National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for agri cultural machinery

  1. American Agri diesel LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    American Agri diesel LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: American Agri-diesel LLC Place: Colorado Springs, Colorado Product: Biodiesel producer in Colorado. References: American...

  2. AgriFuel Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Name: AgriFuel Company Place: Cranford, New Jersey Sector: Biofuels Product: AgriFuel produces and markets biofuels refined from waste vegetable oil,...

  3. Agri Source Fuels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Agri-Source Fuels Place: Pensacola, Florida Zip: 32505 Product: Biodiesel producer located in Florida that owns a plant in Dade City. References: Agri-Source...

  4. Agri Energy Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Agri-Energy Inc Place: Nashville, Tennessee Zip: 37201 Product: Biodiesel producer, located in Nashville, Tennessee. References: Agri-Energy Inc1 This...

  5. Sunrise Agri Fuels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Agri Fuels Jump to: navigation, search Name: Sunrise Agri Fuels Place: Bird Island, Minnesota Zip: 55310 Sector: Biomass Product: Manufacturer of Biomass Fuel Pellets for Pellet...

  6. East Kansas Agri Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kansas Agri Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: East Kansas Agri-Energy Place: Garnett, Kansas Zip: 66032 Product: Dry-mill bioethanol producer Coordinates: 32.609607,...

  7. Agri Energy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Agri-Energy LLC Place: Luverne, Minnesota Zip: 56156 Product: Corn trader and bioethanol producer. References: Agri-Energy LLC1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI...

  8. East Kansas Agri-Energy, LLC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2007-12-01

    This is a combined heat and power (CHP) project profile on a 1.6 MW CHP application at East Kansas Agri-Energy, LLC in Garnett, Kansas.

  9. Commonwealth AgriEnergy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Commonwealth AgriEnergy Place: Hopkinsville, Kentucky Zip: 42241 Product: Bioethanol producer using corn as feedstock Coordinates: 36.867275, -87.487699 Show Map...

  10. Mid America Agri Products | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Products Jump to: navigation, search Name: Mid America Agri Products Place: Madrid, Nebraska Zip: 69150 Product: Ethanol producer located in Madrid, Nebraska. Coordinates:...

  11. Agri Energy Funding Solutions | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Place: Omaha, Nebraska Zip: 68137-2495 Sector: Biomass, Wind energy Product: AGRI-ENERGY FUNDING SOLUTIONS is a market consultant for BioDiesel, Ethanol as well as Biomass...

  12. Agri capital GmbH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    capital GmbH Jump to: navigation, search Name: agri.capital GmbH Place: Muenster, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany Zip: 48155 Product: Muenster-based agri.capital develops and...

  13. MECS 2006- Machinery

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Machinery (NAICS 333) Sector with Total Energy Input, October 2012 (MECS 2006)

  14. Agri Ethanol Products LLC AEPNC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ethanol Products LLC AEPNC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Agri-Ethanol Products LLC (AEPNC) Place: Raleigh, North Carolina Zip: 27615 Product: Ethanol producer and project...

  15. AgriKomp GmbH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zip: D-91732 Product: A major German and international group specializing in biogas plants. Subdidiaries France, Italy, Czech Rep, Poland References: agriKomp GmbH1 This...

  16. MACHINERY RESONANCE AND DRILLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leishear, R.; Fowley, M.

    2010-01-23

    New developments in vibration analysis better explain machinery resonance, through an example of drill bit chattering during machining of rusted steel. The vibration of an operating drill motor was measured, the natural frequency of an attached spring was measured, and the two frequencies were compared to show that the system was resonant. For resonance to occur, one of the natural frequencies of a structural component must be excited by a cyclic force of the same frequency. In this case, the frequency of drill bit chattering due to motor rotation equaled the spring frequency (cycles per second), and the system was unstable. A soft rust coating on the steel to be drilled permitted chattering to start at the drill bit tip, and the bit oscillated on and off of the surface, which increased the wear rate of the drill bit. This resonant condition is typically referred to as a motor critical speed. The analysis presented here quantifies the vibration associated with this particular critical speed problem, using novel techniques to describe resonance.

  17. Chung Hsin Electric Machinery Manufacturing Corporation CHEM...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Chung Hsin Electric Machinery Manufacturing Corporation CHEM Jump to: navigation, search Name: Chung Hsin Electric & Machinery Manufacturing Corporation (CHEM) Place: Taoyuan...

  18. Machinery (2010 MECS) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Machinery (2010 MECS) Machinery (2010 MECS) Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Machinery Sector (NAICS 333) Energy use data source: 2010 EIA MECS (with adjustments) Footprint Last Revised: February 2014 View footprints for other sectors here. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint Machinery (122.63 KB) More Documents & Publications MECS 2006 - Machinery Cement (2010 MECS) Glass and Glass Products (2010 MECS) Manufacturing Energy Sankey Diagrams Manufacturing energy Sankey

  19. China National Machinery Industry Complete Engineering Corporation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Industry Complete Engineering Corporation CMCEC Jump to: navigation, search Name: China National Machinery Industry Complete Engineering Corporation (CMCEC) Place: Beijing,...

  20. Nakagawa Electric Machinery Manufacturer | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search Name: Nakagawa Electric Machinery Manufacturer Place: Saku, Nagano, Japan Product: A company engages in electrical equipment manufacture. Coordinates:...

  1. Dongying Shengdong Machinery Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Dongying Shengdong Machinery Company Place: China Product: EMC specialised in cogeneration and installing power stations to make use of various types of waste gases....

  2. Architecture of the synaptotagmin-SNARE machinery for neuronal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Architecture of the synaptotagmin-SNARE machinery for neuronal exocytosis Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Architecture of the synaptotagmin-SNARE machinery for neuronal ...

  3. EIS-0300: Minnesota Agri-Power Project: Biomass for Rural Development, Granite Falls, Minnesota

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes DOE and the Minnesota Environmental Quality Boards' [MEQB, a Minnesota State agency] decision to support a proposal by the Minnesota Valley Alfalfa Producers (MnVAP) to construct and operate a 75–103 megawatt biomass fueled gasifier and electric generating facility, known as the Minnesota Agri-Power Plant (MAPP), and associated transmission lines and alfalfa processing facilities.

  4. POSCO Machinery Co Ltd POS M | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Machinery Co Ltd POS M Jump to: navigation, search Name: POSCO Machinery Co Ltd (POS-M) Place: Junnam, Korea (Republic) Zip: 545 885 Product: Korean-based engineering service...

  5. A New Link Between Human and Bacterial Signaling Machinery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Link Between Human and Bacterial Signaling Machinery A New Link Between Human and Bacterial Signaling Machinery Print Tuesday, 19 August 2014 10:34 The human immune system...

  6. Yingkou Jinchen Machinery Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Machinery Co., Ltd Place: Yingkou, Liaoning Province, China Product: China-based PV module laminator maker. Coordinates: 40.686409, 122.277618 Show Map Loading map......

  7. IN OTHER CATEGORIES; MACHINERY; MASS BALANCE; MECHANICAL VIBRATIONS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    world Bracher, B. 42 ENGINEERING NOT INCLUDED IN OTHER CATEGORIES; MACHINERY; MASS BALANCE; MECHANICAL VIBRATIONS; MAINTENANCE; REPAIR Field balancing can achieve significant...

  8. Local Option- Renewable Energy Machinery and Tools Property Tax Exemption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    HB 1297 enacted in March 2015 provides option for local governing body of any county, city, or town to impose a different property tax on renewable energy generating machinery and tools than other...

  9. Rotating machinery surveillance system reduces plant downtime and radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bohanick, J.S.; Robinson, J.C.; Allen, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    A rotating machinery surveillance system (RMSS) was permanently installed at Grand Gulf nuclear station (GGNS) as part of a program sponsored by the US Department of Energy whose goal was to reduce radiation exposure to power plant personnel resulting from the inspection, maintenance, and repair of rotating machinery. The RMSS was installed at GGNS in 1983 to continuously monitor 173 analog vibration signals from proximity probes mounted on 26 machine trains and {approximately}450 process data points via a computer data link. Vibration frequency spectra, i.e., the vibration amplitude versus frequency of vibration, and various characterizations of these spectra are the fundamental data collected by the RMSS for performing machinery diagnostics. The RMSS collects vibration frequency spectra on a daily basis for all the monitored rotating equipment and automatically stores the collected spectra for review by the vibration engineer. Vibration spectra automatically stored by the RMSS fall into categories that include the last normal, alarm, minimum and maximum, past three-day data set, baseline, current, and user-saved spectra. During first and second fuel-cycle operation at GGNS, several significant vibration problems were detected by the RMSS. Two of these are presented in this paper: recirculation pumps and turbine-generator bearing degradation. The total reduction in personnel radiation exposure at GGNS from 1985 to 1987 due to the presence of the RMSS was estimated to be in the range from 49 to 54 person-rem.

  10. Machinery monitoring system installed at nuclear power station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piety, K.; Hamrick, L.; McCurdy, A.

    1981-10-01

    The Grand Gulf Nuclear Station under construction in Mississippi will have a computer-based system to monitor 300 process variables and 200 vibration signals in each of the two units. The system's functions include monitoring support, startup/shutdown, surveillance, and diagnostics. The tasks associated with machinery monitoring are broken down into the initial plant design, construction and startup testing, and power-operation phases. The value of this monitoring is discussed and summarized in a table showing the impact of component failure on plant availability. 4 figures, 3 tables. (DCK)

  11. Systems and methods for autonomously controlling agricultural machinery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoskinson, Reed L.; Bingham, Dennis N.; Svoboda, John M.; Hess, J. Richard

    2003-07-08

    Systems and methods for autonomously controlling agricultural machinery such as a grain combine. The operation components of a combine that function to harvest the grain have characteristics that are measured by sensors. For example, the combine speed, the fan speed, and the like can be measured. An important sensor is the grain loss sensor, which may be used to quantify the amount of grain expelled out of the combine. The grain loss sensor utilizes the fluorescence properties of the grain kernels and the plant residue to identify when the expelled plant material contains grain kernels. The sensor data, in combination with historical and current data stored in a database, is used to identify optimum operating conditions that will result in increased crop yield. After the optimum operating conditions are identified, an on-board computer can generate control signals that will adjust the operation of the components identified in the optimum operating conditions. The changes result in less grain loss and improved grain yield. Also, because new data is continually generated by the sensor, the system has the ability to continually learn such that the efficiency of the agricultural machinery is continually improved.

  12. Monitoring of vibrating machinery using artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alguindigue, I.E.; Loskiewicz-Buczak, A. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Uhrig, R.E. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1991-01-01

    The primary source of vibration in complex engineering systems is rotating machinery. Vibration signatures collected from these components render valuable information about the operational state of the system and may be used to perform diagnostics. For example, the low frequency domain contains information about unbalance, misalignment, instability in journal bearing and mechanical looseness; analysis of the medium frequency range can render information about faults in meshing gear teeth; while the high frequency domain will contain information about incipient faults in rolling-element bearings. Trend analysis may be performed by comparing the vibration spectrum for each machine with a reference spectrum and evaluating the vibration magnitude changes at different frequencies. This form of analysis for diagnostics is often performed by maintenance personnel monitoring and recording transducer signals and analyzing the signals to identify the operating condition of the machine. With the advent of portable fast Fourier transform (FFT) analyzers and laptop'' computers, it is possible to collect and analyze vibration data an site and detect incipient failures several weeks or months before repair is necessary. It is often possible to estimate the remaining life of certain systems once a fault has been detected. RMS velocity, acceleration, displacements, peak value, and crest factor readings can be collected from vibration sensors. To exploit all the information embedded in these signals, a robust and advanced analysis technique is required. Our goal is to design a diagnostic system using neural network technology, a system such as this would automate the interpretation of vibration data coming from plant-wide machinery and permit efficient on-line monitoring of these components.

  13. Monitoring of vibrating machinery using artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alguindigue, I.E.; Loskiewicz-Buczak, A.; Uhrig, R.E. |

    1991-12-31

    The primary source of vibration in complex engineering systems is rotating machinery. Vibration signatures collected from these components render valuable information about the operational state of the system and may be used to perform diagnostics. For example, the low frequency domain contains information about unbalance, misalignment, instability in journal bearing and mechanical looseness; analysis of the medium frequency range can render information about faults in meshing gear teeth; while the high frequency domain will contain information about incipient faults in rolling-element bearings. Trend analysis may be performed by comparing the vibration spectrum for each machine with a reference spectrum and evaluating the vibration magnitude changes at different frequencies. This form of analysis for diagnostics is often performed by maintenance personnel monitoring and recording transducer signals and analyzing the signals to identify the operating condition of the machine. With the advent of portable fast Fourier transform (FFT) analyzers and ``laptop`` computers, it is possible to collect and analyze vibration data an site and detect incipient failures several weeks or months before repair is necessary. It is often possible to estimate the remaining life of certain systems once a fault has been detected. RMS velocity, acceleration, displacements, peak value, and crest factor readings can be collected from vibration sensors. To exploit all the information embedded in these signals, a robust and advanced analysis technique is required. Our goal is to design a diagnostic system using neural network technology, a system such as this would automate the interpretation of vibration data coming from plant-wide machinery and permit efficient on-line monitoring of these components.

  14. Neural networks for the monitoring of rotating machinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alguindigue, I.E.; Loskiewicz-Buczak; Uhrig, R.E. |

    1991-12-31

    Vibration monitoring of components in engineering systems and plants involves the collection of vibration data and detailed analysis to detect features which reflect the operational state of the machinery. The analysis leads to the identification of potential failures and their causes, and makes it possible to perform efficient preventive maintenance. This paper describes a methodology for the automation of some of the activities related to motion and vibration monitoring in these systems. The technique involves training a neural network to model the inter- relationship between signals from two related sensors mounted on an engineering system or component at a time when it is known to be operating properly. Then one signal (or its characteristics) is put into the neural network model to predict the second signal (or its characteristics). This predicted signal is continuously compared with the actual signal A deviation between the predicted and actual signal indicates a changing relationship, usually failure of the component or system. This deviation may be quantified and provides meaningful information about the degree of degradation and deterioration of the component.

  15. Condition monitoring of machinery using motor current signature analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kryter, R.C.; Haynes, H.D.

    1989-01-01

    Motor current signature analysis (MCSA) is a powerful monitoring tool for motor-driven equipment that provides a nonintrusive means for detecting the presence of mechanical and electrical abnormalities in the motor and the driven equipment, including altered conditions in the process ''downstream'' of the motor-driven equipment. It was developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as a means for determining the effects of aging and service wear systems, but it is applicable to a broad range of machinery. MCSA is based on the recognition that an electric motor (ac or dc) driving a mechanical load acts as an efficient and permanently available transducer by sensing mechanical load variations, large and small, long-term and rapid, and converting them into variations in the induced current generated in the motor windings. These motor current variations are carried by the electrical cables processes as desired. Motor current signatures, obtained in both time and over time to provide early indication of degradation. Successful applications of MCSA technology (patent applied for) include not only motor-operated valves but also pumps of various designs, blowers, and air conditioning systems. Examples are presented briefly, and speculation regarding the applicability of MCSA to a broader range of equipment monitoring and production line testing is also given. 1 ref., 13 figs.

  16. Neural networks for the monitoring of rotating machinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alguindigue, I.E.; Loskiewicz-Buczak . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Uhrig, R.E. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1991-01-01

    Vibration monitoring of components in engineering systems and plants involves the collection of vibration data and detailed analysis to detect features which reflect the operational state of the machinery. The analysis leads to the identification of potential failures and their causes, and makes it possible to perform efficient preventive maintenance. This paper describes a methodology for the automation of some of the activities related to motion and vibration monitoring in these systems. The technique involves training a neural network to model the inter- relationship between signals from two related sensors mounted on an engineering system or component at a time when it is known to be operating properly. Then one signal (or its characteristics) is put into the neural network model to predict the second signal (or its characteristics). This predicted signal is continuously compared with the actual signal A deviation between the predicted and actual signal indicates a changing relationship, usually failure of the component or system. This deviation may be quantified and provides meaningful information about the degree of degradation and deterioration of the component.

  17. Solarcoating Machinery GmbH ScM | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Solarcoating Machinery GmbH (ScM) Place: Dormagen, Germany Zip: 41539 Product: German manufacturer of turnkey thin-film fab including the cleaning, TCO and PECVD systems....

  18. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Food Machinery and Chemical Co - WV 04

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Food Machinery and Chemical Co - WV 04 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Food Machinery and Chemical Co. (WV.04 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Food Machining Corp WV.04-1 Location: Nitro , West Virginia WV.04-1 Evaluation Year: 1994 WV.04-1 Site Operations: Proposed research and development on treatment of calcium and aluminum phosphate materials to extract uranium. WV.04-2 WV.04-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Operations were

  19. Safeguards Culture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frazar, Sarah L.; Mladineo, Stephen V.

    2012-07-01

    The concepts of nuclear safety and security culture are well established; however, a common understanding of safeguards culture is not internationally recognized. Supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration, the authors prepared this report, an analysis of the concept of safeguards culture, and gauged its value to the safeguards community. The authors explored distinctions between safeguards culture, safeguards compliance, and safeguards performance, and evaluated synergies and differences between safeguards culture and safety/security culture. The report concludes with suggested next steps.

  20. NAFTA opportunities: Oil and gas field drilling machinery and services sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) significantly improves market access in Mexico and Canada for U.S. exports of oil and gas field equipment. Foreign markets account for more than 80 percent of U.S. shipments of oil and gas field machinery. Foreign markets are expected to continue their importance to this industry, in the long term. Mexico and Canada are moderate-sized markets for U.S. exports of oilfield products. In 1992, U.S. exports of this equipment amounted to about $113 million to Mexico and $11 million to Canada.

  1. Cultural Preservation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    environmental protection program, LANL specialists oversee and manage the Laboratory's cultural resources programs. Several laws, including the National Historic Preservation...

  2. A new structural framework for integrating replication protein A into DNA processing machinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brosey, Chris; Yan, Chunli; Tsutakawa, Susan; Heller, William; Rambo, Robert; Tainer, John; Ivanov, Ivaylo; Chazin, Walter

    2013-01-17

    By coupling the protection and organization of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) with recruitment and alignment of DNA processing factors, replication protein A (RPA) lies at the heart of dynamic multi-protein DNA processing machinery. Nevertheless, how RPA coordinates biochemical functions of its eight domains remains unknown. We examined the structural biochemistry of RPA's DNA-binding activity, combining small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering with all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the architecture of RPA's DNA-binding core. The scattering data reveal compaction promoted by DNA binding; DNA-free RPA exists in an ensemble of states with inter-domain mobility and becomes progressively more condensed and less dynamic on binding ssDNA. Our results contrast with previous models proposing RPA initially binds ssDNA in a condensed state and becomes more extended as it fully engages the substrate. Moreover, the consensus view that RPA engages ssDNA in initial, intermediate and final stages conflicts with our data revealing that RPA undergoes two (not three) transitions as it binds ssDNA with no evidence for a discrete intermediate state. These results form a framework for understanding how RPA integrates the ssDNA substrate into DNA processing machinery, provides substrate access to its binding partners and promotes the progression and selection of DNA processing pathways.

  3. A new structural framework for integrating replication protein A into DNA processing machinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brosey, Chris A; Yan, Chunli; Tsutakawa, Susan E; Heller, William T; Rambo, Robert P; Tainer, John A; Ivanov, Ivaylo; Chazin, Walter J

    2013-01-01

    By coupling the protection and organization of ssDNA with the recruitment and alignment of DNA processing factors, Replication Protein A (RPA) lies at the heart of dynamic multi-protein DNA processing machinery. Nevertheless, how RPA manages to coordinate the biochemical functions of its eight domains remains unknown. We examined the structural biochemistry of RPA s DNA binding activity, combining small-angle x-ray and neutron scattering with all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the architecture of RPA s DNA-binding core. It has been long held that RPA engages ssDNA in three stages, but our data reveal that RPA undergoes two rather than three transitions as it binds ssDNA. In contrast to previous models, RPA is more compact when fully engaged on 20-30 nucleotides of ssDNA than when DNA-free, and there is no evidence for significant population of a highly compacted structure in the initial 8-10 nucleotide binding mode. These results provide a new framework for understanding the integration of ssDNA into DNA processing machinery and how binding partners may manipulate RPA architecture to gain access to the substrate.

