Sample records for agribusiness tax-exempt municipal

  1. Energy Replacement Generation Tax Exemption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under the Energy Replacement Generation Tax Exemption, the following facilities are exempt from the replacement tax:

  2. Commercial Solar Property Tax Exemption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The tax exemption is generally for “certified pollution control equipment and facilities” which includes any property including real or personal property, equipment, facilities, or devices used t...

  3. Sales Tax Exemption (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Sales Tax Exemption applies to the purchase of machinery and equipment, parts, tools, and supplies used or consumed in the production of tangible personal property for sale or in the production...

  4. Enterprise Zone Sales Tax Exemption (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Enterprise Zone Sales Tax Exemption offers businesses located in such economic development zones a 100 percent sales tax exemption on the purchase of labor and materials to construct or remodel...

  5. Property Tax Exemption for Wind Generators (Oklahoma)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The state of Oklahoma offers a five year ad valorem property tax exemption for certain windpower generators.

  6. Tax-Exempt Bond Financing (Delaware)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Delaware Economic Development Authority provides tax-exempt bond financing for financial assistance to new or expanding businesses, governmental units and certain organizations that are exempt...

  7. Tax-Exempt Industrial Revenue Bonds (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tax-Exempt Industrial Revenue Bonds are issued by cities and counties for the purchase, construction, improvement or remodeling of a facility for agricultural, commercial, hospital, industrial,...

  8. Water Pollution Control Facilities, Tax exemption (Michigan)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Water Pollution Control Exemption, PA 451 of 1994, Part 37, as amended, affords a 100% property and sales tax exemption to facilities that are designed and operated primarily for the control,...

  9. Sales Tax Exemption for Hydrogen Fuel Cells

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A sales tax exemption may also be taken on building materials used to construct a new or renovated building or purchases of machinery for a research district. A research district is defined as...

  10. Air Pollution Control Facility, Tax Exemption (Michigan) | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Sales Tax Incentive Provider Department of Treasury An application for a pollution control tax exemption certificate shall be filed with the state tax commission in a manner...

  11. Property Tax Exemption for Machinery, Equipment, Materials, and Supplies (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Property Tax Exemption for Machinery, Equipment, Materials, and Supplies exists for low-dollar items of machinery, equipment, materials and supplies used for business purposes, or in activities...

  12. Coal Conversion Facility Privilege Tax Exemptions (North Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Coal Conversion Facility Privilege Tax Exemptions are granted under a variety of conditions through the North Dakota Tax Department. Privilege tax, which is in lieu of property taxes on the...

  13. Sales and Use Tax Exemption (STX) (New Jersey)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Any company with 1,000 or more employees that needs to make purchases for construction and renovation of a new business location can apply for a sales tax exemption certificate to purchase...

  14. New York City- Residential Solar Sales Tax Exemption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In July 2005, New York enacted [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=NY24F&re... legislation] that allows local governments to grant a local sales tax exemption for...

  15. NYC property tax exemption program : existing policies and future planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jenny Chiani

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New York City's tax expenditures relate to real property tax totaled $4.5 billion in fiscal year 2012. The largest expenditure relates to the "421-a" tax exemption program for new multi-family residential real estate ...

  16. Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Electrical Generating Equipment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Indiana does not have a specific sales and use tax exemption for equipment used in the production of renewable electricity. Therefore, such equipment is presumed to be subject to sales and use tax....

  17. Municipal Support of Projects (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Municipalities may choose to support projects, such as those which will generate electricity through the use of a renewable energy source, by tax-exempt bond financing; easements for roads, water...

  18. Puerto Rico- Property Tax Exemption for Solar and Renewable Energy Equipment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Puerto Rico provides a property tax exemption for all "solar powered material, equipment or accessory and renewable energy collection, storage, generation, distribution, and application equipment."...

  19. Local Option- Solar Sales Tax Exemption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The exemption does not apply to solar pool heating or other recreational applications. The laws also permit local governments (municipalities and counties) to grant an exemption from local sales...

  20. Sales Tax Exemption for Energy-Efficient Products (Sales Tax Holiday)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Virginia allows a four-day sales tax exemption on Energy Star products of $2,500 or less per product, purchased for non-commercial home or personal use. Beginning in 2007, the 100% exemption from...

  1. Sales Tax Exemption for Energy-Efficient Products (Sales Tax Holiday) (Georgia))

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Georgia allows an annual state and local sales tax exemption on Energy Star products of $1,500 or less per product, purchased for non-commercial home or personal use.The 100% exemption from the...

  2. Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Residential Solar and Wind Electricity Sales (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In May 2011 Maryland enacted legislation providing a sales and use tax exemption for sales of electricity from qualifying solar energy and residential wind energy equipment to residential customers...

  3. Qualified Energy Property Tax Exemption for Projects over 250 kW (Payment in Lieu)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ohio's Renewable and Advanced Energy Project Property Tax Exemption, enacted with the passage of Ohio S.B. 232 in the summer of 2010, exempts qualified energy projects in Ohio from public utility...

  4. Qualified Energy Property Tax Exemption for Projects 250 kW or Less

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ohio's Renewable and Advanced Energy Project Property Tax Exemption, enacted with the passage of Ohio S.B. 232 in the summer of 2010, exempts qualified energy projects in Ohio from public utility...

  5. City and County of Honolulu- Real Property Tax Exemption for Alternative Energy Improvements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In September 2009, the Honolulu City Council unanimously passed Bill 58 to create a real property tax exemption for alternative energy improvements. This bill became effective October 1, 2009. The...

  6. Form 14-305 (Back)(Rev.9-11/6) Motor Vehicle Rental Tax Exemption Certificate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Form 14-305 (Back)(Rev.9-11/6) Motor Vehicle Rental Tax Exemption Certificate This certificate family home z residential treatment center z institution providing basic care z therapeutic camp z

  7. Local Option- Property Tax Exemption for Renewable Energy Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Beginning in October 2013, a municipality may also adopt an ordinance to exempt commercial or industrial Class I renewable resources*, certain hydropower facilities**, or solar thermal or geother...

  8. Local Option- Property Tax Exemption for Renewable Energy Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Colorado enacted legislation in April 2007 ([http://www.leg.state.co.us/clics/clics2007a/csl.nsf/fsbillcont3/31EEE26A... SB 145]) to authorize counties and municipalities to offer property or sales...

  9. Fuel Cell Financing for Tax-Exempt Entities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdf Flash2006-52.pdf0.pdfDepartment of Energy's2ofFuel Cell Financing for Tax-Exempt

  10. Local Option- Real Property Tax Exemption for Green Buildings (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In July 2012 New York enacted legislation allowing municipal corporations to exempt green buildings from real property taxes. It is important to note that this law allows but does not require local...

  11. Missouri Agribusiness Revolving Loan Fund (Missouri)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Missouri Agricultural and Small Business Development Authority’s (MASBDA) Missouri Agribusiness Revolving Loan Fund offers financing to value-added agriculture enterprises, agriculture support...

  12. Solar Sales Tax Exemption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For both residential and non-residential systems, the exemption applies to solar-energy systems that utilize solar radiation to produce energy designed to provide heating, cooling, hot water and/or...

  13. Solar Property Tax Exemption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In Missouri, solar energy systems not held for resale are exempt from state, local, and county property taxes. As enacted in July 2013, the law does not define solar energy systems.

  14. Economics, Management, Policy and Trade for Agribusiness and Communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economics, Management, Policy and Trade for Agribusiness and Communities Goal: Colorado State, and outreach in the economic and business aspects of agriculture, its' business firms, industries and policy of Agricultural and Resource Economics offers the B. S. in Agribusiness (217 majors in Fall 2008) and the B. S

  15. The University of Georgia Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Robert A.

    and Environmental Sciences An Evaluation of Direct and Indirect Economic Losses Incurred by Georgia FruitThe University of Georgia Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development College of Agricultural ............................................................................................................................................................ 3 Economic Consequences

  16. An application of agribusiness strategic planning under risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Charles Tudor

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Agriculture entered a new era with the passage of the 1996 FAIR Act. This new era will likely be associated with increasing risk factors that agribusiness managers must consider in developing appropriate management strategies. Managers who can...

  17. Economic impact of emerging rural agribusiness centers: the cooperative linkage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuhrenberg, Stephen Blaine

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the states of Texas, 10 Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia and Kansas as a base for defining and measuring agribusiness center growth. In each state, regions were selected for analysis based on agriculture as a dominant economic activity. Counties within a... of this study was to determine the economic impacts of current and emerging rural business centers on cooperatives in the Texas High Plains and vice versa. The study determines the impact of cooperative business activity on a county's agribusiness center...

  18. Renewable Energy Sales Tax Exemption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Utah exempts the purchase or lease of equipment used to generate electricity from renewable resources from the state sales tax. Eligible purchases or leases must be made for or by a renewable...

  19. Renewable Energy Sales Tax Exemption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Certain renewable energy systems and equipment sold in Rhode Island are exempt from the state's sales and use tax. Eligible products include solar electric systems, DC-to-AC inverters that...

  20. Solar Property Tax Exemption (Missouri)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In Missouri, solar energy systems not held for resale are exempt from state, local, and county property taxes. As enacted in July 2013, the law does not define solar energy systems; further rules...

  1. Energy Equipment Property Tax Exemption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A "solar energy device" for the purpose of this incentive is defined as "a system or series of mechanisms designed primarily to provide heating, to provide cooling, to produce electrical power, to...

  2. Residential Solar Sales Tax Exemption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New York enacted legislation in July 2005 exempting the sale and installation of residential solar-energy systems from the state's sales and compensating use taxes. The exemption was extended to...

  3. Wind Energy Sales Tax Exemption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In order to claim the exemption, buyers must complete an exemption certificate (MN Dept. of Revenue Form ST3 - Certificate of Exemption) and supply it to the equipment seller.

  4. Solar Energy Sales Tax Exemption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "a set of devices whose primary purpose is to collect solar energy and convert and store it for useful purposes including heating and cooling buildings or other energy-using processes, or to...

  5. Renewable Energy Sales Tax Exemptions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The original Wis. Stat. § 77.54(30) was also amended in 1987 to exempt the sale of qualifying biomass residues used as fuel for business activity from the state sales and use tax gross receipts....

  6. Agriculture Taxes in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Lonnie L.; Stallmann, Judith I.

    2002-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication explains the tax exemptions and special provisions available to Texas farmers, ranchers and agribusiness managers and the effect of those exemptions on state and local governmental revenues....

  7. The Ohio Enterprise Zone program (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Ohio Enterprise Zone program is an economic development tool administered by municipal and county governments that provides real and personal property tax exemptions to businesses making...

  8. The Ohio Community Reinvestment Area (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Ohio Community Reinvestment Area program is an economic development tool administered by municipal and county government that provides real property tax exemptions for property owners who...

  9. Commercial and Industrial Machinery Tax Exemption (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    All commercial and industrial machinery and equipment acquired by qualified purchase or lease made or entered into after June 30, 2006 shall be exempt from property tax. All commercial and...

  10. Solar and CHP Sales Tax Exemption (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Solar energy systems have been exempt from Florida's sales and use tax since July 1, 1997. The term "solar energy system" means the equipment and requisite hardware that provide and are used for...

  11. Property Tax Exemption for Residential Solar Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    [http://www.nmlegis.gov/Sessions/10%20Regular/final/HB0233.pdf HB 233 of 2010] exempted residential solar energy systems from property tax assessments. According to state law, for the purposes of...

  12. Alternative Energy Personal Property Tax Exemption | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to promote the development, commercialization, and manufacturing of a broad range of alternative energy technologies. The Michigan Next Energy Authority Act of 2002...

  13. Biomass Sales and Use Tax Exemption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Georgia enacted legislation in April 2006 (HB 1018) creating an exemption for biomass materials from the state's sales and use taxes. The term "biomass material" is defined as "organic matter,...

  14. Property Tax Exemption for Renewable Energy Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In order to claim the exemption, property owners must apply for a certificate from their local assessor which will reduce the assessed value of their property to what it would be without the...

  15. Renewable Energy Sales and Use Tax Exemption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The sales of equipment used to generate electricity using fuel cells, wind, sun, biomass energy, tidal or wave energy, geothermal, anaerobic digestion or landfill gas is eligible for a 75% exempt...

  16. Puerto Rico- Excise Tax Exemption for Farmers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In Puerto Rico, "bona fide farmers" are exempted from paying all types of excises for equipment, articles and objects whose operation depend solely on solar, wind, hydro or any other type of power,...

  17. Property Tax Exemption for Wind Generators

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Manufacturing facilities (broadly defined as “facilities engaged in the mechanical or chemical transformation of materials or substances into new products”) are eligible for the property tax exem...

  18. Local Option- Property Tax Exemption for Solar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Virginia allows any county, city or town to exempt or partially exempt solar energy equipment or recycling equipment from local property taxes. Residential, commercial or industrial property is...

  19. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Vehicle (EV) Infrastructure and Battery Tax Exemptions Natural Gas Tax Exemptions Biofuels Distribution Tax Exemption Biofuels Tax Deduction Biofuels Production Tax Exemption...

  20. Municipal waste processing apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayberry, J.L.

    1988-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to apparatus for processing municipal waste, and more particularly to vibrating mesh screen conveyor systems for removing grit, glass, and other noncombustible materials from dry municipal waste. Municipal waste must be properly processed and disposed of so that it does not create health risks to the community. Generally, municipal waste, which may be collected in garbage trucks, dumpsters, or the like, is deposited in processing areas such as landfills. Land and environmental controls imposed on landfill operators by governmental bodies have increased in recent years, however, making landfill disposal of solid waste materials more expensive. 6 figs.

  1. Municipal Utility Districts (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Municipal Utility Districts, regulated by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, may be created for the following purposes: (1) the control, storage, preservation, and distribution of its...

  2. PSNH- Municipal Smart Start Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Public Service of New Hampshire (PSNH), an electric utility, offers the Smart Start Program to Municipal customers. This program assists municipalities in reducing energy consumption and electric...

  3. Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Community Wind Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In May 2007, Nebraska established an exemption from the sales and use tax imposed on the gross receipts from the sale, lease, or rental of personal property for use in a community-based energy...

  4. Alabama Property Tax Exemptions (Alabama) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Revenue. Relevant exemptions to energy generation facilities are abatements for air and water pollution control device and industrial purposes. There is no minimum amount...

  5. Arizona Department of Revenue Transaction Privilege Tax Exemption Certificate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Pak Kin

    for extracting milk and for cooling milk and livestock. 15. Machinery, equipment or transmission lines used

  6. Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Electrical Generating Facilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Electrical generating facilities are exempt from sales and use taxes in North Dakota. The exemption is granted for the purchase of building materials, production equipment, and any other tangible...

  7. Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Gas Processing Facilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In North Dakota, materials purchased for building or expending gas processing facilities are exempt from sales and use taxes. Building materials, equipment, and other tangible property are eligible...

  8. Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Renewable Energy Property (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Nebraska allows for a refund of the sales and use taxes paid for a renewable energy system used to produce electricity for sale. To qualify, the investment must be at least $20 million. The law...

  9. Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Renewable Energy Equipment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Colorado exempts from the state's sales and use tax all sales, storage, and use of components used in the production of alternating current electricity from a renewable energy source. Effective...

  10. Energy Used in Manufacturing Sales and Use Tax Exemption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Georgia enacted legislation in April 2012 (HB 386) creating an exemption for energy used in the manufacturing of a product from the state's sales and use taxes. The sale, use, storage, or...

  11. Local Option- Solar Sales Tax Exemption (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New York enacted legislation in July 2005 exempting the sale and installation of residential solar-energy systems from the state's sales and compensating use taxes. The exemption applies to solar...

  12. Tax Exemption for Large-Scale Renewable Energy Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In August 2007 Kentucky established the ''Incentives for Energy Independence Act'' (IEIA) to promote the development of renewable energy and alternative fuel facilities, energy efficient buildings,...

  13. Property Tax Exemption for Wind Energy Generation Facilities (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    [http://nebraskalegislature.gov/FloorDocs/101/PDF/Slip/LB1048.pdf Nebraska Legislative Bill 1048 (LB1048)] created a nameplate capacity tax that replaced the Nebraska Department of Revenue's...

  14. Puerto Rico- Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Green Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Puerto Rican law exempts from the sales and use tax solar electric equipment, associated accessories, and components used to produce electrical energy. Distributors or manufacturers must submit a...

  15. Local Option- Property Tax Exemption for Renewable Energy Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Eligible renewable energy property is defined as "any fixture, product, system, device or interacting group of devices that produce electricity from renewable resources, including, but not limited...

  16. Fuel Cell Financing for Tax-Exempt Entitities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of directly purchasing a 300 kW fuel cell for a combined heat and power (CHP) system with (2) the cost of pur service contracts to include the Energy Investment Tax Credit. Introduction The Energy Investment Tax Credit (ITC)1 can help reduce the cost of installing a fuel cell system. While Department of Treasury

  17. Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Renewable Energy Equipment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The statute defines the components of a system eligible for the exemption; these include trackers, generating equipment, supporting structures or racks, inverters, towers and foundations, balance...

  18. Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Solar and Geothermal Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Consumers purchasing the eligible equipment or services must present form CERT-140 to the seller at the time of purchase. Certification Form CERT-140 is available on the Connecticut Department of...

  19. Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Community Renewable Energy Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In May 2007 Nebraska established an exemption from the sales and use tax imposed on the gross receipts from the sale, lease, or rental of personal property for use in a community-based energy dev...

  20. Biomass Gasification and Methane Digester Property Tax Exemption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In order to be eligible for the exemption, methane digester equipment must be certified by the Michigan Department of Agriculture (MDA) and the farm must be verified as compliant under the...

  1. Property Tax Exemption for Solar and Wind Energy Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In May 2009 the exemption was amended yet again by H.B. 1171 to add "residential wind energy equipment" as an eligible technology. In order to qualify, equipment must be sited on residential...

  2. Local Option- Real Property Tax Exemption for Green Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In order to qualify for an exemption, the new construction or improvement (does not include routine maintenance or repairs) must commence on or after January 1, 2013; be valued in excess of $10,0...

  3. Local Option- Renewable Energy Machinery and Tools Property Tax Exemption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    HB 1297 enacted in March 2015 provides option for local governing body of any county, city, or town to impose a different property tax on renewable energy generating machinery and tools than other...

  4. Property Tax Exemption for Renewable Energy Systems | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010 |of EnergySelected | DepartmentPhoto ofSavings

  5. Property Tax Exemption for Renewable Energy Systems | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010 |of EnergySelected | DepartmentPhoto

  6. Tax Exemption for Wind Energy Generation | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23,EnergyChicopee ElectricCommunity-Based EnergyNWSmall

  7. Tax-Exempt Bond Financing for Nonprofit Organizations and Industries |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23,EnergyChicopee ElectricCommunity-Based EnergyNWSmallTax Incentives ofDepartment

  8. Fuel Cell Financing for Tax-Exempt Entities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdf Flash2006-52.pdf0.pdfDepartment of Energy's2of

  9. Renewable Energy Equipment Sales Tax Exemption | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010InJanuary 29,3,Utility

  10. Renewable Energy Property Tax Exemption | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010InJanuary 29,3,UtilityInvestor-OwnedSolar Water Heat

  11. Renewable Energy Property Tax Exemption | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010InJanuary 29,3,UtilityInvestor-OwnedSolar Water

  12. Renewable Energy Property Tax Exemption | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010InJanuary 29,3,UtilityInvestor-OwnedSolar WaterWater

  13. Renewable Energy Property Tax Exemption | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010InJanuary 29,3,UtilityInvestor-OwnedSolar

  14. Renewable Energy Systems Property Tax Exemption | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010InJanuaryGeothermal Electric Solar

  15. Renewable Energy Systems Property Tax Exemption | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010InJanuaryGeothermal Electric SolarResidential

  16. Renewable Energy Systems Sales Tax Exemption | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010InJanuaryGeothermal Electric

  17. Residential Solar Energy Property Tax Exemption | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptemberAssessments

  18. Local Option - Property Tax Exemption for Renewable Energy | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaeferApril 1, 1999InspectionsAnnualThe following terms areSchools

  19. Local Option - Property Tax Exemption | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaeferApril 1, 1999InspectionsAnnualThe following terms areSchoolsSavings

  20. Local Option - Residential Property Tax Exemption for Solar | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaeferApril 1, 1999InspectionsAnnualThe following terms

  1. Methane Gas Conversion Property Tax Exemption | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaeferApril 1,(EAC) Richard2015 RDSHARP Supporting ElementsDepartment

  2. Energy Conversion and Thermal Efficiency Sales Tax Exemption | Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy Chinaof EnergyImpactOn July 2, 2014 inJohn Schueler JohnAHRIConstruction Schools

  3. Solar Energy Sales Tax Exemption | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014,Zaleski - PolicyWork ForceSectorProcessDepartment of

  4. Solar and CHP Sales Tax Exemption | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014,Zaleski - PolicyWorkSunShot SolarDownload presentation slides from

  5. Solar and Wind Energy Business Franchise Tax Exemption | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014,Zaleski - PolicyWorkSunShot SolarDownload presentation

  6. Solar and Wind Equipment Sales Tax Exemption | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014,Zaleski - PolicyWorkSunShot SolarDownload

  7. Municipal Energy Reduction Fund

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In March 2010, the New Hampshire Community Development Finance Authority (CDFA) launched a revolving loan program to encourage the state’s municipal governments to invest in energy efficiency and...

  8. Illinois Municipal Electric Agency- Electric Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Illinois Municipal Electric Agency (IMEA) offers rebates to member municipal utilities* (those who purchase wholesale electric service from IMEA) and retail customers for energy efficiency...

  9. Essays on Municipal Public Finance in Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardner, Rachel Elizabeth

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on Municipal Public Finance in Brazil By Rachel Elizabethon Municipal Public Finance in Brazil by Rachel Elizabethlocal public finance in Brazil, with a focus on how federal

  10. Municipal Energy Plan Program (Ontario, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ontario is supporting local energy planning by introducing the Municipal Energy Plan (MEP) program. The MEP program is designed to help municipalities better understand their local energy needs ...

  11. Massachusetts Municipal Commercial Industrial Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Certain municipal utilities in Massachusetts, in cooperation with Massachusetts Municipal Wholesale Electric Company ([http://www.mmwec.org/ MMWEC]), have begun offering energy efficiency...

  12. Agriculture Taxes in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Lonnie L.; Stallmann, Judith I.

    2002-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    farmers, ranchers and agribusiness firms, including: a73 Exemption from state and local sales and use taxes on purchased farm inputs and products. a73 The provision for local property tax pro- ductivity valuation for open space land. a73 Exemption from... and local level and the provision for open space productivity valuation of land used in agriculture, timber or wildlife production. Sales tax exemptions Farmers and ranchers are exempt from state and local sales taxes for several items, including most...

  13. Municipal Solid Waste in The United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    2007 Facts and Figures Municipal Solid Waste in The United States #12;United States Environmental Protection Agency Office of Solid Waste (5306P) EPA530-R-08-010 November 2008 www.epa.gov #12;MUNICIPAL SOLID ............................................................................................................................... 1 WHAT IS INCLUDED IN MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE

  14. Advanced Characterisation of Municipal Solid Waste Ashes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Advanced Characterisation of Municipal Solid Waste Ashes Preparatory thesis Randi Skytte Pedersen is to investigate Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) ashes with respect to particle sizes, structures and composition with characterisation of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) ashes from the Danish power plant M°abjergværket, Holstebro. MSW

  15. Municipal Solid Waste in The United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barlaz, Morton A.

    2011 Facts and Figures Municipal Solid Waste in The United States #12;United States Environmental Protection Agency Office of Solid Waste (5306P) EPA530-R-13-001 May 2013 www.epa.gov #12;MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE IN THE UNITED STATES: 2011 FACTS AND FIGURES Table of Contents Chapter Page MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE

  16. Denton Municipal Electric- Standard Offer Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Within the GreenSense program, Denton Municipal Electric's Standard Offer Program provides rebates to large commercial and industrial customers for lighting retrofits, HVAC upgrades and motor...

  17. Lassen Municipal Utility District- PV Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lassen Municipal Utility District (LMUD) is providing incentives for its customers to purchase solar electric photovoltaic (PV) systems. Rebate levels will decrease annually over the life of the...

  18. 2011 Municipal Consortium Northwest Region Workshop Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Northwest Region Workshop, held in Seattle July 15, 2011.

  19. Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides a brief overview of municipal solid waste energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply waste to energy within the Federal sector.

  20. Draft Transcript on Municipal PV Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Webinar on navigating the legal, tax, and finance issues associated with the installation of Municipal PV Systems. The following agenda was developed based on Pat Boylston's experience assisting municipalities with their PV projects and the requests for information that the Solar America City technical team leads have received from many of the 25 Solar America Cities since the April 2008 meeting in Tucson.

  1. Alameda Municipal Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Program...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Motors: 0.18per kWh saved Lighting: 0.20per kWh saved HVAC: 0.22per kWh saved Refrigeration: 0.22per kWh saved Provider Alameda Municipal Power Alameda Municipal Power...

  2. Federal, Municipal, Universities and Other ESPC Case Studies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal, Municipal, Universities and Other ESPC Case Studies from Different States Federal, Municipal, Universities and Other ESPC Case Studies from Different States Provides a...

  3. Toward Energy Efficient Municipalities: General Comments on Policy...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Efficient Municipalities: General Comments on Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation Toward Energy Efficient Municipalities: General Comments on...

  4. Design Case Summary: Production of Mixed Alcohols from Municipal...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Mixed Alcohols from Municipal Solid Waste via Gasification Design Case Summary: Production of Mixed Alcohols from Municipal Solid Waste via Gasification The Bioenergy Technologies...

  5. Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority (OMPA) offers the Demand and Energy Efficiency Program (DEEP) to eligible commercial, industrial, and municipal government customers served by OMPA. This...

  6. February 19, 2013 Webinar: Exploring How Municipal Utilities...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    February 19, 2013 Webinar: Exploring How Municipal Utilities Fund Solar Energy Projects February 19, 2013 Webinar: Exploring How Municipal Utilities Fund Solar Energy Projects This...

  7. Wakefield Municipal Gas and Light Department- Residential Conservation Services Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Wakefield Municipal Gas and Light Department (WMGLD), in cooperation with the Massachusetts Municipal Wholesale Electric Company (MMWEC), offers the "Incentive Rebate Program" to encourage...

  8. Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act provides for planning for the processing and disposal of municipal waste; requires counties to submit plans for municipal waste management systems within their boundaries; authorizes...

  9. State Clean Energy Policies Analysis: State, Utility, and Municipal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    State, Utility, and Municipal Loan Programs Jump to: navigation, search Name State Clean Energy Policies Analysis: State, Utility, and Municipal Loan Programs AgencyCompany...

  10. Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    1: Availability of Feedstock and Technology Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume 1: Availability of Feedstock and Technology Municipal solid waste (MSW) is...

  11. Silicon Valley Power and Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority Win...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Silicon Valley Power and Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority Win 2014 Public Power Wind Awards Silicon Valley Power and Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority Win 2014 Public Power Wind...

  12. Sales Tax Exemption for Wind Energy Business Designated High Impact Business

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A business establishing a new wind power facility in Illinois that will not be located in an Enterprise Zone* may be eligible for designation as a "High Impact Business." After receiving the...

  13. Gross Receipts Tax Exemption for Sales of Wind and Solar Systems to Government Entities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Mexico has a gross receipts tax structure for businesses instead of a sales tax. Businesses are taxed on the gross amount of their business receipts each year before expenses are deducted. ...

  14. Partial Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Agricultural Solar Power Facilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The California State Board of Equalization issued a Special Notice in November 2012, clarifying that photovoltaic (PV) systems that are used to provide electricity to farm equipment and machinery...

  15. Partial Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Agricultural Solar Power Facilities (California)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    California provides a partial exemption of the state's sales and use tax for farm equipment and machinery. The exemption only applies to taxes levied by the State, and not sales and use taxes...

  16. Fuel Cell Financing for Tax-Exempt Entities | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2: FinalOffers3.pdf0-45.pdf0 Budget Fossil Energy FYWednesday, December 03,StatusFinancing

  17. Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Energy-Efficient Products | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, anEnergyDepartmentDepartmentEnergy PerformedFactEnergy

  18. Excise Tax Exemption for Solar- or Wind-Powered Systems | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy Chinaof EnergyImpactOn Chapter 42.15 - Attachment 1Wednesday,Energy Wind (Small)

  19. Concord Municipal Light Plant- Solar Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Concord Municipal Light Plant (CMLP) offers rebates to customers who install solar photovoltaic (PV) systems that are designed to offset the customer's electrical needs. Systems must be owned by...

