after comminution were found inversely proportional to the bulk densities of all four energy crops crops. The bulk densities for 4-mm and smaller Miscanthus and switchgrass particles were higher than

  11. Atmospheric inversion of surface carbon flux with consideration of the spatial distribution of US crop production and consumption

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, J. M.; Univ. of Toronto, ON; Fung, J. W.; Mo, G.; Deng, F.; West, T. O.

    2015-01-19

    In order to improve quantification of the spatial distribution of carbon sinks and sources in the conterminous US, we conduct a nested global atmospheric inversion with detailed spatial information on crop production and consumption. County-level cropland net primary productivity, harvested biomass, soil carbon change, and human and livestock consumption data over the conterminous US are used for this purpose. Time-dependent Bayesian synthesis inversions are conducted based on CO? observations at 210 stations to infer CO? fluxes globally at monthly time steps with a nested focus on 30 regions in North America. Prior land surface carbon fluxes are first generated usingmore†Ľa biospheric model, and the inversions are constrained using prior fluxes with and without adjustments for crop production and consumption over the 2002Ė2007 period. After these adjustments, the inverted regional carbon sink in the US Midwest increases from 0.25 Ī 0.03 to 0.42 Ī 0.13 Pg C yr?Ļ, whereas the large sink in the US southeast forest region is weakened from 0.41 Ī 0.12 to 0.29 Ī 0.12 Pg C yr?Ļ. These adjustments also reduce the inverted sink in the west region from 0.066 Ī 0.04 to 0.040 Ī 0.02 Pg C yr?Ļ because of high crop consumption and respiration by humans and livestock. The general pattern of sink increases in crop production areas and sink decreases (or source increases) in crop consumption areas highlights the importance of considering the lateral carbon transfer in crop products in atmospheric inverse modeling, which provides a reliable atmospheric perspective of the overall carbon balance at the continental scale but is unreliable for separating fluxes from different ecosystems.ę†less

  12. Atmospheric inversion of surface carbon flux with consideration of the spatial distribution of US crop production and consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, J. M.; Fung, J. W.; Mo, G.; Deng, F.; West, T. O.

    2015-01-19

    In order to improve quantification of the spatial distribution of carbon sinks and sources in the conterminous US, we conduct a nested global atmospheric inversion with detailed spatial information on crop production and consumption. County-level cropland net primary productivity, harvested biomass, soil carbon change, and human and livestock consumption data over the conterminous US are used for this purpose. Time-dependent Bayesian synthesis inversions are conducted based on CO? observations at 210 stations to infer CO? fluxes globally at monthly time steps with a nested focus on 30 regions in North America. Prior land surface carbon fluxes are first generated using a biospheric model, and the inversions are constrained using prior fluxes with and without adjustments for crop production and consumption over the 2002Ė2007 period. After these adjustments, the inverted regional carbon sink in the US Midwest increases from 0.25 Ī 0.03 to 0.42 Ī 0.13 Pg C yr?Ļ, whereas the large sink in the US southeast forest region is weakened from 0.41 Ī 0.12 to 0.29 Ī 0.12 Pg C yr?Ļ. These adjustments also reduce the inverted sink in the west region from 0.066 Ī 0.04 to 0.040 Ī 0.02 Pg C yr?Ļ because of high crop consumption and respiration by humans and livestock. The general pattern of sink increases in crop production areas and sink decreases (or source increases) in crop consumption areas highlights the importance of considering the lateral carbon transfer in crop products in atmospheric inverse modeling, which provides a reliable atmospheric perspective of the overall carbon balance at the continental scale but is unreliable for separating fluxes from different ecosystems.

  13. Atmospheric inversion of the surface carbon flux with consideration of the spatial distributions of US crop production and consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, J. M.; Fung, J. W.; Mo, G.; Deng, F.; West, Tristram O.

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve quantification of the spatial distribution of carbon sinks and sources in the conterminous USA, we conduct a nested global atmospheric inversion with consideration of the spatial information of crop production and consumption. Spatially distributed 5 county-level cropland net primary productivity, harvested biomass, soil carbon change, and human and livestock consumption data over the conterminous USA are used for this purpose. Time-dependent Bayesian synthesis inversions are conducted based on CO? observations at 210 stations to infer CO? fluxes globally at monthly time steps with a nested focus on 30 regions in North America. Prior land surface carbon 10 fluxes are first generated using a biospheric model, and the inversions are constrained using prior fluxes with and without adjustments for crop production and consumption over the 2002Ė2007 period. After these adjustments, the inverted regional carbon sink in the US Midwest increases from 0.25 Ī 0.03 Pg C yr?Ļ to 0.42 Ī 0.13 Pg C yr?Ļ, whereas the large sink in the US Southeast forest region is weakened from 0.41Ī0.12 Pg C yr?Ļ 15 to 0.29 Ī0.12 Pg C yr?Ļ. These adjustments also reduce the inverted sink in the West region from 0.066 Ī 0.04 Pg C yr?Ļ to 0.040 Ī 0.02 Pg C yr?1 because of high crop consumption and respiration by humans and livestock. The general pattern of sink increase in crop production areas and sink decreases (or source increases) in crop consumption areas highlights the importance of considering the lateral carbon transfer in crop 20 products in atmospheric inverse modeling, which provides an atmospheric perspective of the overall carbon balance of a region.

  14. Atmospheric inversion of surface carbon flux with consideration of the spatial distribution of US crop production and consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, J. M. [Nanjing Univ., Jiangsu (China); Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Fung, J. W. [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Mo, G. [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Deng, F. [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); West, T. O. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve quantification of the spatial distribution of carbon sinks and sources in the conterminous US, we conduct a nested global atmospheric inversion with detailed spatial information on crop production and consumption. County-level cropland net primary productivity, harvested biomass, soil carbon change, and human and livestock consumption data over the conterminous US are used for this purpose. Time-dependent Bayesian synthesis inversions are conducted based on CO? observations at 210 stations to infer CO? fluxes globally at monthly time steps with a nested focus on 30 regions in North America. Prior land surface carbon fluxes are first generated using a biospheric model, and the inversions are constrained using prior fluxes with and without adjustments for crop production and consumption over the 2002Ė2007 period. After these adjustments, the inverted regional carbon sink in the US Midwest increases from 0.25 Ī 0.03 to 0.42 Ī 0.13 Pg C yr?Ļ, whereas the large sink in the US southeast forest region is weakened from 0.41 Ī 0.12 to 0.29 Ī 0.12 Pg C yr?Ļ. These adjustments also reduce the inverted sink in the west region from 0.066 Ī 0.04 to 0.040 Ī 0.02 Pg C yr?Ļ because of high crop consumption and respiration by humans and livestock. The general pattern of sink increases in crop production areas and sink decreases (or source increases) in crop consumption areas highlights the importance of considering the lateral carbon transfer in crop products in atmospheric inverse modeling, which provides a reliable atmospheric perspective of the overall carbon balance at the continental scale but is unreliable for separating fluxes from different ecosystems.

  15. Essays on the Effect of Climate Change over Agriculture and Forestry†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villavicencio Cordova, Xavier A.

    2010-07-14

    In this dissertation, I study the effects of climate change on agricultural total factor productivity and crop yields and their variability. In addition, an examination was conducted on the value of select climate change ...

  16. Solar Grade Silicon from Agricultural By-products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard M. Laine

    2012-08-20

    In this project, Mayaterials developed a low cost, low energy and low temperature method of purifying rice hull ash to high purity (5-6Ns) and converting it by carbothermal reduction to solar grade quality silicon (Sipv) using a self-designed and built electric arc furnace (EAF). Outside evaluation of our process by an independent engineering firm confirms that our technology greatly lowers estimated operating expenses (OPEX) to $5/kg and capital expenses (CAPEX) to $24/kg for Sipv production, which is well below best-in-class plants using a Siemens process approach (OPEX of 14/kg and CAPEX of $87/kg, respectively). The primary limiting factor in the widespread use of photovoltaic (PV) cells is the high cost of manufacturing, compared to more traditional sources to reach 6 g Sipv/watt (with averages closer to 8+g/watt). In 2008, the spot price of Sipv rose to $450/kg. While prices have since dropped to a more reasonable $25/kg; this low price level is not sustainable, meaning the longer-term price will likely return to $35/kg. The 6-8 g Si/watt implies that the Sipv used in a module will cost $0.21-0.28/watt for the best producers (45% of the cost of a traditional solar panel), a major improvement from the cost/wafer driven by the $50/kg Si costs of early 2011, but still a major hindrance in fulfilling DOE goal of lowering the cost of solar energy below $1/watt. The solar cell industry has grown by 40% yearly for the past eight years, increasing the demand for Sipv. As such, future solar silicon price spikes are expected in the next few years. Although industry has invested billions of dollars to meet this ever-increasing demand, the technology to produce Sipv remains largely unchanged requiring the energy intensive, and chlorine dependent Siemens process or variations thereof. While huge improvements have been made, current state-of-the-art industrial plant still use 65 kWh/kg of silicon purified. Our technology offers a key distinction to other technologies as it starts one step upstream from all other Sipv production efforts. Our process starts by producing high purity SiO2/C feedstocks from which Sipv can be produced in a single, chlorine free, final EAF step. Specifically, our unique technology, and the resultant SiO2/C product can serve as high purity feedstocks to existing metallurgical silicon (Simet) producers, allowing them to generate Sipv with existing US manufacturing infrastructure, reducing the overall capital and commissioning schedule. Our low energy, low CAPEX and OPEX process purifies the silica and carbon present in rice hull ash (RHA) at low temperatures (< 200C) to produce high purity (5-6 Ns) feedstock for production of Sipv using furnaces similar to those used to produce Simet. During the course of this project we partnered with Wadham Energy LP (Wadham), who burns 220k ton of rice hulls (RH)/yr generating 200 GWh of electricity/yr and >30k ton/yr RHA. The power generation step produces much more energy (42 kWh/kg of final silicon produced) than required to purify the RHA (5 kWh/kg of Sipv, compared to 65 kWh/kg noted above. Biogenic silica offers three very important foundations for producing high purity silicon. First, wastes from silica accumulating plants, such as rice, corn, many grasses, algae and grains, contain very reactive, amorphous silica from which impurities are easily removed. Second, plants take up only a limited set of, and minimal quantities of the heavy metals present in nature, meaning fewer minerals must be removed. Third, biomass combustion generates a product with intrinsic residual carbon, mixed at nanometer length scales with the SiO2. RHA is 80-90 wt% high surface area (20 m2/g), amorphous SiO2 with some simple mineral content mixed intimately with 5-15 wt% carbon. The mineral content is easily removed by low cost, acid washes using Mayaterials IP, leading to purified rice hull ash (RHAclean) at up to 6N purity. This highly reactive silica is partially extracted from RHAclean at 200 C in an environmentally benign process to adjust SiO2:C ratios to those needed in EA

  17. An analysis of producing ethanol and electric power from woody residues and agricultural crops in East Texas†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ismayilova, Rubaba Mammad

    2007-09-17

    ethanol production. The results were integrated into a comprehensive set of information that addresses the effects of biomass energy development in the region. The analysis indicates that none of the counties in East Texas have sufficient biomass...

  18. Assessing the Economic Viability of Bio-based Products for Missouri Value-added Crop Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicholas Kalaitzandonakes

    2005-11-30

    While research and development on biobased products has continued strong over the years, parallel attention on the economics and management of such product innovation has been lacking. With the financial support of the Department of Energy, the Economics and Management of Agrobiotechnology Center at the University of Missouri-Columbia has launched a pilot graduate education program that seeks to fill the gap. Within this context, a multi-disciplinary research and teaching program has been structured with an emphasis on new product and innovation economics and management. More specifically, this pilot graduate education program has the following major objectives: (1) To provide students with a strong background in innovation economics, management, and strategy. (2) To diversify the students academic background with coursework in science and technology. (3) To familiarize the student with biobased policy initiatives through interaction with state and national level organizations and policymakers. (4) To facilitate active collaboration with industry involved in the development and production of biobased products. The pilot education program seeks to develop human capital and research output. Although the research is, initially, focused on issues related to the State of Missouri, the results are expected to have national implications for the economy, producers, consumers and environment.

  19. Production and fuel characteristics of vegetable oil from oilseed crops in the Pacific Northwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auld, D.L.; Bettis, B.L.; Peterson, C.L.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the potential yield and fuel quality of various oilseed crops adapted to the Pacific Northwest as a source of liquid fuel for diesel engines. The seed yield and oil production of three cultivars of winter rape (Brassica napus L.), two cultivars of safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) and two cultivars of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) were evaluated in replicated plots at Moscow. Additional trials were conducted at several locations in Idaho, Oregon and Washington. Sunflower, oleic and linoleic safflower, and low and high erucic acid rapeseed were evaluated for fatty acid composition, energy content, viscosity and engine performance in short term tests. During 20 minute engine tests power output, fuel economy and thermal efficiency were compared to diesel fuel. Winter rape produced over twice as much farm extractable oil as either safflower or sunflower. The winter rape cultivars, Norde and Jet Neuf had oil yields which averaged 1740 and 1540 L/ha, respectively. Vegetable oils contained 94 to 95% of the KJ/L of diesel fuel, but were 11.1 to 17.6 times more viscous. Viscosity of the vegetable oils was closely related to fatty acid chain length and number of unsaturated bonds (R/sup 2/=.99). During short term engine tests all vegetable oils produced power outputs equivalent to diesel, and had thermal efficiencies 1.8 to 2.8% higher than diesel. Based on these results it appears that species and cultivars of oilseed crops to be utilized as a source of fuel should be selected on the basis of oil yield. 1 figure, 5 tables.

  20. Plant genetics, sustainable agriculture and global food security.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronald, Pamela

    2011-01-01

    effects have resulted from commercialization of ge- netically engineered crops (Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources,

  1. Effects of Irrigating with Treated Oil and Gas Product Water on Crop Biomass and Soil Permeability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terry Brown; Jeffrey Morris; Patrick Richards; Joel Mason

    2010-09-30

    Demonstrating effective treatment technologies and beneficial uses for oil and gas produced water is essential for producers who must meet environmental standards and deal with high costs associated with produced water management. Proven, effective produced-water treatment technologies coupled with comprehensive data regarding blending ratios for productive long-term irrigation will improve the state-of-knowledge surrounding produced-water management. Effective produced-water management scenarios such as cost-effective treatment and irrigation will discourage discharge practices that result in legal battles between stakeholder entities. The goal of this work is to determine the optimal blending ratio required for irrigating crops with CBNG and conventional oil and gas produced water treated by ion exchange (IX), reverse osmosis (RO), or electro-dialysis reversal (EDR) in order to maintain the long term physical integrity of soils and to achieve normal crop production. The soils treated with CBNG produced water were characterized with significantly lower SAR values compared to those impacted with conventional oil and gas produced water. The CBNG produced water treated with RO at the 100% treatment level was significantly different from the untreated produced water, while the 25%, 50% and 75% water treatment levels were not significantly different from the untreated water. Conventional oil and gas produced water treated with EDR and RO showed comparable SAR results for the water treatment technologies. There was no significant difference between the 100% treated produced water and the control (river water). The EDR water treatment resulted with differences at each level of treatment, which were similar to RO treated conventional oil and gas water. The 100% treated water had SAR values significantly lower than the 75% and 50% treatments, which were similar (not significantly different). The results of the greenhouse irrigation study found the differences in biomass production between each soil were significant for Western Wheatgrass and Alfafla. The Sheridan sandy loam soil resulted in the highest production for western wheatgrass and alfalfa while the X-ranch sandy loam had the lowest production rate for both plants. Plant production levels resulting from untreated CBNG produced water were significantly higher compared to untreated conventional oil and gas produced water. However, few differences were found between water treatments. The biomass produced from the greenhouse study was analyzed for elemental composition and for forage value. Elemental composition indentified several interesting findings. Some of the biomass was characterized with seemly high boron and sodium levels. High levels of boron found in some of the biomass was unexpected and may indicate that alfalfa and western wheatgrass plants may have been impacted by either soil or irrigation water containing high boron levels. Plants irrigated with water treated using EDR technology appeared to contain higher levels of boron with increased levels of treatment. Forage evaluations were conducted using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy. The data collected show small differences, generally less than 10%, between produced water treatments including the no treatment and 100% treatment conditions for each plant species studied. The forage value of alfalfa and western wheatgrass did not show significant tendencies dependent on soil, the amount of produced water treatment, or treatment technology.

  2. This is SLU Alnarp SLU Alnarp is situated in Sweden's most dynamic agricultural, horticultural and food production region,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deals with the entire cultivation chain. This includes production of food, raw materials for industry's growing population with food, clean water, fibres, materials and energy using sus- tainable methods is a research network focused on new or improved crops and food products, materials, pharmaceuticals and energy

  3. Plant Water Use and Growth in Response to Soil Salinity in Irrigated Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Runkle, Benjamin Reade

    2009-01-01

    tolerance in plants. Crop Science, 45(2): 437. Cox, P. ,for crop tolerance. Crop Science, 45(1): 209. Steppuhn, H. ,in agricultural crops. Crop Science, 45(1): 221. Tolson,

  4. Effect of crop residue harvest on long-term crop yield, soil erosion, and carbon balance: tradeoffs for a sustainable bioenergy feedstock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregg, Jay S.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.

    2010-08-26

    Agricultural residues are a potential feedstock for bioenergy production, if residue harvest can be done sustainably. The relationship between crop residue harvest, soil erosion, crop yield and carbon balance was modeled with the Erosion Productivity Impact Calculator/ Environment Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) using a factorial design. Four crop rotations (winter wheat [Triticum aestivum (L.)] Ė sunflower [Helianthus annuus]; spring wheat [Triticum aestivum (L.)] Ė canola [Brassica napus]; corn [Zea mays L.] Ė soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.]; and cotton [Gossypium hirsutum] Ė peanut [Arachis hypogaea]) were simulated at four US locations each, under different topographies (0-10% slope), and management practices [crop residue removal rates (0-75%), conservation practices (no till, contour cropping, strip cropping, terracing)].

  5. The impact of mineral fertilizers on the carbon footprint of crop production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brentrup, Frank

    2009-01-01

    hence yield. The use of mineral fertilizer as a source ofsustainable agriculture. Mineral fertilizers are applied toresidues are decomposed to minerals Soil Figure 1: Mineral

  6. Regional Uptake and Release of Crop Carbon in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, Tristram O.; Bandaru, Varaprasad; Brandt, Craig C.; Schuh, A.E.; Ogle, S.M.

    2011-08-03

    Carbon fixed by agricultural crops in the US creates regional CO2 sinks where it is harvested and regional CO2 sources where it is released back to the atmosphere. The quantity and location of these fluxes differ depending on the annual supply and demand of crop commodities. Data on the harvest of crop biomass, storage, import and export, and on the use of biomass for food, feed, fiber, and fuel were compiled to estimate an annual crop carbon budget for 2000 to 2008. Net sources of CO2 associated with the consumption of crop commodities occurred in the Eastern Uplands, Southern Seaboard, and Fruitful Rim regions. Net sinks associated with the production of crop commodities occurred in the Heartland, Northern Crescent, Northern Great Plains, and Mississippi Portal regions. The national crop carbon budget was balanced to within 0.7 to 6.6% yr-1 during the period of this analysis.

  7. Weed Management in Organic Crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guiltinan, Mark

    Weed Management in Organic Crops Research Results Update Bill Curran Penn State University #12;Weed management tactics for organic productionCrop rotation ∑ Cover crops - dead mulches and green manures ∑ Primary and secondary tillage ∑ Irrigation and drainage ∑ Crop residue management ∑ Planting date

  8. Agricultural productivity in past societies: Toward an empirically informed model for testing cultural evolutionary hypotheses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    emulator of future climate change for impacts assessment.Emulating global climate change impacts on crop yields.potential challenges that climate change poses (Oyebamiji et

  9. Measuring Abatement Potentials When Multiple Change is Present: The Case of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation in U.S. Agriculture and Forestry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    can also offset greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by increasing production of energy crops, which can Professor Department of Agricultural Economics Texas A&M University Hamburg, Germany April 2003 1 #12 with conventional agricultural production. Competition among practices is examined under a wide range

  10. The Effect of Cropping Upon the Active Potash of the Soil.†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1924-01-01

    and the active potash lost from the soil, calculated from Table 3, is ,722 -L .016. This is a high correlation and shows a high relation between the pat- ash removed by crops and the 'active potash lost by soils. The correlation between the butter production... EXPEWMENT s r: ATION AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF %'EXAS W. B. BIZZELL, President -- -- BULLETIN NO. 325 SEPTEMBER, 1924 DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY EFFECT OF CROPPING UPON THE ACTIVE POTASH OF THE SOIL B. YOUNGBLOOD, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION...

  11. Regulation of GM Crops in Canada: Science-Based or...... ? E. Ann Clark, Plant Agriculture, University of Guelph, Guelph (eaclark@uoguelph.ca) 2004 E. Ann Clark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, E. Ann

    .....(see below) Most of what government has accepted as evidence of the safety of GM crops is not in the refereed risks. 3 on unscientific criteria, such as ethics, religious concerns, personal preference, power issues approach - in terms of: ∑ which questions to ask, ∑ how to design the study, or ∑ how to interpret

  12. Interdisciplinary Pest Management Potentials of Cover Cropping Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bachie, Oli Gurmu

    2011-01-01

    Cover Crop. J. Agronomy & Crop Science 186, 145-149 Allisonresistance in cowpea. Crop Science 40:611-618. Finch S. andProduction. J. Agronomy & Crop Science 191: 172ó Krueger

  13. Impact of demand-enhancing farm policy on the agricultural sector: a firm level simulation of ethanol production subsidies†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wasson, Leta Susanne

    1990-01-01

    to a 60 cent per gallon subsidy on each gallon of ethanol blended with gasoline. Other federal incentives include the Crude Oil Windfall Profit Tax of 1980 which gave blenders of ethanol an income tax credit and extended the gasoline tax exemption... subsidies providing for all off- highway uses of diesel fuel and gasoline to be exempt from Federal Excise taxes. Also, the Federal Crop Insurance Corporation has provided insurance against production losses due to weather and other perils at subsidized...

  14. Economic evaluation and conceptual design of optimal agricultural systems for production of food and energy. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1982-03-01

    The major technical and economic considerations which determined the scope of the study and the structure of the linear programming (LP) models are discussed. Four models, each representing a typical crop, beef, dairy, or swine farm in conjunction with ethanol facilities are characterized by the same general behavioral and mathematical model structure. Specific activities, constraints, and data for each of the four models are presented. An overview of the model structure is provided in the context of the general scope and background assumptions, and of its LP implementation. Simulated initial conditions and outcomes are reported for typical Illinois farms. Policy implications are discussed as related to agriculture, energy, and inter-industry coordination. (MHR)

  15. Recent developments in the use of transgenic plants for the production of human therapeutics and biopharmaceuticals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timko, Michael

    tools in the medical healthcare industry. As the products of genetically modified plants make their way to dramatic improvements in crop yields worldwide, the advent of genetic engineering in the early 1970's market globally and has impacted agricultural crop productivity, food quality, and human nutrition

  16. Despite the growth of agriculture and the consumption of forestry resources, these activities represent a continually decreasing percentage of production in Latin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Key messages ∑ Despite the growth of agriculture and the consumption of forestry resources, these activities represent a continually decreasing percentage of production in Latin American countries. ∑ Forest products account for a larger proportion of Latin America's material extraction than would

  17. Applications of Copulas to Analysis of Efficiency of Weather Derivatives as Primary Crop Insurance Instruments†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Filonov, Vitaly

    2012-10-19

    insurance. It is also a matter of common knowledge that weather is an important production factor and at the same time one of the greatest sources of risk in agriculture. Hence introduction of crop insurance contracts, based on weather indexes, might be a...

  18. Economic Effect on Agricultural Production of Alternative Energy Input Prices: Texas High Plains†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, B. M.; Lacewell, R. D.; Condra, G. D.

    1976-01-01

    The Arab oil embargo of 1973 awakened the world to the reality of energy shortages and higher fuel prices. Agriculture in the United States is highly mechanized and thus energy intensive. This study seeks to develop an evaluative capability...

  19. Agricultural productivity in past societies: Toward an empirically informed model for testing cultural evolutionary hypotheses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    due to changes in climate, technology, or genetics needs tofactors as new technologies and practices or climate change.climate change, genetic improvements due to artificial selection, or improved agricultural techniques and technology.

  20. Oklahoma Agriculture Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    Oklahoma Agriculture Agriculture #12;Oklahoma Agriculture 2011Oklahoma Agriculture 2011 Oklahoma well-being of our communities and the counties in which they are located. Oklahoma State University Resources Oklahoma State University #12;Farm Operations ∑ 86,600 farms; 4th in the nation ∑ Average age

  1. Potential producers and their attitudes toward adoption of biomass crops in central Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahmani, M.; Hodges, A.W.; Stricker, J.A.

    1996-12-31

    A recent study by the University of Florida, Center for Biomass Programs (1996) showed that biomass crops have potential as a new agricultural commodity in central Florida. Both herbaceous and woody biomass crops have high yields, and weather and soil conditions are favorable. In the Polk County area over 40,371 ha (100,000 A) of phosphate-mined land and about 161,486 ha (400,000 A) of pastureland may be available for biomass production at low opportunity cost. Phosphate land is owned by a few mining companies while pastureland is owned by or rented to cattlemen. Infrastructure for large-scale crop production, such as in the Midwest United States, does not presently exist in central Florida. Personal interviews were conducted with phosphate company managers and a mail survey was conducted with 940 landowners, with at least 16 ha (40 A) of agricultural land. Data were gathered related to decision making factors in growing biomass and other new crops. Results suggested that economic factors, particularly availability of an established market and an assured high return per acre were considered the most important factors. Lack of familiarity with new crops was an important barrier to their adoption. Potential net returns and production costs were considered the most important information needed to make decisions about growing biomass crops.

  2. Fuel from Tobacco and Arundo Donax: Synthetic Crop for Direct Drop-in Biofuel Production through Re-routing the Photorespiration Intermediates and Engineering Terpenoid Pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-02-15

    PETRO Project: Biofuels offer renewable alternatives to petroleum-based fuels that reduce net greenhouse gas emissions to nearly zero. However, traditional biofuels production is limited not only by the small amount of solar energy that plants convert through photosynthesis into biological materials, but also by inefficient processes for converting these biological materials into fuels. Farm-ready, non-food crops are needed that produce fuels or fuel-like precursors at significantly lower costs with significantly higher productivity. To make biofuels cost-competitive with petroleum-based fuels, biofuels production costs must be cut in half.

  3. Crop Insurance Terms and Definitions†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stokes, Kenneth; Waller, Mark L.; Outlaw, Joe; Barnaby, G. A. Art

    2008-10-17

    on the date coverage begins for the crop year. To qualify, an enterprise unit must contain all of the insurable acreage of the same insured crop in: One or more basic units that are located 1. in two or more separate sections, section equivalents, FSA... by the termination date specified in the Crop Provisions. Earliest planting date. The initial planting date contained in the Special Provisions, which is the earliest date the insured may plant an in- sured agricultural commodity and qualify for a replanting...

  4. Modeling impacts of carbon sequestration on net greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural soils in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    affect nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4) emissions from the agricultural soils in six selected sites for their potential to sequester C in their soil organic pools through management alternatives. For example, replacing but also elevates the soil fertility to optimize the crop production. The C seques- tration issue

  5. The Effect of Transaction Costs on Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation for Agriculture and Forestry†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Seong Woo

    2011-08-08

    of the activities of agricultural and forestry to EPA?s carbon prices: 40 percent from tillage practices, 30 percent from afforestation, 20 percent from methane capture, and 20 percent from production of bioenergy crops. Mooney et al. (2003................................ 14 III ECONOMIC POTENTIAL OF GHG EMISSION REDUCTIONS: EFFECTS OF INCLUDING TRANSACTION COSTS IN ELIGIBILITY ................................................................................. 19 Introduction...

  6. Effect of chronic inhalation of inorganic arsenic on the risk of stillbirth in a community surrounding an agriculture chemical production facility: a hospital-based study†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ihrig, Melanie M

    1997-01-01

    EFFECT OF CHRONIC INHALATION OF INORGANIC ARSENIC ON THE RISK OF STILLBIRTH IN A COMMUNITY SURROUNDING AN AGRICULTURE CHEMICAL PRODUCTION FACILITY: A HOSPITAL-BASED STUDY A Thesis by MELANIE M. IHRIG Submitted to the Office of Graduate...