  4. Chaos concepts as diagnostic tools for assessing rotating machinery vibration signatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, M.L.; Loparo, K.A.

    1996-06-01

    Chaos content in measured vibration signals is of some practical importance in rotordynamical systems. Of particular interest is the relationship between the occurrence of determinsite chaos and the diagnosis of mechanical failures in rotating machinery. Two nonlinear rotordynamical systems were studied using simulation and various forms of subharmonic, quasiperiodic and chaotic vibrations were observed. Different routes into and out of chaos show important signs for wear assessment and failure prediction. Experimental test facilities are currently under development and the next steps involve experimental verification of the simulation results and the development of signal processing techniques for extracting the dynamical features of the vibration signatures from measured time series data. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olszewski, M.

    2006-10-31

    , subsystems, and component research and development activities; (2) Develop and validate individual subsystems and components, including electric motors, emission control devices, battery systems, power electronics, accessories, and devices to reduce parasitic losses; and (3) Determine how well the components and subsystems work together in a vehicle environment or as a complete propulsion system and whether the efficiency and performance targets at the vehicle level have been achieved. The research performed under the Vehicle Systems subprogram will help remove technical and cost barriers to enable the development of technology for use in such advanced vehicles as hybrid and fuel-cell-powered automobiles that meet the goals of the FreedomCAR Program. A key element in making hybrid electric vehicles practical is providing an affordable electric traction drive system. This will require attaining weight, volume, and cost targets for the power electronics and electrical machines subsystems of the traction drive system. Areas of development include these: (1) Novel traction motor designs that result in increased power density and lower cost; (2) Inverter technologies involving new topologies to achieve higher efficiency and the ability to accommodate higher-temperature environments; (3) Converter concepts that employ means of reducing the component count and integrating functionality to decrease size, weight, and cost; (4) More effective thermal control and packaging technologies; and (5) Integrated motor/inverter concepts. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center conducts fundamental research, evaluates hardware, and assists in the technical direction of the DOE Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program, Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program. In this role, ORNL serves on the FreedomCAR Electrical and Electronics Technical Team, evaluates proposals for DOE, and lends its technological expertise to

  6. FY2009 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olszewski, Mitchell

    2009-11-01

    system and whether the efficiency and performance targets at the vehicle level have been achieved. The research performed under this subprogram will help remove technical and cost barriers to enable the development of technology for use in such advanced vehicles as hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), plug-in HEVs (PHEVs), all electric vehicles, and fuel-cell-powered automobiles that meet the goals of the Vehicle Technologies Program. A key element in making these advanced vehicles practical is providing an affordable electric traction drive system. This will require attaining weight, volume, and cost targets for the power electronics and electrical machines subsystems of the traction drive system. Areas of development include these: (1) novel traction motor designs that result in increased power density and lower cost; (2) inverter technologies involving new topologies to achieve higher efficiency, with the ability to accommodate higher-temperature environments while achieving high reliability; (3) converter concepts that employ means of reducing the component count and integrating functionality to decrease size, weight, and cost; (4) new onboard battery charging concepts that result in decreased cost and size; (5) more effective thermal control and packaging technologies; and (6) integrated motor/inverter concepts. ORNL's Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center conducts fundamental research, evaluates hardware, and assists in the technical direction of the DOE Vehicle Technologies Program, APEEM subprogram. In this role, ORNL serves on the FreedomCAR Electrical and Electronics Technical Team, evaluates proposals for DOE, and lends its technological expertise to the direction of projects and evaluation of developing technologies. ORNL also executes specific projects for DOE. The following report discusses those projects carried out in FY 2009 and conveys highlights of their accomplishments. Numerous project reviews, technical reports, and papers have been

  7. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olszewski, M.

    2008-10-15

    performance targets at the vehicle level have been achieved. The research performed under this subprogram will help remove technical and cost barriers to enable the development of technology for use in such advanced vehicles as hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), plug-in HEVs, and fuel-cell-powered automobiles that meet the goals of the Vehicle Technologies Program. A key element in making HEVs practical is providing an affordable electric traction drive system. This will require attaining weight, volume, and cost targets for the power electronics and electrical machines subsystems of the traction drive system. Areas of development include these: (1) novel traction motor designs that result in increased power density and lower cost; (2) inverter technologies involving new topologies to achieve higher efficiency and the ability to accommodate higher-temperature environments; (3) converter concepts that employ means of reducing the component count and integrating functionality to decrease size, weight, and cost; (4) more effective thermal control and packaging technologies; and (5) integrated motor/inverter concepts. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center conducts fundamental research, evaluates hardware, and assists in the technical direction of the DOE Vehicle Technologies Program, APEEM subprogram. In this role, ORNL serves on the FreedomCAR Electrical and Electronics Technical Team, evaluates proposals for DOE, and lends its technological expertise to the direction of projects and evaluation of developing technologies.

  8. Decreased expression of RNA interference machinery, Dicer and Drosha, is associated with poor outcome in ovarian cancer patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merritt, William M.; Lin, Yvonne G.; Han, Liz Y.; Kamat, Aparna A.; Spannuth, Whitney A.; Schmandt, Rosemarie; Urbauer, Diana; Pennacchio, Len A.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Zeidan, Alexandra; Wang, Hua; Mueller, Peter; Lenburg, Marc E.; Gray, Joe W.; Mok, Samuel; Birrer, Michael J.; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Coleman, Robert L.; Bar-Eli, Menashe; Sood, Anil K.

    2008-05-06

    The clinical and functional significance of RNA interference (RNAi) machinery, Dicer and Drosha, in ovarian cancer is not known and was examined. Dicer and Drosha expression was measured in ovarian cancer cell lines (n=8) and invasive epithelial ovarian cancer specimens (n=111) and correlated with clinical outcome. Validation was performed with previously published cohorts of ovarian, breast, and lung cancer patients. Anti-Galectin-3 siRNA and shRNA transfections were used for in vitro functional studies. Dicer and Drosha mRNA and protein levels were decreased in 37% to 63% of ovarian cancer cell lines and in 60% and 51% of human ovarian cancer specimens, respectively. Low Dicer was significantly associated with advanced tumor stage (p=0.007), and low Drosha with suboptimal surgical cytoreduction (p=0.02). Tumors with both high Dicer and Drosha were associated with increased median patient survival (>11 years vs. 2.66 years for other groups; p<0.001). In multivariate analysis, high Dicer (HR=0.48; p=0.02), high-grade histology (HR=2.46; p=0.03), and poor chemoresponse (HR=3.95; p<0.001) were identified as independent predictors of disease-specific survival. Findings of poor clinical outcome with low Dicer expression were validated in separate cohorts of cancer patients. Galectin-3 silencing with siRNA transfection was superior to shRNA in cell lines with low Dicer (78-95% vs. 4-8% compared to non-targeting sequences), and similar in cell lines with high Dicer. Our findings demonstrate the clinical and functional impact of RNAi machinery alterations in ovarian carcinoma and support the use of siRNA constructs that do not require endogenous Dicer and Drosha for therapeutic applications.

  9. Anaerobic thermophilic culture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Wiegel, Jurgen K. W.

    1981-01-01

    A newly discovered thermophilic anaerobe is described that was isolated in a biologically pure culture and designated Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus ATCC 3/550. T. Ethanolicus is cultured in aqueous nutrient medium under anaerobic, thermophilic conditions and is used in a novel process for producing ethanol by subjecting carbohydrates, particularly the saccharides, to fermentation action of the new microorganism in a biologically pure culture.

  10. Safeguards Culture: Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frazar, Sarah L.; Mladineo, Stephen V.

    2010-06-01

    Today, safeguards culture can be a useful tool for measuring nonproliferation postures, but so far its impact on the international safeguards regime has been underappreciated. There is no agreed upon definition for safeguards culture nor agreement on how it should be measured. This paper argues that safeguards culture as an indicator of a country’s nonproliferation posture can be a useful tool.

  11. Safeguards Culture: Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mladineo, Stephen V.

    2009-05-27

    Abstract: At the 2005 INMM/ESARDA Workshop in Santa Fe, New Mexico, I presented a paper entitled “Changing the Safeguards Culture: Broader Perspectives and Challenges.” That paper described a set of theoretical models that can be used as a basis for evaluating changes to safeguards culture. This paper builds on that theoretical discussion to address practical methods for influencing culture. It takes lessons from methods used to influence change in safety culture and security culture, and examines the applicability of these lessons to changing safeguards culture. Paper: At the 2005 INMM/ESARDA Workshop on “Changing the Safeguards Culture: Broader Perspectives and Challenges,” in Santa Fe, New Mexico, I presented a paper entitled “Changing the Safeguards Culture: Broader Perspectives and Challenges.” That paper, coauthored by Karyn R. Durbin and Andrew Van Duzer, described a set of theoretical models that can be used as a basis for evaluating changes to safeguards culture. This paper updates that theoretical discussion, and seeks to address practical methods for influencing culture. It takes lessons from methods used to influence change in safety culture and security culture, and examines the applicability of these lessons to changing safeguards culture. Implicit in this discussion is an understanding that improving a culture is not an end in itself, but is one method of improving the underlying discipline, that is safety, security, or safeguards. Culture can be defined as a way of life, or general customs and beliefs of a particular group of people at a particular time. There are internationally accepted definitions of safety culture and nuclear security culture. As yet, there is no official agreed upon definition of safeguards culture. At the end of the paper I will propose my definition. At the Santa Fe Workshop the summary by the Co-Chairs of Working Group 1, “The Further Evolution of Safeguards,” noted: “It is clear that ‘safeguards culture’ needs to be

  12. FY 2005 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olszewski, M

    2005-11-22

    component research and development activities; (2) Develop and validate individual subsystems and components, including electric motors, emission control devices, battery systems, power electronics, accessories, and devices to reduce parasitic losses; and (3) Determine how well the components and subsystems work together in a vehicle environment or as a complete propulsion system and whether the efficiency and performance targets at the vehicle level have been achieved. The research performed under the Vehicle Systems subprogram will help remove technical and cost barriers to enable technology for use in such advanced vehicles as hybrid and fuel-cell-powered automobiles that meet the goals of the FreedomCAR Program. A key element in making hybrid electric vehicles practical is providing an affordable electric traction drive system. This will require attaining weight, volume, and cost targets for the power electronics and electrical machines subsystems of the traction drive system. Areas of development include: (1) Novel traction motor designs that result in increased power density and lower cost; (2) Inverter technologies involving new topologies to achieve higher efficiency and the ability to accommodate higher-temperature environments; (3) Converter concepts that employ means of reducing the component count and integrating functionality to decrease size, weight, and cost; (4) More effective thermal control and packaging technologies; and (5) Integrated motor/inverter concepts. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center conducts fundamental research, evaluates hardware, and assists in the technical direction of the DOE Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program, Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program. In this role, ORNL serves on the FreedomCAR Electrical and Electronics Technical Team, evaluates proposals for DOE, and lends its technological expertise to the direction of projects and

  13. ORISE: Our Culture

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Our Culture The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) cares about its employees, and this is evident through the abundance of benefits-both tangible and...

  14. Anaerobic thermophilic culture system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Wiegel, Jurgen K. W.

    1981-01-01

    A mixed culture system of the newly discovered microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus ATCC31550 and the microorganism Clostridium thermocellum ATCC31549 is described. In a mixed nutrient culture medium that contains cellulose, these microorganisms have been coupled and cultivated to efficiently ferment cellulose to produce recoverable quantities of ethanol under anaerobic, thermophilic conditions.

  15. Bootheel Agri Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zip: 63801 Product: Developer of a now-postponed 100m gallon (378m litre) per year bioethanol plant in Sikeston, Missouri. Coordinates: 36.876525, -89.588284 Show Map Loading...

  16. Development and demonstration of surveillance and diagnostics of rotating machinery for reducing radiation exposure to nuclear power plant personnel: Appendices: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, J.W.; Bohanick, J.S.

    1988-02-19

    This program was designed to reduce radiation exposure to power plant personnel resulting from inspection, maintenance, and repair of rotating equipment. The new rotating machinery monitoring system for this program was installed at GGNS during August 1983. The following nine appendices are presented: signals monitored at GGNS; definition of characterized spectral values; instructions for alignment and balance programs; machine diagrams; FFT program; software module descriptions; sample radiation survey forms used for exposure study; radiation exposure compared to other plants; and a technical section instruction for the vibration monitoring program at GGNS.

  17. FY2007 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olszewski, Mitchell

    2007-10-01

    the efficiency and performance targets at the vehicle level have been achieved. The research performed under this subprogram will help remove technical and cost barriers to enable the development of technology for use in such advanced vehicles as hybrid and fuel-cell-powered automobiles that meet the goals of the FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program. A key element in making hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) practical is providing an affordable electric traction drive system. This will require attaining weight, volume, and cost targets for the power electronics and electrical machines subsystems of the traction drive system. Areas of development include these: (1) novel traction motor designs that result in increased power density and lower cost; (2) inverter technologies involving new topologies to achieve higher efficiency and the ability to accommodate higher-temperature environments; (3) converter concepts that employ means of reducing the component count and integrating functionality to decrease size, weight, and cost; (4) more effective thermal control and packaging technologies; and (5) integrated motor/inverter concepts. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center conducts fundamental research, evaluates hardware, and assists in the technical direction of the DOE Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program, APEEM subprogram. In this role, ORNL serves on the FreedomCAR Electrical and Electronics Technical Team, evaluates proposals for DOE, and lends its technological expertise to the direction of projects and evaluation of developing technologies. ORNL also executes specific projects for DOE. The following report discusses those projects carried out in FY 2007 and conveys highlights of their accomplishments. Numerous project reviews, technical reports, and papers have been published for these efforts, if the reader is interested in pursuing details of the work.

  18. Enclosure Requirements to Protect Personnel from Spinning Rotor Frailures at the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKeever, John W

    2007-08-01

    Performance evaluation of electric motors is a major function of the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center (PEEMRC). Normally these motors have a fixed wire-wound stator and a rotating rotor, which may have conductors embedded in a ferromagnetic core (induction motors), magnets mounted on the surface of the ferromagnetic core with a thin metal or composite cylinder or ring to hold them in place, or magnets embedded in the ferromagnetic core. Most of the work currently involves the last two permanent magnet (PM) configurations. Although the stator of a radial-gap motor can absorb energy from many of the fragments ejected from the rotor during operation, the stator of an axial-gap motor is not positioned to provide significant protection. The housing of each motor can also absorb some of the energy. The most conservative approach, however, is to assume that all fragments from the rotor must be contained by a protective enclosure. An ideal enclosure is transparent. Manufacturers of such plastics as Lexan, Tuffak, and Cyrolon sell different variations of transparent enclosure material. Lexan is a polycarbonate sheet. Lexgard{reg_sign} is a penetration resistant material made by layering polycarbonate material between pieces of ordinary glass. A fragment striking a sheet of enclosure material will pierce the surface layer, but the layered polycarbonate-glass material is able to absorb the fragment's energy before it completes penetration. Tuffak{reg_sign} is Lexan polycarbonate. Cyrolon{reg_sign} bullet resistant material is acrylic sheet. The ability of the enclosure to stop a fragment depends on its thickness as well as the penetration capability of the fragment; for example, a lead fragment has much less penetrating capability than a steel fragment. Enclosure thicknesses are commercially available to provide several levels of protection. These levels depend on the momentum of the fragments and have been evaluated for some common types of ammunition

  19. Safety Culture in Nuclear Installations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    IAEA-TECDOC-1329 Safety Culture in Nuclear Installations, Guidance for use in the Enhancement of Safety Culture, International Atomic Energy Agency IAEA, December 2002.

  20. Hanford Cultural Resources - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About Us Hanford Site Wide Programs Hanford's Tribal Program Hanford Cultural Resources About Us Hanford's Tribal Program Home Hanford Cultural Resources DOE American Indian Tribal...

  1. Mass algal culture system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raymond, Lawrence P.

    1981-01-01

    An apparatus and process for the culture of algae in a liquid medium is disclosed. The medium circulates through an open trough and is exposed to an atmosphere which is temperature regulated. The nutrient content of the liquid medium is regulated to control the chemical composition growth and reproduction characteristics of the cultured algae. Before it is allowed to strike the medium, sunlight is passed through a filter to remove wavelengths which are not photosynthetically active. Heat energy can be recovered from the filter.

  2. Mass algal culture system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raymond, Lawrence P.

    1982-01-01

    An apparatus and process for the culture of algae in a liquid medium is disclosed. The medium circulates through an open trough and is exposed to an atmosphere which is temperature regulated. The nutrient content of the liquid medium is regulated to control the chemical composition growth and reproduction characteristics of the cultured algae. Before it is allowed to strike the medium, sunlight is passed through a filter to remove wavelengths which are not photosynthetically active. Heat energy can be recovered from the filter.

  3. Measuring Safeguards Culture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frazar, Sarah L.; Mladineo, Stephen V.

    2011-07-19

    As the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) implements a State Level Approach to its safeguards verification responsibilities, a number of countries are beginning new nuclear power programs and building new nuclear fuel cycle faculties. The State Level approach is holistic and investigatory in nature, creating a need for transparent, non-discriminatory judgments about a state's nonproliferation posture. In support of this need, the authors previously explored the value of defining and measuring a state's safeguards culture. We argued that a clear definition of safeguards culture and an accompanying set of metrics could be applied to provide an objective evaluation and demonstration of a country's nonproliferation posture. As part of this research, we outlined four high-level metrics that could be used to evaluate a state's nuclear posture. We identified general data points. This paper elaborates on those metrics, further refining the data points to generate a measurable scale of safeguards cultures. We believe that this work could advance the IAEA's goals of implementing a safeguards system that is fully information driven, while strengthening confidence in its safeguards conclusions.

  4. DOE - NNSA/NFO -- Cultural Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cultural Resources NNSANFO Language Options U.S. DOENNSA - Nevada Field Office Click to subscribe to NNSS News Cultural Resources Environmental Cultural photo Prehistoric ...

  5. Poeh Cultural Center wins grant

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Poeh Cultural Center wins grant, educates public Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue: September 1, 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Poeh Cultural Center wins grant Native American Venture Acceleration Fund money helps increase education and tourism. May 2, 2016 Poeh Cultural Center and Museum received a grant through the Native American Venture Acceleration Fund in January to develop training programs for artists and to

  6. Cultural Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic SearchQuerying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Cultural...

  7. Surveys of organizational culture and safety culture in nuclear power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Walter S.

    2000-07-30

    The results of a survey of organizational culture at a nuclear power plant are summarized and compared with those of a similar survey which has been described in the literature on ''high-reliability organizations''. A general-purpose cultural inventory showed a profile of organizational style similar to that reported in the literature; the factor structure for the styles was also similar to that of the plant previously described. A specialized scale designed to measure ''safety culture'' did not distinguished among groups within the organization that would be expected to differ.

  8. Organizational Culture and Safety Culture: Are they one and the...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    upward information flow won't exist in the safety aspect for very long. If employee involvement in planning is not a norm for the organizational culture - employee involvement in...

  9. Hanford cultural resources management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatters, J.C.

    1989-06-01

    As a federal agency, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been directed by Congress and the President to provide leadership in the preservation of prehistoric, historical, and cultural resources on lands it administers, to manage these in a spirit of stewardship for future generations, and to protect and preserve the rights of Native Americans to religious freedom. The purpose of this document is to describe how the DOE-Richland Operations (DOE-RL) will meet those responsibilities on the Hanford Site, pursuant to guidelines for Agency Responsibilities under the Historic Preservation Act (FR 53:31, February 17, 1988). This document is intended for multiple uses. Among other things, the text is designed as a manual for cultural resource managers to follow and as an explanation of the process of cultural resource regulatory compliance for the DOE-RL and Site contractors. 10 refs., 17 figs., 11 tabs.