  20. Alameda Municipal Power- Residential Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Alameda Municipal Power (AMP) offers a grant to help its residential customers who have electric heat weatherize homes to increase efficiency. To participate, customers must complete and send in a...

  1. 2011 Municipal Consortium Northeast Region Workshop Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Northeast Region Workshop, held in Philadelphia, May 19–20, 2011.

  2. 2011 Municipal Consortium Southwest Region Workshop Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Southwest Region Workshop, held in San Jose, California, August 25­–26, 2011.

  3. 2010 Municipal Consortium Southwest Region Workshop Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Southwest Region Workshop, held in Los Angeles on September 30, 2010.

  4. River Falls Municipal Utilities- Distributed Solar Tariff

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    River Falls Municipal Utilities (RFMU), a member of WPPI Energy, offers a special energy purchase rate to its customers that generate electricity using solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. The special...

  5. Experimental analysis of municipal solid waste samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendoza Sanchez, Itza

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EXPERIMENTAL ANALYSIS OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE SAMPLES A Thesis by ITZA MENDOZA SANCHEZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ASM University tn partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May... 2002 Major Subject: Civil Engmeering EXPERIMENTAL ANALYSIS OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE SAMPLES A Thesis by ITZA MENDOZA SANCHEZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M Umversity in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  6. Municipal Solid WasteMunicipal Solid Waste Landfills In CitiesLandfills In Cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Municipal Solid WasteMunicipal Solid Waste Landfills In CitiesLandfills In Cities Arun to minimize public health and environmental impacts. Landfilling is the process by which residual solid waste is placed in a landfill. #12;Case in Supreme Court · Pathetic condition of Solid waste practices in India

  7. The Potential of Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Municipal Solid Waste: A Technical and Economic Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Jian; Ebrik, Mirvat; Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1996 19950414. Municipal solid waste processing facility andconversion of municipal-solid-waste to ethanol. Biotechnol.Bioconversion of municipal solid waste to glucose for bio-

  8. Georgia: Data Center and Historic Municipal Building Go Green...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Municipal Building Go Green Georgia: Data Center and Historic Municipal Building Go Green August 21, 2013 - 9:45am Addthis Data centers can consume 100 to 200 times more...

  9. Saint Peter Municipal Utilities- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Southern Minnesota Municipal Power Agency ([http://www.smmpa.com SMMPA]) is a joint-action agency which generates and sells reliable electricity at wholesale to its eighteen non-profit, municipally...

  10. Mora Municipal Utilities- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Southern Minnesota Municipal Power Agency ([http://www.smmpa.com SMMPA]) is a joint-action agency which generates and sells reliable electricity at wholesale to its eighteen non-profit, municipally...

  11. Energy Department Works with Sacramento Municipal Utility District...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    About Us Initiatives & Projects Energy Transition Initiative Energy Department Works with Sacramento Municipal Utility District on Renewable Electricity Generation and...

  12. Nonlinear Model Predictive Control of Municipal Solid Waste Combustion Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van den Hof, Paul

    Nonlinear Model Predictive Control of Municipal Solid Waste Combustion Plants M. Leskens , R.h.Bosgra@tudelft.nl, p.m.j.vandenhof@tudelft.nl Keywords : nonlinear model predictive control, municipal solid waste combus- tion Abstract : Combustion of municipal solid waste (MSW; = household waste) is used to reduce

  13. Department of Environmental Engineering Leaching from Municipal Solid Waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of Environmental Engineering Leaching from Municipal Solid Waste Incineration Residues Ji í Hyk s #12;#12;Leaching from Municipal Solid Waste Incineration Residues Ji í Hyks Ph.D. Thesis Municipal Solid Waste Incineration Residues Cover: Torben Dolin & Julie Camilla Middleton Printed by: Vester

  14. Improved Economic Performance Municipal Solid Waste Combustion Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van den Hof, Paul

    Improved Economic Performance of Municipal Solid Waste Combustion Plants by Model Based Combustion Control #12;#12;Improved Economic Performance of Municipal Solid Waste Combustion Plants by Model Based-of-the-art and challenges in the operation of MSWC plants . . . 1 1.1.1 The aims of municipal solid waste combustion

  15. 25 Cologne Municipal Museum 30 Museum Ludwig

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iosup, Alexandru

    TAXI TAXI TAXI TAXI TAXI TAXI TAXI TAXI TAXI H H TAXI Museums 25 Cologne Municipal Museum 30 Museum Ludwig 33 EL-DE Haus NS-Documentation Centre 34 Roman-Germanic Museum 36 Applied Arts and Crafts Museum 48 Käthe-Kollwitz Museum 52 Wallraf-Richartz-Museum 54 Museum of East-Asian Art 56 Schnütgen Museum

  16. Essays on Municipal Public Finance in Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardner, Rachel Elizabeth

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Revenue Generation Infrastructure IV-2SLS Coefficient onIV-2SLS estimates indicate a null relationship between transfers and per capita revenue generation.IV-2SLS fixed effects estimates without municipality fixed effects seem to indicate 0.2 cent increase in local revenue generation

  17. Contaminant Transport in Municipal Water Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stockie, John

    Chapter 1 Contaminant Transport in Municipal Water Systems Presented at the 3rd PIMS Industrial the inverse problem. We begin in the following sections with an overview of the physics of ow in water forcing to raise the hydraulic head of the water in the network. The nodes are either junctions, tanks

  18. QUALITY OF COMPOSTS FROM MUNICIPAL BIODEGRADABLE WASTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    QUALITY OF COMPOSTS FROM MUNICIPAL BIODEGRADABLE WASTE OF DIFFERENT ORIGINS I. ZDANEVITCH AND O countries. One of the outputs of this treatment is a compost prepared from the organic matter of the waste the total MSW in the plant. Unlike in Germany or Austria, where only the compost from selective collection

  19. Energy utilization: municipal waste incineration. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaBeck, M.F.

    1981-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    An assessment is made of the technical and economical feasibility of converting municipal waste into useful and useable energy. The concept presented involves retrofitting an existing municipal incinerator with the systems and equipment necessary to produce process steam and electric power. The concept is economically attractive since the cost of necessary waste heat recovery equipment is usually a comparatively small percentage of the cost of the original incinerator installation. Technical data obtained from presently operating incinerators designed specifically for generating energy, documents the technical feasibility and stipulates certain design constraints. The investigation includes a cost summary; description of process and facilities; conceptual design; economic analysis; derivation of costs; itemized estimated costs; design and construction schedule; and some drawings.

  20. Planning for municipal solid waste recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belnay, G.A.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research identifies those community characteristics and program components that have resulted in early, consistent, high levels of recycling participation in New Jersey. Discriminant analysis of socio-economic, demographic, institutional, and motivational factors is used to classify each of the state's 567 minor civil divisions into groups that describe participation levels. Of the four hypotheses advanced to explain the variation of recycling around the state, leadership emerges as the key factor in local program success. Local political and governmental leaders set the municipal recycling agenda, and through their knowledge, programs that fit the unique characteristics of their town are designed and aggressively implemented. Significant savings in the municipality's solid waste disposal budget and the added bonus of State Tonnage Grant Award Revenues are obtained by the urban, well-established, experienced recyclers identified by the analysis and confirmed by the individual case studies discussed.

  1. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Air Pollution Control Facility, Tax Exemption (Michigan) An application for a pollution control tax exemption certificate shall be filed with the state tax commission in a manner...

  2. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Retailer Tax Credit Clean Diesel Fleet Vehicle Grants Ethanol Sales Tax Exemption Biofuels Tax Exemption Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Low-Interest Loans Idle Reduction Weight...

  3. Marshall Municipal Utilities- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Marshall Municipal Utilities offers incentives to commercial customers which help cover the installation costs of energy efficient lighting, heating and cooling equipment, motors, variable...

  4. River Falls Municipal Utilities- Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Wisconsin)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    River Falls Municipal Utility (RFMU) offers a variety of rebates to business customers for implementing energy efficient equipment upgrades. Rebates are available for commercial lighting, central...

  5. Standards for Municipal Small Wind Regulations and Model Ordinance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In July 2008, New Hampshire enacted legislation designed to prevent municipalities from adopting ordinances or regulations that place unreasonable limits on or hinder the performance of wind energy...

  6. Hercules Municipal Utility- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hercules Municipal Utility provides financial incentives for its residential members to increase the energy efficiency of participating homes. Rebates are offered for a variety of home appliances...

  7. River Falls Municipal Utilities- Energy Star Appliance Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    River Falls Municipal Utility (RFMU), in conjuction with the Wisconsin Focus on Energy program, offers a variety of rebates to residential electric customers for upgrading to energy efficient...

  8. Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority- WISE Energy Efficiency Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority (OMPA) offers loans for a variety of measures and equipment through its WISE Loan Program. This program encourages residential and commercial customers to...

  9. Anoka Municipal Utility- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Anoka Municipal Utility (AMU) offers the Commercial and Industrial Lighting and Motor Rebate Program for commercial and industrial customers who install high efficiency lighting, motors, and...

  10. Northern Municipal Power Agency- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Northern Municipal Power Agency, in association with the Minnkota Power Cooperative, Inc., offers a variety of rebates for the purchase of qualifying energy efficient equipment. Rebates are...

  11. Elk River Municipal Utilities- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Elk River Municipal Utilities offers a variety of rebates to commercial, industrial, and agricultural customers for the installation of specific energy efficient equipment. Rebates are available...

  12. Anoka Municipal Utility- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Anoka Municipal Utilities (AMU) offers incentives for residential customers to install energy-efficient appliances and light bulbs in eligible homes. Rebates are available for Energy Star qualified...

  13. Mansfield Municipal Electric Department- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mansfield Municipal Electric Department encourages energy efficiency through the ENERGY STAR Appliance Rebate Incentive Program. Cash rebates are offered for ENERGY STAR central air conditioners,...

  14. Elk River Municipal Utilities- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    [http://www.elkriverutilities.com/index.php Elk River Municipal Utilities] provides rebates to their residential electric customers who purchase and install Energy Star rated appliances and HVAC...

  15. Lassen Municipal Utility District- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lassen Municipal Utility District (LMUD) offers an incentive for residential customers who purchase and install efficient lighting, HVAC equipment and ENERGY STAR rated appliances for eligible...

  16. Business Case for CNG in Municipal Fleets (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, C.

    2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Presentation about compressed natural gas in municipal fleets, assessing investment profitability, the VICE model, base-case scenarios, and pressing questions for fleet owners.

  17. Municipal Consortium Annual Meeting Presentations and Materials—Phoenix, AZ

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to presentations and materials from the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Annual Meeting held in Phoenix on September 11, 2013.

  18. Municipal Bond - Power Purchase Agreement Model Continues to...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for power purchase agreement model to provide low-cost solar energy. Author: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Municipal Bond - Power Purchase Agreement Model Continues to...

  19. Treated wastewater discharged from municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) contains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    Treated wastewater discharged from municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) contains plants radically improve the overall quality of the treated wastewa- ter compared to secondary plants

  20. Reading Municipal Light Department- Business Lighting Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reading Municipal Light Department (RMLD) offers incentives for non-residential customers to install energy efficient lights and sensors in existing facilities. In addition to rebates for the...

  1. Northern Municipal Power Agency- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Northern Municipal Power Agency, in collaboration with Minnkota Power Cooperative, Inc., offers rebates for non-residential customers to improve the energy efficiency of eligible facilities....

  2. Wellesley Municipal Light Plant- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wellesley Municipal Light Plant (WMLP) offers a number of appliance rebates to residential customers who purchase and install energy efficient equipment. Rebates are available for refrigerators,...

  3. art municipal waste: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and tested by reality Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 24 Composition of Municipal Solid Waste-Need for Thermal Treatment in the present Indian context Renewable Energy...

  4. Donation of municipal open space in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buzzingham, Donald

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Donors - City Size . 39 47 51 Figure 4 ? Open Space Donations Restrictions - City Size CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Statement of the Problem As reported by the 1970 Census of Populati on, 73. 5 percent of all Americans now live in urban areas occupying... by the Playground and Recreation Association (1929) surveyed 956 municipalities which reported 3, 158 do- nated parks and playgrounds constituting 69, 716. 71 acres. When this donated acreage is compared with total park acre- age of 248, 627. 2 acres as reported...

  5. Edinburg Municipal Utilities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJump to: navigation, search ToolEcoware Spa JumpEdinburg Municipal

  6. Woodstock Municipal Wind | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Wind Project JumpWisconsin: EnergyWoodruff ElectricMunicipal

  7. Philippi Municipal Electric | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska: Energy Resources JumpPfhotonika Jump to:Philippi Municipal Electric

  8. Working With Municipal Utilities | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015Visiting Strong,Women @ Energy:TerriWith Municipal Utilities Working

  9. Mohawk Municipal Comm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu anMicrogreen PolymersModular Energy Devices IncMohawk Municipal

  10. Minnesota Municipal Power Agency | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio:Menomonee|MililaniMindanao GEPPMinnesota Municipal Power Agency

  11. Kenyon Municipal Utilities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |Jilin Zhongdiantou New EnergyKenosistec SrlKenyon Municipal Utilities

  12. Minnesota Municipal Power Agency | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu anMicrogreen Polymers Inc JumpFinancing MechanismsMunicipal

  13. Waverly Municipal Elec Utility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin BaxinUmweltVillageGraph HomeWaranaWater PowerWaverly Municipal Elec

  14. Utah Municipal Power Agency | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga,planning methodologies and tools |UC 54-2Full Proof ofUtah Municipal

  15. Municipal solid-waste management in Istanbul

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanat, Gurdal, E-mail: gkanat@gmail.co [Yildiz Teknik Universitesi Cevre Muh Bolumu, 34220 Davutpasa-Esenler, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Istanbul, with a population of around 13 million people, is located between Europe and Asia and is the biggest city in Turkey. Metropolitan Istanbul produces about 14,000 tons of solid waste per day. The aim of this study was to assess the situation of municipal solid-waste (MSW) management in Istanbul. This was achieved by reviewing the quantity and composition of waste produced in Istanbul. Current requirements and challenges in relation to the optimization of Istanbul's MSW collection and management system are also discussed, and several suggestions for solving the problems identified are presented. The recovery of solid waste from the landfills, as well as the amounts of landfill-generated biogas and electricity, were evaluated. In recent years, MSW management in Istanbul has improved because of strong governance and institutional involvement. However, efforts directed toward applied research are still required to enable better waste management. These efforts will greatly support decision making on the part of municipal authorities. There remains a great need to reduce the volume of MSW in Istanbul.

  16. Challenges of Handling Storm Water Runoff Through Municipal Sewer Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    cleaned and retained as a Best Management Practice (BMP). Receives only non-industrial storm water on storm water are leading municipalities to change permitting practices. As a result, facilitiesChallenges of Handling Storm Water Runoff Through Municipal Sewer Systems A South Carolina Case

  17. Country report Municipal solid waste composition determination supporting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Country report Municipal solid waste composition determination supporting the integrated solid a variation between the municipal solid waste (MSW) composition in the region of Crete (2003­2004) and MSW composition suggested in the National Solid Waste Planning (2000) [National Solid Waste Planning, 2000

  18. Aluminum Reactions and Problems in Municipal Solid Waste Landfills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluminum Reactions and Problems in Municipal Solid Waste Landfills G. Vincent Calder, Ph.D.1 ; and Timothy D. Stark, Ph.D., P.E., F.ASCE2 Abstract: Aluminum enters municipal solid waste MSW landfills from: Solid wastes; Aluminum; Chemicals; Waste disposal; Landfills. Author keywords: Solid waste; Leachate

  19. Metals in Municipal Landfill Leachate And Their Health Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    raw leachate contains concentrations of heavy metals in excess ofthe drinking water standards of the un- saturated zone. If municipal solid waste is placed di- rectly into ground water, or if leachateMetals in Municipal Landfill Leachate And Their Health Effects STEPHEN C. JAMES, BS, MSCE Abstract

  20. THERMODYNAMIC STUDY OF HEAVY METALS BEHAVIOUR DURING MUNICIPAL WASTE INCINERATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    THERMODYNAMIC STUDY OF HEAVY METALS BEHAVIOUR DURING MUNICIPAL WASTE INCINERATION Y. ME´ NARD, A Me´tallurgie (LSG2M) Nancy, France T he incineration of municipal solid waste (MSW) contributes occurring during waste combustion. Second, results from the bed model were taken as boundary conditions

  1. Biogas From Municipal WWTPs: Fuel Cells Viewed as a Value Proposition...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    From Municipal WWTPs: Fuel Cells Viewed as a Value Proposition Biogas From Municipal WWTPs: Fuel Cells Viewed as a Value Proposition Presentation about the value proposition for...

  2. FirstEnergy (Potomac Edison)- Municipal and Street Lighting Program (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FirstEnergy offers several incentives for non-residential and municipal customers to upgrade traffic signals, pedestrian signals, street lights to more efficient fixtures. The Municipal Lighting...

  3. An Economic Assessment of Market-Based Approaches to Regulating the Municipal Solid Waste Stream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menell, Peter S.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rates for Municipal Solid Waste: Implementation Experience,in the Northeast, Solid Waste Digest: National Edition,Residential Municipal Solid Waste as a Pollution Prevention

  4. Predicting on-site environmental impacts of municipal engineering works

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gangolells, Marta, E-mail: marta.gangolells@upc.edu; Casals, Miquel, E-mail: miquel.casals@upc.edu; Forcada, Núria, E-mail: nuria.forcada@upc.edu; Macarulla, Marcel, E-mail: marcel.macarulla@upc.edu

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The research findings fill a gap in the body of knowledge by presenting an effective way to evaluate the significance of on-site environmental impacts of municipal engineering works prior to the construction stage. First, 42 on-site environmental impacts of municipal engineering works were identified by means of a process-oriented approach. Then, 46 indicators and their corresponding significance limits were determined on the basis of a statistical analysis of 25 new-build and remodelling municipal engineering projects. In order to ensure the objectivity of the assessment process, direct and indirect indicators were always based on quantitative data from the municipal engineering project documents. Finally, two case studies were analysed and found to illustrate the practical use of the proposed model. The model highlights the significant environmental impacts of a particular municipal engineering project prior to the construction stage. Consequently, preventive actions can be planned and implemented during on-site activities. The results of the model also allow a comparison of proposed municipal engineering projects and alternatives with respect to the overall on-site environmental impact and the absolute importance of a particular environmental aspect. These findings are useful within the framework of the environmental impact assessment process, as they help to improve the identification and evaluation of on-site environmental aspects of municipal engineering works. The findings may also be of use to construction companies that are willing to implement an environmental management system or simply wish to improve on-site environmental performance in municipal engineering projects. -- Highlights: • We present a model to predict the environmental impacts of municipal engineering works. • It highlights significant on-site environmental impacts prior to the construction stage. • Findings are useful within the environmental impact assessment process. • They also help contractors to implement environmental management systems.

  5. Frequently Asked Questions About the Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page addresses many of the questions about the Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium.

  6. Municipal wireless mesh networks as a competitive broadband delivery platform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassan-Ali, Mudhafar

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently there has been a growing interest in deploying Wireless Mesh Networks by municipalities. This interest stems from the desire to provide broadband connectivity to users lacking access to broadband alternatives. The ...

  7. Marshall Municipal Utilities- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    [http://www.marshallutilities.com/index.php Marshall Municipal Utilities (MMU)] offers a variety of incentives for its residential customers to install energy-efficient equipment in their homes. ...

  8. Denton Municipal Electric- GreenSense Solar Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Denton Municipal Electric offers rebates to its electric customers for the installation of solar PV and solar water heating systems. The solar rebates are designed for residential and small...

  9. Taunton Municipal Lighting Plant- Residential PV Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Customers of Taunton Municipal Lighting Plant (TMLP) may be eligible for $2.00/watt rebate on solar photovoltaic (PV) installations. The minimum system size eligible for this rebate is 1 kilowatt ...

  10. Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2: A Techno-economic Evaluation of the Production of Mixed Alcohols Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume 2: A Techno-economic Evaluation of the Production...

  11. Clayton Municipal Airport (CAO) Pavement Condition and Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cal, Mark P.

    Clayton Municipal Airport (CAO) Pavement Condition and Analysis Submitted to: Jane M. Lucero, AICP .................................................................................................................Skid Resistance 13 .......................................3. Predicted Pavement Conditions Assuming No Maintenance 13 .....................Table 4. Predicted Pavement Conditions (PCI) Assuming no Maintenance 14

  12. Raton Municipal Airport (RTN) Pavement Condition and Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cal, Mark P.

    Raton Municipal Airport (RTN) Pavement Condition and Analysis Submitted to: Jane M. Lucero, AICP .................................................................................................................Skid Resistance 14 .......................................3. Predicted Pavement Conditions Assuming No Maintenance 14 ...............Table 4. Predicted Pavement Conditions (PCI) Assuming no Maintenance After 2007

  13. Deming Municipal Airport (DMN) Pavement Condition and Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cal, Mark P.

    Deming Municipal Airport (DMN) Pavement Condition and Analysis Submitted to: Jane M. Lucero, AICP .................................................................................................................Skid Resistance 16 .......................................3. Predicted Pavement Conditions Assuming No Maintenance 16 2 #12;...............Table 4. Predicted Pavement Conditions (PCI) Assuming no Maintenance After

  14. Belen Alexander Municipal Airport (E80) Pavement Condition and Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cal, Mark P.

    Belen Alexander Municipal Airport (E80) Pavement Condition and Analysis Submitted to: Jane M ........................................................................................................................Skid Resistance 13 ...............................................3. Predicted Pavement Conditions Assuming No Maintenance 13 ..........Table 4. Predicted Pavement Conditions (PCI) Assuming no Maintenance

  15. Moriarty Municipal Airport (0E0) Pavement Condition and Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cal, Mark P.

    Moriarty Municipal Airport (0E0) Pavement Condition and Analysis Submitted to: Jane M. Lucero, AICP Effect of Coal Tar Seal on PCI 13 .......................................4. Predicted Pavement Conditions Assuming No Maintenance 14 ...............Table 5. Predicted Pavement Conditions (PCI) Assuming

  16. Marshall Municipal Utilities- Solar Thermal Water Heater Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Marshall Municipal Utilities (MMU) offers residential customers rebates for installing a ENERGY STAR Solar Thermal Water Heater. Rebates are based on the size of the system; MMU offers $20 per...

  17. Denton Municipal Electric- GreenSense Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Denton Municipal Electric pays residential and small commercial customers to reduce energy demand and consumption in order to reduce the utility bills of DME customers, reduce peak load, reduce...

  18. Mandatory Green Power Option for Large Municipal Utilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Municipal electric utilities serving more than 40,000 customers in Colorado must offer an optional green-power program that allows retail customers the choice of supporting emerging renewable...

  19. River Falls Municipal Utilities- Renewable Energy Finance Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    River Falls Municipal Utilities (RFMU) offers loans of $2,500 - $50,000 to its residential customers for the installation of photovoltaic (PV), solar thermal, geothermal, wind electric systems. The...

  20. City of Greensburg- Green Building Requirement for New Municipal Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In the aftermath of a May 2007 tornado that destroyed 95% of the city, the Greensburg City Council passed an ordinance requiring that all newly constructed or renovated municipally owned facilities...

  1. City of Dallas- Green Building Requirements for Municipal Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2003 the Dallas City Council passed a resolution requiring that all new municipal buildings larger than 10,000 square feet be constructed to meet LEED Silver Certification standards. In 2006...

  2. New York City- Green Building Requirements for Municipal Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2005 New York City passed a law (Local Law No. 86) making a variety of green building and energy efficiency requirements for municipal buildings and other projects funded with money from the...

  3. Reading Municipal Light Department- Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reading Municipal Light Department (RMLD) offers energy efficiency incentives to eligible commercial and industrial customers. Rebates of up to $50,000 are available to customers who wish to reduce...

  4. 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium North Central Region Workshop, held in Kansas City, MO, March 8–9, 2011.

  5. 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium North Central Region Workshop, held in Detroit, June 16–17, 2011.

  6. Alameda Municipal Power- Commercial New Construction Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Alameda Municipal Power (AMP) offers the following grant and rebate programs to AMP customers. Projects will only be funded if AMP receives and approves the application and performs a pre...

  7. Concord Municipal Light Plant- Solar Photovoltaic Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Concord Municipal Light Plant (CMLP) offers rebates to customers who install solar photovoltaic (PV) systems that are designed to offset the customer's electrical needs. Systems must be owned by...

  8. Municipal Solid Waste Generation: Feasibility of Reconciling Measurement Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, Shelly H.

    2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    to be measured. This research investigates the reconciliation of results from two methodologies for estimating municipal solid waste (MSW) generation, and assessing the potential for solid waste planners to combine the two methods in a cost-effective manner...

  9. Willmar Municipal Utilities- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Willmar Municipal Utilities offer rebates on Energy Star rated appliances and air conditioners and Marathon water heaters. In addition to these rebates, WMU also offers a Load Sharing Program. ...

  10. Reading Municipal Light Department- Residential ENERGY STAR Appliance Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reading Municipal Light Department (RMLD) offers rebates to residential customers who install Energy Star appliances in eligible homes. The offer is limited to one rebate per appliance or a maximum...

  11. Energy Smart- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (20 Municipalities)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Franklin Energy Services has partnered with the Michigan Public Power Agency (MPPA), which is made up of 20 municipal utilities, to offer the Energy Smart Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate...

  12. Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority- WISE Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority (OMPA) offers rebates on a variety of HVAC equipment through its WISE Rebate program. This program encourages residential customers and builders to upgrade to...

  13. City of Houston- Green Building Requirements for New Municipal Structures

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In June 2004 the Houston City Council passed a resolution requiring adherence to the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) guidelines in the construction or renovation of municipal...

  14. Mora Municipal Utilities- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Southern Minnesota Municipal Power Agency ([http://www.smmpa.com SMMPA]) is a joint-action agency which generates and sells reliable electricity at wholesale to its eighteen non-profit,...

  15. Concord Municipal Light Plant- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Concord Municipal Light Plant (CMLP) offers rebates to commercial customers for a variety of appliances, ETS heating systems, general lighting upgrades, CFL bulbs, and exit sign retrofit kits. A...

  16. Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff Webcast

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This May 6, 2010 webcast served as the first official meeting of the new DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium. Ed Smalley of Seattle City Light and Bruce Kinzey of Pacific Northwest...

  17. GHG emission factors developed for the recycling and composting of municipal waste in South African municipalities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedrich, Elena, E-mail: Friedriche@ukzn.ac.za; Trois, Cristina

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • GHG emission factors for local recycling of municipal waste are presented. • GHG emission factors for two composting technologies for garden waste are included. • Local GHG emission factors were compared to international ones and discussed. • Uncertainties and limitations are presented and areas for new research highlighted. - Abstract: GHG (greenhouse gas) emission factors for waste management are increasingly used, but such factors are very scarce for developing countries. This paper shows how such factors have been developed for the recycling of glass, metals (Al and Fe), plastics and paper from municipal solid waste, as well as for the composting of garden refuse in South Africa. The emission factors developed for the different recyclables in the country show savings varying from ?290 kg CO{sub 2} e (glass) to ?19 111 kg CO{sub 2} e (metals – Al) per tonne of recyclable. They also show that there is variability, with energy intensive materials like metals having higher GHG savings in South Africa as compared to other countries. This underlines the interrelation of the waste management system of a country/region with other systems, in particular with energy generation, which in South Africa, is heavily reliant on coal. This study also shows that composting of garden waste is a net GHG emitter, releasing 172 and 186 kg CO{sub 2} e per tonne of wet garden waste for aerated dome composting and turned windrow composting, respectively. The paper concludes that these emission factors are facilitating GHG emissions modelling for waste management in South Africa and enabling local municipalities to identify best practice in this regard.

  18. Air emissions assessment and air quality permitting for a municipal waste landfill treating municipal sewage sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koehler, J. [Woodward-Clyde International -- Americas, Oakland, CA (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a case study into the air quality permitting of a municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill in the San Francisco Bay Area undergoing a proposed expansion in operations to increase the life of the landfill. The operations of this facility include MSW landfilling, the treatment and disposal of municipal sewage sludge, the aeration of petroleum-contaminated soils, the construction of a new on-site plant to manufacture soil amendment products from waste wood and other organic material diverted from the landfill, and the installation of a vaporator to create steam from leachate for injection into the landfill gas flare. The emissions assessment for each project component relied upon interpretation of source tests from similar operations, incorporation of on-site measurements into emissions models and mass balances, and use of AP-42 procedures for emissions sources such as wind-blown dust, material handling and transfer operations, and fugitive landfill gas. Air permitting issues included best available control technology (BACT), emission offset thresholds, new source performance standards (NSPS), potential air toxics health risk impacts, and compliance with federal Title V operating permit requirements. With the increasing difficulties of siting new landfills, increasing pressures to reduce the rate of waste placement into existing landfills, and expanding regulatory requirements on landfill operations, experiences similar to those described in this paper are likely to increase in the future as permitting scenarios become more complex.