  7. The Impact of Biofuel and Greenhouse Gas Policies on Land Management, Agricultural Production, and Environmental Quality†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Justin Scott

    2012-10-19

    emissions and mitigation, commodity prices, production, net exports, sectoral economic welfare, and shifts in management practices and intensity. Direct and indirect consequences of RFS2 and carbon policy are highlighted, including regional production...

  8. P3.2. Climate change and agricultural production risks PI: P. Calanca1), J. Fuhrer (Deputy PI)1), Co-PI: B. Lehmann2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    residues, soils may turn from a C sink to a source of atmospheric CO2. SOM stabilization depends on residue directly by more frequent and persistent dry spells and high temperatures, and indirectly through shifts (frequency/persistence) increase crop production risks by affecting physical and chemical properties

  9. The significance of local water resources captured in small reservoirs for crop production A global-scale analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas, Ellen M.

    modelling Food security Crop yield s u m m a r y Rainwater harvesting, broadly defined as the collection significance, rainwater harvesting in small reser- voirs has previously been overlooked in large data and other physical datasets to explore the potential role of small, localized rainwater harvesting

  10. Wood products trade and foreign markets: Asian market profile issue, November 1993. Foreign agriculture circular

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    Contents: trade summary; significant developments; status of usda/ccc export credit guarantees for wood products; US global export status; trends in US exports to the pacific rim; market profiles for wood products; pacific rim; europe; commodity/country trade tables; US exports, 1988 - 1st half 1993; US imports, 1988 - 1st half 1993.

  11. Meeting the Radiative Forcing Targets of the Representative Concentration Pathways in a World with Agricultural Climate Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyle, G. Page; Mueller, C.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-02-28

    This study assesses how climate impacts on agriculture may change the evolution of the agricultural and energy systems in meeting the end-of-century radiative forcing targets of the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs). We build on the recently completed ISI-MIP exercise that has produced global gridded estimates of future crop yields for major agricultural crops using climate model projections of the RCPs from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). For this study we use the bias-corrected outputs of the HadGEM2-ES climate model as inputs to the LPJmL crop growth model, and the outputs of LPJmL to modify inputs to the GCAM integrated assessment model. Our results indicate that agricultural climate impacts generally lead to an increase in global cropland, as compared with corresponding emissions scenarios that do not consider climate impacts on agricultural productivity. This is driven mostly by negative impacts on wheat, rice, other grains, and oil crops. Still, including agricultural climate impacts does not significantly increase the costs or change the technological strategies of global, whole-system emissions mitigation. In fact, to meet the most aggressive climate change mitigation target (2.6 W/m2 in 2100), the net mitigation costs are slightly lower when agricultural climate impacts are considered. Key contributing factors to these results are (a) low levels of climate change in the low-forcing scenarios, (b) adaptation to climate impacts, simulated in GCAM through inter-regional shifting in the production of agricultural goods, and (c) positive average climate impacts on bioenergy crop yields.

  12. Agricultural production in the United States by county: a compilation of information from the 1974 census of agriculture for use in terrestrial food-chain transport and assessment models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shor, R.W.; Baes, C.F. III; Sharp, R.D.

    1982-01-01

    Terrestrial food-chain models that simulate the transport of environmentally released radionuclides incorporate parameters describing agricultural production and practice. Often a single set of default parameters, such as that listed in USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.109, is used in lieu of site-specific information. However, the geographical diversity of agricultural practice in the United States suggests the limitations of a single set of default parameters for assessment models. This report documents default parameters with a county-wide resolution based on analysis of the 1974 US Census of Agriculture for use in terrestrial food chain models. Data reported by county, together with state-based information from the US Department of Agriculture, Economic and Statistics Service, provided the basis for estimates of model input parameters. This report also describes these data bases, their limitations, and lists default parameters by county. Vegetable production is described for four categories: leafy vegetables; vegetables and fruits exposed to airborne material; vegetables, fruits, and nuts protected from airborne materials; and grains. Livestock feeds were analyzed in categories of hay, silage, pasture, and grains. Pasture consumption was estimated from cattle and sheep inventories, their feed requirements, and reported quantities of harvested forage. The results were compared with assumed yields of the pasture areas reported. In addition, non-vegetable food production estimates including milk, beef, pork, lamb, poultry, eggs, goat milk, and honey are described. The agricultural parameters and land use information - in all 47 items - are tabulated in four appendices for each of the 3067 counties of the US reported to the Census of Agriculture, excluding those in Hawaii and Alaska.

  13. Test of a solar crop dryer Danish Technological Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Test of a solar crop dryer Danish Technological Institute Danish Institute of Agricultural Sciences Aidt MiljÝ A/S SEC-R-6 #12;Test of a solar crop dryer SÝren ōstergaard Jensen Danish Technological/S January 2001 #12;Preface The report describes the tests carried out on a solar crop dryer. The work

  14. Developing Switchgrass as a Bioenergy Crop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bouton, J.; Bransby, D.; Conger, B.; McLaughlin, S.; Ocumpaugh, W.; Parrish, D.; Taliaferro, C.; Vogel, K.; Wullschleger, S.

    1998-11-08

    The utilization of energy crops produced on American farms as a source of renewable fuels is a concept with great relevance to current ecological and economic issues at both national and global scales. Development of a significant national capacity to utilize perennial forage crops, such as switchgrass (Panicum virgatum, L.) as biofuels could benefit our agricultural economy by providing an important new source of income for farmers. In addition energy production from perennial cropping systems, which are compatible with conventional fining practices, would help reduce degradation of agricultural soils, lower national dependence on foreign oil supplies, and reduce emissions of greenhouse gases and toxic pollutants to the atmosphere (McLaughlin 1998). Interestingly, on-farm energy production is a very old concept, extending back to 19th century America when both transpofiation and work on the farm were powered by approximately 27 million draft animals and fueled by 34 million hectares of grasslands (Vogel 1996). Today a new form of energy production is envisioned for some of this same acreage. The method of energy production is exactly the same - solar energy captured in photosynthesis, but the subsequent modes of energy conversion are vastly different, leading to the production of electricity, transportation fuels, and chemicals from the renewable feedstocks. While energy prices in the United States are among the cheapest in the world, the issues of high dependency on imported oil, the uncertainties of maintaining stable supplies of imported oil from finite reserves, and the environmental costs associated with mining, processing, and combusting fossil fuels have been important drivers in the search for cleaner burning fuels that can be produced and renewed from the landscape. At present biomass and bioenergy combine provide only about 4% of the total primary energy used in the U.S. (Overend 1997). By contrast, imported oil accounts for approximately 44% of the foreign trade deficit in the U.S. and about 45% of the total annual U.S. oil consumption of 34 quads (1 quad = 1015 Btu, Lynd et al. 1991). The 22 quads of oil consumed by transportation represents approximately 25% of all energy use in the US and excedes total oil imports to the US by about 50%. This oil has environmental and social costs, which go well beyond the purchase price of around $15 per barrel. Renewable energy from biomass has the potential to reduce dependency on fossil fhels, though not to totally replace them. Realizing this potential will require the simultaneous development of high yielding biomass production systems and bioconversion technologies that efficiently convert biomass energy into the forms of energy and chemicals usable by industry. The endpoint criterion for success is economic gain for both agricultural and industrial sectors at reduced environmental cost and reduced political risk. This paper reviews progress made in a program of research aimed at evaluating and developing a perennial forage crop, switchgrass as a regional bioenergy crop. We will highlight here aspects of research progress that most closely relate to the issues that will determine when and how extensively switchgrass is used in commercial bioenergy production.

  15. United States based agricultural {open_quotes}waste products{close_quotes} as fillers in a polypropylene homopolymer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobson, R.E.; Rowell, R.M.; Caulfield, D.F. [Forest Products Lab., Madison, WI (United States)] [and others

    1995-11-01

    With the advent of modern coupling agents (MAPP or maleic anhydride grafted polypropylene), the potential use of various types of renewable, sustainable agricultural byproducts as fillers in thermoplastics is explored. Over 7.7 billion pounds of fillers were used in the plastics industry in 1993. With sharp price increases in commodity thermoplastics (i.e. approximately 25% in 94`), the amount of fillers in thermoplastic materials will increase throughout the 90`s. Various types of agricultural fibers are evaluated for mechanical properties vs. 50% wood flour and 40% talc filled polypropylene (PP). The fibers included in this study are: kenaf core, oat straw, wheat straw, oat hulls, wood flour (pine), corncob, hard corncob, rice hulls, peanut hulls, corn fiber, soybean hull, residue, and jojoba seed meal. Composite interfaces were modified with MAPP to improve the mechanical properties through increased adhesion between the hydrophilic and polar fibers with the hydrophobic and non-polar matrix. The agro-waste composites had compositions of 50% agro-waste/48% PP/2% MAPP. All of the agricultural waste by-products were granulated through a Wiley mill with a 30 mesh screen and compounded in a high intensity shear-thermo kinetic mixer. The resultant blends were injection molded into ASTM standard samples and tested for tensile, flexural, and impact properties. This paper reports on the mechanical properties of the twelve resultant composites and compares them to wood flour and talc-filled polypropylene composites. The mechanical properties of kenaf core, oat straw, wheat straw, and oat hulls compare favorably to the wood flour and talc-filled PP, which are both commercially available and used in the automotive and furniture markets.

  16. Climate change effects on agriculture: Economic responses to biophysical shocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Gerald; Valin, Hugo; Sands, Ronald; Havlik, Petr; Ahammad, Helal; Deryng, Delphine; Elliott, Joshua; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Heyhoe, Edwina; Kyle, G. Page; von Lampe, Martin; Lotze-Campen, Hermann; Mason d'Croz, Daniel; van Meijl, Hans; van der Mensbrugghe, Dominique; Mueller, C.; Popp, Alexander; Robertson, Richard; Robinson, Sherman; Schmid, E.; Schmitz, Christoph; Tabeau, Andrzej; Willenbockel, Dirk

    2013-12-16

    Agricultural production is sensitive to weather and will thus be directly affected by climate change. Plausible estimates of these climate change impacts require combined use of climate, crop, and economic models. Results from previous studies vary substantially due to differences in models, scenarios, and data. This paper is part of a collective effort to systematically integrate these three types of models. We focus on the economic component of the assessment, investigating how nine global economic models of agriculture represent endogenous responses to seven standardized climate change scenarios produced by two climate and five crop models. These responses include adjustments in yields, area, consumption, and international trade. We apply biophysical shocks derived from the IPCCís Representative Concentration Pathway that result in end-of-century radiative forcing of 8.5 watts per square meter. The mean biophysical impact on crop yield with no incremental CO2 fertilization is a 17 percent reduction globally by 2050 relative to a scenario with unchanging climate. Endogenous economic responses reduce yield loss to 11 percent, increase area of major crops by 12 percent, and reduce consumption by 2 percent. Agricultural production, cropland area, trade, and prices show the greatest degree of variability in response to climate change, and consumption the lowest. The sources of these differences includes model structure and specification; in particular, model assumptions about ease of land use conversion, intensification, and trade. This study identifies where models disagree on the relative responses to climate shocks and highlights research activities needed to improve the representation of agricultural adaptation responses to climate change.

  17. Economic Contributions of Florida's Agricultural, Natural Resource, Food and Kindred Product Manufacturing and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Manufacturing and Distribution, and Service Industries in 20081 Alan W. Hodges and Mohammad Rahmani2 1 economic sectors for food and kindred product manufacturing, wholesale and retail distribution, input supplies, support services, and nature-based recreation/eco-tourism. In addition to farming, forestry

  18. Economic Contributions of Florida Agriculture, Natural Resources, Food and Kindred Product Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Manufacturing and Distribution, and Service Industries in 20061 Alan W. Hodges, Mohammad Rahmani, and W. David range of other economic sectors for food and kindred products manufacturing, wholesale and retail distribution, input suppliers, support services, and nature-based recreation. In addition to farms, forests

  19. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Possible future trade-offs between agriculture, energy production,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phipps, Steven J.

    and advances in technology that enable deep shales containing oil and gas to be fractured and mined, and sunflowers. In addition, it is the center of a major oil and gas boom made possible by rising oil prices of the major grassland biomes-turned-granaries between resource exploitation and food production on one hand

  20. An aggregate production function for U. S. agriculture: an alternative to the Tyner-Tweeten approach†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cornforth, Gerald Charles

    1976-01-01

    time? The Tyner and Tweeten decade elasticity estimates were determined independently using distributed-lag factor- share ad)ustment models, whereas ridge regression was used in this study to directly and simultaneously estimate these elasticities.... A Cobb-Douglas production function employing nine input variables [assumed by Tyner and Tweeten (1965, 1966)] was fit using ordinary least squares and ridge regression. The ridge results appeared to be statistically reliable. A time trend model...

  1. College of Agricultural Sciences College of Agricultural Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horticulture Environmental Horticulture Organic Agriculture Plant Health Soil Resources and Conservation Soil and applied research; production and utilization of food and related products; resource use and conservation

  2. Cassava, a potential biofuel crop in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jansson, C.

    2010-01-01

    18-673389 Keywords: cassava; bioethanol; biofuel; metabolicRecently, cassava-derived bioethanol production has beenbenefits compared to other bioethanol- producing crops in

  3. Higher U.S. Crop Prices Trigger Little Area Expansion so Marginal Land for Biofuel Crops Is Limited

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swinton, S.; Babcock, Bruce; James, Laura; Bandaru, Varaprasad

    2011-06-12

    By expanding energy biomass production on marginal lands that are not currently used for crops, food price increases and indirect climate change effects can be mitigated. Studies of the availability of marginal lands for dedicated bioenergy crops have focused on biophysical land traits, ignoring the human role in decisions to convert marginal land to bioenergy crops. Recent history offers insights about farmer willingness to put non-crop land into crop production. The 2006-09 leap in field crop prices and the attendant 64% gain in typical profitability led to only a 2% increase in crop planted area, mostly in the prairie states

  4. Evaluating the potential use of winter cover crops in cornsoybean systems for sustainable co-production of food and fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    concerns have motivated intense interest in the development of renewable energy sources, including fuels of the atmospheric impact of fossil fuel combustion has spurred research and development of renewable alternatives of total US fuel consumption, and places energy production in competition with food production for raw

  5. Global crop yield losses from recent warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lobell, D; Field, C

    2006-06-02

    Global yields of the world-s six most widely grown crops--wheat, rice, maize, soybeans, barley, sorghum--have increased since 1961. Year-to-year variations in growing season minimum temperature, maximum temperature, and precipitation explain 30% or more of the variations in yield. Since 1991, climate trends have significantly decreased yield trends in all crops but rice, leading to foregone production since 1981 of about 12 million tons per year of wheat or maize, representing an annual economic loss of $1.2 to $1.7 billion. At the global scale, negative impacts of climate trends on crop yields are already apparent. Annual global temperatures have increased by {approx}0.4 C since 1980, with even larger changes observed in several regions (1). While many studies have considered the impacts of future climate changes on food production (2-5), the effects of these past changes on agriculture remain unclear. It is likely that warming has improved yields in some areas, reduced them in others, and had negligible impacts in still others; the relative balance of these effects at the global scale is unknown. An understanding of this balance would help to anticipate impacts of future climate changes, as well as to more accurately assess recent (and thereby project future) technologically driven yield progress. Separating the contribution of climate from concurrent changes in other factors--such as crop cultivars, management practices, soil quality, and atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) levels--requires models that describe the response of yields to climate. Studies of future global impacts of climate change have typically relied on a bottom-up approach, whereby field scale, process-based models are applied to hundreds of representative sites and then averaged (e.g., ref 2). Such approaches require input data on soil and management conditions, which are often difficult to obtain. Limitations on data quality or quantity can thus limit the utility of this approach, especially at the local scale (6-8). At the global scale, however, many of the processes and impacts captured by field scale models will tend to cancel out, and therefore simpler empirical/statistical models with fewer input requirements may be as accurate (8, 9). Empirical/statistical models also allow the effects of poorly modeled processes (e.g., pest dynamics) to be captured and uncertainties to be readily quantified (10). Here we develop new, empirical/statistical models of global yield responses to climate using datasets on broad-scale yields, crop locations, and climate variability. We focus on global average yields for the six most widely grown crops in the world: wheat, rice, maize, soybeans, barley, and sorghum. Production of these crops accounts for over 40% of global cropland area (11). 55% of non-meat calories, and over 70% of animal feed (12).

  6. Development of Genomic and Genetic Tools for Foxtail Millet, and Use of These Tools in the Improvement of Biomass Production for Bioenergy Crops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doust, Andrew, N.

    2011-11-11

    The overall aim of this research was to develop genomic and genetic tools in foxtail millet that will be useful in improving biomass production in bioenergy crops such as switchgrass, napier grass, and pearl millet. A variety of approaches have been implemented, and our lab has been primarily involved in genome analysis and quantitative genetic analysis. Our progress in these activities has been substantially helped by the genomic sequence of foxtail millet produced by the Joint Genome Institute (Bennetzen et al., in prep). In particular, the annotation and analysis of candidate genes for architecture, biomass production and flowering has led to new insights into the control of branching and flowering time, and has shown how closely related flowering time is to vegetative architectural development and biomass accumulation. The differences in genetic control identified at high and low density plantings have direct relevance to the breeding of bioenergy grasses that are tolerant of high planting densities. The developmental analyses have shown how plant architecture changes over time and may indicate which genes may best be manipulated at various times during development to obtain required biomass characteristics. This data contributes to the overall aim of significantly improving genetic and genomic tools in foxtail millet that can be directed to improvement of bioenergy grasses such as switchgrass, where it is important to maximize vegetative growth for greatest biomass production.

  7. The contribution of future agricultural trends in the US Midwest to global climate change mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, Allison M.; Kyle, G. Page; Zhang, Xuesong; Bandaru, Varaprasad; West, Tristram O.; Wise, Marshall A.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2014-01-19

    Land use change is a complex response to changing environmental and socioeconomic systems. Historical drivers of land use change include changes in the natural resource availability of a region, changes in economic conditions for production of certain products and changing policies. Most recently, introduction of policy incentives for biofuel production have influenced land use change in the US Midwest, leading to concerns that bioenergy production systems may compete with food production and land conservation. Here we explore how land use may be impacted by future climate mitigation measures by nesting a high resolution agricultural model (EPIC Ė Environmental Policy Indicator Climate) for the US Midwest within a global integrated assessment model (GCAM Ė Global Change Assessment Model). This approach is designed to provide greater spatial resolution and detailed agricultural practice information by focusing on the climate mitigation potential of agriculture and land use in a specific region, while retaining the global economic context necessary to understand the far ranging effects of climate mitigation targets. We find that until the simulated carbon prices are very high, the US Midwest has a comparative advantage in producing traditional food and feed crops over bioenergy crops. Overall, the model responds to multiple pressures by adopting a mix of future responses. We also find that the GCAM model is capable of simulations at multiple spatial scales and agricultural technology resolution, which provides the capability to examine regional response to global policy and economic conditions in the context of climate mitigation.

  8. Comparison of Crop Rotation for Verticillium Wilt Management and Effect on Pythium Species in Conventional and Organic Strawberry Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subbarao, Krishna V

    2009-01-01

    and Wilcox, W. F. 1994. Strawberry black root rot: A review.Adv. Strawberry Res. 13:13-19. 45. Xiao, C. L. , Subbarao,to methyl bro- mide for strawberry production. HortScience

  9. Public Parking Lots > Agriculture Building Parkade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Farm Residences Crop Science Seed Barn Rayner Dairy Research & Teaching Facility Poultry Centre Engineering Poultry Science Kirk Hall Agriculture Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada SCIENCE PLACE VETERINARY PerformanceCentre Environment Canada Canadian Wildlife Service CANADIANWILDLIFECRT Field #9 Field #10 Tennis

  10. Public Parking Lots > Agriculture Building Parkade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Farm Residences Crop Science Seed Barn Rayner Dairy Research & Teaching Facility Poultry Centre Spinks Engineering Poultry Science Kirk Hall Agriculture Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada SCIENCE PLACE PerformanceCentre Environment Canada Canadian Wildlife Service CANADIANWILDLIFECRT Field #9 Field #10 Tennis

  11. Organic farming practices for rice under diversified cropping systems in humid tropics.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varughese, Kuruvilla Dr; Rani, B Dr; Abraham, Suja; John, Jacob Dr; M, Vijayan Dr

    2009-01-01

    HTM (accessed on 15-1- KAU (Kerala Agricultural University).Crops. (2002) 12 th edition, Kerala Agricultural University,humid tropical regions of Kerala there is a reduction in

  12. Remote estimation of gross primary production in maize and support for a new paradigm based on total crop chlorophyll content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rundquist, Donald C.

    distributed carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes is essential for regional and global studies of carbon budgetsRemote estimation of gross primary production in maize and support for a new paradigm based and global studies of carbon budgets. Because of the observed close relationship between GPP and total canopy

  13. Current biofuel feedstock crops such as corn lead to large environmental losses of N through nitrate leaching and N2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, Mark B.

    219 Current biofuel feedstock crops such as corn lead to large environmental losses of N through biofuel crops established on a rich Mollisol soil. Reduced Nitrogen Losses after Conversion of Row Crop Agriculture to Perennial Biofuel Crops Candice M. Smith, Mark B. david,* Corey A. Mitchell, Michael d. Masters

  14. daho has approximately 4 million acres of irrigated agricultural land. Most of it is in pas-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Laughlin, Jay

    -sensitive crops are grown, or where water supply may be limited or pumping lift is high. Lower ∑ Agricultural Experiment Station CIS 1055 Table 1. 1994 Idaho acreage irrigated by crop (adapted from 1995 Idaho

  15. Energy-conserving perennial agriculture for marginal land in southern Appalachia. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, G.

    1982-01-30

    USDA economists predict the end of surplus farm production in the US within this decade. More and more marginal land will be cropped to provide feed for the growing world population and to produce energy. Much of this potential cropland in Southern Appalachia is poorly suited to annual crops, such as corn. Perennial crops are much better suited to steep, rocky, and wet sites. Research was undertaken on the theoretical potentials of perennial species with high predicted yields of protein, carbohydrates, or oils. Several candidate staple perennial crops for marginal land in Southern Appalachia were identified, and estimates were made of their yields, energy input requirements, and general suitabilities. Cropping systems incorporating honeylocust, persimmon, mulberry, jujube, and beech were compared with corn cropping systems. It appears that these candidate staple perennials show distinct advantages for energy conservation and environmental preservation. Detailed economic analyses must await actual demonstration trials, but preliminary indications for ethanol conversion systems with honeylocust are encouraging. It is suggested that short-term loans to farmers undertaking this new type of agriculture would be appropriate to solve cash-flow problems.

  16. Collection Policy: SOIL, CROP AND ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES Subject Scope | Priority Tables | Other policies . . .

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    Collection Policy: SOIL, CROP AND ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES Subject Scope | Priority Tables | Other. Research is tending away from classical agronomy to the science of soil, crop, air. More emphasis is on the environment, less on agriculture. 1.3 Graduate program The Field of Soil, Crop and Atmospheric Sciences offers

  17. CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 52, MAYJUNE 2012 1209 Cereal cyst nematode (CCN) describes a group of closely

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pappu, Hanu R.

    CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 52, MAY≠JUNE 2012 1209 RESEARCH Cereal cyst nematode (CCN) describes a group, Institute of Crop Sciences, Shanxi Acad- emy of Agricultural Sciences, Taiyuan 030032, China; T.D. Murray:1209≠1217 (2012). doi: 10.2135/cropsci2011.11.0591 © Crop Science Society of America | 5585 Guilford Rd., Madison

  18. Regional scale cropland carbon budgets: evaluating a geospatial agricultural modeling system using inventory data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xuesong; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Manowitz, David H.; Sahajpal, Ritvik; West, Tristram O.; Thomson, Allison M.; Xu, Min; Zhao, Kaiguang; LeDuc, Stephen D.; Williams, Jimmy R.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate quantification and clear understanding of regional scale cropland carbon (C) cycling is critical for designing effective policies and management practices that can contribute toward stabilizing atmospheric CO2 concentrations. However, extrapolating site-scale observations to regional scales represents a major challenge confronting the agricultural modeling community. This study introduces a novel geospatial agricultural modeling system (GAMS) exploring the integration of the mechanistic Environmental Policy Integrated Climate model, spatially-resolved data, surveyed management data, and supercomputing functions for cropland C budgets estimates. This modeling system creates spatially-explicit modeling units at a spatial resolution consistent with remotely-sensed crop identification and assigns cropping systems to each of them by geo-referencing surveyed crop management information at the county or state level. A parallel computing algorithm was also developed to facilitate the computationally intensive model runs and output post-processing and visualization. We evaluated GAMS against National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) reported crop yields and inventory estimated county-scale cropland C budgets averaged over 2000Ė2008. We observed good overall agreement, with spatial correlation of 0.89, 0.90, 0.41, and 0.87, for crop yields, Net Primary Production (NPP), Soil Organic C (SOC) change, and Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE), respectively. However, we also detected notable differences in the magnitude of NPP and NEE, as well as in the spatial pattern of SOC change. By performing crop-specific annual comparisons, we discuss possible explanations for the discrepancies between GAMS and the inventory method, such as data requirements, representation of agroecosystem processes, completeness and accuracy of crop management data, and accuracy of crop area representation. Based on these analyses, we further discuss strategies to improve GAMS by updating input data and by designing more efficient parallel computing capability to quantitatively assess errors associated with the simulation of C budget components. The modularized design of the GAMS makes it flexible to be updated and adapted for different agricultural models so long as they require similar input data, and to be linked with socio-economic models to understand the effectiveness and implications of diverse C management practices and policies.

  19. Solanaceae Coordinated Agricultural Project Dedicated to the Improvement of Potato and Tomato

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    SolCAP Solanaceae Coordinated Agricultural Project Dedicated to the Improvement of Potato are dedicated to the improvement of the Solanaceae crops: potato and tomato. Through innovative research

  20. Agriculture intensifies soil moisture decline in Northern China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Yaling; Pan, Zhihua; Zhuang, Qianlai; Miralles, Diego; Teuling, Adriann; Zhang, Tonglin; An, Pingli; Dong, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Jingting; He, Di; Wang, Liwei; Pan, Xuebiao; Bai, Wei; Niyogi, Dev

    2015-07-09

    Northern China is one of the most densely populated regions in the world. Agricultural activities have intensified since the 1980s to provide food security to the country. However, this intensification has likely contributed to an increasing scarcity in water resources, which may in turn be endangering food security. Based on in-situ measurements of soil moisture collected in agricultural plots during 1983Ė2012, we find that topsoil (0Ė50 cm) volumetric water content during the growing season has declined significantly (p<0.01), with a trend of -0.011 to -0.015 m3 m-3 per decade. Observed discharge declines for the three large river basins are consistent with the effects of agricultural intensification, although other factors (e.g. dam constructions) likely have contributed to these trends. Practices like fertilizer application have favoured biomass growth and increased transpiration rates, thus reducing available soil water. In addition, the rapid proliferation of water-expensive crops (e.g., maize) and the expansion of the area dedicated to food production have also contributed to soil drying. Adoption of alternative agricultural practices that can meet the immediate food demand without compromising future water resources seem critical for the sustainability of the food production system.

  1. Agriculture intensifies soil moisture decline in Northern China

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Yaling; Pan, Zhihua; Zhuang, Qianlai; Miralles, Diego; Teuling, Adriann; Zhang, Tonglin; An, Pingli; Dong, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Jingting; He, Di; et al

    2015-07-09

    Northern China is one of the most densely populated regions in the world. Agricultural activities have intensified since the 1980s to provide food security to the country. However, this intensification has likely contributed to an increasing scarcity in water resources, which may in turn be endangering food security. Based on in-situ measurements of soil moisture collected in agricultural plots during 1983Ė2012, we find that topsoil (0Ė50 cm) volumetric water content during the growing season has declined significantly (pmore†Ľwith the effects of agricultural intensification, although other factors (e.g. dam constructions) likely have contributed to these trends. Practices like fertilizer application have favoured biomass growth and increased transpiration rates, thus reducing available soil water. In addition, the rapid proliferation of water-expensive crops (e.g., maize) and the expansion of the area dedicated to food production have also contributed to soil drying. Adoption of alternative agricultural practices that can meet the immediate food demand without compromising future water resources seem critical for the sustainability of the food production system.ę†less

  2. Modelling the UK perennial energy crop market†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, Peter Mark William

    2014-11-27

    Biomass produced from perennial energy crops, Miscanthus and willow or poplar grown as short-rotation coppice, is expected to contribute to UK renewable energy targets and reduce the carbon intensity of energy production. ...

  3. A national research & development strategy for biomass crop feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, L.L.; Cushman, J.H.