  10. Perspectives on Changing Safeguards Culture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mladineo, Stephen V.; Durbin, Karyn R.; Van Duzer, Andrew

    2005-12-01

    The importance of culture in the nuclear field has become widely recognized. In the wake of the 9-11 attacks in the United States, and terrorist attacks worldwide, the international community has become interested in strengthening nuclear security culture for much of the same reasons that it became interested in strengthening the nuclear safety culture in the 1980’s. The accidents that occurred at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl led to a realization that nuclear operations in one country can directly affect other countries. The accidents also led to the realization that technology alone cannot guarantee safety and that the human element has a key role to play in the safety operation of nuclear power plans.

  11. Introduction to Safety Culture Advice

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Safety Culture Advice Thursday, June 7, 2012 As expressed in past advice, and in draft advice being proposed today, the safe and effective treatment of Hanford's tank waste through vitrification, is a priority for the Hanford Advisory Board. The cornerstone of vitrification is the Waste Treatment Plant. We all want the WTP to work safely and effectively. The Tank Waste Committee and the Health Safety and Environmental Protection Committee are bringing this advice forward today in response to

  12. Cultural Resource Conservation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Services » Environment » Environmental Policy and Assistance » Cultural Resource Conservation Cultural Resource Conservation DOE is committed to responsible stewardship of cultural resources on its lands and has an obligation to protect these resources for future generations. Many rich and varied natural and cultural resources are present on the Departments lands and waters that contain archaeological and historical sites, threatened and endangered species, marine mammals, Native American

  13. "Berkeley Lab Cultural Festival," October 26, 2011

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lee, Soo; Simon, Horst; Grasz, Erna; Carl, Rachel; Ezeife, Loretta; Serafino, Adel;

    2013-05-29

    This is the First Annual Berkeley Lab Cultural Festival, sponsored by the Lab-Wide Diversity and Inclusion Council subcommittee.

  14. Word Pro - S2

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Table 2.7 U.S. Government Energy Consumption by Agency, Fiscal Years (Trillion Btu) Fiscal Year a Agri- culture Defense Energy GSA b HHS c Interior Justice NASA d Postal Service ...

  15. A literature review of safety culture.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, Kerstan Suzanne; Stevens-Adams, Susan Marie; Wenner, Caren A.

    2013-03-01

    Workplace safety has been historically neglected by organizations in order to enhance profitability. Over the past 30 years, safety concerns and attention to safety have increased due to a series of disastrous events occurring across many different industries (e.g., Chernobyl, Upper Big-Branch Mine, Davis-Besse etc.). Many organizations have focused on promoting a healthy safety culture as a way to understand past incidents, and to prevent future disasters. There is an extensive academic literature devoted to safety culture, and the Department of Energy has also published a significant number of documents related to safety culture. The purpose of the current endeavor was to conduct a review of the safety culture literature in order to understand definitions, methodologies, models, and successful interventions for improving safety culture. After reviewing the literature, we observed four emerging themes. First, it was apparent that although safety culture is a valuable construct, it has some inherent weaknesses. For example, there is no common definition of safety culture and no standard way for assessing the construct. Second, it is apparent that researchers know how to measure particular components of safety culture, with specific focus on individual and organizational factors. Such existing methodologies can be leveraged for future assessments. Third, based on the published literature, the relationship between safety culture and performance is tenuous at best. There are few empirical studies that examine the relationship between safety culture and safety performance metrics. Further, most of these studies do not include a description of the implementation of interventions to improve safety culture, or do not measure the effect of these interventions on safety culture or performance. Fourth, safety culture is best viewed as a dynamic, multi-faceted overall system composed of individual, engineered and organizational models. By addressing all three components of

  16. Algal Culture Management and Strain Selection Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    ATP3 (Algae Testbed Public-Private Partnership) will be hosting the Microalgal Culture Management and Strain Selection Workshop August 24–28, 2015, at The University of Texas at Austin. Topics will include isolating and identifying microalgae, handling and managing microalgal cultures, screening for desirable characteristics, genetically improving strains, and analyzing lipids and higher-value products. Workshop modules will include hands-on bioprospecting, performing sample measurements, monitoring cultures for contaminants, and analyzing algal biomass composition.

  17. Montana Cultural Records Webpage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Montana Cultural Records Webpage Abstract Provides access to the Montana Antiquities Database and provides information about the structure and...

  18. MOWII Webinar: Wind Development Cultural Resource Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    During the planning stages, wind energy development can be affected by the regulatory process relative to cultural resource management issues. Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act ...

  19. Cultural Roadmap Meeting | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Team met with members of the geothermal permitting community who had experience and involvement in navigating the tribal and cultural process. During the afternoon workshop,...

  20. Reversible gelling culture media for in-vitro cell culture in three-dimensional matrices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    An, Yuehuei H.; Mironov, Vladimir A.; Gutowska, Anna

    2000-01-01

    A gelling cell culture medium useful for forming a three dimensional matrix for cell culture in vitro is prepared by copolymerizing an acrylamide derivative with a hydrophilic comonomer to form a reversible (preferably thermally reversible) gelling linear random copolymer in the form of a plurality of linear chains having a plurality of molecular weights greater than or equal to a minimum gelling molecular weight cutoff, mixing the copolymer with an aqueous solvent to form a reversible gelling solution and adding a cell culture medium to the gelling solution to form the gelling cell culture medium. Cells such as chondrocytes or hepatocytes are added to the culture medium to form a seeded culture medium, and temperature of the medium is raised to gel the seeded culture medium and form a three dimensional matrix containing the cells. After propagating the cells in the matrix, the cells may be recovered by lowering the temperature to dissolve the matrix and centrifuging.

  1. Cultural intelligence support for military operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guthormsen, Amy M.; MacKerrow, Edward P; Merritt, Terence M; Morgart, Ruth E

    2010-04-08

    It has long been recognized that military success relies on knowledge of the enemy. In the context of standard warfare, adequate knowledge of the enemy may be gained by analyzing observable, measurable data. In the context of modern counterinsurgency operations and the global war on terror, the task of predicting the behavior of the enemy is vastly more complex and difficult. Without an understanding of the ways individuals in the host nation interpret and react to events, no amount of objective information can provide the insight required to accurately predict behavior. US military doctrine has begun to recognize the importance of the many ways that local culture can affect operation success. Increasingly military decision makers use cultural information in the service of operation planning, and troops are provided with pre-deployment cultural training. However, no amount of training can cover the breadth and depth of potentially useful cultural information, and no amount of careful planning can avoid the need to adapt as situations develop. Therefore, a critical challenge is to provide useful tools to US personnel in their efforts to collect, analyze, and utilize cultural information. Essential functions for cultural support tools include the following: (1) to narrow down a broad range of available data and focus the user's attention on context-relevant information, (2) to present cultural information in an easily understood form, (3) to prompt the user to seek relevant information in the environment, (4) to synthesize information, and (5) to predict outcomes based on possible courses of operation. In this paper, we begin by reviewing the ways in which military operations can benefit from cultural intelligence. We then discuss frameworks for analyzing cultural information in the context of a military operation. We conclude with a demonstration of our current efforts to develop a tool that meets the aforementioned functional challenges.

  2. Integrated Safety Management Safety Culture Resources | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Safety Culture Resources Integrated Safety Management Safety Culture Resources A collection of resources available in implementing ISM safety culture activities Safety from the Operator's Perspective: We are All in This Together (2005) Transcript, Keeping the Edge: Enhancing Performance Through Managing Culture (2003), Edgar H. Schein, Ph.D. Proceedings of the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards Safety Culture Workshop (2003) Safety Culture in Nuclear Installations: Guidance for

  3. Cultural Artifacts Cross Eras at the NNSS

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is well known that the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) is home to many artifacts from the Cold War. But few people may be aware of the older important cultural resources that exist throughout the site.

  4. Department of Energy Management of Cultural Resources

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-05-02

    The purpose of this Policy is to ensure that Department of Energy (DOE) programs, including the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), and field elements integrate cultural resources management into their missions and activities. Certified 1-28-11. No cancellation.

  5. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowrey, Diana Lee

    2009-02-01

    As a federal agency, the U.S. Department of Energy has been directed by Congress, the U.S. president, and the American public to provide leadership in the preservation of prehistoric, historic, and other cultural resources on the lands it administers. This mandate to preserve cultural resources in a spirit of stewardship for the future is outlined in various federal preservation laws, regulations, and guidelines such as the National Historic Preservation Act, the Archaeological Resources Protection Act, and the National Environmental Policy Act. The purpose of this Cultural Resource Management Plan is to describe how the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office will meet these responsibilities at the Idaho National Laboratory. This Laboratory, which is located in southeastern Idaho, is home to a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least 13,500 years of human occupation in the southeastern Idaho area. These resources are nonrenewable; bear valuable physical and intangible legacies; and yield important information about the past, present, and perhaps the future. There are special challenges associated with balancing the preservation of these sites with the management and ongoing operation of an active scientific laboratory. The Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office is committed to a cultural resource management program that accepts these challenges in a manner reflecting both the spirit and intent of the legislative mandates. This document is designed for multiple uses and is intended to be flexible and responsive to future changes in law or mission. Document flexibility and responsiveness will be assured through annual reviews and as-needed updates. Document content includes summaries of Laboratory cultural resource philosophy and overall Department of Energy policy; brief contextual overviews of Laboratory missions, environment, and cultural history; and an overview of cultural resource management practices. A series of

  6. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowrey, Diana Lee

    2011-02-01

    As a federal agency, the U.S. Department of Energy has been directed by Congress, the U.S. president, and the American public to provide leadership in the preservation of prehistoric, historic, and other cultural resources on the lands it administers. This mandate to preserve cultural resources in a spirit of stewardship for the future is outlined in various federal preservation laws, regulations, and guidelines such as the National Historic Preservation Act, the Archaeological Resources Protection Act, and the National Environmental Policy Act. The purpose of this Cultural Resource Management Plan is to describe how the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office will meet these responsibilities at the Idaho National Laboratory. This Laboratory, which is located in southeastern Idaho, is home to a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least 13,500 years of human occupation in the southeastern Idaho area. These resources are nonrenewable; bear valuable physical and intangible legacies; and yield important information about the past, present, and perhaps the future. There are special challenges associated with balancing the preservation of these sites with the management and ongoing operation of an active scientific laboratory. The Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office is committed to a cultural resource management program that accepts these challenges in a manner reflecting both the spirit and intent of the legislative mandates. This document is designed for multiple uses and is intended to be flexible and responsive to future changes in law or mission. Document flexibility and responsiveness will be assured through annual reviews and as-needed updates. Document content includes summaries of Laboratory cultural resource philosophy and overall Department of Energy policy; brief contextual overviews of Laboratory missions, environment, and cultural history; and an overview of cultural resource management practices. A series of

  7. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julie Braun Williams

    2013-02-01

    As a federal agency, the U.S. Department of Energy has been directed by Congress, the U.S. president, and the American public to provide leadership in the preservation of prehistoric, historic, and other cultural resources on the lands it administers. This mandate to preserve cultural resources in a spirit of stewardship for the future is outlined in various federal preservation laws, regulations, and guidelines such as the National Historic Preservation Act, the Archaeological Resources Protection Act, and the National Environmental Policy Act. The purpose of this Cultural Resource Management Plan is to describe how the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office will meet these responsibilities at Idaho National Laboratory in southeastern Idaho. The Idaho National Laboratory is home to a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least 13,500 years of human occupation in the southeastern Idaho area. These resources are nonrenewable, bear valuable physical and intangible legacies, and yield important information about the past, present, and perhaps the future. There are special challenges associated with balancing the preservation of these sites with the management and ongoing operation of an active scientific laboratory. The Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office is committed to a cultural resource management program that accepts these challenges in a manner reflecting both the spirit and intent of the legislative mandates. This document is designed for multiple uses and is intended to be flexible and responsive to future changes in law or mission. Document flexibility and responsiveness will be assured through regular reviews and as-needed updates. Document content includes summaries of Laboratory cultural resource philosophy and overall Department of Energy policy; brief contextual overviews of Laboratory missions, environment, and cultural history; and an overview of cultural resource management practices. A series of appendices

  8. Integration of Safety Culture Attributes into EFCOG Work Planning...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Planning and Control Guidance Document Integration of Safety Culture Attributes into EFCOG ... Topics Covered: Integration of Safety Culture (SC) Attributes into EFCOG Work Planning and ...

  9. BLM Manual 8140 - Protecting Cultural Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    section provides general guidance for protecting cultural resources from natural or human-caused deterioration; for making decisions about recovering significant cultural...

  10. Independent Oversight Follow-up Assessment of Safety Culture...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assessment of Safety Culture at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - June 2014 Independent Oversight Follow-up Assessment of Safety Culture at the Waste Treatment and...

  11. Enterprise Assessments Follow-up Assessment of Safety Culture...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assessment of Safety Culture at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - June 2015 Enterprise Assessments Follow-up Assessment of Safety Culture at the Hanford...

  12. Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Oversight Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility ... of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project Table of ...

  13. Independent Oversight Follow-up Assessment of Safety Culture...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Independent Oversight Follow-up Assessment of Safety Culture at the Waste Treatment and ... Assessment of Safety Culture at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Table ...

  14. Wyoming Department of State Parks and Cultural Resources | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cultural Resources Jump to: navigation, search Name: Wyoming Department of State Parks and Cultural Resources Abbreviation: SPCR Address: 2301 Central Avenue Place: Cheyenne,...

  15. Self-Reliability and Motivation in a Nuclear Security Culture...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and Motivation in a Nuclear Security Culture Enhancement Program Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Self-Reliability and Motivation in a Nuclear Security Culture ...

  16. Zero Emissions Coal Syngas Oxygen Turbo Machinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis Horazak

    2010-12-31

    Siemens Energy, Inc. (formerly Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation) worked with Clean Energy Systems and Florida Turbine Technologies to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of advanced turbines for oxy-fuel based power systems that discharge negligible CO{sub 2} into the atmosphere. The approach builds upon ultra supercritical steam turbine and advanced gas turbine technology with the goal of attaining plant efficiencies above 50% in the 2015 timeframe. Conceptual designs were developed for baseline, near term, and long term oxy-fuel turbine cycles, representing commercial introductions of increasingly advanced thermal conditions and increasing exposure to steam-CO{sub 2} mixtures. An economic analysis and market demand study was performed by Science Applications International Corp. (SAIC), and indicated that long-term oxy-fuel turbine cycles start to look attractive in 2025 when the CO{sub 2} tax is assumed to reach $40/ ton, and by 2030 it has a clear advantage over both IGCC with sequestration and pulverized coal with sequestration. A separate risk analysis of the oxy-fuel combustor, HP turbine, re-heater, and IP turbine of the long-term cycle identified and categorized risks and proposed mitigation measures. In 2007 the program began to focus on a potential oxy-fuel turbine power generation demonstration project in the 2012 -13 time period while still maintaining a link to the requirements of the long-term oxy-syngas cycle. The SGT-900 turbine was identified as the best fit for modification into an intermediate pressure turbine (IPT) for this application. The base metals, bond coats, thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), and rotor materials used in the SGT-900 were tested for their ability to operate in the steam- CO{sub 2} environment of the oxy-fuel OFT-900. Test results indicated that these same materials would operate satisfactorily, and the plan, is to use SGT-900materials for the OFT-900. Follow-on programs for corrosion testing and evaluation of crack growth rates in oxy-fuel environments have been proposed to build on these results and provide quantifiable assessments of the effects of oxy-fuel environments on the service lives of turbine components.

  17. Aerodynamic seal assemblies for turbo-machinery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bidkar, Rahul Anil; Wolfe, Christopher; Fang, Biao

    2015-09-29

    The present application provides an aerodynamic seal assembly for use with a turbo-machine. The aerodynamic seal assembly may include a number of springs, a shoe connected to the springs, and a secondary seal positioned about the springs and the shoe.

  18. Machinery Footprint, October 2012 (MECS 2006)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-10-17

    Manufacturing energy and carbon footprints map energy consumption and losses, as well as greenhouse gas emissions from fuel consumption, for fifteen individual U.S. manufacturing sectors (representing 94% of all manufacturing energy use) and for the entire manufacturing sector. By providing energy consumption and emissions figures broken down by end use, the footprints allow for comparisons of energy use and emissions sources both within and across sectors. The footprints portray a large amount of information for each sector, including: * Comparison of the energy generated offsite and transferred to facilities versus that generated onsite * Nature and amount of energy consumed by end use within facilities * Magnitude of the energy lost both outside and inside facility boundaries * Magnitude of the greenhouse gas emissions released as a result of manufacturing energy use. Energy losses indicate opportunities to improve efficiency by implementing energy management best practices, upgrading energy systems, and developing new technologies. Footprints are available below for each sector. Data is presented in two levels of detail. The first page provides a high- level snapshot of the offsite and onsite energy flow, and the second page shows the detail for onsite generation and end use of energy. The principle energy use data source is the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), for consumption in the year 2006, when the survey was last completed.

  19. Advanced power electronics and electric machinery program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2007-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (composed of automakers Ford, General Motors, and Chrysler) announced in January 2002 a new cooperative research effort. Known as "FreedomCAR" (derived from "Freedom" and "Cooperative Automotive Research"), it represents DOE's commitment to developing public/private partnerships to fund high-risk, high-payoff research into advanced automotive technologies. Efficient fuel cell technology, which uses hydrogen to power automobiles without air pollution, is a very promising pathway to achieving the ultimate vision. The new partnership replaces and builds upon the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles initiative that ran from 1993 through 2001.

  20. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Machinery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Steam Distribution Losses 0 1 13 0 1 2 1 4 3 0 2 0 147 28 70 0 0 0 Conventional Boilers 2 CHP Cogeneration Nonprocess Energy Process Cooling and Refrigeration Electro-Chemical ...

  1. Build Replication into Corporate Culture | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Build Replication into Corporate Culture Build Replication into Corporate Culture This presentation addresses how to build replication into the corporate culture. Build Replication into Corporate Culture (August 23, 2011) (1.87 MB) More Documents & Publications Implementing a Corporate Energy Management System 3M's Model Rewards and Recognition Program Engages Employees and Drives Energy Savings Efforts Replicate Best Practices

  2. Cultural Resource Program and Curation Services - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Public Safety and Resource Protection (PSRP) Cultural Resource Program and Curation Services Public Safety and Resource Protection (PSRP) Public Safety and Resource Protection Home Cultural Resource Program and Curation Services Ecological Monitoring Environmental Surveillance Meteorology and Climatology Services Seismic Monitoring Cultural Resource Program and Curation Services Email Email Page | Print Print Page | Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size Cultural Resource Program and

  3. Increasing cell culture population doublings for long-term growth of finite life span human cell cultures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stampfer, Martha R; Garbe, James C

    2015-02-24

    Cell culture media formulations for culturing human epithelial cells are herein described. Also described are methods of increasing population doublings in a cell culture of finite life span human epithelial cells and prolonging the life span of human cell cultures. Using the cell culture media disclosed alone and in combination with addition to the cell culture of a compound associated with anti-stress activity achieves extended growth of pre-stasis cells and increased population doublings and life span in human epithelial cell cultures.

  4. Corporate Culture | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Corporate Culture NNSA's annual budget is more than $10 billion. Our employees use their scientific, technical and professional expertise to oversee world-class science and engineering programs that use the world's largest and fastest computers, along with other state-of-the-art equipment that push the envelope of creativity and innovation. NNSA's annual budget is more than $10 billion. Our employees use their scientific, technical and professional expertise to oversee world-class science and

  5. Hanford Site, Tribes Raise Awareness of Culturally Significant...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    volcanic glass, which is part of a simulated fire hearth at the cultural test beds site. ... volcanic glass, which is part of a simulated fire hearth at the cultural test beds site. ...

  6. Sponsoring, Mentoring and Guiding Cultural Diverse Young Scientists...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sponsoring, Mentoring and Guiding Cultural Diverse Young Scientists and Engineers Presentation on successful mentoring. PDF icon Partnership meeting presentation 020711...