  19. Mercury emissions from municipal solid waste combustors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines emissions of mercury (Hg) from municipal solid waste (MSW) combustion in the United States (US). It is projected that total annual nationwide MSW combustor emissions of mercury could decrease from about 97 tonnes (1989 baseline uncontrolled emissions) to less than about 4 tonnes in the year 2000. This represents approximately a 95 percent reduction in the amount of mercury emitted from combusted MSW compared to the 1989 mercury emissions baseline. The likelihood that routinely achievable mercury emissions removal efficiencies of about 80 percent or more can be assured; it is estimated that MSW combustors in the US could prove to be a comparatively minor source of mercury emissions after about 1995. This forecast assumes that diligent measures to control mercury emissions, such as via use of supplemental control technologies (e.g., carbon adsorption), are generally employed at that time. However, no present consensus was found that such emissions control measures can be implemented industry-wide in the US within this time frame. Although the availability of technology is apparently not a limiting factor, practical implementation of necessary control technology may be limited by administrative constraints and other considerations (e.g., planning, budgeting, regulatory compliance requirements, etc.). These projections assume that: (a) about 80 percent mercury emissions reduction control efficiency is achieved with air pollution control equipment likely to be employed by that time; (b) most cylinder-shaped mercury-zinc (CSMZ) batteries used in hospital applications can be prevented from being disposed into the MSW stream or are replaced with alternative batteries that do not contain mercury; and (c) either the amount of mercury used in fluorescent lamps is decreased to an industry-wide average of about 27 milligrams of mercury per lamp or extensive diversion from the MSW stream of fluorescent lamps that contain mercury is accomplished.

  20. International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    linking municipal solid waste treatment facilities as wellReview of Municipal Solid Waste Thermal Treatment Practices.Biological Treatment of Municipal Solid Waste. Available at

  1. Biomonitoring of the genotoxic potential of aqueous extracts of soils and bottom ash resulting from municipal solid waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mailhes, Corinne

    municipal solid waste incineration, using the comet and micronucleus tests on amphibian (Xenopus laevis ash resulting from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWIBA percolate), using amphibian larvae waste incineration bottom ash; Percolate 1. Introduction Environmental management of municipal solid

  2. Does it have to be so complicated? : municipal renewable energy projects in Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riberio, Lori A. (Lori Ann)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis examines municipal implementation of renewable energy projects in Massachusetts. It explores projects that have been planned and completed, drivers for municipal adoption of renewable energy, the implementation ...

  3. North Branch Municipal Water and Light- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Southern Minnesota Municipal Power Agency ([http://www.smmpa.com SMMPA]) is a joint-action agency which generates and sells reliable electricity at wholesale to its eighteen non-profit, municipally...

  4. Feasibility of Municipal Water Mains as Heat Sink for Residential Air-Conditioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vliet, G. C.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been proposed that municipal water mains be used as the heat sink or the heat source for air-conditioning or heating, respectively. This paper addresses the extent of thermal contamination associated with the use of municipal water...

  5. The Potential of Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Municipal Solid Waste: A Technical and Economic Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Jian; Ebrik, Mirvat; Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    e.g. waste water treatment, solid waste combustion) weretreatments. Results and Discussions Cellulosic MSW Feedstocks Municipal solid waste (

  6. The Municipal Solid Waste Landfill as a Source of Montreal Protocol-restricted Halocarbons in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Municipal Solid Waste Landfill as a Source of Montreal Protocol-restricted Halocarbons of Geophysics #12;2 #12;The Municipal Solid Waste Landfill as a Source of Montreal Protocol municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills. With several hundred MSW landfills in both the US and UK, estimating

  7. Environmental Audit of Municipal Solid Waste T. V. Ramachandra Shruthi Bachamanda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    1 Environmental Audit of Municipal Solid Waste Management T. V. Ramachandra Shruthi Bachamanda Abstract The management of municipal solid waste has become an acute problem due to enhanced economic to handle this problem in a safe and hygienic manner. In this regard, Municipal Solid Waste Management (MSWM

  8. THESIS FOR THE DEGREE OF LICENTIATE OF PHILOSOPHY Mathematical Models in Municipal Solid Waste Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patriksson, Michael

    THESIS FOR THE DEGREE OF LICENTIATE OF PHILOSOPHY Mathematical Models in Municipal Solid Waste¨oteborg University G¨oteborg, Sweden February 15, 2007 #12;Mathematical Models in Municipal Solid Waste Michael K waste planners in decisions concerning the overall management of solid waste in a municipality

  9. Advance Refundings of Municipal Bonds Columbia Business School

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadeh, Norman M.

    Advance Refundings of Municipal Bonds Andrew Ang Columbia Business School and NBER Richard C. Green of Vineer Bhansali, Trevor Harris, Tal Heppenstall, Andrew Kalotay, Kemp Lewis, Paul Luhmann, Matt of colleagues, especially Jennifer Carpenter, Dan Li, Norman Sch¨urhoff, and Chester Spatt, along with seminar

  10. Broadband municipal optical networks in Greece: A suitable business model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouras, Christos

    Broadband municipal optical networks in Greece: A suitable business model Christos Bouras a, Greece b Research Academic Computer Technology Institute, N. Kazanzaki, University of Patras Campus, GR-26500 Rio, Greece c Department of Informatics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, PO Box 114, GR

  11. Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This appendix contains background information, technical descriptions, economic data, mass and energy balances, and information on environmental releases for the refuse derived fuels (RDF) option in municipal solid waste management alternatives. Demonstration programs at St. Louis, Missouri; Franklin, Ohio; and Delaware are discussed. Information on pellet production and cofiring with coal is also presented.

  12. The Effect of Municipal Initiatives on State Climate Change Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fenton, Barbara Parsons

    2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Faced with near-unanimous scientific consensus that climate change is being accelerated by human activity and no decisive federal policy on the issue, U.S. states and municipalities are taking the initiative to mitigate the problem despite the lack...

  13. Aluminum Waste Reaction Indicators in a Municipal Solid Waste Landfill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluminum Waste Reaction Indicators in a Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Timothy D. Stark, F.ASCE1 landfills may contain aluminum from residential and commercial solid waste, industrial waste, and aluminum American Society of Civil Engineers. CE Database subject headings: Solid wastes; Leaching; Aluminum

  14. Heavy metals in composted municipal solid wastes for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

    Heavy metals in composted municipal solid wastes for amendment of agricultural soils/ Métaux lourds dans le compost de déchets municipaux pour application agricole Valérie Duchesneau, #4634809 EVS4904 métaux lourds des compostes de déchets municipaux? http://www.ecometiers.com/fiche/images/43.jpg La

  15. Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This appendix contains the numerically indexed bibliography for the complete group of reports on municipal solid waste management alternatives. The list references information on the following topics: mass burn technologies, RDF technologies, fluidized bed combustion, pyrolysis and gasification of MSW, materials recovery- recycling technologies, sanitary landfills, composting and anaerobic digestion of MSW.

  16. Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This appendix contains the alphabetically indexed bibliography for the complete group of reports on municipal waste management alternatives. The references are listed for each of the following topics: mass burn technologies, RDF technologies, fluidized-bed combustion, pyrolysis and gasification of MSW, materials recovery- recycling technologies, sanitary landfills, composting, and anaerobic digestion of MSW.

  17. Configurable Process Models: Experiences from a Municipality Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Aalst, Wil

    Configurable Process Models: Experiences from a Municipality Case Study Florian Gottschalk1 , Teun.larosa@qut.edu.au Abstract. Configurable process models integrate different variants of a business process into a single model. Through configuration users of such models can then combine the variants to derive a process

  18. Taiwan`s experience with municipal waste recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, C.H. [Da-Yeh Univ., Chang-Hwa (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, each person on the average produces 1.15 kg of the municipal waste per day and a total of 9 million metric tons were generated annually in Taiwan. The disposal of such a huge amount of waste presents tremendous challenge for the island due to the scarcity of landfills and incineration facilities available locally. EPA of Taiwan, R.O.C. thus takes an active role in promoting waste recycling to reduce the garbage produced in municipalities. In order to efficiently utilize the government`s human and financial resources used in recycling, started from January 31, 1989, EPA has mandated the producer responsibility recycling program for several designated post-consumer products such as PET, PVC bottles, scrap tires, scrap motor vehicles, etc. Producer responsibility recycling program specifies that the manufacturers, importers and sellers of these designated products have the responsibility to retrieve their products and recycle them properly. Several negative effects have been encountered while the implementation of this producer responsibility recycling program in Taiwan which resulted in a modification of this recycling program recently. This paper presents the encountered experiences on the implementation of municipal waste recycling program in Taiwan.

  19. Blazing the energy trail: The Municipal Energy Management Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Urban Consortium Energy Task Force pioneers energy and environmental solutions for US cities and counties. When local officials participate in the task force, they open the door to many resources for their communities. The US is entering a period of renewed interest in energy management. Improvements in municipal energy management allow communities to free up energy operating funds to meet other needs. These improvements can even keep energy dollars in the community through the purchase of services and products used to save energy. With this idea in mind, the US Department of Energy Municipal Energy Management Program has funded more than 250 projects that demonstrate innovative energy technologies and management tools in cities and counties through the Urban Consortium Energy Task Force (UCETF). UCETF helps the US Department of Energy foster municipal energy management through networks with cities and urbanized counties and through links with three national associations of local governments. UCETF provides funding for projects that demonstrate innovative and realistic technologies, strategies, and methods that help urban America become more energy efficient and environmentally responsible. The task force provides technical support to local jurisdictions selected for projects. UCETF also shares information about successful energy management projects with cities and counties throughout the country via technical reports and project papers. The descriptions included here capsulize a sample of UCETF`s demonstration projects around the country.

  20. The Oklahoma Municipal Clerks and Treasurers Institute is an advanced educational program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    The Oklahoma Municipal Clerks and Treasurers Institute is an advanced educational program designed 21 2014 InsTITuTe Oklahoma Municipal Clerks & Treasurers OklahOMa sTaTe unIversITyWes WaTkIns CenTer sTIllWaTer, OklahOMa enrOll TOday 1-866-678-3933 | cepd.okstate.edu The Oklahoma Municipal Clerks

  1. EPA RE-Powering America's Lands: Kansas City Municipal Farm Site...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    EPA RE-Powering America's Lands: Kansas City Municipal Farm Site -- Biomass Power Analysis Re-direct Destination: Through the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, the economic...

  2. American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities)- Commercial Efficiency Smart Program (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Efficiency Smart™ provides energy efficiency incentives and technical assistance to the American Municipal Power, Inc (AMP) network of public power communities. The Efficiency Smart service...

  3. American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities)- Residential Efficiency Smart Program (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Efficiency Smart ™ provides energy efficiency incentives to the American Municipal Power, Inc (AMP) network of public power communities. Efficiency Smart assists residential, commercial , and...

  4. February 19, 2013 Webinar: Exploring How Municipal Utilities Fund Solar Energy Projects

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This webinar was held February 19, 2013, and provided information on Concord Light, the municipal electric utility serving Concord, Massachusetts, and their solar photovoltaic (PV) rebate program....

  5. Community Renewable Energy Success Stories Webinar: Exploring How Municipal Utilities Fund Solar Energy Projects (text version)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Below is the text version of the webinar titled "Exploring How Municipal Utilities Fund Solar Energy Projects," originally presented on February 19, 2013.

  6. Standards for Municipal Small Wind Regulations and Small Wind Model Wind Ordinance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In July 2008, New Hampshire enacted legislation designed to prevent municipalities from adopting ordinances or regulations that place unreasonable limits or hinder the performance of wind energy...

  7. Text-Alternative Version: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool Webcast

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text-alternative version of the "Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool" webcast, held April 3, 2012.

  8. Municipal Consortium LED Street Lighting Workshop Presentations and Materials—Los Angeles, CA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Workshop held in Los Angeles April 19–20, 2012.

  9. Municipal Consortium LED Street Lighting Workshop Presentations and Materials—Dallas, TX

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Workshop held in Dallas March 15–16, 2012.

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - akwapim south municipality Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Joint Implementation project in Poland") 12;Promotion... municipal coal-fired district heating plants to combined heat and power with utilisation ... Source: Louisiana Forest...

  11. Text-Alternative Version: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text-alternative version of the Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff webcast, held May 6, 2010.

  12. Municipal Consortium LED Street Lighting Workshop Presentations and Materials—Boston, MA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Workshop held in Boston August 2–3, 2012.

  13. An Economic Assessment of Market-Based Approaches to Regulating the Municipal Solid Waste Stream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menell, Peter S.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rates for Municipal Solid Waste: Implementation Experience,RCRA) and the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984,by the EPA, states, and solid waste organizations throughout

  14. Cape Light Compact- Commercial, Industrial and Municipal Buildings Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Through a multi-member partnership, Cape Light Compact (CLC) and Masssave offer a variety of financial incentives for commercial, industrial, and municipal facilities. Custom rebate options are...

  15. Comprehensive Municipal Solid Waste Management, Resource Recovery, and Conservation Act (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act encourages the establishment of regional waste management facilities and the cooperation of local waste management entities in order to streamline the management of municipal solid waste...

  16. Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Composting of municipal solid waste (MSW) is experiencing a dramatic resurgence in the US. Several factors are driving this interest in composting including landfill closures, resistance to siting of new landfills and combustion facilities, public support for recycling, and, in general, the overall costs of waste disposal. Starting with only one demonstration project operating in 1980, the total number of projects in the US has increased to sixteen by July 1991. There are approximately 100 projects in some form of planning or development. One reason some communities are sekniing composting as a waste management option is that sewage sludge and MSW can be co-composted thereby recycling a major portion of the overall municipal waste stream. In 1991, five of the operating facilities have incorporated sludge, with a number of new plants also developing systems with this capability. Generic composting technologies are described followed by a comprehensive discussion of operating facilities. Information is presented on the type of processing system, capital and operating costs, and the status of compost markets. A discussion is also included on the operational problems and challenges faced by composting facility developers and operators. Also presented are facility energy usage and a discussion of the energy implications from the use of compost as a soil and fertilizer replacement. A discussion of cost sensitivity shows how facility costs are impacted by waste handling procedures, regulations, reject disposal, and finance charges. The status of, and potential for, integrating composting into the overall waste management strategy is also discussed, including composting's contribution to municipal recycling goals, and the status of public acceptance of the technology. Finally information and research needs are summarized.

  17. Comparison of slope stability in two Brazilian municipal landfills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gharabaghi, B. [School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1 (Canada)], E-mail: bgharaba@uoguelph.ca; Singh, M.K. [Department of Civil and Geological Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, S7N 5A9 (Canada); Inkratas, C. [School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1 (Canada)], E-mail: cinkrata@uoguelph.ca; Fleming, I.R. [Department of Civil and Geological Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, S7N 5A9 (Canada)], E-mail: ian.fleming@usask.ca; McBean, E. [School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1 (Canada)], E-mail: emcbean@uoguelph.ca

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The implementation of landfill gas to energy (LFGTE) projects has greatly assisted in reducing the greenhouse gases and air pollutants, leading to an improved local air quality and reduced health risks. The majority of cities in developing countries still dispose of their municipal waste in uncontrolled 'open dumps.' Municipal solid waste landfill construction practices and operating procedures in these countries pose a challenge to implementation of LFGTE projects because of concern about damage to the gas collection infrastructure (horizontal headers and vertical wells) caused by minor, relatively shallow slumps and slides within the waste mass. While major slope failures can and have occurred, such failures in most cases have been shown to involve contributory factors or triggers such as high pore pressures, weak foundation soil or failure along weak geosynthetic interfaces. Many researchers who have studied waste mechanics propose that the shear strength of municipal waste is sufficient such that major deep-seated catastrophic failures under most circumstances require such contributory factors. Obviously, evaluation of such potential major failures requires expert analysis by geotechnical specialists with detailed site-specific information regarding foundation soils, interface shearing resistances and pore pressures both within the waste and in clayey barrier layers or foundation soils. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the potential use of very simple stability analyses which can be used to study the potential for slumps and slides within the waste mass and which may represent a significant constraint on construction and development of the landfill, on reclamation and closure and on the feasibility of a LFGTE project. The stability analyses rely on site-specific but simple estimates of the unit weight of waste and the pore pressure conditions and use 'generic' published shear strength envelopes for municipal waste. Application of the slope stability analysis method is presented in a case study of two Brazilian landfill sites; the Cruz das Almas Landfill in Maceio and the Muribeca Landfill in Recife. The Muribeca site has never recorded a slope failure and is much larger and better-maintained when compared to the Maceio site at which numerous minor slumps and slides have been observed. Conventional limit-equilibrium analysis was used to calculate factors of safety for stability of the landfill side slopes. Results indicate that the Muribeca site is more stable with computed factors of safety values in the range 1.6-2.4 compared with computed values ranging from 0.9 to 1.4 for the Maceio site at which slope failures have been known to occur. The results suggest that this approach may be useful as a screening-level tool when considering the feasibility of implementing LFGTE projects.

  18. Heavy metal characterization of municipal solid waste compost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worsham, Michael Craig

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -Chair of Committee) Emile A. Schweikert (Member) James T. P Y o (Head of Depar ment) May 1992 ABSTRA. CT Heavy Metal Characterization Of Municipal Solid Waste Compost (May 1992) Michael Craig Worsham, B. S. , S. U. N. Y. at Stony Brook Co-Chairs of Advisory... Committee: Dr. Bill Batchelor Dr. Kirk W. Brown Waste incineration and composting create solid residues which are later applied to or buried under soils. Although incinerator ash has been studied extensively for heavy metal content, much less is known...

  19. Municipal Aggregation and Retail Competition in the Ohio Energy Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Littlechild, Stephen C

    communities Actual number of aggregating communities Ratio Actual to Proportionate Average low income electricity bill 2002 First Energy CEI 0.7 31 104 3.35 $77 OE 1.1 49 65 1.33 $67 TE 0.3 13 14 1.08 CGE/Duke 0.7 31 8 0.26 $52... should be drawn? Is municipal aggregation an efficient competitive mechanism, more 4 NOPEC July 2004, cited in Colton (2006) pp. 6,7. 5 NOPEC Year-end Report 2005. 6 Ohio Regulatory Update, Strategic Energy at http...

  20. Municipal Energy Agency of NE | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu anMicrogreenMoon LakeMountainMunicipal Energy Agency of NE Jump

  1. Stuart Municipal Utilities Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <Maintained By Fault Propagation And Interaction |Stuart Municipal

  2. Keosauqua Municipal Light & Pwr | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |Jilin Zhongdiantou New EnergyKenosistec SrlKenyon Municipal

  3. Municipal Energy Agency of MS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search EquivalentMunicipal

  4. Single-Issue Industrial Revenue Bond Program (Missouri)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Missouri Development Finance Board administers a Single-Issue Tax-Exempt Industrial Revenue Bond Program as well as a Taxable Industrial Revenue Bond Program. The Tax-Exempt Program finances (i...

  5. GHG emission factors developed for the collection, transport and landfilling of municipal waste in South African municipalities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedrich, Elena, E-mail: Friedriche@ukzn.ac.za [CRECHE Centre for Research in Environmental, Coastal and Hydrological Engineering, School of Engineering, Civil Engineering Programme, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Howard College Campus, Durban (South Africa); Trois, Cristina [CRECHE Centre for Research in Environmental, Coastal and Hydrological Engineering, School of Engineering, Civil Engineering Programme, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Howard College Campus, Durban (South Africa)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: ? An average GHG emission factor for the collection and transport of municipal solid waste in South Africa is calculated. ? A range of GHG emission factors for different types of landfills (including dumps) in South Africa are calculated. ? These factors are compared internationally and their implications for South Africa and developing countries are discussed . ? Areas for new research are highlighted. - Abstract: Greenhouse gas (GHG) emission factors are used with increased frequency for the accounting and reporting of GHG from waste management. However, these factors have been calculated for developed countries of the Northern Hemisphere and are lacking for developing countries. This paper shows how such factors have been developed for the collection, transport and landfilling of municipal waste in South Africa. As such it presents a model on how international results and methodology can be adapted and used to calculate country-specific GHG emission factors from waste. For the collection and transport of municipal waste in South Africa, the average diesel consumption is around 5 dm{sup 3} (litres) per tonne of wet waste and the associated GHG emissions are about 15 kg CO{sub 2} equivalents (CO{sub 2} e). Depending on the type of landfill, the GHG emissions from the landfilling of waste have been calculated to range from ?145 to 1016 kg CO{sub 2} e per tonne of wet waste, when taking into account carbon storage, and from 441 to 2532 kg CO{sub 2} e per tonne of wet waste, when carbon storage is left out. The highest emission factor per unit of wet waste is for landfill sites without landfill gas collection and these are the dominant waste disposal facilities in South Africa. However, cash strapped municipalities in Africa and the developing world will not be able to significantly upgrade these sites and reduce their GHG burdens if there is no equivalent replacement of the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) resulting from the Kyoto agreement. Other low cost avenues need to be investigated to suit local conditions, in particular landfill covers which enhance methane oxidation.

  6. Natural radiation exposure in a municipality of the Brazilian Sertao

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malanca, A. [UFRN, Natal (Brazil)] [UFRN, Natal (Brazil); Gaidolfi, L. [Settore Fisico-Ambientale, Piacenza (Italy)] [Settore Fisico-Ambientale, Piacenza (Italy)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sixty-seven thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) were distributed to the inhabitants of a Brazilian municipality located in the semi-arid inland (Sertao) of the state of Rio Grande do Norte. All the TLDs were exposed for 180 d in bedrooms or in living areas of the selected buildings and eventually returned to the authors` laboratory in italy. Radiological measurements gave a range of 32-330 nGy h{sup -1}, an arithmetic mean of 107 {+-} 47 nGy h{sup -1}, and a geometric mean of 99 nGy h{sup -1}. This last value corresponds to an annual indoor effective dose equivalent of 425 {mu}Sv. Concentrations of primordial radionuclides in some samples of building material, soil, and rock collected in the aformentioned territory were analytically determined by gamma spectrometer. The relatively high content of {sup 226}Ra (98.5 {+-} 12 Bq kg{sup -1}), {sup 232}Th (252.5 {+-} 47 Bq kg{sup -1}), and {sup 40}K (1533 {+-} 169 Bq kg{sup -1}) in bedrock is probably responsible for the elevated {lambda}-radiation environment of that municipality. 12 refs., 1 fig., 2 tab.

  7. Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This appendix provides information on fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) technology as it has been applied to municipal waste combustion (MWC). A review of the literature was conducted to determine: (1) to what extent FBC technology has been applied to MWC, in terms of number and size of units was well as technology configuration; (2) the operating history of facilities employing FBC technology; and (3) the cost of these facilities as compared to conventional MSW installations. Where available in the literature, data on operating and performance characteristics are presented. Tabular comparisons of facility operating/cost data and emissions data have been complied and are presented. The literature review shows that FBC technology shows considerable promise in terms of providing improvements over conventional technology in areas such as NOx and acid gas control, and ash leachability. In addition, the most likely configuration to be applied to the first large scale FBC dedicated to municipal solid waste (MSW) will employ circulating bed (CFB) technology. Projected capital costs for the Robbins, Illinois 1600 ton per day CFB-based waste-to-energy facility are competitive with conventional systems, in the range of $125,000 per ton per day of MSW receiving capacity.

  8. Seepage Test Loss Results The Main Canal Valley Municipal Utility District No. 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leigh, E.; Fipps, G.

    TR-326 2008 Seepage Test Loss Results The Main Canal Valley Municipal Utility District No. 2 Eric Leigh Texas AgriLife Extension Associate, Biological and Agricultural Engineering, College Station Guy... Fipps Texas AgriLife Extension Professor and Extension Agricultural Engineer, Biological and Agricultural Engineering, College Station January 21, 2004 SEEPAGE LOSS TEST RESULTS THE MAIN CANAL VALLEY MUNICIPAL UTILITY DISTRICT...

  9. STATUS OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE GENERATION IN KERALA AND THEIR CHARACTERISTICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    STATUS OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE GENERATION IN KERALA AND THEIR CHARACTERISTICS Dr. R. Ajayakumar the generation of municipal solid waste (MSW) in Kerala beyond the assimilative of capacity of our environment and management capacity of the existing waste management systems. Therefore, there is an urgent necessity

  10. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Shear strength of municipal solid waste for stability analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Shear strength of municipal solid waste for stability analyses Timothy D. Stark Æ solid waste (MSW) using the back analysis of failed waste slopes as well as field and laboratory test analyses. Keywords Municipal solid waste Á Shear strength Á Slope stability Á Landfill Introduction

  11. Geoelectrical characterization of the internal structure and biodegradation of an old Municipal Solid Waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Solid Waste Naudet V., Gourry J.-C., Girard J.-F., Deparis J. This study presents results from geoelectrical methods performed on an old French Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) landfill located in South of France sequentially filled with 50% of municipal waste and 50% of industrial waste. The site was covered by a rather

  12. MULTIPLE-SCALE DYNAMIC LEACHING OF A MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE INCINERATION ASH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 MULTIPLE-SCALE DYNAMIC LEACHING OF A MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE INCINERATION ASH Waste Management (in source such as municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration ash, requires a knowledge of the so percolating through waste evolve over time, for a given percolation scenario (infiltration rate, waste source

  13. Sepiolite as an Alternative Liner Material in Municipal Solid Waste Landfills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydilek, Ahmet

    Sepiolite as an Alternative Liner Material in Municipal Solid Waste Landfills Yucel Guney1 ; Savas in municipal solid waste landfills. However, natural clays may not always provide good contaminant sorption in solid waste landfills. DOI: 10.1061/ ASCE 1090-0241 2008 134:8 1166 CE Database subject headings

  14. IJEP 8 ( 1 ) : 51-54 Municipal Solid Waste Recycle -An Economic Proposition for a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    . In addition, treatment and disposal of huge tonnages of municipal solid waste ( MSW ) generated fromIJEP 8 ( 1 ) : 51-54 Municipal Solid Waste Recycle - An Economic Proposition for a Developing. To quote an example, for solid waste management of greater Bombay the corporation spends 9% of its annual

  15. Dechlorination ability of municipal waste incineration fly ash for polychlorinated phenols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirkva, Vladimir

    Dechlorination ability of municipal waste incineration fly ash for polychlorinated phenols Leona incineration fly ash at 200 °C under nitrogen atmosphere. Thermodynamic calculations have been carried out ash produced by municipal waste incineration (MWI) have clearly demonstrated that MWI fly ash can

  16. 2014 ENERGY AND ECONOMIC VALUE OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE (MSW), INCLUDING NON-RECYCLED PLASTICS (NRP),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    1 2014 ENERGY AND ECONOMIC VALUE OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE (MSW), INCLUDING NON-RECYCLED PLASTICS #12;2 2014 ENERGY AND ECONOMIC VALUE OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE (MSW), INCLUDING NON-RECYCLED PLASTICS-recycled plastics (NRP). The study presented in this Report is based on 2011 data, compiled in the EEC 2013 Survey

  17. The role of cemeteries in the development of municipal and national military parks: the cemetery-park connection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Carlton J

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis examines how cemeteries, both municipal and military, have developed in America based on internal and external influences and the role that they have played in the development of municipal and national military parks, respectively...

  18. The Effects of Recharge, Agricultural Pumping and Municipal Pumping on Springflow and Pumping Lifts Within the Edwards Aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    The Effects of Recharge, Agricultural Pumping and Municipal Pumping on Springflow and Pumping Lifts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 The Effects of Recharge and Pumping Over Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 The Effects of Agricultural Pumping, Municipal Pumping and Recharge on Comal Springflow

  19. International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Co-processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in theno date. “Integrated Solid Waste Management. ” Presentationincineration of Municipal Solid Waste in Cement Industry. :

  20. Business Innovation Programs Agribusiness Supply Chain Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Efficiency Metrics: Left: At the Process Heating Assessment & Scoping (PHAST) workshop in Kokomo, Indiana the line" collecting data on the Current State of a process. The Infrared Imager camera can see both visible and infrared light, overlay them in a single image, and identify an overloaded ,,hot circuit

  1. SNS Project Tax Exemption (11-01) (a) This Agreement is exempt from State of Tennessee Sales/Use tax for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    of the facility, and (3) Any property, services, building materials, machinery, equipment, supplies, repair parts, replacement materials or other items used exclusively in construction, operation, or repair of the facility; (2) Any services, materials or items furnished or supplied to or used exclusively in the operation

  2. Process modeling of hydrogen production from municipal solid waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorsness, C.B.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ASPEN PLUS commercial simulation software has been used to develop a process model for a conceptual process to convert municipal solid waste (MSW) to hydrogen. The process consists of hydrothermal treatment of the MSW in water to create a slurry suitable as feedstock for an oxygen blown Texaco gasifier. A method of reducing the complicated MSW feed material to a manageable set of components is outlined along with a framework for modeling the stoichiometric changes associated with the hydrothermal treatment process. Model results indicate that 0.672 kmol/s of hydrogen can be produced from the processing of 30 kg/s (2600 tonne/day) of raw MSW. A number of variations on the basic processing parameters are explored and indicate that there is a clear incentive to reduce the inert fraction in the processed slurry feed and that cofeeding a low value heavy oil may be economically attractive.