    1997-07-01

    Planning was initiated in 1996 with the objective of reevaluating current biomass feedstock research and development strategies to: (1) assure that by 2005, one or more commercial lignocellulosic to ethanol projects will be able to acquire a dependable supply of biomass crop feedstocks; (2) assure that recently initiated demonstrations of crops to electricity will be successful and; (3) assure that the research base needed to support future biomass industry expansion is being developed. Multiple trends and analyses indicate that biomass energy research and development strategies must take into account the fact that competition for land will define the upper limits of available biomass energy crop supplies and will largely dictate the price of those supplies. Only crop production and utilization strategies which contribute profit to the farmer or landowner and to energy producers will be used commercially for biomass energy production. Strategies for developing biomass {open_quotes}energy{close_quotes} crop supplies must take into consideration all of the methods by which biomass crops will enter biomass energy markets. The lignocellulosic materials derived from crops can be available as primary residues or crop by-products; secondary residues or processing by-products; co-products (at both the crop production and processing stages); or, as dedicated energy crops. Basic research and development (R&D) leading to yield improvement continues to be recommended as a major long-term focus for dedicated energy crops. Many additional near term topics need attention, some of which are also applicable to by-products and co-products. Switchgrass R&D should be expanded and developed with greater collaboration of USDA and state extension groups. Woody crop research should continue with significant cost-share from industries developing the crops for other commercial products. Co-product options need more investigation.

  4. Wind Turbines Benefit Crops

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Takle, Gene

    2013-03-01

    Ames Laboratory associate scientist Gene Takle talks about research into the effect of wind turbines on nearby crops. Preliminary results show the turbines may have a positive effect by cooling and drying the crops and assisting with carbon dioxide uptake.

  5. Wind Turbines Benefit Crops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takle, Gene

    2010-01-01

    Ames Laboratory associate scientist Gene Takle talks about research into the effect of wind turbines on nearby crops. Preliminary results show the turbines may have a positive effect by cooling and drying the crops and assisting with carbon dioxide uptake.

  6. The politics of food production: a comparative study of the agricultural development policies of five African nations.†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallis, Leslie Jean

    1975-01-01

    , whose life inspired my interest in Africa ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I wish to express my sincere appreciation to my committee chairman~ Dr Kwang Ro, for the idea for my thesis and encouragement in writing it. I also wish to thank Dr, Gary Halter and Dr Henry... OF INCREASING FOOD PRODUCTION One of the most pressing problems facing the world today is the continuously unfavorable relationship between population growth and food production. Food production is Africa's most important activity; yet 20%%d ? 30'X...

  7. Crop and Soil Science Sequence This concentration emphasizes the scientific aspects of agronomy including

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Branoff, Theodore J.

    Crop and Soil Science Sequence This concentration emphasizes the scientific aspects of agronomy and improving the soil physical, chemical and microbial characteristics to enhance crop production breeding, soil and crop management, cropping systems, and plant nutrition. Agronomists are employed by seed

  8. Agricultural niche market risk-takers: analysis of production practices and information sources of Texas meat goat producers†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coleman, Kelly Lee Ann

    2001-01-01

    auctions; 6) supplemental feed their herds; and 7) graze their herds on native brushy rangeland. Innovativeness of producers and its relationship to demographic, educational, and production variables were examined. The data revealed that more innovative...

  9. The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Bunny

    Management, Agricultural Systems Management, Construction Systems Management, Animal Sciences, Crop Science Management, Animal Sciences, Crop Science, Landscape Horticulture, Soil Sciences, and Turfgrass Science Agronomic sciences Horticulture and Crop Science 200 (5), 411 (3), 412 (3), 414 (2), 422 (4) ENR 300.01 (3

  10. The Ohio State University College of Food, Agriculture, and Environmental Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Bunny

    by College of Arts and Sciences Crop Science Minor (CROPSCI-MN) Kent Harrison, Coordinating Adviser 310E://cfaes.osu.edu/current-students/academics-advising/minor- requirements The crop science minor is useful for students in Agriculture and Biological Sciences who plan in crop science consists of 20-25 credit hours of course work. The distribution is listed below. If you

  11. Agriculture and Environmental Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    and organic wastes, bioenergy, pesticides, and wetlands. Course Description and Statement of General Education to minimize agricultural pollution and sustain food production adequate for the world's population topics include point and nonpoint source pollution, the Clean Water Act, wetlands, bioenergy, food waste

  12. CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 49, MARCHAPRIL 2009 589 The primary turf species used for golf course putting green

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsiang, Tom

    CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 49, MARCH≠APRIL 2009 589 RESEARCH The primary turf species used for golf course.2135/cropsci2008.06.0303 © Crop Science Society of America 677 S. Segoe Rd., Madison, WI 53711 USA All rights. Laberge, Soils and Crops Research and Development Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, 2560 Hochelaga

  13. Utilization of Agricultural WasteUtilization of Agricultural Waste for Composite Panelsfor Composite Panels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utilization of Agricultural WasteUtilization of Agricultural Waste for Composite Panelsfor. The benefits of utilizing agricultural residues for woodbenefits of utilizing agricultural residues for wood a fiber source that is currentlyadded product from a fiber source that is currently not well utilized

  14. Analysis of factor productivity in agricultural systems in Zimbabwe and application of Geographic Information Systems in soil erosion prediction†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mugabe, Phanuel

    1994-01-01

    , variable and fixed costs of production were obtained from Zimbabwe Government publications. These figures were used to calculate rates of return to labor and capital for each of the systems under study. Land use classes of the area delineated from aerial...

  15. A general model for estimating the economic and production effects of specified pesticide withdrawals: a cotton application†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casey, James Elmer

    1973-01-01

    of agricul- tural production and the environment. Restricting this discussion to reports concerned with agriculture, the publications can be separated into (1) nature of agriculture pollution, (2) value of pesticides to farmers, (3) impact of withdrawing..., the desirability of introducing pesticidee into the environment has been questioned. Increased awareness of the environ- ment has caused society to focus on the social costs of using chemicals. Certain pesticides present a threat to fish, wildlife, crops...

  16. Barley Production in Texas.†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkins, I. M.; Gardenshire, J. H.; McDaniel, M. E.; Porter, K. B.

    1969-01-01

    -68' Produc- Yield Farm Acreage tion, per acre, price per Year Seeded Harvested bushels bushel bushel 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 Average 'Data furnished by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Statis- tical Reporting... placement TABLE 7. FERTILIZER RESPONSE OF SMALL GRAINS IPl GRAIN, FORAGE AND SILAGE PRODUCTION Forage yield, pounds per acre of dry matter College Station (7) 400 pounds 400 pounds 5-10-10 No 5-10-10 at seeding plus Crop fertilizer at seeding - 30 N...

  17. Crop Revenue Coverage (CRC)†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stokes, Kenneth; Barnaby, G. A. Art; Waller, Mark L.; Outlaw, Joe

    2008-10-17

    Crop Revenue Coverage guarantees a stated amount of revenue based on commodity futures prices. This publication explains how CRC works and gives examples based on harvest price scenarios....

  18. Individuals Agricultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    , with the highest density in the first year, and no obvious differences between the second and the third year. We in the first year, and the lowest in the third year Though taxa diversity was lower in the third year Yards Mesic Yards Year Yea r 321 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 Agricultural Desert Parks Desert Remnants

  19. An Integrated Modeling and Data Management Strategy for Cellulosic Biomass Production Decisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David J. Muth Jr.; K. Mark Bryden; Joshua B. Koch

    2012-07-01

    Emerging cellulosic bioenergy markets can provide land managers with additional options for crop production decisions. Integrating dedicated bioenergy crops such as perennial grasses and short rotation woody species within the agricultural landscape can have positive impacts on several environmental processes including increased soil organic matter in degraded soils, reduced sediment loading in watersheds, lower green house gas (GHG) fluxes, and reduced nutrient loading in watersheds. Implementing this type of diverse bioenergy production system in a way that maximizes potential environmental benefits requires a dynamic integrated modeling and data management strategy. This paper presents a strategy for designing diverse bioenergy cropping systems within the existing row crop production landscape in the midwestern United States. The integrated model developed quantifies a wide range environmental processes including soil erosion from wind and water, soil organic matter changes, and soil GHG fluxes within a geospatial data management framework. This framework assembles and formats information from multiple spatial and temporal scales. The data assembled includes yield and productivity data from harvesting equipment at the 1m scale, surface topography data from LiDAR mapping at the less than 1m scale, soil data from US soil survey databases at the 10m to 100m scale, and climate data at the county scale. These models and data tools are assembled into an integrated computational environment that is used to determine sustainable removal rates for agricultural residues for bioenergy production at the sub-field scale under a wide range of land management practices. Using this integrated model, innovative management practices including cover cropping are then introduced and evaluated for their impact on bioenergy production and important environmental processes. The impacts of introducing dedicated energy crops onto high-risk landscape positions currently being manage in row crop production are also investigated.

  20. Projecting net incomes for Texas crop producers: an application of probabilistic forecasting†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eggerman, Christopher Ryan

    2006-10-30

    Agricultural policy changes directly affect the economic viability of Texas crop producers because government payments make up a significant portion of their net farm income (NFI). NFI projections benefit producers, ...

  1. S u m m e r 2 0 1 5 g r o w 1FOXES, COYOTES AND BADGERS TURF SCIENCE AT WHISTLING STRAITS P, FROM POLLUTANT TO PRODUCT College of Agricultural & Life Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Monica G.

    , FROM POLLUTANT TO PRODUCT College of Agricultural & Life Sciences UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN MADISON of biogas 12 Living Science Horticulture professor Irwin Goldman sparks a love of plants among students from of Energy, has been to realize the grand vision of a biorefinery--the bioenergy version of the petroleum

  2. Factors affecting agricultural journalists and agricultural communicators†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chenault, Edith Anne

    2009-05-15

    Agricultural journalism and agricultural communication have been researched in depth, identifying job skills, job satisfaction, educational backgrounds, and curriculum issues. However, a study examining the spheres ...

  3. Influence of habitat and landscape perenniality on insect natural enemies in three candidate biofuel crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landis, Doug

    biofuel crops Ben P. Werling a, , Timothy D. Meehan b , Claudio Gratton b , Douglas A. Landis April 2011 Accepted 22 June 2011 Available online 28 June 2011 Keywords: Biofuels Biodiversity Biological control Land use change a b s t r a c t Cultivation of biofuel crops could change agricultural

  4. Climate policy implications for agricultural water demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2013-03-28

    Energy, water and land are scarce resources, critical to humans. Developments in each affect the availability and cost of the others, and consequently human prosperity. Measures to limit greenhouse gas concentrations will inevitably exact dramatic changes on energy and land systems and in turn alter the character, magnitude and geographic distribution of human claims on water resources. We employ the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), an integrated assessment model to explore the interactions of energy, land and water systems in the context of alternative policies to limit climate change to three alternative levels: 2.5 Wm-2 (445 ppm CO2-e), 3.5 Wm-2 (535 ppm CO2-e) and 4.5 Wm-2 (645 ppm CO2-e). We explore the effects of two alternative land-use emissions mitigation policy optionsóone which taxes terrestrial carbon emissions equally with fossil fuel and industrial emissions, and an alternative which only taxes fossil fuel and industrial emissions but places no penalty on land-use change emissions. We find that increasing populations and economic growth could be anticipated to almost triple demand for water for agricultural systems across the century even in the absence of climate policy. In general policies to mitigate climate change increase agricultural demands for water still further, though the largest changes occur in the second half of the century, under both policy regimes. The two policies examined profoundly affected both the sources and magnitudes of the increase in irrigation water demands. The largest increases in agricultural irrigation water demand occurred in scenarios where only fossil fuel emissions were priced (but not land-use change emission) and were primarily driven by rapid expansion in bioenergy production. In these scenarios water demands were large relative to present-day total available water, calling into question whether it would be physically possible to produce the associated biomass energy. We explored the potential of improved water delivery and irrigation system efficiencies. These could potentially reduce demands substantially. However, overall demands remained high under our fossil-fuel-only tax policy. In contrast, when all carbon was priced, increases in agricultural water demands were smaller than under the fossil-fuel-only policy and were driven primarily by increased demands for water by non-biomass crops such as rice. Finally we estimate the geospatial pattern of water demands and find that regions such as China, India and other countries in south and east Asia might be expected to experience greatest increases in water demands.?

  5. Radioactivity in food crops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drury, J.S.; Baldauf, M.F.; Daniel, E.W.; Fore, C.S.; Uziel, M.S.

    1983-05-01

    Published levels of radioactivity in food crops from 21 countries and 4 island chains of Oceania are listed. The tabulation includes more than 3000 examples of 100 different crops. Data are arranged alphabetically by food crop and geographical origin. The sampling date, nuclide measured, mean radioactivity, range of radioactivities, sample basis, number of samples analyzed, and bibliographic citation are given for each entry, when available. Analyses were reported most frequently for /sup 137/Cs, /sup 40/K, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 226/Ra, /sup 228/Ra, plutonium, uranium, total alpha, and total beta, but a few authors also reported data for /sup 241/Am, /sup 7/Be, /sup 60/Co, /sup 55/Fe, /sup 3/H, /sup 131/I, /sup 54/Mn, /sup 95/Nb, /sup 210/Pb, /sup 210/Po, /sup 106/Ru, /sup 125/Sb, /sup 228/Th, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 95/Zr. Based on the reported data it appears that radioactivity from alpha emitters in food crops is usually low, on the order of 0.1 Bq.g/sup -1/ (wet weight) or less. Reported values of beta radiation in a given crop generally appear to be several orders of magnitude greater than those of alpha emitters. The most striking aspect of the data is the great range of radioactivity reported for a given nuclide in similar food crops with different geographical origins.

  6. Developing an Integrated Model Framework for the Assessment of Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal Limits for Bioenergy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Muth, Jr.; Jared Abodeely; Richard Nelson; Douglas McCorkle; Joshua Koch; Kenneth Bryden

    2011-08-01

    Agricultural residues have significant potential as a feedstock for bioenergy production, but removing these residues can have negative impacts on soil health. Models and datasets that can support decisions about sustainable agricultural residue removal are available; however, no tools currently exist capable of simultaneously addressing all environmental factors that can limit availability of residue. The VE-Suite model integration framework has been used to couple a set of environmental process models to support agricultural residue removal decisions. The RUSLE2, WEPS, and Soil Conditioning Index models have been integrated. A disparate set of databases providing the soils, climate, and management practice data required to run these models have also been integrated. The integrated system has been demonstrated for two example cases. First, an assessment using high spatial fidelity crop yield data has been run for a single farm. This analysis shows the significant variance in sustainably accessible residue across a single farm and crop year. A second example is an aggregate assessment of agricultural residues available in the state of Iowa. This implementation of the integrated systems model demonstrates the capability to run a vast range of scenarios required to represent a large geographic region.

  7. U.S. Agriculture and International Trade†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCorkle, Dean; Benson, Geoffrey A.; Marchant, Mary; Rosson, C. Parr

    1999-06-23

    International markets are important for many U.S. farm products and greatly affect U.S. agriculture. This publication discusses the causes of import change, the export product mix, major markets, and markets of the future....

  8. ReproducedfromCropScience.PublishedbyCropScienceSocietyofAmerica.Allcopyrightsreserved. CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 47, MAYJUNE 2007 1281

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfrender, Michael

    ReproducedfromCropScience.PublishedbyCropScienceSocietyofAmerica.Allcopyrightsreserved. CROP in Crop Sci. 47:1281≠1288 (2007). doi: 10.2135/cropsci2006.11.0702 © Crop Science Society of America 677 S online May 31, 2007Published online May 31, 2007 #12;ReproducedfromCropScience.PublishedbyCropScience

  9. Water, energy, and farm production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulibarri, C.A.; Seely, H.S.; Willis, D.B.; Anderson, D.M.

    1996-04-01

    Electric utility rate deregulation can have disproportionate impacts on water-intensive crops, which have historically relied upon pressurized irrigation technologies and surface water resources. Based on a case study of agricultural growers in southern California, the paper models the impacts of utility rates considered in the Western Area Power Administration`s Sierra Nevada Customer Service Region. The study was performed as part of the 2004 Power Marketing Program Draft Environmental Impact Statement. The empirical results reflect linear-programming estimates of the income transfers from growers to energy providers based on county-wide coverage of 13 junior and senior irrigation districts and short-run production possibilities of 11 irrigated crops. Transfers of income from growers to energy suppliers occur through their losses in producer surplus.

  10. A roadmap for research on crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) to enhance sustainable food and bioenergy production in a hotter, drier world

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yang, Xiaohan; Cushman, John C.; Borland, Anne M.; Edwards, Erika; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Owen, Nick; Griffiths, Howard; Smith, J. Andrew C.; Cestari De Paoli, Henrique; et al

    2015-07-07

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) is a specialized mode of photosynthesis that features nocturnal CO? uptake, facilitates increased water-use efficiency (WUE), and enables CAM plants to inhabit water-limited environments such as semi-arid deserts or seasonally dry forests. Human population growth and global climate change now present challenges for agricultural production systems to increase food, feed, forage, fiber, and fuel production. One approach to meet these challenges is to increase reliance on CAM crops, such as Agave and Opuntia, for biomass production on semi-arid, abandoned, marginal, or degraded agricultural lands. Major research efforts are now underway to assess the productivity of CAMmore†Ľcrop species and to harness the WUE of CAM by engineering this pathway into existing food and bioenergy crops. An improved understanding of CAM gained through intensive and expanded research efforts has potential for high returns on research investment in the foreseeable future. To help realize the potential of sustainable dryland agricultural systems, it is necessary to address scientific questions related to the genomic features, regulatory mechanisms, and evolution of CAM; CAM-into-C3 engineering; and the production of CAM crops. Answering these questions requires collaborative efforts to build infrastructure for CAM model systems, field trials, mutant collections, and data management.ę†less

  11. Winter crop sensitivity to inter-annual climate variability in central India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeFries, Ruth S.

    Winter crop sensitivity to inter-annual climate variability in central India Pinki Mondal & Meha Dordrecht 2014 Abstract India is predicted to be one of the most vulnerable agricultural regions to future variability in a local market and subsistence-based agricultural system in central India, a data

  12. Review: Balancing Limiting Factors and Economic Drivers to Achieve Sustainable Midwestern US Agricultural Residue Feedstock Supplies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wally W. Wilhelm; J. Richard Hess; Douglas L. Karlen; David J. Muth; Jane M. F. Johnson; John M. Baker; Hero T. Gollany; Jeff M. Novak; Diane E. Stott; Gary E. Varvel

    2010-10-01

    Advanced biofuels will be developed using cellulosic feedstock rather than grain or oilseed crops that can also be used for food and feed. To be sustainable, these new agronomic production systems must be economically viable without degrading soil resources. This review examines six agronomic factors that collectively define many of the limits and opportunities for harvesting crop residue for biofuel feedstock. These six ďlimiting factorsĒ are discussed in relationship to economic drivers associated with harvesting corn (Zea mays L.) stover as a potential cellulosic feedstock. The limiting factors include soil organic carbon, wind and water erosion, plant nutrient balance, soil water and temperature dynamics, soil compaction, and off-site environmental impacts. Initial evaluations using the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation 2.0 (RUSLE2) show that a single factor analysis based on simply meeting tolerable soil loss might indicate stover could be harvested sustainably, but the same analysis based on maintaining soil organic carbon shows the practice to be non-sustainable. Modifying agricultural management to include either annual or perennial cover crops is shown to meet both soil erosion and soil carbon requirements. The importance of achieving high yields and planning in a holistic manner at the landscape scale are also shown to be crucial for balancing limitations and drivers associated with renewable bioenergy production.

  13. Polymer Coated Urea: Effect on Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Potato Agriculture Irrigated potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) production requires significant inputs of fertilizer N for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Abstract: Polymer Coated Urea: Effect on Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Potato Agriculture Irrigated-textured, well-drained soils where potatoes are commonly grown. Polymer coated controlled-release ureas (PCU

  14. MODELING PHOTOSYNTHESIS OF HETEROGENEOUS ROSE CROP CANOPIES IN THE GREENHOUSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lieth, J. Heinrich

    MODELING PHOTOSYNTHESIS OF HETEROGENEOUS ROSE CROP CANOPIES IN THE GREENHOUSE Soo-Hyung Kim and J training system ("bent canopy") is widely used in greenhouse rose production. The bent canopy consists

  15. Agricultural and Food Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) #12;86 Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) Undergraduate Catalogue 2014≠15 Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) Officers in agriculture was initiated in 1956. #12;87Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) Undergraduate

  16. Water, Agriculture + settlement design in the arid lower Colorado River Basin : 3 new models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirth, Timo Matti

    2011-01-01

    This thesis investigates possible conversions of an increasingly unviable type of irrigated agricultural landscape, seen under the influences of three simultaneous processes: urban growth, change of cropping practice and ...

  17. The Agricultural Benefits of Salinity Control on the Red River of Texas and Oklahoma†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, D. H.; Lacewell, R. D.; Moore, D. S.

    1980-01-01

    Salinity of the waters from the Red River and its major tributaries has virtually eliminated its use for irrigation of agricultural crops in Texas and Oklahoma. A chloride control project has been proposed whereby the source salt waters...

  18. Evaluation of the potential for agricultural development at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RG Evans; MJ Hattendorf; CT Kincaid

    2000-02-25

    By 2050, when cleanup of the Hanford Site is expected to be completed, large worldwide demands to increase the global production of animalhlish protein, food, and fiber are anticipated, despite advancements in crop breeding, genetic engineering, and other technologies. World population is projected to double to more than 12 billion people, straining already stressed worldwide agricultural resources. The current world surpluses in many commodities will not last when faced with increasing population, decreasing ocean fisheries, and rapid loss of productive lands from soil salivation and erosion. The production of pharmaceuticals from bioengineered plants and animals will undoubtedly add more pressure on the already limited (and declining) arable land base. In addition there will be pressure to produce crops that can help reduce the world's dependence on petroleum and be used for chemical plant feedstock. These external, formidable pressures will necessitate increasing investments in irrigation infi-a-structures in many areas of the world to increase productivity. Intensive greenhouse culture and aqua-culture also will be greatly expanded. There will be large economic and social pressures to expand production in areas such as the Pacific Northwest. Agricultural exports will continue to be important The most likely large areas for expanded irrigation in the Pacific Northwest are the undeveloped East High areas of the Columbia Basin Project and non-restricted areas within the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. Both of these are potentially highly productive area: for producing food and export capital. The environmental concerns will be large however, the favorable growing conditions, high-quality (low-salinity) abundant water supplies and minimal problems with salivation of soils make the Pacific Northwest a very desirable region for economically sustainable expansion from a world perspective.

  19. Agriculture, technology, and conflict†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zilverberg, Cody John

    2009-05-15

    Conflict and agriculture have a long, shared history. The purpose of this research is to look at the relationships between agriculture, agricultural technologies, and conflict during current and recent conflicts, large scale and localized...

  20. 1. AGRICULTURE BUILDING 2. AGRICULTURE GREENHOUSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Keith

    1. AGRICULTURE BUILDING 2. AGRICULTURE GREENHOUSE 3. AGRICULTURE MECHANICS SHOP 4. ALUMNI ASSOCIATION (TRACIE D. PEARMAN) 5. APARTMENTS (UNIVERSITY WOODS) 6. ART BUILDING 7. ART STUDIO 8. AUSTIN BUILDING 9. BIOLOGY GREENHOUSE 10. BOYNTON BUILDING 11. BUSINESS BUILDING (R. E. MCGEE) 12. CHEMISTRY

  1. Smarter Cropping: Internet program helps farmers make decisions about crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2009-01-01

    Wythe tx H2O | pg. 26 Smarter Cropping Internet program helps farmers make decisions about crops Along the coastal plains of Texas, farmers and crop managers are using the Internet to make more informed decisions about growing cotton. This Web...

  2. CROP STAGES Keith Mason

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    are at early fruit coloring. WEATHER NOTES Complete weather data for your area can be found at enviroweather through the weekend with temperatures returning to normal. DEGREE DAYS GDD (from March 1) Base 42 Base 50-23-08 1242 726 6-30-08 1423 852 Projected for 7-7-08 1609 982 Contents ∑ Crop Stages ∑ Weather notes

  3. Crop Biotechnology: Feeds for Livestock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Eenennaam, Alison L.

    ? A biotech crop is a crop plant that has been genetically engineered using recombinant DNA technology either also been developed using biotechnology, and crops with modified composition or nutritional properties they are grown. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is responsible for evaluating

  4. Nanoplankton contributions to phytoplankton standing crop and primary productivity in the central equatorial Pacific (Sept./Oct. 1975; Feb./Mar. 1976)†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stockwell, Dean Alan

    1982-01-01

    of Hasle (1959, 1976), Allen (1961), Semina ( 1968, 1969, 1971, and 1972), and Venrick et al. (1973) have attempted to describe species composition, as well as characterize distributional patterns of the phytoplankton communities found within the DOMES... spatially 24 and temporally. In oceanic waters coccolithophorids, naked flagel- lates, and monads tend to dominate the plankton (Hasle 1959; Hulburt 1970). Here, nanoplankton are generally reported to be more abundant and more productive than net...

  5. Transactions of the ASAE Vol. 48(2): 841-847 E 2005 American Society of Agricultural Engineers ISSN 0001-2351 841

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finer, John J.

    -23. The authors are Marco Tulio Buenrostro-Nava, Graduate Student, Department of Horticulture and Crop Science and Development Center, and John James Finer, Professor, Department of Horticulture and Crop Science, Ohio: John J. Finer, Department of Horticulture and Crop Science, Ohio Agriculture Research and Development

  6. UnitedStates of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of tropical forests for products and energy; forest and wildlife management, the South Pacific Forestry, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; 88 p. The 17 of the USDA Forest Service's tropical forestry research, forestry research in Asia and the Pacific, management

  7. The Texas crop and livestock reporting service's data accumulation technique for cotton and an investigation into its reliability†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallant, Francis Xavier

    1971-01-01

    Texas Crop and Livestock Reporting Service Acreage and Production of Crops--1970. . . . . . 13 IV Farm Strata. 1969 Survey 14 16 VI Crop Reporter Questionnaire 20 VII Census Bureau Cotton Ginnings. . 23 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION: THE EXISTENCE... figures of Table I are derived from independent estimates of acreage planted, harvested, and total cotton production. The preliminary acreage planted and harvested figures are primarily the result of two sample surveys. These are the June Crop Survey...

  8. Roadmap for Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buckel, Jeffrey A.

    A Science Roadmap for Food and Agriculture A Science Roadmap for Food and Agriculture Prepared and Policy (ESCOP)-- Science and Technology Committee November 2010 #12;2 pA Science Roadmap for Food and Agriculture #12;A Science Roadmap for Food and Agriculture p i About this Publication To reference

  9. An Integrated Model for Assessment of Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal Limits for Bioenergy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Muth; K. M. Bryden

    2003-12-01

    Agricultural residues have been identified as a significant potential resource for bioenergy production, but serious questions remain about the sustainability of harvesting residues. Agricultural residues play an important role in limiting soil erosion from wind and water and in maintaining soil organic carbon. Because of this, multiple factors must be considered when assessing sustainable residue harvest limits. Validated and accepted modeling tools for assessing these impacts include the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation Version 2 (RUSLE2), the Wind Erosion Prediction System (WEPS), and the Soil Conditioning Index. Currently, these models do not work together as a single integrated model. Rather, use of these models requires manual interaction and data transfer. As a result, it is currently not feasible to use these computational tools to perform detailed sustainable agricultural residue availability assessments across large spatial domains or to consider a broad range of land management practices. This paper presents an integrated modeling strategy that couples existing datasets with the RUSLE2 water erosion, WEPS wind erosion, and Soil Conditioning Index soil carbon modeling tools to create a single integrated residue removal modeling system. This enables the exploration of the detailed sustainable residue harvest scenarios needed to establish sustainable residue availability. Using this computational tool, an assessment study of residue availability for the state of Iowa was performed. This study included all soil types in the state of Iowa, four representative crop rotation schemes, variable crop yields, three tillage management methods, and five residue removal methods. The key conclusions of this study are that under current management practices and crop yields nearly 26.5 million Mg of agricultural residue are sustainably accessible in the state of Iowa, and that through the adoption of no till practices residue removal could sustainably approach 40 million Mg. However, when considering the economics and logistics of residue harvest, yields below 2.25 Mg ha-1 are generally considered to not be viable for a commercial bioenergy system. Applying this constraint, the total agricultural residue resource available in Iowa under current management practices is 19 million Mg. Previously published results have shown residue availability from 22 million Mg to over 50 million Mg in Iowa.

  10. Variable Crop Share Leases.†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sartin, Marvin; Sammons, Ray

    1980-01-01

    and management. To adequately value these items, an understanding of the concepts of fixed cost is necessary. FIXED (OWNERSHIP) COSTS of particular assets consist primarily of depreciation and interest on investment. These costs are not always apparent because... broad categories: cash and crop-shares. Under a cash lease, the tenant pays for the rights to farm the land. Cash leases usually provide the tenant operator with more freedom in making management decisions, and the tenant must accept more...