  7. Track 1: Safety Culture- Taking ISMS to the Next Level

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 1: Safety Culture - Taking ISMS to the Next Level

  8. Making Energy Efficiency Part of Corporate Culture | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Making Energy Efficiency Part of Corporate Culture Making Energy Efficiency Part of Corporate Culture This presentation discusses how Nissan Motor Company incorporated energy efficiency into its corporate environment through executive management support and cross-functional corporate teams. Making Energy Efficiency Part of Corporate Culture (June 12, 2012) (6.61 MB) More Documents & Publications Energy Management and Financing Nissan Showcases the Results of an Energy-Wise Corporate Culture

  9. Hanford Advisory Board Advice: Testing Safety Culture in Practice,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hanford Advisory Board Advice: Testing Safety Culture in Practice, Draft 3, Feb 3, 2016 Lead Issue Managers: Dirk Dunning and Liz Mattson Background The Hanford Advisory Board (HAB, Board) has been focused on reviewing, discussing, and issuing advice on safety culture since the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board issued its Recommendation 2011-1: Safety Culture at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant in June 2011. Safety culture terminology has created confusion in our discussions,

  10. Welcome to the Cultural Resources Newsletter | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Welcome to the Cultural Resources Newsletter Welcome to the Cultural Resources Newsletter Welcome to the Cultural Resources Newsletter (446.29 KB) More Documents & Publications Secretary Directs FPO to Prepare Strategic Plan Strategic Plan Submitted to the Secretary Microsoft Word - August06.doc

  11. Safety Culture at the WTP White Paper: Potential Attachment for Advice on Waste Treatment Plant Safety Culture

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    29/2011 Page 1 of 6 Safety Culture at the WTP White Paper: Potential Attachment for Advice on Waste Treatment Plant Safety Culture Introduction This white paper provides context for the Hanford Advisory Board's (HAB) concerns regarding safety culture at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). This document is intended to clarify terminology associated with "safety culture" and to provide background about its conception, application, and development. The HAB has advised that a rigorous safety

  12. Training Framework to Improve the DOE Performance-Based Culture |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Training Framework to Improve the DOE Performance-Based Culture Training Framework to Improve the DOE Performance-Based Culture Guidance Memorandum for implementing the Secretaries initiative for improving the Performanced-Based Culture of the Department. Training Framework Improve Performance (239.56 KB) Responsible Contacts N. Tony Nguyen PROGRAM ANALYST E-mail tony.nguyen@hq.doe.gov Phone 202-586-4533 More Documents & Publications Audit Report: IG-0510 Annual

  13. DOE - NNSA/NFO -- Photo Library Cultural Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cultural Resources NNSA/NFO Language Options U.S. DOE/NNSA - Nevada Field Office Photo Library - Cultural Resources Prehistoric cultural resources are abundant at the Nevada National Security Site, indicating Native Americans have occupied the region for more than 10,000 years. Historic artifacts of more recent origin are also present, reflecting use by miners, ranchers and settlers who traveled through the area. Instructions: Click the photograph THUMBNAIL to view the photograph details Click

  14. Integration of Safety Culture Attributes into EFCOG Work Planning and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Control Guidance Document | Department of Energy Safety Culture Attributes into EFCOG Work Planning and Control Guidance Document Integration of Safety Culture Attributes into EFCOG Work Planning and Control Guidance Document May 15, 2013 Presenters: Steele Coddington, NSTec, Las Vegas, and John McDonald, WRPS, Hanford Topics Covered: Integration of Safety Culture (SC) Attributes into EFCOG Work Planning and Control Guidance Document Linking SC to WP&C CRADS EFCOG and DOE SC and WP&C

  15. Independent Oversight Assessment of the Nuclear Safety Culture...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Health, Safety and Security HSS Independent Oversight Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture and Management of Nuclear Safety ... EM Office of Environmental Management EM-1 ...

  16. A GIS approach to cultural resources management and NEPA compliance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moeller, K.

    1996-06-01

    Cultural resources management and historic preservation compliance are best approached within the broader framework of natural resources planning and land management. Argonne National Laboratory is currently assisting federal agencies with the development of computer- based resource management systems for large facilities, and cultural resources management and preservation are components of these systems. In the area of cultural resources, Argonne is using the GIS tool to demonstrate how federal facilities can manage large, complex databases, integrate cultural resource data with other environmental variables, model distributions of resources to aid in inventory and evaluation, link the data to quantitative and impact modes, and effectively manage and monitor resource planning activities and environmental compliance.

  17. BLM Manual 8120 - Tribal Consultation Under Cultural Resources...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: BLM Manual 8120 - Tribal Consultation Under Cultural ResourcesPermitting...

  18. BLM Manual 8110 - Identifying and Evaluating Cultural Resources...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: BLM Manual 8110 - Identifying and Evaluating Cultural ResourcesPermitting...

  19. Key Practical Issues in Strengthening Safety Culture, INSAG-15

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Key Pratical Issues in Strengthening Safety Culture, INSAG-15. A report by the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Gorup, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 2002.

  20. Self-Reliability and Motivation in a Nuclear Security Culture...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Self-Reliability and Motivation in a Nuclear Security Culture Enhancement Program Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Self-Reliability and Motivation in a ...

  1. Indoctrinating Subcontractors into the DOE Safety Culture and...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Many of WCH subcontracts target small businesses with limited experience in the DOE safety culture. Safety Performance is factored into the incentive fee structure of the RCCC ...

  2. Wyoming Department of State Parks and Cultural Resources and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Historic Sites - Rules and Regulations, Chapter 1Legal Abstract This chapter sets forth the rules and regulations of the Wyoming Department of State Parks and Cultural...

  3. CSB Investigations and Safety Culture | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    from occurring again. Analysis of Safety Systems CSB Investigations and Safety Culture More Documents & Publications Nuclear Safety Workshop Summary Operating Experience...

  4. Fluorescent tracking of nickel ions in human cultured cells ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fluorescent tracking of nickel ions in human cultured cells Citation Details In-Document ... B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International ...

  5. Sponsoring, Mentoring and Guiding Cultural Diverse Young Scientists and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engineers | Argonne National Laboratory Sponsoring, Mentoring and Guiding Cultural Diverse Young Scientists and Engineers Presentation on successful mentoring. PDF icon Partnership meeting presentation 020711

  6. Pueblo De San Ildefonso Department of Environmental and Cultural...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Environmental and Cultural Preservation Program Overview 2015 Topic: Director Raymond Martinez, and Governor Mountain, provided the membership with an update on the Pueblo de San...

  7. Essential Innovations Ekistics Town Planning Jiangsu Sifang Culture...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal energy Product: Announced in October 2006, this is a JV between Essential Innovation of Canada, Ekistics Town Planning also of Canada, and Jiangsu Sifang Culture...

  8. "Violent Intent Modeling: Incorporating Cultural Knowledge into the Analytical Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Nibbs, Faith G.

    2007-08-24

    While culture has a significant effect on the appropriate interpretation of textual data, the incorporation of cultural considerations into data transformations has not been systematic. Recognizing that the successful prevention of terrorist activities could hinge on the knowledge of the subcultures, Anthropologist and DHS intern Faith Nibbs has been addressing the need to incorporate cultural knowledge into the analytical process. In this Brown Bag she will present how cultural ideology is being used to understand how the rhetoric of group leaders influences the likelihood of their constituents to engage in violent or radicalized behavior, and how violent intent modeling can benefit from understanding that process.

  9. Characterization of anaerobic microbial culture with high acidogenic activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De la Torre, I.; Goma, G.

    1981-01-01

    The mixed cultures which were used were isolated from municipal sludge digestors, and the production of organic acids (acetic, propionic, butyric, etc.) from carbohydrates was tested. The behavior of the reference population (culture R) obtained directly from the sewage treatment plant, is compared to that obtained after three months in a plug-flow reactor (Gradostat fermentor) without pH control (culture A) and after six months with pH control (culture B). For culture B, the specific rate of acid production is related to the cell growth rate by (1/X)rp equals 17 mu plus 1.6 with a 0.36 g/g for the initial culture (R) to 0.72 g/g for culture B after six months in continuous culture, and 0.8 g/g in plug-flow continuous culture. The productivity of organic acids reaches 1.7 g/liter/hour. It is suggested that the acidogenic fermentation, the first step of methanogenesis, is a potential process to produce acetic, propionic, and butyric acids.

  10. Preservation technologies; tools for enhanced cultural resource management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Culbertson, J.D.

    1995-12-01

    Legislation enacted since the mid sixties has defined requirements for cultural resource management. This is an important area of environmental management that has received only limited attention. Cultural resources are integral to environmental systems; they need to be considered in any resource management activities. They also provide important information about long term changes in environmental systems and the effects of human activity.

  11. DOE Policy 141.1: Management of Cultural Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of DOE Policy 141.1 is to ensure that Department of Energy (DOE) programs and field elements integrate cultural resources management into their missions and activities and to raise the level of awareness and accountability among DOE contractors concerning the importance of the Department’s cultural resource-related legal and trust responsibilities.

  12. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for FY 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brenda R. Pace; Julie B. Braun

    2009-10-01

    This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during fiscal year 2009 (FY 2009). Throughout the year, thirty-eight cultural resource localities were revisited including: two locations with Native American human remains, one of which is a cave, two additional caves, twenty-two prehistoric archaeological sites, six historic homesteads, two historic stage stations, two historic trails, and two nuclear resources, including Experimental Breeder Reactor-I, which is a designated National Historic Landmark. Several INL project areas were also monitored in FY 2009 to assess project compliance with cultural resource recommendations and monitor the effects of ongoing project activities. Although impacts were documented at a few locations and trespassing citations were issued in one instance, no significant adverse effects that would threaten the National Register eligibility of any resources were observed. Monitoring also demonstrated that several INL projects generally remain in compliance with recommendations to protect cultural resources.

  13. Testing the cultural theory of risk in France

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brenot, J.; Bonnefous, S.; Marris, C.

    1998-12-01

    Cultural Theory, as developed by Mary Douglas, argues that differing risk perceptions can be explained by reference to four distinct cultural biases: hierarchy, egalitarianism, individualism, and fatalism. This paper presents empirical results from a quantitative survey based on a questionnaire devised by Karl Dake to measure these cultural biases. A large representative sample was used to test this instrument in the French social context. Correlations between cultural biases and perceptions of 20 social and environmental risks were examined. These correlations were very weak, but were statistically significant: cultural biases explained 6%, at most, of the variance in risk perceptions. Standard socio-demographic variables were also weakly related to risk perceptions (especially gender, social class, and education), and cultural biases and socio-demographic variables were themselves intercorrelated (especially with age, social class, and political outlook). The authors compare these results with surveys conducted in other countries using the same instrument and conclude that new methods, more qualitative and contextual, still need to be developed to investigate the cultural dimensions of risk perceptions. The paper also discusses relationships between perceptions of personal and residual risk, and between perceived risk and demand for additional safety measures. These three dimensions were generally closely related, but interesting differences were observed for some risk issues. Included in the list of risk perceptions were pollution, hazardous materials, and radioactive wastes.

  14. Building a Strong Culture That Produces Sustainable Performance - 13444

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, John A. Jr

    2013-07-01

    Washington River Protection Solutions LLC (WRPS) has been involved with culture improvement for a number of years which has included co-chairing the industry effort to develop the EFCOG safety culture guidance documents [1, 2], and integration of this guidance into organizational processes and behavior expectations, described in more detail below. As various organizational cultural assessments have been periodically performed, and subsequent actions implemented to address improvement opportunities, organizational performance has shown improvement. Culture improvement is evident in the company's industrial safety statistics, event rates, safety culture survey results, employee morale, productivity, leadership effectiveness, and employee engagement. There does appear to be a relationship between striving to demonstrate behaviors consistent with excellent safety culture and good organizational performance over the past couple of years at WRPS. As performance continues to be evaluated, an improvement opportunity was identified to further enhance performance through field oriented behavioral/cultural improvement activities. WRPS recently conducted a three month effort to improve consistent implementation of management expectations by increasing management field presence with a focus on interacting real-time with workers and first line supervisors, and changing behaviors as appropriate. (authors)

  15. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for FY 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brenda R. Pace

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during fiscal year 2008 (FY 2008). Throughout the year, 45 cultural resource localities were revisited including: two locations of heightened Shoshone-Bannock tribal sensitivity, four caves, one butte, twenty-eight prehistoric archaeological sites, three historic homesteads, two historic stage stations, one historic canal construction camp, three historic trails, and Experimental Breeder Reactor-I, which is a designated National Historic Landmark. Several INL project areas were also monitored in FY 2008 to assess project compliance with cultural resource recommendations, confirm the locations of previously recorded cultural resources in relation to project activities, to assess the damage caused by fire-fighting efforts, and to watch for cultural materials during ground disturbing activities. Although impacts were documented at a few locations, no significant adverse effects that would threaten the National Register eligibility of any resource were observed. Monitoring also demonstrated that INL projects generally remain in compliance with recommendations to protect cultural resources

  16. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julie B. Williams; Brenda Pace

    2013-10-01

    This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during 2013. Throughout the year, thirty-eight cultural resource localities were revisited including: two locations with Native American human remains, one of which is also a cave; fourteen additional caves; seven prehistoric archaeological sites ; four historic archaeological sites; one historic trail; one nuclear resource (Experimental Breeder Reactor-I, a designated National Historic Landmark); and nine historic structures located at the Central Facilities Area. Of the monitored resources, thirty-three were routinely monitored, and five were monitored to assess project compliance with cultural resource recommendations along with the effects of ongoing project activities. On six occasions, ground disturbing activities within the boundaries of the Power Burst Facility/Critical Infrastructure Test Range Complex (PBF/CITRC) were observed by INL CRM staff prepared to respond to any additional finds of Native American human remains. In addition, two resources were visited more than once as part of the routine monitoring schedule or to monitor for additional damage. Throughout the year, most of the cultural resources monitored had no visual adverse changes resulting in Type 1determinations. However, Type 2 impacts were noted at eight sites, indicating that although impacts were noted or that a project was operating outside of culturally cleared limitations, cultural resources retained integrity and noted impacts did not threaten National Register eligibility. No new Type 3 or any Type 4 impacts that adversely impacted cultural resources and threatened National Register eligibility were observed at cultural resources monitored in 2013.

  17. AN OVERVIEW OF CULTURAL RESOURCES ON PAHUTE AND RAINIER MESAS...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AN OVERVIEW OF CULTURAL RESOURCES ON PAHUTE AND RAINIER MESAS ON THE NEVADA TEST SITE, NYE ... Officer. Mr. Robert Bivona, Nevada Test Site Support Office, and his predecessor Mr. ...

  18. Operational Pause at Savannah River Site Benefits Safety Culture, Operations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AIKEN, S.C. – EM and the Savannah River Site (SRS) management and operations contractor are seeing positive impacts on safety culture as the site works to restore operations following last year’s operational pause.

  19. Developing safety culture-rocket science or common sense?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahn, J.A.

    1998-08-01

    Despite evidence of significant management contributions to the causes of major accidents, recent events at Millstone Nuclear Power Station in the US and Ontario Hydro in Canada might lead one to conclude that the significance of safety culture, and the role of management in developing and maintaining an appropriate safety culture, is either not being understood or not being taken serious as integral to the safe operation of some complex, high-reliability operations. It is the purpose of this paper to address four aspects of management that are particularly important to safety culture, and to illustrate how development of an appropriate safety culture is more a matter of common sense than rocket science.

  20. Best Seller Cites Westinghouse Safety Culture at WIPP as "World...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Westinghouse TRU Solutions LLC. "We are proud of our safety culture, and we continuously work to enhance it." Westinghouse is the management and operating contractor for the U.S....

  1. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for FY 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    INL Cultural Resource Management Office

    2010-10-01

    This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during fiscal year 2010 (FY 2010). Throughout the year, thirty-three cultural resource localities were revisited, including somethat were visited more than once, including: two locations with Native American human remains, one of which is a cave, two additional caves, twenty-six prehistoric archaeological sites, two historic stage stations, and Experimental Breeder Reactor-I, which is a designated National Historic Landmark. The resources that were monitored included seventeen that are routinely visited and sixteen that are located in INL project areas. Although impacts were documented at a few locations and one trespassing incident (albeit sans formal charges) was discovered, no significant adverse effects that would threaten the National Register eligibility of any resources were observed. Monitoring also demonstrated that several INL projects generally remain in compliance with recommendations to protect cultural resources.

  2. Best Practices Workshop for Safety Culture | Y-12 National Security...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from 20 organizations recently met at Y-12 to share safety culture best practices and lessons learned. The two-day workshop featured more than two dozen presentations on...

  3. New culturing tool reveals a full genome from single cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New culturing tool reveals New culturing tool reveals a full genome from single cells A new technique for genetic analysis, "gel microdroplets," helps scientists generate complete genomes from a single cell. March 15, 2013 Two GMD containing gut-community microcolonies are shown, with green fluorescence marking the DNA. Two GMD containing gut-community microcolonies are shown, with green fluorescence marking the DNA. Photo credit A. Dichosa, Los Alamos National Laboratory. Contact

  4. Annual training event instrumental in region's safety culture |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Annual training event instrumental in region's safety culture Annual training event instrumental in region's safety culture September 8, 2014 - 10:00am Addthis Participants receive hands-on demonstrations for protective equipment. This year’s event offers 45 safety courses and seminars. Participants receive hands-on demonstrations for protective equipment. This year's event offers 45 safety courses and seminars. Oak Ridge, TN - This week, the Oak Ridge Office of

  5. Creating a Culture of Risk Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Creating a Culture of Risk Assessment Creating a Culture of Risk Assessment Decisions regarding how to secure and invest in the Nation's energy infrastructure are often complex. Limited resources and investment returns, tight budgets, and lack of information can hinder the process of how to best maintain or improve existing infrastructure or build new energy facilities and systems. Threats or hazards that can impact energy infrastructure and the consequences of those impacts must be known to

  6. An Independent Evaluation of Safety Culture at the U. S. Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... and execute the actions that will result in improved safe and reliable performance. The safety culture components important for the existence of a healthy safety culture ...

  7. UTEX The Culture Collection of Algae at The University of Texas...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    UTEX The Culture Collection of Algae at The University of Texas at Austin Jump to: navigation, search Name: University of Texas at Austin The Culture Collection of Algae...

  8. Minnesota Agri-Power Project. Quarterly report, January--March, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilbur, D.

    1998-05-01

    The Minnesota Valley Alfalfa Producers propose to build an alfalfa processing plant integrated with an advanced power plant system at the Granite Falls, Minnesota industrial park to provide 75 MW of base load electric power and a competitively priced source of value added alfalfa based products. This project utilizes air blown fluidized bed gasification technology to process alfalfa stems and another biomass to produce a hot, clean, low heating value gas that will be used in a gas turbine. Exhaust heat from the gas turbine will be used to generate steam to power a steam turbine and provide steam for the processing of the alfalfa leaf into a wide range of products including alfalfa leaf meal, a protein source for livestock. This progress report describes feedstock testing, feedstock supply system, performance guarantees, sales contracts, environmental permits, education, environment, economy, and project coordination and control.

  9. PRELIMINARY SURVEY OF U.S. STEEL CORPORATION--AGRI-CHEMICAL

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    status of those facilities utilized under Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) raw materials ... The 2 measurements consisted of garrma-ray exposure rates at a height of 1 m above the ...

  10. DOE STTR Phase I Final Technical Report For Agri-Tech Producers...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Product Output: .5 Tons per Hour Torrefied Product * Energy Content-lO,OOO BTUlb 5,500 kCalkg ( 10%) * Moisture Content < 10% * Input to Output Ratio: Approx. 3 tons of "green...

  11. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Annual Report FY 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton F. Marler; Julie Braun; Hollie Gilbert; Dino Lowrey; Brenda Ringe Pace

    2007-04-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory Site is home to vast numbers and a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least a 13,500-year span of human occupation in the region. As a federal agency, the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office has legal responsibility for the management and protection of those resources and has delegated these responsibilities to its primary contractor, Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA). The INL Cultural Resource Management Office, staffed by BEA professionals, is committed to maintaining a cultural resource management program that accepts these challenges in a manner reflecting the resources’ importance in local, regional, and national history. This annual report summarizes activities performed by the INL Cultural Resource Management Office staff during Fiscal Year 2006. This work is diverse, far-reaching and though generally confined to INL cultural resource compliance, also includes a myriad of professional and voluntary community activities. This document is intended to be both informative to internal and external stakeholders, and to serve as a planning tool for future cultural resource management work to be conducted on the INL.