  3. Municipal solid waste combustion: Fuel testing and characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bushnell, D.J.; Canova, J.H.; Dadkhah-Nikoo, A.

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to screen and characterize potential biomass fuels from waste streams. This will be accomplished by determining the types of pollutants produced while burning selected municipal waste, i.e., commercial mixed waste paper residential (curbside) mixed waste paper, and refuse derived fuel. These materials will be fired alone and in combination with wood, equal parts by weight. The data from these experiments could be utilized to size pollution control equipment required to meet emission standards. This document provides detailed descriptions of the testing methods and evaluation procedures used in the combustion testing and characterization project. The fuel samples will be examined thoroughly from the raw form to the exhaust emissions produced during the combustion test of a densified sample.

  4. DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium shares technical information and experiences related to LED street and area lighting demonstrations and serves as an objective resource for evaluating new products on the market intended for those applications. Cities, power providers, and others who invest in street and area lighting are invited to join the Consortium and share their experiences. The goal is to build a repository of valuable field experience and data that will significantly accelerate the learning curve for buying and implementing high-quality, energy-efficient LED lighting. Consortium members are part of an international knowledge base and peer group, receive updates on Consortium tools and resources, receive the Consortium E-Newsletter, and help steer the work of the Consortium by participating on a committee. Learn more about the Consortium.

  5. Briquette comprising caking coal and municipal solid waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schulz, H.W.

    1980-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Briquettes of specified geometry and composition are produced to serve as feed material or ''burden'' in a moving-burden gasifier for the production of a synthesis or fuel gas from organic solid waste materials and coal, including especially, the so-called ''caking'' coals, as in the process of copending application number 675,918. The briquettes are formed from a well-blended mixture of shredded organic solid wastes, including especially, municipal solid waste (Msw) or biomass, and crushed caking coal, including coal fines. A binder material may or may not be required, depending on the coal/msw ratio and the compaction pressure employed. The briquettes may be extruded, stamped, or pressed, employing compaction pressures in excess of 1000 psi, and preferably in the range of 2000 to 10,000 psi. The briquettes may be circular, polygonal, or irregular in cross-section; they may be solid, or concentrically perforated to form a hollow cylinder or polygon; they may be formed into saddles, pillows or doughnuts. The ratio of caking coal to shredded municipal solid waste is controlled so that each part of the predominantly cellulosic organic solid waste will be blended with 0.5 to 3.0 parts of crushed coal. Suitable binder materials include dewatered sewage slude (Dss), ''black liquor'' rich in lignin derivatives, black strap molasses, waste oil, and starch. The binder concentration is preferably in the range of 2 to 6 percent. If coals high in sulfur content are to be processed, at least a stoichiometric equivalent of dolomite may be included in the briquette formulation to eliminate a major fraction of the sulfur with the slag.

  6. Optimal planning for the sustainable utilization of municipal solid waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santibañez-Aguilar, José Ezequiel [Chemical Engineering Department, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Morelia, Michoacán 58060 (Mexico); Ponce-Ortega, José María, E-mail: jmponce@umich.mx [Chemical Engineering Department, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Morelia, Michoacán 58060 (Mexico); Betzabe González-Campos, J. [Institute of Chemical and Biological Researches, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Morelia, Michoacán 58060 (Mexico); Serna-González, Medardo [Chemical Engineering Department, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Morelia, Michoacán 58060 (Mexico); El-Halwagi, Mahmoud M. [Chemical Engineering Department, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Adjunct Faculty at the Chemical and Materials Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80204, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • An optimization approach for the sustainable management of municipal solid waste is proposed. • The proposed model optimizes the entire supply chain network of a distributed system. • A case study for the sustainable waste management in the central-west part of Mexico is presented. • Results shows different interesting solutions for the case study presented. - Abstract: The increasing generation of municipal solid waste (MSW) is a major problem particularly for large urban areas with insufficient landfill capacities and inefficient waste management systems. Several options associated to the supply chain for implementing a MSW management system are available, however to determine the optimal solution several technical, economic, environmental and social aspects must be considered. Therefore, this paper proposes a mathematical programming model for the optimal planning of the supply chain associated to the MSW management system to maximize the economic benefit while accounting for technical and environmental issues. The optimization model simultaneously selects the processing technologies and their location, the distribution of wastes from cities as well as the distribution of products to markets. The problem was formulated as a multi-objective mixed-integer linear programing problem to maximize the profit of the supply chain and the amount of recycled wastes, where the results are showed through Pareto curves that tradeoff economic and environmental aspects. The proposed approach is applied to a case study for the west-central part of Mexico to consider the integration of MSW from several cities to yield useful products. The results show that an integrated utilization of MSW can provide economic, environmental and social benefits.

  7. Energy Smart- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (20 Municipalities)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Franklin Energy Services has partnered with the Michigan Public Power Agency (MPPA), which is made up of 20 municipal utilities, to offer the Energy Smart Commercial and Industrial Energy...

  8. Municipal District Heating and Cooling Co-generation System Feasibility Research 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, W.; Guan, W.; Pan, Y.; Ding, G.; Song, X.; Zhang, Y.; Li, Y.; Wei, H.; He, Y.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In summer absorption refrigerating machines provide cold water using excess heat from municipal thermoelectric power plant through district heating pipelines, which reduces peak electric load from electricity networks in summer. The paper simulates...

  9. The role of SCADA in developing a lean enterprise for municipal wastewater operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prutz, Stanley J

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Central to optimizing a wastewater system's operations is the collection of alarm and operational data from various remote locations throughout a municipality, hence the basic need for supervisory control and data acquisition ...

  10. Webcast: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This April 3, 2012 webcast presented information about the Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool developed by DOE"s Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium. Doug Elliott of Pacific Northwest...

  11. Municipal Consortium Releases Updated Model Specification for Networked Outdoor Lighting Control Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium (MSSLC) has released an update to its Model Specification for Adaptive Control and Remote Monitoring of LED Roadway...

  12. Municipal strategies for affordable housing : incenting an exacting public goods from private developers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Ari Alowan

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis studies the next generation of municipal housing policy by asking, "How can cities effectively use the private-sector to promote affordable housing development?" In response, it looks at an array of public-sector ...

  13. Solute transport under steady and transient conditions in biodegraded municipal solid waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bendz, David; Singh, Vijay P.

    , Sweden Vijay P. Singh Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge Abstract. The transport of a conservative tracer (lithium) in a large (3.5 m 3) undisturbed municipal solid waste sample has been...

  14. Economies of size in municipal water treatment technologies: Texas lower Rio Grande Valley 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Christopher Neil

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    , technological advancements have improved the economic viability of reverse-osmosis (RO) desalination of brackish-groundwater as a potable water source. Brackish-groundwater may be an alternative water source that provides municipalities an opportunity to hedge...

  15. RELATING TO LOCAL GOVERNMENT; ENACTING THE RENEWABLE ENERGY FINANCING DISTRICT ACT; AUTHORIZING MUNICIPALITIES AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    TO LOCAL GOVERNMENT; ENACTING THE RENEWABLE ENERGY FINANCING DISTRICT ACT; AUTHORIZING MUNICIPALITIES to encourage the development of distributed generation renewable energy sources and the installation. the creation and administration of renewable energy financing districts to facilitate the development

  16. Urban growth pattern and sustainable development: a comparative study of municipalities in the Seoul Metropolitan Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paek, Seunggeun

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The main purpose of this study was to obtain a better understanding of the impact of urban growth and change on sustainability based on a comparative study of municipalities comprising Gyeonggi Province within the Seoul Metropolitan Region, Korea...

  17. Taunton Municipal Lighting Plant- Residential and Non-Profit Weatherization Program (Massachusetts)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Taunton Municipal Lighting Plant (TMLP) offers the 'House N Home' Thermal Rebate Program which provides financial incentives to residential and non-Profit customers for making buildings more energy...

  18. Development of infrastructure asset management software solutions for municipalities in South Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von Holdt, Christopher James

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This Record of Study presents the development of infrastructure asset management software solutions for municipalities in South Africa. The study was performed within a multidisciplinary engineering consulting company in South Africa...

  19. DE LA RUE AU PALAIS MUNICIPAL. LA GESTION DES CONFLITS SOCIAUX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    #12;DE LA RUE AU PALAIS MUNICIPAL. LA GESTION DES CONFLITS SOCIAUX PAR LE PARTI DE LA RÉVOLUTION parti politique3 . Pour cette raison, le cas du Parti de la Révolution démocratique (PRD), au Mexique

  20. Overburden effects on waste compaction and leachate generation in municipal landfills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehevec, Adam Wade

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a model to predict the effects of overburden pressure on the formation of leachate within municipal solid waste landfills. In addition, it estimates the compaction and subsequent settlement that the waste will undergo due...

  1. Local action for the global environment : municipal government participation in a voluntary climate protection program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravin, Amelia L., 1977-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cities for Climate ProtectionTM (CCP) campaign is a voluntary environmental program for municipalities, which is increasingly being applied around the world by local governments taking action on climate change. This ...

  2. Municipal District Heating and Cooling Co-generation System Feasibility Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, W.; Guan, W.; Pan, Y.; Ding, G.; Song, X.; Zhang, Y.; Li, Y.; Wei, H.; He, Y.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In summer absorption refrigerating machines provide cold water using excess heat from municipal thermoelectric power plant through district heating pipelines, which reduces peak electric load from electricity networks in summer. The paper simulates...

  3. River Falls Municipal Utilities- Non-Profit Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Wisconsin)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    River Falls Municipal Utility (RFMU) provides matching rebates to non-profit customers who participate and receive rebates through the Focus On Energy program. Incentives are available on a range...

  4. North Branch Municipal Water and Light- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Southern Minnesota Municipal Power Agency ([http://www.smmpa.com SMMPA]) is a joint-action agency which generates and sells reliable electricity at wholesale to its eighteen non-profit,...

  5. Saint Peter Municipal Utilities- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Southern Minnesota Municipal Power Agency ([http://www.smmpa.com SMMPA]) is a joint-action agency which generates and sells reliable electricity at wholesale to its eighteen non-profit,...

  6. Constructed Wetlands and Waste Stabilization Ponds for municipal wastewater treatment in France: comparison of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    13 Constructed Wetlands and Waste Stabilization Ponds for municipal wastewater treatment in France In France, vertical flow constructed wetlands and waste stabilisation ponds are both extensive treatment Vertical Flow Constructed Wetlands, Waste Stabilization Ponds, operation and maintenance, sludge management

  7. Use of Municipal Assistance Programs to Advance the Adoption of Solar Technologies (Note: Real One)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report serves as a tool for municipalities and organizations that are exploring programs to facilitate the installation of solar energy technologies at the local level. The report discusses programs being implemented in Berkeley, San Francisco, and Madison. Program design considerations, lessons learned from program administrators, and recommendations to consider when designing a municipal assistance program are included, but no program design is prescribed. Recommendations should be customized to serve the needs of a specific market.

  8. Critical review of size-reduction and separation equipment used on municipal solid waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chin, Billy Show-Ming

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CRITICAL REVIEW OF SIZE-REDUCTION AND SEPARATION EQUIPMENT USED ON MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE A Thesis by BILLY SHOW-MING CHIN Submitted to the Graduate College of' Texas AEcM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1975 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering CRITICAL REVIEW OF SIZE-REDUCTION AND SEPARATION EQUIPMENT USED ON MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE A Thesis BILLY SHOW-MING CHIN Approved as to styie and content by: Chairman of ommzttee...

  9. Mutagenic potential of plants grown on a soil amended with mutagenic municipal sewage sludge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiedler, Daniel Alain

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MUTAGENIC POTENTIAL OF PLANTS GROWN ON A SOIL AMENDED WITH MUTAGENIC MUNICIPAL SEWAGE SLUDGE A Thesis by DANIEL ALAIN FIEDLER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1988 Major Subject: Agronomy MUTAGENIC POTENTIAL OF PLANTS GROWN ON A SOIL AMENDED WITH MUTAGENIC MUNICIPAL SEWAGE SLUDGE A Thesis by DANIEL ALAIN FIEDLER Approved as to sty1e and content by; Kirk W. Brown (Chairman...

  10. Acute and chronic toxicity of municipal landfill leachate as determined with bioassays and chemical analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrab, Gregory Ernst

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    municipal landfill leachates were determined to have mean estimated cumulative cancer risks on the same order of magnitude (10 4) as leachates from co-disposal and hazardous waste landfills. The use of a battery of acute and chronic toxicity bioassays..., chemical analysis, and an estimated cancer risk calculation resulted in data providing evidence that municipal solid waste landfill leachates are as acutely and chronically toxic as co-disposal and hazardous waste landfill leachates. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS...

  11. The importance of public relations to municipal parks and recreation departments in the State of Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hildebrandt, William Jon Edward

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE IMPORTANCE OF PUBLIC RELATIONS TO MUNICIPAL PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENTS IN THE STATE OF TEXAS A Thesis by WILLIAM JON EDWARD HILDEBRANDT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1982 Major Subjects Recreation and Resources Development THE IMPORTANCE OF PUBLIC RELATIONS TO MUNICIPAL PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENTS IN THE STATE OF TEXAS A Thesis by WILLIAM JON EDWARD...

  12. An Evaluation of the Perceived Effectiveness of the Municipal Forester Institute on its Participants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirk, Melanie Rena'

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    AN EVALUATION OF THE PERCEIVED EFFECTIVENESS OF THE MUNICIPAL FORESTER INSTITUTE ON ITS PARTICIPANTS A Dissertation by MELANIE RENA? KIRK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY December 2009 Major Subject: Agricultural Leadership, Education, and Communications AN EVALUATION OF THE PERCEIVED EFFECTIVENESS OF THE MUNICIPAL FORESTER INSTITUTE...

  13. Acute and chronic toxicity of municipal landfill leachate as determined with bioassays and chemical analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrab, Gregory Ernst

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ACUTE AND CHRONIC TOXICITY OF MUNICIPAL LANDFILL LEACHATE AS DETERMINED WITH BIOASSAYS AND CHEMICAL ANALYSIS A Thesis by GREGORY ERNST SCHRAB Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1990 Major Subject: Soil Science ACUTF AND CHRONIC TOXICITY OF MUNICIPAL LANDFILL LEACHATE AS DETERMINED WITH BIOASSAYS AND CHEMICAL ANALYSIS A Thesis by GREGORY ERNST SCHRAB Approved as to style...

  14. Field versus laboratory characterization of clay deposits for use as in situ municipal landfill liners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Sharon Elizabeth

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FIELD VERSUS LABORATORY CHARACTERIZATION OF CLAY DEPOSITS FOR USE AS IN SITU MUNICIPAL LANDFILL LINERS A Thesis by SHARON ELIZABETH WECHSLER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies Texas Aa? University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of . KASTER OF SCIENCE Nay 1990 Major Subject: Geology FIELD VERSUS LABORATORY CHARACTERIZATION OF CLAY DEPOSITS FOR USE AS IN SITU MUNICIPAL LANDFILL LINERS A Thesis by SHARON ELIZABETH WECHSLER Approved as to style...

  15. Integrating Enhanced Building Operations into Municipal Sustainability Programming: A Report from NYC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bobker, M.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 2 The GHG Inventory showed over 75% of energy use to be attributable to buildings. PlaNYC2030 sets a reduction target of 30% of 2005 consumption. However, when taking projected urban growth into account, the reduction target is actually over.... Municipalities, large and small, have become a focal area for Greenhouse Gas (GHG) reduction commitments. Guided most often by the International Council of Local Environmental Initiatives (ICLEI), numerous municipalities have conducted GHG inventories...

  16. Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The enthusiasm for and commitment to recycling of municipal solid wastes is based on several intuitive benefits: Conservation of landfill capacity; Conservation of non-renewable natural resources and energy sources; Minimization of the perceived potential environmental impacts of MSW combustion and landfilling; Minimization of disposal costs, both directly and through material resale credits. In this discussion, recycling'' refers to materials recovered from the waste stream. It excludes scrap materials that are recovered and reused during industrial manufacturing processes and prompt industrial scrap. Materials recycling is an integral part of several solid waste management options. For example, in the preparation of refuse-derived fuel (RDF), ferrous metals are typically removed from the waste stream both before and after shredding. Similarly, composting facilities, often include processes for recovering inert recyclable materials such as ferrous and nonferrous metals, glass, Plastics, and paper. While these two technologies have as their primary objectives the production of RDF and compost, respectively, the demonstrated recovery of recyclables emphasizes the inherent compatibility of recycling with these MSW management strategies. This appendix discusses several technology options with regard to separating recyclables at the source of generation, the methods available for collecting and transporting these materials to a MRF, the market requirements for post-consumer recycled materials, and the process unit operations. Mixed waste MRFs associated with mass bum plants are also presented.

  17. LCA comparison of container systems in municipal solid waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rives, Jesus, E-mail: Jesus.Rives@uab.ca [SosteniPrA (UAB-IRTA), Institute of Environmental Science and Technology (ICTA), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona - UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Rieradevall, Joan; Gabarrell, Xavier [SosteniPrA (UAB-IRTA), Institute of Environmental Science and Technology (ICTA), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona - UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Department of Chemical Engineering, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona - UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The planning and design of integrated municipal solid waste management (MSWM) systems requires accurate environmental impact evaluation of the systems and their components. This research assessed, quantified and compared the environmental impact of the first stage of the most used MSW container systems. The comparison was based on factors such as the volume of the containers, from small bins of 60-80 l to containers of 2400 l, and on the manufactured materials, steel and high-density polyethylene (HDPE). Also, some parameters such as frequency of collections, waste generation, filling percentage and waste container contents, were established to obtain comparable systems. The methodological framework of the analysis was the life cycle assessment (LCA), and the impact assessment method was based on CML 2 baseline 2000. Results indicated that, for the same volume, the collection systems that use HDPE waste containers had more of an impact than those using steel waste containers, in terms of abiotic depletion, global warming, ozone layer depletion, acidification, eutrophication, photochemical oxidation, human toxicity and terrestrial ecotoxicity. Besides, the collection systems using small HDPE bins (60 l or 80 l) had most impact while systems using big steel containers (2400 l) had less impact. Subsequent sensitivity analysis about the parameters established demonstrated that they could change the ultimate environmental impact of each waste container collection system, but that the comparative relationship between systems was similar.

  18. Utilization of municipal wastewater for cooling in thermoelectric power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Safari, Iman; Walker, Michael E.; Hsieh, Ming-Kai; Dzombak, David A.; Liu, Wenshi; Vidic, Radisav D.; Miller, David C.; Abbasian, Javad

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process simulation model has been developed using Aspen Plus(R) with the OLI (OLI System, Inc.) water chemistry model to predict water quality in the recirculating cooling loop utilizing secondary- and tertiary-treated municipal wastewater as the source of makeup water. Simulation results were compared with pilot-scale experimental data on makeup water alkalinity, loop pH, and ammonia evaporation. The effects of various parameters including makeup water quality, salt formation, NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2} evaporation mass transfer coefficients, heat load, and operating temperatures were investigated. The results indicate that, although the simulation model can capture the general trends in the loop pH, experimental data on the rates of salt precipitation in the system are needed for more accurate prediction of the loop pH. It was also found that stripping of ammonia and carbon dioxide in the cooling tower can influence the cooling loop pH significantly. The effects of the NH{sub 3} mass transfer coefficient on cooling loop pH appear to be more significant at lower values (e.g., k{sub NH3}< 4×10{sup -3} m/s) when the makeup water alkalinity is low (e.g., <90 mg/L as CaCO{sub 3}). The effect of the CO{sub 2} mass transfer coefficient was found to be significant only at lower alkalinity values (e.g., k{sub CO2}<4×10{{sup -6} m/s).

  19. Is Dilution The Solution To Pollution? Municipal Sewerage Systems In Late Nineteenth Century San Francisco And London

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Brooke Ray

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the concept of biological treatment of wastewater, whichwastewater treatment planning. Contrasting Paradigms: Biologicalbiological treatment, incorporating ecological, social, and economic benefits into municipal wastewater

  20. Agribusiness Faculty Members’ Perceptions of Importance and Inclusion of Decision Science Topics in Undergraduate Agribusiness Curricula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfskill, Lawrence Arthur

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Chair of Committee, Gary J. Wingenbach Committee Members, Timothy H. Murphy Theresa P. Murphrey James W. Mjelde Head of Department, Jack Elliot August 2011 Major Subject: Agricultural... committee, both in their committee roles and outside of that in class, the hallways, and in the office, have all done their part to mentor and guide me. To Dr. Tim Murphy, Dr. Theresa Murphrey, and Dr. Jim Mjelde: your support and direction have been...

  1. Scenarios of Global Municipal Water-Use Demand Projections over the 21st Century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Davies, Evan; Eom, Jiyong

    2013-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper establishes three future projections of global municipal water use to the end of the 21st century: A reference business-as usual (BAU) scenario, a High Technological Improvement (High Tech) scenario and a Low Technological Improvement (Low Tech) scenario. A global municipal water demand model is constructed using global water use statistics at the country-scale, calibrated to the base year of 2005, and simulated to the end of the 21st century. Since the constructed water demand model hinges on socioeconomic variables (population, income), water price, and end-use technology and efficiency improvement rates, projections of those input variables are adopted to characterize the uncertainty in future water demand estimates. The water demand model is linked to the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), a global change integrated assessment model. Under the reference scenario, the global total water withdrawal increases from 466 km3/year in 2005 to 941 km3/year in 2100,while withdrawals in the high and low tech scenarios are 321 km3/ year and 2000 km3/ year, respectively. This wide range (321-2000 km3/ year) indicates the level of uncertainty associated with such projections. The simulated global municipal demand projections are most sensitive to population and income projections, then to end-use technology and efficiency projections, and finally to water price. Thus, using water price alone as a policy measure to reduce municipal water use may substantiate the share of municipal water price of people’s annual incomes.

  2. Third-Party Finance for Commercial Photovoltaic Systems: The Rise of the PPA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark A

    2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Installations of grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems in the United States have increased dramatically in recent years, growing from less than 20 MW in 2000 to nearly 500 MW at the end of 2007, a compound average annual growth rate of 59%. Of particular note is the increasing contribution of 'non-residential' grid-connected PV systems--defined here as those systems installed on the customer (rather than utility) side of the meter at commercial, institutional, non-profit, or governmental properties--to the overall growth trend. Although there is some uncertainty in the numbers, non-residential PV capacity grew from less than half of aggregate annual capacity installations in 2000-2002 to nearly two-thirds in 2007. This relative growth trend is expected to have continued through 2008. This article, which is excerpted from a longer report, focuses specifically on just one subset of the non-residential PV market: systems hosted (and perhaps owned) by commercial, tax-paying entities. Tax-exempt entities (e.g., non-profits or municipalities) face unique issues and have different financing options at their disposal; readers interested in PV financing options for tax-exempt entities can find more information in the Bolinger report.

  3. Municipal solid waste management: A bibliography of US Department of Energy contractor report through 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. Department of Energy contractors continue to conduct research targeting the productive and responsible use of the more than 516,000 metric tons (567,000 tons) of municipal solid waste (MSW) that is generated each day in the United States. It is becoming more and more prudent to improve current methods of MSW management and to continue to search for additional cost-effective, energy-efficient means to manage our MSW resource. This bibliography provides information about technical reports on energy from municipal waste that were prepared under grants or contracts from the US DOE. The reports listed focus on energy from municipal waste technologies and energy conservation in wastewater treatment.

  4. Medium term municipal solid waste generation prediction by autoregressive integrated moving average

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Younes, Mohammad K.; Nopiah, Z. M.; Basri, Noor Ezlin A.; Basri, Hassan [Department of Civil and Structural Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Generally, solid waste handling and management are performed by municipality or local authority. In most of developing countries, local authorities suffer from serious solid waste management (SWM) problems and insufficient data and strategic planning. Thus it is important to develop robust solid waste generation forecasting model. It helps to proper manage the generated solid waste and to develop future plan based on relatively accurate figures. In Malaysia, solid waste generation rate increases rapidly due to the population growth and new consumption trends that characterize the modern life style. This paper aims to develop monthly solid waste forecasting model using Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA), such model is applicable even though there is lack of data and will help the municipality properly establish the annual service plan. The results show that ARIMA (6,1,0) model predicts monthly municipal solid waste generation with root mean square error equals to 0.0952 and the model forecast residuals are within accepted 95% confident interval.

  5. Before the tap runs dry: Municipal water users urged to conserve to help declining supplies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2 txH2O Fall 2013 Story by Kathy Wythe Photo from Crestock.com. BEFORE THE TAP RUNS DRY Municipal water users urged to conserve to help declining supplies Fall 2013 txH2O 3 The future of water in Texas consists of ?what ifs.? What...? scenarios don?t have to happen. If there is anything positive about the state?s continuing drought, it is that it has motivated legislators, state agencies and local municipalities to take action. Many agree that something has to be done. And...

  6. EPA RE-Powering America's Lands: Kansas City Municipal Farm Site -- Biomass Power Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunsberger, R.; Mosey, G.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Through the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, the economic and technical feasibility of utilizing biomass at the Kansas City, Missouri, Municipal Farm site, a group of City-owned properties, is explored. The study that none of the technologies we reviewed--biomass heat, power and CHP--are economically viable options for the Municipal Farms site. However, if the site were to be developed around a future central biomass heating or CHP facility, biomass could be a good option for the site.

  7. Development of a purpose built landfill system for the control of methane emissions from municipal solid waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    solid waste Sudhakar Yedla*, Jyoti K. Parikh Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Vaidya (PBLF) has been proposed for the control of methane emissions from municipal solid waste (MSW Generation of municipal solid waste (MSW) increases with socio-economic development. In developing coun

  8. Generation!and!Disposition!of!Municipal!Solid!Waste! (MSW)!in!the!United!States!A!National!Survey!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ! 1! ! Generation!and!Disposition!of!Municipal!Solid!Waste! (MSW of solid wastes and advance sustainable waste management in the U.S. to the level of several leading-2010, the Earth Engineering Center (EEC) of Columbia University conducted a bi- annual survey on Municipal Solid

  9. Generation!and!Disposition!of!Municipal!Solid!Waste! (MSW)!in!the!United!States!A!National!Survey!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    ! 1! ! Generation!and!Disposition!of!Municipal!Solid!Waste! (MSW on Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) Generation and Disposition in the U.S., in collaboration with Ms. Nora Goldstein of solid wastes and advance sustainable waste management in the U.S. to the level of several leading

  10. Lead Isotopic Composition of Fly Ash and Flue Gas Residues from Municipal Solid Waste Combustors in France: Implications for Atmospheric Lead Source Tracing.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Lead Isotopic Composition of Fly Ash and Flue Gas Residues from Municipal Solid Waste Combustors@crpg.cnrs-nancy.fr _______________________________________________________________________________________ Fly ash and flue gas residues from eight municipal solid waste combusters (MSWC) in France (1992 of "industrial Pb" is not an easy task because of its possible extreme heterogeneity. Municipal solid waste

  11. A Review of Today's Anaerobic Diges6on Technology of Organic Municipal Solid Waste and Its Implementa6on in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglesia, Enrique

    . Organic Municipal Solid Waste Management · 19.74 million tons of organic waste or 4,935 kWh can be produced from organic municipal solid waste per yearA Review of Today's Anaerobic Diges6on Technology of Organic Municipal Solid

  12. Municipal solid waste management: A bibliography of US Department of Energy contractor reports through 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shepherd, P.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    US Department of Energy contractors continue to conduct research targeting the productive and responsible use of the more than 536,000 tons of municipal solid waste (MSW) that is generated each day in the United States. It is becoming more and more prudent to improve current methods of MSW management and to continue to search for additional cost-effective, energy-efficient means to manage our MSW resource. This bibliography is an updated version of Municipal Waste to Energy: An Annotated Bibliography of US Department of Energy Contractor Reports, by Caroline Brooks, published in 1987. Like its predecessor, this bibliography provides information about technical reports on energy from municipal waste that were prepared under grants or contracts from the US Department of Energy. The reports listed focus on energy from municipal waste technologies and energy conservation in wastewater treatment. The bibliography contains three indexes -- an author index, a subject index, and a title index. The reports are listed alphabetically in the subject areas and may appear under more than one subject. All of the reports cited in the original MSW bibliography are also included in this update. The number of copies of each report originally published varied according to anticipated public demand. However, all reports are available in either microfiche or hard copy form and may be ordered from the National Technical Information Service (NTIS), US Department of Commerce, Springfield, VA 22161. Explicit information on ordering reports is included in Appendix A.