  11. Functional Genomics of Drought Tolerance in Bioenergy Crops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Hengfu [ORNL; Chen, Rick [ORNL; Yang, Jun [ORNL; Weston, David [ORNL; Chen, Jay [ORNL; Muchero, Wellington [ORNL; Ye, Ning [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Cheng, Zong-Ming [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Yang, Xiaohan [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    With the predicted trends in climate change, drought will increasingly impose a grand challenge to biomass production. Most of the bioenergy crops have some degree of drought susceptibility with low water-use efficiency (WUE). It is imperative to improve drought tolerance and WUE in bioenergy crops for sustainable biomass production in arid and semi-arid regions with minimal water input. Genetics and functional genomics can play a critical role in generating knowledge to inform and aid genetic improvement of drought tolerance in bioenergy crops. The molecular aspect of drought response has been extensively investigated in model plants like Arabidopsis, yet our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying drought tolerance in bioenergy crops are limited. Crops exhibit various responses to drought stress depending on species and genotype. A rational strategy for studying drought tolerance in bioenergy crops is to translate the knowledge from model plants and pinpoint the unique features associated with individual species and genotypes. In this review, we summarize the general knowledge about drought responsive pathways in plants, with a focus on the identification of commonality and specialty in drought responsive mechanisms among different species and/or genotypes. We describe the genomic resources developed for bioenergy crops and discuss genetic and epigenetic regulation of drought responses. We also examine comparative and evolutionary genomics to leverage the ever-increasing genomics resources and provide new insights beyond what has been known from studies on individual species. Finally, we outline future exploration of drought tolerance using the emerging new technologies.

  12. Minor in Plant Breeding College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    Minor in Plant Breeding College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Cornell University Description of the Minor The Minor Program of Study in Plant Breeding will provide a basic understanding of crop improvement, a historical perspective of the discipline, and a sense of how plant breeding contributes

  13. Alan a. Blggs Agriculture Canada, Research Station, Vineland Station, Ontario

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biggs, Alan R.

    Alan a. Blggs Agriculture Canada, Research Station, Vineland Station, Ontario IntegratedApproach to Controlling LeucostomaCankerof Peachin Ontario Peach (Prunuspersica (L.) Batsch) is the third most valuable fruit crop in Ontario, Canada, following appIes (Matus domestica Barkh.) and grapes (Vizisspp.). In 1988

  14. Agricultural Input Model User's Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Arturo A.

    Prepared by Peng Wang and Arturo A. Keller Bren School of Environmental Science & Management University THE SYSTEM DATABASE FILE...........................................14 6. IMPORTING WATERSHED AND CROP........................................................ 21 6.4 Choose crop type and edit the crop parameters

  15. Impacts of Tighter Credit in Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klose, Steven; Klinefelter, Danny A.; Hogan, Robert J.

    2009-03-26

    The availability of credit is critical to agricultural production. In the current tight credit situation, it is important for borrowers to understand the sources of credit and the nature of credit markets. This publications examines various sources...

  16. Texas Crop Profile: Peppers†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Kent D.; Holloway, Rodney L.

    2001-02-13

    -head sorghum can get 10 to 12 feet high. Onion yields have been shown to increase by 50 percent to 100 percent with windbreaks. Currently, only about 10 percent to 25 percent of growers use windbreaks. Planting: Statewide, 80 to 90 percent of the peppers... and liniments. Peppers also play a part in rituals, magic and folklore. Gulamic acid (AuxiGro ? ) is a newly registered agrochemical that acts as a plant growth regula- tor. It enhances crop growth and yield. It is registered on bell peppers and other vegetables...

  17. Biodiesel is produced from a wide variety of oilseed crops. In Europe, canola is the major biodiesel crop while in the U.S. soybeans dominates. Montana State University and USDA researchers have

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    for License Increased Oil Yield in Oilseed Crops to Enhance Biodiesel Production #12; have developed a protein that can be expressed in a variety of oilseed crops to increase the oil yield to work for a broad range of oilseed plants including biodiesel and cereal crops. Increased oil

  18. Loss of phosphorus from soil in semi-arid northern Tanzania as a result of cropping: evidence from sequential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Johannes

    Loss of phosphorus from soil in semi-arid northern Tanzania as a result of cropping: evidence from-arid northern Tanzania, the native woodland is being rapidly cleared and replaced by low input agriculture Tanzania, the indigenous tropical woodland is rapidly being replaced by low input agriculture. In addition

  19. Analysis of methods and models for assessing the direct and indirect economic impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes in the agricultural sector of the US economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callaway, J.M.

    1982-08-01

    Alternative methods for quantifying the economic impacts associated with future increases in the ambient concentration of CO/sub 2/ were examined. A literature search was undertaken, both to gain a better understanding of the ways in which CO/sub 2/ buildup could affect crop growth and to identify the different methods available for assessing the impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes on crop yields. The second task involved identifying the scope of both the direct and indirect economic impacts that could occur as a result of CO/sub 2/-induced changes in crop yields. The third task then consisted of a comprehensive literature search to identify what types of economic models could be used effectively to assess the kinds of direct and indirect economic impacts that could conceivably occur as a result of CO/sub 2/ buildup. Specific attention was focused upon national and multi-regional agricultural sector models, multi-country agricultural trade models, and macroeconomic models of the US economy. The fourth and final task of this research involved synthesizing the information gathered in the previous tasks into a systematic framework for assessing the direct and indirect economic impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes related to agricultural production.

  20. Soil Carbon Change and Net Energy Associated with Biofuel Production on Marginal Lands: A Regional Modeling Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandaru, Varaprasad; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Manowitz, David H.; Link, Robert P.; Zhang, Xuesong; Post, W. M.

    2013-12-01

    The use of marginal lands (MLs) for biofuel production has been contemplated as a promising solution for meeting biofuel demands. However, there have been concerns with spatial location of MLs, their inherent biofuel potential, and possible environmental consequences with the cultivation of energy crops. Here, we developed a new quantitative approach that integrates high-resolution land cover and land productivity maps and uses conditional probability density functions for analyzing land use patterns as a function of land productivity to classify the agricultural lands. We subsequently applied this method to determine available productive croplands (P-CLs) and non-crop marginal lands (NC-MLs) in a nine-county Southern Michigan. Furthermore, Spatially Explicit Integrated Modeling Framework (SEIMF) using EPIC (Environmental Policy Integrated Climate) was used to understand the net energy (NE) and soil organic carbon (SOC) implications of cultivating different annual and perennial production systems.

  1. Roadmap for Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    A Science Roadmap for Agriculture Prepared by the National Association of State Universities Force on Building a Science Roadmap #12;#12;A Science Roadmap for Agriculture Prepared by the National on Organization and Policy (ESCOP) Task Force on Building a Science Roadmap for Agriculture NOVEMBER 2001 #12

  2. USDA Agricultural Conservation Easement Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA's) Agricultural Conservation Easement Program (ACEP) provides financial and technical assistance to help conserve agricultural lands, wetlands, and their related benefits.

  3. Climate-Smart Agriculture: Policies, Practices and Financing...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and responding to climate change. Projections based on population growth and food consumption patterns indicate that agricultural production will need to increase by at...

  4. Biomass Energy Crops: Massachusetts' Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    plant fuel. We examine potential biomass energy demand in the 5-county area, and then review cropBiomass Energy Crops: Massachusetts' Potential Prepared for: Massachusetts Division of Energy is thought to have significantly more potential than forest biomass energy (Perlack, Wright et al. 2005). One

  5. Collection Policy: Crop and Soil Sciences Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    Collection Policy: Crop and Soil Sciences ___________________________________________________________________________________ Introduction: This 2007 collection policy review for the Department of Crops and Soil Sciences comes several the Department of Atmospheric and Earth Sciences. Since then, Crops and Soil Sciences has reorganized into three

  6. Bridging Principles and Practices of Sustainable Cropping Systems -LRES 528.01 Tuesday 3:10 4 PM; 233 Linfield Hall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    of the instructors to emphasize climate change implications for sustainable agriculture, reflecting bio-energy in cropping systems reflect bio-energy and food security. Twice during the semester, each student will lead

  7. Copyright 2012 -Copyright Information, Privacy Statement, and Terms of Use American Society of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America 5585 Guilford Road | Madison. Magdi M. Selim, School of Plant, Environmental and Soil Science, Louisiana State University Agricultural

  8. The Environmental Impacts of Subsidized Crop Insurance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaFrance, Jeffrey T.; Shimshack, J. P.; Wu, S. Y.

    2001-01-01

    May 1996): 428-438. Environmental Impacts of Subsidized CropPaper No. 912 THE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS OF SUBSIDIZED CROPsuch copies. The Environmental Impacts of Subsidized Crop

  9. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station General scientist with the Station's Wildland Recreation and Urban Cultures Research Unit, 4955 Canyon Crest Drive

  10. Cover Crops for the Garden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    matter for your soil or compost pile. Organic matter is thatin the spring or made into compost, cover crops will act asgathered up and added to your compost pile. The first method

  11. Barley Production in Texas.†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkins, I. M.; Gardenhire, J. H.; Porter, K. B.

    1958-01-01

    . DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SUMMARY Barley is a relatively minor. crop in Texas, but it has a dual value to growers as a grain crop and as winter pasture for livestock. The use of barley as a winter pasture crop for livestock has expanded considerably... in recent years. The barley acreage is distributed widely over the State. The type and varieties of barley grow,n in cm area are determined by winter temperatures and uses made of the .cmp. All barley grown for grain in Texas is used for livestock fezd...

  12. Soil erosion and agricultural sustainability David R. Montgomery*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, David R.

    Soil erosion and agricultural sustainability David R. Montgomery* Department of Earth and Space conventionally plowed agricultural fields average 1≠2 orders of magnitude greater than rates of soil production indicates that, considered globally, hill- slope soil production and erosion evolve to balance geologic

  13. Crop rotation and soil temperature influence the community structure of Aspergillus flavus in soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cotty, Peter J.

    June 2010 Available online 14 July 2010 Keywords: Maize Cottonseed Biocontrol Population structure a b the strain L isolates. The S strain has been implicated as the primary causal agent of several contamination, the main causal agent of aflatoxin contami- nation, frequently infects several agricultural crops

  14. THE POTENTIAL FOR MICRO-ALGAE AND OTHER "MICRO-CROPS" TO PRODUCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Paul N.

    THE POTENTIAL FOR MICRO-ALGAE AND OTHER "MICRO-CROPS" TO PRODUCE SUSTAINABLE BIOFUELS A REVIEW INTRODUCTION Biofuel derived from algae and other micro-crops has been proposed as an environmentally benign transportation fuel. Algae can be cultivated on low productivity lands using low quality water. Interest in algae

  15. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Faculty of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    produces large amounts of sludge from a range of industrial processes using water created when pulp and paper is produced, and the further treatment and disposal of this sludge is a costly process since any Department of Crop production Ecology Treatment and utilization of pulp industry residues using Short

  16. Biofuels and Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Biofuels and Agriculture Biofuels and Agriculture A Factsheet for Farmers American farmers have "biofuels" like ethanol and biodiesel mean that new markets are opening up. These can provide extra farm as growing markets for other biofuels like biodiesel. What are biofuels? Biofuels (short for "biomass fuels

  17. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    In the U.S. commercially grown biotech crops include corn,the second generation of biotech crops, expected to providealso known as either biotech or genetically engineered (GE)

  18. FIELD CROPS 2012 Weeds: Corn 5-53

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    in Delmarva corn production. To be successful in controlling weeds in corn, the weed control program must this record to plan your weed control program. Cultural control. Several aspects of cultural weed control should be considered in planning a corn weed control program. These include weed-free seed, cover crops

  19. Policy Tools for U.S. Agriculture.†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knutson, Ronald D.; Richardons, James W.; Klinefelter, Danny A.; Paggi, Mechel S.; Smith, Edward G.

    1986-01-01

    control and conservation strategy that may cost less than paying storage and interest on surplus commodities. ? Long-term land retirement programs can adversely affect local agribusiness and rural communities. ? Increased prices for commodities... the cover crop. To remove from production cropland that is resulting in surpluses or is subject to erosion. The program was first authorized in the 1956 farm bill as the Soil Bank Program. In 1965 Congress re-established a land retirement program...

  20. Measuring, Comparing, and Contrasting the Agricultural Paradigmatic Preferences Held by Florida Extension Agents: The Redevelopment of an Instrument to Determine Individual and Collective Preferences†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanagorski, Laura Anne 1980-

    2012-11-28

    incorporates scientifically-based practices such as mechanical weeding, composting, integrated pest management, crop rotation, permaculture, precision agriculture, and soil nutrient testing (Alonge & Martin, 1995; Chavez-Tafur &Vermeulen, 2010; Feenstra...

  1. Mapping intra-field yield variation using high resolution satellite imagery to integrate bioenergy and environmental stewardship in an agricultural watershed

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hamada, Yuki; Ssegane, Herbert; Negri, Maria Cristina

    2015-07-31

    Biofuels are important alternatives for meeting our future energy needs. Successful bioenergy crop production requires maintaining environmental sustainability and minimum impacts on current net annual food, feed, and fiber production. The objectives of this study were to: (1) determine under-productive areas within an agricultural field in a watershed using a single date; high resolution remote sensing and (2) examine impacts of growing bioenergy crops in the under-productive areas using hydrologic modeling in order to facilitate sustainable landscape design. Normalized difference indices (NDIs) were computed based on the ratio of all possible two-band combinations using the RapidEye and the National Agriculturalmore†ĽImagery Program images collected in summer 2011. A multiple regression analysis was performed using 10 NDIs and five RapidEye spectral bands. The regression analysis suggested that the red and near infrared bands and NDI using red-edge and near infrared that is known as the red-edge normalized difference vegetation index (RENDVI) had the highest correlation (R2 = 0.524) with the reference yield. Although predictive yield map showed striking similarity to the reference yield map, the model had modest correlation; thus, further research is needed to improve predictive capability for absolute yields. Forecasted impact using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool model of growing switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) on under-productive areas based on corn yield thresholds of 3.1, 4.7, and 6.3 Mg∑ha-1 showed reduction of tile NO3-N and sediment exports by 15.9%Ė25.9% and 25%Ė39%, respectively. Corresponding reductions in water yields ranged from 0.9% to 2.5%. While further research is warranted, the study demonstrated the integration of remote sensing and hydrologic modeling to quantify the multifunctional value of projected future landscape patterns in a context of sustainable bioenergy crop production.ę†less

  2. CORNELL QUARTERLY Agricultural Wastes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    on fossil fuels, points out Donald R. Price, associate professor of agricultural engineering. Natural petroleum, and for the use of ethanol as liquid fuel, are discussed by Robert K. Finn, professor of chemical

  3. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture DESIGN: A Program to Create Data Forest Service Entry Research Work Unit at the Station's Forest Fire Laboratory, 4955 Canyon Crest Drive, Riverside, CA 92507

  4. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station General Observatory in Stinson Beach, Calif. Thomas E. Martin is Assistant Unit Leader--Wildlife at the U.S. Fish

  5. Overshooting of agricultural prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stamoulis, Kostas G.; Rausser, Gordon C.

    1987-01-01

    Rotenberg, Julio J. , "Sticky Prices in the United States,"Monetary Policy on United States Agriculture. A Fix-Price,Flex-Price Approach," Unpublished Ph.D. Disser- tation,

  6. Teaching Organic Farming and Gardening: Resources for Instructors, 3rd Edition. Part 3 - Social and Environmental Issues in Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    smaller-scale growers ii. GMO rules: Current rules governinggenetically modified crops favor GMO producers overconsumers concerned about GMO products; e.g. , there is

  7. Observations on European Agriculture.†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1911-01-01

    AS ACKICUL-I-uRAL EXPE RIMENT STATIONS bLLETIN No. 14-1 DECEMBER, 1911 Division of Chemistry Observations on European Agriculture BY G. S. FRAPS, Chemist 0 Postoffice : CULLEGE STATION; TEXAS AUSTIN. TEXAS I AUSTIN PRINTING CO:. PRINTERS... ............................................... and Conclusions 35 [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] rrvations on European Agriculture By C. S. FRAPS ie object of this Bulletin is to present such abservadons on :ulture in Europe as may offer suggestions of value to Texas - :ulturists. The writer...

  8. Faculty of Agricultural Sciences Department of Agricultural Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krivobokova, Tatyana

    Faculty of Agricultural Sciences Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development Platz-4823 Doctoral researcher in Agricultural and Experimental Economics The Collaborative Research Center (CRC to join the Chair of International Agricultural Economics (Jun.Prof. Dr. M. Wollni) of the University

  9. Agronomic Suitability of Bioenergy Crops in Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemus, Rocky; Baldwin, Brian; Lang, David

    2011-10-01

    In Mississippi, some questions need to be answered about bioenergy crops: how much suitable land is available? How much material can that land produce? Which production systems work best in which scenarios? What levels of inputs will be required for productivity and longterm sustainability? How will the crops reach the market? What kinds of infrastructure will be necessary to make that happen? This publication helps answer these questions: √?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę Which areas in the state are best for bioenergy crop production? √?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę How much could these areas produce sustainably? √?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę How can bioenergy crops impact carbon sequestration and carbon credits? √?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę How will these crops affect fertilizer use and water quality? √?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬

  10. ReproducedfromCropScience.PublishedbyCropScienceSocietyofAmerica.Allcopyrightsreserved. 2558 CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 47, NOVEMBERDECEMBER 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, David R.

    ReproducedfromCropScience.PublishedbyCropScienceSocietyofAmerica.Allcopyrightsreserved. 2558 CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 47, NOVEMBER≠DECEMBER 2007 BOOK REVIEW Dirt: The Erosion of Civilization. David R science along with very readable prose to document the boom and bust cycles in agricul- ture that have

  11. Montana State University 1 College of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barge, Marcy

    , livestock production, and soil and water conservation. Soil Science Minor (http://catalog-majors with fundamental soils courses in preparation for natural resource careers. Water Resources Minor (http://catalog for professional training in veterinary medicine. ∑ B.S. in Agricultural Business (http://catalog

  12. Solar radiation management impacts on agriculture in China: A case study in the Geoengineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    Solar radiation management impacts on agriculture in China: A case study in the Geoengineering-Earth Science and Technology, Yokohama, Japan Abstract Geoengineering via solar radiation management could affect agricultural productivity due to changes in temperature, precipitation, and solar radiation

  13. Climate change and agriculture : global and regional effects using an economic model of international trade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reilly, John M.

    1993-01-01

    Empirical estimates of the economic welfare implications of the impact of climate change on global agricultural production are made. Agricultural yield changes resulting from climate scenarios associated with a doubling ...

  14. GroBot : an open-source model for controlled environment agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feshbach, Emma (Emma Elizabeth)

    2015-01-01

    The growing demand for food challenges our current farming methods, motivating the search for new paradigms for agricultural production. In this work, the GroBot is presented as an open-source model for the fourth agricultural ...

  15. Brazos River Bottom cotton producers' knowledge, attitudes and practices of sustainable agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thigpen, Laura Langham

    1994-01-01

    the production of agricultural commodities and the natural environment is undergoing profound changes. Due to an increase in environmental and food safety concerns, many changes in United States agricultural policy are taking place. The objective of the study...

  16. Emergency Alternative Crops for South Texas†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Livingston, Stephen; Bade, David H.

    1996-10-21

    is the best choice. Details are provided on soybeans, various types of peas, alyce clover, sorghums and other crops....

  17. Regional Focus on GM Crop Regulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Church, George M.

    Regional Focus on GM Crop Regulation THE RECENT MEDIA COVERAGE OF THE DEVEL- opments in Brazil for com- mercial genetically modified (GM) crops in both the scientific and regulatory arena. The release of GM crops in these coun- tries might result in the unintentional entry of GM seeds into neighboring

  18. Global climate change and maize production in Spain: Risk assessment and impacts of weather on yields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feijoo, M.L.; Mestre, F.; Iglesias, A.; Rosenzweig, C.

    1996-12-31

    The study evaluates the potential effect of climate change on maize production in Spain, combining climate models, a crop productivity model, a decision support system and a yield-response model. The study was carried out for two agricultural regions that include the largest areas of Spain where maize is grown as a high input crop. The paper combines the output from a crop model with different techniques of analysis. The scenarios used in this study were generated from the output of two General Circulation Models (GCMs): the Goddard Institute for Space Studies model (GISS) and the Canadian Climate Change Model (CCCM). The study also includes a preliminary evaluation of the potential changes in monetary returns taking into account the possible variability of grain yields and prices, using mean-Gini stochastic dominance (MGSD). A yield response model was estimated using simulated data from the crop model. Weather variables are included. Typically, temperature and precipitation are the only weather variables included in these models. However, solar radiation is another important climate factor for plant growth and development and were included in the yield response model.

  19. DISCUSSION: ECONOMIES OF SCALE AND SCOPE IN AGRICULTURAL BIOTECHNOLOGY RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foltz, Jeremy D.

    incentives for research, new avenues of rents for firms and the public sector in agriculture, and new types and applied research or product development) as well as between dif- ferent types of research organizationsDISCUSSION: ECONOMIES OF SCALE AND SCOPE IN AGRICULTURAL BIOTECHNOLOGY RESEARCH JEREMY D. FOLTZ

  20. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    advantage of biomass ethanol from energy crops compared toethanol. Energy Policy and Biomass Ethanol Productionbiomass ethanol can play an important role in supplying energy

  1. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    innovation regarding alternative energy sources. A relatedin developing alternatives to oil as energy sources, it mayan energy crop and grow- ersí most profitable alternative

  2. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    also exists for producing green energy using targeted cropsEnergy Independence and Security Act of 2007, the EPA introduced another mandate: biofuels must reduce green-

  3. Agricultural and biofuel implications of a species diversity experiment with native perennial grassland plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Agricultural and biofuel implications of a species diversity experiment with native perennial-negative biofuels. Fertilized mono- cultures of Panicum virgatum (one of the species in the Tilman et al., 2006a). An important question to now consider is whether biofuel crop breeding programs should also be initiated

  4. rBST Adoption in the United States: A Retrospective Look at a "Juggernaut" Agricultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foltz, Jeremy D.

    agricultural biotechnology had been trotted out after some of the genetically modified crops that were also in the United States over Monsanto's intent to market recombinant bovine somatotropin (rBST), a genetically engineered hormone that stimulates treated cows to produce more milk. The Food and Drug Administration

  5. Agricultural Economic Impacts of Climate Change in Yolo County (Preliminary) Study objective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Katherine W.

    Document the history and projections of agriculturally relevant climate change in Yolo County and assess 319 333 502 Projections IGCC B1 and A2 climate projections differ and show ups and downs though 2050 and downs over the period. We fit statistical models to the crop acreage history as functions of prices

  6. Credit Constraints and Productivity in Peruvian Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boucher, Stephen; Guirkinger, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    are factored in. Second, lenders may require borrowers torationing derives from lendersí unwillingness to raise theor quality of collateral the lender requires to overcome the

  7. Sustainable biomass products development and evaluation, Hamakua project. Final draft report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-05-01

    The PICHTR Sustainable Biomass Energy Program was developed to evaluate the potential to cultivate crops for energy production as an alternative use of lands made available by the closing of large sugar plantations. In particular, the closing of the Hamakua Sugar Company on the island of Hawaii brought a great deal of attention to the future of agriculture in this region and in the state. Many options were proposed. Several promising alternatives had been proposed for cane lands. These included dedicated feedstock supply systems (DFSS) for electrical energy production, cultivation of sugarcane to produce ethanol and related by-products, and the production of feed and crops to support animal agriculture. Implementation of some of the options might require preservation of large tracts of land and maintenance of the sugar mills and sugar infrastructure. An analysis of the technical, financial, and other issues necessary to reach conclusions regarding the optimal use of these lands was required. At the request of the Office of State Planning and Senator Akaka`s office, the Pacific International Center for High Technology Research (PICHTR) established and coordinated a working group composed of state, county, federal, and private sector representatives to identify sustainable energy options for the use of idle sugar lands on the island of Hawaii. The Sustainable Biomass Energy Program`s Hamakua Project was established to complete a comprehensive evaluation of the most viable alternatives and assess the options to grow crops as a source of raw materials for the production of transportation fuel and/or electricity on the island of Hawaii. The motivation for evaluating biomass to energy conversion embraced the considerations that Hawaii`s energy security would be improved by diversifying the fuels used for transportation and reducing dependency on imported fossil fuels. The use of waste products as feedstocks could divert wastes from landfills.

  8. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , evaluation, monitoring, point counts, sampling of populations, standards of censusing Technical Editors: C Technical Report PSW-GTR-149 #12;Publisher: Albany, California Mailing address: PO Box 245. Berkeley CA 9470 of Agriculture Abstract Ralph, C. John; Sauer, John R.; Droege, Sam, technical editors. 1995. Monitoring Bird

  9. ADDRESS SERVICE REQUESTED AGRICULTURAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    much of the state's manufacturing, shipping and tourism offerings. Water is necessary for life -- every Endowed Chair in Water Research, said that access to safe drinking water is one of the most serious public is a vital component of so many industries -- agriculture, manufac- turing and tourism, just to name a few

  10. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Intermountain Research Station Research Research Station's Riparian-Stream Ecology and Management Research Work Unit at Boise, ID. He re- ceived with the Intermountain Research Station's Riparian-Stream Ecology and Man- agement Research Work Unit at the Forestry

  11. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station General,000 xylem resin samples of pine (Pinus) species and hybrids--largely from the western United States locations in the eastern and southern United States. Cover Image: Chapter 6, Figure 6-2. #12;Xylem

  12. AGRICULTURAL SUMMER 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MICHIGAN AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION SUMMER 2005 VOL. 23 NO. 2 futures #12;2 | FUTURES Asthma, cystic fibrosis, Lyme disease, pre- mature birth, campylobacteriosis and dis- eases caused by West Nile research projects is searching for the genes responsi- ble for human asthma. Her long-term goal

  13. Agriculture and Life Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Responsibility 7 Virginia Tech Principles of Community 7 STUDENTS ARE ~ 8 University/College Policy and Procedures 9 Absences 9 Personal Illness: 9 Death/Illness in the Family 9 Attendance of a Professional of Agriculture and Life Sciences that advising is a collaborative effort between the student and faculty advisor

  14. Evaluating Crop-Share Leases.†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sartin, Marvin; Brints, Norman

    1979-01-01

    with the greatest influence on yield (fertilizer, insecticide, irrigation, etc.) should be shared by the landowner and the tenant. An equitable crop-share lease encourages the tenant to use the same quantity of inputs and produce the same yield level... lease agree ment is calculation of the proportion of total (fixed and variable) inputs supplied by the tenant and landowner. While this approach requires time and detail, those who exercise care with data development can formulate an equitable lease...

  15. Weather Effects on European Agricultural Output 1850-1913

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solomou, Solomos; Wu, Weike

    2004-06-16

    This paper compares the effects of weather shocks on agricultural production in Britain, France and Germany during the late nineteenth century. Using semi- parametric models to estimate the non-linear agro-weather relationship, we find...

  16. Communication Factors Affecting African Policymakers' Decisions about Agricultural Biotechnology†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Begashaw, Belay Ejigu

    2010-10-12

    The purpose of this study was to develop a model for impacting decisions on agricultural biotechnology practices in food production among African policymakers. The research focused on three African countries, namely, South Africa, Malawi and Ghana...

  17. The economic potential of producing energy from agricultural biomass†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerko, Christine

    1996-01-01

    fuels; hence, are largely unable to be supplied at a competitive price. This study examined how forcing increased biomass energy generation, along with improvements in biomass production technology, will impact agricultural feedstock prices...

  18. Biomass Biorefinery for the production of Polymers and Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Oliver P. Peoples

    2008-05-05

    The conversion of biomass crops to fuel is receiving considerable attention as a means to reduce our dependence on foreign oil imports and to meet future energy needs. Besides their use for fuel, biomass crops are an attractive vehicle for producing value added products such as biopolymers. Metabolix, Inc. of Cambridge proposes to develop methods for producing biodegradable polymers polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) in green tissue plants as well as utilizating residual plant biomass after polymer extraction for fuel generation to offset the energy required for polymer extraction. The primary plant target is switchgrass, and backup targets are alfalfa and tobacco. The combined polymer and fuel production from the transgenic biomass crops establishes a biorefinery that has the potential to reduce the nationís dependence on foreign oil imports for both the feedstocks and energy needed for plastic production. Concerns about the widespread use of transgenic crops and the growerís ability to prevent the contamination of the surrounding environment with foreign genes will be addressed by incorporating and expanding on some of the latest plant biotechnology developed by the project partners of this proposal. This proposal also addresses extraction of PHAs from biomass, modification of PHAs so that they have suitable properties for large volume polymer applications, processing of the PHAs using conversion processes now practiced at large scale (e.g., to film, fiber, and molded parts), conversion of PHA polymers to chemical building blocks, and demonstration of the usefulness of PHAs in large volume applications. The biodegradability of PHAs can also help to reduce solid waste in our landfills. If successful, this program will reduce U.S. dependence on imported oil, as well as contribute jobs and revenue to the agricultural economy and reduce the overall emissions of carbon to the atmosphere.