  12. Hanford Cultural Resources Laboratory annual report for fiscal year 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatters, J.C.; Cadoret, N.A.; Minthorn, P.E.

    1990-06-01

    This report summarizes activities of the Hanford Cultural Resources Laboratory (HCRL) during fiscal year 1989. The HCRL provides support for managing the archaeological, historical, and cultural resources of the Hanford Site, Washington, in a manner consistent with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, the Archaeological Resources Protection Act of 1979, and the American Indian Religious Freedom Act of 1978. A major task in FY 1989 was completion and publication of the Hanford Cultural Resources Management Plan, which prioritizes tasks to be undertaken to bring the US Department of Energy -- Richland Operations into compliance with federal statutes, relations, and guidelines. During FY 1989, six tasks were performed. In order of priority, these were conducting 107 cultural resource reviews, monitoring the condition of 40 known prehistoric archaeological sites, assessing the condition of artifact collections from the Hanford Site, evaluating three sites and nominating two of those to the National Register of Historic Places, developing an education program and presenting 11 lectures to public organizations, and surveying approximately 1 mi{sup 2} of the Hanford Site for cultural resources. 7 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Annual Report FY 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julie Braun; Hollie Gilbert; Dino Lowrey; Clayton Marler; Brenda Pace

    2008-03-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site is home to vast numbers and a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least a 13,500-year span of human land use in the region. As a federal agency, the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office has legal responsibility for the management and protection of those resources and has delegated these responsibilities to its primary contractor, Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA). The BEA professional staff is committed to maintaining a cultural resource management program that accepts these challenges in a manner reflecting the resources’ importance in local, regional, and national history. This annual report summarizes activities performed by the INL Cultural Resource Management Office (CRMO) staff during fiscal year 2007. This work is diverse, far-reaching and though generally confined to INL cultural resource compliance, also includes a myriad of professional and voluntary community activities. This document is intended to be both informative to internal and external stakeholders, and to serve as a planning tool for future cultural resource management work to be conducted on the INL.

  14. Low hardness organisms: Culture methods, sensitivities, and practical applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DaCruz, A.; DaCruz, N.; Bird, M.

    1995-12-31

    EPA Regulations require biomonitoring of permitted effluent and stormwater runoff. Several permit locations were studied, in Virginia, that have supply water and or stormwater runoff which ranges in hardness from 5--30 mg/L. Ceriodaphnia dubia (dubia) and Pimephales promelas (fathead minnow) were tested in reconstituted water with hardnesses from 5--30 mg/L. Results indicated osmotic stresses present in the acute tests with the fathead minnow as well as chronic tests for the dubia and the fathead minnow. Culture methods were developed for both organism types in soft (30 mg) reconstituted freshwater. Reproductivity and development for each organisms type meets or exceeds EPA testing requirements for moderately hard organisms. Sensitivities were measured over an 18 month interval using cadmium chloride as a reference toxicant. Additionally, sensitivities were charted in contrast with those of organisms cultured in moderately hard water. The comparison proved that the sensitivities of both the dubia and the fathead minnow cultured in 30 mg water increased, but were within two standard deviations of the organism sensitivities of those cultured in moderately hard water. Latitude for use of organisms cultured in 30 mg was documented for waters ranging in hardness from 10--100 mg/L with no acclimation period required. The stability of the organism sensitivity was also validated. The application was most helpful in stormwater runoff and in effluents where the hardness was 30 mg/L or less.

  15. Identifying Differences in Cultural Behavior in Online Groups

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory, Michelle L.; Engel, David W.; Bell, Eric B.; Mcgrath, Liam R.

    2012-07-23

    We have developed methods to identify online communities, or groups, using a combination of structural information variables and content information variables from weblog posts and their comments to build a characteristic footprint for groups. We have worked with both explicitly connected groups and 'abstract' groups, in which the connection between individuals is in interest (as determined by content based features) and behavior (metadata based features) as opposed to explicit links. We find that these variables do a good job at identifying groups, placing members within a group, and helping determine the appropriate granularity for group boundaries. The group footprint can then be used to identify differences between the online groups. In the work described here we are interested in determining how an individual's online behavior is influenced by their membership in more than one group. For example, individuals belong to a certain culture; they may belong as well to a demographic group, and other 'chosen' groups such as churches or clubs. There is a plethora of evidence surrounding the culturally sensitive adoption, use, and behavior on the Internet. In this work we begin to investigate how culturally defined internet behaviors may influence behaviors of subgroups. We do this through a series of experiments in which we analyze the interaction between culturally defined behaviors and the behaviors of the subgroups. Our goal is to (a) identify if our features can capture cultural distinctions in internet use, and (b) determine what kinds of interaction there are between levels and types of groups.

  16. INTEGRATED SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM SAFETY CULTURE IMPROVEMENT INITIATIVE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCDONALD JA JR

    2009-01-16

    In 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) identified safety culture as one of their top Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) related priorities. A team was formed to address this issue. The team identified a consensus set of safety culture principles, along with implementation practices that could be used by DOE, NNSA, and their contractors. Documented improvement tools were identified and communicated to contractors participating in a year long pilot project. After a year, lessons learned will be collected and a path forward determined. The goal of this effort was to achieve improved safety and mission performance through ISMS continuous improvement. The focus of ISMS improvement was safety culture improvement building on operating experience from similar industries such as the domestic and international commercial nuclear and chemical industry.

  17. Hanford Cultural Resources Laboratory annual report for fiscal year 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nickens, P.R.; Wright, M.K.; Cadoret, N.A.; Dawson, M.V.; Harvey, D.W.; Simpson, E.M.

    1995-09-01

    The Hanford Site occupies 560 sq. miles of land along the Columbia River in SE Washington. The Hanford Reach of the river is one of the most archaeologically rich areas in the western Columbia Plateau. To manage the Hanford Site`s archaeological, historical, and cultural resources, the Hanford Cultural Resources Laboratory (HCRL) was established in 1987. HCRL ensures DOE complies with federal statutes, regulations, and guidelines. In FY 1994, HCRL conducted cultural resource reviews, conducted programs to identify and monitor historic and archaeological sites, etc. HCRL staff conducted 511 reviews, 29 of which required archaeological surveys and 10 of which required building documentation. Six prehistoric sites, 23 historic sites, one paleontological site, and two sites with historic and prehistoric components were discovered.

  18. INEEL Cultural Resource Management Program Annual Report - 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton F. Marler

    2005-01-01

    As a federal agency, the U.S. Department of Energy has been directed by Congress, the U.S. president, and the American public to provide leadership in the preservation of prehistoric, historic, and other cultural resources on the lands it administers. This mandate to preserve cultural resources in a spirit of stewardship for the future is outlined in various federal preservation laws, regulations, and guidelines such as the National Historic Preservation Act, the Archaeological Resources Protection Act, and the National Environmental Policy Act. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Site is located in southeastern Idaho, and is home to vast numbers and a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least 13,000-year span of human occupation in the region. These resources are nonrenewable, bear valuable physical and intangible legacies, and yield important information about the past, present, and perhaps the future. There are special challenges associated with balancing the preservation of these resources with the management and ongoing operation of an active scientific laboratory, while also cleaning up the waste left by past programs and processes. The Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office has administrative responsibility for most of the Site, excluding lands and resources managed by the Naval Reactors Facility and (in 2004) Argonne National Laboratory-West. The Department of Energy is committed to a cultural resource program that accepts these challenges in a manner reflecting both the spirit and intent of the legislative requirements. This annual report is an overview of Cultural Resource Management Program activities conducted during Fiscal Year 2004 and is intended to be both informative to external stakeholders and to serve as a planning tool for future cultural resource management work to be conducted on the Site.

  19. Guidelines for Evaluating and Documenting Traditional Cultural Properties (NPS, 1998)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This National Park Service bulletin is meant to assist federal agencies, State Historic Preservation Officers, local governments, Indian tribes, and other historic preservation practitioners in determining whether properties thought to have traditional cultural significance are eligible for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places.

  20. 7th Workshop on Risk Informed Regulation and Safety Culture

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The 7th Workshop on Risk Informed Regulation and Safety Culture was one of a series of workshops designed by the Office of Nuclear Energy in concert with experts from the Idaho National Laboratory to assist China in developing a comprehensive, successful and efficient Risk-Informed Regulatory framework.

  1. Guidelines for Evaluating and Documenting Traditional Cultural Properties

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This National Park Service bulletin is meant to assist federal agencies, State Historic Preservation Officers, local governments, Indian tribes, and other historic preservation practitioners in determining whether properties thought to have traditional cultural significance are eligible for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places.

  2. Method and system of culturing an algal mat

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Das, Keshav C; Cannon, Benjamin R; Bhatnagar, Ashish; Chinnasamy, Senthil

    2014-05-13

    A system and method for culturing algae are presented. The system and method utilize a fog of growth medium that is delivered to an algal mat generator along with a stream of CO.sub.2 to promote growth of algal cells contained in the generator.

  3. CULTURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DAVIS, M.

    2005-04-01

    The Cultural Resource Management Plan (CRMP) for Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) provides an organized guide that describes or references all facets and interrelationships of cultural resources at BNL. This document specifically follows, where applicable, the format of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Guidelines for Development of Cultural Resource Management Plans, DOE G 450.1-3 (9-22-04[m1]). Management strategies included within this CRMP are designed to adequately identify the cultural resources that BNL and DOE consider significant and to acknowledge associated management actions. A principal objective of the CRMP is to reduce the need for additional regulatory documents and to serve as the basis for a formal agreement between the DOE and the New York State Historic Preservation Officer (NYSHPO). The BNL CRMP is designed to be a ''living document.'' Each section includes identified gaps in the management plan, with proposed goals and actions for addressing each gap. The plan will be periodically revised to incorporate new documentation.

  4. Centrifugally activated bearing for high-speed rotating machinery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, Richard F.

    1994-01-01

    A centrifugally activated bearing is disclosed. The bearing includes an annular member that extends laterally and radially from a central axis. A rotating member that rotates about the central axis relative to the annular member is also included. The rotating member has an interior chamber that surrounds the central axis and in which the annular member is suspended. Furthermore, the interior chamber has a concave shape for retaining a lubricant therein while the rotating member is at rest and for retaining a lubricant therein while the rotating member is rotating. The concave shape is such that while the rotating member is rotating a centrifugal force causes a lubricant to be forced away from the central axis to form a cylindrical surface having an axis collinear with the central axis. This centrifugally displaced lubricant provides restoring forces to counteract lateral displacement during operation.

  5. Baicheng Miracle Equipment Machinery Company Ltd | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    energy Product: A wind equipment manufacturer, jointly established by Jiangsu Miracle Logistics System Engineering Ltd and Baicheng Tongye Ltd. Coordinates: 45.234879,...

  6. Centrifugally activated bearing for high-speed rotating machinery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, R.F.

    1994-02-15

    A centrifugally activated bearing is disclosed. The bearing includes an annular member that extends laterally and radially from a central axis. A rotating member that rotates about the central axis relative to the annular member is also included. The rotating member has an interior chamber that surrounds the central axis and in which the annular member is suspended. Furthermore, the interior chamber has a concave shape for retaining a lubricant therein while the rotating member is at rest and for retaining a lubricant therein while the rotating member is rotating. The concave shape is such that while the rotating member is rotating a centrifugal force causes a lubricant to be forced away from the central axis to form a cylindrical surface having an axis collinear with the central axis. This centrifugally displaced lubricant provides restoring forces to counteract lateral displacement during operation. 4 figures.

  7. Metaproteomics Identifies the Protein Machinery Involved in Metal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    tools to identify biomarkers for monitoring microbial activity affecting U ... for site assessment, efficient implementation of bioremediation and long-term monitoring. ...

  8. Pressure actuated film riding seals for turbo machinery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bidkar, Rahul Anil; Thatte, Azam Mihir; Gibson, Nathan Evan McCurdy; Giametta, Andrew Paul

    2015-08-25

    A seal assembly for a rotary machine is provided. The seal assembly includes multiple sealing device segments disposed circumferentially intermediate to a stationary housing and a rotor. Each of the sealing device segments includes a stator interface element, a shoe plate having an extended portion having one or more labyrinth teeth facing the rotor and a load bearing portion, wherein the shoe plate is configured to generate an aerodynamic force between the shoe plate and the rotor. The sealing device segment further includes a secondary seal configured to be in contact with the stator interface element at a radially outer end and configured to be in contact with an elevated nose section of the extended portion of the shoe plate on a radially inner end; and multiple flexible elements attached to the shoe plate and to the stator interface element.

  9. Shanghai Hanhong Precision Machinery Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Shanghai Municipality, China Zip: 200444 Product: A Shanghai-based semiconductor machine and integrated circuits equipment maker. References: Shanghai Hanhong Precision...

  10. Architecture of the synaptotagmin–SNARE machinery for neuronal exocytosis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhou, Qiangjun; Lai, Ying; Bacaj, Taulant; Zhao, Minglei; Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Zeldin, Oliver B.; Brewster, Aaron S.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Cohen, Aina E.; et al

    2015-08-17

    Synaptotagmin-1 and neuronal SNARE proteins have central roles in evoked synchronous neurotransmitter release; however, it is unknown how they cooperate to trigger synaptic vesicle fusion. We report atomic-resolution crystal structures of Ca2+- and Mg2+-bound complexes between synaptotagmin-1 and the neuronal SNARE complex, one of which was determined with diffraction data from an X-ray free-electron laser, leading to an atomic-resolution structure with accurate rotamer assignments for many side chains. The structures reveal several interfaces, including a large, specific, Ca2+-independent and conserved interface. Tests of this interface by mutagenesis suggest that it is essential for Ca2+-triggered neurotransmitter release in mouse hippocampal neuronalmore » synapses and for Ca2+-triggered vesicle fusion in a reconstituted system. Lastly, we propose that this interface forms before Ca2+ triggering, moves en bloc as Ca2+ influx promotes the interactions between synaptotagmin-1 and the plasma membrane, and consequently remodels the membrane to promote fusion, possibly in conjunction with other interfaces.« less

  11. Architecture of the synaptotagmin–SNARE machinery for neuronal exocytosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Qiangjun; Lai, Ying; Bacaj, Taulant; Zhao, Minglei; Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Zeldin, Oliver B.; Brewster, Aaron S.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Cohen, Aina E.; Soltis, S. Michael; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Chollet, Matthieu; Lemke, Henrik T.; Pfuetzner, Richard A.; Choi, Ucheor B.; Weis, William I.; Diao, Jiajie; SĂĽdhof, Thomas C.; Brunger, Axel T.

    2015-08-17

    Synaptotagmin-1 and neuronal SNARE proteins have central roles in evoked synchronous neurotransmitter release; however, it is unknown how they cooperate to trigger synaptic vesicle fusion. We report atomic-resolution crystal structures of Ca2+- and Mg2+-bound complexes between synaptotagmin-1 and the neuronal SNARE complex, one of which was determined with diffraction data from an X-ray free-electron laser, leading to an atomic-resolution structure with accurate rotamer assignments for many side chains. The structures reveal several interfaces, including a large, specific, Ca2+-independent and conserved interface. Tests of this interface by mutagenesis suggest that it is essential for Ca2+-triggered neurotransmitter release in mouse hippocampal neuronal synapses and for Ca2+-triggered vesicle fusion in a reconstituted system. Lastly, we propose that this interface forms before Ca2+ triggering, moves en bloc as Ca2+ influx promotes the interactions between synaptotagmin-1 and the plasma membrane, and consequently remodels the membrane to promote fusion, possibly in conjunction with other interfaces.

  12. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Fenn Machinery Co - CT 11

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Mayor R. Mortemsem; Subject: Information regarding Fenn Mfg. Site; December 2, 1994 CT.11-3 - US AEC Letter; R. Smith to D. Sturges; Subject: Uranium Fabrication; November 8, 195

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: Careers: Life at Sandia: People and Culture

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    People and Culture Solar cell picture Quality people, quality work Integrity, excellence, and exceptional service in the national interest. At Sandia, creativity, multidisciplinary thought, and diverse ideas are encouraged. Our unique work requires the collective minds of the nation's top scientists, engineers, and support staff. Each year, Sandians are recognized for developing a range of breakthrough technologies with commercial applications of global importance. Sandia embraces diversity,

  14. Cultural analysis: The missing factor in root-cause evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamb, H.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a model that can focus attention on appropriate cultural targets of inquiry, provide a completion criterion for root-cause completeness, and illustrate results. The illustration provided is as follows: Discover the root causes(s) related to issues of a nuclear reactor operator sleeping, inattention to duties, failure to adhere to procedures, and management inaction or adequate action.

  15. Co-cultured Synechococcus and Shewanella Produce Hydrocarbons without

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cellulosic Feedstock - Energy Innovation Portal Co-cultured Synechococcus and Shewanella Produce Hydrocarbons without Cellulosic Feedstock DOE Grant Recipients University of Minnesota Contact University of Minnesota About This Technology <span id="Caption"><span id="ctl00_MainContentHolder_zoomimage_defaultCaption">Shewanella Oneidensis naturally produces hydrocarbons without cellulosic feedstock.</span></span> Shewanella Oneidensis naturally

  16. Nissan Showcases the Results of an Energy-Wise Corporate Culture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-06-11

    The corporate leadership at Nissan cultivates a culture of energy efficiency, encouraging employees to practice good energy management at work and in every part of their lives. Read about Nissan's energy-conscience culture.

  17. Establishing and Promoting a Culture of Safety in Chemistry Laboratory Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fryberger, Teresa

    2014-12-23

    Final technical/scientific report for the project, Establishing and Promoting a Culture of Safety in Chemistry Laboratory Research.

  18. Microsoft PowerPoint - January Safety Culture.pptx [Read-Only]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Culture Presentation to Hanford Advisory Board Steve Pfaff February 9, 2012 Safety Culture * Safety culture is an organization's values and behaviors modeled by its leaders and internalized by its members, which serve to make safe performance of work the to make safe performance of work the overriding priority to protect the workers, public, and the environment. (DOE ISMS Guide, DOE G 450.4-1C) ORP is Not Alone! Safety is Everyone's responsibility * Who helps us in our safety culture efforts? -

  19. Microsoft Word - 2015 12 7 Organizational Safety Culture - HAB Advice first draft Rev 1.....docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    COMMITTEE DISCUSSION Hanford Advisory Board Advice: Testing Safety Culture in Practice Lead Issue Managers: Dirk Dunning and Liz Mattson Background The Hanford Advisory Board (HAB, Board) has been focused on reviewing, discussing, and issuing advice on safety culture since the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board issued its Recommendation 2011-1: Safety Culture at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant in June 2011. Safety culture terminology has created confusion in our discussions, as

  20. INL Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for FY 2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pace, Brenda Ringe; Olson, Christina Liegh; Gilbert, Hollie Kae; Holmer, Marie Pilkington

    2015-10-01

    This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during fiscal year (FY) 2015. Throughout the year, 67 total monitoring visits were completed, with several especially sensitive resources visited on more than one occasion. Overall, FY 2015 monitoring included surveillance of the following 49 individual cultural resource localities: three locations with human remains, one of which is also a cave; nine additional caves; twenty prehistoric archaeological sites; five historic archaeological sites; two historic trails; Experimental Breeder Reactor I (EBR-I), a National Historic Landmark; Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion (ANP) objects located at EBR-I; and eight Arco Naval Proving Ground (NPG) property types. Several INL work processes and projects were also monitored to confirm compliance with original INL CRM recommendations and assess the effects of ongoing work. On two occasions, ground disturbing activities within the boundaries of the Power Burst Facility/Critical Infrastructure Test Range Complex (PBF/CITRC) were observed by INL CRM staff prepared to respond to any additional finds of Native American human remains. Finally, the current location housing INL Archives and Special Collections was evaluated once. Most of the cultural resources monitored in FY 2015 exhibited no adverse impacts, resulting in Type 1 impact assessments. However, Type 2 impacts were noted 13 times. In one case, a portion of a historic trail was graded without prior review or coordination with the INL CRM Office, resulting in impacts to the surface of the trail and one archaeological site. Evidence of unauthorized artifact collection/ looting was also documented at three archaeological sites located along INL powerlines. Federal agents concluded a FY 2012 investigation by filing civil charges and levying fine under the Archaeological Resource Protection Act against one INL employee for this kind

  1. Practitioners, professional cultures, and perceptions of impact assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, Richard K.; Hart, Andrew; Freeman, Claire; Coutts, Brian; Colwill, David; Hughes, Andrew

    2012-01-15

    The very nature of impact assessment (IA) means that it often involves practitioners from a very wide range of disciplinary and professional backgrounds, which open the possibility that how IA is perceived and practised may vary according to the professional background of the practitioner. The purpose of this study is to investigate the extent to which a practitioner's professional background influences their perceptions of the adequacy of impact assessment in New Zealand under the Resource Management Act (RMA). Information gathered concerned professional affiliations, training, understanding of impact assessment practise, and perceptions of adequacy in relation to impact assessment. The results showed a dominance of a legalistic, operational perspective of impact assessment under the Resource Management Act, across all the main professions represented in the study. However, among preparers of impact assessments there was clear evidence of differences between the four main professional groups - surveyors, planners, engineers and natural scientists - in the way they see the nature and purpose of impact assessment, the practical steps involved, and what constitutes adequacy. Similarly, impact assessment reviewers - predominantly planners and lawyers - showed variations in their expectations of impact assessment depending on their respective professional affiliation. Although in many cases the differences seem to be more of a matter of emphasis, rather than major disputes on what constitutes a good process, even those differences can add up to rather distinct professional cultures of impact assessment. The following factors are seen as leading to the emergence of such professional cultures: different professions often contribute in different ways to an impact assessment, affecting their perception of the nature and purpose of the process; impact assessment training will usually be a secondary concern, compared with the core professional training, which will be

  2. Spectroradiometric monitoring for open outdoor culturing of algae and cyanobacteria

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Reichardt, Thomas A.; Collins, Aaron M.; McBride, Robert C.; Behnke, Craig A.; Timlin, Jerilyn A.