  13. Demonstration of Alternative Fuel, Light and Heavy Duty Vehicles in State and Municipal Vehicle Fleets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, John H.; Polubiatko, Peter; Tucchio, Michael A.

    2002-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This project involved the purchase of two Compressed Natural Gas School Buses and two electric Ford Rangers to demonstrate their viability in a municipal setting. Operational and maintenance data were collected for analysis. In addition, an educational component was undertaken with middle school children. The children observed and calculated how electric vehicles could minimize pollutants through comparison to conventionally powered vehicles.

  14. Three-dimensional deformation and strain induced by municipal pumping, part 1: Analysis of field data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tingley, Joseph V.

    a Department of Geosciences Virginia Tech 4044 Derring Hall Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA b Olver Incorporated 1116 June 2005 Abstract A 62-day controlled aquifer test was performed at the site of a new municipal well from the pumped well and a nearby observation well. The purpose of the investigation was to quantify

  15. An overview of renewable energy utilization from municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration in Taiwan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    An overview of renewable energy utilization from municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration in Taiwan by imported fuels. In this regard, renewable energy like waste-to-energy is become attractive. The objective to promote the use of MSW-to-energy. q 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Waste-to-energy

  16. Toward a Low-CarMunicipal Financing for Energy Efficiency and Solar Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Toward a Low-CarMunicipal Financing for Energy Efficiency and Solar Power By Merrian C. Fuller, such as improving energy efficiency and add- ing solar photovoltaics (PV) and solar thermal systems to buildings, and the aver- age cost of natural gas has risen more than 10 percent a year for residential customers

  17. ANNUAL REPORT General Permit for the Discharger of Storm Water from Small Municipal Separate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    . These activities and structural improvements are referred to as Best Management Practices (BMPs). BMPs9/14/11 1 ANNUAL REPORT General Permit for the Discharger of Storm Water from Small Municipal. Permittee (Agency Name): University of California Santa Cruz 2. Contact Person: _Courtney Trask, Storm Water

  18. ANNUAL REPORT General Permit for the Discharger of Storm Water from Small Municipal Separate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    . These activities and structural improvements are referred to as Best Management Practices (BMPs). BMPs9/14/10 1 ANNUAL REPORT General Permit for the Discharger of Storm Water from Small Municipal. Permittee (Agency Name): University of California Santa Cruz 2. Contact Person: _Courtney Trask, Storm Water

  19. ANNUAL REPORT General Permit for the Discharger of Storm Water from Small Municipal Separate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    , 2013 to June 30, 2014 (Year 5) The University of California at Santa Cruz's Storm Water Management improvements are referred to as Best Management Practices (BMPs). BMPs will be updated as appropriate1 ANNUAL REPORT General Permit for the Discharger of Storm Water from Small Municipal Separate

  20. Modeling Integrated Decisions for a Municipal Water System with Recourse and Uncertainties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    for a municipal water system to cost-effectively accommodate a distribution of water shortages. Alternative robust in action costs, life spans, water volumes gained or saved, shortage levels, and shortage probabilities make water shortages pressing or impending realities for Amman, Jordan and many other urban water

  1. Composition of Municipal Solid Waste-Need for Thermal Treatment in the present Indian context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Composition of Municipal Solid Waste- Need for Thermal Treatment in the present Indian context of an eternally inherent low heating value on the other. Current status of Solid Waste Management The MSW Rules front in India17 . None of the major metros have any projects of significant scale of Solid Waste

  2. Resource recovery potential from secondary components of segregated municipal solid wastes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Resource recovery potential from secondary components of segregated municipal solid wastes H. N solid wastes (MSW) . Fermentation wastes . Solid-state stratified bed (SSB) . BMP Introduction India is building up its city level solid waste management in an extensive manner. It has framed necessary rules

  3. INTRODUCTION Yard wastes currently represent about 15% of the total municipal solid waste collected in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    INTRODUCTION Yard wastes currently represent about 15% of the total municipal solid waste collected: Collect representative and typical yard trash samples throughout Florida; Characterize the wastes these wastes. WORK ACCOMPLISHED Visited two compost and mulch processing facilities in Gainesville on 10

  4. Sudhakar Yedla* and Sarika Kansal Economic insight into municipal solid waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Sudhakar Yedla* and Sarika Kansal Economic insight into municipal solid waste management in Mumbai: a critical analysis 511 " Economic insight into solid waste management Conventional MSW management fails metropolitan city in India, presents the most critical solid waste management system in India. The present

  5. Municipal Solid Waste as an Energy Source by Roller-Grate Incineration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karnoski, P. J.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Grumman/VKW (Duesseldorf) Roller-Grate System was developed specifically to mass-burn municipal solid wastes achieving efficient combustion by a rolling and mixing action of the fuel bed, and independent control of primary air and roller speed...

  6. A range of soil amendments including diammonium phosphate fertilizer (DAP), municipal biosolids (BS), biosolids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    biosolids (BS), biosolids compost, and Al- and Fe-based water treatment residuals were tested on Pb-, Zn for the first season, with the highest growth in the treatments that included compost and biosolids). Application of municipal biosolids in combination with a lime source has also been shown to reduce th

  7. Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 11, Alphabetically indexed bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This appendix contains the alphabetically indexed bibliography for the complete group of reports on municipal waste management alternatives. The references are listed for each of the following topics: mass burn technologies, RDF technologies, fluidized-bed combustion, pyrolysis and gasification of MSW, materials recovery- recycling technologies, sanitary landfills, composting, and anaerobic digestion of MSW.

  8. Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 12, Numerically indexed bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This appendix contains the numerically indexed bibliography for the complete group of reports on municipal solid waste management alternatives. The list references information on the following topics: mass burn technologies, RDF technologies, fluidized bed combustion, pyrolysis and gasification of MSW, materials recovery- recycling technologies, sanitary landfills, composting and anaerobic digestion of MSW.

  9. Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 4, Appendix B: RDF technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This appendix contains background information, technical descriptions, economic data, mass and energy balances, and information on environmental releases for the refuse derived fuels (RDF) option in municipal solid waste management alternatives. Demonstration programs at St. Louis, Missouri; Franklin, Ohio; and Delaware are discussed. Information on pellet production and cofiring with coal is also presented.

  10. Project Profile: The Sacramento Municipal Utility District Consumnes Power Plant Solar Augmentation Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD), under the Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Heat Integration for Baseload Renewable Energy Development (HIBRED) program, is demonstrating a hybrid CSP solar energy system that takes advantage of an existing electrical generator for its power block and transmission interconnection.

  11. Statistical comparison of leachate from hazardous, codisposal, and municipal solid waste landfills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbons, R.D.; Dolan, D.G.; May, H.; O'Leary, K.; O'Hara, R.

    1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been considerable debate regarding the chemical characterization of landfill leachate in general and the comparison of various types of landfill leachate (e.g., hazardous, codisposal, and municipal) in particular. For example, the preamble to the US EPA Subtitle D regulation (40 CFR Parts 257 and 258) suggests that there are no significant differences between the number and concentration of toxic constituents in hazardous versus municipal solid waste landfill leachate. The purpose of this paper is to statistically test this hypothesis in a large leachate database comprising 1490 leachate samples from 283 sample points (i.e., monitoring location such as a leachate sump) in 93 landfill waste cells (i.e., a section of a facility that took a specific waste stream or collection of similar waste streams) from 48 sites with municipal, codisposal, or hazardous waste site histories. Results of the analysis reveal clear differention between landfill leachate types, both in terms of constituents detected and their concentrations. The result of the analysis is a classification function that can estimate the probability that new leachate or ground water sample was produced by the disposal of municipal, codisposal, or hazardous waste. This type of computation is illustrated, and applications of the model to Superfund cost-allocation problems are discussed.

  12. Study of the VOC emissions from a municipal solid waste storage pilot-scale cell: Comparison with biogases from municipal waste landfill site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiriac, R., E-mail: rodica.chiriac@univ-lyon1.fr [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, CNRS, UMR 5615, Laboratoire des Multimateriaux et Interfaces, 43 boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); De Araujos Morais, J. [Universite Federal de Paraiba, Campus I Departamento de Engenharia Civil e Ambiental, Joao Pessoa, Paraiba (Brazil); Carre, J. [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, CNRS, UMR 5256, Institut de Recherche sur la Catalyse et l'Environnement, 43 boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Bayard, R. [Universite de Lyon, INSA de Lyon, Laboratoire de Genie Civil et d'Ingenierie environnementale (LGCIE), F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Chovelon, J.M. [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, CNRS, UMR 5256, Institut de Recherche sur la Catalyse et l'Environnement, 43 boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Gourdon, R. [Universite de Lyon, INSA de Lyon, Laboratoire de Genie Civil et d'Ingenierie environnementale (LGCIE), F-69622 Villeurbanne (France)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: > Follow-up of the emission of VOCs in a municipal waste pilot-scale cell during the acidogenesis and acetogenesis phases. > Study from the very start of waste storage leading to a better understanding of the decomposition/degradation of waste. > Comparison of the results obtained on the pilot-scale cell with those from 3 biogases coming from the same landfill site. > A methodology of characterization for the progression of the stabilization/maturation of waste is finally proposed. - Abstract: The emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from municipal solid waste stored in a pilot-scale cell containing 6.4 tonnes of waste (storage facility which is left open during the first period (40 days) and then closed with recirculation of leachates during a second period (100 days)) was followed by dynamic sampling on activated carbon and analysed by GC-MS after solvent extraction. This was done in order to know the VOC emissions before the installation of a methanogenesis process for the entire waste mass. The results, expressed in reference to toluene, were exploited during the whole study on all the analyzable VOCs: alcohols, ketones and esters, alkanes, benzenic and cyclic compounds, chlorinated compounds, terpene, and organic sulphides. The results of this study on the pilot-scale cell are then compared with those concerning three biogases from a municipal waste landfill: biogas (1) coming from waste cells being filled or recently closed, biogas (2) from all the waste storage cells on site, and biogas (3) which is a residual gas from old storage cells without aspiration of the gas. The analysis of the results obtained revealed: (i) a high emission of VOCs, principally alcohols, ketones and esters during the acidogenesis; (ii) a decrease in the alkane content and an increase in the terpene content were observed in the VOCs emitted during the production of methane; (iii) the production of heavier alkanes and an increase in the average number of carbon atoms per molecule of alkane with the progression of the stabilisation/maturation process were also observed. Previous studies have concentrated almost on the analysis of biogases from landfills. Our research aimed at gaining a more complete understanding of the decomposition/degradation of municipal solid waste by measuring the VOCs emitted from the very start of the landfill process i.e. during the acidogenesis and acetogenesis phases.

  13. Esthetically Designed Municipal PV System Maximizes Energy Production and Revenue Return

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In late 2008, the City of Sebastopol, CA installed a unique 42 kW grid-interactive photovoltaic (PV) system to provide electricity for pumps of the Sebastopol municipal water system. The resulting innovative Sun Dragon PV system, located in a public park, includes design elements that provide optimized electrical performance and revenue generation for the energy produced while also presenting an artistic and unique appearance to park visitors.

  14. A study of tritium in municipal solid waste leachate and gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mutch Jr, R. D. [HydroQual, Inc., 1200 MacArthur Blvd., Mahwah, NJ 07430 (United States); Manhattan College, Riverdale, NY (United States); Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Mahony, J. D. [HydroQual, Inc., 1200 MacArthur Blvd., Mahwah, NJ 07430 (United States); Manhattan College, Riverdale, NY (United States)

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It has become increasingly clear in the last few years that the vast majority of municipal solid waste landfills produce leachate that contains elevated levels of tritium. The authors recently conducted a study of landfills in New York and New Jersey and found that the mean concentration of tritium in the leachate from ten municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills was 33,800 pCi/L with a peak value of 192,000 pCi/L. A 2003 study in California reported a mean tritium concentration of 99,000 pCi/L with a peak value of 304,000 pCi/L. Studies in Pennsylvania and the UK produced similar results. The USEPA MCL for tritium is 20,000 pCi/L. Tritium is also manifesting itself as landfill gas and landfill gas condensate. Landfill gas condensate samples from landfills in the UK and California were found to have tritium concentrations as high as 54,400 and 513,000 pCi/L, respectively. The tritium found in MSW leachate is believed to derive principally from gaseous tritium lighting devices used in some emergency exit signs, compasses, watches, and even novelty items, such as 'glow stick' key chains. This study reports the findings of recent surveys of leachate from a number of municipal solid waste landfills, both open and closed, from throughout the United States and Europe. The study evaluates the human health and ecological risks posed by elevated tritium levels in municipal solid waste leachate and landfill gas and the implications to their safe management. We also assess the potential risks posed to solid waste management facility workers exposed to tritium-containing waste materials in transfer stations and other solid waste management facilities. (authors)

  15. Municipal Solid Waste as an Energy Source by Roller-Grate Incineration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karnoski, P. J.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and the potential benefits to municipalities and industry are discussed. Firm agreements covering waste and energy revenues are essential, as is the ability of the plant to constantly receive refuse and produce power for its customers. Methods of aChieJ:ing... wishes to express his appreciation to Mr. Herbert P. Otte and Mr. James A. Fife of Grumman Ecosystems Corporation and Mr. Klaus Feindler of Grumman Allied Corporation for their assistance in providing the background information and references...

  16. District heating from electric-generating plants and municipal incinerators: local planner's assessment guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pferdehirt, W.; Kron, N. Jr.

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This guide is designed to aid local government planners in the preliminary evaluation of the feasibility of district heating using heat recovered from electric generating plants and municipal incinerators. System feasibility is indicated by: (1) the existence of an adequate supply of nearby waste heat, (2) the presence of a sufficiently dense and large thermal load, and (3) a favorable cost comparison with conventional heating methods. 34 references.

  17. An Evaluation of the Perceived Effectiveness of the Municipal Forester Institute on its Participants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirk, Melanie Rena'

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    AN EVALUATION OF THE PERCEIVED EFFECTIVENESS OF THE MUNICIPAL FORESTER INSTITUTE ON ITS PARTICIPANTS A Dissertation by MELANIE RENA? KIRK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... ON ITS PARTICIPANTS A Dissertation by MELANIE RENA? KIRK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Chair of Committee...

  18. Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume 1: Availability of Feedstock and Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valkenburt, Corinne; Walton, Christie W.; Thompson, Becky L.; Gerber, Mark A.; Jones, Susanne B.; Stevens, Don J.

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report investigated the potential of using municipal solid waste (MSW) to make synthesis gas (syngas) suitable for production of liquid fuels. Issues examined include: • MSW physical and chemical properties affecting its suitability as a gasifier feedstock and for liquid fuels synthesis • expected process scale required for favorable economics • the availability of MSW in quantities sufficient to meet process scale requirements • the state-of-the-art of MSW gasification technology.

  19. Combustion of municipal solid wastes with oil shale in a circulating fluidized bed. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem addressed by our invention is that of municipal solid waste utilization. The dimensions of the problem can be visualized by the common comparison that the average individual in America creates in five years time an amount of solid waste equivalent in weight to the Statue of Liberty. The combustible portion of the more than 11 billion tons of solid waste (including municipal solid waste) produced in the United States each year, if converted into useful energy, could provide 32 quads per year of badly needed domestic energy, or more than one-third of our annual energy consumption. Conversion efficiency and many other factors make such a production level unrealistic, but it is clear that we are dealing with a very significant potential resource. This report describes research pertaining to the co-combustion of oil shale with solid municipal wastes in a circulating fluidized bed. The oil shale adds significant fuel content and also constituents that can possible produce a useful cementitious ash.

  20. Waste collection systems for recyclables: An environmental and economic assessment for the municipality of Aarhus (Denmark)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, A.W., E-mail: awl@env.dtu.d [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Merrild, H.; Moller, J.; Christensen, T.H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recycling of paper and glass from household waste is an integrated part of waste management in Denmark, however, increased recycling is a legislative target. The questions are: how much more can the recycling rate be increased through improvements of collection schemes when organisational and technical limitations are respected, and what will the environmental and economic consequences be? This was investigated in a case study of a municipal waste management system. Five scenarios with alternative collection systems for recyclables (paper, glass, metal and plastic packaging) were assessed by means of a life cycle assessment and an assessment of the municipality's costs. Kerbside collection would provide the highest recycling rate, 31% compared to 25% in the baseline scenario, but bring schemes with drop-off containers would also be a reasonable solution. Collection of recyclables at recycling centres was not recommendable because the recycling rate would decrease to 20%. In general, the results showed that enhancing recycling and avoiding incineration was recommendable because the environmental performance was improved in several impact categories. The municipal costs for collection and treatment of waste were reduced with increasing recycling, mainly because the high cost for incineration was avoided. However, solutions for mitigation of air pollution caused by increased collection and transport should be sought.

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Biofuels Distribution Infrastructure Tax Credit Biofuels Production Facility Tax Credit Fuel Cell Vehicle Tax Credit Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Tax Exemption Idle Reduction Weight...

  2. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Biofuels Production Tax Exemption Qualifying buildings, equipment, and land used in the manufacturing of alcohol fuel, biodiesel, or biodiesel feedstocks, are exempt from state and...

  3. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    after Maine's legislative session ends. Last Updated May 2014 State Incentives Biofuels Production Tax Credit Biodiesel Fuel Tax Exemption Idle Reduction Weight Exemption...

  4. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Biofuels Tax Exemption Biodiesel or other biofuels produced by an individual from feedstocks grown on the individual's property and used in the individual's own vehicle are exempt...

  5. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Biofuels Distribution Tax Exemption Fuel delivery vehicles, machinery, equipment, and related services that are used for the retail sale or distribution of blends of 20% biodiesel...

  6. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Tax Exemption for Public Transportation Alternative fuel purchased by a public transportation corporation to fuel a vehicle used for public transportation is exempt from the state...

  7. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Ethanol Production Equipment Tax Exemption A county, city, or town may exempt, partially exempt, or set a lower tax rate for qualified equipment used by farmers or farm...

  8. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Tribal Government Savings Category: Fuel Cells, Photovoltaics, Solar Water Heat Alternative Energy Personal Property Tax Exemption '''''Note: The exemption may only be...

  9. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Distributor Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Air Pollution Control Facility, Tax Exemption (Michigan) An application for a pollution control...

  10. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Ethanol and Biodiesel Tax Exemption Motor fuels sold to an ethanol or biodiesel production facility and motor fuels manufactured at and sold from an ethanol or biodiesel facility...

  11. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Biodiesel Tax Exemption Biodiesel producers that produce biodiesel from waste vegetable oil feedstock are exempt from the state special fuel tax. Waste vegetable oil is used...

  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Biodiesel Feedstock Tax Exemption Waste vegetable oil, specifically cooking oil gathered from restaurants or commercial food processors, an individual uses to produce biodiesel for...

  13. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Excise Tax Exemption for Biodiesel Produced by Schools Biodiesel fuel manufactured by a public or private secondary school is exempt from the diesel fuel excise tax and the...

  14. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Biodiesel Equipment and Fuel Tax Exemption Certain property and equipment used to manufacture, produce, or extract unblended biodiesel are exempt from state sales and use taxes....

  15. Hydrogen | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for clean energy technology manufacturers. March 28, 2014 Sales Tax Exemption for Hydrogen Generation Facilities In North Dakota, the sale of hydrogen used to power an internal...

  16. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Biogas Production Sales Tax Exemption Biogas production systems, including sales and storage systems, that create a transportation fuel or renewable natural gas, are exempt from...

  17. International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    no date. “Integrated Solid Waste Management. ” Presentationincineration of Municipal Solid Waste in Cement Industry. :Conference on Sustainable Solid Waste Management, Chennai,

  18. International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies (IPTS). 1999. “The Incineration of Waste in Europe:Seemann, A. 2007. “Co-incineration of Municipal Solid Wastefacilities Composting Incineration Uncontrolled landfill

  19. Alternative approaches for better municipal solid waste management in Mumbai, India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rathi, Sarika [International Research Institute for Climate Prediction, Earth Institute, Columbia University, 61 Rt. 9W, Monell, Palisades, NY 10964 (United States)]. E-mail: sarika@iri.columbia.edu

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste is an unavoidable by product of human activities. Economic development, urbanization and improving living standards in cities, have led to an increase in the quantity and complexity of generated waste. Rapid growth of population and industrialization degrades the urban environment and places serious stress on natural resources, which undermines equitable and sustainable development. Inefficient management and disposal of solid waste is an obvious cause of degradation of the environment in most cities of the developing world. Municipal corporations of the developing countries are not able to handle increasing quantities of waste, which results in uncollected waste on roads and in other public places. There is a need to work towards a sustainable waste management system, which requires environmental, institutional, financial, economic and social sustainability. This study explores alternative approaches to municipal solid waste (MSW) management and estimates the cost of waste management in Mumbai, India. Two alternatives considered in the paper are community participation and public private partnership in waste management. Data for the present study are from various non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and from the private sector involved in waste management in Mumbai. Mathematical models are used to estimate the cost per ton of waste management for both of the alternatives, which are compared with the cost of waste management by Municipal Corporation of Greater Mumbai (MCGM). It is found that the cost per ton of waste management is Rs. 1518 (US$35) with community participation; Rs. 1797 (US$41) with public private partnership (PPP); and Rs. 1908 (US$44) when only MCGM handles the waste. Hence, community participation in waste management is the least cost option and there is a strong case for comprehensively involving community participation in waste management.

  20. Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 9, Appendix G: Composting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Composting of municipal solid waste (MSW) is experiencing a dramatic resurgence in the US. Several factors are driving this interest in composting including landfill closures, resistance to siting of new landfills and combustion facilities, public support for recycling, and, in general, the overall costs of waste disposal. Starting with only one demonstration project operating in 1980, the total number of projects in the US has increased to sixteen by July 1991. There are approximately 100 projects in some form of planning or development. One reason some communities are sekniing composting as a waste management option is that sewage sludge and MSW can be co-composted thereby recycling a major portion of the overall municipal waste stream. In 1991, five of the operating facilities have incorporated sludge, with a number of new plants also developing systems with this capability. Generic composting technologies are described followed by a comprehensive discussion of operating facilities. Information is presented on the type of processing system, capital and operating costs, and the status of compost markets. A discussion is also included on the operational problems and challenges faced by composting facility developers and operators. Also presented are facility energy usage and a discussion of the energy implications from the use of compost as a soil and fertilizer replacement. A discussion of cost sensitivity shows how facility costs are impacted by waste handling procedures, regulations, reject disposal, and finance charges. The status of, and potential for, integrating composting into the overall waste management strategy is also discussed, including composting`s contribution to municipal recycling goals, and the status of public acceptance of the technology. Finally information and research needs are summarized.

  1. Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 3, Appendix A: Mass burn technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This appendix on Mass Burn Technologies is the first in a series designed to identify, describe and assess the suitability of several currently or potentially available generic technologies for the management of municipal solid waste (MSW). These appendices, which cover eight core thermoconversion, bioconversion and recycling technologies, reflect public domain information gathered from many sources. Representative sources include: professional journal articles, conference proceedings, selected municipality solid waste management plans and subscription technology data bases. The information presented is intended to serve as background information that will facilitate the preparation of the technoeconomic and life cycle mass, energy and environmental analyses that are being developed for each of the technologies. Mass burn has been and continues to be the predominant technology in Europe for the management of MSW. In the United States, the majority of the existing waste-to-energy projects utilize this technology and nearly 90 percent of all currently planned facilities have selected mass burn systems. Mass burning generally refers to the direct feeding and combustion of municipal solid waste in a furnace without any significant waste preprocessing. The only materials typically removed from the waste stream prior to combustion are large bulky objects and potentially hazardous or undesirable wastes. The technology has evolved over the last 100 or so years from simple incineration to the most highly developed and commercially proven process available for both reducing the volume of MSW and for recovering energy in the forms of steam and electricity. In general, mass burn plants are considered to operate reliably with high availability.

  2. Before the tap runs dry: Municipal water users urged to conserve to help declining supplies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    water user, a#14;er agricultural irrigation and other urban uses, such as in-home and municipal use,? Cabrera said. Finch said some Texas cities still use #31;#30; percent or more of their water for landscapes, a prime target for water conservation... and you are using the right amount of water and the right kind of plants.? According to Wagner, a number of strategies, tools and management practices can signi#19;cantly reduce water usage in urban landscape irrigation. ?Using water-conserving...

  3. Energy optimization of water and wastewater management for municipal and industrial applications conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These proceedings document the presentations given at the Energy Optimization of Water and Wastewater Management for Municipal and Industrial Applications Conference, sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). The conference was organized and coordinated by Argonne National Laboratory. The conference focused on energy use and conservation in water and wastewater. The General Session also reflects DOE's commitment to the support and development of waste and wastewater systems that are environmentally acceptable. The conference proceedings are divided into two volumes. Volume 1 contains the General Session and Sessions 1 to 5. Volume 2 covers Sessions 6 to 12. Separate abstracts are prepared for each item within the scope of the Energy Data Base.

  4. Energy optimization of water and wastewater management for municipal and industrial applications conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These proceedings document the presentations given at the Energy Optimization of Water and Wastewater Management for Municipal and Industrial Applications, Conference, sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). The conference was organized and coordinated by Argonne National Laboratory. The conference focused on energy use on conservation in water and wastewater. The General Session also reflects DOE's commitment to the support and development of waste and wastewater systems that are environmentally acceptable. The conference proceedings are divided into two volumes. Volume 1 contains the General Session and Sessions 1 to 5. Volume 2 covers Sessions 6 to 12. Separate abstracts are prepared for each item within the scope of the Energy Data Base.

  5. Assessment of municipal solid waste for energy production in the western United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodman, B.J.; Texeira, R.H.

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) represents both a significant problem and an abundant resource for the production of energy. The residential, institutional, and industrial sectors of this country generate about 250 million tons of MSW each year. In this report, the authors have compiled data on the status of MSW in the 13-state western region, including economic and environmental issues. The report is designed to assist the members of the Western Regional Biomass Energy Program Ad Hoc Resource Committee in determining the potential for using MSW to produce energy in the region. 51 refs., 7 figs., 18 tabs.

  6. Water-related environmental control requirements at municipal solid waste-to-energy conversion facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, J C; Johnson, L D

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water use and waste water production, water pollution control technology requirements, and water-related limitations to their design and commercialization are identified at municipal solid waste-to-energy conversion systems. In Part I, a summary of conclusions and recommendations provides concise statements of findings relative to water management and waste water treatment of each of four municipal solid waste-to-energy conversion categories investigated. These include: mass burning, with direct production of steam for use as a supplemental energy source; mechanical processing to produce a refuse-derived fuel (RDF) for co-firing in gas, coal or oil-fired power plants; pyrolysis for production of a burnable oil or gas; and biological conversion of organic wastes to methane. Part II contains a brief description of each waste-to-energy facility visited during the subject survey showing points of water use and wastewater production. One or more facilities of each type were selected for sampling of waste waters and follow-up tests to determine requirements for water-related environmental controls. A comprehensive summary of the results are presented. (MCW)

  7. Prospects for pyrolysis technologies in managing municipal, industrial, and DOE cleanup wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reaven, S.J. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pyrolysis converts portions of municipal solid wastes, hazardous wastes, and special wastes such as tires, medical wastes, and even old landfills into solid carbon and a liquid or gaseous hydrocarbon stream. Pyrolysis heats a carbonaceous waste stream typically to 290--900 C in the absence of oxygen, and reduces the volume of waste by 90% and its weight by 75%. The solid carbon char has existing markets as an ingredient in many manufactured goods, and as an adsorbent or filter to sequester certain hazardous wastes. Pyrolytic gases may be burned as fuel by utilities, or liquefied for use as chemical feedstocks, or low-pollution motor vehicle fuels and fuel additives. This report analyzes the potential applications of pyrolysis in the Long Island region and evaluates for the four most promising pyrolytic systems their technological and commercial readiness, their applicability to regional waste management needs, and their conformity with DOE requirements for environmental restoration and waste management. This summary characterizes their engineering performance, environmental effects, costs, product applications, and markets. Because it can effectively treat those wastes that are inadequately addressed by current systems, pyrolysis can play an important complementing role in the region`s existing waste management strategy. Its role could be even more significant if the region moves away from existing commitments to incineration and MSW composting. Either way, Long Island could become the center for a pyrolysis-based recovery services industry serving global markets in municipal solid waste treatment and hazardous waste cleanup. 162 refs.