  19. Department of Crop and Soil Sciences PhD Graduate Research Assistantship: Soil Science/Soil Quality/Soil Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flury, Markus

    Department of Crop and Soil Sciences PhD Graduate Research Assistantship: Soil Science/Soil Quality/Soil Physics Position Summary: Plastic mulches are used in agriculture to conserve water, suppress weeds, and increase soil temperatures. However, plastic mulches need to be disposed off at the end

  20. Food & Agriculture Policy Issues for the 1980s.†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anonymous

    1980-01-01

    to urban development, highways and other nonfarm uses. This conversion of 2.5 to 3.0 million acres annually is reducing this basic resource for food pro duction and may also have environmental effects in local areas. Policy questions raised by the land... conversion issue include: Should federal, state and local government policies be developed to preserve agri cultural land for food and fiber production? If so, what type of policies are needed? Energy and Agriculture American agriculture production...

  1. Part 4: Conclusion "Growing biofuel crops is a considerably long-term investment. We need to frame the food vs.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ." and the following outcomes - "(1) Strategic partnerships for the research, development, testing, and deployment of renewable biofuels technologies and production of biomass crops; (2) Evaluation of Hawaii's potential/or crops, conversion of biomass to useable fuels, distribution infrastructure, and end user markets. Each

  2. Biomass fuel from woody crops for electric power generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perlack, R.D.; Wright, L.L.; Huston, M.A.; Schramm, W.E.

    1995-06-22

    This report discusses the biologic, environmental, economic, and operational issues associated with growing wood crops in managed plantations. Information on plantation productivity, environmental issues and impacts, and costs is drawn from DOE`s Biofuels Feedstock Development as well as commercial operations in the US and elsewhere. The particular experiences of three countries--Brazil, the Philippines, and Hawaii (US)--are discussed in considerable detail.

  3. Production

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Algae production R&D focuses on exploring resource use and availability, algal biomass development and improvements, characterizing algal biomass components, and the ecology and engineering of cultivation systems.

  4. Power Lines and Crops Can Be Good Neighbors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-08-01

    Two of the Pacific Northwestís greatest economic assets are its wealth of agriculture and its clean and reliable electricity fueled largely by hydropower. Sometimes the two intersect. Transmission lines carrying electricity to the regionís farms, businesses and homes must, of necessity, span large areas where people grow crops and orchards. To ensure a safe and reliable flow of electricity across these expanses, trees and other vegetation must be managed to certain standards. At the same time, the Bonneville Power Administration ó which owns and operates three-quarters of the regionís high-voltage transmission ó recognizes the importance of our regionís agricultural bounty. We are committed to working with individuals and agricultural communities to facilitate ongoing land-use activities in transmission rights-of-way as long as those uses are compatible with transmission safety and reliability standards. Our goal with vegetation management is to keep you and your property safe while protecting the reliability of our regionís electricity system. By working together, BPA and landowners can protect the system and public safety.

  5. Agricultural biotechnology and Indian newspapers†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sivakumar, Gayathri

    2004-11-15

    This study is designed to look into how agricultural biotechnology is covered by Indian newspapers. A through study of the literature showed that agricultural biotechnology is a much debated topic and there is a vast difference between the concerns...

  6. United States Department of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    United States Department of Agriculture Keys to Soil Taxonomy Ninth Edition, 2003 #12;#12;Keys to Soil Taxonomy By Soil Survey Staff United States Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service Ninth Edition, 2003 #12;The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits

  7. AGRICULTURAL INVENTORY LOWER FRASER VALLEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inventory Estimates 8 #12;- ii - LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1 Agricultural Waste Management Zones 2 Figure 2 4 Livestock Mass Distribution by Waste Management Zone 10 Figure 5 Agricultural Land Distribution by Waste Management Zone 10 Figure 6 Livestock Mass to Agricultural Land Ratio by Waste Management Zone 11

  8. Agriculture and Agribusiness Institute; Extension Educator Fruit Tree Position Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    and statewide leadership and educational programming expertise in tree fruit production. Located in Oceana in consideration of renewal. Application Process For additional information interested and qualified candidates, entomology, plant pathology or crop science, must be earned by date of hire; Three-years' experience

  9. Production of bioenergy and biochemicals from industrial and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    and agricultural wastewater, includ- ing methanogenic anaerobic digestion, biological hydro- gen production material in industrial and agricultural wastewater Methanogenic anaerobic digestion of organic material

  10. Engineered High Energy Crop (EHEC) Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Engineered High Energy Crop Programs Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement DOEEIS-0481 JULY 2015 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK...

  11. Cassava, a potential biofuel crop in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jansson, C.

    2010-01-01

    Cassava, a potential biofuel crop in China Christer Janssoncassava; bioethanol; biofuel; metabolic engineering; Chinathe potentials of cassava in the biofuel sector and point to

  12. Global Economic Effects of Changes in Crops, Pasture, and Forests due to Changing Climate, Carbon Dioxide, and Ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reilly, John M.

    Multiple environmental changes will have consequences for global vegetation. To the extent that crop yields and pasture and forest productivity are affected there can be important economic consequences. We examine the ...

  13. Training agricultural scientists at the International Center for the Improvement of Maize and Wheat†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cote?, Michael E.

    1986-01-01

    agricultural production" (World Food Conference, 1974). At a meeting of the Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) of the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR) held at CIMMYT in Mexico during October, 1975, the consensus of those...TRAINING AGRICULTURAL SCIENTISTS AT THE INTERNATIONAL CENTER FOR THE IMPROVEMENT OF MAIZE AND WHEAT A PROFESSIONAL PAPER by Michael E. Cote Submitted to the College of Agriculture of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  14. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kershen, Drew; Martin, Philip L.; Sexton, Steven

    2012-01-01

    entific studies on the safety of GMO crops and their foodto the existence of the Non-GMO label and the USDA-Organicengineered content. These Non-GMO and USDA-Organic labels

  15. Salinity Control in Irrigation Agriculture.†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Longenecker, Donald E.; Lyerly, Paul J.

    1962-01-01

    -tolerant tolerant salt salt tolerant tolerant FIELD CROPS Field bean Cowpea White clover" Alsike clover Red clover Ladino clwer Crimson clover Rose clover Burnet clover Lima bean Green bean Celery Pear Apple Orange Grapefruit Plum Apricot... Ryegrass Sour clover Rye (hay) Birdsfoot Wheat (hay) trefoil Oats (hay) VEGETABLECROPS Tomato Garden beet Broccoli Kale Cabbage Spinach Pepper Okra Lettuce Sweet corn Onion Pea Watermelon Cantaloupe Squash FRUIT CROPS Olive Pomegranate...

  16. Salinity Control in Irrigation Agriculture.†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Longenecker, Donald E.; Lyerly, Paul J.

    1957-01-01

    Barley (grain) Cowpeas (grain) Rye (grain) Sugar beet Corn (field) Wheat Rape Castorbean (grain) Soybean Oats (grain) Rice FORAGE CROPS White clover8 TaIl fesque Wheat- Alkali sacaton Alsike clover Meadow grasses Bermudagrass Red clover fesque... Sudangrass Barley (hay) Ladino clover Orchard- Sweetclover Rhodesgrass Crimson grass Alfalfa Blue clover Millet Ryegrass Panicgrass Rose clover Sour clover Rye (hay) Burnet clover Birdsfoot Wheat (hay) trefoil Oats (hay) VEGETABLE CROPS Lima bean...

  17. Agricultural Biomass and Landfill Diversion Incentive (Texas...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Landfill Diversion Incentive (Texas) Agricultural Biomass and Landfill Diversion Incentive (Texas) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor...

  18. Resolving the agriculture-petroleum conflict: the experience of cacao smallholders in Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scherr, S.J.

    1983-01-01

    In 1972, PEMEX, the Mexican national oil company, discovered huge reserves of oil and natural gas along the Gulf Coast, and began intensive exploitation in Tabasco and northern Chiapas states. Severe conflict between PEMEX and the agricultural economy of Tabasco seemed certain. But despite problems of labor scarcity, inflation, migration, pollution, agricultural production 1974 to 1979 increased for the state's major products - cacao, coconut, beef, and bananas. This study analyzes how agriculture-petroleum conflicts have been resolved in Tabasco, and how relevant its experience is to other agricultural areas undergoing rapid large-scale industrial development. Cacao farming was chosen as a case study. Detailed farm budget, family employment, and technical production data were used to document farm production strategies. Research results suggest that resolution of agriculture-petroleum conflicts depends on: demographic conditions, employment conditions, agricultural prices, petroleum company flexibility, government development policy, and farmer political strength. Support for the campesino sector is critical.

  19. ABSTRACT: Bioenergy Harvesting Technologies to Supply Crop Residues...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    objectives for the integration of advanced logistical systems and focused bioenergy harvesting technologies that supply crop residues and energy crops in a large bale format....

  20. Reducing the negative human-health impacts of bioenergy crop...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Reducing the negative human-health impacts of bioenergy crop emissions through region-specific crop selection Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Reducing the negative...

  1. Review and analysis of parameters for assessing transport of environmentally released radionuclides through agriculture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baes, C.F. III; Sharp, R.D.; Sjoreen, A.L.; Shor, R.W.

    1984-09-01

    Most of the default parameters incorporated into the TERRA computer code are documented including a literature review and systematic analysis of element-specific transfer parameters B/sub v/, B/sub r/, F/sub m/, F/sub f/, and K/sub d/. This review and analysis suggests default values which are consistent with the modeling approaches taken in TERRA and may be acceptable for most assessment applications of the computer code. However, particular applications of the code and additional analysis of elemental transport may require alternative default values. Use of the values reported herein in other computer codes simulating terrestrial transport is not advised without careful interpretation of the limitations and scope these analyses. An approach to determination of vegetation-specific interception fractions is also discussed. The limitations of this approach are many, and its use indicates the need for analysis of deposition, interception, and weathering processes. Judgement must be exercised in interpretation of plant surface concentrations generated. Finally, the location-specific agricultural, climatological, and population parameters in the default SITE data base documented. These parameters are intended as alternatives to average values currently used. Indeed, areas in the United States where intensive crop, milk, or beef production occurs will be reflected in the parameter values as will areas where little agricultural activity occurs. However, the original information sources contained some small error and the interpolation and conversion methods used will add more. Parameters used in TERRA not discussed herein are discussed in the companion report to this one - ORNL-5785. In the companion report the models employed in and the coding of TERRA are discussed. These reports together provide documentation of the TERRA code and its use in assessments. 96 references, 78 figures, 21 tables.

  2. Simulating and evaluating best management practices for integrated landscape management scenarios in biofuel feedstock production

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ha, Miae; Wu, May

    2015-09-08

    Sound crop and land management strategies can maintain land productivity and improve the environmental sustainability of agricultural crop and feedstock production. With this study, it evaluates a strategy of incorporating landscape design and management concepts into bioenergy feedstock production. It examines the effect of land conversion and agricultural best management practices (BMPs) on water quality (nutrients and suspended sediments) and hydrology. The strategy was applied to the watershed of the South Fork Iowa River in Iowa, where the focus was on converting low-productivity land to provide cellulosic biomass and implementing riparian buffers. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) wasmore†Ľemployed to simulate the impact at watershed and sub-basin scales. The study compared the representation of buffers by using trapping efficiency and area ratio methods in SWAT. Landscape design and management scenarios were developed to quantify water quality under (i) current land use, (ii) partial land conversion to switchgrass, and (iii) riparian buffer implementation. Results show that implementation of vegetative barriers and riparian buffer can trap the loss of total nitrogen, total phosphorus, and sediment significantly. The effect increases with the increase of buffer area coverage. Implementing riparian buffer at 30 m width is able to produce 4 million liters of biofuels. When low-productivity land (15.2% of total watershed land area) is converted to grow switchgrass, suspended sediment, total nitrogen, total phosphorus, and nitrate loadings are reduced by 69.3%, 55.5%, 46.1%, and 13.4%, respectively. The results highlight the significant role of lower-productivity land and buffers in cellulosic biomass and provide insights into the design of an integrated landscape with a conservation buffer for future bioenergy feedstock production.ę†less

  3. Montana State University 1 Sustainable Food &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    ecosystems, cropping systems, pest management, applied ecology, soil and water science, biochemistry, environmental biology, cropping systems, precision agriculture, ecologically-based pest management, weed science, or agricultural entomology (pest management science). Sustainable Crop Production Option--Department of Plant

  4. Disaggregated greenhouse gas emission inventories from agriculture via a coupled economic-ecosystem model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    systems in the federal state of Baden-Wu®rttemberg, Southwest Germany. EFEM is an economic farm production-ecosystem model; Agricultural production systems; Stocking rates 1. Introduction In Germany, agriculture Kaltschmitt a , Ju®rgen Zeddies b a Institute for Energy and Environment, Torgauer Str. 116, D-04347 Leipzig

  5. Reducing the negative human-health impacts of bioenergy crop emissions through region-specific crop selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Porter, WC; Rosenstiel, TN; Guenther, A; Lamarque, J-F; Barsanti, K

    2015-01-01

    bioenergy crops such as eucalyptus, giant reed, anduse of crops such as poplar, eucalyptus, and switchgrass asemitters such as eucalyptus. The com- bined health bene?ts

  6. IRRIGATION WATER QUALITY FOR AGRICULTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radcliffe, David

    IRRIGATION WATER QUALITY FOR AGRICULTURE Irrigation Water Background In the past, there were minor of irrigation water in Georgia. This is because only a small amount of acreage under irrigated agriculture utilized potable (suitable for drinking) quality water. Thus, quality of irrigation water was not closely

  7. AGRICULTURAL WINTER/SPRING 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    animal agriculture and the impact of air and water quality on human health. Powers also heads the new MSU agriculture on air quality through a number of projects. "The manure won't go away," Powers says regulations to ensure that air and water quality are preserved." In her air quality research, Powers

  8. Production and price projections for Texas grapefruit - 1975†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tefertiller, Edward Harold

    1969-01-01

    . fornia Fresh and Processed Harkets for Grapefruit Production Per Capita On-Tree and F. o. b. Texas Prices for Grapefruit Crop Values for Texas Grapefruit Total Projecting Consumer Demand for the Future (1975) Projected 1975 Production.../Capita Quantities and Texas Grapefruit Price Equation Projected Quantities for 1975 Price Equation (On-Treuj Projected 1975 On-Tree Prices and Crop Valves Optimum 1975/76 Production for Texas Grapefruit Growers Crop Value- for Texas Fresh Grapefruit 38 38...

  9. College of Agriculture and Life Sciences The NewYork State Agricultural Experiment Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    , and bioenergy crops that drive economic activity, and their impact is multiplied as industries from equipment

  10. SHORT ROTATION WOODY CROPS FACTSHEET SERIES # 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    SHORT ROTATION WOODY CROPS FACTSHEET SERIES # 5 Sustainability of SRWC for Energy1 WHAT of the SRWC systems and the relatively narrow genetic base in Salix, Populus or Eucalyptus SRWC may promote

  11. Cassava, a potential biofuel crop in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jansson, C.

    2010-01-01

    as a means to produce novel biodiesel crops. We also donítto oil Ethanol and biodiesel are the two major bio-basedin transportation. Compared to biodiesel, the net energy

  12. Features . . . Cover Crop Value to Cotton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    .............................................................................................Page 6 Fuel Prices Projections - Encouraging News .......................Page 7 Agronomy Notes VolumeFeatures . . . Cotton Cover Crop Value to Cotton Cotton Price and Rotation ..............................................................Page 5 Miscellaneous Large differences in nitrogen prices.......................................Page 6

  13. Agricultural Waste Management System Component Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    Agricultural Waste Management System Component Design Chapter 10 Part 651 Agricultural Waste Management Field Handbook 10≠1(210-vi-AWMFH, rev. 1, July 1996) Chapter 10 Agricultural Waste Management....................................................................................................10≠70 10≠i #12;Chapter 10 Agricultural Waste Management System Component Design Part 651 Agricultural

  14. Covering Note INTER-ACADEMY REPORT ON GM CROPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giri, Ranjit K.

    Covering Note for INTER-ACADEMY REPORT ON GM CROPS (Updated) The Inter-Academy Report on GM crops the main conclusions and recommendations. The literature on GM crops is voluminous. More than a hundred seek to enunciate a national strategy on GM crops. The rest deals with concerns, surveillance etc. #12

  15. Impacts of Global Change on Diseases of Agricultural Crops and Forest Trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of Plant Pathology, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506-5502, USA. 5 Natural Resources on Climate Change projects rising levels of greenhouse gas and global temperature. The well-known dependence on pathogens have recently been shown in literature linking pathogen abundance to atmospheric composition. Past

  16. Furrow Diking Technology for Agricultural Water Conservation and its Impact on Crop Yields in Texas†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishna, J. Hari; Arkin, Gerald F.

    1988-01-01

    simulated. Daily weather data for 25 years from five Texas regions were used for the analyses. Depending on the location, furrow diking in the growing season increased average annual sorghum yields by 320 to 570 kg/ha, corn yields by 180 to 570 kg...

  17. The herbicide 2, 4-D can be used in agricultural crops, forests, roadsides, lawns,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    of water: Avoid spraying on hard surfaces, especially when water from irrigation or rain can wash. Will injure desired broadleaf plants if drift contacts them. Water quality issues: 2, 4-D breaks down rapidly

  18. Cyfluthrin can be used to control insects in agricultural crops, landscapes, and turf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    , especially where water from irrigation or rain can wash the insecticide away. Do not apply near a water body insects. Water quality issues: Cyfluthrin can attach to soil, which then can be carried by runoff in sediment into lakes, streams, and other water bodies, poisoning small aquatic creatures. However

  19. Imidacloprid is an insecticide that can be used on agricultural crops, landscapes,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    sprays on hard surfaces around buildings, especially where water from irrigation or rain can wash by the California Department of Pesticide Regulation. Water quality issues: Imidacloprid breaks down slowly in water and sediment, so it is very long lasting.It moves readily in soil and water, increasing its potential

  20. Students' Perceptions of International Agriculture After an International Agricultural Experience†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Kasey Lynn

    2012-02-14

    Study abroad and internship experiences are the best ways for students to globalize their education. The purpose of this study was to identify students' perceptions of international agriculture before and after they ...

  1. The global gridded crop model intercomparison: Data and modeling protocols for Phase 1 (v1.0)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, J.; MŁller, C.; Deryng, D.; Chryssanthacopoulos, J.; Boote, K. J.; BŁchner, M.; Foster, I.; Glotter, M.; Heinke, J.; Iizumi, T.; Izaurralde, R. C.; Mueller, N. D.; Ray, D. K.; Rosenzweig, C.; Ruane, A. C.; Sheffield, J.

    2015-02-11

    We present protocols and input data for Phase 1 of the Global Gridded Crop Model Intercomparison, a project of the Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP). The project consist of global simulations of yields, phenologies, and many land-surface fluxes using 12Ė15 modeling groups for many crops, climate forcing data sets, and scenarios over the historical period from 1948 to 2012. The primary outcomes of the project include (1) a detailed comparison of the major differences and similarities among global models commonly used for large-scale climate impact assessment, (2) an evaluation of model and ensemble hindcasting skill, (3) quantification of key uncertainties from climate input data, model choice, and other sources, and (4) a multi-model analysis of the agricultural impacts of large-scale climate extremes from the historical record.

  2. The global gridded crop model intercomparison: Data and modeling protocols for Phase 1 (v1.0)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Elliott, J.; MŁller, C.; Deryng, D.; Chryssanthacopoulos, J.; Boote, K. J.; BŁchner, M.; Foster, I.; Glotter, M.; Heinke, J.; Iizumi, T.; et al

    2015-02-11

    We present protocols and input data for Phase 1 of the Global Gridded Crop Model Intercomparison, a project of the Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP). The project consist of global simulations of yields, phenologies, and many land-surface fluxes using 12Ė15 modeling groups for many crops, climate forcing data sets, and scenarios over the historical period from 1948 to 2012. The primary outcomes of the project include (1) a detailed comparison of the major differences and similarities among global models commonly used for large-scale climate impact assessment, (2) an evaluation of model and ensemble hindcasting skill, (3) quantification ofmore†Ľkey uncertainties from climate input data, model choice, and other sources, and (4) a multi-model analysis of the agricultural impacts of large-scale climate extremes from the historical record.ę†less

  3. Argonne National Laboratory Scientists Study Benefits of Bioenergy Crop Integration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Scientists at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), funded by the U.S. Department of Energyís Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO), are studying multifunctional landscapes and how they can benefit farmers, the environment, and the bioenergy industry nationwide. Their study, ďMultifunctional landscapes: Site characterization and field-scale design to incorporate biomass production into an agricultural system,Ē is set to be published in September 2015 in the journal, Biomass and Bioenergy.

  4. 1132 WWW.CROPS.ORG CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 52, MAYJUNE 2012 While varying regionally, root-feeding plant-parasitic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    1132 WWW.CROPS.ORG CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 52, MAY≠JUNE 2012 RESEARCH While varying regionally, root, Statistician, Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Plant and Soil Science Building, Michigan State University.08.0409 © Crop Science Society of America | 5585 Guilford Rd., Madison, WI 53711 USA All rights reserved. No part

  5. 2212 WWW.CROPS.ORG CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 51, SEPTEMBEROCTOBER 2011 Turfgrass quality is evaluated by integrating factors of canopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2212 WWW.CROPS.ORG CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 51, SEPTEMBER≠OCTOBER 2011 RESEARCH Turfgrass quality.2135/cropsci2010.12.0728 Published online 6 July 2011. © Crop Science Society of America | 5585 Guilford Rd, reflectance at 661 nm; R935, reflectance at 935 nm. Published in Crop Sci. 51:2212≠2218 (2011). doi: 10

  6. Selection on Crop-Derived Traits and QTL in Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) Crop-Wild Hybrids under Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, John M.

    Selection on Crop-Derived Traits and QTL in Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) Crop-Wild Hybrids under grown under wild-like low water conditions. Crop-derived petiole length and head diameter were favored size and leaf pressure potential. Interestingly, the additive effect of the crop-derived allele

  7. The concept of a sustainable agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kriewaldt, David Mark

    1993-01-01

    The concept of a sustainable agriculture varies much with writers: some see it as the preservation of agricultural resources or as the reduction of agricultural contamination of the environment or both. Other authors focus on economic viability...

  8. Farm Size in Relation to Market Outlets and Forward Contracts for Major Field Crops and Beef Cattle Texas Rollin Plains.†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Donald S.; Martin, J. Rod

    1978-01-01

    STATION / Neville P. Clarke, Director The Texas A&M University System 1 College Station, Texas Farm Size in Relation to Market Outlets and Fomd Contracts for Major Field Crops and Beef Cattle, B-1187 Texas Rolling Plains February 1978 Donald S. Moore... and J. Rod Martin* Agricultural producers are continually adjusting to changing marketing channels. Some farmers obviously seek these changes, while others are only later affected by the changing conditions. One example of changing marketing channels...

  9. Plot size and location within a cotton block: their effects on the canopy temperature function and crop water stress index†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaitan, Camilo Alberto

    1988-01-01

    in the cotton block, using the theoretical lower baseline. Table 23. CWSI and linear regression of the CTF for two 0. 6 PET water treatment plots randomly located in the cotton block, using the theoretical lower baseline. . . . . 82 Table 24. Summary... to evaluate the effects of a randomized plot design on the crop water stress index (CWSI) and canopy temperature function (CTF) of cotton. Trickle irrigated cotton at the Agricultural Research Station near Pecos Texas was used to investigate...

  10. Estimating production functions with damage control inputs: an application to Korean vegetable production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Pil Ja

    2002-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the use of chemicals for pest control in Korean cucumber production. The empirical issue addressed is whether estimating crop production functions consistent with the economic theory of damage control inputs makes significant...

  11. South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops -2015 SOYBEAN DISEASE CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops - 2015 259 SOYBEAN DISEASE CONTROL John D years. Soybean Rust is active in South Carolina primarily after mid-August in most years. Soybean South Carolina Soybean Production Guide for information on accurate identification of diseases based

  12. Aspects of Applied Biology 112, 2011 Biomass and Energy Crops IV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Aspects of Applied Biology 112, 2011 Biomass and Energy Crops IV 147 By JACOB M JUNGERS, JARED J Program (CRP), may provide acreage and economic incentives for cellulosic energy production. Improving, biomass yields, bioenergy Introduction The United States'Energy Independence and SecurityAct of 2007 (EISA

  13. Multiplex detection of agricultural pathogens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McBride, Mary Teresa (Brentwood, CA); Slezak, Thomas Richard (Livermore, CA); Messenger, Sharon Lee (Kensington, CA)

    2010-09-14

    Described are kits and methods useful for detection of seven agricultural pathogens (BPSV; BHV; BVD; FMDV; BTV; SVD; and VESV) in a sample. Genomic sequence information from 7 agricultural pathogens was analyzed to identify signature sequences, e.g., polynucleotide sequences useful for confirming the presence or absence of a pathogen in a sample. Primer and probe sets were designed and optimized for use in a PCR based, multiplexed Luminex assay to successfully identify the presence or absence of pathogens in a sample.

  14. Multiplex detection of agricultural pathogens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siezak, Thomas R.; Gardner, Shea; Torres, Clinton; Vitalis, Elizabeth; Lenhoff, Raymond J.

    2013-01-15

    Described are kits and methods useful for detection of agricultural pathogens in a sample. Genomic sequence information from agricultural pathogens was analyzed to identify signature sequences, e.g., polynucleotide sequences useful for confirming the presence or absence of a pathogen in a sample. Primer and probe sets were designed and optimized for use in a PCR based, multiplexed Luminex assay and/or an array assay to successfully identify the presence or absence of pathogens in a sample.

  15. Interactions of woody biofuel feedstock production systems with water resources: Considerations for sustainability.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trettin, Carl,C.; Amatya, Devendra; Coleman, Mark.

    2008-07-01

    Abstract. Water resources are important for the production of woody biofuel feedstocks. It is necessary to ensure that production systems do not adversely affect the quantity or quality of surface and ground water. The effects of woody biomass plantations on water resources are largely dependent on the prior land use and the management regime. Experience from both irrigated and non-irrigated systems has demonstrated that woody biofuel production systems do not impair water quality. Water quality actually improves from conversion of idle or degraded agricultural lands to woody biomass plantations. Site water balance may be altered by cultivation of woody biomass plantations relative to agricultural use, due to increases in evapostranspiration (ET) and storage. Incorporation of woody biomass production plantations within the landscape provides an opportunity to improve the quality of runoff water and soil conservation. Given the centrality of water resources to the sustainability of ecosystem services and other values derived, the experience with woody biofuels feedstock production systems is positive. Keywords. Short rotation woody crop, forest hydrology, water quality, hardwood plantation.

  16. CliCrop: a Crop Water-Stress and Irrigation Demand Model for an Integrated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CliCrop: a Crop Water-Stress and Irrigation Demand Model for an Integrated Global Assessment Blanc and C. Adam Schlosser Report No. 214 April 2012 #12;The MIT Joint Program on the Science Change Science (CGCS) and the Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research (CEEPR). These two

  17. CropS/Pl P 403/503 Advanced Cropping Systems Fall 2013, 3 Credits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pappu, Hanu R.

    CropS/Pl P 403/503 Advanced Cropping Systems Fall 2013, 3 Credits Time: Tu,Th 1:25-2:40; Field, whichever you prefer on your transcripts. Undergraduates generally enroll as 403 and graduates as 503 to critically interpret agronomic literature. GRADING: 403 and 503 Credit: ∑ Five quizzes (40 points each

  18. Press Conference Call Tomorrow: Agriculture Secretary Vilsack...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Press Conference Call Tomorrow: Agriculture Secretary Vilsack and Energy Secretary Chu to Discuss Efforts to Reduce U.S. Oil Dependence Press Conference Call Tomorrow: Agriculture...

  19. Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature...