    2014-08-20

    We assess the measurement of hyperspectral reflectance for the outdoor monitoring of green algae and cyanobacteria cultures with a multi-channel, fiber-coupled spectroradiometer. Reflectance data acquired over a four-week period are interpreted via numerical inversion of a reflectance model, in which the above-water reflectance is expressed as a quadratic function of the single backscattering albedo, dependent on the absorption and backscatter coefficients. The absorption coefficient is treated as the sum of component spectra consisting of the cultured species (green algae or cyanobacteria), dissolved organic matter, and water (including the temperature dependence of the water absorption spectrum). The backscatter coefficient is approximatedmore » as the scaled Hilbert transform of the culture absorption spectrum with a wavelength-independent vertical offset. Additional terms in the reflectance model account for the pigment fluorescence features and the water surface reflection of sunlight and skylight. For both the green algae and cyanobacteria, the wavelength-independent vertical offset of the backscatter coefficient is found to scale linearly with daily dry weight measurements, providing the capability for a non-sampling measurement of biomass in outdoor ponds. Other fitting parameters in the reflectance model are compared to auxiliary measurements and physics-based calculations. The magnitudes of the sunlight and skylight water-surface contributions derived from the reflectance model compare favorably with Fresnel reflectance calculations, while the reflectance-derived quantum efficiency of Chl-a fluorescence is found to be in agreement with literature values. To conlclude, the water temperature derived from the reflectance model exhibits excellent agreement with thermocouple measurements during the morning hours and highlights significantly elevated temperatures in the afternoon hours.« less

  3. Spectroradiometric monitoring for open outdoor culturing of algae and cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reichardt, Thomas A.; Collins, Aaron M.; McBride, Robert C.; Behnke, Craig A.; Timlin, Jerilyn A.

    2014-08-20

    We assess the measurement of hyperspectral reflectance for the outdoor monitoring of green algae and cyanobacteria cultures with a multi-channel, fiber-coupled spectroradiometer. Reflectance data acquired over a four-week period are interpreted via numerical inversion of a reflectance model, in which the above-water reflectance is expressed as a quadratic function of the single backscattering albedo, dependent on the absorption and backscatter coefficients. The absorption coefficient is treated as the sum of component spectra consisting of the cultured species (green algae or cyanobacteria), dissolved organic matter, and water (including the temperature dependence of the water absorption spectrum). The backscatter coefficient is approximated as the scaled Hilbert transform of the culture absorption spectrum with a wavelength-independent vertical offset. Additional terms in the reflectance model account for the pigment fluorescence features and the water surface reflection of sunlight and skylight. For both the green algae and cyanobacteria, the wavelength-independent vertical offset of the backscatter coefficient is found to scale linearly with daily dry weight measurements, providing the capability for a non-sampling measurement of biomass in outdoor ponds. Other fitting parameters in the reflectance model are compared to auxiliary measurements and physics-based calculations. The magnitudes of the sunlight and skylight water-surface contributions derived from the reflectance model compare favorably with Fresnel reflectance calculations, while the reflectance-derived quantum efficiency of Chl-a fluorescence is found to be in agreement with literature values. To conlclude, the water temperature derived from the reflectance model exhibits excellent agreement with thermocouple measurements during the morning hours and highlights significantly elevated temperatures in the afternoon hours.

  4. WTP Safety Culture Advice Joint Topic (HSEP/TWC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    January 2012 v1 Page 1 of 2 Note: The views expressed in committee meetings should not be considered a substitute for full HAB consensus on any particular issue. WTP Safety Culture Advice Joint Topic (HSEP/TWC) Framing questions for discussion regarding DOE's recently released Implementation Plan: Re: Secretary Chu's response to the DNFSB with the Implementation Plan for Recommendation 2011-1 (December 27, 2011) Note: The ORP coordinator for the DOE Response to DNFSB 2011-1 is Steve Pfaff. o

  5. Ion beam analysis in cultural heritage studies: Milestones and perspectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dran, Jean-Claude; Calligaro, Thomas

    2013-07-18

    For three decades, ion beam analysis (IBA) in external mode was considered as the best choice for the characterisation of cultural heritage materials, as it combines excellent analytical performance and non-invasive character. However, in recent years, other analytical techniques arose as serious competitors, such as those based on synchrotron radiation (X-ray absorption, fluorescence or diffraction) or those using portable instruments (XRF, micro-Raman). It is shown that nevertheless IBA remains unmatched thanks to two unique features, namely the analysis of light elements and the high-resolution 3D chemical imaging.

  6. Culture, and a Metrics Methodology for Biological Countermeasure Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, Mary J.

    2007-03-15

    Outcome Metrics Methodology defines a way to evaluate outcome metrics associated with scenario analyses related to biological countermeasures. Previous work developed a schema to allow evaluation of common elements of impacts across a wide range of potential threats and scenarios. Classes of metrics were identified that could be used by decision makers to differentiate the common bases among disparate scenarios. Typical impact metrics used in risk calculations include the anticipated number of deaths, casualties, and the direct economic costs should a given event occur. There are less obvious metrics that are often as important and require more intensive initial work to be incorporated. This study defines a methodology for quantifying, evaluating, and ranking metrics other than direct health and economic impacts. As has been observed with the consequences of Hurricane Katrina, impacts to the culture of specific sectors of society are less obvious on an immediate basis but equally important over the ensuing and long term. Culture is used as the example class of metrics within which • requirements for a methodology are explored • likely methodologies are examined • underlying assumptions for the respective methodologies are discussed • the basis for recommending a specific methodology is demonstrated. Culture, as a class of metrics, is shown to consist of political, sociological, and psychological elements that are highly valued by decision makers. In addition, cultural practices, dimensions, and kinds of knowledge offer complementary sets of information that contribute to the context within which experts can provide input. The quantification and evaluation of sociopolitical, socio-economic, and sociotechnical impacts depend predominantly on subjective, expert judgment. Epidemiological data is limited, resulting in samples with statistical limits. Dose response assessments and curves depend on the quality of data and its relevance to human modes of exposure

  7. American Material Culture: Investigating a World War II Trash Dump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julie Braun

    2005-10-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory: An Historical Trash Trove Historians and archaeologists love trash, the older the better. Sometimes these researchers find their passion in unexpected places. In this presentation, the treasures found in a large historic dump that lies relatively untouched in the middle of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) will be described. The U.S. military used the central portion of the INL as one of only six naval proving grounds during World War II. They dumped trash in dry irrigation canals during and after their wartime activities and shortly before the federal government designated this arid and desolate place as the nation’s nuclear reactor testing station in 1949. When read critically and combined with memories and photographs, the 60-year old trash provides a glimpse into 1940s’ culture and the everyday lives of ordinary people who lived and worked during this time on Idaho’s desert. Thanks to priceless stories, hours of research, and the ability to read the language of historic artifacts, the dump was turned from just another trash heap into a treasure trove of 1940s memorabilia. Such studies of American material culture serve to fire our imaginations, enrich our understanding of past practices, and humanize history. Historical archaeology provides opportunities to integrate inanimate objects with animated narrative and, the more recent the artifacts, the more human the stories they can tell.

  8. American Material Culture: Investigating a World War II Trash Dump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julie Braun

    2005-10-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory: An Historical Trash Trove Historians and archaeologists love trash, the older the better. Sometimes these researchers find their passion in unexpected places. In this presentation, the treasures found in a large historic dump that lies relatively untouched in the middle of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) will be described. The U.S. military used the central portion of the INL as one of only six naval proving grounds during World War II. They dumped trash in dry irrigation canals during and after their wartime activities and shortly before the federal government designated this arid and desolate place as the nation’s nuclear reactor testing station in 1949. When read critically and combined with memories and photographs, the 60-year old trash provides a glimpse into 1940s’ culture and the everyday lives of ordinary people who lived and worked during this time on Idaho’s desert. Thanks to priceless stories, hours of research, and the ability to read the language of historic artifacts, the dump was turned from just another trash heap into a treasure trove of 1940s memorabilia. Such studies of American material culture serve to fire our imaginations, enrich our understanding of past practices, and humanize history. Historical archaeology provides opportunities to integrate inanimate objects with animated narrative and, the more recent the artifacts, the more human the stories they can tell.

  9. Safety Culture And Best Practices At Japan's Fusion Research Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rule, K.; King, M.; Takase, Y.; Oshima, Y.; Nishimura, K.; Sukegawa, A.

    2014-04-01

    The Safety Monitor Joint Working Group (JWG) is one of the magnetic fusion research collaborations between the US Department of Energy and the government of Japan. Visits by occupational safety personnel are made to participating institutions on a biennial basis. In the 2013 JWG visit of US representatives to Japan, the JWG members noted a number of good safety practices in the safety walkthroughs. These good practices and safety culture topics are discussed in this paper. The JWG hopes that these practices for worker safety can be adopted at other facilities. It is a well-known, but unquantified, safety principle that well run, safe facilities are more productive and efficient than other facilities (Rule, 2009). Worker safety, worker productivity, and high quality in facility operation all complement each other (Mottel, 1995).

  10. Safety Culture and Best Practices at Japan's Fusion Research Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rule, Keith

    2014-05-01

    The Safety Monitor Joint Working Group (JWG) is one of the magnetic fusion research collaborations between the US Department of Energy and the government of Japan. Visits by occupational safety personnel are made to participating institutions on a biennial basis. In the 2013 JWG visit of US representatives to Japan, the JWG members noted a number of good safety practices in the safety walkthroughs. These good practices and safety culture topics are discussed in this paper. The JWG hopes that these practices for worker safety can be adopted at other facilities. It is a well-known, but unquantified, safety principle that well run, safe facilities are more productive and efficient than other facilities (Rule, 2009). Worker safety, worker productivity, and high quality in facility operation all complement each other (Mottel, 1995).

  11. Using Operational Security (OPSEC) to Support a Cyber Security Culture in

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Control Systems Environments | Department of Energy Using Operational Security (OPSEC) to Support a Cyber Security Culture in Control Systems Environments Using Operational Security (OPSEC) to Support a Cyber Security Culture in Control Systems Environments This document reviews several key operational cyber security elements that are important for control systems and industrial networks and how those elements can drive the creation of a cyber security-sensitive culture. Using Operational

  12. Getting on the same page-Safety Culture | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Getting on the same ... Getting on the same page-Safety Culture Posted: July 21, 2015 - 5:27pm Safety culture encompasses our core values, attitudes and behaviors that emphasize safety - the protection of people and the environment - as the overriding priority of our work. The National Nuclear Security Administration Production Office and Consolidated Nuclear Security are committed to having a strong safety culture. The combined core values of NPO and CNS - trust, excellence, teamwork,

  13. Review of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Immobilization Plant Project, October 2010 | Department of Energy Review of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project, October 2010 Review of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project, October 2010 October 2010 Report for independent review of the nuclear safety culture at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) project at DOE's Hanford Site. This report provides the results of a

  14. DISPELLING MYTHS AND MISCONCEPTIONS TO IMPLEMENT A SAFETY CULTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potts, T. Todd; Smith, Ken; Hylko, James M.

    2003-02-27

    Industrial accidents are typically reported in terms of technological malfunctions, ignoring the human element in accident causation. However, over two-thirds of all accidents are attributable to human and organizational factors (e.g., planning, written procedures, job factors, training, communication, and teamwork), thereby affecting risk perception, behavior and attitudes. This paper reviews the development of WESKEM, LLC's Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Program that addresses human and organizational factors from a top-down, bottom-up approach. This approach is derived from the Department of Energy's Integrated Safety Management System. As a result, dispelling common myths and misconceptions about safety, while empowering employees to ''STOP work'' if necessary, have contributed to reducing an unusually high number of vehicle, ergonomic and slip/trip/fall incidents successfully. Furthermore, the safety culture that has developed within WESKEM, LLC's workforce consists of three common characteristics: (1) all employees hold safety as a value; (2) each individual feels responsible for the safety of their co-workers as well as themselves; and (3) each individual is willing and able to ''go beyond the call of duty'' on behalf of the safety of others. WESKEM, LLC as a company, upholds the safety culture and continues to enhance its existing ES&H program by incorporating employee feedback and lessons learned collected from other high-stress industries, thereby protecting its most vital resource - the employees. The success of this program is evident by reduced accident and injury rates, as well as the number of safe work hours accrued while performing hands-on field activities. WESKEM, LLC (Paducah + Oak Ridge) achieved over 800,000 safe work hours through August 2002. WESKEM-Paducah has achieved over 665,000 safe work hours without a recordable injury or lost workday case since it started operations on February 28, 2000.

  15. Integration of Safety Culture Attributes into the EFCOG WP&C Program Guideline Document

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slide Presentation by Steele Coddington, NSTec, Las Vegas and John McDonald, WRPS, Hanford. Integration of Safety Culture Attributes into EFCOG Work Planning and Control Guidance Document.

  16. DOE Policy 141.1: Management of Cultural Resources (2001) | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    (DOE) programs and field elements integrate cultural resources management into their missions and activities and to raise the level of awareness and accountability among DOE ...

  17. Environmental Guidelines for Development of Cultural Resource Management Plans--Update

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-09-22

    This Guide provides guidelines for the development of an individual Cultural Resource Management Plan for each DOE facility and program. Canceled by DOE N 251.82.

  18. DOE Policy 141.1: Management of Cultural Resources (DOE, 2001...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to raise the level of awareness and accountability among DOE contractors concerning the importance of the Department's cultural resource-related legal and trust responsibilities. ...

  19. Nissan Showcases the Results of an Energy-Wise Corporate Culture |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Showcases the Results of an Energy-Wise Corporate Culture Nissan Showcases the Results of an Energy-Wise Corporate Culture This case study describes the benefits of Nissan instilling a deep-rooted, company-wide culture of energy efficiency and how it informed long-term success in energy management and plant-wide energy performance. Nissan Showcases the Results of an Energy-Wise Corporate Culture (June 2010) (1.3 MB) More Documents & Publications Nissan North America:

  20. Review of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project, October 2010 Review of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project, October 2010 October ...

  1. Integrating community perceptions and cultural diversity in social impact assessment in Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nzeadibe, Thaddeus Chidi; Ajaero, Chukwuedozie Kelechukwu; Okonkwo, Emeka Emmanuel; Okpoko, Patrick Uche; Akukwe, Thecla Iheoma; Njoku-Tony, Roseline Feechi

    2015-11-15

    The Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) Act of 1992 aimed to make the environment a central theme in development in Nigeria. Nevertheless, the extent of engagement with local cultures in the Nigerian EIA process is not statutorily guaranteed. While most EIAs in Nigeria have been for oil and gas projects in the Niger Delta, and have focused strongly on the biophysical environment, socio-economic and cultural aspects have remained marginal. The palpable neglect of community perceptions and cultural diversity in social impact assessment (SIA) in this region prone to conflict has tended to alienate the people in the decision-making process. Thus, despite claims to compliance with regulatory requirements for EIAs, and numerous purported sustainable development initiatives by international oil companies (IOCs), the region continues to face multiple sustainability challenges. This paper situates local perceptions and cultural diversity in participatory development and canvasses the integration of community perceptions and cultural diversity into SIA in the Niger Delta region. It is argued that doing this would be critical to ensuring acceptance and success of development actions within the context of local culture while also contributing to sustainable development policy in the region. - Highlights: • Nigeria EIA Act aimed to make the environment central to development in Nigeria. • Engagement with local communities in the process is not statutorily guaranteed. • SIAs in Nigeria neglect community perceptions and cultural diversity. • Article canvasses integrating community perceptions and cultural diversity in SIA. • Local acceptance in context of culture would yield sustainable development outcomes.

  2. NMSA 18-6-9 - Cultural Properties Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Properties ActLegal Abstract Governs excavation of, injury or destruction to, and criminal damage to cultural property. Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 1993 Legal...

  3. Use of co-cultures in the production of ethanol by the fermentation of biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeikus, J.G.; Ben-Bassat, A.; Lamed, R.J.; Ng, T.K.

    1983-08-23

    Production of ethanol and enzymes is disclosed by fermentation of biomass with co-cultures of C. thermocellum and C. thermohydrosulfuricum.

  4. Apical polarity in three-dimensional culture systems: where to now?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inman, J.L.; Bissell, Mina

    2010-01-21

    Delineation of the mechanisms that establish and maintain the polarity of epithelial tissues is essential to understanding morphogenesis, tissue specificity and cancer. Three-dimensional culture assays provide a useful platform for dissecting these processes but, as discussed in a recent study in BMC Biology on the culture of mammary gland epithelial cells, multiple parameters that influence the model must be taken into account.

  5. Phenylpropanoid metabolism in suspension cultures of Vanilla planifolia Andr

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Funk, C.; Brodelius, P.E. )

    1990-09-01

    Feeding of cinnamic acid and ferulic acid to non-treated and chitosan-treated cell suspension cultures of Vanilla planifolia resulted in the formation of trace amounts of p-hydroxybenzoic acid (5.2 micrograms per gram fresh weight of cells) and vanillic acid (6.4 micrograms per gram fresh weight of cells), respectively. Addition of a 4-hydroxycinnamate: CoA-ligase inhibitor, 3,4-(methylenedioxy)-cinnamic acid (MDCA), resulted in a reduced biosynthesis of ligneous material with a simultaneous significant increased vanillic acid formation (around 75 micrograms per gram fresh weight of cells). A K{sub i} of 100 micromolar for 4-hydroxycinnamate: CoA-ligase in a crude preparation was estimated for this inhibitor. It is suggested that the conversion of cinnamic acids into benzoic acids does not involve cinnamoyl CoA esters as intermediates. Feeding of {sup 14}C-cinnamic acid and {sup 14}C-ferulic acid to cells treated with MDCA indicate that cinnamic acid, but not ferulic acid, is a precursor of vanillic acid in these cultivated cells of V. planifolia.