  8. Municipal solid waste management challenges in developing countries - Kenyan case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry, Rotich K. [College of Environment and Resources, Jilin University, Changchun 130026 (China); Zhao Yongsheng [College of Environment and Resources, Jilin University, Changchun 130026 (China)]. E-mail: zhaoyongsheng@jlu.edu.cn; Dong Jun [College of Environment and Resources, Jilin University, Changchun 130026 (China)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides an overview of the state of municipal solid waste management (MSWM) by local authorities in Kenya as a case study of a low-income developing country. Approaches of possible solutions that can be undertaken to improve municipal solid waste (MSW) services are discussed. Poor economic growth (1.1% in 1993) has resulted in an increase in the poverty level which presently stands at 56%. Migration from the rural areas to the urban areas has resulted in unplanned settlements in suburban areas accommodating about 60% of the urban population on only 5% urban land area. Political interference also hampers smooth running of local authorities. Vulnerability of pollution of surface and groundwater is high because local authorities rarely considered environmental impact in siting MSW disposal sites. Illegal dumping of MSW on the river banks or on the roadside poses environmental and economic threats on nearby properties. Poor servicing of MSW collection vehicles, poor state of infrastructure and the lack of adequate funding militate against optimization of MSW disposal service. The rural economy needs to be improved if rural-urban migration is to be managed. Involvement of stakeholders is important to achieve any meaningful and sustainable MSWM. The role of the informal sector through community-based organizations (CBOs), Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) and the private sector in offering solutions towards improvement of MSWM also is explored.

  9. Preozonation of primary-treated municipal wastewater for reuse in biofuel feedstock generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mondala, Andro H.; Hernandez, Rafael; French, William Todd; Estevez, L. Antonio; Meckes, Mark; Trillo, Marlene; Hall, Jacqueline

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of a laboratory scale investigation on ozone pretreatment of primary-treated municipal wastewater for potential reuse in fermentation processes for the production of biofuels and bio-based feedstock chemicals were presented. Semi-batch preozonation with 3.0% (w/w) ozone at 1 L min -1 resulted into a considerable inactivation of the indigenous heterotrophic bacteria in the wastewater with less than 0.0002% comprising the ozone-resistant fraction of the microbial population. The disinfection process was modeled using first-order inactivation kinetics with a rate constant of 4.39 Ã?Â?Ã?Â? 10 -3 s -1. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) levels were reduced by 30% in 1-h experiments. COD depletion was also modeled using a pseudo-first-order kinetics at a rate constant of 9.50 Ã?Â?Ã?Â? 10 -5 s -1. Biological oxygen demand (BOD 5) values were reduced by 60% up to 20 min of ozonation followed by a plateau and some slight increases attributed to partial oxidation of recalcitrant materials. Ozone also had no substantial effect on the concentration of ammonium and phosphate ions, which are essential for microbial growth and metabolism. Preliminary tests indicated that oleaginous microorganisms could be cultivated in the ozonated wastewater, resulting in relatively higher cell densities than in raw wastewater and comparable results with autoclave-sterilized wastewater. This process could potentially produce significant quantities of oil for biofuel production from municipal wastewater streams.

  10. Utilization of ash from municipal solid waste combustion. Final report, Phase I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, C.M.; Hartman, R.M.; Kort, D.; Rapues, N.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This ash study investigates several aspects of Municipal Waste Combustion (MWC) ash utilization to develop an alternative to the present disposal practice of landfilling in a lined monofill. Ash was investigated as a daily or final cover for municipal waste in the landfill to prevent erosion and as a road construction aggregate. Samples of eight mixtures of ash and other materials, and one sample of soil were analyzed for chemical constituents. Biological tests on these mixters were conducted, along with erosion tests and sieve analyses. A chemical analysis of each sieve size was conducted. Geotechnical properties of the most promising materials were made. Findings to this point include: all ash samples take have passed the EPA TCLP testing; chemical analysis of bottom and combined ash samples indicate less than expected variability; selected ash mixtures exhibited very low coefficients of hydraulic conductivity; all but one of the ash mixtures exhibited greater erosion resistance than the currently used landfill cover material; MWC combined analysis indicates this is a viable alternative for landfill cover; MWC ash size reactions and chemical analysis show bottom and combined ash to be a viable alternative for road construction.

  11. Energy implications of the thermal recovery of biodegradable municipal waste materials in the United Kingdom

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnley, Stephen, E-mail: s.j.burnley@open.ac.uk [Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Phillips, Rhiannon, E-mail: rhiannon.jones@environment-agency.gov.uk [Strategy Unit, Welsh Assembly Government, Ty Cambria, 29 Newport Road, Cardiff CF24 0TP (United Kingdom); Coleman, Terry, E-mail: terry.coleman@erm.com [Environmental Resources Management Ltd, Eaton House, Wallbrook Court, North Hinksey Lane, Oxford OX2 0QS (United Kingdom); Rampling, Terence, E-mail: twa.rampling@hotmail.com [7 Thurlow Close, Old Town Stevenage, Herts SG1 4SD (United Kingdom)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: > Energy balances were calculated for the thermal treatment of biodegradable wastes. > For wood and RDF, combustion in dedicated facilities was the best option. > For paper, garden and food wastes and mixed waste incineration was the best option. > For low moisture paper, gasification provided the optimum solution. - Abstract: Waste management policies and legislation in many developed countries call for a reduction in the quantity of biodegradable waste landfilled. Anaerobic digestion, combustion and gasification are options for managing biodegradable waste while generating renewable energy. However, very little research has been carried to establish the overall energy balance of the collection, preparation and energy recovery processes for different types of wastes. Without this information, it is impossible to determine the optimum method for managing a particular waste to recover renewable energy. In this study, energy balances were carried out for the thermal processing of food waste, garden waste, wood, waste paper and the non-recyclable fraction of municipal waste. For all of these wastes, combustion in dedicated facilities or incineration with the municipal waste stream was the most energy-advantageous option. However, we identified a lack of reliable information on the energy consumed in collecting individual wastes and preparing the wastes for thermal processing. There was also little reliable information on the performance and efficiency of anaerobic digestion and gasification facilities for waste.

  12. Environmental assessment of garden waste management in the Municipality of Aarhus, Denmark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boldrin, Alessio, E-mail: aleb@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Andersen, Jacob K.; Christensen, Thomas H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An environmental assessment of six scenarios for handling of garden waste in the Municipality of Aarhus (Denmark) was performed from a life cycle perspective by means of the LCA-model EASEWASTE. In the first (baseline) scenario, the current garden waste management system based on windrow composting was assessed, while in the other five scenarios alternative solutions including incineration and home composting of fractions of the garden waste were evaluated. The environmental profile (normalised to Person Equivalent, PE) of the current garden waste management in Aarhus is in the order of -6 to 8 mPE Mg{sup -1} ww for the non-toxic categories and up to 100 mPE Mg{sup -1} ww for the toxic categories. The potential impacts on non-toxic categories are much smaller than what is found for other fractions of municipal solid waste. Incineration (up to 35% of the garden waste) and home composting (up to 18% of the garden waste) seem from an environmental point of view suitable for diverting waste away from the composting facility in order to increase its capacity. In particular the incineration of woody parts of the garden waste improved the environmental profile of the garden waste management significantly.

  13. Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 5, Appendix C, Fluidized-bed combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This appendix provides information on fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) technology as it has been applied to municipal waste combustion (MWC). A review of the literature was conducted to determine: (1) to what extent FBC technology has been applied to MWC, in terms of number and size of units was well as technology configuration; (2) the operating history of facilities employing FBC technology; and (3) the cost of these facilities as compared to conventional MSW installations. Where available in the literature, data on operating and performance characteristics are presented. Tabular comparisons of facility operating/cost data and emissions data have been complied and are presented. The literature review shows that FBC technology shows considerable promise in terms of providing improvements over conventional technology in areas such as NOx and acid gas control, and ash leachability. In addition, the most likely configuration to be applied to the first large scale FBC dedicated to municipal solid waste (MSW) will employ circulating bed (CFB) technology. Projected capital costs for the Robbins, Illinois 1600 ton per day CFB-based waste-to-energy facility are competitive with conventional systems, in the range of $125,000 per ton per day of MSW receiving capacity.

  14. A historical perspective of Global Warming Potential from Municipal Solid Waste Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habib, Komal, E-mail: koh@kbm.sdu.dk [Institute of Chemical Engineering, Biotechnology and Environmental Technology, University of Southern Denmark, Niels Bohr’s Alle 1, 5230 Odense M (Denmark); Schmidt, Jannick H.; Christensen, Per [Department of Development and Planning, Aalborg University, Fibigerstraede 13, DK-9220 Aalborg OE (Denmark)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • Five scenarios are compared based on different waste management systems from 1970 to 2010. • Technology development for incineration and vehicular exhaust system throughout the time period is considered. • Compared scenarios show continuous improvement regarding environmental performance of waste management system. • Energy and material recovery from waste account for significant savings of Global Warming Potential (GWP) today. • Technology development for incineration has played key role in lowering the GWP during past five decades. - Abstract: The Municipal Solid Waste Management (MSWM) sector has developed considerably during the past century, paving the way for maximum resource (materials and energy) recovery and minimising environmental impacts such as global warming associated with it. The current study is assessing the historical development of MSWM in the municipality of Aalborg, Denmark throughout the period of 1970 to 2010, and its implications regarding Global Warming Potential (GWP{sub 100}), using the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) approach. Historical data regarding MSW composition, and different treatment technologies such as incineration, recycling and composting has been used in order to perform the analysis. The LCA results show a continuous improvement in environmental performance of MSWM from 1970 to 2010 mainly due to the changes in treatment options, improved efficiency of various treatment technologies and increasing focus on recycling, resulting in a shift from net emission of 618 kg CO{sub 2}-eq. tonne{sup ?1} to net saving of 670 kg CO{sub 2}-eq. tonne{sup ?1} of MSWM.

  15. Determinants of efficiency in the provision of municipal street-cleaning and refuse collection services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benito-Lopez, Bernardino, E-mail: benitobl@um.es [University of Murcia (Spain); Rocio Moreno-Enguix, Maria del, E-mail: mrmoreno@um.es [University of Murcia (Spain); Solana-Ibanez, Jose, E-mail: jsolana@um.es [University of Murcia (Spain)

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective waste management systems can make critical contributions to public health, environmental sustainability and economic development. The challenge affects every person and institution in society, and measures cannot be undertaken without data collection and a quantitative analysis approach. In this paper, the two-stage double bootstrap procedure of is used to estimate the efficiency determinants of Spanish local entities in the provision of public street-cleaning and refuse collection services. The purpose is to identify factors that influence efficiency. The final sample comprised 1072 municipalities. In the first stage, robust efficiency estimates are obtained with Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA). We apply the second stage, based on a truncated-regression, to estimate the effect of a group of environmental factors on DEA estimates. The results show the existence of a significant relation between efficiency and all the variables analysed (per capita income, urban population density, the comparative index of the importance of tourism and that of the whole economic activity). We have also considered the influence of a dummy categorical variable - the political sign of the governing party - on the efficient provision of the services under study. The results from the methodology proposed show that municipalities governed by progressive parties are more efficient.

  16. A multi-level biological approach to evaluate impacts of a major municipal effluent in wild St. Lawrence River yellow perch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernatchez, Louis

    . Yellow perch were sampled upstream of a major municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) and 4 km and 10A multi-level biological approach to evaluate impacts of a major municipal effluent in wild St 3P8, Canada H I G H L I G H T S · A multi-level biological approach was used to evaluate impacts

  17. Machinery sharing by agribusiness firms: methodology, application, and simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfley, Jared Lynn

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    entering into a joint machinery ownership contract are examined. Two, two-player models, a Nash equilibrium game theoretical model and an applied two-farm simulation model are used to determine impacts of machinery sharing on firms engaged in machinery...

  18. Risks to Agribusiness Investment in Sub-Saharan Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Richard

    Policy Analysis and Research Group February 12, 2010 Professor C. Leigh Anderson, PI and Lead Faculty Associate Professor Mary Kay Gugerty, Lead Faculty Ryan Gockel, Lead Research Analyst This literature review

  19. (Rev.4-07/17) TEXAS HOTEL OCCUPANCY TAX EXEMPTION CERTIFICATE NOTE: This certificate is for business only, not to be used for private purposes, under penalty of law. The hotel operator may request a govern-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    claimed: United States government or Texas government official exempt from state, city, and county taxes. Includes US govern- ment agencies and its employees traveling on official business, Texas state officials as defined in Section 61.003, Texas Education Code. Beginning October 1, 2003, non-Texas institutions

  20. Environmental, Economic, and Energy Assessment of the Ultimate Analysis and Moisture Content of Municipal Solid Waste in a Parallel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    pollution for the co-combustion of coal with MSW using five MSW composition scenarios, four of which were ABSTRACT: Use of municipal solid waste (MSW) as fuel for electricity generation reduces landfill disposal-combustion is a waste-to-energy technology that can use MSW and coal as co-fuels, offering potential energy recovery

  1. Report No. PA 14 of 2008 Compliance to rules governing municipal solid, bio-medical and plastic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    -medical and plastic waste Objective 5: Whether effective compliance to rules/laws regulating municipal solid waste, bio-medical waste and plastic waste was taking place in the state. The United Nations Conference of 2008 54 · The Recycled Plastics Manufacture and Usage Rules were notified in 1999 with an amendment

  2. Municipal Solid Waste Landfills The following Oklahoma landfills currently accept dead livestock. As each facility has different guidelines and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    Municipal Solid Waste Landfills The following Oklahoma landfills currently accept dead livestock-581-3468 Garfield City of Enid Landfill 580-249-4917 Garvin Foster Waste Disposal Landfill 405-238-2012 Jackson City-436-1403 Call ahead, may limit qty. Pottawatomie Absolute Waste Solutions 405-598-3893 Call ahead Seminole

  3. Review of composting and anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste and a methodological proposal for a mid-size city

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Review of composting and anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste and a methodological proposal-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI, USA ABSTRACT: Composting industry is a progressive and innovative industry that has been and processes on composting and anaerobic digestion are compiled, showing the versatility and multivariable

  4. Allegheny County Municipalities -Census 2000 Social and Economic Profiles -December 2002 Total Workers 16 years and over 567

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibille, Etienne

    .0% Population for whom Poverty Status is determined 1,030 Income below poverty level Income below 200% of poverty level Poverty Status in 1999 52 5.0% Workers 16 and over 567 Work in municipality of residence,506 With Social Security Income Households with Social Security Income 360 23.9% Population for whom Poverty

  5. State Clean Energy Policies Analysis: State, Utility, and Municipal Loan Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High initial costs can impede the deployment of clean energy technologies. Financing can reduce these costs. And, state, municipal, and utility-sponsored loan programs have emerged to fill the gap between clean energy technology financing needs and private sector lending. In general, public loan programs are more favorable to clean energy technologies than are those offered by traditional lending institutions; however, public loan programs address only the high up-front costs of clean energy systems, and the technology installed under these loan programs rarely supports clean energy production at levels that have a notable impact on the broader energy sector. This report discusses ways to increase the impact of these loan programs and suggests related policy design considerations.

  6. Evaluation of gasification and novel thermal processes for the treatment of municipal solid waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niessen, W.R.; Marks, C.H.; Sommerlad, R.E. [Camp Dresser and McKee, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)] [Camp Dresser and McKee, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report identifies seven developers whose gasification technologies can be used to treat the organic constituents of municipal solid waste: Energy Products of Idaho; TPS Termiska Processor AB; Proler International Corporation; Thermoselect Inc.; Battelle; Pedco Incorporated; and ThermoChem, Incorporated. Their processes recover heat directly, produce a fuel product, or produce a feedstock for chemical processes. The technologies are on the brink of commercial availability. This report evaluates, for each technology, several kinds of issues. Technical considerations were material balance, energy balance, plant thermal efficiency, and effect of feedstock contaminants. Environmental considerations were the regulatory context, and such things as composition, mass rate, and treatability of pollutants. Business issues were related to likelihood of commercialization. Finally, cost and economic issues such as capital and operating costs, and the refuse-derived fuel preparation and energy conversion costs, were considered. The final section of the report reviews and summarizes the information gathered during the study.

  7. Recovery and recycling practices in municipal solid waste management in Lagos, Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kofoworola, O.F. [Environment Division, Joint Graduate School of Energy and Environment, King Mongkuts University of Technology Thonburi, 91 Prachauthit Road, Bangmod, Tungkru, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand)], E-mail: sholafemi28@yahoo.com

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The population of Lagos, the largest city in Nigeria, increased seven times from 1950 to 1980 with a current population of over 10 million inhabitants. The majority of the city's residents are poor. The residents make a heavy demand on resources and, at the same time, generate large quantities of solid waste. Approximately 4 million tonnes of municipal solid waste (MSW) is generated annually in the city, including approximately 0.5 million of untreated industrial waste. This is approximately 1.1 kg/cap/day. Efforts by the various waste management agencies set up by the state government to keep its streets and neighborhoods clean have achieved only minimal success. This is because more than half of these wastes are left uncollected from the streets and the various locations due to the inadequacy and inefficiency of the waste management system. Whilst the benefits of proper solid waste management (SWM), such as increased revenues for municipal bodies, higher productivity rate, improved sanitation standards and better health conditions, cannot be overemphasized, it is important that there is a reduction in the quantity of recoverable materials in residential and commercial waste streams to minimize the problem of MSW disposal. This paper examines the status of recovery and recycling in current waste management practice in Lagos, Nigeria. Existing recovery and recycling patterns, recovery and recycling technologies, approaches to materials recycling, and the types of materials recovered from MSW are reviewed. Based on these, strategies for improving recovery and recycling practices in the management of MSW in Lagos, Nigeria are suggested.

  8. Emission of volatile sulfur compounds during composting of municipal solid waste (MSW)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Hongyu [Beijing Building Materials Academy of Science Research/State Key Laboratory of Solid Waste Reuse for Building Material, Beijing 100041 (China); College of Resources and Environment Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094 (China); Schuchardt, Frank [Johann Heinrich von Thuenen-Institute, Institute of Agricultural Technology and Biosystems Engineering, Bundesallee 50, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany); Li, Guoxue, E-mail: ligx@cau.edu.cn [College of Resources and Environment Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094 (China); Yang, Jinbing; Yang, Qingyuan [College of Resources and Environment Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094 (China)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: ? We compare the volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) emissions during three types of municipal solid wastes (MSWs) composting. ? The VSCs released from the kitchen waste composting was significantly higher than that from 15–80 mm fraction of MSW. ? Among the five VSCs, H{sub 2}S was the most abundant compound with 39.0–43.0% of total VSCs released. ? Addition of 20% cornstalks could significantly reduce the VSCs emissions during kitchen waste composting. - Abstract: Volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) are the main source for malodor from composting plants. In this study, the VSCs generated from composting of 15–80 mm municipal solid waste (T0), kitchen waste (T1) and kitchen waste mixed dry cornstalks (T2) were measured in 60 L reactors with forced aeration for a period of 30 days. The VSCs detected in all treatments were hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), methyl mercaptan (MM), dimethyl sulfide (DMS), carbon bisulfide (CS{sub 2}) and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS). Over 90% of the VSCs emissions occurred during the first 15 days, and reached their peak values at days 4–7. The emission profiles of five VSCs species were significantly correlated with internal materials temperature and outlet O{sub 2} concentration (p < 0.05). Total emissions of the VSCs were 216.1, 379.3 and 126.0 mg kg{sup ?1} (dry matter) for T0, T1 and T2, respectively. Among the five VSCs, H{sub 2}S was the most abundant compound with 39.0–43.0% of total VSCs released. Composting of kitchen waste from separate collection posed a negative influence on the VSC and leachate production because of its high moisture content. An addition of dry cornstalks at a mixing ratio of 4:1 (wet weight) could significantly reduce the VSCs emissions and avoid leachate. Compared to pure kitchen waste, VSCs were reduced 66.8%.

  9. Intervention strategies for energy efficient municipal buildings: Influencing energy decisions throughout buildings` lifetimes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The current energy-related decisionmaking processes that take place during the lifetimes of municipal buildings in San Francisco do not reflect our ideal picture of energy efficiency as a part of staff awareness and standard practice. Two key problems that undermine the success of energy efficiency programs are lost opportunities and incomplete actions. These problems can be caused by technology-related issues, but often the causes are institutional barriers (organizational or procedural {open_quotes}people problems{close_quotes}). Energy efficient decisions are not being made because of a lack of awareness or policy mandate, or because financial resources are not available to decisionmakers. The Bureau of Energy Conservation (BEC) is working to solve such problems in the City & County of San Francisco through the Intervention Strategies project. In the first phase of the project, using the framework of the building lifetime, we learned how energy efficiency in San Francisco municipal buildings can be influenced through delivering services to support decisionmakers; at key points in the process of funding, designing, constructing and maintaining them. The second phase of the project involved choosing and implementing five pilot projects. Through staff interviews, we learned how decisions that impact energy use are made at various levels. We compiled information about city staff and their needs, and resources available to meet those needs. We then designed actions to deliver appropriate services to staff at these key access points. BEC implemented five pilot projects corresponding to various stages in the building`s lifetime. These were: Bond Guidelines, Energy Efficient Design Practices, Commissioning, Motor Efficiency, and Facilities Condition Monitoring Program.

  10. Co-gasification of municipal solid waste and material recovery in a large-scale gasification and melting system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanigaki, Nobuhiro, E-mail: tanigaki.nobuhiro@nsc-eng.co.jp [Nippon Steel Engineering Co., Ltd. (Head Office), Osaki Center Building 1-5-1, Osaki, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 141-8604 (Japan); Manako, Kazutaka [Nippon Steel Engineering Co., Ltd., 46-59, Nakabaru, Tobata-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 804-8505 (Japan); Osada, Morihiro [Nippon Steel Engineering Co., Ltd. (Head Office), Osaki Center Building 1-5-1, Osaki, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 141-8604 (Japan)

    2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study evaluates the effects of co-gasification of MSW with MSW bottom ash. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No significant difference between MSW treatment with and without MSW bottom ash. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCDD/DFs yields are significantly low because of the high carbon conversion ratio. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Slag quality is significantly stable and slag contains few hazardous heavy metals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The final landfill amount is reduced and materials are recovered by DMS process. - Abstract: This study evaluates the effects of co-gasification of municipal solid waste with and without the municipal solid waste bottom ash using two large-scale commercial operation plants. From the viewpoint of operation data, there is no significant difference between municipal solid waste treatment with and without the bottom ash. The carbon conversion ratios are as high as 91.7% and 95.3%, respectively and this leads to significantly low PCDD/DFs yields via complete syngas combustion. The gross power generation efficiencies are 18.9% with the bottom ash and 23.0% without municipal solid waste bottom ash, respectively. The effects of the equivalence ratio are also evaluated. With the equivalence ratio increasing, carbon monoxide concentration is decreased, and carbon dioxide and the syngas temperature (top gas temperature) are increased. The carbon conversion ratio is also increased. These tendencies are seen in both modes. Co-gasification using the gasification and melting system (Direct Melting System) has a possibility to recover materials effectively. More than 90% of chlorine is distributed in fly ash. Low-boiling-point heavy metals, such as lead and zinc, are distributed in fly ash at rates of 95.2% and 92.0%, respectively. Most of high-boiling-point heavy metals, such as iron and copper, are distributed in metal. It is also clarified that slag is stable and contains few harmful heavy metals such as lead. Compared with the conventional waste management framework, 85% of the final landfill amount reduction is achieved by co-gasification of municipal solid waste with bottom ash and incombustible residues. These results indicate that the combined production of slag with co-gasification of municipal solid waste with the bottom ash constitutes an ideal approach to environmental conservation and resource recycling.

  11. Financial sustainability in municipal solid waste management – Costs and revenues in Bahir Dar, Ethiopia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lohri, Christian Riuji, E-mail: christian.lohri@eawag.ch; Camenzind, Ephraim Joseph, E-mail: ephraimcamenzind@hotmail.com; Zurbrügg, Christian, E-mail: christian.zurbruegg@eawag.ch

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • Cost-revenue analysis over 2 years revealed insufficient cost-recovery. • Expenses for motorized secondary collection increased by 82% over two years. • Low fee collection rate and reliance on only one revenue stream are problematic. • Different options for cost reduction and enhanced revenue streams are recommended. • Good public–private alliance is crucial to plan and implement improvement measures. - Abstract: Providing good solid waste management (SWM) services while also ensuring financial sustainability of the system continues to be a major challenge in cities of developing countries. Bahir Dar in northwestern Ethiopia outsourced municipal waste services to a private waste company in 2008. While this institutional change has led to substantial improvement in the cleanliness of the city, its financial sustainability remains unclear. Is the private company able to generate sufficient revenues from their activities to offset the costs and generate some profit? This paper presents a cost-revenue analysis, based on data from July 2009 to June 2011. The analysis reveals that overall costs in Bahir Dar’s SWM system increased significantly during this period, mainly due to rising costs related to waste transportation. On the other hand, there is only one major revenue stream in place: the waste collection fee from households, commercial enterprises and institutions. As the efficiency of fee collection from households is only around 50%, the total amount of revenues are not sufficient to cover the running costs. This results in a substantial yearly deficit. The results of the research therefore show that a more detailed cost structure and cost-revenue analysis of this waste management service is important with appropriate measures, either by the privates sector itself or with the support of the local authorities, in order to enhance cost efficiency and balance the cost-revenues towards cost recovery. Delays in mitigating the evident financial deficit could else endanger the public-private partnership (PPP) and lead to failure of this setup in the medium to long term, thus also endangering the now existing improved and currently reliable service. We present four options on how financial sustainability of the SWM system in Bahir Dar might be enhanced: (i) improved fee collection efficiency by linking the fees of solid waste collection to water supply; (ii) increasing the value chain by sales of organic waste recycling products; (iii) diversifying revenue streams and financing mechanisms (polluter-pays-, cross-subsidy- and business-principles); and (iv) cost reduction and improved cost-effectiveness. We argue that in a PPP setup such as in Bahir Dar, a strong alliance between the municipality and private enterprise is important so that appropriate solutions for improved financial sustainability of a SWM system can be sought and implemented.

  12. Stable isotope signatures for characterising the biological stability of landfilled municipal solid waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wimmer, Bernhard, E-mail: bernhard.wimmer@ait.ac.at [AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Health and Environment Department, Environmental Resources and Technologies, Konrad-Lorenz-Strasse 24, 3430 Tulln (Austria); Hrad, Marlies; Huber-Humer, Marion [Institute of Waste Management, Department of Water-Atmosphere-Environment, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Muthgasse 107, 1190 Vienna (Austria); Watzinger, Andrea; Wyhlidal, Stefan; Reichenauer, Thomas G. [AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Health and Environment Department, Environmental Resources and Technologies, Konrad-Lorenz-Strasse 24, 3430 Tulln (Austria)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: ? The isotopic signature of ?{sup 13}C-DIC of leachates is linked to the reactivity of MSW. ? Isotopic signatures of leachates depend on aerobic/anaerobic conditions in landfills. ? In situ aeration of landfills can be monitored by isotope analysis in leachate. ? The isotopic analysis of leachates can be used for assessing the stability of MSW. ? ?{sup 13}C-DIC of leachates helps to define the duration of landfill aftercare. - Abstract: Stable isotopic signatures of landfill leachates are influenced by processes within municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills mainly depending on the aerobic/anaerobic phase of the landfill. We investigated the isotopic signatures of ?{sup 13}C, ?{sup 2}H and ?{sup 18}O of different leachates from lab-scale experiments, lysimeter experiments and a landfill under in situ aeration. In the laboratory, columns filled with MSW of different age and reactivity were percolated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. In landfill simulation reactors, waste of a 25 year old landfill was kept under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The lysimeter facility was filled with mechanically shredded fresh waste. After starting of the methane production the waste in the lysimeter containments was aerated in situ. Leachate and gas composition were monitored continuously. In addition the seepage water of an old landfill was collected and analysed periodically before and during an in situ aeration. We found significant differences in the ?{sup 13}C-value of the dissolved inorganic carbon (?{sup 13}C-DIC) of the leachate between aerobic and anaerobic waste material. During aerobic degradation, the signature of ?{sup 13}C-DIC was mainly dependent on the isotopic composition of the organic matter in the waste, resulting in a ?{sup 13}C-DIC of ?20‰ to ?25‰. The production of methane under anaerobic conditions caused an increase in ?{sup 13}C-DIC up to values of +10‰ and higher depending on the actual reactivity of the MSW. During aeration of a landfill the aerobic degradation of the remaining organic matter caused a decrease to a ?{sup 13}C-DIC of about ?20‰. Therefore carbon isotope analysis in leachates and groundwater can be used for tracing the oxidation–reduction status of MSW landfills. Our results indicate that monitoring of stable isotopic signatures of landfill leachates over a longer time period (e.g. during in situ aeration) is a powerful and cost-effective tool for characterising the biodegradability and stability of the organic matter in landfilled municipal solid waste and can be used for monitoring the progress of in situ aeration.