  20. Mapping the Potential for Biofuel Production on Marginal Lands: Differences in Definitions, Data and Models across Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Sarah M

    2014-01-01

    D. Land availability for biofuel production. Environ. Sci.of land available for biofuel production. Environ. Sci.so marginal land for biofuel crops is limited. Energy Policy

  1. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    in Europe. Current biofuel production in Brazil cannot meetthat expansion of biofuel production will expand defores-attributes to support biofuel production. The challenge is

  2. Evaluating atmospheric CO2 inversions at multiple scales over a highly-inventoried agricultural landscape.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuh, Andrew E.; Lauvaux, Thomas; West, Tristram O.; Denning, A.; Davis, Kenneth J.; Miles, Natasha; Richardson, S. J.; Uliasz, Marek; Lokupitiya, Erandathie; Cooley, Dan; Andrews, Arlyn; Ogle, Stephen

    2013-05-01

    An intensive regional research campaign was conducted by the North American Carbon Program (NACP) in 2005 to study the carbon cycle of the highly productive agricultural regions of the Midwestern United States. Forty-_ve di_erent associated projects were spawned across _ve U.S. agencies over the course of nearly a decade involving hundreds of researchers. The primary objective of the project was to investigate the ability of atmospheric inversion techniques to use highly calibrated CO2 mixing ratio data to estimate CO2 exchange over the major croplands of the U.S. Statistics from densely monitored crop production, consisting primarily corn and soybeans, provided the backbone of a well-studied\\bottom up"flux estimate that was used to evaluate the atmospheric inversion results. Three different inversion systems, representing spatial scales varying from high resolution mesoscale, to continental, to global, coupled to different transport models and optimization techniques were compared to the bottom up" inventory estimates. The mean annual CO2-C sink for 2007 from the inversion systems ranged from 120 TgC to 170 TgC, when viewed across a wide variety of inversion setups, with the best" point estimates ranging from 145 TgC to 155 TgC. Inversion-based mean C sink estimates were generally slightly stronger, but statistically indistinguishable,from the inventory estimate whose mean C sink was 135 TgC. The inversion results showed temporal correlations at seasonal lengths while week to week correlations remained low. Comparisons were made between atmospheric transport yields of the two regional inversion systems, which despite having different influence footprints in space and time due to differences in underlying transport models and external forcings, showed similarity when aggregated in space and time.

  3. Women: the key to successful development policies for subsistence agriculture in sub-Saharan Africa†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Kathie Elaine

    1971-01-01

    fulfillment of the requirement for the deSree of IIASTER OF SCIERCE December 1971 Major Subject: Economics NOMEN: THE KEY TO SUCCESSFUL DEVELOPMENT POLICIES FOR SUBSISTENCE AGRICULTURE IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA A Thesis KATHIE ELAINE RYAN Approved... Africa 10 Western. Afric- Southern Africa 12 Need for Fzpanded Stu. dy Overall Economic Efficiency 13 18 II. THE SITUAT ON IN AGRICULTURE 21 Nature of Subsistence Agriculture Traditional Production Practices 21 23 Traditional Roles 26...

  4. The structure of agriculture in metropolitan and nonmetropolitan America†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Michelle L

    2003-01-01

    the following questions: (1) What was the structure of U.S. agricultural production systems in 1992 and had this structure changed by 1997? (2) What was the relationship between metropolitan proximity and U.S. agristructure and its changes from 1992 to 1997...

  5. Final Technical Report for project entitled "Equipment Request for the Belleville Agricultural Research and Education Center"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, Bryan; Nehring, Jarrett; Susan Graham, Brian Klubek

    2013-01-16

    Executive Summary The funding provided by the DOE for this project was used exclusively to purchase research equipment involved with the field development and evaluation of crop production technologies and practices for energy crop production. The new equipment has been placed into service on the SIU farms and has significantly enhanced our research capacity and scope for agronomy and precision ag research to support novel seed traits or crop management strategies for improving the efficiency and productivity of corn and soybeans. More specifically, the precision ag capability of the equipment that was purchased has heightened interest by faculty and associated industry partners to develop collaborative projects. In addition, this equipment has provided SIU with a foundation to be more successful at securing competitive grants in energy crop production and precision ag data management. Furthermore, the enhanced capacity for agronomy research in the southern Illinois region has been realized and will benefit crop producers in this region by learning to improve their operations from our research outcomes.

  6. Alternative Policy Tools for U.S. Agriculture.†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knutson, Ronald D.; Richardson, James W.

    1984-01-01

    , Supply Control Long-term land retirement is a multiple year voluntary program that removes cropland from the production of farm commodities. To remove from production cropland that is devoted to crops in surplus or is subject to erosion. The program... program in 1970. Land retirement is acceptable to consumers and producers only when surplus stocks and low prices are a chronic problem. If needed, the land can readily be put back into produc tion, as it was in the early 1970s. Land retirement...

  7. Salinity Control in Irrigation Agriculture.†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyerly, Paul J.; Longenecker, Donald E.

    1962-01-01

    these analyses as a basis for planning management prac- tices . TEST-DON'T GUESS . Apply water uniformly by using a properly de- signed irrigation system and by leveling where necessary . Apply enough water for the crop plus enough to keep salt leached to a... tolerant to your salt conditions . Plant good seed under optimum moisture and temperature conditions . Fertilize to replace nutrients lost by leaching and to maintain adequate fertility . Use soil-improving grasses or legumes to main- tain good soil...

  8. Tuberous legumes: preliminary evaluation of tropical Australian and introduced species as fuel crops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saxon, E.C.

    1981-04-01

    The evaluation of native and introduced legumes with starch-storing roots or tubers was undertaken to test whether plants traditionally collected as food by Australian aborigines might have a role in the development of crops for liquid fuel production (by fermentation of carbohydrates to ethanol). Tuberous-rooted legumes from overseas were planted at the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, division of Tropical Crops and Pastures, Kimberley Research Station, Western Australia (15/sup 0/39'S, 128/sup 0/42'E) in December 1974, March 1978 and February 1979. Roots from the latter plantings were harvested in June 1979. Native plant material was collected during visits to aboriginal communities in the Kimberleys between April and June 1979. The native and introduced specimens were analyzed for fermentable carbohydrate and protein content. Several native plants appear more promising than introduced species as liquid fuel crops.

  9. The Mississippi University Research Consortium for the Utilization of Biomass: Production of Alternative Fuels from Waste Biomass Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drs. Mark E. Zapp; Todd French; Lewis Brown; Clifford George; Rafael Hernandez; Marvin Salin; Drs. Huey-Min Hwang, Ken Lee, Yi Zhang; Maria Begonia; Drs. Clint Williford; Al Mikell; Drs. Robert Moore; Roger Hester .

    2009-03-31

    The Mississippi Consortium for the Utilization of Biomass was formed via funding from the US Department of Energy's EPSCoR Program, which is administered by the Office of Basic Science. Funding was approved in July of 1999 and received by participating Mississippi institutions by 2000. The project was funded via two 3-year phases of operation (the second phase was awarded based on the high merits observed from the first 3-year phase), with funding ending in 2007. The mission of the Consortium was to promote the utilization of biomass, both cultured and waste derived, for the production of commodity and specialty chemicals. These scientific efforts, although generally basic in nature, are key to the development of future industries within the Southeastern United States. In this proposal, the majority of the efforts performed under the DOE EPSCoR funding were focused primarily toward the production of ethanol from lignocellulosic feedstocks and biogas from waste products. However, some of the individual projects within this program investigated the production of other products from biomass feeds (i.e. acetic acid and biogas) along with materials to facilitate the more efficient production of chemicals from biomass. Mississippi is a leading state in terms of raw biomass production. Its top industries are timber, poultry production, and row crop agriculture. However, for all of its vast amounts of biomass produced on an annual basis, only a small percentage of the biomass is actually industrially produced into products, with the bulk of the biomass being wasted. This situation is actually quite representative of many Southeastern US states. The research and development efforts performed attempted to further develop promising chemical production techniques that use Mississippi biomass feedstocks. The three processes that were the primary areas of interest for ethanol production were syngas fermentation, acid hydrolysis followed by hydrolyzate fermentation, and enzymatic conversion. All three of these processes are of particular interest to states in the Southeastern US since the agricultural products produced in this region are highly variable in terms of actual crop, production quantity, and the ability of land areas to support a particular type of crop. This greatly differs from the Midwestern US where most of this region's agricultural land supports one to two primary crops, such as corn and soybean. Therefore, developing processes which are relatively flexible in terms of biomass feedstock is key to the southeastern region of the US if this area is going to be a 'player' in the developing biomass to chemicals arena. With regard to the fermentation of syngas, research was directed toward developing improved biocatalysts through organism discovery and optimization, improving ethanol/acetic acid separations, evaluating potential bacterial contaminants, and assessing the use of innovative fermentors that are better suited for supporting syngas fermentation. Acid hydrolysis research was directed toward improved conversion yields and rates, acid recovery using membranes, optimization of fermenting organisms, and hydrolyzate characterization with changing feedstocks. Additionally, a series of development efforts addressed novel separation techniques for the separation of key chemicals from fermentation activities. Biogas related research focused on key factors hindering the widespread use of digester technologies in non-traditional industries. The digestion of acetic acids and other fermentation wastewaters was studied and methods used to optimize the process were undertaken. Additionally, novel laboratory methods were designed along with improved methods of digester operation. A search for better performing digester consortia was initiated coupled with improved methods to initiate their activity within digester environments. The third activity of the consortium generally studied the production of 'other' chemicals from waste biomass materials found in Mississippi. The two primary examples of this activity are production of chem

  10. Effects of federal risk management programs on investment, production, and contract design under uncertainty†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Sangtaek

    2006-04-12

    Agricultural producers face uncertain agricultural production and market conditions. Much of the uncertainty faced by agricultural producers cannot be controlled by the producer, but can be managed. Several risk management programs are available...

  11. Essays on the Effect of Climate Change on Agriculture and Agricultural Transportation†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Attavanich, Witsanu

    2012-02-14

    This dissertation analyzes the impact of climate, and atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) on crop yields and grain transportation. The analysis of crop yields endeavors to advance the literature by statistically estimating ...

  12. Faculty of Landscape Architecture, Horticulture and Crop Production Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , urban and rural landscape planning, or horticultural and dynamic vegetation design. Apart from Project- Energy Landscapes and Master Planning, 15 credits - Theme Course, 15 credits - Design Project in landscape design, planning and management, this master's programme gives you an oppor- tunity to study

  13. High Tunnel Crop Production Tips Lewis W. Jett

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Robert M.

    . Specifically, high tunnels are passively vented, solar greenhouses covered with 1-2 layers of greenhouse supplemental heating systems? High tunnels should be designed and managed as passively vented and solar heated structures. However, supplemental heat (propane space heaters, wood stoves, etc) can be used to protect

  14. Production Practices for Irrigated Crops on the High Plains.†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonnen, C. A.; McArthur, W. C.; Magee, A. C.; Hughes, W.F.

    1953-01-01

    per acre of cotton for one irrigation on sandy soils but only .85 hour per acre on heavy soils. This saving was possible because the runs were longer and it was not necessary to re-set siphon tubes so often on heavy soils. Also, farmers on sandy... soils had more trouble from washing and from ditches breaking than was experienced on, heavy soils. Sondy Soils Two-.or l*artor Faur-rnr 1.oslsr equlpmsnt *qulpmenl TO?OI how. pel acre YO- Tm~tor Yon TVO~O. 398 48 383 33 Hand "orb Machine work...

  15. Opportunities for Energy Crop Production Based on Subfield Scale...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    is a promising means to supply an expanding biofuel industry while increasing biomass yields, benefiting soil and water quality, and increasing biodiversity. Despite these...

  16. Non-Traditional Soil Additives: Can They Improve Crop Production?†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFarland, Mark L.; Stichler, Charles; Lemon, Robert G.

    2002-06-26

    Non-traditional soil additives include soil conditioners such as organic materials and minerals, soil activators that claim to stimulate soil microbes or inoculate soil with new beneficial organisms, and wetting agents that may be marketed...

  17. Opportunities for Energy Crop Production Based on Subfield Scale

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech ConnectSpeeding access to science informationArticle)effectsTransfer

  18. What is Different About Ag-Biotech? An Investigation of University Agricultural Patenting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foltz, Jeremy D.

    What is Different About Ag-Biotech? An Investigation of University Agricultural Patenting Jeremy D the question: is ag- biotech different from other agricultural research in terms of patent production or patent quality? It does so by estimating count data models of the difference (if any) between ag- biotech patents

  19. Integrating Agricultural and Forestry GHG Mitigation Response into General Economy Frameworks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    for characterizing potential responses to greenhouse gas mitigation policies by the agriculture and forestry can be achieved through AF efforts by employing sink strategies, biofuel production or emissions management relative to carbon, methane (CH4) or nitrous oxide (N2O). Agricultural and forestry participation

  20. Agricultural and Biological Engineering College of Agricultural Sciences Cooperative Extension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    solar energy or "green sunshine" derived from the solar- powered photosynthesis process during the growth and development phases of plant materials. Utilizing Biomass Energy The four methods in which, and Pennsylvania Counties Cooperating Biomass Energy Dennis E. Buffington, Professor, Agricultural and Biological

  1. Issues Driving the Outlook for Specialty Crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    % Vegetables and melons 19% Nursery/green house 10% Grains and cotton 9% Hay and forage crops 19% Fruits 15% Tree nuts 13%Vegetables and melons 9% Nursery/green house 0.004% Grains and cotton 38% #12;Geographic, ≠ Regulations (including greenhouse gas policy), water, labor, air quality, water quality, etc. #12;The

  2. Genetically modified food and crops: perceptions of risks†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Clare R.

    2010-01-01

    The debate around genetically modified food and crops has proved to be complex and far-reaching, involving diverse stakeholder groups and many issues. Although the extent of global uptake of GM crops has been substantial ...

  3. FISHING PERMIT Eastern Shore Agricultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISHING PERMIT Eastern Shore Agricultural Research and Extension Center If all fields are not filled out, you do NOT have permission to fish! Name: ____________________________________________ Fishing Permit is valid for ONE YEAR. In return for this privilege, I agree to: 1. ABSOLVE the Eastern

  4. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    examination. Global production of olive oil increased fromon country of production of the oil (for example, if it is1. World Production and Exports of Olive Oil (1,000 tons),

  5. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hyunok; Sumner, Daniel A.; Martin, Philip; Hochman, Gal; Rajagopal, Deepak; Zilberman, David

    2011-01-01

    oil reserve and produce 42% of the crude-oil production. Thefuel prices and crude-oil production but increase overallpower to control production and pricing of oil with varying

  6. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hyunok; Sumner, Daniel A.; Martin, Philip; Hochman, Gal; Rajagopal, Deepak; Zilberman, David

    2011-01-01

    produce 42% of the crude-oil production. The organizationfuel prices and crude-oil production but increase overallcrude oil during the same period. Although prices more than qua- drupled, OPEC production

  7. The Crop of the Day (c) Paul Gepts 2013 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gepts, Paul

    20130404 1 The Crop of the Day Strawberry (c) Paul Gepts 2013 1 Sources ∑ Sauer JD (1993) Fragaria Strawberries. In: Historical geography of crop plants. CRC, Boca Raton, FL: pp. 127130 ∑ Jones JK (1976) Strawberry, Fragaria ananassa (Rosaceae). In: N.W. Simmonds (ed), Evolution of crop plants, Longman, London

  8. Department of Soil and Crop Sciences Promotion and Tenure Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermķdez, Josť Luis

    Department of Soil and Crop Sciences Promotion and Tenure Policy Adopted by Action of the Soil & Crop Sciences Faculty on June 21, 1993. Modified by departmental action in January 2012. INTRODUCTION The Soil & Crop Sciences Department at Texas A&M University seeks to retain and reward faculty members who

  9. !ncredible Kerala? A Political Ecological Analysis of Organic Agriculture in the "Model for Development"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thottathil, Sapna

    2012-01-01

    3.1. Introduction 3.2. Rice 3.3. Coconut 3.4. Arecanut 3.5.Plantains Cashewnut Tapioca Coconut Coffee Tea Rubber 2009-agricultural products Ė such as coconut oil and pepper Ė in

  10. Report to the New Jersey State Board of Agriculture September 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Robert M.

    over bare ground and black plastic production. It was found shredded leaf mulch application yields agriculture for a changing climate." Shredded leaf mulch application is a worthwhile cultural practice

  11. CliCrop: a Crop Water-Stress and Irrigation Demand Model for an Integrated Global Assessment Model Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fant, C.A.

    This paper describes the use of the CliCrop model in the context of climate change general assessment

  12. Biomass crops can be used for biological disinfestation and remediation of soils and water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stapleton, James J; Banuelos, Gary

    2009-01-01

    Bioremediation crops should be compatible in rotations with other agronomic crops, such as cotton, wheat, of irrigation water

  13. Cassava, a potential biofuel crop in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jansson, C.

    2010-01-01

    cassava-derived bioethanol production has been increasingof cassava for bioethanol production. 1. Introduction 1.1.a direct comparison of bioethanol production from different

  14. Systems and methods for autonomously controlling agricultural machinery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoskinson, Reed L.; Bingham, Dennis N.; Svoboda, John M.; Hess, J. Richard

    2003-07-08

    Systems and methods for autonomously controlling agricultural machinery such as a grain combine. The operation components of a combine that function to harvest the grain have characteristics that are measured by sensors. For example, the combine speed, the fan speed, and the like can be measured. An important sensor is the grain loss sensor, which may be used to quantify the amount of grain expelled out of the combine. The grain loss sensor utilizes the fluorescence properties of the grain kernels and the plant residue to identify when the expelled plant material contains grain kernels. The sensor data, in combination with historical and current data stored in a database, is used to identify optimum operating conditions that will result in increased crop yield. After the optimum operating conditions are identified, an on-board computer can generate control signals that will adjust the operation of the components identified in the optimum operating conditions. The changes result in less grain loss and improved grain yield. Also, because new data is continually generated by the sensor, the system has the ability to continually learn such that the efficiency of the agricultural machinery is continually improved.

  15. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology 182183 (2013) 112 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    2013-01-01

    , even when renewable energy production was included as a fossil fuel carbon offset. The most productive. To account for C removed in harvestable biomass we calculated adjusted Net Ecosystem Production (NEPadj; g C recommendations for future establishment of biofuels feedstock and row agriculture systems with different

  16. 298 WWW.CROPS.ORG CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 51, JANUARYFEBRUARY 2011 Pima cotton (Gossypium barbadense L.) was grown on 149,000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradford, Kent

    298 WWW.CROPS.ORG CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 51, JANUARY≠FEBRUARY 2011 RESEARCH Pima cotton (Gossypium. © Crop Science Society of America | 5585 Guilford Rd., Madison, WI 53711 USA All rights reserved. No part by the publisher. #12;CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 51, JANUARY≠FEBRUARY 2011 WWW.CROPS.ORG 299 In the United States,

  17. Transgenic approaches to altering carbon and nitrogen partitioning in whole plants: assessing the potential to improve crop yields and nutritional quality

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yadav, Umesh P.; Ayre, Brian G.; Bush, Daniel R.

    2015-04-22

    The principal components of plant productivity and nutritional value, from the standpoint of modern agriculture, are the acquisition and partitioning of organic carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) compounds among the various organs of the plant. The flow of essential organic nutrients among the plant organ systems is mediated by its complex vascular system, and is driven by a series of transport steps including export from sites of primary assimilation, transport into and out of the phloem and xylem, and transport into the various import-dependent organs. Manipulating C and N partitioning to enhance yield of harvested organs is evident in the earliest crop domestication events and continues to be a goal for modern plant biology. Research on the biochemistry, molecular and cellular biology, and physiology of C and N partitioning has now matured to an extent that strategic manipulation of these transport systems through biotechnology are being attempted to improve movement from source to sink tissues in general, but also to target partitioning to specific organs. These nascent efforts are demonstrating the potential of applied biomass targeting but are also identifying interactions between essential nutrients that require further basic research. In this review, we summarize the key transport steps involved in C and N partitioning, and discuss various transgenic approaches for directly manipulating key C and N transporters involved. In addition, we propose several experiments that could enhance biomass accumulation in targeted organs while simultaneously testing current partitioning models.

  18. Transgenic approaches to altering carbon and nitrogen partitioning in whole plants: assessing the potential to improve crop yields and nutritional quality

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yadav, Umesh P.; Ayre, Brian G.; Bush, Daniel R.

    2015-04-22

    The principal components of plant productivity and nutritional value, from the standpoint of modern agriculture, are the acquisition and partitioning of organic carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) compounds among the various organs of the plant. The flow of essential organic nutrients among the plant organ systems is mediated by its complex vascular system, and is driven by a series of transport steps including export from sites of primary assimilation, transport into and out of the phloem and xylem, and transport into the various import-dependent organs. Manipulating C and N partitioning to enhance yield of harvested organs is evident in themore†Ľearliest crop domestication events and continues to be a goal for modern plant biology. Research on the biochemistry, molecular and cellular biology, and physiology of C and N partitioning has now matured to an extent that strategic manipulation of these transport systems through biotechnology are being attempted to improve movement from source to sink tissues in general, but also to target partitioning to specific organs. These nascent efforts are demonstrating the potential of applied biomass targeting but are also identifying interactions between essential nutrients that require further basic research. In this review, we summarize the key transport steps involved in C and N partitioning, and discuss various transgenic approaches for directly manipulating key C and N transporters involved. In addition, we propose several experiments that could enhance biomass accumulation in targeted organs while simultaneously testing current partitioning models.ę†less

  19. Recent Agricultural Ergonomics Research at UC Davis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    Davis, Berkeley and San Francisco ∑ Focus on labor-intensive agriculture Agricultural Ergonomics effects of prolonged exposure to musculoskeletal disorders risk factors- Manual weeding Focus on basic exposure to musculoskeletal disorders risk factors- Manual weeding Recent Research Projects Fatigue

  20. Randolph EMC- Agricultural Efficient Lighting Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Agricultural members of Randolph EMC (REMC) who upgrade to energy-efficient†CFL bulbs in agricultural facilities are eligible for an incentive to help cover the initial cost of installation. The...

  1. Global trends in agriculture and food systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    development * Corresponding author: Danish Research Centre for Organic Food and Farming (DARCOF), P.O. Box 501 Global trends in agriculture and food systems Marie Trydeman Knudsen*, Niels Halberg, JÝrgen E .................................................................................16 Global trends in organic agriculture

  2. Child Labor in Texas Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, David

    2005-04-28

    percent of all work fatalities. Farm hazards include machinery, confined spaces, animals and live- stock, chemicals, respiratory irritants, toxic gases and extreme environmental conditions. Children working in agriculture may be hired employees, labor... contractor employees or farm family members. Child labor laws exist to ensure that a child is not employed in an occupation or manner that can harm him or her. However, these laws do not cover workers under age 16 who work on their parent?s or guardian?s...

  3. OTEC- Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Oregon Trail Electric Consumers Cooperative (OTEC) offers programs to agricultural customers.† Interested customers should contact a local OTEC office.

  4. Emissions Of Greenhouse Gases From Rice Agriculture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Aslam K. Khalil

    2009-07-16

    This project produced detailed data on the processes that affect methane and nitrous oxide emissions from rice agriculture and their inter-relationships. It defines the shifting roles and potential future of these gases in causing global warming and the benefits and tradeoffs of reducing emissions. The major results include: 1). Mechanisms and Processes Leading to Methane Emissions are Delineated. Our experiments have tested the standard model of methane emissions from rice fields and found new results on the processes that control the flux. A mathematical mass balance model was used to unravel the production, oxidation and transport of methane from rice. The results suggested that when large amounts of organic matter are applied, the additional flux that is observed is due to both greater production and reduced oxidation of methane. 2). Methane Emissions From China Have Been Decreasing Over the Last Two Decades. We have calculated that methane emissions from rice fields have been falling in recent decades. This decrease is particularly large in China. While some of this is due to reduced area of rice agriculture, the bigger effect is from the reduction in the emission factor which is the annual amount of methane emitted per hectare of rice. The two most important changes that cause this decreasing emission from China are the reduced use of organic amendments which have been replaced by commercial nitrogen fertilizers, and the increased practice of intermittent flooding as greater demands are placed on water resources. 3). Global Methane Emissions Have Been Constant For More Than 20 Years. While the concentrations of methane in the atmosphere have been leveling off in recent years, our studies show that this is caused by a near constant total global source of methane for the last 20 years or more. This is probably because as some anthropogenic sources have increased, others, such as the rice agriculture source, have fallen. Changes in natural emissions appear small. 4). Nitrous Oxide Emissions From Rice Fields Increase as Methane Emissions Drop. Inundated conditions favor anaerobic methane production with high emission rates and de-nitrification resulting in modest nitrous oxide emissions. Under drier conditions such as intermittent flooding, methane emissions fall and nitrous oxide emissions increase. Increased nitrogen fertilizer use increases nitrous oxide emissions and is usually accompanied by reduced organic matter applications which decreases methane emissions. These mechanisms cause a generally inverse relationship between methane and nitrous oxide emissions. Reduction of methane from rice agriculture to control global warming comes with tradeoffs with increased nitrous oxide emissions. 5). High Spatial Resolution Maps of Emissions Produced. Maps of methane and nitrous oxide emissions at a resolution of 5 min ◊ 5 min have been produced based on the composite results of this research. These maps are necessary for both scientific and policy uses.

  5. UF in Brazil Urban, Medical, & Agricultural Entomology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    UF in Brazil Urban, Medical, & Agricultural Entomology Summer B: August 9 - 21, 2015 Explore aspects in Brazil and the United States. Course Information College of Agricultural and Life Sciences: Urban, Medical and Agricultural Entomology in Brazil Total Number of Credits Offered: 3 About

  6. Agricultural & Environmental Sciences eap.ucop.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernes, Peter J.

    Agricultural & Environmental Sciences eap.ucop.edu #12;UC Education Abroad Program Special Focus Pilot Program in Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Wageningen University and Research Centre This special-focus pilot program is available only to UC Davis College of Agricultural and Environmental

  7. MANAGEMENT OF AGRICULTURAL WASTES LOWER FRASER VALLEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;MANAGEMENT OF AGRICULTURAL WASTES IN THE LOWER FRASER VALLEY SUMMARY REPORT - A WORKING DOCUMENT Presented on Behalf of: The Management of Agricultural Wastes in the Lower Fraser Valley Program of the Agricultural Nutrient Management in the Lower Fraser Valley program. The ideas and opinions expressed herein do

  8. Information Basic to Adjustments in Rice Production in Texas.†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonnen, C. A. (Clarence Alfred); Magee, A. C. (Aden Combs)

    1945-01-01

    - to be made. It deals with product,ion and production requirements, the effect of changes in production practices, and in turn with-the probable t of these changes on earnings. is dir 1. sized Q -- profitab duction 6. F sic information obtained...-acre crop. L. Larger earnings were obtained by tenant farmers under cash rent than under share-crop rent. 3. A yield of about 10 barrels per acre pays the expenses of making a rice crop but leaves the operator nothing for his labor and management. Yields...

  9. Future Public Policy and Ethical Issues Facing the Agricultural and Microbial Genomics Sectors of the Biotechnology Industry: A Roundtable Discussion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diane E. Hoffmann

    2003-09-12

    On September 12, 2003, the University of Maryland School of Law's Intellectual Property and Law & Health Care Programs jointly sponsored and convened a roundtable discussion on the future public policy and ethical issues that will likely face the agricultural and microbial genomics sectors of the biotechnology industry. As this industry has developed over the last two decades, societal concerns have moved from what were often local issues, e.g., the safety of laboratories where scientists conducted recombinant DNA research on transgenic microbes, animals and crops, to more global issues. These newer issues include intellectual property, international trade, risks of genetically engineered foods and microbes, bioterrorism, and marketing and labeling of new products sold worldwide. The fast paced nature of the biotechnology industry and its new developments often mean that legislators, regulators and society, in general, must play ''catch up'' in their efforts to understand the issues, the risks, and even the benefits, that may result from the industry's new ways of conducting research, new products, and novel methods of product marketing and distribution. The goal of the roundtable was to develop a short list of the most significant public policy and ethical issues that will emerge as a result of advances in these sectors of the biotechnology industry over the next five to six years. More concretely, by ''most significant'' the conveners meant the types of issues that would come to the attention of members of Congress or state legislators during this time frame and for which they would be better prepared if they had well researched and timely background information. A concomitant goal was to provide a set of focused issues for academic debate and scholarship so that policy makers, industry leaders and regulators would have the intellectual resources they need to better understand the issues and concerns at stake. The goal was not to provide answers to any of the issues or problems, simply to identify those topics that deserve our attention as a society. Some of the issues may benefit from legislation at the federal or state levels, others may be more appropriately addressed by the private sector. Participants at the roundtable included over a dozen experts in the areas of microbiology, intellectual property, agricultural biotechnology, microbial genomics, bioterrorism, economic development, biotechnology research, and bioethics. These experts came from federal and state government, industry and academia. The participants were asked to come to the roundtable with a written statement of the top three to five public policy/ ethical issues they viewed as most likely to be significant to the industry and to policy makers over the next several years.