  6. Specific albumin binding to microvascular endothelium in culture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schnitzer, J.E.; Carley, W.W.; Palade, G.E. )

    1988-03-01

    The specific binding of rat serum albumin (RSA) to confluent microvascular endothelial cells in culture derived from the vasculature of the rat epididymal fat pad was studied at 4{degree}C by radioassay and immunocytochemistry. Radioiodinated RSA ({sup 125}I-RSA) binding to the cells reached equilibrium at {approximately} 20 min incubation. Albumin binding was a slowly saturating function over concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 50 mg/ml. Specific RSA binding with a moderate apparent affinity constant of 1.0 mg/ml and with a maximum binding concentration of 90 ng/cm{sup 2} was immunolocalized with anti-RSA antibody to the outer (free) side of the enothelium. Scatchard analysis of the binding yielded a nonlinear binding curve with a concave-upward shape. Dissociation rate analysis supports negative cooperativity of albumin binding, but multiple binding sites may also be present. Albumin binding fulfilled many requirements for ligand specificity including saturability, reversibility, competibility, and dependence on both cell type and cell number. The results are discussed in terms of past in situ investigations on the localization of albumin binding to vascular endothelium and its effect on transendothelial molecular transport.

  7. Bone morphogenetic protein-induced cartilage development in tissue culture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sato, K.; Urist, M.R.

    1984-03-01

    Outgrowths of mesenchyme-type cells from explants of allogeneic rat muscle onto a substratum of bone matrix containing bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) differentiate into cartilage. When BMP is chemically extracted from the bone matrix, the explanted cells develop only into fibrous tissue. When exogenous bovine BMP is introduced into the culture medium, either as a microsuspension or as a layer of particles between the matrix and the muscle cell tissue, cartilage develops at the interface between the matrix and the mesenchymal cell outgrowth. The chondrogenetic response is induced by as little as 2 micrograms of BMP; the optimum dose is 10 micrograms/40 mg (wet weight) of explant. The endogenous BMP equivalent for a comparable chondrogenetic response is about 0.6 micrograms/mg of allogeneic matrix. The minimum time for transfer of BMP to mesenchymal cell receptors is 1.0 hour, adequate time is 2.5 hours, and optimum time is approximately 5.0 hours. Measured in terms of incorporation of /sup 3/H-thymidine into DNA and of /sup 35/S sulfate into glycosaminoglycan, there is a latent period of one to three days preceeding the differentiation of mesenchyme-type cells into cartilage. During this latent period BMP-modulated mesenchymal cells disaggregate, migrate, reaggregate, and proliferate on new surfaces and constitute the morphogenetic phase of bone development. By the fourth day cells simultaneously undergo mitotic division, synthesize extracellular cartilage matrix, and establish the cytodifferentiation phase of development.

  8. Safety culture management: The importance of organizational factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haber, S.B.; Shurberg, D.A.; Jacobs, R.; Hofmann, D.

    1995-05-01

    The concept of safety culture has been used extensively to explain the underlying causes of performance based events, both positive and negative, across the nuclear industry. The work described in this paper represents several years of effort to identify, define and assess the organizational factors important to safe performance in nuclear power plants (NPPs). The research discussed in this paper is primarily conducted in support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC) efforts in understanding the impact of organizational performance on safety. As a result of a series of research activities undertaken by numerous NRC contractors, a collection of organizational dimensions has been identified and defined. These dimensions represent what is believed to be a comprehensive taxonomy of organizational elements that relate to the safe operation of nuclear power plants. Techniques were also developed by which to measure these organizational dimensions, and include structured interview protocols, behavioral checklists, and behavioral anchored rating scales (BARS). Recent efforts have focused on devising a methodology for the extraction of information related to the identified organizational dimensions from existing NRC documentation. This type of effort would assess the applicability of the organizational dimensions to existing NRC inspection and evaluation reports, refine the organizational dimensions previously developed so they are more relevant to the task of retrospective analysis, and attempt to rate plants based on the review of existing NRC documentation using the techniques previously developed for the assessment of organizational dimensions.

  9. Quantifying Stochastic Noise in Cultured Circadian Reporter Cells

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    John, Peter C.; Doyle, III, Francis J.

    2015-11-20

    We report that stochastic noise at the cellular level has been shown to play a fundamental role in circadian oscillations, influencing how groups of cells entrain to external cues and likely serving as the mechanism by which cell-autonomous rhythms are generated. Despite this importance, few studies have investigated how clock perturbations affect stochastic noise—even as increasing numbers of high-throughput screens categorize how gene knockdowns or small molecules can change clock period and amplitude. This absence is likely due to the difficulty associated with measuring cell-autonomous stochastic noise directly, which currently requires the careful collection and processing of single-cell data. Inmore » this study, we show that the damping rate of population-level bioluminescence recordings can serve as an accurate measure of overall stochastic noise, and one that can be applied to future and existing high-throughput circadian screens. Using cell-autonomous fibroblast data, we first show directly that higher noise at the single-cell results in faster damping at the population level. Next, we show that the damping rate of cultured cells can be changed in a dose-dependent fashion by small molecule modulators, and confirm that such a change can be explained by single-cell noise using a mathematical model. We further demonstrate the insights that can be gained by applying our method to a genome-wide siRNA screen, revealing that stochastic noise is altered independently from period, amplitude, and phase. Finally, we hypothesize that the unperturbed clock is highly optimized for robust rhythms, as very few gene perturbations are capable of simultaneously increasing amplitude and lowering stochastic noise. Ultimately, this study demonstrates the importance of considering the effect of circadian perturbations on stochastic noise, particularly with regard to the development of small-molecule circadian therapeutics.« less

  10. Algae culture for cattle feed and water purification. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varani, F.T.; Schellenbach, S.; Veatch, M.; Grover, P.; Benemann, J.

    1980-05-16

    The feasibility of algae growth on centrate from anaerobic digester effluent and the refeed of both effluent solids and the algae to feedlot cattle were investigated. The digester was operated with dirt feedlot manure. The study serves as a supplement for the work to design a utility sized digester for the City of Lamar to convert local feedlot manure into a fuel gas. The biogas produced would power the electrical generation plant already in service. Previous studies have established techniques of digester operation and the nutritional value for effluent solids as fed to cattle. The inclusion of a single-strain of algae, Chlorella pyrenidosa in the process was evaluated here for its capability (1) to be grown in both open and closed ponds of the discharge water from the solids separation part of the process, (2) to purify the discharge water, and (3) to act as a growth stimulant for cattle feed consumption and conversion when fed at a rate of 6 grams per head per day. Although it was found that the algae could be cultured and grown on the discharge water in the laboratory, the study was unable to show that algae could accomplish the other objectives successfully. However, the study yielded supplementary information useful to the overall process design of the utility plant. This was (1) measurement of undried digester solids fed to cattle in a silage finishing ration (without algae) at an economic value of $74.99 per dry ton based on nutritional qualities, (2) development of a centrate treatment system to decolorize and disinfect centrate to allow optimum algae growth, and (3) information on ionic and mass balances for the digestion system. It is the recommendation of this study that algae not be used in the process in the Lamar bioconversion plant.

  11. Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Cultural environment and aesthetic resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trettin, L.D.; Petrich, C.H.; Saulsbury, J.W.

    1996-01-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on the cultural environment and aesthetic resources during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The cultural environment in the Geothermal Resource Zone (GRZ) and associated study area consists of Native Hawaiian cultural and religious practices and both Native Hawaiian and non-Native Hawaiian cultural resources. This report consists of three sections: (1) a description of Native Hawaiian cultural and religious rights, practices, and values; (2) a description of historic, prehistoric, and traditional Native Hawaiian sites; and (3) a description of other (non-native) sites that could be affected by development in the study area. Within each section, the level of descriptive detail varies according to the information currently available. The description of the cultural environment is most specific in its coverage of the Geothermal Resource Subzones in the Puna District of the island of Hawaii and the study area of South Maui. Ethnographic and archaeological reports by Cultural Advocacy Network Developing Options and International Archaeological Research Institute, Inc., respectively, supplement the descriptions of these two areas with new information collected specifically for this study. Less detailed descriptions of additional study areas on Oahu, Maui, Molokai, and the island of Hawaii are based on existing archaeological surveys.

  12. Cultural Resource Protection Plan for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pace, Brenda Ringe; Gilbert, Hollie Kae

    2015-05-01

    This plan addresses cultural resource protection procedures to be implemented during construction of the Remote Handled Low Level Waste project at the Idaho National Laboratory. The plan proposes pre-construction review of proposed ground disturbing activities to confirm avoidance of cultural resources. Depending on the final project footprint, cultural resource protection strategies might also include additional survey, protective fencing, cultural resource mapping and relocation of surface artifacts, collection of surface artifacts for permanent curation, confirmation of undisturbed historic canal segments outside the area of potential effects for construction, and/or archaeological test excavations to assess potential subsurface cultural deposits at known cultural resource locations. Additionally, all initial ground disturbing activities will be monitored for subsurface cultural resource finds, cultural resource sensitivity training will be conducted for all construction field personnel, and a stop work procedure will be implemented to guide assessment and protection of any unanticipated discoveries after initial monitoring of ground disturbance.

  13. EIS-0238: Withdrawal of Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Proposed Minnesota Agri-Power Plant and Associated Facilities On October 7, 1998 (63 FR ... facility, known as the Minnesota Agri- Power Plant (MAPP), and associated transmission ...

  14. Stabilization of gene expression and cell morphology after explant recycling during fin explant culture in goldfish

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chenais, Nathalie; Lareyre, Jean-Jacques; Le Bail, Pierre-Yves; Labbe, Catherine

    2015-07-01

    The development of fin primary cell cultures for in vitro cellular and physiological studies is hampered by slow cell outgrowth, low proliferation rate, poor viability, and sparse cell characterization. Here, we investigated whether the recycling of fresh explants after a first conventional culture could improve physiological stability and sustainability of the culture. The recycled explants were able to give a supplementary cell culture showing faster outgrowth, cleaner cell layers and higher net cell production. The cells exhibited a highly stabilized profile for marker gene expression including a low cytokeratin 49 (epithelial marker) and a high collagen 1a1 (mesenchymal marker) expression. Added to the cell spindle-shaped morphology, motility behavior, and actin organization, this suggests that the cells bore stable mesenchymal characteristics. This contrast with the time-evolving expression pattern observed in the control fresh explants during the first 2 weeks of culture: a sharp decrease in cytokeratin 49 expression was concomitant with a gradual increase in col1a1. We surmise that such loss of epithelial features for the benefit of mesenchymal ones was triggered by an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) process or by way of a progressive population replacement process. Overall, our findings provide a comprehensive characterization of this new primary culture model bearing mesenchymal features and whose stability over culture time makes those cells good candidates for cell reprogramming prior to nuclear transfer, in a context of fish genome preservation. - Highlights: • Recycled fin explants outgrow cells bearing stable mesenchymal traits. • Cell production and quality is enhanced in the recycled explant culture system. • Fresh fin primary culture is highly variable and loose epithelial traits over time.

  15. Safety Reports Series No. 11, Developing Safety Culture in Nuclear Activities: Practical Suggestions to Assist Progress, International Atomic Energy Agency

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Safety Reports Series No. 11, Developing Safety Culture in Nuclear Activities: Practical Suggestions to Assist Progress, International Atomic Energy Agency

  16. Environmental guidelines for Development of Cultural Resource Management plans. Working draft for comment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    DOE has stewardship responsibilities for managing the cultural resources remaining on DOE-owned and other lands impacted by DOE programs. Goal of the DOE-wide Cultural Resource Management (CRM) program is to identify and consolidate compliance actions associated with statutory and regulatory requirements. This document is to provide guidelines to DOE field managers; its implementation is intended to assure that each DOE facility and program complies with executive orders, statutes, and regulations governing the management of cultural resources. It covers CRM goals, existing conditions, CRM methods, CRM procedures and administration, and plan attachments. Glossary, legislation, and documents are covered in appendices.

  17. Characteristics of enriched cultures for bio-huff-`n`-puff tests at Jilin oil field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiu-Yuan Wang; Gang Dai; Yan-Fen Xue; Shu-Hua Xie

    1995-12-31

    Three enriched cultures (48, 15a, and 26a), selected from more than 80 soil and water samples, could grow anaerobically in the presence of crude oil at 30{degrees}C and could ferment molasses to gases and organic acids. Oil recovery by culture 48 in the laboratory model experiment was enhanced by 25.2% over the original reserves and by 53.7% over the residual reserves. Enriched culture 48 was composed of at least 4 species belonging to the genera Eubacterium, Fusobacterium, and Bacteroides. This enriched culture was used as inoculum for MEOR field trials at Jilin oil field with satisfactory results. The importance of the role of these isolates in EOR was confirmed by their presence and behavior in the fluids produced from the microbiologically treated reservoir.

  18. Reconstitution activity of hypoxic cultured human cord blood CD34-positive cells in NOG mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shima, Haruko; Takubo, Keiyo; Iwasaki, Hiroko; Yoshihara, Hiroki; Gomei, Yumiko; Hosokawa, Kentaro; Arai, Fumio; Takahashi, Takao; Suda, Toshio

    2009-01-16

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) reside in hypoxic areas of the bone marrow. However, the role of hypoxia in the maintenance of HSCs has not been fully characterized. We performed xenotransplantation of human cord blood cells cultured in hypoxic or normoxic conditions into adult NOD/SCID/IL-2R{gamma}{sup null} (NOG) mice. Hypoxic culture (1% O{sub 2}) for 6 days efficiently supported the maintenance of HSCs, although cell proliferation was suppressed compared to the normoxic culture. In contrast, hypoxia did not affect in vitro colony-forming ability. Upregulation of a cell cycle inhibitor, p21, was observed in hypoxic culture. Immunohistochemical analysis of recipient bone marrow revealed that engrafted CD34{sup +}CD38{sup -} cord blood HSCs were hypoxic. Taken together, these results demonstrate the significance of hypoxia in the maintenance of quiescent human cord blood HSCs.

  19. DOE P 141.1 Department of Energy Management of Cultural Resources

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    U.S. Department of Energy POLICY Washington, D.C. Approved: 5-2-01 SUBJECT: DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY MANAGEMENT OF CULTURAL RESOURCES PURPOSE AND SCOPE The purpose of this Policy is- *...

  20. Hanford Site, Tribes Raise Awareness of Culturally Significant Resources With Training Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. – About seven acres in size, the cultural resources test beds site is a small area of the 586-square-mile Hanford site. But its impact is big.

  1. Environmental guidelines for development of Cultural Resource Management plans. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines to the DOE field managements with responsibility for the development of an individual Cultural Resource Management Plan for each DOE facility and program.

  2. Proceedings of the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards Safety Culture Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    NUREG/CP-0183, Proceedings of the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards Safety Culture Workshop, June 12, 2003 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards Washington, DC 20555-0001.

  3. Pueblo De San Ildefonso Department of Environmental and Cultural Preservation Program Overview 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the September 30, 2015 meeting: Director Raymond Martinez, and Governor Mountain, provided the membership with an update on the Pueblo de San Ildefonso's perspectives on: environmental clean up and cultural preservation.

  4. EM’s Safety Chief Talks Safety Culture Improvements With EM Update

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – EM Safety, Security, and Quality Programs Deputy Assistant Secretary James Hutton recently spoke with EM Update about the EM program’s improvements in safety culture.

  5. Enhanced growth medium and method for culturing human mammary epithelial cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stampfer, Martha R.; Smith, Helene S.; Hackett, Adeline J.

    1983-01-01

    Methods are disclosed for isolating and culturing human mammary epithelial cells of both normal and malignant origin. Tissue samples are digested with a mixture including the enzymes collagenase and hyaluronidase to produce clumps of cells substantially free from stroma and other undesired cellular material. Growing the clumps of cells in mass culture in an enriched medium containing particular growth factors allows for active cell proliferation and subculture. Clonal culture having plating efficiencies of up to 40% or greater may be obtained using individual cells derived from the mass culture by plating the cells on appropriate substrates in the enriched media. The clonal growth of cells so obtained is suitable for a quantitative assessment of the cytotoxicity of particular treatment. An exemplary assay for assessing the cytotoxicity of the drug adriamycin is presented.

  6. DOE P 141.1 – Department of Energy Management of Cultural Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this Policy is (1) to ensure that U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs, including the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), and field elements integrate cultural resources management into their missions and activities, and (2) to raise the level of awareness and accountability among DOE (including NNSA) contractors concerning the importance of DOE's cultural resource-related legal and trust responsibilities.

  7. DOE P 141.1 – Department of Energy Management of Cultural Resources (DOE, 2001)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this Policy is (1) to ensure that U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs, including the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), and field elements integrate cultural resources management into their missions and activities, and (2) to raise the level of awareness and accountability among DOE (including NNSA) contractors concerning the importance of DOE's cultural resource-related legal and trust responsibilities.

  8. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Office FY 2010 Activity Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollie K. Gilbert; Clayton F. Marler; Christina L. Olson; Brenda R. Pace; Julie Braun Williams

    2011-09-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site is home to vast numbers and a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least a 13,500 year span of human land use in the region. As a federal agency, the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) has legal responsibility for the management and protection of the resources and has contracted these responsibilities to Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA). The BEA professional staff is committed to maintaining a cultural resource management program that accepts the challenge of preserving INL cultural resources in a manner reflecting their importance in local, regional, and national history. This report summarizes activities performed by the INL Cultural Resource Management Office (CRMO) staff during fiscal year 2010. This work is diverse, far-reaching and though generally confined to INL cultural resource compliance, also includes a myriad of professional and voluntary community activities. This document is intended to be informative to both internal and external stakeholders and to serve as a planning tool for future INL cultural resource management work.

  9. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Office FY 2011 Activity Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julie Braun Williams; Brenda R. Pace; Hollie K. Gilbert; Christina L. Olson

    2012-09-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site is home to vast numbers and a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least a 13,500 year span of human land use in the region. As a federal agency, the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) has legal responsibility for the management and protection of the resources and has contracted these responsibilities to Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA). The BEA professional staff is committed to maintaining a cultural resource management program that accepts the challenge of preserving INL cultural resources in a manner reflecting their importance in local, regional, and national history. This report is intended as a stand-alone document that summarizes activities performed by the INL Cultural Resource Management Office (CRMO) staff during fiscal year 2011. This work is diverse, far-reaching and though generally confined to INL cultural resource compliance, also includes a myriad of professional and voluntary community activities. This document is intended to be informative to both internal and external stakeholders, serve as a planning tool for future INL cultural resource management work, and meet an agreed upon legal requirement.

  10. Relationship between substrate concentration and fermentation product ratios in Clostridium thermocellum cultures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brener, D.; Johnson, B.F.

    1984-05-01

    Growth of Clostridium thermocellum in batch cultures was studied over a broad range of cellobiose concentrations. Cultures displayed important differences in their substrate metabolism as determined by the end product yields. Bacterial growth was severly limited when the initial cellobiose concentration was 0.2 (wt/vol), was maximal at substrate concentrations between 0.5 and 2.0%, and did not occur at 5.0% cellobiose. Ethanol accumulated maximally (38.3% ..mu..mol/10/sup 9/ cells) in cultures with an initial cellobiose concentration of 0.8%, whereas cultures in 2.0% cellobiose accumulated on 17.3 ..mu..mol, and substrate-limited cultures (0.2% cellobiose) accumulated little, if any, ethanol beyond that initially detected (8.3 ..mu..mol/10/sup 9/ cells). In a medium with 0.8% cellobiose, ethanol was produced at a constant rate of approximately 1.1 ..mu..mol/10/sup 9/ cells per h from late-logarithmic phase (16 h) of growth well into stationary phase (44 h). When ethanol was added exogenously at levels more than twice the maximum produced by the cultures themselves (0.5% vol/vol), neither the extent of growth (maximum Klett units, 150) nor the amounts of ethanol produced (approximately 0.17%) by the culture was affected. The ratio of ethanol to acetate was highest (2.8) when cells were grown in 0.8% cellobiose and lowest (1.2) when cells were grown in 0.2% cellobiose. 18 references.

  11. Development of a cell culture surface conversion technique using alginate thin film for evaluating effect upon cellular differentiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakashima, Y.; Tsusu, K.; Minami, K.; Nakanishi, Y.