  13. Combined Municipal Solid Waste and biomass system optimization for district energy applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rentizelas, Athanasios A., E-mail: arent@central.ntua.gr; Tolis, Athanasios I., E-mail: atol@central.ntua.gr; Tatsiopoulos, Ilias P., E-mail: itat@central.ntua.gr

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • Combined energy conversion of MSW and agricultural residue biomass is examined. • The model optimizes the financial yield of the investment. • Several system specifications are optimally defined by the optimization model. • The application to a case study in Greece shows positive financial yield. • The investment is mostly sensitive on the interest rate, the investment cost and the heating oil price. - Abstract: Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) disposal has been a controversial issue in many countries over the past years, due to disagreement among the various stakeholders on the waste management policies and technologies to be adopted. One of the ways of treating/disposing MSW is energy recovery, as waste is considered to contain a considerable amount of bio-waste and therefore can lead to renewable energy production. The overall efficiency can be very high in the cases of co-generation or tri-generation. In this paper a model is presented, aiming to support decision makers in issues relating to Municipal Solid Waste energy recovery. The idea of using more fuel sources, including MSW and agricultural residue biomass that may exist in a rural area, is explored. The model aims at optimizing the system specifications, such as the capacity of the base-load Waste-to-Energy facility, the capacity of the peak-load biomass boiler and the location of the facility. Furthermore, it defines the quantity of each potential fuel source that should be used annually, in order to maximize the financial yield of the investment. The results of an energy tri-generation case study application at a rural area of Greece, using mixed MSW and biomass, indicate positive financial yield of investment. In addition, a sensitivity analysis is performed on the effect of the most important parameters of the model on the optimum solution, pinpointing the parameters of interest rate, investment cost and heating oil price, as those requiring the attention of the decision makers. Finally, the sensitivity analysis is enhanced by a stochastic analysis to determine the effect of the volatility of parameters on the robustness of the model and the solution obtained.

  14. Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 6, Appendix D, Pyrolysis and gasification of MSW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Appendix summarizes information available in the open literature describing the technology and operating experierice of pyrolysis technology as applied to the management of municipal solid waste (MSW). The literature search, which emphasized the time frame of greatest activity in MSW pyrolysis (i.e., the mid-1960s to the mid-1980s), focused on the scale of application, material feedstock, technical limitations and economic considerations. Smaller scale facilities, either laboratory/research scale (< I TPD) or process development/pilot scale plants (1-20 TPD) for municipal waste and related materials (agricultural, forest residues, industrial wastes, etc.), are mentioned in the literature (275, 495). However, such data are sparse, dated, and often have limited applicability to MSW in general, and for design scale-up in particular. Therefore, greatest emphasis was placed on identifying demonstration scale (20--150 TPD) will commercial seals (> 150 TPD) studies which could be expected to provide economic, environmental, and energy data that can be scaled with possibly less risk. While the promise of pyrolysis of MSW lies in its ability to transform municipal waste into gaseous and liquid chemicals and fuel products, the major limitation is the unproven technical and economic feasibility of a large scale facility.

  15. A comparison of municipal solid waste management in Berlin and Singapore

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Dongqing, E-mail: dqzhang@ntu.edu.s [DHI-NTU Centre, Nanyang Environment and Water Research Institute, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Keat, Tan Soon [Maritime Research Centre, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Gersberg, Richard M. [Graduate School of Public Health, San Diego State University, Hardy Tower 119, 5500 Campanile, San Diego CA 92182-4162 (United States)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A comparative analysis of municipal solid waste management (MSWM) in Singapore and Berlin was carried out in order to identify its current status, and highlight the prevailing conditions of MSWM. An overview of the various aspects of MSWM in these two cities is provided, with emphasis on comparing the legal, technical, and managerial aspects of MSW. Collection systems and recycling practiced with respect to the involvement of the government and the private sector, are also presented. Over last two decades, the city of Berlin has made impressive progress with respect to its waste management. The amounts of waste have declined significantly, and at the same time the proportion that could be recovered and recycled has increased. In contrast, although Singapore's recycling rate has been increasing over the past few years, rapid economic and population growth as well as change in consumption patterns in this city-state has caused waste generation to continue to increase. Landfilling of MSW plays minor role in both cities, one due to geography (Singapore) and the other due to legislative prohibition (Berlin). Consequently, both in Singapore and Berlin, waste is increasingly being used as a valuable resource and great efforts have been made for the development of incineration technology and energy recovery, as well as climate protection.

  16. Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 10, Appendix H: Anaerobic digestion of MSW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While municipal solid waste (MSW) thermoconversion and recycling technologies have been described in Appendices A through E, this appendix addresses the role of bioconversion technologies in handling the organic fraction in MSW and sewage sludge. Much of the organic matter in MSW, consisting mainly of paper, food waste, and yard waste, has potential for conversion, along with sewage sludge, through biochemical processes to methane and carbon dioxide providing a measurable, renewable energy resource potential. The gas produced may be treated for removal of carbon dioxide and water, leaving pipeline quality gas. The process also has the potential for producing a stabilized solid product that may be suitable as a fuel for combustion or used as a compost fertilizer. Anaerobic digestion can occur naturally in an uncontrolled environment such as a landfill, or it can occur in a controlled environment such as a confined vessel. Landfill gas production is discussed in Appendix F. This appendix provides information on the anaerobic digestion process as it has been applied to produce methane from the organic fraction of MSW in enclosed, controlled reactors.

  17. Characterization of landfill gas composition at the Fresh Kills municipal solid-waste landfill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eklund, B.; Anderson, E.P.; Walker, B.L.; Burrows, D.B. [Radian International, LLC, Austin, TX (United States)] [Radian International, LLC, Austin, TX (United States)

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The most common disposal method in the US for municipal solid waste (MSW) is burial in landfills. Until recently, air emissions from these landfills were not regulated. Under the New Source Performance Standards and Emission Guidelines for MSW landfills, MSW operators are required to determine the nonmethane organic gas generation rate of their landfill through modeling and/or measurements. This paper summarizes speciated nonmethane organic compound (NMOC) measurement data collected during an intensive, short-term field program. Over 250 separate landfill gas samples were collected from emission sources at the Fresh Kills landfill in New York City and analyzed for approximately 150 different analytes. The average total NMOC value for the landfill was 438 ppmv (as hexane) versus the regulatory default value of 4,000 ppmv (as hexane). Over 70 individual volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were detected and quantified in the landfill gas samples. The typical gas composition for this landfill was determined as well as estimates of the spatial, temporal, and measurement variability in the gas composition. The data for NMOC show that the gas composition within the landfill is equivalent to the composition of the gas exiting the landfill through passive vents and through the soil cover.

  18. Wind Energy Applications for Municipal Water Services: Opportunities, Situation Analyses, and Case Studies; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flowers, L.; Miner-Nordstrom, L.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As communities grow, greater demands are placed on water supplies, wastewater services, and the electricity needed to power the growing water services infrastructure. Water is also a critical resource for thermoelectric power plants. Future population growth in the United States is therefore expected to heighten competition for water resources. Many parts of the United States with increasing water stresses also have significant wind energy resources. Wind power is the fastest-growing electric generation source in the United States and is decreasing in cost to be competitive with thermoelectric generation. Wind energy can offer communities in water-stressed areas the option of economically meeting increasing energy needs without increasing demands on valuable water resources. Wind energy can also provide targeted energy production to serve critical local water-system needs. The research presented in this report describes a systematic assessment of the potential for wind power to support water utility operation, with the objective to identify promising technical applications and water utility case study opportunities. The first section describes the current situation that municipal providers face with respect to energy and water. The second section describes the progress that wind technologies have made in recent years to become a cost-effective electricity source. The third section describes the analysis employed to assess potential for wind power in support of water service providers, as well as two case studies. The report concludes with results and recommendations.

  19. Integrated municipal solid waste treatment using a grate furnace incinerator: The Indaver case

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vandecasteele, C. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, De Croylaan 46, 3001 Leuven (Belgium)], E-mail: carlo.vandecasteele@cit.kuleuven.be; Wauters, G. [Indaver, Dijle 17a, 2800 Mechelen (Belgium); Arickx, S. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, De Croylaan 46, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Jaspers, M. [Indaver, Dijle 17a, 2800 Mechelen (Belgium); Van Gerven, T. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, De Croylaan 46, 3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated installation for treatment of municipal solid waste and comparable waste from industrial origin is described. It consists of three grate furnace lines with flue gas treatment by half-wet scrubbing followed by wet scrubbing, and an installation for wet treatment of bottom ash. It is demonstrated that this integrated installation combines high recovery of energy (40.8% net) with high materials recovery. The following fractions were obtained after wet treatment of the bottom ash: ferrous metals, non-ferrous metals, three granulate fractions with different particle sizes, and sludge. The ferrous and non-ferrous metal fractions can both be recycled as high quality raw materials; the two larger particle size particle fractions can be applied as secondary raw materials in building applications; the sand fraction can be used for applications on a landfill; and the sludge is landfilled. For all components of interest, emissions to air are below the limit values. The integrated grate furnace installation is characterised by zero wastewater discharge and high occupational safety. Moreover, with the considered installation, major pollutants, such as PCDD/PCDF, Hg and iodine-136 are to a large extent removed from the environment and concentrated in a small residual waste stream (flue gas cleaning residue), which can be landfilled after stabilisation.

  20. The impact of municipal solid waste treatment methods on greenhouse gas emissions in Lahore, Pakistan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batool, Syeda Adila [Department of Space Science, Punjab University, Lahore 54600 (Pakistan)], E-mail: aadila_batool@yahoo.com; Chuadhry, Muhammad Nawaz [College of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of the Punjab, Lahore (Pakistan)], E-mail: muhammadnawazchaudhry@yahoo.com

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The contribution of existing municipal solid waste management to emission of greenhouse gases and the alternative scenarios to reduce emissions were analyzed for Data Ganj Bukhsh Town (DGBT) in Lahore, Pakistan using the life cycle assessment methodology. DGBT has a population of 1,624,169 people living in 232,024 dwellings. Total waste generated is 500,000 tons per year with an average per capita rate of 0.84 kg per day. Alternative scenarios were developed and evaluated according to the environmental, economic, and social atmosphere of the study area. Solid waste management options considered include the collection and transportation of waste, collection of recyclables with single and mixed material bank container systems (SMBCS, MMBCS), material recovery facilities (MRF), composting, biogasification and landfilling. A life cycle inventory (LCI) of the six scenarios along with the baseline scenario was completed; this helped to quantify the CO{sub 2} equivalents, emitted and avoided, for energy consumption, production, fuel consumption, and methane (CH{sub 4}) emissions. LCI results showed that the contribution of the baseline scenario to the global warming potential as CO{sub 2} equivalents was a maximum of 838,116 tons. The sixth scenario had a maximum reduction of GHG emissions in terms of CO{sub 2} equivalents of -33,773 tons, but the most workable scenario for the current situation in the study area is scenario 5. It saves 25% in CO{sub 2} equivalents compared to the baseline scenario.

  1. COMPARISON BETWEEN FRESH AND AGED MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTES AND THEIR RECYCLING METHODS IN CHINA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Zhou; D. Chen; W. Cui

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SUMMARY: Fresh municipal solid wastes (MSW) and aged MSW including MSW from landfills and dumpsite have been characterized and compared by their components, moisture content and lower heat value (LHV) in order to recycle and dispose them properly. Firstly the characterizing experiments were performed and the results showed that generally the fresh MSW are of high moisture contents and their LHV is below 6500kJ/kg; and when 40 % of plastics were separated, their LHV is less than 5000kJ/kg. Combustibles in aged MSW were easily to be separated and their LHV is higher than 11000kJ/kg as just separated. Analysis of aged MSW of different years ’ old showed that as MSW became older the moisture and paper contents decreased. No leachate produced from aged MSW during the analysis and separation process. For both fresh MSW and aged MSW the main contributor to LHV is plastics. Secondly a simple separating system consisting of a roller screen and a winnower is used to separate plastics from fresh MSW and aged MSW, and the quality of plastics were compared by their physical parameters after made into pellets; the results showed that plastics from fresh MSW can be recycled as raw material for secondary product; while plastics separated from aged MSW are of lower quality and only suitable to be recycled as fuel material. Finally different recycling methods were suggested for fresh and aged MSWs based on their characteristics. 1.

  2. Life cycle assessment of four municipal solid waste management scenarios in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong Jinglan, E-mail: hongjing@sdu.edu.c [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Li Xiangzhi [Department of Pathology, University of Michigan, 1301 Catherine, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Zhaojie Cui [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A life cycle assessment was carried out to estimate the environmental impact of municipal solid waste. Four scenarios mostly used in China were compared to assess the influence of various technologies on environment: (1) landfill, (2) incineration, (3) composting plus landfill, and (4) composting plus incineration. In all scenarios, the technologies significantly contribute to global warming and increase the adverse impact of non-carcinogens on the environment. The technologies played only a small role in the impact of carcinogens, respiratory inorganics, terrestrial ecotoxicity, and non-renewable energy. Similarly, the influence of the technologies on the way other elements affect the environment was ignorable. Specifically, the direct emissions from the operation processes involved played an important role in most scenarios except for incineration, while potential impact generated from transport, infrastructure and energy consumption were quite small. In addition, in the global warming category, highest potential impact was observed in landfill because of the direct methane gas emissions. Electricity recovery from methane gas was the key factor for reducing the potential impact of global warming. Therefore, increasing the use of methane gas to recover electricity is highly recommended to reduce the adverse impact of landfills on the environment.

  3. An environmental assessment of recovering methane from municipal solid waste by anaerobic digestion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, P.R.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of an experimental process which produces synthetic natural gas (SNG) or biogas by anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste (MSW) is evaluated. This technology, if implemented, would be utilized in lieu of incineration or directly landfilling waste. An environmental assessment describing the principal impacts associated with operating the MSW anaerobic digestion process is presented. Variations in process configurations provide for SNG or electricity production and digester residue incineration, composting, or landfilling. Four process configuration are compared to the conventional solid waste disposal alternative of mass burn incineration and landfilling. Emissions are characterized, effluents quantified, and landfill areas predicted. The quantity of SNG and electricity recovered, and aluminum and ferrous metals recycled is predicted along with the emissions and effluents avoided by recovering energy and recycling metals. Air emissions are the primary on-site concern with the anaerobic digestion process. However, when compared to mass burn incineration, the projected particulate emissions for the anaerobic digestion process range from 2.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} to 2.6 {times} {sup 10{minus}5} pounds per ton of waste vs. 3.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} pounds per ton for mass burn. SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and PCCD emissions have a similar relationship.

  4. Evaluation of methane emissions from Palermo municipal landfill: Comparison between field measurements and models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Di Bella, Gaetano, E-mail: dibella@idra.unipa.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Ambientale e Aerospaziale, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Di Trapani, Daniele, E-mail: ditrapani@idra.unipa.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Ambientale e Aerospaziale, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Viviani, Gaspare, E-mail: gviv@idra.unipa.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Ambientale e Aerospaziale, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Methane (CH{sub 4}) diffuse emissions from Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) landfills represent one of the most important anthropogenic sources of greenhouse gas. CH{sub 4} is produced by anaerobic biodegradation of organic matter in landfilled MSW and constitutes a major component of landfill gas (LFG). Gas recovery is a suitable method to effectively control CH{sub 4} emissions from landfill sites and the quantification of CH{sub 4} emissions represents a good tool to evaluate the effectiveness of a gas recovery system in reducing LFG emissions. In particular, LFG emissions can indirectly be evaluated from mass balance equations between LFG production, recovery and oxidation in the landfill, as well as by a direct approach based on LFG emission measurements from the landfill surface. However, up to now few direct measurements of landfill CH{sub 4} diffuse emissions have been reported in the technical literature. In the present study, both modeling and direct emission measuring methodologies have been applied to the case study of Bellolampo landfill located in Palermo, Italy. The main aim of the present study was to evaluate CH{sub 4} diffuse emissions, based on direct measurements carried out with the flux accumulation chamber (static, non-stationary) method, as well as to obtain the CH{sub 4} contoured flux map of the landfill. Such emissions were compared with the estimate achieved by means of CH{sub 4} mass balance equations. The results showed that the emissions obtained by applying the flux chamber method are in good agreement with the ones derived by the application of the mass balance equation, and that the evaluated contoured flux maps represent a reliable tool to locate areas with abnormal emissions in order to optimize the gas recovery system efficiency.

  5. Atmospheric fluidized bed combustion of municipal solid waste: test program results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preuit, L C; Wilson, K B

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Air classified municipal solid waste (MSW) was fired in an atmospheric fluidized bed combustor at low excess air to simulate boiler conditions. The 7 ft/sup 2/ combustor at Combustion Power Company's energy laboratory in Menlo Park, CA, incorporates water tubes for heat extraction and recycles elutriated particles to the bed. System operation was stable while firing processed MSW for the duration of a 300-h test. Low excess air, low exhaust gas emissions, and constant bed temperature demonstrated feasibility of steam generation from fluidized bed combustion of MSW. During the 300-h test, combustion efficiency averaged 99%. Excess air was typically 44% while an average bed temperature of 1400/sup 0/F and an average superficial gas velocity of 4.6 fps were maintained. Typical exhaust emission levels were 30 ppM SO/sub 2/, 160 ppM NO/sub x/, 200 ppM CO, and 25 ppM hydrocarbons. No agglomeration of bed material or detrimental change in fluidization properties was experienced. A conceptual design study of a full scale plant to be located at Stanford University was based on process conditions from the 300-h test. The plant would produce 250,000 lb/hr steam at the maximum firing rate of 1000 tons per day (TPD) processed MSW. The average 800 TPD firing rate would utilize approximately 1200 TPD raw MSW from surrounding communities. The Stanford Solid Waste energy Program was aimed at development of a MSW-fired fluidized bed boiler and cogeneration plant to supply most of the energy needs of Stanford University.

  6. RD & D priorities for energy production and resource conservation from municipal solid waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report identifies research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) needs and priorities associated with municipal solid waste (MSW) management technologies that conserve or produce energy or resources. The changing character of MSW waste management and the public`s heightened awareness of its real and perceived benefits and costs creates opportunities for RD&D in MSW technologies. Increased recycling, for example, creates new opportunities for energy, chemicals, and materials recovery. New technologies to control and monitor emissions from MSW combustion facilities are available for further improvement or application. Furthermore, emerging waste-to-energy technologies may offer environmental, economic, and other advantages. Given these developments, DOE identified a need to assess the RD&D needs and pdodties and carefully target RD&D efforts to help solve the carbon`s waste management problem and further the National Energy Strategy. This report presents such an assessment. It identifies and Documents RD&D needs and priorities in the broad area of MSW resource . recovery, focusing on efforts to make MSW management technologies commercially viable or to improve their commercial deployment over a 5 to l0 year period. Panels of technical experts identifies 279 RD&D needs in 12 technology areas, ranking about one-fifth of these needs as priorities. A ``Peer Review Group`` identified mass-burn combustion, ``systems studies,`` landfill gas, and ash utilization and disposal as high priority areas for RD&D based on cost and the impacts of further RD&D. The results of this assessment are intended to provide guidance to DOE concerning possible future RD&D projects.

  7. Modeling and comparative assessment of municipal solid waste gasification for energy production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arafat, Hassan A., E-mail: harafat@masdar.ac.ae; Jijakli, Kenan

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • Study developed a methodology for the evaluation of gasification for MSW treatment. • Study was conducted comparatively for USA, UAE, and Thailand. • Study applies a thermodynamic model (Gibbs free energy minimization) using the Gasify software. • The energy efficiency of the process and the compatibility with different waste streams was studied. - Abstract: Gasification is the thermochemical conversion of organic feedstocks mainly into combustible syngas (CO and H{sub 2}) along with other constituents. It has been widely used to convert coal into gaseous energy carriers but only has been recently looked at as a process for producing energy from biomass. This study explores the potential of gasification for energy production and treatment of municipal solid waste (MSW). It relies on adapting the theory governing the chemistry and kinetics of the gasification process to the use of MSW as a feedstock to the process. It also relies on an equilibrium kinetics and thermodynamics solver tool (Gasify®) in the process of modeling gasification of MSW. The effect of process temperature variation on gasifying MSW was explored and the results were compared to incineration as an alternative to gasification of MSW. Also, the assessment was performed comparatively for gasification of MSW in the United Arab Emirates, USA, and Thailand, presenting a spectrum of socioeconomic settings with varying MSW compositions in order to explore the effect of MSW composition variance on the products of gasification. All in all, this study provides an insight into the potential of gasification for the treatment of MSW and as a waste to energy alternative to incineration.

  8. Quantification of greenhouse gas emissions from waste management processes for municipalities - A comparative review focusing on Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedrich, Elena, E-mail: Friedriche@ukzn.ac.za [CRECHE Centre for Research in Environmental, Coastal and Hydrological Engineering, School of Civil Engineering, Surveying and Construction, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Howard College Campus, Durban (South Africa); Trois, Cristina [CRECHE Centre for Research in Environmental, Coastal and Hydrological Engineering, School of Civil Engineering, Surveying and Construction, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Howard College Campus, Durban (South Africa)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The amount of greenhouse gases (GHG) emitted due to waste management in the cities of developing countries is predicted to rise considerably in the near future; however, these countries have a series of problems in accounting and reporting these gases. Some of these problems are related to the status quo of waste management in the developing world and some to the lack of a coherent framework for accounting and reporting of greenhouse gases from waste at municipal level. This review summarizes and compares GHG emissions from individual waste management processes which make up a municipal waste management system, with an emphasis on developing countries and, in particular, Africa. It should be seen as a first step towards developing a more holistic GHG accounting model for municipalities. The comparison between these emissions from developed and developing countries at process level, reveals that there is agreement on the magnitude of the emissions expected from each process (generation of waste, collection and transport, disposal and recycling). The highest GHG savings are achieved through recycling, and these savings would be even higher in developing countries which rely on coal for energy production (e.g. South Africa, India and China) and where non-motorized collection and transport is used. The highest emissions are due to the methane released by dumpsites and landfills, and these emissions are predicted to increase significantly, unless more of the methane is captured and either flared or used for energy generation. The clean development mechanism (CDM) projects implemented in the developing world have made some progress in this field; however, African countries lag behind.

  9. Combustion of municipal solid wastes with oil shale in a circulating fluidized bed. Quarterly report, quarter ending December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate that cocombustion of municipal solid waste and oil shale can reduce emissions of gaseous pollutants (SO{sub 2} and HCl) to acceptable levels. Tests in 6- and 15-inch units showed that the oil shale absorbs acid gas pollutants and produces an ash which could be, at the least, disposed of in a normal landfill. Further analysis of the results are underway to estimate scale-up to commercial size. Additional work will be done to evaluate the cementitious properties of oil shale ash.

  10. Toxicity mitigation and solidification of municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash using alkaline activated coal ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivan Diaz-Loya, E. [Alternative Cementitious Binders Laboratory (ACBL), Department of Civil Engineering, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Allouche, Erez N., E-mail: allouche@latech.edu [Alternative Cementitious Binders Laboratory (ACBL), Department of Civil Engineering, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Eklund, Sven; Joshi, Anupam R. [Department of Chemistry, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Kupwade-Patil, Kunal [Alternative Cementitious Binders Laboratory (ACBL), Department of Civil Engineering, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Incinerator fly ash (IFA) is added to an alkali activated coal fly ash (CFA) matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Means of stabilizing the incinerator ash for use in construction applications. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Concrete made from IFA, CFA and IFA-CFA mixes was chemically characterized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmentally friendly solution to IFA disposal by reducing its toxicity levels. - Abstract: Municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration is a common and effective practice to reduce the volume of solid waste in urban areas. However, the byproduct of this process is a fly ash (IFA), which contains large quantities of toxic contaminants. The purpose of this research study was to analyze the chemical, physical and mechanical behaviors resulting from the gradual introduction of IFA to an alkaline activated coal fly ash (CFA) matrix, as a mean of stabilizing the incinerator ash for use in industrial construction applications, where human exposure potential is limited. IFA and CFA were analyzed via X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Inductive coupled plasma (ICP) to obtain a full chemical analysis of the samples, its crystallographic characteristics and a detailed count of the eight heavy metals contemplated in US Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR). The particle size distribution of IFA and CFA was also recorded. EPA's Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) was followed to monitor the leachability of the contaminants before and after the activation. Also images obtained via Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), before and after the activation, are presented. Concrete made from IFA, CFA and IFA-CFA mixes was subjected to a full mechanical characterization; tests include compressive strength, flexural strength, elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio and setting time. The leachable heavy metal contents (except for Se) were below the maximum allowable limits and in many cases even below the reporting limit. The leachable Chromium was reduced from 0.153 down to 0.0045 mg/L, Arsenic from 0.256 down to 0.132 mg/L, Selenium from 1.05 down to 0.29 mg/L, Silver from 0.011 down to .001 mg/L, Barium from 2.06 down to 0.314 mg/L and Mercury from 0.007 down to 0.001 mg/L. Although the leachable Cd exhibited an increase from 0.49 up to 0.805 mg/L and Pd from 0.002 up to 0.029 mg/L, these were well below the maximum limits of 1.00 and 5.00 mg/L, respectively.

  11. Comparative assessment of municipal sewage sludge incineration, gasification and pyrolysis for a sustainable sludge-to-energy management in Greece

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samolada, M.C. [Dept. Secretariat of Environmental and Urban Planning – Decentralized Area Macedonian Thrace, Taki Oikonomidi 1, 54008 Thessaloniki (Greece); Zabaniotou, A.A., E-mail: azampani@auth.gr [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, University Box 455, University Campus, 541 24 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • The high output of MSS highlights the need for alternative routes of valorization. • Evaluation of 3 sludge-to-energy valorisation methods through SWOT analysis. • Pyrolysis is an energy and material recovery process resulting to ‘zero waste’. • Identification of challenges and barriers for MSS pyrolysis in Greece was investigated. • Adopters of pyrolysis systems face the challenge of finding new product markets. - Abstract: For a sustainable municipal sewage sludge management, not only the available technology, but also other parameters, such as policy regulations and socio-economic issues should be taken in account. In this study, the current status of both European and Greek Legislation on waste management, with a special insight in municipal sewage sludge, is presented. A SWOT analysis was further developed for comparison of pyrolysis with incineration and gasification and results are presented. Pyrolysis seems to be the optimal thermochemical treatment option compared to incineration and gasification. Sewage sludge pyrolysis is favorable for energy savings, material recovery and high added materials production, providing a ‘zero waste’ solution. Finally, identification of challenges and barriers for sewage sludge pyrolysis deployment in Greece was investigated.

  12. Municipal solid waste management: Identification and analysis of engineering indexes representing demand and costs generated in virtuous Italian communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gamberini, R., E-mail: rita.gamberini@unimore.it; Del Buono, D.; Lolli, F.; Rimini, B.

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • Collection and analysis of real life data in the field of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) generation and costs for management. • Study of 92 virtuous Italian communities. • Elaboration of trends of engineering indexes useful during design and evaluation of MSWM systems. - Abstract: The definition and utilisation of engineering indexes in the field of Municipal Solid Waste Management (MSWM) is an issue of interest for technicians and scientists, which is widely discussed in literature. Specifically, the availability of consolidated engineering indexes is useful when new waste collection services are designed, along with when their performance is evaluated after a warm-up period. However, most published works in the field of MSWM complete their study with an analysis of isolated case studies. Conversely, decision makers require tools for information collection and exchange in order to trace the trends of these engineering indexes in large experiments. In this paper, common engineering indexes are presented and their values analysed in virtuous Italian communities, with the aim of contributing to the creation of a useful database whose data could be used during experiments, by indicating examples of MSWM demand profiles and the costs required to manage them.

  13. If current capacity were to be expanded so that all of the non-recycled municipal solid waste that is currently sent to U.S. landfills each year could instead be converted to energy, we could generate enough electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    If current capacity were to be expanded so that all of the non-recycled municipal solid waste at Columbia University assessed the energy value of municipal solid waste that is currently sent to U so that we could convert our non-recycled waste to alternative energy instead of landfilling it, we

  14. COMPACTING BIOMASS AND MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTES TO FORM AND UPGRADED FUEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry Liu; Yadong Li

    2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biomass waste materials exist in large quantity in every city and in numerous industrial plants such as wood processing plants and waste paper collection centers. Through minimum processing, such waste materials can be turned into a solid fuel for combustion at existing coal-fired power plants. Use of such biomass fuel reduces the amount of coal used, and hence reduces the greenhouse effect and global warming, while at the same time it reduces the use of land for landfill and the associated problems. The carbon-dioxide resulting from burning biomass fuel is recycled through plant growth and hence does not contribute to global warming. Biomass fuel also contains little sulfur and hence does not contribute to acid rain problems. Notwithstanding the environmental desirability of using biomass waste materials, not much of them are used currently due to the need to densify the waste materials and the high cost of conventional methods of densification such as pelletizing and briquetting. The purpose of this project was to test a unique new method of biomass densification developed from recent research in coal log pipeline (CLP). The new method can produce large agglomerates of biomass materials called ''biomass logs'' which are more than 100 times larger and 30% denser than conventional ''pellets'' or ''briquettes''. The Phase I project was to perform extensive laboratory tests and an economic analysis to determine the technical and economic feasibility of the biomass log fuel (BLF). A variety of biomass waste materials, including wood processing residues such as sawdust, mulch and chips of various types of wood, combustibles that are found in municipal solid waste stream such as paper, plastics and textiles, energy crops including willows and switch grass, and yard waste including tree trimmings, fallen leaves, and lawn grass, were tested by using this new compaction technology developed at Capsule Pipeline Research Center (CPRC), University of Missouri-Columbia (MU). The compaction conditions, including compaction pressure, pressure holding time, back pressure, moisture content, particle size and shape, piston and mold geometry and roughness, and binder for the materials were studied and optimized. The properties of the compacted products--biomass logs--were evaluated in terms of physical, mechanical, and combustion characteristics. An economic analysis of this technology for anticipated future commercial operations was performed. It was found that the compaction pressure and the moisture content of the biomass materials are critical for producing high-quality biomass logs. For most biomass materials, dense and strong logs can be produced under room temperature without binder and at a pressure of 70 MPa (10,000 psi), approximately. A few types of the materials tested such as sawdust and grass need a minimum pressure of 100 MPa (15,000 psi) in order to produce good logs. The appropriate moisture range for compacting waste paper into good logs is 5-20%, and the optimum moisture is in the neighborhood of 13%. For the woody materials and yard waste, the appropriate moisture range is narrower: 5-13%, and the optimum is 8-9%. The compacted logs have a dry density of 0.8 to 1.0 g/cm{sup 3}, corresponding to a wet density of 0.9 to 1.1 g/cm{sup 3}, approximately. The logs have high strength and high resistance to impact and abrasion, but are feeble to water and hence need to be protected from water or rain. They also have good long-term performance under normal environmental conditions, and can be stored for a long time without significant deterioration. Such high-density and high-strength logs not only facilitate handling, transportation, and storage, but also increase the energy content of biomass per unit volume. After being transported to power plants and crushed, the biomass logs can be co-fired with coal to generate electricity.

  15. ,2009,)3(1,Report and Opinionnet.sciencepub.www://http,com.gmail@sciencepub Studies on Municipal Solid Waste Management in Mysore City-A case study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Solid Waste Management in Mysore City- A case study Yadav Ishwar Chandra and N.Linthoingambi Devi_ishwar@yahoo.com, Phone no: +919873453116 Abstract: Solid waste management is a worldwide phenomenon. It is a big challenge all over the world for human beings. The problem of municipal solid waste management (MSWM

  16. Biosolids are the solids produced during municipal wastewater treatment. Composts are made from a variety of organic materials, including both urban and agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    ISSUE Biosolids are the solids produced during municipal wastewater treatment. Composts are made and compost users need information on the product's proper use, safety, and benefits. Furthermore, biosolids and compost producers need up-to-date information on making and marketing their products, as well

  17. Emissions of PCDD/Fs from municipal solid waste incinerators in China Yuwen Ni, Haijun Zhang, Su Fan, Xueping Zhang, Qing Zhang, Jiping Chen *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Emissions of PCDD/Fs from municipal solid waste incinerators in China Yuwen Ni, Haijun Zhang, Su February 2009 Available online 21 March 2009 Keywords: MSWIs PCDD/Fs Congener patterns Emission factor a b s t r a c t Gas emission of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD

  18. A summary of the report on prospects for pyrolysis technologies in managing municipal, industrial, and Department of Energy cleanup wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reaven, S.J.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pyrolysis converts portions of municipal solid wastes, hazardous wastes and special wastes such as tires, medical wastes and even old landfills into solid carbon and a liquid or gaseous hydrocarbon stream. In the past twenty years, advances in the engineering of pyrolysis systems and in sorting and feeding technologies for solid waste industries have ensured consistent feedstocks and system performance. Some vendors now offer complete pyrolysis systems with performance warranties. This report analyzes the potential applications of pyrolysis in the Long Island region and evaluates the four most promising pyrolytic systems for their readiness, applicability to regional waste management needs and conformity with DOE environmental restoration and waste management requirements. This summary characterizes the engineering performance, environmental effects, costs, product applications and markets for these pyrolysis systems.

  19. RCRA, superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Municipal solid waste disposal facility criteria updated July 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The module provides a summary of the regulatory criteria for municipal solid waste landfills (MSWLFs) and provides the statutory authority under RCRA and the Clean Water Act (CWA) directing EPA to develop the MSWLF criteria in 40 CFR Part 258. It gives the part 258 effective date and the compliance dates for providing demonstrations to satisfy individual regulatory requirements. It identifies the types of facilities that qualify for the small landfill exemption. It explains the requirements of each subpart of part 258 as they apply to states with EPA-approved MSWLF permit programs and states without approved permit programs. It compares the MSWLF environmental performance standards described in part 258 to the corresponding requirements for hazardous waste TSDFs in part 264, which are generally more stringent.

  20. Combustion of municipal solid wastes with oil shale in a circulating fluidized bed. Quarterly report, quarter ending 31 December 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The test plan is designed to demonstrate that oil shale co-combusted with municipal solid waste (MSW) can reduce gaseous pollutants (SO{sub 2}, CO) to acceptable levels (90%+ reduction) and produce a cementitious ash which will, at a minimum, be acceptable in normal land fills. The small-scale combustion testing will be accomplished in a 6-in. circulating fluid bed combustor (CFBC) at Hazen Research Laboratories. This work will be patterned after the study the authors conducted in 1988 when coal and oil shale were co-combusted in a program sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute. The specific purpose of the test program will be to: determine the required ratio of oil shale to MSW by determining the ratio of absorbent to pollutant (A/P); determine the effect of temperature and resident time in the reactor; and determine if kinetic model developed for coal/oil shale mixture is applicable.

  1. Municipal Solid Waste Combustion : Fuel Testing and Characterization : Task 1 Report, May 30, 1990-October 1, 1990.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bushnell, Dwight J.; Canova, Joseph H.; Dadkhah-Nikoo, Abbas.

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to screen and characterize potential biomass fuels from waste streams. This will be accomplished by determining the types of pollutants produced while burning selected municipal waste, i.e., commercial mixed waste paper residential (curbside) mixed waste paper, and refuse derived fuel. These materials will be fired alone and in combination with wood, equal parts by weight. The data from these experiments could be utilized to size pollution control equipment required to meet emission standards. This document provides detailed descriptions of the testing methods and evaluation procedures used in the combustion testing and characterization project. The fuel samples will be examined thoroughly from the raw form to the exhaust emissions produced during the combustion test of a densified sample.

  2. Web-GIS oriented systems viability for municipal solid waste selective collection optimization in developed and transient economies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rada, E.C., E-mail: Elena.Rada@ing.unitn.it [University of Trento, Department of Civil, Environmental and Mechanical Engineering, Via Mesiano, 77, 38123 Trento (Italy); Ragazzi, M. [University of Trento, Department of Civil, Environmental and Mechanical Engineering, Via Mesiano, 77, 38123 Trento (Italy); Fedrizzi, P. [I and S, Informatica e Servizi srl, Via Solteri, 74, 38121 Trento (Italy)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: ? As an appropriate solution for MSW management in developed and transient countries. ? As an option to increase the efficiency of MSW selective collection. ? As an opportunity to integrate MSW management needs and services inventories. ? As a tool to develop Urban Mining actions. - Abstract: Municipal solid waste management is a multidisciplinary activity that includes generation, source separation, storage, collection, transfer and transport, processing and recovery, and, last but not least, disposal. The optimization of waste collection, through source separation, is compulsory where a landfill based management must be overcome. In this paper, a few aspects related to the implementation of a Web-GIS based system are analyzed. This approach is critically analyzed referring to the experience of two Italian case studies and two additional extra-European case studies. The first case is one of the best examples of selective collection optimization in Italy. The obtained efficiency is very high: 80% of waste is source separated for recycling purposes. In the second reference case, the local administration is going to be faced with the optimization of waste collection through Web-GIS oriented technologies for the first time. The starting scenario is far from an optimized management of municipal solid waste. The last two case studies concern pilot experiences in China and Malaysia. Each step of the Web-GIS oriented strategy is comparatively discussed referring to typical scenarios of developed and transient economies. The main result is that transient economies are ready to move toward Web oriented tools for MSW management, but this opportunity is not yet well exploited in the sector.

  3. Oxygen demand for the stabilization of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste in passively aerated bioreactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kasinski, Slawomir, E-mail: slawomir.kasinski@uwm.edu.pl; Wojnowska-Baryla, Irena

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • The use of an passively aerated reactor enables effective stabilization of OFMSW. • Convective air flow does not inhibit the aerobic stabilization of waste. • The use of an passively aerated reactor reduces the heat loss due to convection. • The volume of supplied air exceeds 1.7–2.88 times the microorganisms demand. - Abstract: Conventional aerobic waste treatment technologies require the use of aeration devices that actively transport air through the stabilized waste mass, which greatly increases operating costs. In addition, improperly operated active aeration systems, may have the adverse effect of cooling the stabilized biomass. Because active aeration can be a limiting factor for the stabilization process, passive aeration can be equally effective and less expensive. Unfortunately, there are few reports documenting the use of passive aeration systems in municipal waste stabilization. There have been doubts raised as to whether a passive aeration system provides enough oxygen to the organic matter mineralization processes. In this paper, the effectiveness of aeration during aerobic stabilization of four different organic fractions of municipal waste in a reactor with an integrated passive ventilation system and leachate recirculation was analyzed. For the study, four fractions separated by a rotary screen were chosen. Despite the high temperatures in the reactor, the air flow rate was below 0.016 m{sup 3}/h. Using Darcy’s equation, theoretical values of the air flow rate were estimated, depending on the intensity of microbial metabolism and the amount of oxygen required for the oxidation of organic compounds. Calculations showed that the volume of supplied air exceeded the microorganisms demand for oxidation and endogenous activity by 1.7–2.88-fold.

  4. Environmental impacts of residual Municipal Solid Waste incineration: A comparison of 110 French incinerators using a life cycle approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beylot, Antoine, E-mail: a.beylot@brgm.fr; Villeneuve, Jacques

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • 110 French incinerators are compared with LCA based on plant-specific data. • Environmental impacts vary as a function of plants energy recovery and NO{sub x} emissions. • E.g. climate change impact ranges from ?58 to 408 kg CO{sub 2}-eq/tonne of residual MSW. • Implications for LCA of waste management in a decision-making process are detailed. - Abstract: Incineration is the main option for residual Municipal Solid Waste treatment in France. This study compares the environmental performances of 110 French incinerators (i.e. 85% of the total number of plants currently in activity in France) in a Life Cycle Assessment perspective, considering 5 non-toxic impact categories: climate change, photochemical oxidant formation, particulate matter formation, terrestrial acidification and marine eutrophication. Mean, median and lower/upper impact potentials are determined considering the incineration of 1 tonne of French residual Municipal Solid Waste. The results highlight the relatively large variability of the impact potentials as a function of the plant technical performances. In particular, the climate change impact potential of the incineration of 1 tonne of waste ranges from a benefit of ?58 kg CO{sub 2}-eq to a relatively large burden of 408 kg CO{sub 2}-eq, with 294 kg CO{sub 2}-eq as the average impact. Two main plant-specific parameters drive the impact potentials regarding the 5 non-toxic impact categories under study: the energy recovery and delivery rate and the NO{sub x} process-specific emissions. The variability of the impact potentials as a function of incinerator characteristics therefore calls for the use of site-specific data when required by the LCA goal and scope definition phase, in particular when the study focuses on a specific incinerator or on a local waste management plan, and when these data are available.

  5. The Emerging Industry Sales and Use Tax Credit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Emerging Industry Sales and Use Tax Credit allows a taxpayer to take a credit, to apply for a refund of taxes paid, or to apply for authority to make tax-exempt purchases of machinery and...

  6. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Tax Exemption The following are exempt from state sales tax: 1) any device, equipment, or machinery operated by hydrogen or fuel cells; 2) any device,...

  7. Industrial Revenue Bond Issuance Cost Assistance (Wisconsin)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Industrial Revenue Bonds (IRB) are tax-exempt bonds that can be used to stimulate capital investment and job creation by providing private borrowers with access to financing at interest rates that...

  8. Private Activity Revenue Bonds (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Private Activity Revenue Bonds are available in the form of both taxable bonds and tax-exempt bonds. Both types of bonds provide access to long-term capital markets for fixed asset financing....

  9. Bond Financing Program (New Hampshire)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    BFA’s Bond Financing Program offers tax-exempt and taxable bonds for fixed-asset expansion projects. Industrial development revenue bonds can be used by manufacturers for the acquisition,...

  10. Secondary Market Taxable Bond Program (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Secondary Market Taxable Bond Program provides tax-exempt interest rate bond financing for real estate and machinery and equipment acquisitions. Up to 90% of the project debt may be financed,...

  11. Collection, Storage And Impounding Of Waters (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kansas Statute Chapter 82 Article 4 lays out property tax exemption requirements for landowners who build and maintain dams on their property in the state of Kansas. Dams must meet the given...

  12. Nuclear Decommissioning Financing Act (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Nuclear Decommissioning Financing Act calls for the establishment of a tax-exempt, tax-deductible decommissioning fund by the licensee of any nuclear power generating facility to pay for the...

  13. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Alternative Fuel Tax Exemption and Rate Reduction E85, compressed natural gas, and hydrogen fuel that is used exclusively to operate a motor vehicle engine is exempt from state...

  14. Pooled Bond Program (South Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Pooled Bond Program offered by the Economic Development Finance Authority is designed for capital intensive projects, providing small businesses access to larger capital markets for tax-exempt...

  15. Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Project Financing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Illinois Finance Authority (IFA) is a state conduit issuer of tax-exempt bonds and credit enhancement for projects in Illinois. The IFA funding is available to commercial as well as non-profit...

  16. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Ethanol Sales Tax Exemption The portion of ethanol (ethyl alcohol) sold and blended with motor fuel is exempt from sales tax. (Reference Oklahoma Statutes 68-500.10-1 and 68-1359...

  17. Uniform Capacity Tax and Exemption for Solar (Vermont)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    During the 2012 legislative session, Vermont passed a 100% property tax exemption for solar photovoltaic (PV) systems up to and including 10 kilowatts (kW). For systems greater than 10 kW, the...

  18. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Natural Gas Tax Exemptions Compressed natural gas (CNG) and liquefied natural gas (LNG) used as a transportation fuel are exempt from the state and local sales, use, and public...

  19. Montana Beginning Farm/Ranch Loan Program (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Loans subsidized by tax-exempt bonds issued by the Montana Agricultural Loan Authority may be used for the production of energy using an alternative renewable energy source. The program is run...

  20. Economic Development Bond Program (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Through its Economic Development Bond Program, the Iowa Finance Authority (IFA) issues tax-exempt bonds on behalf of private entities or organizations for eligible purposes. The responsibility for...

  1. Private Activity Bond Allocation (Missouri)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Private Activity Bond Allocation Program provides low-interest financing through tax-exempt bonds for certain types of projects, including electric and gas utility projects. Eligible applicants...

  2. Property Tax Exclusion for Residential Renewable Energy Property (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Florida provides a property tax exemption for residential photovoltaic systems, wind energy systems, solar water heaters, and geothermal heat pumps installed on or after January 1, 2013. For the...

  3. Stop Playing Favorites with the Tax Code 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Lori L.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    particularly harmful form of playing favorites with the tax code by encouraging vertical integration and discouraging reliance upon outside small businesses. Eliminating sales tax exemptions and exclusions would go a long way toward solving budget problems...

  4. Renewable Energy Tax Incentive Program (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Renewable Energy Tax Incentive Program provides various tax exemptions to businesses that either use or manufacture or install solar or wind energy. They can receive franchise tax deductions...

  5. Keystone Opportunity Zones (Pennsylvania)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Keystone Opportunity Zones allows businesses located within designated areas to qualify for a tax exemption, deduction, credit, or abatement of state and local taxes such as sales and use tax,...

  6. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Biodiesel Tax Exemption Biodiesel is exempt from the 0.30 per gallon state motor fuel tax. Biodiesel may be blended with other fuel for use in motor vehicles, but only the...

  7. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Biodiesel Fuel Tax Exemption An individual that produces biodiesel for personal use or use by a member of his or her immediate family is exempt from the state fuel excise tax....

  8. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Biodiesel Blend Tax Exemption Biodiesel blends of at least 20% (B20) that are used for personal, noncommercial use by the individual that produced the biodiesel portion of the fuel...

  9. Local Option- Solar, Wind and Biomass Energy Systems Exemption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Section 487 of the New York State Real Property Tax Law provides a 15-year real property tax exemption for solar, wind energy, and farm-waste energy systems constructed in New York State. As...

  10. Nonprofit Hospitals’ Approach to Community Health Needs Assessment: A Mixed Methods Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennel, Cara LeAnne

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonprofit hospitals are tax exempt but must demonstrate community benefit to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) to maintain this status. In attempts to improve accountability, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 includes a...

  11. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Tax Exemption Liquefied petroleum gas (propane) is exempt from the state fuel excise tax when sold from a licensed propane vendor to a licensed propane user or a propane vehicle...

  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Propane Excise Tax Exemption Propane is exempt from the state excise tax when it is used to operate motor vehicles on public highways provided that vehicles are equipped with...

  13. Cogeneration Personal Property Tax Credit (District of Columbia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The District of Columbia Council created a personal property tax exemption for solar energy systems and cogeneration systems within the District by enacting B19-0749 in December of 2012.

  14. Strategies and Project Delivery Methods for Captial Improvement Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, D.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 Access to Capital FUNDING/FINANCING OPTION PUBLIC AGENCY PRIVATE COMPANY Utility Rebates X X Incentives X X Tax Exempt Bonds X Not for Profit only KOs X LoanSTAR X Tax Exempt Lease X Commercial Loans X X Shared Savings... of selected improvement measures • Establish energy baseline • Pursue grants and rebates, secure financing • Complete construction schedule • Determine commissioning and M&V plan • Select and manage subcontractors • Secure permits • Procure...

  15. Analysis of the value of battery storage with wind and photovoltaic generation to the Sacramento Municipal Utility District

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaininger, H.W. [Zaininger Engineering Co., Inc., Roseville, CA (United States)

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results of an analysis to determine the economic and operational value of battery storage to wind and photovoltaic (PV) generation technologies to the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) system. The analysis approach consisted of performing a benefit-cost economic assessment using established SMUD financial parameters, system expansion plans, and current system operating procedures. This report presents the results of the analysis. Section 2 describes expected wind and PV plant performance. Section 3 describes expected benefits to SMUD associated with employing battery storage. Section 4 presents preliminary benefit-cost results for battery storage added at the Solano wind plant and the Hedge PV plant. Section 5 presents conclusions and recommendations resulting from this analysis. The results of this analysis should be reviewed subject to the following caveat. The assumptions and data used in developing these results were based on reports available from and interaction with appropriate SMUD operating, planning, and design personnel in 1994 and early 1995 and are compatible with financial assumptions and system expansion plans as of that time. Assumptions and SMUD expansion plans have changed since then. In particular, SMUD did not install the additional 45 MW of wind that was planned for 1996. Current SMUD expansion plans and assumptions should be obtained from appropriate SMUD personnel.

  16. Hydro-mechanical behavior of Municipal Solid Waste subject to leachate recirculation in a large-scale compression reactor cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olivier, Franck [Environment, Energy and Waste Research Center (CREED), 291, avenue Dreyfous Ducas, 78520 Limay (France) and Laboratoire LIRIGM - Maison des Geosciences, 1381, rue de la piscine 38400 Saint-Martin d'Heres (France)]. E-mail: franck.olivier@ujf-grenoble.fr; Gourc, Jean-Pierre [Laboratoire LIRIGM - Maison des Geosciences, 1381, rue de la piscine 38400 Saint-Martin d'Heres (France)]. E-mail: gourc@ujf-grenoble.fr

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper presents the results of a laboratory experiment on Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) subjected to one-dimensional compression in a 1 m{sup 3} instrumented cell. The focus was on the hydro-mechanical behavior of the material under conditions of confinement and leachate percolation that replicate those found in real-scale landfills. The operation of the apparatus is detailed together with the testing methodology and the monitoring program. Two samples of waste were tested: the first extended over a period of 10 months ('Control Test') and the second for 22 months ('Enhanced Test' with leachate recirculation). Consolidation data is reported with regard to both short-term (stress-dependent) and long-term (time-dependent) settlements. A discussion follows based on the derived values of primary and secondary compression ratios. Correlations between compression parameters and the biodegradation process are presented. In particular, results clearly highlight the effect of leachate recirculation on waste settlement: 24% secondary deformation reached after slightly less than 2 years (equivalent to a 5-fold increase in compressibility) and 17.9% loss of dry matter. Comparisons are proposed considering the results derived from the few monitoring programs conducted on experimental bioreactors worldwide. Finally, the hydraulic characterization of waste is discussed with regard to the evaluation of effective porosity and permeability.

  17. Feasibility of geothermal heat use in the San Bernardino Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant. Final report, September 1980-June 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Racine, W.C.; Larson, T.C.; Stewart, C.A.; Wessel, H.B.

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system was developed for utilizing nearby low temperature geothermal energy to heat two high-rate primary anaerobic digesters at the San Bernardino Wastewater Treatment Plant. The geothermal fluid would replace the methane currently burned to fuel the digesters. A summary of the work accomplished on the feasibility study is presented. The design and operation of the facility are examined and potentially viable applications selected for additional study. Results of these investigations and system descriptions and equipment specifications for utilizing geothermal energy in the selected processes are presented. The economic analyses conducted on the six engineering design cases are discussed. The environmental setting of the project and an analysis of the environmental impacts that will result from construction and operation of the geothermal heating system are discussed. A Resource Development Plan describes the steps that the San Bernardino Municipal Water Department could follow in order to utilize the resource. A preliminary well program and rough cost estimates for the production and injection wells also are included. The Water Department is provided with a program and schedule for implementing a geothermal system to serve the wastewater treatment plant. Regulatory, financial, and legal issues that will impact the project are presented in the Appendix. An outline of a Public Awareness Program is included.

  18. Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 7, Appendix E -- Material recovery/material recycling technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The enthusiasm for and commitment to recycling of municipal solid wastes is based on several intuitive benefits: Conservation of landfill capacity; Conservation of non-renewable natural resources and energy sources; Minimization of the perceived potential environmental impacts of MSW combustion and landfilling; Minimization of disposal costs, both directly and through material resale credits. In this discussion, ``recycling`` refers to materials recovered from the waste stream. It excludes scrap materials that are recovered and reused during industrial manufacturing processes and prompt industrial scrap. Materials recycling is an integral part of several solid waste management options. For example, in the preparation of refuse-derived fuel (RDF), ferrous metals are typically removed from the waste stream both before and after shredding. Similarly, composting facilities, often include processes for recovering inert recyclable materials such as ferrous and nonferrous metals, glass, Plastics, and paper. While these two technologies have as their primary objectives the production of RDF and compost, respectively, the demonstrated recovery of recyclables emphasizes the inherent compatibility of recycling with these MSW management strategies. This appendix discusses several technology options with regard to separating recyclables at the source of generation, the methods available for collecting and transporting these materials to a MRF, the market requirements for post-consumer recycled materials, and the process unit operations. Mixed waste MRFs associated with mass bum plants are also presented.

  19. Demonstration of constructed wetlands for treatment of municipal wastewaters, monitoring report for the period, March 1988--October 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choate, K.D.; Watson, J.T.; Steiner, G.R.

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To evaluate the constructed wetland technology, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) implemented a municipal wastewater demonstration project in western Kentucky. Using combined city, State, and TVA appropriated funds, three constructed wetland systems were built at Benton, Hardin, and Pembroke, Kentucky. Demonstration objectives include evaluating relative advantages and disadvantages of these types of systems; determining permit compliance ability; developing, evaluating, and improving basic design and operation criteria; evaluating cost effectiveness; and transferring technology to users and regulators. A demonstration monitoring project was implemented with a partnership of funds from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region IV, other EPA funds through the National Small Flows Clearinghouse (NSFC), and TVA appropriations. TVA is managing the project in cooperation with an interagency team consisting of EPA, Kentucky Division of Water and NSFC. This report, which supersedes the first monitoring report (Choate, et. al., 1989) of these demonstration projects, describes each constructed wetland system, its status, and summarizes monitoring data and plans for each system. 5 refs., 30 figs., 26 tabs.

  20. Use of Treated Municipal Wastewater as Power Plant Cooling System Makeup Water: Tertiary Treatment versus Expanded Chemical Regimen for Recirculating Water Quality Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Dzombak; Radisav Vidic; Amy Landis

    2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Treated municipal wastewater is a common, widely available alternative source of cooling water for thermoelectric power plants across the U.S. However, the biodegradable organic matter, ammonia-nitrogen, carbonate and phosphates in the treated wastewater pose challenges with respect to enhanced biofouling, corrosion, and scaling, respectively. The overall objective of this study was to evaluate the benefits and life cycle costs of implementing tertiary treatment of secondary treated municipal wastewater prior to use in recirculating cooling systems. The study comprised bench- and pilot-scale experimental studies with three different tertiary treated municipal wastewaters, and life cycle costing and environmental analyses of various tertiary treatment schemes. Sustainability factors and metrics for reuse of treated wastewater in power plant cooling systems were also evaluated. The three tertiary treated wastewaters studied were: secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected to acid addition for pH control (MWW_pH); secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected to nitrification and sand filtration (MWW_NF); and secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected nitrification, sand filtration, and GAC adsorption (MWW_NFG). Tertiary treatment was determined to be essential to achieve appropriate corrosion, scaling, and biofouling control for use of secondary treated municipal wastewater in power plant cooling systems. The ability to control scaling, in particular, was found to be significantly enhanced with tertiary treated wastewater compared to secondary treated wastewater. MWW_pH treated water (adjustment to pH 7.8) was effective in reducing scale formation, but increased corrosion and the amount of biocide required to achieve appropriate biofouling control. Corrosion could be adequately controlled with tolytriazole addition (4-5 ppm TTA), however, which was the case for all of the tertiary treated waters. For MWW_NF treated water, the removal of ammonia by nitrification helped to reduce the corrosivity and biocide demand. Also, the lower pH and alkalinity resulting from nitrification reduced the scaling to an acceptable level, without the addition of anti-scalant chemicals. Additional GAC adsorption treatment, MWW_NFG, yielded no net benefit. Removal of organic matter resulted in pitting corrosion in copper and cupronickel alloys. Negligible improvement was observed in scaling control and biofouling control. For all of the tertiary treatments, biofouling control was achievable, and most effectively with pre-formed monochloramine (2-3 ppm) in comparison with NaOCl and ClO2. Life cycle cost (LCC) analyses were performed for the tertiary treatment systems studied experimentally and for several other treatment options. A public domain conceptual costing tool (LC3 model) was developed for this purpose. MWW_SF (lime softening and sand filtration) and MWW_NF were the most cost-effective treatment options among the tertiary treatment alternatives considered because of the higher effluent quality with moderate infrastructure costs and the relatively low doses of conditioning chemicals required. Life cycle inventory (LCI) analysis along with integration of external costs of emissions with direct costs was performed to evaluate relative emissions to the environment and external costs associated with construction and operation of tertiary treatment alternatives. Integrated LCI and LCC analysis indicated that three-tiered treatment alternatives such as MWW_NSF and MWW_NFG, with regular chemical addition for treatment and conditioning and/or regeneration, tend to increase the impact costs and in turn the overall costs of tertiary treatment. River water supply and MWW_F alternatives with a single step of tertiary treatment were associated with lower impact costs, but the contribution of impact costs to overall annual costs was higher than all other treatment alternatives. MWW_NF and MWW_SF alternatives exhibited moderate external impact costs with moderate infrastructure and chemical conditioner dosing, which makes them (especially