  10. FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing Countries AgencyCompany Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture...

  11. Influence of Cropping Systems On Cotton and Corn Yields on the Gulf Coast Prairie.†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeter, B. E.; Smith, J. C.; Whiteley, E. L.

    1962-01-01

    and better stands of cotton were obtained. The main disadvantage of this system was that two planting operations a year were re- quired. Cropping systems containing Dallisgrass and White clover are more highly recommended than all other systems tested... clover can cause bloat in cattle; (3) 2 years are needed to obtain high forage yields and (4) it is difficult to obtain a good seedbed for corn or cotton when the land goes out of forage production. Dallisgrass and White clover produced higher...

  12. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    highly processed products such as canola oil, produced withanimal products, soya sauce and veg- etable oils (Japanproducts are labeled ďNaturalĒ or ďAll-NaturalĒ and they contain corn, corn meal, canola oil

  13. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Colin A.; Novan, Kevin; Rausser, Gordon; Iho, Antti; Parker, Doug; Zilberman, David

    2013-01-01

    V. 16 no. 3 ē Jan/Feb 2013 Shale Gas Boom: Implications forRegulation and Transboundary Water Quality Shale Gas Growthin Shale Gas Production In 2000, shale gas production

  14. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    oil in Malaysia, and from rapeseed in Europe. Current biofuel production in Brazil cannot meet domestic demand

  15. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    energy production technologies, such as petroleum-like hydroprocess- ing and direct solar-to-fuel processes, and their potential

  16. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    oil prices affect the price of local and non-local milk products.oil prices lead to larger price increases for non-local goods than they do for local milk products.products. The monetary costs of transporting food reached new heights in 2008 when oil

  17. Biotechnology research in Nigeria: A socio-economic analysis of the organication of agricultural research system's response to biotechnology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duru, G.C.

    1988-01-01

    Many agricultural development experts and social scientists argue that a lack of appropriate technology was a limiting factor in the efforts by developing countries to expand their agricultural productivity. Biotechnology is now advanced as a technology that could meet these needs. Agricultural and social scientists maintain that the new biotechnology, if realistically applied, could assist a developing nation such as Nigeria to solve its agricultural problems. But one concern is the private character of biotechnology which limits its transferability to the LDCs. This situation will impose unusual constraints on national agricultural development programs and increase dependence if national research capability is weak. The basic finding of this field research was that the Nigerian national agricultural research system was weak, which meant that the potentials and promises of biotechnology will elude the country's desire to improve its agriculture in the immediate future. The primary weakness rested in inadequate funding and infrastructural deficiencies.

  18. Figure 1. Primary research site at Cornell with quadruplicate test strips (each ~1 acre) representing four crop treatments.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for these soils. Unfortunately, the research base on perennial bioenergy grass production and impacts crop yields but also the potential for soil carbon accumulation (sequestration) to take place ≠ nitrous oxide [N O] and 4 2methane [CH ] ≠ which have a strong impact on the overall "emissions footprint

  19. Agriculture-related radiation dose calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furr, J.M.; Mayberry, J.J.; Waite, D.A.

    1987-10-01

    Estimates of radiation dose to the public must be made at each stage in the identification and qualification process leading to siting a high-level nuclear waste repository. Specifically considering the ingestion pathway, this paper examines questions of reliability and adequacy of dose calculations in relation to five stages of data availability (geologic province, region, area, location, and mass balance) and three methods of calculation (population, population/food production, and food production driven). Calculations were done using the model PABLM with data for the Permian and Palo Duro Basins and the Deaf Smith County area. Extra effort expended in gathering agricultural data at succeeding environmental characterization levels does not appear justified, since dose estimates do not differ greatly; that effort would be better spent determining usage of food types that contribute most to the total dose; and that consumption rate and the air dispersion factor are critical to assessment of radiation dose via the ingestion pathway. 17 refs., 9 figs., 32 tabs.

  20. Differences in Impact Factor Across Fields and Over Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Althouse, Benjamin M.; West, Jevin D.; Bergstrom, Ted C; Bergstrom, Carl T.

    2008-01-01

    Pharmacology Agriculture Crop Science Geography SociologyPharmacology Agriculture Crop Science Ecology & EvolutionPharmacology Agriculture Crop Science Geography Sociology

  1. Traffic lights for crop-based biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phalan, Ben

    stream_source_info Phalan_311010.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 11462 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name Phalan_311010.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Traffic lights for crop-based biofuels Ben... if it reduces the number of pedestrians killed and injured. How is this relevant to biofuels? There are many different kinds of biofuels, including some with considerable potential to generate cleaner energy and boost rural economies, but also others which...

  2. Money Crops in Place of Cotton.†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kyle, E. J.; Morgan, J. Oscar; Burns, J. C.; Ridgway, J. W.; Proctor, W. F.; Youngblood, B.; Connor, A. B.; Conway, T. J.; Eliot, H. M.; Ousley, Clarence

    1914-01-01

    down and to absorb moisture. Plant February 20th to March 15th. Thin to approxi- mately one stalk per square yard. BLANK PAGE IN ORIGINAL BLANK PAGE IN ORIGINAL MONEY CROPS IN PLACE OF COTTON. 9 Bur Clover, Bermuda and Rescue Pastures...: For pasture and waste lands. Plow the land, harrow and sow broadcast bur clover and rescue grass seed as early as possible and not later than November 15th, using ten pounds of seed of each per acre. Follow with a smoothing harrow to cover seed. In April...

  3. National Microalgae Biofuel Production Potential and Resource Demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wigmosta, Mark S.; Coleman, Andre M.; Skaggs, Richard; Huesemann, Michael H.; Lane, Leonard J.

    2011-04-14

    Microalgae continue to receive global attention as a potential sustainable "energy crop" for biofuel production. An important step to realizing the potential of algae is quantifying the demands commercial-scale algal biofuel production will place on water and land resources. We present a high-resolution national resource and oil production assessment that brings to bear fundamental research questions of where open pond microalgae production can occur, how much land and water resource is required, and how much energy is produced. Our study suggests under current technology microalgae have the potential to generate 220 billion liters/year of oil, equivalent to 48% of current U.S. petroleum imports for transportation fuels. However, this level of production would require 5.5% of the land area in the conterminous U.S., and nearly three times the volume of water currently used for irrigated agriculture, averaging 1,421 L water per L of oil. Optimizing the selection of locations for microalgae production based on water use efficiency can greatly reduce total water demand. For example, focusing on locations along the Gulf Coast, Southeastern Seaboard, and areas adjacent to the Great Lakes, shows a 75% reduction in water demand to 350 L per L of oil produced with a 67% reduction in land use. These optimized locations have the potential to generate an oil volume equivalent to 17% of imports for transportation fuels, equal to the Energy Independence and Security Act year 2022 "advanced biofuels" production target, and utilizing some 25% of the current irrigation consumptive water demand for the U. S. These results suggest that, with proper planning, adequate land and water are available to meet a significant portion of the U.S. renewable fuel goals.

  4. Winter Production, Storage & Sales: A Northeast SARE project http://extension.umass.edu/vegetable/projects/winter9production9storage9sales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    :&:site:selection.!Our! research!farm!sites!experience!relatively!high! winds,!as!well!as!significant!snow!accumulation.! One!established!low!tunnels!at!the!NH!Agricultural!Experiment! Station's!Woodman!Farm!in!Durham,!NH!and!the!UMass!Crops!Research!Farm!in!Deerfield,!MA.!Both! sites!low!tunnels!to!overwinter!crops.!! ! About:Our:Low:Tunnels: ! Tunnel:bows.!Our!low!tunnels!were!constructed! from!10'=long!bows!made!of!0

  5. Missouri Agricultural Energy Saving Team-A Revolutionary Opportunity (MAESTRO)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntosh, Jane; Schumacher, Leon

    2014-10-23

    The Missouri Agricultural Energy Saving Team-A Revolutionary Opportunity (MAESTRO) program brought together a team of representatives from government, academia, and private industry to enhance the availability of energy efficiency services for small livestock producers in the State of Missouri. The Missouri Department of Agriculture (MDA) managed the project via a subcontract with the University of Missouri (MU), College of Agriculture Food and Natural Resources, MU Extension, the MU College of Human Environmental Sciences, the MU College of Engineering, and the Missouri Agricultural and Small Business Development Authority (MASBDA). MU teamed with EnSave, Inc, a nationally-recognized expert in agricultural energy efficiency to assist with marketing, outreach, provision of farm energy audits and customer service. MU also teamed with independent home contractors to facilitate energy audits of the farm buildings and homes of these livestock producers. The goals of the project were to: (1) improve the environment by reducing fossil fuel emissions and reducing the total energy used on small animal farms; (2) stimulate the economy of local and regional communities by creating or retaining jobs; and (3) improve the profitability of Missouri livestock producers by reducing their energy expenditures. Historically, Missouri scientists/engineers conducted programs on energy use in agriculture, such as in equipment, grain handling and tillage practices. The MAESTRO program was the first to focus strictly on energy efficiency associated with livestock production systems in Missouri and to investigate the applicability and potential of addressing energy efficiency in animal production from a building efficiency perspective. A. Project Objectives The goal of the MAESTRO program was to strengthen the financial viability and environmental soundness of Missouri's small animal farms by helping them implement energy efficient technologies for the production facility, farm buildings, and the homes on these farms. The expected measurable outcomes of the project were to improve the environment and stimulate the economy by: ē Reducing annual fossil fuel emissions by 1,942 metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent, reducing the total annual energy use on at least 323 small animal farms and 100 farm homes by at least 8,000 kWh and 2,343 therms per farm. ē Stimulating the economy by creating or retaining at least 69 jobs, and saving small animal farmers an average of $2,071 per farm in annual energy expenditures. B. Project Scope The MAESTRO team chose the target population of small farms because while all agriculture is traditionally underserved in energy efficiency programs, small farms were particularly underserved because they lack the financial resources and access to energy efficiency technologies that larger farms deploy. The MAESTRO team reasoned that energy conservation, financial and educational programs developed while serving the agricultural community could serve as a national model for other states and their agricultural sectors. The target population was approximately 2,365 small animal farm operations in Missouri, specifically those farms that were not by definition a confined animal feeding operation (CAFO). The program was designed to create jobs by training Missouri contractors and Missouri University Extension staff how to conduct farm audits. The local economy would be stimulated by an increase in construction activity and an increasing demand for energy efficient farm equipment. Additionally, the energy savings were deemed critical in keeping Missouri farms in business. This project leveraged funds using a combination of funds from the Missouri Department of Natural Resourcesí Missouri Energy Center and its Soil and Water Conservation Program, from the state's Linked Deposits, MASBDA's agricultural loan guarantee programs, and through the in-kind contribution of faculty and staff time to the project from these agencies and MU. Several hundred Missouri livestock producers were contacted during the MAESTRO project. Of the

  6. HORTICULTURAL & FOREST CROPS 2013 Table of Contents 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    HORTICULTURAL & FOREST CROPS 2013 Table of Contents 1 1 Regulations and Basic Information Safe Quantities of Water ............................................................................ 1-29 Table 1

  7. HORTICULTURAL & FOREST CROPS 2014 Table of Contents 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    HORTICULTURAL & FOREST CROPS 2014 Table of Contents 1 1 Regulations and Basic Information Safe Quantities of Water ............................................................................ 1-29 Table 1

  8. Weather-based forecasts of California crop yields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lobell, D B; Cahill, K N; Field, C B

    2005-09-26

    Crop yield forecasts provide useful information to a range of users. Yields for several crops in California are currently forecast based on field surveys and farmer interviews, while for many crops official forecasts do not exist. As broad-scale crop yields are largely dependent on weather, measurements from existing meteorological stations have the potential to provide a reliable, timely, and cost-effective means to anticipate crop yields. We developed weather-based models of state-wide yields for 12 major California crops (wine grapes, lettuce, almonds, strawberries, table grapes, hay, oranges, cotton, tomatoes, walnuts, avocados, and pistachios), and tested their accuracy using cross-validation over the 1980-2003 period. Many crops were forecast with high accuracy, as judged by the percent of yield variation explained by the forecast, the number of yields with correctly predicted direction of yield change, or the number of yields with correctly predicted extreme yields. The most successfully modeled crop was almonds, with 81% of yield variance captured by the forecast. Predictions for most crops relied on weather measurements well before harvest time, allowing for lead times that were longer than existing procedures in many cases.

  9. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    Europe. It is producing biodiesel from veg- etable oil, fromsuch as Jatropha, for biodiesel. Some industrial forestsfor the production of biodiesel. The econom- ics of algae as

  10. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Aaron; Zilberman, David; Saitone, Tina; Sexton, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    fact, voluntary labeling of GMO-free products can meet thespecific traits. Obviously, GMO technologies are still inR&D Associated with European GMO Restrictions of 1999

  11. A Comparative SWOT Analysis of the National Agricultural Extension Program Organization to Determine Best-Fit Program Model: A Case Study of the North West and South West Regions of Cameroon.†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nyambi, Gwendoline

    2012-07-16

    Agriculture is crucial to the economic and social wellbeing of the Republic of Cameroon. A national need for increased productivity, farm incomes, food security and rural development requires more effective agricultural ...

  12. Vegetable Crops Hotline index 2008 MANAGEMENT TIPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    's Wilt 489 Using Herbicides with Plastic Mulch 490 Midwest Vegetable Production Guide for Commercial

  13. Agriculture, Land Use, Energy and Carbon Emission Impacts of Global Biofuel Mandates to Mid-Century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, Marshall A.; Dooley, James J.; Luckow, Patrick; Calvin, Katherine V.; Kyle, G. Page

    2014-02-01

    Three potential future scenarios of expanded global biofuel production are presented here utilizing the GCAM integrated assessment model. These scenarios span a range that encompasses on the low end a continuation of existing biofuel production policies to two scenarios that would require an expansion of current targets as well as an extension of biofuels targets to other regions of the world. Conventional oil use is reduced by 4-8% in the expanded biofuel scenarios, which results in a decrease of in CO2 emissions on the order of 1-2 GtCO2/year by mid-century from the global transportation sector. The regional distribution of crop production is relatively unaffected, but the biofuels targets do result in a marked increase in the production of conventional crops used for energy. Producer prices of sugar and corn reach levels about 12% and 7% above year 2005 levels, while the increased competition for land causes the price of food crops such as wheat, although not used for bioenergy in this study, to increase by 1 to 2%. The amount of land devoted to growing all food crops and dedicated bioenergy crops is increased by about 10% by 2050 in the High biofuel case, with concurrent decreases in other uses of land such as forest and pasture. In both of the expanded biofuels cases studied, there is an increase in net cumulative carbon emissions for the first couple of decades due to these induced land use changes. However, the difference in net cumulative emissions from the biofuels expansion decline by about 2035 as the reductions in energy system emissions exceed further increases in emissions from land use change. Even in the absence of a policy that would limit emissions from land use change, the differences in net cumulative emissions from the biofuels scenarios reach zero by 2050, and are decreasing further over time in both cases.

  14. ARGENTINA AGRICULTURE: THE DEVELOPING CRISIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horrell, Carl Michael

    2014-12-31

    not understand how to put in place the most efficient and productive political-economic systems to promote the most efficient production of food, fiber, and fuel. Nature has blessed few countries in the world as it has Argentina with fertile land and climate...

  15. International Conference on Machine Control & Guidance 2008 1 Integrated Controls for Agricultural Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and energy production is rising with a growing world population. Today, GNSS sensors are widely used-konzept GmbH, Germany Abstract Naturally, most agricultural operations are undertaken in the space domain and change the environment for plant and animal production. Hence, appropriate information on current

  16. Global Climate Change and Agriculture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izaurralde, Roberto C.

    2009-01-01

    The Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released in 2007 significantly increased our confidence about the role that humans play in forcing climate change. There is now a high degree of confidence that the (a) current atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) far exceed those of the pre-industrial era, (b) global increases in CO2 arise mainly from fossil fuel use and land use change while those of CH4 and N2O originate primarily from agricultural activities, and (c) the net effect of human activities since 1750 has led to a warming of the lower layers of the atmosphere, with an increased radiative forcing of 1.6 W m-2. Depending on the scenario of human population growth and global development, mean global temperatures could rise between 1.8 and 4.0 įC by the end of the 21st century.

  17. ORISE: Multiple research appointments available through Agricultural...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Multiple research appointments available through Agricultural Research Service Postdoctoral Research Program Selected candidates participate in USDA research for one to four years...

  18. Estimating Mitigation Potential of Agricultural Projects: an...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tool (EX-ACT) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Brazil-Estimating Mitigation Potential of Agricultural Projects: an Application of the...

  19. WINDExchange: Agricultural and Rural Resources and Tools

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    Rural Communities Printable Version Bookmark and Share Wind for Homeowners, Farmers, & Businesses Resources & Tools Agricultural and Rural Resources and Tools This page lists...

  20. INTEGRATED COCKROACH (DICTYOPTERA, BLATTELLIDAE) MANAGEMENT IN CONFINED SWINE PRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    183 INTEGRATED COCKROACH (DICTYOPTERA, BLATTELLIDAE) MANAGEMENT IN CONFINED SWINE PRODUCTION-7613, U.S.A. Abstract - Swine production is an important component of North Carolina's agricultural economy. Cockroaches have long been recognized as important pests in swine production and severe

  1. Efficient crop type mapping based on remote sensing in the Central Valley, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhong, Liheng

    2012-01-01

    1, Geographic Area Series, Part 51 . National Agricultural1, Geographic Area Series, Part 51 . National Agricultural

  2. Research Master's Degree in Soil and Crop Sciences A candidate for a research master's degree in Soil and Crop Sciences is expected to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    ___________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ Research Master's Degree in Soil and Crop Sciences A candidate for a research master's degree in Soil and Crop Sciences is expected to demonstrate mastery of knowledge and skill in the Field of Soil and Crop research in the field of soil and crop sciences. Candidates are expected to synthesize and create new

  3. Developing salt-tolerant crop plants: challenges and opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blumwald, Eduardo

    Developing salt-tolerant crop plants: challenges and opportunities Toshio Yamaguchi and Eduardo areas of the world; the need to produce salt-tolerant crops is evident. Two main approaches are being used to improve salt tolerance: (i) the exploitation of natural genetic variations, either through

  4. Translational genomics of Vegetable Crops Las Vegas, NV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    Translational genomics of Vegetable Crops Las Vegas, NV July 21, 2005 David Francis and Allen Van Deynze At the recent ASHS meetings in Las Vegas, a workshop "Translational Genomics of Vegetable Crops interventions" (Minna and Gazdar, 1996). In applied plant science, "translational genomics" implies

  5. Profitability of Willow Biomass Crops Affected by Incentive Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    Crops in New York Short-rotation woody crops (SRWC) like shrub willow (Salix spp.) are a potential source of biomass for energy generation and bioproducts in the USA [1, 2] and globally [3]. While@syr.edu Bioenerg. Res. (2013) 6:53≠64 DOI 10.1007/s12155-012-9234-y #12;result in a very positive net energy

  6. GEOGRAPHICAL APPROACHES TO CROP CONSERVATION: THE PARTITIONINGOF GENETIC DIVERSITY IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    , University of Wisconsin, Mad- ison, W15 3706) and David S. Douches(Department of Crop and Soil ScienceGEOGRAPHICAL APPROACHES TO CROP CONSERVATION: THE PARTITIONINGOF GENETIC DIVERSITY IN ANDEAN POTATOES1 KARL S. ZIMMERER AND DAVID S. DOUCHES Zimmerer,Karl S. (Department of Geography, 384 Science Hall

  7. Energy Crops and their Implications on Surface Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, Atul K.

    Energy Crops and their Implications on Surface Energy and Water Balance Yang Song Rahul Barman Phenological differences Variation in water and thermal energy consumption #12;Objectives Examine potential crops on energy and water balance Temporal and spatial patterns of · Evapotranspiration · Radiation

  8. Perceptions Of Texas Agricultural Education Teachers Regarding Diversity Inclusion In Secondary Agricultural Education Programs†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lavergne, Douglas D.

    2010-01-14

    of this study was to explore and analyze Texas secondary agricultural education teachers' attitudes toward diversity inclusion in Texas secondary agricultural education programs. Using a web-based questionnaire, the researcher employed a nonproportional...

  9. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hyunok; Sumner, Daniel A.; Martin, Philip; Hochman, Gal; Rajagopal, Deepak; Zilberman, David

    2011-01-01

    countries increased while crude-oil prices grew by more thanproduce 42% of the crude-oil production. The organizationin global demand for crude oil from 2000 to 2008, associated

  10. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Colin A.; Novan, Kevin; Rausser, Gordon; Iho, Antti; Parker, Doug; Zilberman, David

    2013-01-01

    Border Price) Japan Japan (LNG Import Price) Europe U.S.into liquefied natural gas (LNG) before it can be exportedSecond, with expan≠ sions in LNG production capacity, the

  11. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hyunok; Sumner, Daniel A.; Martin, Philip; Hochman, Gal; Rajagopal, Deepak; Zilberman, David

    2011-01-01

    countries increased while crude-oil prices grew by more thana rapid increase in the price of crude oil during the samewill reduce fuel prices and crude-oil production but

  12. Agricultural Productivity and Mortality: Evidence from Kagera, Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ikegami, Munenobu

    2009-01-01

    Mortality: Evidence from Kagera, Tanzania Munenobu IkegamiEvidence from Kagera, Tanzania. CEGA Working Paper SeriesEvidence from Kagera, Tanzania ? Munenobu Ikegami Ü August

  13. Agricultural labor productivity in the Lower South, 1720-1800

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenbloom, Joshua L.; Mancall, Peter C.; Weiss, Thomas

    2002-10-01

    an even more reliable source of irrigation as early as the 1730s. But adoption of tidal irrigation was slow proceeded slowly until the 1780s, reflecting the large sunk cost of planters investments in existing irrigation systems. During the Revolution..., many planters were unable to maintain these systems, however, and after the war they chose to invest in newer tidal irrigation methods, rather than in the replace older irrigation investments. 3 The more regular availability of water substantially...

  14. Nitrate Leaching from Intensive Fiber Production on Abandoned Agricultural Land

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, T.M.

    1999-01-01

    Paper outlines nitrate leaching results of loblolly pine and sweet gum that were grown with irrigation, continuous fertilization and insect pest control on a year old abandoned peanut field. Wells and tension lysimeters were used to measure nitrate in soil moisture and groundwater on three replicate transects for two years. Groundwater nitrate concentration beneath the minimum treatment was much higher than the maximum treatment and old field. All three treatments often exceeded the drinking water standard. Forest and lake edge had low levels while the soil moisture nitrate concentrations in the two plantation treatments were much higher than the old field.

  15. Industrial and Agricultural Production Efficiency Program | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nA Guide toIMPROVEMENT OFBarriers to Industrial EnergyThe ThomasEnergy

  16. Technical specifications for mechanical recycling of agricultural plastic waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Briassoulis, D. Hiskakis, M.; Babou, E.

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: ē Technical specifications for agricultural plastic wastes (APWs) recycling proposed. ē Specifications are the base for best economical and environmental APW valorisation. ē Analysis of APW reveals inherent characteristics and constraints of APW streams. ē Thorough survey on mechanical recycling processes and industry as it applies to APW. ē Specifications for APW recycling tested, adjusted and verified through pilot trials. - Abstract: Technical specifications appropriate for the recycling of agricultural plastic wastes (APWs), widely accepted by the recycling industry were developed. The specifications establish quality standards to be met by the agricultural plastics producers, users and the agricultural plastic waste management chain. They constitute the base for the best economical and environmental valorisation of the APW. The analysis of the APW streams conducted across Europe in the framework of the European project ďLabelAgriWasteĒ revealed the inherent characteristics of the APW streams and the inherent constraints (technical or economical) of the APW. The APW stream properties related to its recycling potential and measured during pilot trials are presented and a subsequent universally accepted simplified and expanded list of APW recycling technical specifications is proposed and justified. The list includes two sets of specifications, applied to two different quality categories of recyclable APW: one for pellet production process (ďQuality IĒ) and another one for plastic profile production process (ďQuality IIĒ). Parameters that are taken into consideration in the specifications include the APW physical characteristics, contamination, composition and degradation. The proposed specifications are focused on polyethylene based APW that represents the vast majority of the APW stream. However, the specifications can be adjusted to cover also APW of different materials (e.g. PP or PVC) that are found in very small quantities in protected cultivations in Europe. The adoption of the proposed specifications could transform this waste stream into a labelled commodity traded freely in the market and will constitute the base for the best economical and environmental valorisation of the APW.

  17. Teaching Organic Farming and Gardening: Resources for Instructors, 3rd Edition. Part 3 - Social and Environmental Issues in Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    2011, 36 million tons of food waste were created, with onlyAgriculture System 5. Waste a) Food is one of the primaryfood productionóthen proceeding through processing, distribution, consumption, and then to the waste

  18. May 27, 1996 Paul Gepts 1 The Crop of the DayThe Crop of the Day

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gepts, Paul

    ://monsterbit.com/touch/greentea.html: Touchstone - Green tea http://newcrop.hort.purdue.edu/hort/newcrops/Crops/Tea: New Crops (Purdue U.): Tea million lbs. ≠ green: 12 ≠ oolong: 2 ≠ jasmine: 0.5 Biggest suppliers? Argentina (33% of black tea), China. Three types of tea derived from Camellia sinensis: green, black, and oolong tea. ≠ For green tea, leaves

  19. Agricultural Management, Water Quality and Phosphorus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agricultural Management, Water Quality and Phosphorus: The Long and Winding Road Andrew Sharpley #12;In the beginning Agriculture and water quality Targeted watershed P management Linking ecosystem Adaptive management How can our research help farmers ? #12;Discovery Farms concept Core farms

  20. Agricultural Opportunities in the Pacific Rim

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Todd, Brian

    Agricultural Opportunities in the Pacific Rim American Society of Farm Managers and Rural and objectives ∑ Objective: Better understand how agricultural export opportunities in the Pacific Rim and Mexico) are top export destinations and they count as Pacific Rim ∑ Of course, we also import from Canada

  1. Climate Change and Agriculture in Vermont INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    Climate Change and Agriculture in Vermont INTRODUCTION Climate change is impacting Northeastern trends in Vermont, 2) the most up-to-date modeled projections available, and 3) potential impacts on Vermont agriculture. OBSERVED It is getting wetter. There has been a 9" increase in average annual

  2. Agricultural and Biological Engineering College of Agricultural Sciences Cooperative Extension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    College H 80 Introduction Biodiesel is a renewable biomass alternative to petro- leum-based diesel fuel-grade Biodiesel Water Raw Biodiesel Wash WaterGlycerol Washer Biodiesel works very well as fuel for any diesel degrades when in contact with biodiesel. Biodiesel production is growing due to fuel prices, a desire

  3. Factors that Most Influence Success or Failure in Illicit Crop Reduction and Drug Supply Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Listerman, Jeffrey Sloan

    2014-12-31

    Several interrelated drivers of illicit crop cultivation appear remarkably consistent across virtually all illegal crop producing regions: insurgency or armed conflict, insufficient state authority and weak territorial ...