    2014-06-15

    Here, we sought to develop a cell culture surface conversion technique that would not damage living cells. An alginate thin film, formed on a glass plate by spin coating of sodium alginate solution and dipping into calcium chloride solution, was used to inhibit adhesion of cells. The film could be removed by ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) at any time during cell culture, permitting observation of cellular responses to conversion of the culture surface in real time. Additionally, we demonstrated the validity of the alginate thin film coating method and the performance of the film. The thickness of the alginate thin film was controlled by varying the rotation speed during spin coating. Moreover, the alginate thin film completely inhibited the adhesion of cultured cells to the culture surface, irrespective of the thickness of the film. When the alginate thin film was removed from the culture surface by EDTA, the cultured cells adhered to the culture surface, and their morphology changed. Finally, we achieved effective differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts into myotube cells by cell culture on the convertible culture surface, demonstrating the utility of our novel technique.

  12. Effects of propionate and acetate additions on solvent production in batch cultures of clostridium acetobutylicum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huesemann, M.H.W. ); Papoutsakis, E.T. )

    1990-05-01

    Addition of acetate or propionate to uncontrolled-pH batch cultures does not affect the initiation of solventogenesis but does enhance final solvent concentrations compared with those of unchallenged cultures. This observation can be explained in terms of the increased buffering capacity of the medium brought about by the added acids, resulting in protection against premature growth inhibition due to low culture pH values at the end of the fermentation. The uptake of propionic acid from the medium does not proceed solely via the coenzyme A-transferase pathway, since less acetone than propanol is formed. Therefore, at least 50% of the propionic acid is taken up through the reversed kinase-phosphotransbutyrylase reaction pathway.

  13. Concentration-dependent gene expression responses to flusilazole in embryonic stem cell differentiation cultures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dartel, Dorien A.M. van; Pennings, Jeroen L.A.; Fonteyne, Liset J.J. de la; Brauers, Karen J.J.; Claessen, Sandra; Delft, Joost H. van; Kleinjans, Jos C.S.; Piersma, Aldert H.

    2011-03-01

    The murine embryonic stem cell test (EST) is designed to evaluate developmental toxicity based on compound-induced inhibition of embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation into cardiomyocytes. The addition of transcriptomic evaluation within the EST may result in enhanced predictability and improved characterization of the applicability domain, therefore improving usage of the EST for regulatory testing strategies. Transcriptomic analyses assessing factors critical for risk assessment (i.e. dose) are needed to determine the value of transcriptomic evaluation in the EST. Here, using the developmentally toxic compound, flusilazole, we investigated the effect of compound concentration on gene expression regulation and toxicity prediction in ESC differentiation cultures. Cultures were exposed for 24 h to multiple concentrations of flusilazole (0.54-54 {mu}M) and RNA was isolated. In addition, we sampled control cultures 0, 24, and 48 h to evaluate the transcriptomic status of the cultures across differentiation. Transcriptomic profiling identified a higher sensitivity of development-related processes as compared to cell division-related processes in flusilazole-exposed differentiation cultures. Furthermore, the sterol synthesis-related mode of action of flusilazole toxicity was detected. Principal component analysis using gene sets related to normal ESC differentiation was used to describe the dynamics of ESC differentiation, defined as the 'differentiation track'. The concentration-dependent effects on development were reflected in the significance of deviation of flusilazole-exposed cultures from this transcriptomic-based differentiation track. Thus, the detection of developmental toxicity in EST using transcriptomics was shown to be compound concentration-dependent. This study provides further insight into the possible application of transcriptomics in the EST as an improved alternative model system for developmental toxicity testing.

  14. Co-culture of 3D tumor spheroids with fibroblasts as a model for epithelial–mesenchymal transition in vitro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Sun-Ah; Lee, Eun Kyung; Kuh, Hyo-Jeong

    2015-07-15

    Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) acts as a facilitator of metastatic dissemination in the invasive margin of malignant tumors where active tumor–stromal crosstalks take place. Co-cultures of cancer cells with cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are often used as in vitro models of EMT. We established a tumor–fibroblast proximity co-culture using HT-29 tumor spheroids (TSs) with CCD-18co fibroblasts. When co-cultured with TSs, CCD-18co appeared activated, and proliferative activity as well as cell migration increased. Expression of fibronectin increased whereas laminin and type I collagen decreased in TSs co-cultured with fibroblasts compared to TSs alone, closely resembling the margin of in vivo xenograft tissue. Active TGFβ1 in culture media significantly increased in TS co-cultures but not in 2D co-cultures of cancer cells–fibroblasts, indicating that 3D context-associated factors from TSs may be crucial to crosstalks between cancer cells and fibroblasts. We also observed in TSs co-cultured with fibroblasts increased expression of α-SMA, EGFR and CTGF; reduced expression of membranous β-catenin and E-cadherin, together suggesting an EMT-like changes similar to a marginal region of xenograft tissue in vivo. Overall, our in vitro TS–fibroblast proximity co-culture mimics the EMT-state of the invasive margin of in vivo tumors in early metastasis. - Highlights: • An adjacent co-culture of tumor spheroids and fibroblasts is presented as EMT model. • Activation of fibroblasts and increased cell migration were shown in co-culture. • Expression of EMT-related factors in co-culture was similar to that in tumor tissue. • Crosstalk between spheroids and fibroblasts was demonstrated by secretome analysis.

  15. Mining machinery/equipment/parts/services. Oil and Gas field equipment/machinery/parts/supplies (Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Trinidad and Tobago)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This 7-part set includes separate reports on market possibilities for field production equipment, drilling equipment, refinery equipment, and auxiliary equipment in the following countries: Argentina, Brazil (2 reports), Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Trinidad and Tobago. Each report has been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  16. Mining machinery/equipment/parts/services. Oil and gas field equipment/machinery/parts/supplies (Ecuador). Refinery equipment, parts, and accessories, March 1991. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-03-01

    The petroleum sector in Ecuador brings in about 65 percent of the country's revenue. Three of the refineries are located in the coastal region. The other two, plus the Liquified Petroleum Gas Plant (LPG), are located in the Oriente region (Amazon jungle). The refineries operate at about 85% of their installation capacity. The Petroindustrial and Petropeninsula investment plan for 1991 comtemplates the expansion of the Esmeraldas refinery to 110,000 barrels a day, and the up-grading of the Shushufindi and Libertad refineries located near the city of Guayaquil. The United States is by far the largest supplier of refinery equipment, parts and accessories, controlling about 90% of the total market.

  17. Guidelines for Evaluating and Documenting Traditional Cultural Properties (NPS, 1990, revised 1998)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This National Park Service bulletin is meant to assist federal agencies, State Historic Preservation Officers, local governments, Indian tribes, and other historic preservation practitioners in determining whether properties thought to have traditional cultural significance are eligible for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places.

  18. U.S. assistance enhancing safety culture in countries operating Soviet-designed reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guppy, J.G.; Horak, W.C.; Reisman, A.W.

    1995-05-01

    The United States Department of Energy (USDOE) is managing the International Nuclear Safety Program (INSP), which is aimed at providing assistance to enhance safety at commercial nuclear power plants (NPPS) in Russia and Ukraine, as well as Central European countries (CEC). The funding for this program has been provided by the US Agency for International Development (AID). Brookhaven National Laboratory has been assisting DOE in certain portions of this program. The enhancement of safety culture is one of the most important goals of the joint International Nuclear Safety Program. In terms of the INSP, safety culture is comprised of two major components; (1) an environment that is a function of regulations, management sensitivity and structure; and (2) an individual commitment to safety in the day to day execution of activities in terms of thought and accountability. The long term impact of the INSP activities can only be measured by the effectiveness of strengthening safety culture within our partner counties. The strengthening of this culture will manifest in reduced risk of a nuclear accident long after other evidence of the INSP activities has disappeared. One area within the INSP, which has already led to a number of successful specific projects, is under the plant safety upgrade activities. Here, the US and the partner countries jointly identify specific target areas for the INSP efforts. Each identified area has a major component involving safety culture enhancement. With any direct involvement in the particular assistance activities, areas are identified to include a need for training. As technical experts and management from the partner country are assisted in addressing the identified needs, the training programs are provided which will not only address the specific need at hand, but will also teach skills which can be applied to different, but related needs that may exist or develop.

  19. LIPID PRODUCTION BY DUNALIELLA SALINA IN BATCH CULTURE: EFFECTS OF NITROGEN LIMITATION AND LIGHT INTENSITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weldy, C.S.; Huesemann, M.

    2007-01-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations are increasing and may cause unknown deleterious environmental effects if left unchecked. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has predicted in its latest report a 2°C to 4°C increase in global temperatures even with the strictest CO2 mitigation practices. Global warming can be attributed in large part to the burning of carbon-based fossil fuels, as the concentration of atmospheric CO2 is directly related to the burning of fossil fuels. Biofuels which do not add CO2 to the atmosphere are presently generated primarily from terrestrial plants, i.e., ethanol from corn grain and biodiesel from soybean oil. The production of biofuels from terrestrial plants is severely limited by the availability of fertile land. Lipid production from microalgae and its corresponding biodiesel production have been studied since the late 1970s but large scale production has remained economically infeasible due to the large costs of sterile growing conditions required for many algal species. This study focuses on the potential of the halophilic microalgae species Dunaliella salina as a source of lipids and subsequent biodiesel production. The lipid production rates under high light and low light as well as nitrogen suffi cient and nitrogen defi cient culture conditions were compared for D. salina cultured in replicate photobioreactors. The results show (a) cellular lipid content ranging from 16 to 44% (wt), (b) a maximum culture lipid concentration of 450mg lipid/L, and (c) a maximum integrated lipid production rate of 46mg lipid/L culture*day. The high amount of lipids produced suggests that D. salina, which can be mass-cultured in non-sterile outdoor ponds, has strong potential to be an economically valuable source for renewable oil and biodiesel production.

  20. Tombs, tunnels, and terraces a cultural resources survey of a former ammunition supply point in Okinawa, Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verhaaren, B. T.; Levenson, J. B.; Komine, G.

    2000-02-09

    U.S. forces serving at military bases on foreign soil are obligated to act as good stewards of the cultural and natural resources under their control. However, cultural resources management presents special challenges at U.S. bases in other countries where cultural properties laws differ in emphasis and detail from those in the United States and issues of land ownership and occupancy are not always clear. Where status of forces agreements (SOFAs) exist, environmental governing standards bridge the gap between U.S. and host nation cultural priorities. In Japan, the Department of Defense Japan Environmental Governing Standards (JEGS) fill this function. Under Criteria 12-4.2 and 12-4.3 of the JEGS, U.S. Forces Japan commit themselves to inventory and protect cultural properties found on the lands they control or use. Cultural properties include archaeological sites, tombs, historic buildings, and shrines. Natural monuments, such as landscape features or plant and animal species, may also be designated as cultural properties. As part of this commitment, in February 1999 a cultural resources inventory was conducted in Area 1, part of Kadena Air Base (AB), Okinawa, Japan. Area 1, the former U.S. army Ammunition Supply Point 1, is currently used primarily for training exercises and recreational paint ball.

  1. A chemically defined culture medium containing Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632 for the fabrication of stratified squamous epithelial cell grafts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aslanova, Afag; Takagi, Ryo; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo; Yamamoto, Masakazu

    2015-05-01

    With the development of a culture method for stratified squamous epithelial cells, tissue-engineered epithelial cell sheets have been successfully applied as clinical cell grafts. However, the implementation of these cell sheets without the use of any animal-derived materials is highly desirable. In this study, Rho-associated protein kinase inhibitor Y-27632 was used to develop a chemically defined culture medium for the fabrication of stratified epithelial cell grafts consisting of human epidermal and oral keratinocytes, and the proliferation activity, cell morphology, and gene expressions of the keratinocytes were analyzed. The results of a colorimetric assay indicated that Y-27632 significantly promoted the proliferation of the keratinocytes in culture media both with and without fetal bovine serum (FBS), although there were no indications of Y-27632 efficacy on cell morphology and stratification of the keratinocytes in culture medium without any animal-derived materials. The results of quantitative RT-PCR revealed that gene expressions correlated with cell adhesion, cell–cell junction, proliferation markers, and stem/progenitor markers in cultured keratinocytes were not strongly affected by the addition of Y-27632 to the culture medium. Moreover, gene expressions of differentiation markers in stratified keratinocytes cultured in medium without FBS were nearly identical to those of keratinocytes co-cultured with 3T3 feeder cells. Interestingly, the expressions of differentiation markers in cultured stratified keratinocytes were suppressed by FBS, whereas they were reconstructed by either co-culture of a 3T3 feeder layer or addition of Y-27632 into the culture medium containing FBS. These findings indicate that Y-27632 is a useful supplement for the development of a chemically defined culture medium for fabrication of stratified epithelial cell grafts for clinical applications for the purpose of developing the culture medium with a lower risk of pathogen

  2. Comparison of Marine Microalgae Culture Systems for Fuels Production and Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weissman, Joseph C; Polle, Juergen

    2006-05-30

    The dual problems of global fossil fuels supplies and global warming focus attention on the need to develop technologies that can provide large amounts of renewable fuels without contributing to global warming. The capture of power plant flue gas CO2 using microalgae cultures is one potential technology that could meet this objective. The central R&D issues are the design and operation of low-cost algal mass culture systems and the development of algal strains and cultivation techniques that can achieve very high biomass productivities. The major objective of this project was to develop mass culture techniques that could result in greatly increased biomass productivities, well above the about 50 metric tons per hectare per year (mt/ha/y) currently achievable. In this project, two marine microalgae species, the diatom Cyclotella sp.. and the green alga Tetraselmis sp., were cultivated on seawater in both open ponds and closed photo bioreactors, under a variety of different cultivation conditions. Simultaneous operation of the closed photo bioreactors and open ponds demonstrated similar productivities, under the same operating conditions. Thus the very expensive closed systems do not provide any major or inherent advantages in microalgae production over open ponds. Mutants of Cyclotella sp. were developed that exhibited reduced pigment content, which theoretically would result in greatly increased productivities when grown under full sunlight. However, in open ponds, these mutant strains exhibited similar productivities as the parental strains. The mutant strains all grew relatively slowly, suggesting that additional mutations masked whatever inherent potential for increased productivities may have resulted from the reduced pigment content. Research is still required to develop improved low pigment strains. When open pond cultures were exposed to intermittent sunlight, by partially covering the ponds with slats, solar conversion efficiencies increased dramatically

  3. Quality of Cultural Heritage in EIA; twenty years of experience in Norway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindblom, Inge

    2012-04-15

    The aim of this paper is to clarify and discuss how quality, relevance, attitudes, beliefs and transfer value act as underlying driving forces in the development of the Cultural Heritage theme in EIAs. One purpose is to identify and discuss some conditions that can better environmental assessment in order to increase the significance of EIA in decision-making with regard to Cultural Heritage. The main tools used are different research methods designed for analyses of quality and quality changes, primarily based on the relevant opinions of 160 people occupied with Cultural Heritage in EIA in Norway. The study is based on a review of 40 types of EIAs from 1991 to 2000, an online questionnaire to 319 (160 responded) individuals from 14 different backgrounds, and interviews with three institutions in Sweden and Denmark. The study confirms a steadily increasing quality on EIRs over time, parallel with an improvement of the way in which Cultural Heritage is treated in EIA. This is supported by both the interviews and the qualitative comments regarding the survey. Potential for improvements is shown to be a need for more detailed background material as well as more use of adequate methods. The survey shows the existence of a wide variety of negative views, attitudes and beliefs, but the consequences of this are difficult to evaluate. However, most certainly, negative attitudes and beliefs have not been powerful enough to be detrimental to the quality of Cultural Heritage component, as nothing in the study indicates that negative attitudes and myths are undermining the system of EIA. The study shows the importance of having on-going discussions on quality and quality change over time by people involved in EIA, and how this is a necessary condition for successful implementation and acceptance. Beliefs and negative attitudes can also be a catalyst for developing better practice and advancing new methodology. In addition, new EIA countries must be prepared for several years

  4. Cultural Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Expand Projects & Initiatives Finance & Rates Expand Finance & Rates Involvement & Outreach Expand Involvement & Outreach Doing Business Expand Doing Business...

  5. Cultural Preservation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Counterterrorism NNSA provides expertise, practical tools, and technically informed policy recommendations required to advance U.S. nuclear counterterrorism and counterproliferation objectives. It executes a unique program of work focused solely on these missions and builds partnerships with U.S. government agencies and key foreign governments on these issues. Learn More Counterterrorism Policy and Cooperation Nuclear Threat Science Learn More About Counterterrorism Related News A snapshot of

  6. Self-Reliability and Motivation in a Nuclear Security Culture Enhancement Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, Cary E.; de Boer, Gloria; De Castro, Kara; Landers, John; Rogers, Erin

    2010-10-01

    The threat of nuclear terrorism has become a global concern. Many countries continue to make efforts to strengthen nuclear security by enhancing systems of nuclear material protection, control, and accounting (MPC&A). Though MPC&A systems can significantly upgrade nuclear security, they do not eliminate the “human factor.” Gen. Eugene Habiger, a former “Assistant Secretary for Safeguards and Security” at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) nuclear-weapons complex and a former commander of U.S. strategic nuclear forces, has observed that “good security is 20% equipment and 80% people.”1 Although eliminating the “human factor” is not possible, accounting for and mitigating the risk of the insider threat is an essential element in establishing an effective nuclear security culture. This paper will consider the organizational role in mitigating the risk associated with the malicious insider through monitoring and enhancing human reliability and motivation as well as enhancing the nuclear security culture.

  7. Culturally relevant science: An approach to math science education for hispanics. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montellano, B.O. de

    1996-11-14

    This progress report summarizes results of a teacher workshop. A letter sent to 17 teachers who had participated in the workshop requested a report of any activities undertaken and copies of lesson plans and materials developed. Only nine responses were received, and not all of them demonstrated a satisfactory level of activity. Teachers who submitted materials showing the most promise were invited to participate in the Summer Writing Workshop. A partial first draft of a companion volume for the teacher`s manual was written which provides a rationale for culturally relevant science and presents the cultural and scientific background needed. The outline of the book is presented in Appendix 1. Appendix 2 is a sample chapter from the book.

  8. Open-access databases as unprecedented resources and drivers of cultural change in fisheries science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McManamay, Ryan A; Utz, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Open-access databases with utility in fisheries science have grown exponentially in quantity and scope over the past decade, with profound impacts to our discipline. The management, distillation, and sharing of an exponentially growing stream of open-access data represents several fundamental challenges in fisheries science. Many of the currently available open-access resources may not be universally known among fisheries scientists. We therefore introduce many national- and global-scale open-access databases with applications in fisheries science and provide an example of how they can be harnessed to perform valuable analyses without additional field efforts. We also discuss how the development, maintenance, and utilization of open-access data are likely to pose technical, financial, and educational challenges to fisheries scientists. Such cultural implications that will coincide with the rapidly increasing availability of free data should compel the American Fisheries Society to actively address these problems now to help ease the forthcoming cultural transition.

  9. Self-Reliability and Motivation in a Nuclear Security Culture Enhancement Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers,E.; deBoer,G.; Crawford, C.; De Castro, K.; Landers, J.

    2009-10-19

    The threat of nuclear terrorism has become a global concern. Many countries continue to make efforts to strengthen nuclear security by enhancing systems of nuclear material protection, control, and accounting (MPC&A). Though MPC&A systems can significantly upgrade nuclear security, they do not eliminate the "human factor." Gen. Eugene Habiger, a former "Assistant Secretary for Safeguards and Security" at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) nuclear-weapons complex and a former commander of U.S. strategic nuclear forces, has observed that "good security is 20% equipment and 80% people." Although eliminating the "human factor" is not possible, accounting for and mitigating the risk of the insider threat is an essential element in establishing an effective nuclear security culture. This paper will consider the organizational role in mitigating the risk associated with the malicious insider through monitoring and enhancing human reliability and motivation as well as enhancing the nuclear security culture.

  10. Independent Oversight Follow-up Assessment of Safety Culture at the Waste

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    - January 2012 | Department of Energy Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - January 2012 Independent Oversight Assessment, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - January 2012 January 2012 Assessment of the Nuclear Safety Culture and Management of Nuclear Safety Concerns at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS),