National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for affecting usage adequacy

  1. Usage Demographics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Demographics Usage Demographics NERSC Usage Demographics 2014 In 2014, NERSC supported about 6,000 users from universities, national laboratories and industry, working on 849...

  2. Usage Statistics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Usage Statistics Usage Statistics Genepool Cluster Statistics Period: daily weekly monthly quarter yearly 2year Utilization By Group Jobs Pending Last edited: 2013-09-26 18:21:13...

  3. NERSC Usage Demographics 2010

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 NERSC Usage Demographics 2010 Academic Usage Usage by Discipline DOE & Other Lab Usage Usage by Institution Type Last edited: 2015-03-02 16:21:16...

  4. Usage Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reports Usage Reports Batch Job Statistics See queue wait times, hours used, top users and other summary statistics for jobs run at NERSC (login required). Read More Parallel...

  5. HSI Usage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Usage HSI Usage HSI is a flexible and powerful command-line utility to access the NERSC HPSS storage systems. Like FTP, you can use it to store and retrieve files but it has a much larger set of commands for listing your files and directories, creating directories, changing file permissions, etc. The command set has a UNIX look and feel (e.g. mv, mkdir, rm, cp, cd, etc.) so that moving through your HPSS directory tree is almost identical to what you would find on a UNIX file system. HSI can be

  6. HTAR Usage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Usage HTAR Usage HTAR is a command line utility that creates and manipulates HPSS-resident tar-format archive files. It is ideal for storing groups of files in HPSS. Since the tar file is created directly in HPSS, it is generally faster and uses less local space than creating a local tar file then storing that into HPSS. Furthermore, HTAR creates an index file that (by default) is stored along with the archive in HPSS. This allows you to list the contents of an archive without retrieving it to

  7. Comparing Resource Adequacy Metrics: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ibanez, E.; Milligan, M.

    2014-09-01

    As the penetration of variable generation (wind and solar) increases around the world, there is an accompanying growing interest and importance in accurately assessing the contribution that these resources can make toward planning reserve. This contribution, also known as the capacity credit or capacity value of the resource, is best quantified by using a probabilistic measure of overall resource adequacy. In recognizing the variable nature of these renewable resources, there has been interest in exploring the use of reliability metrics other than loss of load expectation. In this paper, we undertake some comparisons using data from the Western Electricity Coordinating Council in the western United States.

  8. Usage Summaries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Usage Summaries PDSF Group Batch Summary Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2016 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 Partial SGE62 2015 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 2014 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 2013 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 2012 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 2011 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62

  9. Draft Chapter 4: Transmission Adequacy | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    4: Transmission Adequacy Draft Chapter 4: Transmission Adequacy A robust interstate electric transmission network must be developed to enable our electricity future. PDF icon Draft Chapter 4: Transmission Adequacy More Documents & Publications DOE EAC Electricity Adequacy Report. Transmission Chapter DRAFT- September 18, 2008 DOE EAC Electricity Adequacy Report. CHAPTER 4: Transmission Adequacy. October 17, 2008 DRAFT Electricity Advisory Committee Meeting, September 25, 2008: Minutes

  10. Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the Northeast United States - November 2013 Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the...

  11. DOE EAC Electricity Adequacy Report. Transmission Chapter DRAFT...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EAC Electricity Adequacy Report. Transmission Chapter DRAFT- September 18, 2008 DOE EAC Electricity Adequacy Report. Transmission Chapter DRAFT- September 18, 2008 The purpose of...

  12. Capacity Adequacy and Revenue Sufficiency in Electricity Markets...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Capacity Adequacy and Revenue Sufficiency in Electricity Markets with Wind Power Title Capacity Adequacy and Revenue Sufficiency in Electricity Markets with Wind Power Publication...

  13. Chapter 4 Transmission Adequacy | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    4 Transmission Adequacy Chapter 4 Transmission Adequacy Transmission lines are the critical link between the point of electricity generation and consumers. The U.S. transmission grid infrastructure is owned and operated by approximately 3,000 distribution utilities and 500 transmission owners. This structure presents a distinct set of challenges in transmission planning, siting, cost allocation, grid operations and management, technological innovation, financing and construction. The development

  14. NERSC Usage and User Demographics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Usage Demographics Users and Projects Through the Years Careers Visitor Info Web Policies Home About Usage and User Demographics NERSC Usage and User Demographics Usage...

  15. NERSC Usage Demographics 2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 NERSC Usage Demographics 2011 Last edited: 2016-02-01 08:07:19

  16. NERSC Usage Demographics 2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 NERSC Usage Demographics 2012 Last edited: 2016-02-01 08:06:52

  17. NERSC Usage Demographics 2013

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 NERSC Usage Demographics 2013 Last edited: 2016-02-01 08:06:48

  18. Western Resource Adequacy: Challenges - Approaches - Metrics | Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Energy West-Wide Resource Assessment Team. Committee on Regional Electric Power Cooperation. March 25, 2004 San Francisco, California PDF icon Western Resource Adequacy: Challenges - Approaches - Metrics More Documents & Publications Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study (EWITS) (Revised) Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Energy Technologies Workshop - Day 1 Presentations Congestion Analysis of the Eastern Interconnection: Simulation Results

  19. NERSC Usage Demographics 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 NERSC Usage Demographics 2014 In 2014, NERSC supported about 6,000 users from universities, national laboratories and industry, working on 849 projects with allocations of NERSC...

  20. FY 2007 Fee Adequacy, Pub 2008 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    FY 2007 Fee Adequacy, Pub 2008 FY 2007 Fee Adequacy, Pub 2008 The purpose of this U.S. Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Fee Adequacy Assessment Report is to present an analysis of the adequacy of the fee being paid by nuclear power utilities for the permanent disposal of their spent nuclear fuel by the Government. In accordance with the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (the Act), the costs for disposal of commercial spent nuclear fuel are to be funded by a fee

  1. Usage by Job Size Table

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Usage by Job Size Table Usage by Job Size Table page loading animation Usage Query Interface System All Hopper Edison Cori Carver Planck Matgen Franklin Hopper 1 Magellan Dirac...

  2. How usage is charged

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    usage is charged How usage is charged MPP Charging (Computational Systems) When a job runs on a NERSC MPP system, such as Hopper, charges accrue against one of the user's repository allocations. The unit of accounting for these charges is the "MPP Hour". A parallel job is charged for exclusive use of each multi-core node allocated to the job. The MPP charge for such a job is calculated as the product of: the job's elapsed wall-clock time in hours the number of nodes allocated to the

  3. NERSC Usage Demographics 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 NERSC Usage Demographics 2014 In 2014, NERSC supported about 6,000 users from universities, national laboratories and industry, working on 849 projects with allocations of NERSC resources. Our users come from across the U.S. and around the globe, with 48 states and 46 countries represented. Last edited: 2016-02-01 08:06:22

  4. usage_household2001.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Usage Indicators Tables (Million U.S. Households; 60 pages, 247 kb) Contents Pages HC6-1a. Usage Indicators by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-2a. Usage Indicators by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-3a. Usage Indicators by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-4a. Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-5a. Usage Indicators by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5

  5. January 16, 2013 Secretarial Determination of the Adequacy of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), DOE has completed its review of the adequacy of the Nuclear Waste Fund fee. Based on that review, the Secretary has determined not to propose an...

  6. DOE Completes Annual Determination of the Adequacy of the Nuclear...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Act of 1982 (NWPA), DOE has completed its annual review of the adequacy of the Nuclear Waste Fund fee. Based on that review, the Office of Standard Contract Management has...

  7. DOE EAC Electricity Adequacy Report. Transmission Chapter DRAFT-

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    September 18, 2008 | Department of Energy EAC Electricity Adequacy Report. Transmission Chapter DRAFT- September 18, 2008 DOE EAC Electricity Adequacy Report. Transmission Chapter DRAFT- September 18, 2008 The purpose of this document is to seed discussion at the September 25-26, 2008 meeting of the DOE Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC). It does not represent the views of all members of the DOE EAC. Dissents received by publication of this draft document are included at the end. PDF icon

  8. Advanced Usage Examples

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Examples Advanced Usage Examples Transferring Data from Batch Jobs Once you have set up your automatic HPSS authentication you can access HPSS within batch scripts. Read More » HSI Shell Script This example shows a batch script containing HSI actions. Read More » PFTP Shell Script This example shows a batch script containing PFTP actions. Read More » HSI Tape Ordering A procedure for generating an ordered list of files to store on HPSS. This allows efficient retrieval of large numbers of

  9. Fiscal Year 2007 Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Fee Adequacy Assessment Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Fee Adequacy Assessment Report is to present an analysis of the adequacy of the fee being paid by nuclear power utilities...

  10. Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Northeast United States - November 2013 | Department of Energy Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the Northeast United States - November 2013 Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the Northeast United States - November 2013 In 2005-06, the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) conducted a study on the adequacy of interstate natural gas pipeline capacity serving the northeastern United States to meet natural gas demand

  11. CBECS 2012: Energy Usage Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2012 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Energy Usage Summary CBECS 2012 - Release date: March 18, 2016 Despite a 14% increase in total buildings and a 22% increase in total floorspace since 2003, energy use in the estimated 5.6 million U.S. commercial buildings was up just 7% during the same period, according to new analysis from the 2012 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). Slower growth in commercial building energy demand since 2003 is explained in part by

  12. 2011 SECRETARIAL DETERMINATION OF THE ADEQUACY OF THE NUCLEAR WASTE FUND

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FEE | Department of Energy 2011 SECRETARIAL DETERMINATION OF THE ADEQUACY OF THE NUCLEAR WASTE FUND FEE 2011 SECRETARIAL DETERMINATION OF THE ADEQUACY OF THE NUCLEAR WASTE FUND FEE As required by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), DOE has completed its annual review of the adequacy of the Nuclear Waste Fund fee. Based on that review, the Office of Standard Contract Management has determined that there is no basis to propose an adjustment to the fee to Congress. The Secretary of

  13. January 16, 2013 Secretarial Determination of the Adequacy of the Nuclear

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste Fund Fee | Department of Energy January 16, 2013 Secretarial Determination of the Adequacy of the Nuclear Waste Fund Fee January 16, 2013 Secretarial Determination of the Adequacy of the Nuclear Waste Fund Fee As required by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), DOE has completed its review of the adequacy of the Nuclear Waste Fund fee. Based on that review, the Secretary has determined not to propose an adjustment to the fee at this time. The Secretary's determination is

  14. GC Commits to Transparency on Nuclear Waste Fund Fee Adequacy Decisions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Consistent with the Administration's commitment to transparency, DOE General Counsel Scott Blake Harris has decided that all future determinations as to the adequacy of the Nuclear Waste Fund fee...

  15. The Adequacy of DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Performance Goals from an Accident Analysis Perspective

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Adequacy of DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Performance Goals from an Accident Analysis Perspective Jeff Kimball Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Staff Department of Energy NPH Conference October 26, 2011

  16. Secretarial Determination of the Adequacy of the Nuclear Waste Fund Fee |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Secretarial Determination of the Adequacy of the Nuclear Waste Fund Fee Secretarial Determination of the Adequacy of the Nuclear Waste Fund Fee I adopt and approve the attached annual determination of the Director, Office of Standard Contract Management, that there is no reasonable basis at this time to conclude that either excess or insufficient funds are being collected and thus will not propose an adjustment to the fee to Congress; the fee will, therefore, remain at

  17. Recent Trends in Car Usage in Advanced Economies - Slower Growth...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Trends in Car Usage in Advanced Economies - Slower Growth Ahead? Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Recent Trends in Car Usage in Advanced Economies -...

  18. Documentation of INL's In Situ Oil Shale Retorting Water Usage...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Oil Shale Retorting Water Usage System Dynamics Model Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Documentation of INL's In Situ Oil Shale Retorting Water Usage System Dynamics ...

  19. Comparing Resource Adequacy Metrics and Their Influence on Capacity Value: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ibanez, E.; Milligan, M.

    2014-04-01

    Traditional probabilistic methods have been used to evaluate resource adequacy. The increasing presence of variable renewable generation in power systems presents a challenge to these methods because, unlike thermal units, variable renewable generation levels change over time because they are driven by meteorological events. Thus, capacity value calculations for these resources are often performed to simple rules of thumb. This paper follows the recommendations of the North American Electric Reliability Corporation?s Integration of Variable Generation Task Force to include variable generation in the calculation of resource adequacy and compares different reliability metrics. Examples are provided using the Western Interconnection footprint under different variable generation penetrations.

  20. The Adequacy of DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Performance Goals from an Accident Analysis Perspective

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Adequacy of DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Performance Goals from an Accident Analysis Perspective Jeff Kimball Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Staff Department of Energy NPH Conference October 26, 2011 The views expressed are solely those of the author and no official support or endorsement of this presentation by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board or the federal government is intended or should be inferred. 1 OBJECTIVE: Assess whether the DOE NPH performance goal concept as

  1. NREL Transportation Project to Reduce Fuel Usage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation Project to Reduce Fuel Usage For more information contact: Sarah Holmes Barba, 303-275-3023 email: Sarah Barba Golden, Colo., Mar. 23, 2001 - The Jefferson County Seniors Resource Center (SRC) Paratransit Service has become an important part of Eulalia Gaillard's life since her stroke in 1996. She calls on SRC to drive her to cardiologist, neurologist and chiropractor appointments each week. "It's wonderful," Gaillard says. "I'd give this program 150 plus in regards

  2. Guideline For Retrieving Customer Usage Data From Utilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar, held on Dec. 16, 2010, provides information for utilities interested in retrieving data on customer usage.

  3. Demonstrating Structural Adequacy of Nuclear Power Plant Containment Structures for Beyond Design-Basis Pressure Loadings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braverman, J.I.; Morante, R.

    2010-07-18

    ABSTRACT Demonstrating the structural integrity of U.S. nuclear power plant (NPP) containment structures, for beyond design-basis internal pressure loadings, is necessary to satisfy Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements and performance goals. This paper discusses methods for demonstrating the structural adequacy of the containment for beyond design-basis pressure loadings. Three distinct evaluations are addressed: (1) estimating the ultimate pressure capacity of the containment structure (10 CFR 50 and US NRC Standard Review Plan, Section 3.8) ; (2) demonstrating the structural adequacy of the containment subjected to pressure loadings associated with combustible gas generation (10 CFR 52 and 10 CFR 50); and (3) demonstrating the containment structural integrity for severe accidents (10 CFR 52 as well as SECY 90-016, SECY 93-087, and related NRC staff requirements memoranda (SRMs)). The paper describes the technical basis for specific aspects of the methods presented. It also presents examples of past issues identified in licensing activities related to these evaluations.

  4. Parallel File Systems at HPC Centers: Usage,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    File Systems at HPC Centers: Usage, Experiences, and Recommendations William ( Bill) E . A llcock ALCF D irector o f O pera:ons Production Systems: ALCF-2 2 Mira - B G/Q s ystem - 49,152 nodes / 786,432 cores - 786 TB of memory - Peak fl op r ate: 1 0 P F - Linpack fl op r ate: 8 .1 P F Vesta --- B G/Q s ystem - 2,048 nodes / 3 2,768 c ores - 32 TB of memory - Peak fl op r ate: 4 19 T F Cetus --- B G/Q s ystem - 1,024 n odes / 1 6,384 c ores - 16 TB of memory - Peak fl op r ate: 2 09 T F Tukey -

  5. Ethanol Usage in Urban Public Transportation - Presentation of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - Presentation of Results Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Ethanol Usage in Urban Public Transportation - Presentation of Results AgencyCompany...

  6. Documentation of INL's In Situ Oil Shale Retorting Water Usage...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Documentation of INL's In Situ Oil Shale Retorting Water Usage System Dynamics Model Earl D Mattson; Larry Hull 02 PETROLEUM water water A system dynamic model was construction to...

  7. Form EIA-457E (2001) -- Household Bottled Gas Usage

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    F (2001) -- Household Natural Gas Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring February 29, 2004 ... This report is required by law. The timely submission of Form EIA-457F by those required ...

  8. Cielo Computational Environment Usage Model With Mappings to ACE

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Requirements for the General Availability User Environment Capabilities Release Version 1.1 (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Cielo Computational Environment Usage Model With Mappings to ACE Requirements for the General Availability User Environment Capabilities Release Version 1.1 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Cielo Computational Environment Usage Model With Mappings to ACE Requirements for the General Availability User Environment Capabilities Release

  9. Cielo Computational Environment Usage Model With Mappings to ACE

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Requirements for the General Availability User Environment Capabilities Release Version 1.1 (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Cielo Computational Environment Usage Model With Mappings to ACE Requirements for the General Availability User Environment Capabilities Release Version 1.1 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Cielo Computational Environment Usage Model With Mappings to ACE Requirements for the General Availability User Environment Capabilities Release

  10. RECS Propane Usage Form_v1 (Draft).xps

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    propane usage for this housing unit between September 2008 and April 2010. Delivery Number Enter the Delivery Date for each delivery 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Enter the Total Dollar Amount including taxes [Exclude late fees, merchandise, repairs, and service charges] 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Form EIA 457D OMB No. 1905-0092 Expires 1/31/13 2009 RECS Propane (Bottled Gas or LPG) Usage Form Delivery Address: Account Number: $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / /

  11. Form EIA-457E (2001) -- Household Bottled Gas Usage

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    E (2001) - Household Electricity Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring February 29, 2004 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey Answers to Frequently Asked Questions About the Household Electricity Usage Form What is the purpose of the Residential Energy Consumption Survey? The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) collects data on energy consumption and expenditures in U.S. housing units. Over 5,000 statistically selected households across the U.S. have already provided information

  12. Form EIA-457E (2001) -- Household Bottled Gas Usage

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    G (2001) -- Household Fuel Oil or Kerosene Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring February 29, 2004 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey Answers to Frequently Asked Questions About the Household Fuel Oil or Kerosene Usage Form What is the purpose of the Residential Energy Consumption Survey? The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) collects data on energy consumption and expenditures in U.S. housing units. Over 5,000 statistically selected households across the U.S. have already

  13. Alternate approaches to verifying the structural adequacy of the Defense High Level Waste Shipping Cask

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimmer, A.; Koploy, M.

    1991-12-01

    In the early 1980s, the US Department of Energy/Defense Programs (DOE/DP) initiated a project to develop a safe and efficient transportation system for defense high level waste (DHLW). A long-standing objective of the DHLW transportation project is to develop a truck cask that represents the leading edge of cask technology as well as one that fully complies with all applicable DOE, Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations. General Atomics (GA) designed the DHLW Truck Shipping Cask using state-of-the-art analytical techniques verified by model testing performed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The analytical techniques include two approaches, inelastic analysis and elastic analysis. This topical report presents the results of the two analytical approaches and the model testing results. The purpose of this work is to show that there are two viable analytical alternatives to verify the structural adequacy of a Type B package and to obtain an NRC license. It addition, this data will help to support the future acceptance by the NRC of inelastic analysis as a tool in packaging design and licensing.

  14. "Table HC4.13 Lighting Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. ... in Buildings With--" "Lighting Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached...

  15. "Table HC11.13 Lighting Usage Indicators by Northeast Census...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing ... Division" ,,"Total Northeast" "Lighting Usage Indicators",,,"Middle ...

  16. "Table HC15.13 Lighting Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Lighting Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Four Most Populated States" "Lighting Usage ...

  17. "Table HC12.13 Lighting Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ... ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Midwest" "Lighting Usage Indicators",,,"East North ...

  18. "Table HC3.13 Lighting Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. ... in Buildings With--" "Lighting Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached...

  19. "Table HC14.13 Lighting Usage Indicators by West Census Region...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Lighting Usage Indicators by West Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ... ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total West" "Lighting Usage Indicators",,,"Mountain","Pacific" ...

  20. "Table HC13.13 Lighting Usage Indicators by South Census Region...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Lighting Usage Indicators by South Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ... ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total South" "Lighting Usage Indicators",,,"South ...

  1. 2011 Radioactive Materials Usage Survey for Unmonitored Point Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sturgeon, Richard W.

    2012-06-27

    This report provides the results of the 2011 Radioactive Materials Usage Survey for Unmonitored Point Sources (RMUS), which was updated by the Environmental Protection (ENV) Division's Environmental Stewardship (ES) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). ES classifies LANL emission sources into one of four Tiers, based on the potential effective dose equivalent (PEDE) calculated for each point source. Detailed descriptions of these tiers are provided in Section 3. The usage survey is conducted annually; in odd-numbered years the survey addresses all monitored and unmonitored point sources and in even-numbered years it addresses all Tier III and various selected other sources. This graded approach was designed to ensure that the appropriate emphasis is placed on point sources that have higher potential emissions to the environment. For calendar year (CY) 2011, ES has divided the usage survey into two distinct reports, one covering the monitored point sources (to be completed later this year) and this report covering all unmonitored point sources. This usage survey includes the following release points: (1) all unmonitored sources identified in the 2010 usage survey, (2) any new release points identified through the new project review (NPR) process, and (3) other release points as designated by the Rad-NESHAP Team Leader. Data for all unmonitored point sources at LANL is stored in the survey files at ES. LANL uses this survey data to help demonstrate compliance with Clean Air Act radioactive air emissions regulations (40 CFR 61, Subpart H). The remainder of this introduction provides a brief description of the information contained in each section. Section 2 of this report describes the methods that were employed for gathering usage survey data and for calculating usage, emissions, and dose for these point sources. It also references the appropriate ES procedures for further information. Section 3 describes the RMUS and explains how the survey results are organized. The RMUS Interview Form with the attached RMUS Process Form(s) provides the radioactive materials survey data by technical area (TA) and building number. The survey data for each release point includes information such as: exhaust stack identification number, room number, radioactive material source type (i.e., potential source or future potential source of air emissions), radionuclide, usage (in curies) and usage basis, physical state (gas, liquid, particulate, solid, or custom), release fraction (from Appendix D to 40 CFR 61, Subpart H), and process descriptions. In addition, the interview form also calculates emissions (in curies), lists mrem/Ci factors, calculates PEDEs, and states the location of the critical receptor for that release point. [The critical receptor is the maximum exposed off-site member of the public, specific to each individual facility.] Each of these data fields is described in this section. The Tier classification of release points, which was first introduced with the 1999 usage survey, is also described in detail in this section. Section 4 includes a brief discussion of the dose estimate methodology, and includes a discussion of several release points of particular interest in the CY 2011 usage survey report. It also includes a table of the calculated PEDEs for each release point at its critical receptor. Section 5 describes ES's approach to Quality Assurance (QA) for the usage survey. Satisfactory completion of the survey requires that team members responsible for Rad-NESHAP (National Emissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants) compliance accurately collect and process several types of information, including radioactive materials usage data, process information, and supporting information. They must also perform and document the QA reviews outlined in Section 5.2.6 (Process Verification and Peer Review) of ES-RN, 'Quality Assurance Project Plan for the Rad-NESHAP Compliance Project' to verify that all information is complete and correct.

  2. Commercial Building Tenant Energy Usage Aggregation and Privacy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livingston, Olga V.; Pulsipher, Trenton C.; Anderson, David M.; Wang, Na

    2014-10-31

    A growing number of building owners are benchmarking their building energy use. This requires the building owner to acquire monthly whole-building energy usage information, which can be challenging for buildings in which individual tenants have their own utility meters and accounts with the utility. Some utilities and utility regulators have turned to aggregation of customer energy use data (CEUD) as a way to give building owners whole-building energy usage data while protecting customer privacy. Meter profile aggregation adds a layer of protection that decreases the risk of revealing CEUD as the number of meters aggregated increases. The report statistically characterizes the similarity between individual energy usage patterns and whole-building totals at various levels of meter aggregation.

  3. Fuel bundle design for enhanced usage of plutonium fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reese, Anthony P.; Stachowski, Russell E.

    1995-01-01

    A nuclear fuel bundle includes a square array of fuel rods each having a concentration of enriched uranium and plutonium. Each rod of an interior array of the rods also has a concentration of gadolinium. The interior array of rods is surrounded by an exterior array of rods void of gadolinium. By this design, usage of plutonium in the nuclear reactor is enhanced.

  4. Edison-PhaseI-Science-and-usage.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    o n the s ystem 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 Machine h ours u sed ( million hours) Binary n ame Top a pplicaFons o n E dison Largest Project Usage of Edison Phase 1 PI Project...

  5. Fuel bundle design for enhanced usage of plutonium fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reese, A.P.; Stachowski, R.E.

    1995-08-08

    A nuclear fuel bundle includes a square array of fuel rods each having a concentration of enriched uranium and plutonium. Each rod of an interior array of the rods also has a concentration of gadolinium. The interior array of rods is surrounded by an exterior array of rods void of gadolinium. By this design, usage of plutonium in the nuclear reactor is enhanced. 10 figs.

  6. Residential Lighting Usage Estimate Tool, v1.0

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    By improving our understanding of residential lighting-energy usage and quantifying it across many different parameters, the new study will be of use to anyone doing energy estimates – such as utilities, market and investment analysts, and government agencies. It will also help manufacturers design products that not only better serve consumers' needs, but that maximize the energy savings that technologies like SSL make possible.

  7. "Table HC10.13 Lighting Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Lighting Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"Housing Units (millions)","U.S. Census Region" "Lighting Usage Indicators",,"Northeast","Midw...

  8. Energy Department Announces $4.5 Million to Expand Usage of Alternativ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    5 Million to Expand Usage of Alternative Fuels Energy Department Announces 4.5 Million to Expand Usage of Alternative Fuels July 16, 2014 - 11:00am Addthis In support of President ...

  9. Water Usage for In-Situ Oil Shale Retorting - A Systems Dynamics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Water Usage for In-Situ Oil Shale Retorting - A Systems Dynamics Model Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Water Usage for In-Situ Oil Shale Retorting - A Systems Dynamics ...

  10. Red Storm usage model :Version 1.12.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jefferson, Karen L.; Sturtevant, Judith E.

    2005-12-01

    Red Storm is an Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) funded massively parallel supercomputer located at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The Red Storm Usage Model (RSUM) documents the capabilities and the environment provided for the FY05 Tri-Lab Level II Limited Availability Red Storm User Environment Milestone and the FY05 SNL Level II Limited Availability Red Storm Platform Milestone. This document describes specific capabilities, tools, and procedures to support both local and remote users. The model is focused on the needs of the ASC user working in the secure computing environments at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and SNL. Additionally, the Red Storm Usage Model maps the provided capabilities to the Tri-Lab ASC Computing Environment (ACE) requirements. The ACE requirements reflect the high performance computing requirements for the ASC community and have been updated in FY05 to reflect the community's needs. For each section of the RSUM, Appendix I maps the ACE requirements to the Limited Availability User Environment capabilities and includes a description of ACE requirements met and those requirements that are not met in that particular section. The Red Storm Usage Model, along with the ACE mappings, has been issued and vetted throughout the Tri-Lab community.

  11. Residential Lighting Usage Estimate Tool, v1.0, MacOS version | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy MacOS version Residential Lighting Usage Estimate Tool, v1.0, MacOS version MacOS version of the Residential Lighting Usage Estimate Tool, v1.0. File Spreadsheet More Documents & Publications Residential Lighting Usage Estimate Tool, v1.0, Windows

  12. Residential Lighting Usage Estimate Tool, v1.0, Windows version |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Windows version Residential Lighting Usage Estimate Tool, v1.0, Windows version Windows version of the Residential Lighting Usage Estimate Tool, v1.0. File Spreadsheet More Documents & Publications Residential Lighting Usage Estimate Tool, v1.0, MacOS

  13. DC Fast Charger Usage in the Pacific Northwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salisbury, Shawn; Smart, John

    2015-02-01

    This document will describe the use of a number of Direct Current Fast Charging Stations throughout Washington and Oregon as a part of of the West Coast Electric Highway. It will detail the usage frequency and location of the charging stations INL has data from. It will also include aggregated data from hundreds of privately owned vehicles that were enrolled in the EV Project regarding driving distance when using one of the West Coast Electric Highway fast chargers. This document is a white paper that will be published on the INL AVTA website.

  14. Use of nanofiltration to reduce cooling tower water usage.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez, Andres L.; Everett, Randy L.; Jensen, Richard Pearson; Cappelle, Malynda A.; Altman, Susan Jeanne

    2010-09-01

    Nanofiltration (NF) can effectively treat cooling-tower water to reduce water consumption and maximize water usage efficiency of thermoelectric power plants. A pilot is being run to verify theoretical calculations. A side stream of water from a 900 gpm cooling tower is being treated by NF with the permeate returning to the cooling tower and the concentrate being discharged. The membrane efficiency is as high as over 50%. Salt rejection ranges from 77-97% with higher rejection for divalent ions. The pilot has demonstrated a reduction of makeup water of almost 20% and a reduction of discharge of over 50%.

  15. Government works with technology to boost gas output/usage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicoll, H.

    1996-10-01

    Specially treated ethane gas from fields of the Moomba area in the Cooper basin of South Australia now flows freely through 870 mi of interstate gas pipeline to an end-user in Sydney, New South Wales. This unprecedented usage of ethane is the result of a long-term cooperative agreement. The producer sought to provide the end-user with ethane gas for usage as a petrochemical feedstock to manufacture ethylene and plastic goods. The end-user had strict specifications for a low-CO{sub 2}, very dry ethane product with a small percentage of methane. In order to meet these, the producer committed millions of dollars to construct a high-technology, state-of-the-art ethane treatment facility in the Moomba area, and lay an extensive pipeline. Santos also contracted with the amines supplier to provide a high-performance, deep CO{sub 2} removal solvent with good corrosion prevention characteristics. The paper discusses the Moomba field overflow, gas treatment, government cooperation, and project completion.

  16. Commercial and Multifamily Building Tenant Energy Usage Aggregation and Privacy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livingston, Olga V.; Pulsipher, Trenton C.; Wang, Na

    2014-11-17

    In a number of cities and states, building owners are required to disclose and/or benchmark their building energy use. This requires the building owner to possess monthly whole-building energy usage information, which can be challenging for buildings in which individual tenants have their own utility meters and accounts with the utility. Some utilities and utility regulators have turned to aggregation of customer data as a way to give building owners the whole-building energy usage data while protecting customer privacy. However, no utilities or regulators appear to have conducted a concerted statistical, cybersecurity, and privacy analysis to justify the level of aggregation selected. Therefore, the Tennant Data Aggregation Task was established to help utilities address these issues and provide recommendations as well as a theoretical justification of the aggregation threshold. This study is focused on the use case of submitting data for ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager (ESPM), but it also looks at other potential use cases for monthly energy consumption data.

  17. Usage based indicators to assess the impact of scholarly works: architecture and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bollen, Johan (Santa Fe, NM); Van De Sompel, Herbert (Santa Fe, NM)

    2012-03-13

    Although recording of usage data is common in scholarly information services, its exploitation for the creation of value-added services remains limited due to concerns regarding, among others, user privacy, data validity, and the lack of accepted standards for the representation, sharing and aggregation of usage data. A technical, standards-based architecture for sharing usage information is presented. In this architecture, OpenURL-compliant linking servers aggregate usage information of a specific user community as it navigates the distributed information environment that it has access to. This usage information is made OAI-PMH harvestable so that usage information exposed by many linking servers can be aggregated to facilitate the creation of value-added services with a reach beyond that of a single community or a single information service.

  18. Characterization of population and usage of unvented kerosene space heaters. Final report, May 1988-January 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, J.; Holland, P.; Mihlmester, P.

    1990-01-01

    The report gives results of a study of the market penetration of unvented kerosene space heaters (UKSHs) in the residential sector. The study was aimed at gathering baseline information to help assess the magnitude and potential severity of a problem involving emissions from unvented appliances, one of a number of synergistic factors affecting indoor air quality. UKSHs can be a significant source of such emissions. UKSH usage patterns were also investigated. Annual sales of UKSHs are estimated at 825,000 units. Leading brands include convective units marketed by Toyotomi USA (kero-Sun) and Corona USA. Some units contain built-in catalytic filters for odor control. Add-on catalytic filters are available from at least one manufacturer. It is believed that 15-17 million portable UKSHs have been sold in the U.S. since the early 1970s. However, it is estimated that, in the 1986-87 heating season, there were only about 7 million units in use. About half of these units are in the South. Depending on whether UKSHs are used as primary or secondary heating sources, they may be used anywhere from 1 to 17 hours a day. Eighty percent of UKSHs are used in multi-family dwellings and mobile homes.

  19. Commercial Building Tenant Energy Usage Data Aggregation and Privacy: Technical Appendix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livingston, Olga V.; Pulsipher, Trenton C.; Anderson, David M.

    2014-11-12

    This technical appendix accompanies report PNNL23786 Commercial Building Tenant Energy Usage Data Aggregation and Privacy. The objective is to provide background information on the methods utilized in the statistical analysis of the aggregation thresholds.

  20. RECS Fuel Oil Usage Form_v1 (Draft).xps

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    fuel oil usage for this delivery address between September 2008 and April 2010. Delivery Number Enter the Delivery Date for each delivery 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Enter the Total...

  1. Water Usage for In-Situ Oil Shale Retorting - A Systems Dynamics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Water Usage for In-Situ Oil Shale Retorting - A Systems Dynamics Model Earl D. Mattson; Larry Hull; Kara Cafferty 02 PETROLEUM Water Water A system dynamic model was construction...

  2. API for current energy usage data per consumer | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    API for current energy usage data per consumer Home > Groups > Developer Hello, I'm a web application developer working on an app to determine an individuals environmental impact,...

  3. RECS Fuel Oil Usage Form_v1 (Draft).xps

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    fuel oil usage for this delivery address between September 2008 and April 2010. Delivery Number Enter the Delivery Date for each delivery 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Enter the Total Dollar Amount including taxes [Exclude late fees, merchandise, repairs, and service charges] 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Form EIA 457G OMB No. 1905-0092 Expires 1/31/13 2009 RECS Fuel Oil and Kerosene Usage Form Delivery Address: Account Number: $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / /

  4. Issues in International Energy Consumption Analysis: Electricity Usage in Indias Housing Sector

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Issues in International Energy Consumption Analysis: Electricity Usage in India's Housing Sector November 2014 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Issues in International Energy Consumption Analysis: Electricity Usage in India's Housing Sector i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of

  5. Green Button Helps More Consumers Click with Their Energy Usage Data |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Helps More Consumers Click with Their Energy Usage Data Green Button Helps More Consumers Click with Their Energy Usage Data September 12, 2013 - 2:41pm Addthis At the White House Energy Datapalooza in October 2012, developers showcased new apps that help consumers harness and interpret their energy use data. The expanding Green Button movement will make apps like these more ubiquitous. | Photo by Sarah Gerrity, Energy Department. At the White House Energy Datapalooza in

  6. Anticipate-Affect

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Anticipate-Affect Anticipate-Affect Scientists are developing sophisticated modeling and research techniques to give them an advantage in their ability to anticipate and affect explosive-related threats or events. v Sophisticated modeling and research techniques to counter threats What conditions lead an individual or group toward committing political violence? Is it possible to accurately forecast who will become radicalized or even estimate when they might resort to violence? These and similar

  7. “Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the Northeast United States” Report Now Available

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2013, OE conducted an assessment to determine how changes to the Northeast gas market may have affected the ability of the interstate pipeline system to meet natural gas demand for “essential human needs” in the event of a disruption in pipeline capacity.

  8. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within Cogeneration Technologies;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 Number of Establishments by Usage of Cogeneration Technologies, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within Cogeneration Technologies; Unit: Establishment Counts. Establishments with Any Cogeneration NAICS Technology Code(a) Subsector and Industry Establishments(b) in Use(c) In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know Total United States 311 Food 14,128 297

  9. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within Cogeneration Technologies;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 Number of Establishments by Usage of Cogeneration Technologies, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within Cogeneration Technologies; Unit: Establishment Counts. Establishments with Any Cogeneration NAICS Technology Code(a) Selected Subsectors and Industry Establishments(b) in Use(c) In Use(d) Not in Use(e) Don't Know In Use(d) Not in Use(e) Don't Know In Use(d) Not in Use(e) Don't Know In Use(d) Not in Use(e) Don't Know In Use(d) Not in Use(e) Don't Know Total United

  10. Documentation of INL's In Situ Oil Shale Retorting Water Usage System

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dynamics Model (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Documentation of INL's In Situ Oil Shale Retorting Water Usage System Dynamics Model Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Documentation of INL's In Situ Oil Shale Retorting Water Usage System Dynamics Model A system dynamic model was construction to evaluate the water balance for in-situ oil shale conversion. The model is based on a systems dynamics approach and uses the Powersim Studio 9(tm) software package. Three phases of an in

  11. Jefferson Lab's Education Web Site Hits New High-Usage Record | Jefferson

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab Web Site Hits New High-Usage Record April 22, 2002 Jefferson Lab's Science Education web site hit a new high in usage yesterday. In a 24-hour-period nearly 125,000 pages were viewed, according to Steve Gagnon, JLab Education technician. "Our previous record was 114,094 pages viewed in a single day," Gagnon explained. "On April 18 a total of 124,900 pages were viewed. Our previous record was set last week. Before that our high was around 89,000 pages. It has been exciting

  12. Jefferson Lab's Education web site hits new high-usage record during 2003

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SOL season | Jefferson Lab web site hits new high-usage record during 2003 SOL season April 2, 2003 Jefferson Lab's Science Education web site is hitting new highs in usage - on a daily basis. Just yesterday - in a 24-hour-period - nearly 212,000 pages were viewed, according to Steve Gagnon, JLab Science Education technician. "It has been exciting to see the level of use our web site has gotten recently," Gagnon said. "Most of the pages accessed were from our Virginia

  13. Documentation of INL's In Situ Oil Shale Retorting Water Usage System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dynamics Model (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Documentation of INL's In Situ Oil Shale Retorting Water Usage System Dynamics Model Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Documentation of INL's In Situ Oil Shale Retorting Water Usage System Dynamics Model A system dynamic model was construction to evaluate the water balance for in-situ oil shale conversion. The model is based on a systems dynamics approach and uses the Powersim Studio 9(tm) software package. Three phases of an in

  14. Water Usage for In-Situ Oil Shale Retorting - A Systems Dynamics Model

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Water Usage for In-Situ Oil Shale Retorting - A Systems Dynamics Model Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Water Usage for In-Situ Oil Shale Retorting - A Systems Dynamics Model A system dynamic model was construction to evaluate the water balance for in-situ oil shale conversion. The model is based on a systems dynamics approach and uses the Powersim Studio 9(tm) software package. Three phases of an insitu retort were consider; a construction

  15. Energy Department Announces $4.5 Million to Expand Usage of Alternative

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Fuels | Department of Energy 5 Million to Expand Usage of Alternative Fuels Energy Department Announces $4.5 Million to Expand Usage of Alternative Fuels July 16, 2014 - 11:00am Addthis In support of President Obama's all-of-the-above energy strategy, the Energy Department today announced up to $4.5 million in funding to expand the use of alternative fuels through the Clean Cities program, which works with nearly 100 local coalitions and thousands of stakeholders across the country to

  16. HSI Usage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rmdir Delete an HPSS directory Local File and Directory Commands Command Function lcd Change local directory lls List local directory lmkdir Make a local directory lpwd...

  17. HTAR Usage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to Create an HTAR Archive Rather than specifying the list of files and directories on the command line when creating an HTAR archive, you can place the list of file and directory...

  18. Relative concordance of human immunodeficiency virus oligomeric and monomeric envelope in CCR5 coreceptor usage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teeravechyan, Samaporn; Suphaphiphat, Pirada; Essex, Max; Lee, Tun-Hou

    2008-01-20

    A major difference between binding and fusion assays commonly used to study the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope is the use of monomeric envelope for the former assay and oligomeric envelope for the latter. Due to discrepancies in their readouts for some mutants, envelope regions involved in CCR5 coreceptor usage were systematically studied to determine whether the discordance is due to inherent differences between the two assays or whether it genuinely reflects functional differences at each entry step. By adding the binding inhibitor TAK-779 to delay coreceptor binding kinetics in the fusion assay, the readouts were found comparable between the assays for the mutants analysed in this study. Our finding indicates that monomeric binding reflects oligomeric envelope-CCR5 interaction, thus discordant results between binding and fusion assays do not necessarily indicate differences in coreceptor usage by oligomeric envelope and monomeric gp120.

  19. Table HC6.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005 Total U.S. Housing Units.................................. 111.1 30.0 34.8 18.4 15.9 12.0 Do Not Have Heating Equipment..................... 1.2 0.3 0.3 Q 0.2 0.2 Have Space Heating Equipment....................... 109.8 29.7 34.5 18.2 15.6 11.8 Use Space Heating Equipment........................ 109.1 29.5 34.4 18.1 15.5 11.6 Have But Do Not Use Equipment.................... 0.8 Q Q Q Q Q Space Heating Usage During 2005

  20. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies; Unit: Establishment Counts. NAICS Code(a) Subsector and Industry Establishments(b) In Use(e) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(e) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(e) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(e) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(e) Not in Use Don't Know Total United States 311 Food 14,128 1,632 9,940 2,556 3,509 8,048 2,571 1,590

  1. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies; Unit: Establishment Counts. NAICS Code(a) Selected Subsectors and Industry Establishments(b) In Use(e) Not in Use(f) Don't Know In Use(e) Not in Use(f) Don't Know In Use(e) Not in Use(f) Don't Know In Use(e) Not in Use(f) Don't Know In Use(e) Not in Use(f) Don't Know Total United States 311 Food 13,271 1,849 10,454 968

  2. Table HC15.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005 Total.................................................................................... 111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day................................................. 8.2 0.6 0.5 0.8 1.4 2 Times A Day.............................................................. 24.6 1.4 1.5 2.0 3.1 Once a Day...................................................................

  3. Determination of usage patterns and emissions for propane/LPG in California. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, M.

    1992-05-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine California usage patterns of Liquified Petroleum Gas (LPG), and to estimate propane emissions resulting from LPG transfer operations statewide, and by county and air basin. The study is the first attempt to quantify LPG transfer emissions for California. This was accomplished by analyzing data from a telephone survey of California businesses that use LPG, by extracting information from existing databases.

  4. Y-12 reduces water usage and wins award | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration reduces water usage and wins award | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs Apply

  5. " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," ",,"Computer Control of Building Wide Evironment(c)",,,"Computer Control of Processes or Major Energy-Using Equipment(d)",,,"Waste Heat Recovery",,,"Adjustable - Speed

  6. " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Computer Control of Building Wide Evironment(c)",,,"Computer Control of Processes or Major Energy-Using Equipment(d)",,,"Waste Heat Recovery",,,"Adjustable - Speed Motors",,,"Oxy - Fuel

  7. Table HC15.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005 Total.................................................................................. 111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment.................................... 17.8 1.8 Q Q 4.9 Have Cooling Equipment................................................. 93.3 5.3 7.0 7.8 7.2 Use Cooling Equipment.................................................. 91.4 5.3 7.0 7.7 6.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use

  8. Table HC6.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005 Total.............................................................................. 111.1 30.0 34.8 18.4 15.9 12.0 Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day........................................... 8.2 1.4 1.9 1.4 1.0 2.4 2 Times A Day........................................................ 24.6 4.3 7.6 4.3 4.8 3.7 Once a Day............................................................ 42.3 9.9

  9. Table HC6.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005 Total................................................................................ 111.1 30.0 34.8 18.4 15.9 12.0 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer............................. 35.5 16.3 9.4 4.0 2.7 3.2 Use a Personal Computer.......................................... 75.6 13.8 25.4 14.4 13.2 8.8 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model.....................................................

  10. Table HC6.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005 Total........................................................................ 111.1 30.0 34.8 18.4 15.9 12.0 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment.......................... 17.8 5.4 5.3 2.7 2.5 2.0 Have Cooling Equipment...................................... 93.3 24.6 29.6 15.7 13.4 10.0 Use Cooling Equipment....................................... 91.4 24.0 29.1 15.5 13.2 9.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it......................

  11. Label Building Natural Gas Usage Form 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Natural Gas Usage Form 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) 1. Timely submission of this report is mandatory under Public Law 93-275, as amended. 2. This completed questionnaire is due by 3. Data reported on this questionnaire are for the entire building identified in the label to the right. 4. Data may be submitted directly on this questionnaire or in any other format, such as a computer-generated listing, which provides the same i nformation and is conve nient for y our

  12. Usage of Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment Along the Corridors between the EV Project Major Cities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mindy Kirkpatrick

    2012-05-01

    The report explains how the EVSE are being used along the corridors between the EV Project cities. The EV Project consists of a nationwide collaboration between Idaho National Laboratory (INL), ECOtality North America, Nissan, General Motors, and more than 40 other city, regional and state governments, and electric utilities. The purpose of the EV Project is to demonstrate the deployment and use of approximately 14,000 Level II (208-240V) electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) and 300 fast chargers in 16 major cities. This research investigates the usage of all currently installed EV Project commercial EVSE along major interstate corridors. ESRI ArcMap software products are utilized to create geographic EVSE data layers for analysis and visualization of commercial EVSE usage. This research locates the crucial interstate corridors lacking sufficient commercial EVSE and targets locations for future commercial EVSE placement. The results and methods introduced in this research will be used by INL for the duration of the EV Project.

  13. "Table HC9.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Climate Zone, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Climate Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Climate Zone1" ,,"Less than 2,000 CDD and --",,,,"2,000 CDD or More and Less than 4,000 HDD" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Greater than 7,000 HDD","5,500 to 7,000 HDD","4,000 to 5,499 HDD","Less than 4,000 HDD" "Home Appliances Characteristics" "Total",111.1,10.9,26.1,27.3,24,22.8

  14. Prolonged cold storage of red blood cells by oxygen removal and additive usage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bitensky, M.W.; Yoshida, Tatsuro

    1998-08-04

    Prolonged cold storage of red blood cells by oxygen removal and additive usage. A cost-effective, 4 C storage procedure that preserves red cell quality and prolongs post-transfusion in vivo survival is described. The improved in vivo survival and the preservation of adenosine triphosphate levels, along with reduction in hemolysis and membrane vesicle production of red blood cells stored at 4 C for prolonged periods of time, is achieved by reducing the oxygen level therein at the time of storage; in particular, by flushing the cells with an inert gas, and storing them in an aqueous solution which includes adenine, dextrose, mannitol, citrate ion, and dihydrogen phosphate ion, but no sodium chloride, in an oxygen-permeable container which is located in an oxygen-free environment containing oxygen-scavenging materials. 8 figs.

  15. Prolonged cold storage of red blood cells by oxygen removal and additive usage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bitensky, Mark W. (Boston, MA); Yoshida, Tatsuro (Newton, MA)

    1998-01-01

    Prolonged cold storage of red blood cells by oxygen removal and additive usage. A cost-effective, 4.degree. C. storage procedure that preserves red cell quality and prolongs post-transfusion in vivo survival is described. The improved in vivo survival and the preservation of adenosine triphosphate levels, along with reduction in hemolysis and membrane vesicle production of red blood cells stored at 4.degree. C. for prolonged periods of time, is achieved by reducing the oxygen level therein at the time of storage; in particular, by flushing the cells with an inert gas, and storing them in an aqueous solution which includes adenine, dextrose, mannitol, citrate ion, and dihydrogen phosphate ion, but no sodium chloride, in an oxygen-permeable container which is located in an oxygen-free environment containing oxygen-scavenging materials.

  16. Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.5 Federal Government Water Usage

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    5 Federal Government Water Usage March 2012 8.5.1 Federal Water Consumption Intensity and Costs (Millions of Gallons) Agency Total Source(s): 164,382.9 536,301.9 3,129,134.9 52.5 FEMP, Annual Report to Congress on Federal Government Energy Management and Conservation Programs FY 2007, Table 9, p. 26, Jan. 2010. HUD 21.8 139.1 1,432.0 15.2 RRB 5.5 19.5 346.9 15.9 SSA 125.0 617.1 9,262.0 13.5 Archives 107.9 552.9 4,062.0 26.6 State 169.0 762.2 4,476.7 37.8 EPA 168.1 1,196.0 3,723.3 45.2 Treasury

  17. " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1. Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," ",,,"Computer","Control of","Processes"," "," "," ",,,," ",," " " "," ","Computer

  18. "Table HC10.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Regions, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Regions, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"Housing Units (millions)","U.S. Census Region" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators",,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Total",111.1,20.6,25.6,40.7,24.2 "Cooking Appliances" "Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked" "3 or More Times A Day",8.2,1.2,1.4,3,2.6 "2 Times A

  19. "Table HC11.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ," U.S. Housing Units (millions) " ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Northeast" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators",,,"Middle Atlantic","New England" "Total",111.1,20.6,15.1,5.5 "Cooking Appliances" "Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked" "3 or More Times A

  20. "Table HC12.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Midwest" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators",,,"East North Central","West North Central" "Total",111.1,25.6,17.7,7.9 "Cooking Appliances" "Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked" "3 or More Times A

  1. "Table HC13.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by South Census Region, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by South Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"South Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total South" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators",,,"South Atlantic","East South Central","West South Central" "Total",111.1,40.7,21.7,6.9,12.1 "Cooking Appliances" "Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked"

  2. "Table HC14.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by West Census Region, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by West Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"West Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total West" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators",,,"Mountain","Pacific" "Total",111.1,24.2,7.6,16.6 "Cooking Appliances" "Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked" "3 or More Times A Day",8.2,2.6,0.7,1.9 "2

  3. "Table HC15.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Four Most Populated States" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators",,"New York","Florida","Texas","California" "Total",111.1,7.1,7,8,12.1 "Cooking Appliances" "Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked" "3 or More Times A Day",8.2,0.6,0.5,0.8,1.4 "2 Times

  4. "Table HC3.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile

  5. "Table HC4.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Renter-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile

  6. "Table HC8.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Urban/Rural Location, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators",,"City","Town","Suburbs","Rural" "Total",111.1,47.1,19,22.7,22.3 "Cooking Appliances" "Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked" "3 or More Times A Day",8.2,3.7,1.6,1.4,1.5 "2

  7. Computer usage and national energy consumption: Results from a field-metering study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desroches, Louis-Benoit; Fuchs, Heidi; Greenblatt, Jeffery; Pratt, Stacy; Willem, Henry; Claybaugh, Erin; Beraki, Bereket; Nagaraju, Mythri; Price, Sarah; Young, Scott

    2014-12-01

    The electricity consumption of miscellaneous electronic loads (MELs) in the home has grown in recent years, and is expected to continue rising. Consumer electronics, in particular, are characterized by swift technological innovation, with varying impacts on energy use. Desktop and laptop computers make up a significant share of MELs electricity consumption, but their national energy use is difficult to estimate, given uncertainties around shifting user behavior. This report analyzes usage data from 64 computers (45 desktop, 11 laptop, and 8 unknown) collected in 2012 as part of a larger field monitoring effort of 880 households in the San Francisco Bay Area, and compares our results to recent values from the literature. We find that desktop computers are used for an average of 7.3 hours per day (median = 4.2 h/d), while laptops are used for a mean 4.8 hours per day (median = 2.1 h/d). The results for laptops are likely underestimated since they can be charged in other, unmetered outlets. Average unit annual energy consumption (AEC) for desktops is estimated to be 194 kWh/yr (median = 125 kWh/yr), and for laptops 75 kWh/yr (median = 31 kWh/yr). We estimate national annual energy consumption for desktop computers to be 20 TWh. National annual energy use for laptops is estimated to be 11 TWh, markedly higher than previous estimates, likely reflective of laptops drawing more power in On mode in addition to greater market penetration. This result for laptops, however, carries relatively higher uncertainty compared to desktops. Different study methodologies and definitions, changing usage patterns, and uncertainty about how consumers use computers must be considered when interpreting our results with respect to existing analyses. Finally, as energy consumption in On mode is predominant, we outline several energy savings opportunities: improved power management (defaulting to low-power modes after periods of inactivity as well as power scaling), matching the rated power of power supplies to computing needs, and improving the efficiency of individual components.

  8. Known Challenges Associated with the Production, Transportation, Storage and Usage of Pyrolysis Oil in Residential and Industrial Settings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Known Challenges Associated with the Production, Transportation, Storage and Usage of Pyrolysis Oil in Residential and Industrial Settings Technical Information Exchange on Pyrolysis Oil May 9-10, 2012 Manchester, NH Dr. Jani Lehto VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland 2 07/05/2012 Outline  Introduction  Main challenges today in general  More details on challenges associated with  Feedstock processing  Pyrolysis oil production  Transportation and storage  Use of pyrolysis

  9. Notices Affected Public: Individuals and

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    3 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 23 / Thursday, February 3, 2011 / Notices Affected Public: Individuals and households; not-for-profit institutions; State, Local, or Tribal Government, State Educational Agencies or Local Educational Agencies. Total Estimated Number of Annual Responses: 22,760. Total Estimated Number of Annual Burden Hours: 8,725. Abstract: The study is being conducted as part of the National Assessment of Title I, mandated by Title I, Part E, Section 1501 of the Elementary and

  10. Factors Affecting PMU Installation Costs

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    September 2014 United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Department of Energy | September 2014 Factors Affecting PMU Installation Costs | Page ii Acknowledgments This report was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (DOE-OE) and drafted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The effort was directed and supported by DOE program manager Joseph Paladino. The lead authors are Marcus Young of ORNL and Alison Silverstein

  11. Statewide Power Problems May Affect SSRL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Statewide Power Problems May Affect SSRL The power crisis affecting California and the northwestern US may have some implication for SSRL users during the current run. As the...

  12. Analysis of Transportation and Logistics Challenges Affecting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Analysis of Transportation and Logistics Challenges Affecting the Deployment of Larger Wind Turbines: Summary of Results Analysis of Transportation and Logistics Challenges Affecting ...

  13. Analyzing the Impact of Residential Building Attributes, Demographic and Behavioral Factors on Natural Gas Usage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livingston, Olga V.; Cort, Katherine A.

    2011-03-03

    This analysis examines the relationship between energy demand and residential building attributes, demographic characteristics, and behavioral variables using the U.S. Department of Energys Residential Energy Consumption Survey 2005 microdata. This study investigates the applicability of the smooth backfitting estimator to statistical analysis of residential energy consumption via nonparametric regression. The methodology utilized in the study extends nonparametric additive regression via local linear smooth backfitting to categorical variables. The conventional methods used for analyzing residential energy consumption are econometric modeling and engineering simulations. This study suggests an econometric approach that can be utilized in combination with simulation results. A common weakness of previously used econometric models is a very high likelihood that any suggested parametric relationships will be misspecified. Nonparametric modeling does not have this drawback. Its flexibility allows for uncovering more complex relationships between energy use and the explanatory variables than can possibly be achieved by parametric models. Traditionally, building simulation models overestimated the effects of energy efficiency measures when compared to actual "as-built" observed savings. While focusing on technical efficiency, they do not account for behavioral or market effects. The magnitude of behavioral or market effects may have a substantial influence on the final energy savings resulting from implementation of various energy conservation measures and programs. Moreover, variability in behavioral aspects and user characteristics appears to have a significant impact on total energy consumption. Inaccurate estimates of energy consumption and potential savings also impact investment decisions. The existing modeling literature, whether it relies on parametric specifications or engineering simulation, does not accommodate inclusion of a behavioral component. This study attempts to bridge that gap by analyzing behavioral data and investigate the applicability of additive nonparametric regression to this task. This study evaluates the impact of 31 regressors on residential natural gas usage. The regressors include weather, economic variables, demographic and behavioral characteristics, and building attributes related to energy use. In general, most of the regression results were in line with previous engineering and economic studies in this area. There were, however, some counterintuitive results, particularly with regard to thermostat controls and behaviors. There are a number of possible reasons for these counterintuitive results including the inability to control for regional climate variability due to the data sanitization (to prevent identification of respondents), inaccurate data caused by to self-reporting, and the fact that not all relevant behavioral variables were included in the data set, so we were not able to control for them in the study. The results of this analysis could be used as an in-sample prediction for approximating energy demand of a residential building whose characteristics are described by the regressors in this analysis, but a certain combination of their particular values does not exist in the real world. In addition, this study has potential applications for benefit-cost analysis of residential upgrades and retrofits under a fixed budget, because the results of this study contain information on how natural gas consumption might change once a particular characteristic or attribute is altered. Finally, the results of this study can help establish a relationship between natural gas consumption and changes in behavior of occupants.

  14. Adequacy of Power-to-Mass Scaling in Simulating PWR Incident Transient for Reduced-Height, Reduced-Pressure and Full-Height, Full-Pressure Integral System Test Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, T.-J.; Lee, C.-H

    2004-03-15

    A complete scheme of scaling methods to design the reduced-height, reduced-pressure (RHRP) Institute of Nuclear Energy Research Integral System Test (IIST) facility and to specify test conditions for incident simulation was developed. In order to preserve core decay power history and coolant mass inventory during a transient, a unique power-to-mass scaling method is proposed and utilized for RHRP and full-height, full-pressure (FHFP) systems. To validate the current scaling method, three counterpart tests done at the IIST facility are compared with the FHFP tests in small-break loss-of-coolant, station blackout, and loss-of-feedwater accidents performed at the Large-Scale Test Facility (LSTF) and the BETHSY test facility. Although differences appeared in design, scaling, and operation conditions among the IIST, LSTF, and BETHSY test facilities, the important physical phenomena shown in the facilities are almost the same. The physics involved in incident transient phenomena are well measured and modeled by showing the common thermal-hydraulic behavior of key parameters and the general consistency of chronological events. The results also confirm the adequacy of power-to-mass scaling methodology.

  15. Hanford Site Beryllium Questionnaire Affected Worker Questionnaire

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beryllium Questionnaire Affected Worker Questionnaire Page 1 of 15 Hanford Site Beryllium Interview Questionnaire Affected Worker Interview Date (MM/YYYY) Name (Last, First, MI) HID# DOB (MM/YYYY) Contractor/Employer Home Address City State Zip Code Home Phone Number ( ) - Alternate Phone Number ( ) - Hanford Site Beryllium Questionnaire Affected Worker Questionnaire Page 2 of 15 Hanford Work History Timeline Original Hire Date for the Hanford Site: (MM/YYYY) Contractor: Job Title: Bargaining

  16. Environmental issues affecting clean coal technology deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, M.J.

    1997-12-31

    The author outlines what he considers to be the key environmental issues affecting Clean Coal Technology (CCT) deployment both in the US and internationally. Since the international issues are difficult to characterize given different environmental drivers in various countries and regions, the primary focus of his remarks is on US deployment. However, he makes some general remarks, particularly regarding the environmental issues in developing vs. developed countries and how these issues may affect CCT deployment. Further, how environment affects deployment depends on which particular type of clean coal technology one is addressing. It is not the author`s intention to mention many specific technologies other than to use them for the purposes of example. He generally categorizes CCTs into four groups since environment is likely to affect deployment for each category somewhat differently. These four categories are: Precombustion technologies such as coal cleaning; Combustion technologies such as low NOx burners; Postcombustion technologies such as FGD systems and postcombustion NOx control; and New generation technologies such as gasification and fluidized bed combustion.

  17. Resource adequacy, capital adequacy and investment uncertainty in the Australian power market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simshauser, Paul

    2010-01-15

    Ignoring the importance of capital markets risks overlooking one of the most fundamental drivers of investment and price in the utilities industry. While the worst effects of the financial crisis are beginning to subside, the residual fallout will be more than a passing fad for energy utilities. (author)

  18. Statistical model selection for better prediction and discovering science mechanisms that affect reliability

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Anderson-Cook, Christine M.; Morzinski, Jerome; Blecker, Kenneth D.

    2015-08-19

    Understanding the impact of production, environmental exposure and age characteristics on the reliability of a population is frequently based on underlying science and empirical assessment. When there is incomplete science to prescribe which inputs should be included in a model of reliability to predict future trends, statistical model/variable selection techniques can be leveraged on a stockpile or population of units to improve reliability predictions as well as suggest new mechanisms affecting reliability to explore. We describe a five-step process for exploring relationships between available summaries of age, usage and environmental exposure and reliability. The process involves first identifying potential candidatemore » inputs, then second organizing data for the analysis. Third, a variety of models with different combinations of the inputs are estimated, and fourth, flexible metrics are used to compare them. As a result, plots of the predicted relationships are examined to distill leading model contenders into a prioritized list for subject matter experts to understand and compare. The complexity of the model, quality of prediction and cost of future data collection are all factors to be considered by the subject matter experts when selecting a final model.« less

  19. Statistical model selection for better prediction and discovering science mechanisms that affect reliability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson-Cook, Christine M.; Morzinski, Jerome; Blecker, Kenneth D.

    2015-08-19

    Understanding the impact of production, environmental exposure and age characteristics on the reliability of a population is frequently based on underlying science and empirical assessment. When there is incomplete science to prescribe which inputs should be included in a model of reliability to predict future trends, statistical model/variable selection techniques can be leveraged on a stockpile or population of units to improve reliability predictions as well as suggest new mechanisms affecting reliability to explore. We describe a five-step process for exploring relationships between available summaries of age, usage and environmental exposure and reliability. The process involves first identifying potential candidate inputs, then second organizing data for the analysis. Third, a variety of models with different combinations of the inputs are estimated, and fourth, flexible metrics are used to compare them. As a result, plots of the predicted relationships are examined to distill leading model contenders into a prioritized list for subject matter experts to understand and compare. The complexity of the model, quality of prediction and cost of future data collection are all factors to be considered by the subject matter experts when selecting a final model.

  20. Exporting licensing regulations affecting US geothermal firms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-08-01

    This document presents a brief introduction and overview of the Department of Commerce's Export Administration Regulations which might affect potential US geothermal goods exporters. It is intended to make US geothermal firms officials aware of the existence of such regulations and to provide them with references, contacts and phone numbers where they can obtain specific and detailed information and assistance. It must be stressed however, that the ultimate responsibility for complying with the above mentioned regulations lies with the exporter who must consult the complete version of the regulations.

  1. Fact #890: September 14, 2015 Gasoline Prices Are Affected by...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fact 890: September 14, 2015 Gasoline Prices Are Affected by Changes in Refinery Output - Dataset Excel file and dataset for Gasoline Prices Are Affected by Changes in Refinery ...

  2. A Systematic Investigation of Parameters Affecting Diesel NOx...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Systematic Investigation of Parameters Affecting Diesel NOx Adsorber Catalyst Performance A Systematic Investigation of Parameters Affecting Diesel NOx Adsorber Catalyst...

  3. Kenya-Affecting Electricity Policy through a Community Micro...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Affecting Electricity Policy through a Community Micro Hydro Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Kenya-Affecting Electricity Policy through a Community Micro Hydro Project...

  4. Factors Affecting HCCI Combustion Phasing for Fuels with Single...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Affecting HCCI Combustion Phasing for Fuels with Single- and Dual-Stage Chemistry Factors Affecting HCCI Combustion Phasing for Fuels with Single- and Dual-Stage Chemistry 2004 ...

  5. EO 13211: Regulations That Significantly Affect Energy Supply...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EO 13211: Regulations That Significantly Affect Energy Supply, Distribution, or Use EO 13211: Regulations That Significantly Affect Energy Supply, Distribution, or Use I am...

  6. Various factors affect coiled tubing limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Y.S.

    1996-01-15

    Safety and reliability remain the primary concerns in coiled tubing operations. Factors affecting safety and reliability include corrosion, flexural bending, internal (or external) pressure and tension (or compression), and mechanical damage due to improper use. Such limits as coiled tubing fatigue, collapse, and buckling need to be understood to avoid disaster. With increased use of coiled tubing, operators will gain more experience. But at the same time, with further research and development of coiled tubing, the manufacturing quality will be improved and fatigue, collapse, and buckling models will become more mature, and eventually standard specifications will be available. This paper reviews the uses of coiled tubing and current research on mechanical behavior of said tubing. It also discusses several models used to help predict fatigue and failure levels.

  7. Cylinder surface, temperature may affect LPG odorization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McWilliams, H.

    1988-01-01

    A study of possible odorant fade in propane by the Arthur D. Little Co. (Boston) has indicated that oxidation of interior surfaces of LPG containers may cause the odorant, ethyl mercaptan, to fade. The oxidation, ferous oxide, is a black, easily oxidizable powder that is the monoxide of iron. The study, contracted for by the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), is part of that agency's study of residential LP-gas systems. Another study is currently underway by an NLPGA task force headed by Bob Reid of Petrolane (Long Beach, Calif.). It may not be finished until the end of next year. Recently, the Propane Gas Association of Canada completed a study of odorant fade with the conclusion that much more study is needed on the subject. In addition to the cylinder surface problem, the CPSC study indicated that ambient temperatures might also affect the presence of odorant in product. This article reviews some of the results.

  8. Assisting Federal Facilities with Energy Conservation Technologies (AFFECT)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Funding Opportunity | Department of Energy Technical Assistance » Assisting Federal Facilities with Energy Conservation Technologies (AFFECT) Funding Opportunity Assisting Federal Facilities with Energy Conservation Technologies (AFFECT) Funding Opportunity The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides project assistance through the AFFECT funding opportunity. AFFECT provides grants for the development of capital projects to increase the energy efficiency and renewable energy

  9. THE EMPLOYEE'S GUIDE TO BENEFITS FOR THOSE AFFECTED BY REDUCTION...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    THE EMPLOYEE'S GUIDE TO BENEFITS FOR THOSE AFFECTED BY REDUCTION IN FORCE THE EMPLOYEE'S GUIDE TO BENEFITS FOR THOSE AFFECTED BY REDUCTION IN FORCE PDF icon THE EMPLOYEE'S GUIDE TO...

  10. Study of Factors Affecting Shrub Establishment on the Monticello, Utah,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Disposal Cell Cover | Department of Energy Study of Factors Affecting Shrub Establishment on the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Cell Cover Study of Factors Affecting Shrub Establishment on the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Cell Cover Study of Factors Affecting Shrub Establishment on the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Cell Cover PDF icon Study of Factors Affecting Shrub Establishment on the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Cell Cover More Documents & Publications Changes in Vegetation at the Monticello,

  11. FEMP Releases AFFECT Funding Opportunity Announcement | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy AFFECT Funding Opportunity Announcement FEMP Releases AFFECT Funding Opportunity Announcement November 5, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis On November 5, 2013, the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) on the EERE Exchange titled "Assisting Federal Facilities with Energy Conservation Technologies (AFFECT)." The AFFECT FOA (DE-FOA-0000901) will provide direct funding to U.S. Federal agencies for the development of combined heat and

  12. Variability of Battery Wear in Light Duty Plug-In Electric Vehicles Subject to Ambient Temperature, Battery Size, and Consumer Usage: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, E.; Neubauer, J.; Brooker, A. D.; Gonder, J.; Smith, K. A.

    2012-08-01

    Battery wear in plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) is a complex function of ambient temperature, battery size, and disparate usage. Simulations capturing varying ambient temperature profiles, battery sizes, and driving patterns are of great value to battery and vehicle manufacturers. A predictive battery wear model developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory captures the effects of multiple cycling and storage conditions in a representative lithium chemistry. The sensitivity of battery wear rates to ambient conditions, maximum allowable depth-of-discharge, and vehicle miles travelled is explored for two midsize vehicles: a battery electric vehicle (BEV) with a nominal range of 75 mi (121 km) and a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) with a nominal charge-depleting range of 40 mi (64 km). Driving distance distributions represent the variability of vehicle use, both vehicle-to-vehicle and day-to-day. Battery wear over an 8-year period was dominated by ambient conditions for the BEV with capacity fade ranging from 19% to 32% while the PHEV was most sensitive to maximum allowable depth-of-discharge with capacity fade ranging from 16% to 24%. The BEV and PHEV were comparable in terms of petroleum displacement potential after 8 years of service, due to the BEV?s limited utility for accomplishing long trips.

  13. The generation fleet in MISO is being affected by time, fuel prices and multiple phases of environmental regulations

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    September 8, 2014 1 MISO's Scope * End-use Customers: 42 million * Maximum Demand: 133,000 MW * Transmission (69 - 500kV): 66,000 miles * Generation: 201,000 MW * Market Participants: 401 * Gross Market Charges: $20.3 billion (2013) Reliability Footprint 2 * Resource Adequacy / Changing Fleet - Renewables Integration - Coal Retirements - Nuclear Challenges - Gas Growth and Cost Reduction * Gas - Electric Coordination - To address growing reliance on gas as a generation fuel * Seams Optimization

  14. Key Parameters Affecting DPF Performance Degradation and Impact on Lifetime

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Economy | Department of Energy Parameters Affecting DPF Performance Degradation and Impact on Lifetime Fuel Economy Key Parameters Affecting DPF Performance Degradation and Impact on Lifetime Fuel Economy Summarizes latest findings on impact of specific parameters affecting ash-related diesel particulate filter performance degradation and information useful to enhance performance and extend service life PDF icon deer11_sappok.pdf More Documents & Publications Characteristics and

  15. Factors Affecting PMU Installation Costs (October 2014) | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Factors Affecting PMU Installation Costs (October 2014) Factors Affecting PMU Installation Costs (October 2014) The Department of Energy investigated the major cost factors that affected PMU installation costs for the synchrophasor projects funded through the Recovery Act Smart Grid Programs. The data was compiled through interviews with the nine projects that deployed production grade synchrophasor systems. The study found that while the costs associated with PMUs as stand-alone

  16. The microbe-mediated mechanisms affecting topsoil carbon stock...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    affecting topsoil carbon stock in Tibetan grasslands Warming has been shown to cause soil carbon (C) loss in northern grasslands owing to accelerated microbial decomposition...

  17. Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil-Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah Michael Vanden Berg; Paul Anderson; Janae Wallace;...

  18. One in five online scholarly articles affected by 'reference...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    One in five online scholarly articles affected by 'reference rot' Alumni Link: Opportunities, News and Resources for Former Employees Latest Issue:September 2015 all issues All...

  19. Ecosystem carbon storage capacity as affected by disturbance...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and tausub 1 is the residence time of the carbon pool affected by disturbances (biomass pool in this study). The disturbance regime is characterized by the mean disturbance...

  20. Analysis of institutional mechanisms affecting residential and commercial buildings retrofit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    Barriers to energy conservation in the residential and commercial sectors influence (1) the willingness of building occupants to modify their energy usage habits, and (2) the willingness of building owners/occupants to upgrade the thermal characteristics of the structures within which they live or work and the appliances which they use. The barriers that influence the willingness of building owners/occupants to modify the thermal efficiency characteristics of building structures and heating/cooling systems are discussed. This focus is further narrowed to include only those barriers that impede modifications to existing buildings, i.e., energy conservation retrofit activity. Eight barriers selected for their suitability for Federal action in the residential and commercial sectors and examined are: fuel pricing policies that in the short term do not provide enough incentive to invest in energy conservation; high finance cost; inability to evaluate contractor performance; inability to evaluate retrofit products; lack of well-integrated or one-stop marketing systems (referred to as lack of delivery systems); lack of precise or customized information; lack of sociological/psychological incentives; and use of the first-cost decision criterion (expanded to include short-term payback criterion for the commercial sector). The impacts of these barriers on energy conservation are separately assessed for the residential and commercial sectors.

  1. The Adequacy of DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Performance Goals...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Implications * SDC-3 is very conservative - high implied seismic risk for SDC-4 is ok - WHERE IS THE PROOF? ANDOR * SDC-4 is not conservative especially when doses exceed...

  2. Assessment of methods for evaluating adequacy of physical protection systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, L.D.

    1980-01-01

    Generally, the scope of a safeguards evaluation model can efficiently address one of two issues: (1) global safeguards effectiveness or (2) vulnerability analysis for individual scenarios. A brief description of the variety of models developed in these areas is discussed. Current generation models are described along with an assessment of their utility and a brief look at future techniques for evaluation will be noted.

  3. The Adequacy of DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Performance Goals...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Lessons-Learned panel Meeting Assigning Seismic Design Category to Large Reactors: A Case Study of the ATR Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications on...

  4. esource Adequacy Implications of Forthcoming EPA Air Quality Regulation

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Table of Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY .............................................................................................................................. iii CHAPTER 1. INTRODUCTION ...................................................................................................................... 1 CHAPTER 2. ALIGNMENT OF POTENTIAL COMPLIANCE PATHWAYS WITH REGULATORY DEADLINES ......... 5 CHAPTER 3. RESOURCE

  5. Enhanced Oil Recovery Affects the Future Energy Mix | GE Global...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enhanced Oil Recovery Affects the Future Energy Mix Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new...

  6. How the Koontz Decision May Affect Climate Change Policy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Please join us for a Sept. 10 webinar to discuss the Supreme Court's controversial decision in Koontz v. St. Johns River Water Management District and explore how the decision may affect the...

  7. Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil-Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Water-relat...

  8. Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil-Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Water-re...

  9. Site-Selective Ionization in Nanoclusters Affects Subsequent Fragmentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site-Selective Ionization in Nanoclusters Affects Subsequent Fragmentation Site-Selective Ionization in Nanoclusters Affects Subsequent Fragmentation Print Wednesday, 30 June 2010 00:00 Understanding charge-transfer processes at the atomic level of nanoscale systems is of the utmost importance for designing nanodevices based on quantum-dot structures, nanotubes, or two-dimensional graphene sheets. Researchers from Western Michigan University, Berkeley Lab, and other international research

  10. A Systematic Investigation of Parameters Affecting Diesel NOx Adsorber

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Catalyst Performance | Department of Energy A Systematic Investigation of Parameters Affecting Diesel NOx Adsorber Catalyst Performance A Systematic Investigation of Parameters Affecting Diesel NOx Adsorber Catalyst Performance 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Dephi Corporation PDF icon 2002_deer_dou.pdf More Documents & Publications Pt-free, Perovskite-based Lean NOx Trap Catalysts Use of a Diesel Fuel Processor for Rapid and Efficient Regeneration of Single Leg NOx Adsorber Systems

  11. Identification and Control of Factors that Affect EGR Cooler Fouling |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Control of Factors that Affect EGR Cooler Fouling Identification and Control of Factors that Affect EGR Cooler Fouling Key factors that cause exhaust gas recirculation cooler fouling were identified through extensive literature search and controlled experiment was devised to study the impact of a few key factors on deposition. PDF icon deer08_styles.pdf More Documents & Publications Factors Impacting EGR Cooler Fouling - Main Effects and Interactions The Impact of PM

  12. One in five online scholarly articles affected by 'reference rot'

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scholarly articles affected by 'reference rot' One in five online scholarly articles affected by 'reference rot' Los Alamos authors focus on reference rot, the combination of link rot and content drift to which references to web resources included in STM articles are subject. January 26, 2015 From left, Los Alamos National Laboratory authors Lyudmila Balakireva, Herbert Van De Sompel and Harihar Shankar, and Martin Klein and Robert Sanderson (on computer screens). Their work was published in the

  13. Characterization of microstructural strengthening in the heat-affected zone

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of a blast-resistant naval steel | Energy Frontier Research Centers microstructural strengthening in the heat-affected zone of a blast-resistant naval steel Home Author: X. Yu, J. Caron, S. S. Babu, J. C. Lippold, D. Isheim, D. N. Seidman Year: 2010 Abstract: The influence of simulated heat-affected zone thermal cycles on the microstructural evolution in a blast-resistant naval steel was investigated by dilatometry, microhardness testing, optical microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction

  14. Factors Affecting HCCI Combustion Phasing for Fuels with Single- and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dual-Stage Chemistry | Department of Energy Affecting HCCI Combustion Phasing for Fuels with Single- and Dual-Stage Chemistry Factors Affecting HCCI Combustion Phasing for Fuels with Single- and Dual-Stage Chemistry 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Sandia National Laboratories PDF icon 2004_deer_dec.pdf More Documents & Publications Microsoft PowerPoint - DEER03-P.ppt HCCI and Stratified-Charge CI Engine Combustion Research Improving Efficiency and

  15. TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes Affecting

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Performance of a Salt Repository for Disposal of Heat-Generating Nuclear Waste | Department of Energy TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes Affecting Performance of a Salt Repository for Disposal of Heat-Generating Nuclear Waste TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes Affecting Performance of a Salt Repository for Disposal of Heat-Generating Nuclear Waste The document describes the initial work on designing and developing requirements for a total

  16. Research Finds Vitamin D Deficiency Affects Bone Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Finds Vitamin D Deficiency Affects Bone Quality Research Finds Vitamin D Deficiency Affects Bone Quality Print Wednesday, 30 April 2014 00:00 Vitamin D deficiency is a widespread medical condition that plays a major role in human bone health. Scientists know that a lack of vitamin D can cause bone diseases such as rickets and osteomalacia. Now a team of researchers working at the ALS has also found that vitamin D deficiency plays a significant role in the bone-aging process. Low levels

  17. Predicting Individual Affect of Health Interventions to Reduce HPV Prevalence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corley, Courtney D.; Mihalcea, Rada; Mikler, Armin R.; Sanfilippo, Antonio P.

    2011-04-01

    Recently, human papilloma virus has been implicated to cause several throat and oral cancers and hpv is established to cause most cervical cancers. A human papilloma virus vaccine has been proven successful to reduce infection incidence in FDA clinical trials and it is currently available in the United States. Current intervention policy targets adolescent females for vaccination; however, the expansion of suggested guidelines may extend to other age groups and males as well. This research takes a first step towards automatically predicting personal beliefs, regarding health intervention, on the spread of disease. Using linguistic or statistical approaches, sentiment analysis determines a texts affective content. Self-reported HPV vaccination beliefs published in web and social media are analyzed for affect polarity and leveraged as knowledge inputs to epidemic models. With this in mind, we have developed a discrete-time model to facilitate predicting impact on the reduction of HPV prevalence due to arbitrary age and gender targeted vaccination schemes.

  18. Survey of state water laws affecting coal slurry pipeline development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogozen, M.B.

    1980-11-01

    This report summarizes state water laws likely to affect the development of coal slurry pipelines. It was prepared as part of a project to analyze environmental issues related to energy transportation systems. Coal slurry pipelines have been proposed as a means to expand the existing transportation system to handle the increasing coal shipments that will be required in the future. The availability of water for use in coal slurry systems in the coal-producing states is an issue of major concern.

  19. Site-Selective Ionization in Nanoclusters Affects Subsequent Fragmentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site-Selective Ionization in Nanoclusters Affects Subsequent Fragmentation Print Understanding charge-transfer processes at the atomic level of nanoscale systems is of the utmost importance for designing nanodevices based on quantum-dot structures, nanotubes, or two-dimensional graphene sheets. Researchers from Western Michigan University, Berkeley Lab, and other international research facilities investigated charge-transfer processes and subsequent ion fragmentation dynamics in nanoclusters

  20. Site-Selective Ionization in Nanoclusters Affects Subsequent Fragmentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site-Selective Ionization in Nanoclusters Affects Subsequent Fragmentation Print Understanding charge-transfer processes at the atomic level of nanoscale systems is of the utmost importance for designing nanodevices based on quantum-dot structures, nanotubes, or two-dimensional graphene sheets. Researchers from Western Michigan University, Berkeley Lab, and other international research facilities investigated charge-transfer processes and subsequent ion fragmentation dynamics in nanoclusters

  1. Site-Selective Ionization in Nanoclusters Affects Subsequent Fragmentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site-Selective Ionization in Nanoclusters Affects Subsequent Fragmentation Print Understanding charge-transfer processes at the atomic level of nanoscale systems is of the utmost importance for designing nanodevices based on quantum-dot structures, nanotubes, or two-dimensional graphene sheets. Researchers from Western Michigan University, Berkeley Lab, and other international research facilities investigated charge-transfer processes and subsequent ion fragmentation dynamics in nanoclusters

  2. Site-Selective Ionization in Nanoclusters Affects Subsequent Fragmentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site-Selective Ionization in Nanoclusters Affects Subsequent Fragmentation Print Understanding charge-transfer processes at the atomic level of nanoscale systems is of the utmost importance for designing nanodevices based on quantum-dot structures, nanotubes, or two-dimensional graphene sheets. Researchers from Western Michigan University, Berkeley Lab, and other international research facilities investigated charge-transfer processes and subsequent ion fragmentation dynamics in nanoclusters

  3. Site-Selective Ionization in Nanoclusters Affects Subsequent Fragmentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site-Selective Ionization in Nanoclusters Affects Subsequent Fragmentation Print Understanding charge-transfer processes at the atomic level of nanoscale systems is of the utmost importance for designing nanodevices based on quantum-dot structures, nanotubes, or two-dimensional graphene sheets. Researchers from Western Michigan University, Berkeley Lab, and other international research facilities investigated charge-transfer processes and subsequent ion fragmentation dynamics in nanoclusters

  4. Site-Selective Ionization in Nanoclusters Affects Subsequent Fragmentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site-Selective Ionization in Nanoclusters Affects Subsequent Fragmentation Print Understanding charge-transfer processes at the atomic level of nanoscale systems is of the utmost importance for designing nanodevices based on quantum-dot structures, nanotubes, or two-dimensional graphene sheets. Researchers from Western Michigan University, Berkeley Lab, and other international research facilities investigated charge-transfer processes and subsequent ion fragmentation dynamics in nanoclusters

  5. Assessing How Renewables Affect Water Used for Thermoelectric Cooling |

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Assessing How Renewables Affect Water Used for Thermoelectric Cooling Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) Community Resources Contact Information Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-23/Germantown Building 1000

  6. NREL: Transmission Grid Integration - Issues Affecting Renewable Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Integration Issues Affecting Renewable Energy Integration NREL is investigating issues related to the integration of renewable energy sources into the transmission system. Developing solutions to these challenges will enable higher penetrations of renewable generation sources on the electric power system and the future growth of renewable energy. The integration of large quantities of renewable energy sources such as wind and solar power will require changes in how our transmission system

  7. Model Captures How Nitrogen Limitation Affects Hydrological Processes |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Model Captures How Nitrogen Limitation Affects Hydrological Processes Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) Community Resources Contact Information Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-23/Germantown Building 1000

  8. Process for selectively treating a subterranean formation using coiled tubing without affecting or being affected by the two adjacent zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vercaemer, C.; Lemanczyk, R.; Piot, B.

    1989-06-27

    A process is described for selectively treating a subterranean formation without affecting adjacent zones above and below the formation characterized by: injecting a treatment fluid into a wellbore annulus adjacent the formation to be treated and simultaneously injecting two protection fluids, immiscible with the treatment fluid, into the annulus adjacent the zones wherein the treatment fluid and protection fluids are separated with the wellbore annulus solely by a fluid interface between the treatment fluid and each of the immiscible protection fluids.

  9. Research Finds Vitamin D Deficiency Affects Bone Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Finds Vitamin D Deficiency Affects Bone Quality Print Vitamin D deficiency is a widespread medical condition that plays a major role in human bone health. Scientists know that a lack of vitamin D can cause bone diseases such as rickets and osteomalacia. Now a team of researchers working at the ALS has also found that vitamin D deficiency plays a significant role in the bone-aging process. Low levels of vitamin D, the "sunshine vitamin," have been previously linked to the

  10. Research Finds Vitamin D Deficiency Affects Bone Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Finds Vitamin D Deficiency Affects Bone Quality Print Vitamin D deficiency is a widespread medical condition that plays a major role in human bone health. Scientists know that a lack of vitamin D can cause bone diseases such as rickets and osteomalacia. Now a team of researchers working at the ALS has also found that vitamin D deficiency plays a significant role in the bone-aging process. Low levels of vitamin D, the "sunshine vitamin," have been previously linked to the

  11. Research Finds Vitamin D Deficiency Affects Bone Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Finds Vitamin D Deficiency Affects Bone Quality Print Vitamin D deficiency is a widespread medical condition that plays a major role in human bone health. Scientists know that a lack of vitamin D can cause bone diseases such as rickets and osteomalacia. Now a team of researchers working at the ALS has also found that vitamin D deficiency plays a significant role in the bone-aging process. Low levels of vitamin D, the "sunshine vitamin," have been previously linked to the

  12. Research Finds Vitamin D Deficiency Affects Bone Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Finds Vitamin D Deficiency Affects Bone Quality Print Vitamin D deficiency is a widespread medical condition that plays a major role in human bone health. Scientists know that a lack of vitamin D can cause bone diseases such as rickets and osteomalacia. Now a team of researchers working at the ALS has also found that vitamin D deficiency plays a significant role in the bone-aging process. Low levels of vitamin D, the "sunshine vitamin," have been previously linked to the

  13. Legal and regulatory issues affecting aquifer thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrickson, P.L.

    1981-10-01

    This document updates and expands the report with a similar title issued in October 1980. This document examines a number of legal and regulatory issues that potentially can affect implementation of the aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) concept. This concept involves the storage of thermal energy in an underground aquifer until a later date when it can be effectively utilized. Either heat energy or chill can be stored. Potential end uses of the energy include district space heating and cooling, industrial process applications, and use in agriculture or aquaculture. Issues are examined in four categories: regulatory requirements, property rights, potential liability, and issues related to heat or chill delivery.

  14. How Has Saving Energy Affected Your Health? | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    We don't often speak of it in these terms, but saving energy can sometimes have a positive influence on your health. Maybe you're getting more exercise because you bike to work instead of drive, or you're getting more fresh air while jogging outside instead of on the treadmill (not to mention vitamin D!). Maybe you're eating more raw fruits and vegetables instead of turning on the oven to bake a pizza or driving for fast food. Tell us your story. How has saving energy affected your health? Each

  15. Research Finds Vitamin D Deficiency Affects Bone Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Finds Vitamin D Deficiency Affects Bone Quality Print Vitamin D deficiency is a widespread medical condition that plays a major role in human bone health. Scientists know that a lack of vitamin D can cause bone diseases such as rickets and osteomalacia. Now a team of researchers working at the ALS has also found that vitamin D deficiency plays a significant role in the bone-aging process. Low levels of vitamin D, the "sunshine vitamin," have been previously linked to the

  16. Research Finds Vitamin D Deficiency Affects Bone Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Finds Vitamin D Deficiency Affects Bone Quality Print Vitamin D deficiency is a widespread medical condition that plays a major role in human bone health. Scientists know that a lack of vitamin D can cause bone diseases such as rickets and osteomalacia. Now a team of researchers working at the ALS has also found that vitamin D deficiency plays a significant role in the bone-aging process. Low levels of vitamin D, the "sunshine vitamin," have been previously linked to the

  17. Factors Affecting Power Output by Photovoltaic Cells Lesson

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Suzanne McClung Unit Title: Option C: Energy Subject: Chemistry Lesson Title: Factors Affecting Power Output by Photovoltaic Cells Grade Level(s): IB 2 (Senior - 3 rd year of chemistry) Lesson Length: 2-90 minute blocks with 30 minutes for wrap up in a 3 rd class period Date(s): * Learning Goals o Students will make observations of voltage and current in a solar panel system o Students will calculate power of a solar panel system o Students will determine the effect of a factor on the power

  18. Microbial Carbon Cycling in Permafrost-Affected Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vishnivetskaya, T.; Liebner, Susanne; Wilhelm, Ronald; Wagner, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    The Arctic plays a key role in Earth s climate system as global warming is predicted to be most pronounced at high latitudes and because one third of the global carbon pool is stored in ecosystems of the northern latitudes. In order to improve our understanding of the present and future carbon dynamics in climate sensitive permafrost ecosystems, present studies concentrate on investigations of microbial controls of greenhouse gas fluxes, on the activity and structure of the involved microbial communities, and on their response to changing environmental conditions. Permafrost-affected soils can function as both a source and a sink for carbon dioxide and methane. Under anaerobic conditions, caused by flooding of the active layer and the effect of backwater above the permafrost table, the mineralization of organic matter can only be realized stepwise by specialized microorganisms. Important intermediates of the organic matter decomposition are hydrogen, carbon dioxide and acetate, which can be further reduced to methane by methanogenic archaea. Evolution of methane fluxes across the subsurface/atmosphere boundary will thereby strongly depend on the activity of anaerobic methanogenic archaea and obligately aerobic methane oxidizing proteobacteria, which are known to be abundant and to significantly reduce methane emissions in permafrost-affected soils. Therefore current studies on methane-cycling microorganisms are the object of particular attention in permafrost studies, because of their key role in the Arctic methane cycle and consequently of their significance for the global methane budget.

  19. High volume - high value usage of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-05-01

    The amount of dry FGD materials produced in the U.S. has not been increasing at the high rate originally anticipated. This has been due to a number of economic factors affecting the utility industry. Technologies for the disposal of large amounts of materials are not going to be implemented in the near term. In light of this development the target application for this project is being changed from highwall adit filling to the filling of auger holes to allow for highwall mining. This application focuses on using the dry FGD material to recover coal isolated by excessive augering. It produces 10 or more times the amount of coal per ton of dry FGD utilized than the originally proposed methodology. It also does not require extensive equipment development and, if applied to abandoned mine lands, may have substantially more significant environmental benefit. We also propose to use a spray dryer material for the demonstration instead of the fluidized bed material originally proposed. The spray dryer material is already slacked eliminating problems associated with heat generation at the mine site. Auger hole grouting with FGD material is also best performed by hydraulic emplacement methods.

  20. Factors that affect electric-utility stranded commitments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirst, E.; Hadley, S.; Baxter, L.

    1996-07-01

    Estimates of stranded commitments for U.S. investor-owned utilities range widely, with many falling in the range of $100 to $200 billion. These potential losses exist because some utility-owned power plants, long-term power-purchase contracts and fuel-supply contracts, regulatory assets, and expenses for public-policy programs have book values that exceed their expected market values under full competition. This report quantifies the sensitivity of stranded- commitment estimates to the various factors that lead to these above- market-value estimates. The purpose of these sensitivity analyses is to improve understanding on the part of state and federal regulators, utilities, customers, and other electric-industry participants about the relative importance of the factors that affect stranded- commitment amounts.

  1. Microscale Confinement features in microfluidic devices can affect biofilm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Aloke; Karig, David K; Neethirajan, Suresh; Acharya, Rajesh K; Mukherjee, Partha P; Retterer, Scott T; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms are aggregations of microbes that are encased by extra-cellular polymeric substances (EPS) and adhere to surfaces and interfaces. Biofilm development on abiotic surfaces is a dynamic process, which typically proceeds through an initial phase of adhesion of plankntonic microbes to the substrate, followed by events such as growth, maturation and EPS secretion. However, the coupling of hydrodynamics, microbial adhesion and biofilm growth remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the effect of semiconfined features on biofilm formation. Using a microfluidic device and fluorescent time-lapse microscopy, we establish that confinement features can significantly affect biofilm formation. Biofilm dynamics change not only as a function of confinement features, but also of the total fluid flow rate, and our combination of experimental results and numerical simulations reveal insights into the link between hydrodynamics and biofilm formation.

  2. Techno-Economic Analysis of the Deacetylation and Disk Refining Process. Characterizing the Effect of Refining Energy and Enzyme Usage on Minimum Sugar Selling Price and Minimum Ethanol Selling Price

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Xiaowen; Shekiro, Joseph; Pschorn, Thomas; Sabourin, Marc; Tucker, Melvin P.; Tao, Ling

    2015-10-29

    A novel, highly efficient deacetylation and disk refining (DDR) process to liberate fermentable sugars from biomass was recently developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The DDR process consists of a mild, dilute alkaline deacetylation step followed by low-energy-consumption disk refining. The DDR corn stover substrates achieved high process sugar conversion yields, at low to modest enzyme loadings, and also produced high sugar concentration syrups at high initial insoluble solid loadings. The sugar syrups derived from corn stover are highly fermentable due to low concentrations of fermentation inhibitors. The objective of this work is to evaluate the economic feasibilitymore » of the DDR process through a techno-economic analysis (TEA). A large array of experiments designed using a response surface methodology was carried out to investigate the two major cost-driven operational parameters of the novel DDR process: refining energy and enzyme loadings. The boundary conditions for refining energy (128–468 kWh/ODMT), cellulase (Novozyme’s CTec3) loading (11.6–28.4 mg total protein/g of cellulose), and hemicellulase (Novozyme’s HTec3) loading (0–5 mg total protein/g of cellulose) were chosen to cover the most commercially practical operating conditions. The sugar and ethanol yields were modeled with good adequacy, showing a positive linear correlation between those yields and refining energy and enzyme loadings. The ethanol yields ranged from 77 to 89 gallons/ODMT of corn stover. The minimum sugar selling price (MSSP) ranged from $0.191 to $0.212 per lb of 50 % concentrated monomeric sugars, while the minimum ethanol selling price (MESP) ranged from $2.24 to $2.54 per gallon of ethanol. The DDR process concept is evaluated for economic feasibility through TEA. The MSSP and MESP of the DDR process falls within a range similar to that found with the deacetylation/dilute acid pretreatment process modeled in NREL’s 2011 design report. The DDR process is a much simpler process that requires less capital and maintenance costs when compared to conventional chemical pretreatments with pressure vessels. As a result, we feel the DDR process should be considered as an option for future biorefineries with great potential to be more cost-effective.« less

  3. Techno-Economic Analysis of the Deacetylation and Disk Refining Process. Characterizing the Effect of Refining Energy and Enzyme Usage on Minimum Sugar Selling Price and Minimum Ethanol Selling Price

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Xiaowen; Shekiro, Joseph; Pschorn, Thomas; Sabourin, Marc; Tucker, Melvin P.; Tao, Ling

    2015-10-29

    A novel, highly efficient deacetylation and disk refining (DDR) process to liberate fermentable sugars from biomass was recently developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The DDR process consists of a mild, dilute alkaline deacetylation step followed by low-energy-consumption disk refining. The DDR corn stover substrates achieved high process sugar conversion yields, at low to modest enzyme loadings, and also produced high sugar concentration syrups at high initial insoluble solid loadings. The sugar syrups derived from corn stover are highly fermentable due to low concentrations of fermentation inhibitors. The objective of this work is to evaluate the economic feasibility of the DDR process through a techno-economic analysis (TEA). A large array of experiments designed using a response surface methodology was carried out to investigate the two major cost-driven operational parameters of the novel DDR process: refining energy and enzyme loadings. The boundary conditions for refining energy (128468 kWh/ODMT), cellulase (Novozymes CTec3) loading (11.628.4 mg total protein/g of cellulose), and hemicellulase (Novozymes HTec3) loading (05 mg total protein/g of cellulose) were chosen to cover the most commercially practical operating conditions. The sugar and ethanol yields were modeled with good adequacy, showing a positive linear correlation between those yields and refining energy and enzyme loadings. The ethanol yields ranged from 77 to 89 gallons/ODMT of corn stover. The minimum sugar selling price (MSSP) ranged from $0.191 to $0.212 per lb of 50 % concentrated monomeric sugars, while the minimum ethanol selling price (MESP) ranged from $2.24 to $2.54 per gallon of ethanol. The DDR process concept is evaluated for economic feasibility through TEA. The MSSP and MESP of the DDR process falls within a range similar to that found with the deacetylation/dilute acid pretreatment process modeled in NRELs 2011 design report. The DDR process is a much simpler process that requires less capital and maintenance costs when compared to conventional chemical pretreatments with pressure vessels. As a result, we feel the DDR process should be considered as an option for future biorefineries with great potential to be more cost-effective.

  4. Fermentation and Hydrogen Metabolism Affect Uranium Reduction by Clostridia

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gao, Weimin; Francis, Arokiasamy J.

    2013-01-01

    Previously, it has been shown that not only is uranium reduction under fermentation condition common among clostridia species, but also the strains differed in the extent of their capability and the pH of the culture significantly affected uranium(VI) reduction. In this study, using HPLC and GC techniques, metabolic properties of those clostridial strains active in uranium reduction under fermentation conditions have been characterized and their effects on capability variance of uranium reduction discussed. Then, the relationship between hydrogen metabolism and uranium reduction has been further explored and the important role played by hydrogenase in uranium(VI) and iron(III) reduction bymore » clostridia demonstrated. When hydrogen was provided as the headspace gas, uranium(VI) reduction occurred in the presence of whole cells of clostridia. This is in contrast to that of nitrogen as the headspace gas. Without clostridia cells, hydrogen alone could not result in uranium(VI) reduction. In alignment with this observation, it was also found that either copper(II) addition or iron depletion in the medium could compromise uranium reduction by clostridia. In the end, a comprehensive model was proposed to explain uranium reduction by clostridia and its relationship to the overall metabolism especially hydrogen (H 2 ) production.« less

  5. EPA Furlough Day on May 24 Will Affect EIS Filing | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Furlough Day on May 24 Will Affect EIS Filing EPA Furlough Day on May 24 Will Affect EIS Filing April 26, 2013 - 11:38am Addthis EISs must be filed with EPA by Thursday, May 23rd...

  6. THE EMPLOYEE'S GUIDE TO BENEFITS FOR THOSE AFFECTED BY REDUCTION IN FORCE

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    EMPLOYEE'S THE EMPLOYEE'S THE EMPLOYEE'S THE EMPLOYEE'S GUIDE TO BENEFITS GUIDE TO BENEFITS GUIDE TO BENEFITS GUIDE TO BENEFITS FOR THOSE FOR THOSE FOR THOSE FOR THOSE AFFECTED BY AFFECTED BY AFFECTED BY AFFECTED BY REDUCTION IN REDUCTION IN REDUCTION IN REDUCTION IN FORCE FORCE FORCE FORCE U.S. OFFICE OF U.S. OFFICE OF U.S. OFFICE OF U.S. OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT WORKFORCE WORKFORCE WORKFORCE WORKFORCE RESTRUCTURING OFFICE

  7. START Alaska Historical Energy Usage Spreadsheet

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Communities applying for the DOE Office of Indian Energy Strategic Technical Assistance Response Team (START) Initiative for Community Energy Planning and Projects Round Two are asked to download...

  8. Federal Acquisition Regulation Clause Usage Guide

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Development Contracts. NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 52.232-3 Payments under Personal Service Contracts. NA NA A A NA NA A NA NA NA NA NA A 52.232-4 Payments under...

  9. Federal Acquisition Regulation Clause Usage Guide

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    R R R R R R R R R R R R R 52.225-14 Inconsistency Between English Version and Translation of Contract. A A A A A A A A A A A A A Provision or Clause (Click on clause number...

  10. Federal Acquisition Regulation Clause Usage Guide

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    R R R R R R R R R R R R R 52.225-14 Inconsistency Between English Version and Translation of Contract. A A A A A A A A A A A A A 52.225-17 Evaluation of Foreign Currency...

  11. Fact #890: September 14, 2015 Gasoline Prices Are Affected by Changes in

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Refinery Output - Dataset | Department of Energy 0: September 14, 2015 Gasoline Prices Are Affected by Changes in Refinery Output - Dataset Fact #890: September 14, 2015 Gasoline Prices Are Affected by Changes in Refinery Output - Dataset Excel file and dataset for Gasoline Prices Are Affected by Changes in Refinery Output File fotw#890_web.xlsx More Documents & Publications Fact #858 February 2, 2015 Retail Gasoline Prices in 2014 Experienced the Largest Decline since 2008 - Dataset LCC

  12. 30 TAC, part 1, chapter 39, rule 39.605 Notice to Affected Agencies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AgenciesLegal Abstract This rule explains the notice to affected agencies requirement for air quality permit applications in Texas. Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 1999...

  13. AFFECT Notice of Intent June 27, 2013 CO and Legal Comments July 3, 2013

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document details the Assisting Federal Facilities with Energy Conservation Technologies (AFFECT) Notice of Intent on June 27, 2013 and the legal comments on July 3, 2013.

  14. AFFECTED DOCUMENT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ADMIN RCD _ COMM REF _ RESPONSE TRACKING INFORMAnON I lOWED BY: (ORG) I TARGET DATE I I I CLOSING CCN COMPL. DATE I I CLOSING REF I I lOWED BY: (ORG) I I I I I TARGET DATE I CLOSING CCN COMPL DATE CLOSING REF TECHNICAL SERVICES DIVISION (TSD) BACKFIT (Documents dated prior to 1 November 1988) FUSRAP COMMUNICATIONS DISTRIBUTION DOEIORO TECHNICAL SERVICES DIVISION (CE-53) BECHTEL NATIONAl.. INC. - JOB 14501 AI$Wl E.e... COMM DATE b~5i=-'/T-'-I'''' ADDR CODE I I I I CLOSES CCN WBS 1/~ .. :2 O~

  15. AFFECTED DOCUMENT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    rr-osams ADMIN RCD _ RESPONSE TRACKING INFORMATION I 'OWED BY: (ORG) I TARGET DATE { I CLOSING CCN COMPL. DATE { CLOSING REF I I lOWED BY: (ORG) { { I { { TARGET DATE I CLOSING CCN COMPL DATE CLOSING REF TECHNICAL SERVICES DIVISION (TSD) BACKFIT (Documents dated prior to 1 November 1988) FUSRAP COMMUNICATIONS DISTRIBUTION DOEIORO TECHNICAL SERVICES DIVISION (CE*53) BECHTEL NATIONAL, INC. -JOB 14501 _-....Iome....:.-R..%.JI&~S::....:::S.::...- TO_---.,!5~Z~IJ~u..~ COMM DATE &6 tlJ t.e

  16. Fact #859 February 9, 2015 Excess Supply is the Most Recent Event to Affect

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Crude Oil Prices - Dataset | Department of Energy 59 February 9, 2015 Excess Supply is the Most Recent Event to Affect Crude Oil Prices - Dataset Fact #859 February 9, 2015 Excess Supply is the Most Recent Event to Affect Crude Oil Prices - Dataset Excel file with dataset for Excess Supply is the Most Recent Event to Affect Crude Oil Prices File fotw#859_web.xlsx More Documents & Publications Fact #860 February 16, 2015 Relationship of Vehicle Miles of Travel and the Price of Gasoline -

  17. Long-term management of AAR-affected structures - An international perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charlwood, R.G.; Solymar, Z.V.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of the paper is to review international practice and comment on progress made in the long-term management of existing AAR-affected dams and hydroelectric plants. A updated detailed worldwide listing which now includes 104 AAR-affected structures constructed since 1900 will be presented. The listing gives summary data on the year of construction, the year that significant problems were noted, aggregate and cement types, measured expansion rates, test data, time to initial deterioration, duration of reaction, damage to the structures and effects on equipment, and repairs or replacement. A comprehensive bibliography will also be given. Analysis of the database and significant case histories will be used to identify issues affecting dam safety, plant operations, remedial measures and long-term performance of AAR-affected structures. The presentation will be illustrated by several case histories where remedial measures have been implemented.

  18. State Air Emission Regulations That Affect Electric Power Producers (Update) (released in AEO2006)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01

    Several states have recently enacted air emission regulations that will affect the electricity generation sector. The regulations govern emissions of NOx, SO2, CO2, and mercury from power plants.

  19. 33 CFR 322: Permits for Structures or Work in or Affecting Navigable...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    33 CFR 322: Permits for Structures or Work in or Affecting Navigable Waters of the United States Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document-...

  20. DOE Offers Relief to Importers Affected by West Coast Port Closures |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Offers Relief to Importers Affected by West Coast Port Closures DOE Offers Relief to Importers Affected by West Coast Port Closures February 27, 2015 - 5:28pm Addthis Closures at 29 West Coast marine ports in February 2015 due to a labor dispute have resulted in significant delays for certain goods entering the United States through those ports. DOE issued an enforcement policy not to seek civil penalties for violations of the energy and water conservation standards

  1. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of integrated

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    community energy systems. Final report (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of integrated community energy systems. Final report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of integrated community energy systems. Final report A detailed description is presented of the laws and programs of the State of North Carolina governing the regulation of public energy utilities, the

  2. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of integrated

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    community energy systems. Final report (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of integrated community energy systems. Final report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of integrated community energy systems. Final report × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and

  3. FE-Funded Study Released on Key Factors Affecting China Shale Gas

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Development | Department of Energy FE-Funded Study Released on Key Factors Affecting China Shale Gas Development FE-Funded Study Released on Key Factors Affecting China Shale Gas Development September 12, 2014 - 7:14am Addthis As many people know, over the past decade the United States has experienced a shale gas revolution that has beneficially transformed its energy landscape. In witnessing this transformation, other nations with significant shale resources are understandably interested in

  4. How the Recovery Act is Affecting Small Business Innovation | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy the Recovery Act is Affecting Small Business Innovation How the Recovery Act is Affecting Small Business Innovation August 2, 2010 - 5:20pm Addthis Dr. Kristina Johnson Dr. Kristina Johnson Founder & CEO, Cube Hydro Partners We invest in our country's small businesses because small businesses invest back in our economy. With small businesses creating nearly two out of every three net new jobs, you probably have a friend, neighbor or family member who makes their livelihood by

  5. Fact #890: September 14, 2015 Gasoline Prices Are Affected by Changes in

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Refinery Output | Department of Energy 0: September 14, 2015 Gasoline Prices Are Affected by Changes in Refinery Output Fact #890: September 14, 2015 Gasoline Prices Are Affected by Changes in Refinery Output SUBSCRIBE to the Fact of the Week Most of the nation has enjoyed average gasoline prices below $3.00 per gallon since the beginning of 2015. California and the rest of the West Coast, however, have experienced higher gasoline prices than the rest of the nation. Although gasoline price

  6. Update on State Air Emission Regulations That Affect Electric Power Producers (released in AEO2005)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01

    Several states have recently enacted air emission regulations that will affect the electricity generation sector. The regulations are intended to improve air quality in the states and assist them in complying with the revised 1997 National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ground-level ozone and fine particulates. The affected states include Connecticut, Massachusetts, Maine, Missouri, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Texas, and Washington. The regulations govern emissions of NOx, SO2, CO2, and mercury from power plants.

  7. Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Potential Oil-Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Technical Report: Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil-Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil-Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah Saline water disposal is one of the most pressing issues

  8. Fact #859 February 9, 2015 Excess Supply is the Most Recent Event to Affect

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Crude Oil Prices | Department of Energy 59 February 9, 2015 Excess Supply is the Most Recent Event to Affect Crude Oil Prices Fact #859 February 9, 2015 Excess Supply is the Most Recent Event to Affect Crude Oil Prices Crude oil prices have been extremely volatile over the past few decades. World events can disrupt the flow of oil to the market or cause uncertainty about future supply or demand for oil, leading to volatility in prices. Supply disruption caused by political events, such as

  9. How Has a Ceiling Fan Affected the Way You Heat and Cool Your Home? |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Has a Ceiling Fan Affected the Way You Heat and Cool Your Home? How Has a Ceiling Fan Affected the Way You Heat and Cool Your Home? September 23, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis On Monday, Chris told you about his new ceiling fan and how it's changed the way he cools his home. In warm weather, ceiling fans cool people (not rooms) by producing a wind-chill effect-which is why you should turn off fans when you leave the room. A ceiling fan allows you to raise the thermostat setting

  10. Householder's Perceptions of Insulation Adequacy and Drafts in the Home in 2001

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2004-01-01

    In order to improve the estimation of end-use heating consumption, the Energy Information Administration's (EIA), 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), for the first time, asked respondents to judge how drafty they perceived their homes to be as a measure of insulation quality.

  11. The adequacy of current import and export controls on sealed radioactive sources.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Longley, Susan W.; Cochran, John Russell; Price, Laura L.; Lipinski, Kendra J.

    2003-10-01

    Millions of sealed radioactive sources (SRSs) are being used for a wide variety of beneficial purposes throughout the world. Security experts are now concerned that these beneficial SRSs could be used in a radiological dispersion device to terrorize and disrupt society. The greatest safety and security threat is from those highly radioactive Category 1 and 2 SRSs. Without adequate controls, it may be relatively easy to legally purchase a Category 1 or 2 SRS on the international market under false pretenses. Additionally, during transfer, SRSs are particularly susceptible to theft since the sources are in a shielded and mobile configuration, transportation routes are predictable, and shipments may not be adequately guarded. To determine if government controls on SRS are adequate, this study was commissioned to review the current SRS import and export controls of six countries. Canada, the Russian Federation, and South Africa were selected as the exporting countries, and Egypt, the Philippines, and the United States were selected as importing countries. A detailed review of the controls in each country is presented. The authors found that Canada and Russia are major exporters, and are exporting highly radioactive SRSs without first determining if the recipient is authorized by the receiving country to own and use the SRSs. Available evidence was used to estimate that on average there are tens to possibly hundreds of intercountry transfers of highly radioactive SRSs each day. Based on these and other findings, this reports recommends stronger controls on the export and import of highly radioactive SRSs.

  12. Structural aging program to assess the adequacy of critical concrete components in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naus, D.J.; Marchbanks, M.F.; Oland, C.B.; Arndt, E.G.

    1989-01-01

    The Structural Aging (SAG) Program is carried out by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under sponsorship of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC). The Program has evolved from preliminary studies conducted to evaluate the long-term environmental challenges to light-water reactor safety-related concrete civil structures. An important conclusion of these studies was that a damage methodology, which can provide a quantitative measure of a concrete structure's durability with respect to potential future requirements, needs to be developed. Under the SAG Program, this issue is being addressed through: establishment of a structural materials information center, evaluation of structural component assessment and repair technologies, and development of a quantitative methodology for structural aging determinations. Progress to date of each of these activities is presented as well as future plans. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  13. A Review And Analysis Of The Adequacy Of The Us Legal, Institutional...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    can be used. These include grants, loans, guaranteed loans, tax incentives and insurance. Two major conclusions which have emerged from an analysis of the varying programs...

  14. Generation Adequacy via Call Options Obligations: Safe Passage to the Promised Land

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oren, Shmuel S.

    2005-11-01

    In contrast to the controversial LICAP, the author's plan relies on standard hedging instruments that a mature energy-only market can support without regulatory intervention. Unlike payments for an artificial capacity product, for which there is no natural demand, energy call options provide intrinsic value to customers, since the generators who are paid for such options must pay back any windfall profits. This amounts to a risk trading arrangement where the consumers assume some of the investment risk, in exchange for reducing their price risk.

  15. Dynamic Response of Large Wind Power Plant Affected by Diverse Conditions at Individual Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Lu, Shuai; Lin, Guang; Wang, Shaobu

    2014-07-31

    Diverse operating conditions at individual wind turbine generators (WTG) within wind power plants (WPPs) can affect the WPP dynamic response to system faults. For example, individual WTGs can experience diverse terminal voltage and power output caused by different wind direction and speed, affecting the response of protection and control limiters. In this paper, we present a study to investigate the dynamic response of a detailed WPP model under diverse power outputs of its individual WTGs. Wake effect is considered as the reason for diverse power outputs. The diverse WTG power output is evaluated in a test system where a large 168-machine test WPP is connected to the IEEE-39-bus system. The power output from each WTG is derived from a wake effect model that uses realistic statistical data for incoming wind speed and direction. The results show that diverse WTG output due to wake effect can affect the WPP dynamic response activating specialized control in some turbines. In addition, transient stability is affected by exhibiting uncertainty in critical clearing time calculation.

  16. Overview of U.S. Legislation and Regulations Affecting Offshore Natural Gas and Oil Activity

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01

    This article presents a summary of the legislative and regulatory regime that affects natural gas and oil exploration and production in offshore regions of the United States. It discusses the role and importance of these areas as well as the competing interests surrounding ownership, production, exploration and conservation.

  17. Analysis of Transportation and Logistics Challenges Affecting the Deployment of Larger Wind Turbines: Summary of Results

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Analysis of Transportation and Logistics Challenges Affecting the Deployment of Larger Wind Turbines: Summary of Results J. Cotrell, T. Stehly, J. Johnson, J. O. Roberts, Z. Parker, G. Scott, and D. Heimiller Technical Report NREL/TP-5000-61063 January 2014 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy

  18. Los Alamos using NIH grant to study how social behaviors affect spread of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    disease Can social media messaging impact epidemics? Los Alamos using NIH grant to study how social behaviors affect spread of disease Connecting social media and epidemiological research will attempt to predict the future, i.e. people's social behavior during an epidemic, using Twitter. August 15, 2011 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from

  19. Buildings Energy Data Book: 4.4 Legislation Affecting Energy Consumption of Federal Buildings and Facilities

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    1 Energy Policy Act of 2005, Provisions Affecting Energy Consumption in Federal Buildings Source(s): Energy Management Requirements - Amended reduction goals set by the National Energy Conservation Policy Act, and requires increasing percentage reductions in energy consumption through FY 2015, with a final energy consumption reduction goal of 20 percent savings in FY 2015, as compared to the baseline energy consumption of Federal buildings in FY 2003. (These goals were superseded by Section 431

  20. Buildings Energy Data Book: 4.4 Legislation Affecting Energy Consumption of Federal Buildings and Facilities

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    2 Executive Order 13423, Provisions Affecting Energy Consumption in Federal Buildings Source(s): -- Requires Federal agencies to improve energy efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions by either 3 percent annual reductions through FY 2015, or by 30 percent by 2015, as compared to FY 2003. -- Requires Federal agencies to obtain at least half of required renewable energy from new renewable sources. Executive Order 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation

  1. Buildings Energy Data Book: 4.4 Legislation Affecting Energy Consumption of Federal Buildings and Facilities

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    3 Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, Provisions Affecting Energy Consumption in Federal Buildings Source(s): Standard Relating to Solar Hot Water - Requires new Federal buildings, or Federal buildings undergoing major renovations, to meet at least 30 percent of hot water demand through the use of solar hot water heaters, if cost-effective. [Section 523] Federally-Procured Appliances with Standby Power - Requires all Federal agencies to procure appliances with standby power consumption

  2. EO 13211: Regulations That Significantly Affect Energy Supply, Distribution, or Use

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    5 Federal Register / Vol. 66, No. 99 / Tuesday, May 22, 2001 / Presidential Documents Executive Order 13211 of May 18, 2001 Actions Concerning Regulations That Significantly Affect En- ergy Supply, Distribution, or Use By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, and in order to appropriately weigh and consider the effects of the Federal Government's regulations on the supply, distribution, and use of energy, it is hereby ordered as

  3. affects on the transport of airborne emissions. This information is needed durin

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    affects on the transport of airborne emissions. This information is needed during the period of repository operation and closure to "estimate the potential effects on the transport of airborne emissions." 1.3.3 Environmental Quality Further federal regulations 10 CFR 960.5-2-5 include the need for information on existing air quality and trends in order to estimate potential impacts on public health and welfare and on environmental quality. 1.3.4 National Ambient Air Quality Standards

  4. Field-To-Fleet Webinar: How Does Feedstock Type Affect Biofuels Conversion?

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    You are invited to join a webinar about BETO's Field-to-Fleet project and its outcomes to date. In honor of Earth Week, the Field-to-Fleet webinar will be held on Wednesday, April 20, from 1-2 p.m. Eastern Time. The Field-to-Fleet project is part of the larger Thermochemical Feedstock Interface Project and is a joint Idaho National Lab, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory project designed to determine how feedstock type affects various thermochemical biofuels conversion processes. The multi-year project has quantified the impacts that feedstock type has on hydrotreating of pyrolysis oil, and is now ready to apply the methodology to other thermochemical conversion pathways. Join us to learn about the Field-to-Fleet project outcomes, impacts, and opportunities for partnership. We'll hear from laboratory project leads BETO's Conversion Technologies team. Register to attend the Field-to-Fleet webinar

  5. Factors affecting the concentration of outdoor particles indoors (COPI): Identification of data needs and existing data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thatcher, Tracy L.; McKone, Thomas E.; Fisk, William J.; Sohn, Michael D.; Delp, Woody W.; Riley, William J.; Sextro, Richard G.

    2001-12-01

    The process of characterizing human exposure to particulate matter requires information on both particle concentrations in microenvironments and the time-specific activity budgets of individuals among these microenvironments. Because the average amount of time spent indoors by individuals in the US is estimated to be greater than 75%, accurate characterization of particle concentrations indoors is critical to exposure assessments for the US population. In addition, it is estimated that indoor particle concentrations depend strongly on outdoor concentrations. The spatial and temporal variations of indoor particle concentrations as well as the factors that affect these variations are important to health scientists. For them, knowledge of the factors that control the relationship of indoor particle concentrations to outdoor levels is particularly important. In this report, we identify and evaluate sources of data for those factors that affect the transport to and concentration of outdoor particles in the indoor environment. Concentrations of particles indoors depend upon the fraction of outdoor particles that penetrate through the building shell or are transported via the air handling (HVAC) system, the generation of particles by indoor sources, and the loss mechanisms that occur indoors, such as deposition. To address these issues, we (i) identify and assemble relevant information including the behavior of particles during air leakage, HVAC operations, and particle filtration; (ii) review and evaluate the assembled information to distinguish data that are directly relevant to specific estimates of particle transport from those that are only indirectly useful and (iii) provide a synthesis of the currently available information on building air-leakage parameters and their effect on indoor particle matter concentrations.

  6. Heat-affected zone liquation crack on resistance spot welded TWIP steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saha, Dulal Chandra [Department of Advanced Materials Engineering, Dong-Eui University, 995 Eomgwangno, Busanjin-gu, Busan 614-714 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, InSung [Automotive Production Development Division, Hyundai Motor Company (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yeong-Do, E-mail: ypark@deu.ac.kr [Department of Advanced Materials Engineering, Dong-Eui University, 995 Eomgwangno, Busanjin-gu, Busan 614-714 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the heat affected zone (HAZ) liquation crack and segregation behavior of the resistance spot welded twinning induced plasticity (TWIP) steel have been reported. Cracks appeared in the post-welded joints that originated at the partially melted zone (PMZ) and propagated from the PMZ through the heat affected zone (HAZ) to the base metal (BM). The crack length and crack opening widths were observed increasing with heat input; and the welding current was identified to be the most influencing parameter for crack formation. Cracks appeared at the PMZ when nugget diameter reached at 4.50 mm or above; and the liquation cracks were found to occur along two sides of the notch tip in the sheet direction rather than in the electrode direction. Cracks were backfilled with the liquid films which has lamellar structure and supposed to be the eutectic constituent. Co-segregation of alloy elements such as, C and Mn were detected on the liquid films by electron-probe microanalysis (EPMA) line scanning and element map which suggests that the liquid film was enrich of Mn and C. The eutectic constituent was identified by analyzing the calculated phase diagram along with thermal temperature history of finite element simulation. Preliminary experimental results showed that cracks have less/no significant effect on the static cross-tensile strength (CTS) and the tensile-shear strength (TSS). In addition, possible ways to avoid cracking were discussed. - Highlights: The HAZ liquation crack during resistance spot welding of TWIP steel was examined. Cracks were completely backfilled and healed with divorced eutectic secondary phase. Co-segregation of C and Mn was detected in the cracked zone. Heat input was the most influencing factor to initiate liquation crack. Cracks have less/no significant effect on static tensile properties.

  7. State policies affecting natural gas consumption (Notice of inquiry issued on August 14, 1992)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemon, R.; Kamphuis-Zatopa, W.

    1993-03-25

    On August 14, 1992, the United States Department of Energy issued a Request for Comments Concerning State Policies Affecting Natural Gas Consumption. This Notice of (NOI) noted the increasing significance of the role played by states and sought to gain better understanding of how state policies impact the gas industry. The general trend toward a. more competitive marketplace for natural gas, as well as recent regulatory and legislative changes at the Federal level, are driving State regulatory agencies to reevaluate how they regulate natural gas. State action is having a significant impact on the use of natural gas for generating electricity, as well as affecting the cost-effective trade-off between conservation expenditures and gas use. Additionally, fuel choice has an impact upon the environment and national energy security. In light of these dimensions, the Department of Energy initiated this study of State regulation. The goals of this NOI are: (1) help DOE better understand the impact of State policies on the efficient use of gas; (2) increase the awareness of the natural gas industry and Federal and State officials to the important role of State policies and regulations; (3) create an improved forum for dialogue on State and Federal natural gas issues; and, (4) develop a consensus on an analytical agenda that would be most helpful in addressing the regulatory challenges faced by the States. Ninety-seven parties filed comments, and of these ninety-seven, fifteen parties filed reply comments. Appendix One lists these parties. This report briefly syntheses the comments received. The goal is to assist parties to judging the extent of consensus on the problems posed and the remedies suggested, aid in identifying future analytical analyses, and assist parties in assessing differences in strategies and regulatory philosophies which shape these issues and their resolution.

  8. CONTINUOSLY STIRRED TANK REACTOR PARAMETERS THAT AFFECT SLUDGE BATCH 6 SIMULANT PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newell, J.; Lambert, D.; Stone, M.; Fernandez, A.

    2010-05-28

    The High Level Radioactive Waste (HLW) Sludge in Savannah River Site (SRS) waste tanks was produced over a period of over 60 years by neutralizing the acidic waste produced in the F and H Separations Canyons with sodium hydroxide. The HLW slurries have been stored at free hydroxide concentrations above 1 M to minimize the corrosion of the carbon steel waste tanks. Sodium nitrite is periodically added as a corrosion inhibitor. The resulting waste has been subjected to supernate evaporation to minimize the volume of the stored waste. In addition, some of the waste tanks experienced high temperatures so some of the waste has been at elevated temperatures. Because the waste is radioactive, the waste is transforming through the decay of shorter lived radioactive species and the radiation damage that the decay releases. The goal of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) simulant development program is to develop a method to produce a sludge simulant that matches both the chemical and physical characteristics of the HLW without the time, temperature profile, chemical or radiation exposure of that of the real waste. Several different approaches have been taken historically toward preparing simulated waste slurries. All of the approaches used in the past dozen years involve some precipitation of the species using similar chemistry to that which formed the radioactive waste solids in the tank farm. All of the approaches add certain chemical species as commercially available insoluble solid compounds. The number of species introduced in this manner, however, has varied widely. All of the simulant preparation approaches make the simulated aqueous phase by adding the appropriate ratios of various sodium salts. The simulant preparation sequence generally starts with an acidic pH and ends up with a caustic pH (typically in the 10-12 range). The current method for making sludge simulant involves the use of a temperature controlled continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR). Precipitated MnO{sub 2} is combined with metal nitrates and fed into the CSTR. The metals are precipitated by a caustic NaOH stream. The rates at which these streams are added allows for pH adjustment of the mixture. A graphical representation of this process is given in Figure 1. In using the CSTR method for developing simulant, there are various parameters that can be adjusted in order to effectuate a physical change in the resulting simulant: pH, temperature, mixing speed, and flow rate. How will changing these parameters affect the physical properties of the sludge simulant? The ability to determine which parameter affects a particular property could allow one to develop a simulant that would better match the physical characteristics of HLW sludge.

  9. Could crop height affect the wind resource at agriculturally productive wind farm sites?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vanderwende, Brian; Lundquist, Julie K.

    2015-11-07

    The collocation of cropland and wind turbines in the US Midwest region introduces complex meteorological interactions that could influence both agriculture and wind-power production. Crop management practices may affect the wind resource through alterations of land-surface properties. We use the weather research and forecasting (WRF) model to estimate the impact of crop height variations on the wind resource in the presence of a large turbine array. A hypothetical wind farm consisting of 121 1.8-MW turbines is represented using the WRF model wind-farm parametrization. We represent the impact of selecting soybeans rather than maize by altering the aerodynamic roughness length in a region approximately 65 times larger than that occupied by the turbine array. Roughness lengths of 0.1 and 0.25 m represent the mature soy crop and a mature maize crop, respectively. In all but the most stable atmospheric conditions, statistically significant hub-height wind-speed increases and rotor-layer wind-shear reductions result from switching from maize to soybeans. Based on simulations for the entire month of August 2013, wind-farm energy output increases by 14 %, which would yield a significant monetary gain. Further investigation is required to determine the optimal size, shape, and crop height of the roughness modification to maximize the economic benefit and minimize the cost of such crop-management practices. As a result, these considerations must be balanced by other influences on crop choice such as soil requirements and commodity prices.

  10. Factors affecting degradation of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) during pre-flotation conditioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caparanga, Alvin R. Basilia, Blessie A.; Dagbay, Kevin B.; Salvacion, Jonathan W.L.

    2009-09-15

    In general, plastics are exposed to different degrading agents in every procedure involved in their recovery from waste mixture and from subsequent recycling. In this study, two methods of pre-flotation conditioning were used to determine how these methods affect the general properties of the pre-conditioned PET particles to be recovered from the PET-PVC mixture. The first method comprised the conditioning of PET samples using an alkaline solution of nonionic surfactant (Triton X-100) based on the patent by the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company. The second method, developed in this study, was a conditioning process which used an alkali-less solution of the same nonionic surfactant (Triton X-100) used in the first method. The following analytical methods were used to characterize properties of the pre-conditioned PET samples that were correlated to relative degradation of the samples: differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), for thermal behavior of the samples; FT-IR spectroscopy, for functional groups present in the samples; and, Pohl's method, for carboxyl end-group concentration count. Results show that in addition to water the presence of NaOH in the conditioning solution contributes to the further degradation of the polymer.

  11. Leading trends in environmental regulation that affect energy development. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steele, R V; Attaway, L D; Christerson, J A; Kikel, D A; Kuebler, J D; Lupatkin, B M; Liu, C S; Meyer, R; Peyton, T O; Sussin, M H

    1980-01-01

    Major environmental issues that are likely to affect the implementation of energy technologies between now and the year 2000 are identified and assessed. The energy technologies specifically addressed are: oil recovery and processing; gas recovery and processing; coal liquefaction; coal gasification (surface); in situ coal gasification; direct coal combustion; advanced power systems; magnetohydrodynamics; surface oil shale retorting; true and modified in situ oil shale retorting; geothermal energy; biomass energy conversion; and nuclear power (fission). Environmental analyses of these technologies included, in addition to the main processing steps, the complete fuel cycle from resource extraction to end use. A comprehensive survey of the environmental community (including environmental groups, researchers, and regulatory agencies) was carried out in parallel with an analysis of the technologies to identify important future environmental issues. Each of the final 20 issues selected by the project staff has the following common attributes: consensus of the environmental community that the issue is important; it is a likely candidate for future regulatory action; it deals with a major environmental aspect of energy development. The analyses of the 20 major issues address their environmental problem areas, current regulatory status, and the impact of future regulations. These analyses are followed by a quantitative assessment of the impact on energy costs and nationwide pollutant emissions of possible future regulations. This is accomplished by employing the Strategic Environmental Assessment System (SEAS) for a subset of the 20 major issues. The report concludes with a more general discussion of the impact of environmental regulatory action on energy development.

  12. A model for heat-affected zone hardness profiles in Al-Li-X alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rading, G.O.; Berry, J.T.

    1998-09-01

    A model based on reaction kinetics and elemental diffusion is proposed to account for the presence of double inflection in the hardness profiles of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) in weldments of Al-Li-X alloys tested without postweld heat treatment (PWHT). Such profiles are particularly evident when (1) the base metal is in the peak-aged (T8 or T6) temper condition prior to welding; (2) the welding process is a high-heat input process, i.e., gas tungsten arc (GTA), gas metal arc (GMA) or plasma arc (PA) welding; and (3) a filler alloy deficient in lithium (i.e., AA 2319) is used. In the first part of this paper, the theoretical mechanisms are presented. It is proposed that the double inflection appears due to complete or partial reversion of the semi-coherent, plate-like precipitates (i.e., {theta}{prime}, T{sub 1} or S{prime}); coarsening of the plate-like precipitates at constant volume fraction; precipitation of {delta}{prime} as a result of natural aging; and diffusion of lithium from the HAZ into the weld pool due to the concentration gradient between the weld pool and the base metal. In the second part (to be published in next month`s Welding Journal), experimental validation of the model is provided using weldments of the Al-Li-Cu Alloy 2095.

  13. Parameters affecting nitrogen oxides in a Coal-Fired Flow Facility system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Xiaoliang

    1996-03-01

    The unusually high temperature in the primary combustor of the Coal-Fired Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) power generation system causes much higher nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) to be produced than in a conventional coal fired generation system. In order to lower the NO{sub x} concentration to an acceptable level, it is important to know how parameters of the MM power generation system affect the NO{sub x} concentration. This thesis investigates those effects in the Coal-Fired Flow Facility (CFFF) at the University of Tennessee Space Institute under the contract of US Department Of Energy (DOE). With thermodynamic and kinetic computer codes, the theoretical studies were carried out on the parameters of the CFFF system. The results gathered from the computer codes were analyzed and compared with the experimental data collected during the LMF5J test. The thermodynamic and kinetic codes together modeled the NO.{sub x} behavior with reasonable accuracy while some inconsistencies happened at the secondary combustor inlet.

  14. Could crop height affect the wind resource at agriculturally productive wind farm sites?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vanderwende, Brian; Lundquist, Julie K.

    2015-11-07

    The collocation of cropland and wind turbines in the US Midwest region introduces complex meteorological interactions that could influence both agriculture and wind-power production. Crop management practices may affect the wind resource through alterations of land-surface properties. We use the weather research and forecasting (WRF) model to estimate the impact of crop height variations on the wind resource in the presence of a large turbine array. A hypothetical wind farm consisting of 121 1.8-MW turbines is represented using the WRF model wind-farm parametrization. We represent the impact of selecting soybeans rather than maize by altering the aerodynamic roughness length inmore » a region approximately 65 times larger than that occupied by the turbine array. Roughness lengths of 0.1 and 0.25 m represent the mature soy crop and a mature maize crop, respectively. In all but the most stable atmospheric conditions, statistically significant hub-height wind-speed increases and rotor-layer wind-shear reductions result from switching from maize to soybeans. Based on simulations for the entire month of August 2013, wind-farm energy output increases by 14 %, which would yield a significant monetary gain. Further investigation is required to determine the optimal size, shape, and crop height of the roughness modification to maximize the economic benefit and minimize the cost of such crop-management practices. As a result, these considerations must be balanced by other influences on crop choice such as soil requirements and commodity prices.« less

  15. Factors affecting breeding season survival of Red-Headed Woodpeckers in South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kilgo, John, C.; Vukovich, Mark

    2011-11-18

    Red-headed woodpecker (Melanerpes erythrocephalus) populations have declined in the United States and Canada over the past 40 years. However, few demographic studies have been published on the species and none have addressed adult survival. During 2006-2007, we estimated survival probabilities of 80 radio-tagged red-headed woodpeckers during the breeding season in mature loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) forests in South Carolina. We used known-fate models in Program MARK to estimate survival within and between years and to evaluate the effects of foliar cover (number of available cover patches), snag density treatment (high density vs. low density), and sex and age of woodpeckers. Weekly survival probabilities followed a quadratic time trend, being lowest during mid-summer, which coincided with the late nestling and fledgling period. Avian predation, particularly by Cooper's (Accipiter cooperii) and sharp-shinned hawks (A. striatus), accounted for 85% of all mortalities. Our best-supported model estimated an 18-week breeding season survival probability of 0.72 (95% CI = 0.54-0.85) and indicated that the number of cover patches interacted with sex of woodpeckers to affect survival; females with few available cover patches had a lower probability of survival than either males or females with more cover patches. At the median number of cover patches available (n = 6), breeding season survival of females was 0.82 (95% CI = 0.54-0.94) and of males was 0.60 (95% CI = 0.42-0.76). The number of cover patches available to woodpeckers appeared in all 3 of our top models predicting weekly survival, providing further evidence that woodpecker survival was positively associated with availability of cover. Woodpecker survival was not associated with snag density. Our results suggest that protection of {ge}0.7 cover patches per ha during vegetation control activities in mature pine forests will benefit survival of this Partners In Flight Watch List species.

  16. Alternate energy source usage for in situ heat treatment processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stone, Jr., Francis Marion (Cut-N-Shoot, TX); Goodwin, Charles R. (League City, TX); Richard, Jr., James (Kingwood, TX)

    2011-03-22

    Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one system for providing power to one or more subsurface heaters is described herein. The system may include an intermittent power source; a transformer coupled to the intermittent power source, and a tap controller coupled to the transformer. The transformer may be configured to transform power from the intermittent power source to power with appropriate operating parameters for the heaters. The tap controller may be configured to monitor and control the transformer so that a constant voltage is provided to the heaters from the transformer regardless of the load of the heaters and the power output provided by the intermittent power source.