  4. Agricultural Research/October 19964 6 gricultural chemical pro-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    (Barbados cherry) and alfalfa to yam and youngberry. While some of these crops have odd-sounding names like

  5. Agricultural pathogen decontamination technology-reducing the threat of infectious agent spread.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Betty, Rita G.; Bieker, Jill Marie; Tucker, Mark David

    2005-10-01

    Outbreaks of infectious agricultural diseases, whether natural occurring or introduced intentionally, could have catastrophic impacts on the U.S. economy. Examples of such agricultural pathogens include foot and mouth disease (FMD), avian influenza (AI), citrus canker, wheat and soy rust, etc. Current approaches to mitigate the spread of agricultural pathogens include quarantine, development of vaccines for animal diseases, and development of pathogen resistant crop strains in the case of plant diseases. None of these approaches is rapid, and none address the potential persistence of the pathogen in the environment, which could lead to further spread of the agent and damage after quarantine is lifted. Pathogen spread in agricultural environments commonly occurs via transfer on agricultural equipment (transportation trailers, tractors, trucks, combines, etc.), having components made from a broad range of materials (galvanized and painted steel, rubber tires, glass and Plexiglas shields, etc), and under conditions of heavy organic load (mud, soil, feces, litter, etc). A key element of stemming the spread of an outbreak is to ensure complete inactivation of the pathogens in the agricultural environment and on the equipment used in those environments. Through the combination of enhanced agricultural pathogen decontamination chemistry and a validated inactivation verification methodology, important technologies for incorporation as components of a robust response capability will be enabled. Because of the potentially devastating economic impact that could result from the spread of infectious agricultural diseases, the proposed capability components will promote critical infrastructure protection and greater border and food supply security. We investigated and developed agricultural pathogen decontamination technologies to reduce the threat of infectious-agent spread, and thus enhance agricultural biosecurity. Specifically, enhanced detergency versions of the patented Sandia decontamination chemistry were developed and tested against a few surrogate pathogens under conditions of relatively heavy organic load. Tests were conducted on surfaces commonly found in agricultural environments. Wide spectrum decontamination efficacy, low corrosivity, and biodegradability issues were addressed in developing an enhanced detergency formulation. A method for rapid assessment of loss of pathogenic activity (inactivation) was also assessed. This enhanced technology will enable rapid assessment of contamination following an intentional event, and will also be extremely useful in routine assessment of agricultural environments. The primary effort during the second year was progress towards a demonstration of both decontamination and viral inactivation technologies of Foot and Mouth virus (FMDv) using the modified SNL chemistry developed through this project. Lab studies using a surrogate virus (bovine enterovirus) were conducted using DF200, modified DF200 chemistry, and decontaminants currently recommended for use in heavily loaded organic, agricultural environments (VirkonS, 10% bleach, sodium hydroxide and citric acid). Tests using actual FMD virus will be performed at the Department of Homeland Security's Plum Island facilities in the fall of 2005. Success and the insight gained from this project will lead to enhanced response capability, which will benefit agencies such as USDA, DHS, DOD, and the agricultural industry.

  6. Forecasting Agriculturally Driven Global Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    production doubled, greatly reducing food shortages, but at high environ- mental cost (1≠5). In addition climate change in environ- mental and societal impacts (2, 8). Population size and per capita consumption capita 1 Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior, Uni- versity of Minnesota, 1987 Upper Buford

  7. Report on Abatement Activities Related to Agriculture and Waste Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Report on Abatement Activities Related to Agriculture and Waste Management in the Lower Fraser Guidelines for Producers 9 2.3 Best Agricultural Waste Management Plans (BAWMPs) 9 3.0 AGRICULTURAL PRACTICES Agricultural Waste management Zones Used in the management of Agricultural Wastes in the Lower Fraser Valley

  8. Evaluation of sweet sorghum as a potential ethanol crop in Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horton, David Scott

    2011-08-01

    Petroleum prices have made alternative fuel crops a viable option for ethanol production. Sweet sorghum [Sorghum bicolor] is a non-food crop that may produce large quantities of ethanol with minimal inputs. Eleven cultivars were planted in 2008 and 2009 as a half-season crop. Four-row plots 6.9 m by 0.5 m, were monitored bimonthly for √?¬?√?¬įBrix, height, and sugar accumulation. Yield and extractable sap were taken at the end of season. Stalk yield was greatest for the cultivar Sugar Top (4945 kg ha-1) and lowest for Simon (1054 kg ha-1). Dale ranked highest ethanol output (807 L ha-1) while Simon (123 L ha-1) is the lowest. All cultivars peak Brix accumulation occurs in early October. Individual sugar concentrations indicated sucrose is the predominant sugar with glucose and fructose levels dependent on cultivar. Supplemental ethanol in fermented wort was the best preservative tested to halt degradation of sorghum wort.

  9. Agricultural green revolution as a driver of increasing atmospheric CO2 seasonal amplitude

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeng, Ning; Zhao, Fang; Collatz, George; Kalnay, Eugenia; Salawitch, Ross J.; West, Tristram O.; Guanter, Luis

    2014-11-20

    The atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) record displays a prominent seasonal cycle that arises mainly from changes in vegetation growth and the corresponding CO2 uptake during the boreal spring and summer growing seasons and CO2 release during the autumn and winter seasons. The CO2 seasonal amplitude has increased over the past five decades, suggesting an increase in Northern Hemisphere biospheric activity. It has been proposed that vegetation growth may have been stimulated by higher concentrations of CO2 as well as by warming in recent decades, but such mechanisms have been unable to explain the full range and magnitude of the observed increase in CO2 seasonal amplitude. Here we suggest that the intensification of agriculture (the Green Revolution, in which much greater crop yield per unit area was achieved by hybridization, irrigation and fertilization) during the past five decades is a driver of changes in the seasonal characteristics of the global carbon cycle. Our analysis of CO2 data and atmospheric inversions shows a robust 15 per cent long-term increase in CO2 seasonal amplitude from 1961 to 2010, punctuated by large decadal and interannual variations. Using a terrestrial carbon cycle model that takes into account high-yield cultivars, fertilizer use and irrigation, we find that the long-term increase in CO2 seasonal amplitude arises from two major regions: the mid-latitude cropland between 256N and 606N and the high-latitude natural vegetation between 506N and 706 N. The long-term trend of seasonal amplitude increase is 0.311 Ī 0.027 percent per year, of which sensitivity experiments attribute 45, 29 and 26 per cent to land-use change, climate variability and change, and increased productivity due to CO2 fertilization, respectively. Vegetation growth was earlier by one to two weeks, as measured by the mid-point of vegetation carbon uptake, and took up 0.5 petagrams more carbon in July, the height of the growing season, during 2001Ė2010 than in 1961Ė1970, suggesting that human land use and management contribute to seasonal changes in the CO2 exchange between the biosphere and the atmosphere.

  10. GCAM 3.0 Agriculture and Land Use: Data Sources and Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick; Calvin, Katherine V.; Emanuel, William R.; Nathan, Mayda; Zhou, Yuyu

    2011-12-12

    This report presents the data processing methods used in the GCAM 3.0 agriculture and land use component, starting from all source data used, and detailing all calculations and assumptions made in generating the model inputs. The report starts with a brief introduction to modeling of agriculture and land use in GCAM 3.0, and then provides documentation of the data and methods used for generating the base-year dataset and future scenario parameters assumed in the model input files. Specifically, the report addresses primary commodity production, secondary (animal) commodity production, disposition of commodities, land allocation, land carbon contents, and land values.

  11. Public Parking Lots > Agriculture Building Parkade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Research Animal Science Farm Residences Crop Science Seed Barn Rayner Dairy Research & Teaching Facility-Food Canada SCIENCE PLACE VETERINARY CRES. Western College of Veterinary Medicine Toxicology Centre Heating Reproduction Centre Ryan-Dubť Equine PerformanceCentre Environment Canada Canadian Wildlife Service

  12. Northern Michigan FruitNet 2013 Northwest Michigan Horticultural Research Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Agricultural Technology at MSU (MSU IAT) has been conducting practical plant, animal and technology certificate Crop Production and Management, Compost Production and Use, Landscape Irrigation, Landscape Design

  13. Communication among Agricultural Policy Influencers: A Delphi Study†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salazar, Victor Kingsley

    2015-05-12

    Agricultural policy affects the agricultural industry in its entirety. It affects everything from the type of food that is grown to how it is processed and distributed. Agricultural policy influencers impact the development of the policy...

  14. Elementary School Teachers' Perception of Agricultural-Related Literature†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leventini, Alexa Marie

    2013-04-24

    and a need was established for accurate, realistic and representative materials of American agriculture for the classroom. This issue of agricultural literacy has become an imminent concern in todayís agricultural industry. With these rising concerns...

  15. Integrating Cover Crops into Strip-Till Cropping Systems in a Semi-Arid Environment†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noland, Reagan Lee

    2014-05-02

    į12'34.47"N, 99į45'5.97"W; 282 m), TX. The main effect was row crop with split-plots strip-tilled into the residue of four legume species [Medicago polymorpha L. cv. Armadillo (burr medic), M. lupulina L. cv. Bee Black (black medic), M. minima (L.) L. cv... planted using a Tye Pasture Pleaser no-till drill (The Tye Co., Lockney, Texas) on November 8, 2011 and November 12, 2012. Seeding rates were the same as those commonly recommended and were 11 kg ha- 1 for Armadillo and Bee Black, 6.7 kg ha-1 for Devine...

  16. Development and application of WRF3.3-CLM4crop to study of agriculture - climate interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Yaqiong

    2013-01-01

    is the balance between net solar radiation and net longwaveor more excess net solar radiation and longwave radiationtoo large downward solar radiation, and net radiation. As a

  17. Sustainable Energy Utility (SEU)- Agricultural Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Delaware Sustainable Energy Utility (DESEU) offers customized loans for agricultural customer as a part of DESEUís revolving loan program. Program applications are accepted on a rolling basis, and...

  18. Quantifying the parameters of successful agricultural producers†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaase, Gregory Herman

    2006-08-16

    The primary purpose of the study was to quantify the parameters of successful agricultural producers. Through the use of the Financial and Risk Management (FARM) Assistance database, this study evaluated economic measures ...

  19. Irrigation Training Program For Texas Agricultural Producers†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, B.L.

    2010-01-01

    The Irrigation Training Program, funded by the Texas Water Development Board (TWDB) through an Agricultural Water Conservation Grant, began in 2006. Administered by the Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI), the Texas State ...

  20. An Analysis on Agricultural Market Behavior†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Chul

    2010-10-12

    This dissertation is concerned with (i) how to model an agricultural market, (ii) how to analyze the impacts of a certain event (i.e. animal disease outbreak) on the market, and (iii) what are the relationships between ...

  1. Three Essays In Environmental And Agricultural Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poudel, Biswo Nath

    2010-01-01

    Environmental and Re- source Economics 32(2005):495-508.Journal of Agricultural Economics 86(2004):1315Ė1321. Barro,Quarterly Journal of Economics 106 (1991):407-443. Barro,

  2. The Greening of Capitalist Agriculture in Nigeria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunmoye, R. Ayo

    1982-01-01

    Shehu Shagari to the U. S. /Nigeria Joint Agricultural1975, pp. 245-261. 25 Nigeria: lJ'he 'l'hird NationalP. Olinger, "The World Bank in Nigeria," RAPE, No. 13, 1978,

  3. Manganese in Texas Soils and its Relation to Crops.†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlyle, E. C. (Elmer Cardinal)

    1931-01-01

    to applications of manganese sulfate. Twenty-one Texas soils have been tested for their response to manganese sulfate by means of pot experiments. No marked increase in the growth of crops was produced by manganese sulfate. On six of the soils manganese... of Procecture 9 .............................. Ifethod for Pot Experiments 10 Determination of ISlanganese in Crops ...................... 10 T)etermination of Acid-soluble 3langanese in Soil ............ 10 Determination of Total Illlanganese in Soil...

  4. Man-Power in Agriculture.†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eliot, H. M.; Brown, B. F.

    1918-01-01

    ~"TORD The conclusions of this bulletin are based upon records of farm opera- tions in Texas. Specialists of tbe Extension Service, working with farmers, helped them to make careful records of all their expenditures and all re- ceipts; therefore, the earnings exhibited... able to escape the disasters that come from unseasonable weather, from periodic outbreaks of insect pests, and from fluctuations in market prices. (4) By having farm products to' market at the several seasons of the year, a farmer is able to make cash...

  5. Analysis of Impacts on Prime or Unique Agricultural Lands in...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    on Analysis of Impacts on Prime or Unique Agricultural Lands in Implementing the National Environmental Policy Act was developed in cooperation with the Department of Agriculture....

  6. Before the Committee on Agriculture Subcommittee on General Farm...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Agriculture Subcommittee on General Farm Commodities and Risk Management Before the Committee on Agriculture Subcommittee on General Farm Commodities and Risk Management Before the...

  7. Identification of Low Emissions Agricultural Pathways and Priorities...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Identification of Low Emissions Agricultural Pathways and Priorities for Mitigation in Agricultural Landscapes using Integrated Assessment Modeling and Scenarios Jump to:...

  8. USDA Agricultural Conservation Easement Program Webinar for Tribes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by the American Indian Higher Education Consortium, this webinar will cover details on the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA's) new Agricultural Conservation Easement Program (ACEP)...

  9. Climate Change and China's Agricultural Sector: An Overview of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Change and China's Agricultural Sector: An Overview of Impacts, Adaptation and Mitigation Jump to: navigation, search Name Climate Change and China's Agricultural Sector:...

  10. Argentina-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Inter-American Development Bank, The Regional Fund for Agricultural Technology, Government of New Zealand Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics...

  11. Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy Impacts in Less Developed...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy Impacts in Less Developed Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy...

  12. Department of Agriculture and Energy Department Announce Up to...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Agriculture and Energy Department Announce Up to 8.7 Million through the Interagency Biomass Research and Development Initiative Department of Agriculture and Energy Department...

  13. Sept/Oct 2010 ListProc Newsletter 2009 Honey Crop Prices: Queens and Almonds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    Proc Newsletter 2009 Honey Crop Prices: Queens and Almonds Yellowjacket Bait CSBA Convention Bee World Revived

  14. Guidelines for graduate students in Soil and Crop Sciences, Cornell University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    1 Guidelines for graduate students in Soil and Crop Sciences, Cornell University Table of Contents and concentrations. About 33 faculty have been drawn together into the field of Soil and Crop Sciences by mutual, Field Crop Science, Soil Science, and Agronomy. The field of Soil and Crop Sciences is closely linked

  15. Reducing the negative human-health impacts of bioenergy crop emissions through region-specific crop selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guenther, Alex

    An expected global increase in bioenergy-crop cultivation as an alternative to fossil fuels will have consequences on both global climate and local air quality through changes in biogenic emissions of volatile organic ...

  16. Reducing the negative human-health impacts of bioenergy crop emissions through region-specific crop selection

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Porter, William C.; Rosenstiel, Todd N.; Guenther, Alex; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Barsanti, Kelley

    2015-05-06

    An expected global increase in bioenergy-crop cultivation as an alternative to fossil fuels will have consequences on both global climate and local air quality through changes in biogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). While greenhouse gas emissions may be reduced through the substitution of next-generation bioenergy crops such as eucalyptus, giant reed, and switchgrass for fossil fuels, the choice of species has important ramifications for human health, potentially reducing the benefits of conversion due to increases in ozone (O?) and fine particulate matter (PM???) levels as a result of large changes in biogenic emissions. Using the Community Earth Systemmore†ĽModel we simulate the conversion of marginal and underutilized croplands worldwide to bioenergy crops under varying future anthropogenic emissions scenarios. A conservative global replacement using high VOC-emitting crop profiles leads to modeled population-weighted O? increases of 5Ė27 ppb in India, 1Ė9 ppb in China, and 1Ė6 ppb in the United States, with peak PM??? increases of up to 2 ?gm?≥. We present a metric for the regional evaluation of candidate bioenergy crops, as well as results for the application of this metric to four representative emissions profiles using four replacement scales (10Ė100% maximum estimated available land). Finally, we assess the total health and climate impacts of biogenic emissions, finding that the negative consequences of using high-emitting crops could exceed 50% of the positive benefits of reduced fossil fuel emissions in value.ę†less

  17. Using Legumes to Enhance Sustainability of Sorghum Cropping Systems in the East Texas Pineywoods Ecoregion: Impacts on Soil Nitrogen, Soil Carbon, and Crop Yields†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neely, Clark B

    2013-05-03

    bicolor (L.) Moench], high-biomass sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench], and annual forage cropping systems. These studies quantified legume soil moisture usage and C and N contributions to the soil and subsequent crop yields in East Texas. Primary...

  18. Biochemical Production of Endophytic Yeast Biofuel: what and why

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    , local production of crops, CO2 reincorporation Degrade lands due to oil sand mining, drilling, exBiochemical Production of Endophytic Yeast Biofuel: what and why In the U.S., the debate about because the farms are growing corns (first generation) for fuel production instead of for human and animal

  19. THE POTENTIAL OF FRESHWATER MACROALGAE AS A BIOFUELS FEEDSTOCK AND THE INFLUENCE OF NUTRIENT AVAILABILITY ON FRESHWATER MACROALGAL BIOMASS PRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun, Jin-Ho

    2014-12-31

    difference in productivity between the treatments, the average dry weight productivity of Oedogonium (3.37 g/m2/day) was found to be much higher than is achievable with common terrestrial plant crops. Although filamentous freshwater macroalgae, therefore...

  20. Baling Used Agricultural Plastic Dr. Ron Goldy, MSUE, District Extension Educator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Only soft-bale technology was tried for baling field plastic Figure 1. Applying plastic mulch and dripBaling Used Agricultural Plastic Dr. Ron Goldy, MSUE, District Extension Educator Introduction: Use of plastics in vegetable production has greatly increased over the past several years (Figure 1). Plastic

  1. ABE Agricultural and Biological Engineering F9 ADDL Animal Disease Diagnostic Lab G10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aerospace Science Laboratory C11 AGAD Agricultural Administration Building G8 AHF Animal Holding Facility G Pete Dye Clubhouse C1 EE Electrical Engineering Building H6 EEL Entomology Environmental Laboratory G8 F9 FOPN Flight Operations Building B11 FORS Forestry Building G8 FPRD Forest Products Building G8

  2. Agriculture and Climate Change in Global Scenarios: Why Don't the Models Agree

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Gerald; van der Mensbrugghe, Dominique; Ahammad, Helal; Blanc, Elodie; Calvin, Katherine V.; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Havlik, Petr; Heyhoe, Edwina; Kyle, G. Page; Lotze-Campen, Hermann; von Lampe, Martin; Mason d'Croz, Daniel; van Meijl, Hans; Mueller, C.; Reilly, J. M.; Robertson, Richard; Sands, Ronald; Schmitz, Christoph; Tabeau, Andrzej; Takahashi, Kiyoshi; Valin, Hugo; Willenbockel, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Agriculture is unique among economic sectors in the nature of impacts from climate change. The production activity that transforms inputs into agricultural outputs makes direct use of weather inputs. Previous studies of the impacts of climate change on agriculture have reported substantial differences in outcomes of key variables such as prices, production, and trade. These divergent outcomes arise from differences in model inputs and model specification. The goal of this paper is to review climate change results and underlying determinants from a model comparison exercise with 10 of the leading global economic models that include significant representation of agriculture. By providing common productivity drivers that include climate change effects, differences in model outcomes are reduced. All models show higher prices in 2050 because of negative productivity shocks from climate change. The magnitude of the price increases, and the adaptation responses, differ significantly across the various models. Substantial differences exist in the structural parameters affecting demand, area, and yield, and should be a topic for future research.

  3. ECONOMIC CONTRIBUTIONS of agriculture, natural resources and related industries in Florida

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    productivity and lower food prices. Driven by innovation and new technology, agriculture and related industries provides a 40% or greater social rate of return on investment, which translates into a 10:1 benefit-cost ratio, based on the average long term cost of capital. In other words, for every $1 of public investment

  4. Opportunities for Quick Response Product and Service Suppliers: The Wood Products Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Opportunities for Quick Response Product and Service Suppliers: The Wood Products Industry Working University Agricultural Center #12;2 February 8, 1995 #12;3 Quick Response Products and Service Suppliers, 104 suppliers of Quick Response (EDI and Automatic Identification) products and services were surveyed

  5. A Research Agenda for Forest Products Marketing and Business Development in Louisiana: 2009-2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    industry. The harvest of timber, which is Louisiana's number one agricultural crop both in terms of gross of materials and supplies and of energy, water and vehicle fuel) which has been embodied in the value than one mill to complete the process. This translates into more employees and more companies #12

  6. Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Agriculture Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Ontario, Prince Edward Island, Quebec, Saskatchewan Keywords (Subject): Land Use, Soils, Agriculture

  7. A threshold area ratio of organic to conventional agriculture causes recurrent pathogen outbreaks in organic agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolokolnikov, Theodore

    A threshold area ratio of organic to conventional agriculture causes recurrent pathogen outbreaks in organic agriculture S. Adl a, , D. Iron b , T. Kolokolnikov b a Department of Biology, Dalhousie 2011 Available online 21 March 2011 Keywords: Allodeposition Diffusive logistic equations Food security

  8. This article was downloaded by:[Danish Veterinary and Agricultural Library] [Danish Veterinary and Agricultural Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Rasmus

    doses should be independently verified with primary sources. The publisher shall not be liable for anyThis article was downloaded by:[Danish Veterinary and Agricultural Library] [Danish Veterinary and Agricultural Library] On: 10 May 2007 Access Details: [subscription number 773444395] Publisher: Taylor

  9. This article was downloaded by:[Danish Veterinary and Agricultural Library] [Danish Veterinary and Agricultural Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Rasmus

    , formulae and drug doses should be independently verified with primary sources. The publisher shallThis article was downloaded by:[Danish Veterinary and Agricultural Library] [Danish Veterinary and Agricultural Library] On: 25 April 2007 Access Details: [subscription number 773444395] Publisher: Taylor

  10. ORIGINAL PAPER The critical role of phosphorus in world production of cereal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolasa, Jurek

    1995≠2008, the global production of dry cereal grains plus legume seeds has not increased per capita of food, the rising cost of food and the availability of P to maintain crop yields of key food staples and legume crops on a per capita basis. We seek to draw attention to the urgent need to utilize world P

  11. SHORT ROTATION WOODY CROPS FACTSHEET SERIES #3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    and low fertility, and many have desirable wood properties for bioenergy production. They have been at a planting density of 1,482 to 2,471 trees ha-1 , and harvested every 6-10 years. They may be replanted

  12. Vulnerability of crops and native grasses to summer drying in the U.S. Southern Great Plains

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Raz-Yaseef, Naama; Billesbach, Dave P.; Fischer, Marc L.; Biraud, Sebastien C.; Gunter, Stacey A.; Bradford, James A.; Torn, Margaret S.

    2015-08-31

    The Southern Great Plains are characterized by a fine-scale mixture of different land-cover types, predominantly winter-wheat and grazed pasture, with relatively small areas of other crops, native prairie, and switchgrass. Recent droughts and predictions of increased drought in the Southern Great Plains, especially during the summer months, raise concern for these ecosystems. We measured ecosystem carbon and water fluxes with eddy-covariance systems over cultivated cropland for 10 years, and over lightly grazed prairie and new switchgrass fields for 2 years each. Growing-season precipitation showed the strongest control over net carbon uptake for all ecosystems, but with a variable effect: grassesmore†Ľ(prairie and switchgrass) needed at least 350 mm of precipitation during the growing season to become net carbon sinks, while crops needed only 100 mm. In summer, high temperatures enhanced evaporation and led to higher likelihood of dry soil conditions. Therefore, summer-growing native prairie species and switchgrass experienced more seasonal droughts than spring-growing crops. For wheat, the net reduction in carbon uptake resulted mostly from a decrease in gross primary production rather than an increase in respiration. Flux measurements suggested that management practices for crops were effective in suppressing evapotranspiration and decomposition (by harvesting and removing secondary growth), and in increasing carbon uptake (by fertilizing and conserving summer soil water). In light of future projections for wetter springs and drier and warmer summers in the Southern Great Plains, our study indicates an increased vulnerability in native ecosystems and summer crops over time.ę†less

  13. Historical Perspective on How and Why Switchgrass was Selected as a "Model" High-Potential Energy Crop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, Lynn L

    2007-11-01

    A review of several publications of the Biofuels Feedstock Development Program, and final reports from the herbaceous crop screening trials suggests that there were several technical and non-technical factors that influenced the decision to focus on one herbaceous "model" crop species. The screening trials funded by the U.S. Department of Energy in the late 1980's to early 1990's assessed a wide range of about 34 species with trials being conducted on a wide range of soil types in 31 different sites spread over seven states in crop producing regions of the U.S. While several species, including sorghums, reed canarygrass and other crops, were identified as having merit for further development, the majority of institutions involved in the herbaceous species screening studies identified switchgrass as having high priority for further development. Six of the seven institutions included switchgrass among the species recommended for further development in their region and all institutions recommended that perennial grasses be given high research priority. Reasons for the selection of switchgrass included the demonstration of relatively high, reliable productivity across a wide geographical range, suitability for marginal quality land, low water and nutrient requirements, and positive environmental attributes. Economic and environmental assessments by Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Biofuels Feedstock Development Program staff together with the screening project results, and funding limitations lead to making the decision to further develop only switchgrass as a "model" or "prototype" species in about 1990. This paper describes the conditions under which the herbaceous species were screened, summarizes results from those trials, discusses the various factors which influenced the selection of switchgrass, and provides a brief evaluation of switchgrass with respect to criteria that should be considered when selecting and developing a crop for biofuels and bioproducts.

  14. The economics of biomass production in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, R.L.; Walsh, M.E.; Lichtenberg, E.; Roningen, V.O.; Shapouri, H.

    1995-12-31

    Biomass crops (e.g. poplar, willow, switchgrass) could become important feedstocks for power, liquid fuel, and chemical production. This paper presents estimates of the potential production of biomass in the US under a range of assumptions. Estimates of potential biomass crop yields and production costs from the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL) are combined with measures of land rents from USDA`s Conservation Reserve Program (CRP), to estimate a competitive supply of biomass wood and grass crops. Estimates are made for one potential biomass use--electric power production--where future costs of electricity production from competing fossil fuels set the demand price. The paper outlines the methodology used and limitations of the analysis.

  15. Analysis of a secondary mortgage market for agricultural real estate†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewandrowski, David J.

    1988-01-01

    Record of Study ANALYSIS OF A SECONDARY MORTGAGE MARKET FOR AGRICULTURAL REAL ESTATE A PROFESSIONAL PAPER by David J, Letrandrotrskt Submitted to the College of Agriculture of Texas Aadf University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OP AGRICULTURE MAY, 1988 Major Subject: Agrl-Banking Department of Agricultural Economics ANALYSIS OF A SECONDARY MORTGAGE MARKET FOR AGRICULTURAL REAL ESTATE A Professional Paper by David J. Lewandrowski...

  16. Development and Deployment of a Short Rotation Woody Crops Harvesting System Based on a Case New Holland Forage Harvester and SRC Woody Crop Header

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisenbies, Mark; Volk, Timothy

    2014-10-03

    Demand for bioenergy sourced from woody biomass is projected to increase; however, the expansion and rapid deployment of short rotation woody crop systems in the United States has been constrained by high production costs and sluggish market acceptance due to problems with quality and consistency from first-generation harvesting systems. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of crop conditions on the performance of a single-pass, cut and chip harvester based on a standard New Holland FR-9000 series forage harvester with a dedicated 130FB short rotation coppice header, and the quality of chipped material. A time motion analysis was conducted to track the movement of machine and chipped material through the system for 153 separate loads over 10 days on a 54-ha harvest. Harvester performance was regulated by either ground conditions, or standing biomass on 153 loads. Material capacities increased linearly with standing biomass up to 40 Mgwet ha-1 and plateaued between 70 and 90 Mgwet hr-1. Moisture contents ranged from 39 to 51% with the majority of samples between 43 and 45%. Loads produced in freezing weather (average temperature over 10 hours preceding load production) had 4% more chips greater than 25.4 mm (P < 0.0119). Over 1.5 Mgdry ha-1 of potentially harvested material (6-9% of a load) was left on site, of which half was commercially undesirable meristematic pieces. The New Holland harvesting system is a reliable and predictable platform for harvesting material over a wide range of standing biomass; performance was consistent overall in 14 willow cultivars.

  17. Energy and Water Use in Irrigated Agriculture During Drought Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritschard, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    DROUGHT CONDITIONS OF 1977. Increased Use of Ground Water.Increased Efficiency of Water Application.Reduce Water Application . . . . Cropping Pattern Changes in

  18. SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP Biomass Outlook 2014: Is Biomass About To Go Bang?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of resources from wood and pellets through to energy crops and waste streams it offers a diverse and often market for biomass and related products, such as pellets, to securely match supply and demand in various

  19. Experiments with Fertilizers on Rotated and Non-Rotated Crops.†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, E. B. (Elbert Brunner)

    1928-01-01

    ., Assisiant; Ranch Recoi and Accounts RURAL HOME RESEARCH: JESSIE WHITACRE. Ph. D., Chief MAMIE GRIMES, M. S., Textile and Clothing S~ecral~st M. S.. Nutrition Spec L. G. RAGSDALE, B: S.. Soil Siruewor ROTANY: SIMON E. WOLFF, M. S., Botanist SWINE... This is a report of experiments conducted over a period of 14 years to study the effect of fertilizers, manure, removal. of crop residues, and rota- tion on the yield of crops. The fertilizer treatments included superphos- phate; superphosphate and manure...

  20. Public Parking Lots > Agriculture Building Parkade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    A R M L A N E F A R M L A N E Stone Barn Livestock Research Animal Science Farm Residences Rayner Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada SCIENCE PLACE VETERINARY CRE SCENT Western College of Veterinary Medicine Teaching Unit Reproduction Centre Ryan-Dubť Equine PerformanceCentre Environment Canada Canadian Wildlife