  17. Low-sulfur coal usage alters transportation strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, H.

    1995-07-01

    As electricity production has grown, so has the amount of coal burned by US utilities. In order to comply with the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA), many utilities have changed from high-sulfur coal to lower-sulfur coal to reduce sulfur dioxide emissions. The primary mode of transporting coal to utilities remains the railroad, and coal represents the largest freight tonnage shipped - two out of every five tons. Since coal is so important to the railroads, it is logical that as utilities have changed their coal-buying strategies, the railroads` strategies have also changed. The increased demand for Western coal has caused rail lines some capacity problems which they are attempting to meet head-on by buying new railcars and locomotives and expanding track capacities. The new railcars typically have aluminum bodies to reduce empty weight, enabling them to carry larger loads of coal. Train locomotives are also undergoing upgrade changes. Most new locomotives have as motors to drive the wheels which deliver more motive power (traction) to the wheel trucks. In fact the motors are up to 30% more efficient at getting the traction to the trucks. Trackage is also being expanded to alleviate serious congestion on the tracks when moving Western coal.

  18. Guideline For Retrieving Customer Usage Data From Utilities (Text Version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Curtis: program lead with the Southwest Energy Efficiency Project, SWEEP. We're based in Boulder, Colorado and are a nonprofit, public interest organization promoting greater energy efficiency in...

  19. Wireline system for multiple direct push tool usage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bratton, Wesley L.; Farrington, Stephen P.; Shinn, II, James D.; Nolet, Darren C.

    2003-11-11

    A tool latching and retrieval system allows the deployment and retrieval of a variety of direct push subsurface characterization tools through an embedded rod string during a single penetration without requiring withdrawal of the string from the ground. This enables the in situ interchange of different tools, as well as the rapid retrieval of soil core samples from multiple depths during a single direct push penetration. The system includes specialized rods that make up the rod string, a tool housing which is integral to the rod string, a lock assembly, and several tools which mate to the lock assembly.

  20. "Table HC1.4 Cooled Floorspace Usage Indicators, 2005" " ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Thermostats" "Reduces Temperature During Day" "Yes",15.1,0.7,2.6,3.4,3,1.7,1.2,2.6 "No",9.9,0.5,2,1.8,1.9,1.1,1,1.6 "Reduces Temperature at Night" "Yes",15.4,0.7,2.8,3.2...

  1. "Table HC1.3 Heated Floorspace Usage Indicators, 2005" " ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Thermostats" "Reduces Temperature During Day" "Yes",18.6,0.4,2.6,3.7,3.7,2,"6 1.9",3.6 "No",14.5,0.7,2.3,3,2.6,1,"6 1.5",2.5 "Reduces Temperature at Night" ...

  2. Documentation of INL's In Situ Oil Shale Retorting Water Usage...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A system dynamic model was construction to evaluate the water balance for in-situ oil shale conversion. The model is based on a systems dynamics approach and uses the...

  3. Cielo Computational Environment Usage Model With Mappings to...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Cielo is a massively parallel supercomputer funded by the DOENNSA Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program, and operated by the Alliance for Computing at Extreme Scale ...

  4. RECS Electricity Usage Form_v2 (25418 - Activated, Traditional...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AActual EEstimated RRead by Customer (select one) A E R 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Enter the Total Dollar Amount including taxes Exclude late fees, merchandise, repairs, and service ...

  5. Department of Energy Federal Acquisition Regulation Clause Usage...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Development Contracts. NA NA A NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 52.232-3 Payments under Personal Service Contracts. NA NA A A NA NA A NA NA NA NA NA A 52.232-4 Payments under...

  6. Using Wireless Technology to Reduce Facility Energy Usage

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation details the U.S. Department of Energy's TEAM initiative's wireless technologies and their applications.

  7. Energy Efficiency: Helping Home Owners and Businesses Understand Energy Usage

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Learn how a team at Berkeley Lab is helping consumers and businesses understand their energy use and save money.

  8. Defining a region of optimization based on engine usage data

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jiang, Li; Lee, Donghoon; Yilmaz, Hakan; Stefanopoulou, Anna

    2015-08-04

    Methods and systems for engine control optimization are provided. One or more operating conditions of a vehicle engine are detected. A value for each of a plurality of engine control parameters is determined based on the detected one or more operating conditions of the vehicle engine. A range of the most commonly detected operating conditions of the vehicle engine is identified and a region of optimization is defined based on the range of the most commonly detected operating conditions of the vehicle engine. The engine control optimization routine is initiated when the one or more operating conditions of the vehicle engine are within the defined region of optimization.

  9. Long-term affected energy production of waste to energy technologies identified by use of energy system analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muenster, M.; Meibom, P.

    2010-12-15

    Affected energy production is often decisive for the outcome of consequential life-cycle assessments when comparing the potential environmental impact of products or services. Affected energy production is however difficult to determine. In this article the future long-term affected energy production is identified by use of energy system analysis. The focus is on different uses of waste for energy production. The Waste-to-Energy technologies analysed include co-combustion of coal and waste, anaerobic digestion and thermal gasification. The analysis is based on optimization of both investments and production of electricity, district heating and bio-fuel in a future possible energy system in 2025 in the countries of the Northern European electricity market (Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Finland and Germany). Scenarios with different CO{sub 2} quota costs are analysed. It is demonstrated that the waste incineration continues to treat the largest amount of waste. Investments in new waste incineration capacity may, however, be superseded by investments in new Waste-to-Energy technologies, particularly those utilising sorted fractions such as organic waste and refuse derived fuel. The changed use of waste proves to always affect a combination of technologies. What is affected varies among the different Waste-to-Energy technologies and is furthermore dependent on the CO{sub 2} quota costs and on the geographical scope. The necessity for investments in flexibility measures varies with the different technologies such as storage of heat and waste as well as expansion of district heating networks. Finally, inflexible technologies such as nuclear power plants are shown to be affected.

  10. Long-term Differences in Tillage and Land Use Affect Intra-aggregate Pore Heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kravchenko, A.N.; Wang, A.N.W.; Smucker, A.J.M.; Rivers, M.L.

    2012-10-25

    Recent advances in computed tomography provide measurement tools to study internal structures of soil aggregates at micrometer resolutions and to improve our understanding of specific mechanisms of various soil processes. Fractal analysis is one of the data analysis tools that can be helpful in evaluating heterogeneity of the intra-aggregate internal structures. The goal of this study was to examine how long-term tillage and land use differences affect intra-aggregate pore heterogeneity. The specific objectives were: (i) to develop an approach to enhance utility of box-counting fractal dimension in characterizing intra-aggregate pore heterogeneity; (ii) to examine intra-aggregate pores in macro-aggregates (4-6 mm in size) using the computed tomography scanning and fractal analysis, and (iii) to compare heterogeneity of intra-aggregate pore space in aggregates from loamy Alfisol soil subjected to 20 yr of contrasting management practices, namely, conventional tillage (chisel plow) (CT), no-till (NT), and native succession vegetation (NS). Three-dimensional images of the intact aggregates were obtained with a resolution of 14.6 {micro}m at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL. Proposed box-counting fractal dimension normalization was successfully implemented to estimate heterogeneity of pore voxel distributions without bias associated with different porosities in soil aggregates. The aggregates from all three studied treatments had higher porosity associated with large (>100 {micro}m) pores present in their centers than in their exteriors. Pores 15 to 60 {micro}m were equally abundant throughout entire aggregates but their distributions were more heterogeneous in aggregate interiors. The CT aggregates had greater numbers of pores 15 to 60 {micro}m than NT and NS. Distribution of pore voxels belonging to large pores was most heterogeneous in the aggregates from NS, followed by NT and by CT. This result was consistent with presence of very large pores associated with former root channels in NT and NS aggregates. Our findings indicate that mechanisms of macro-aggregate formation might differ in their importance in different land use and management practices.

  11. THE HUNT FOR GREEN EVERY APRIL: FACTORS AFFECTING FITNESS IN SWITCHGRASS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarath, Gautam

    2014-12-10

    This grant funded work was undertaken to develop fundamental biological knowledge of the factors affecting the complex plant trait fitness in switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.), a plant being developed as a biomass crop. Using a diverse range of latitudinally-adapted switchgrass plants, genomic, molecular and physiological studies were performed to track a number of different aspects of plant genetics and physiology over the course of the growing season. Work was performed on both genetically unrelated and genetically related plants. Plants were established in the field from seedlings raised in a greenhouse, or from clones present in other field nurseries. Field grown plants were used as the source of all tissues. The three objectives of this proposal were:(1) Transcript Profiling, Metabolomics, and C and N Partitioning and Recycling in Crowns and Rhizomes of Switchgrass over two growing seasons; (2) Gene Profiling During Regreening and Dormancy of Bulked Segregants; (3) Extent of Linkage Disequilibrium in Populations for Adaptation and Fitness Traits Being Developed for Central and Northern USA, that Show Significant Heterosis. Objective 1 results: Plants were labeled using 13CO2 (a stable isotope) using an acrylic chamber constructed specifically for this purpose. Plants became labeled with 13C and label decayed in aerial tissues over the course of the growing season. Varying amounts of 13C were recovered in the rhizomes. These data are being analyzed. Plants were also labeled with 15N-urea. Plants absorbed significant amounts of label that was remobilized to the growing shoots. N-dynamics would suggest that a portion of the 15N absorbed into the crowns and rhizomes is sequestered below ground. Variable amounts of 15N were translocated from the shoots to the roots over the course of the growing season. Polar metabolites extracted from a diverse array of rhizomes were analyzed using GCMS. Data indicated that there was a significant shift in metabolite pools over the course of the growing season, and differences in the levels of specific metabolites could be linked to the progression of dormancy. Several metabolites that accumulate in dormant rhizomes were identified. Some of these metabolites could be potentially linked to winter-survival of switchgrass. Extensive high-throughput sequencing was conducted on crown and rhizome samples collected from field grown plants. Initial work was performed on a Roche 454 system. All later work was performed on an Illumina sequencing-by-synthesis system. Some of these datasets have been published as peer-reviewed papers, other data are currently being analyzed and being readied for publication. Objective 2 results: Genetically related but phenotypically divergent plants from an octaploid switchgrass population were grown in a replicated field nursery. Rhizomes were harvested at four different times over the course of the growing season from plants with high winter survival and those with lower winter survival. RNA-Seq was performed on harvested materials. Initial analysis suggests that plants with lowered winter survival experience a greater level of cellular stress in dormant tissues. This aspect of plant function is being probed in greater depth. Objective 3 results: A total of 592 individual clones with three clonal replications in a randomized complete block design from each of five populations used in Objective 1 studies were rated for heading date in 2012 and 2014, green-up day of year in 2013, anthesis date in 2012, and yield in 2012, they were also subjected to NIR spectroscopy to derive cell wall composition estimates based on prior NIR calibrations. Plants were genotyped via a genotyping by sequencing (GBS) approach from reduced representation libraries constructed with adaptors that identified each individual. Libraries generated with the restriction enzyme PstI and called SNPs using Samtools after alignment to version 1.1 of the switchgrass genome sequence. A total of approximately 40,000 SNPs were found. These were then further filtered to eliminate markers with a m

  12. OPERATIONAL AND COMPOSITIONAL FACTORS THAT AFFECT THE PERFORMANCE PROPERTIES OF ARP/MCU SALTSTONE GROUT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reigel, M.; Edwards, T.; Pickenheim, B.

    2012-02-15

    The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) receives low level waste (LLW) salt solution from Tank 50H for treatment and disposal. Tank 50H receives transfers from the Effluent Treatment Project (ETP), the H-Canyon General Purpose Evaporator, and the Actinide Removal Process/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (ARP/MCU) Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSS-HT). At the SPF, the LLW is mixed with premix (a cementitious mixture of portland cement (PC), blast furnace slag (BFS) and Class F fly ash (FA)) in a Readco mixer to produce fresh (uncured) saltstone that is transferred to the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) vaults. The saltstone formulation (mix design) must produce a grout waste form that meets both placement and performance properties. In previous simulated saltstone studies, multiple compositional factors were identified that drive the performance properties of saltstone made from the projected ARP/MCU salt solution. This composition was selected as salt solution simulant since ARP/MCU is the primary influent into Tank 50H. The primary performance property investigated was hydraulic conductivity since it is a variable input property to the saltstone Performance Assessment (PA) transport model. In addition, the porosity, also referred to as void structure, is another variable that impacts the PA response. In addition, Young's modulus and cured density are other performance properties analyzed in this report; however they are indicators of the performance of saltstone and not direct inputs into the PA. The data from previous studies showed that the largest impact on the performance properties of saltstone was due to curing temperature, followed by aluminate concentration in the salt solution, water to premix ratio and premix composition. However, due to the scope of the previous studies, only a few mixes were cured and analyzed at higher temperatures. The samples cured at 60 C had an increased hydraulic conductivity of approximately 600 times that of the sample cured at room temperature. The hydration reactions initiated during the mixing of the premix and salt solution continue during the curing period in the vaults to produce the hardened waste form product. The heat generated from exothermic hydration reactions results in a temperature increase in the vaults that depends on the composition of the decontaminated salt solution being dispositioned, the grout formulation (mix design) and the pour frequency and volume. This heat generation is a contributing factor to the temperature increase in the vaults that leads to an increased cure temperature for the grout. This report will further investigate the impact of curing temperature on saltstone performance properties (hydraulic conductivity, Young's modulus, porosity, etc.) over a range of aluminate concentration, water to premix (w/p) ratio and weight percent fly ash in the premix processed at the SPF. The three curing temperatures selected for this study were chosen to provide data at fixed cure temperatures that represent measured temperatures in the SDF vaults. This does not represent the conditions in the vault where the temperature of the saltstone is continually changing with time. For example, it may take several days for the saltstone to reach 60 C at a given elevation. Previous results demonstrated that the rates at which a selected curing temperature is reached affect the performance properties. The approach taken in this task, a rapid increase to the curing temperature, may be conservative with respect to decreased performance. Nevertheless, the data will provide a basis from which to determine the impact of curing temperature on saltstone performance as a function of key variables. A statistical evaluation of the results for these mixes will be performed to provide the range, and associated uncertainties, of hydraulic conductivity and other properties over this factor space.

  13. Enhanced Geothermal Systems Research and Development: Models of Subsurface Chemical Processes Affecting Fluid Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moller, Nancy; Weare J. H.

    2008-05-29

    Successful exploitation of the vast amount of heat stored beneath the earths surface in hydrothermal and fluid-limited, low permeability geothermal resources would greatly expand the Nations domestic energy inventory and thereby promote a more secure energy supply, a stronger economy and a cleaner environment. However, a major factor limiting the expanded development of current hydrothermal resources as well as the production of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) is insufficient knowledge about the chemical processes controlling subsurface fluid flow. With funding from past grants from the DOE geothermal program and other agencies, we successfully developed advanced equation of state (EOS) and simulation technologies that accurately describe the chemistry of geothermal reservoirs and energy production processes via their free energies for wide XTP ranges. Using the specific interaction equations of Pitzer, we showed that our TEQUIL chemical models can correctly simulate behavior (e.g., mineral scaling and saturation ratios, gas break out, brine mixing effects, down hole temperatures and fluid chemical composition, spent brine incompatibilities) within the compositional range (Na-K-Ca-Cl-SO4-CO3-H2O-SiO2-CO2(g)) and temperature range (T < 350C) associated with many current geothermal energy production sites that produce brines with temperatures below the critical point of water. The goal of research carried out under DOE grant DE-FG36-04GO14300 (10/1/2004-12/31/2007) was to expand the compositional range of our Pitzer-based TEQUIL fluid/rock interaction models to include the important aluminum and silica interactions (T < 350C). Aluminum is the third most abundant element in the earths crust; and, as a constituent of aluminosilicate minerals, it is found in two thirds of the minerals in the earths crust. The ability to accurately characterize effects of temperature, fluid mixing and interactions between major rock-forming minerals and hydrothermal and/or injected fluids is critical to predict important chemical behaviors affecting fluid flow, such as mineral precipitation/dissolution reactions. We successfully achieved the project goal and objectives by demonstrating the ability of our modeling technology to correctly predict the complex pH dependent solution chemistry of the Al3+ cation and its hydrolysis species: Al(OH)2+, Al(OH)2+, Al(OH)30, and Al(OH)4- as well as the solubility of common aluminum hydroxide and aluminosilicate minerals in aqueous brines containing components (Na, K, Cl) commonly dominating hydrothermal fluids. In the sodium chloride system, where experimental data for model parameterization are most plentiful, the model extends to 300C. Determining the stability fields of aluminum species that control the solubility of aluminum-containing minerals as a function of temperature and composition has been a major objective of research in hydrothermal chemistry.

  14. Notice of Intent to Issue Funding Opportunity Announcement "Assisting Federal Facilities with Energy Conservation Technologies (AFFECT) 2016"

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) intends to issue, on behalf of the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), a funding opportunity announcement (FOA) titled "Assisting Federal Facilities with Energy Conservation Technologies (AFFECT) 2016" this April or May.

  15. Surface coal mining operations in two Oklahoma Counties raise questions about prime farmland reclamation and bond adequacy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-08-08

    The Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 allows prime farmland to be mined but requires the coal operator to reclaim it according to special reclamation standards. To be considered prime farmland, the soil must meet the Secretary of Agriculture's definition of prime soil and have historically been used for intensive agricultural purposes. In Oklahoma, the historical-use provision has generally been applied to lands that have been used for cropland for 5 of the preceding 10 years. GAO's review of mining activities in two Oklahoma counties showed that the land comprising 54 of the 58 mine permits issued since the act's passage contained some prime soil. None, however, required reclamation to prime farmland standards because landowners signed letters stating that the land had not been farmed for crops for five of the preceding 10 years. GAO also found that numerous sites in the two counties were abandoned by mining companies after the act was passed. Since abandonment, no reclamation has occurred on most of these sites. The Department of the Interior's Office of Surface Mining questions whether the bonds on the unreclaimed sites, if collected, will be adequate to do the necessary reclamation. Oklahoma's Department of Mines has taken action to increase bond amounts on newly-issued permits and on some older permitted areas in order to prevent future reclamation problems.

  16. TH-C-18A-09: Exam and Patient Parameters Affecting the DNA Damage Response Following CT Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elgart, S; Adibi, A; Bostani, M; Ruehm, S; Enzmann, D; McNitt-Gray, M; Iwamoto, K

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To identify exam and patient parameters affecting the biological response to CT studies using in vivo and ex vivo blood samples. Methods: Blood samples were collected under IRB approval from 16 patients undergoing clinically-indicated CT exams. Blood was procured prior to, immediately after and 30minutes following irradiation. A sample of preexam blood was placed on the patient within the exam region for ex vivo analysis. Whole blood samples were fixed immediately following collection and stained for ?H2AX to assess DNA damage response (DDR). Median fluorescence of treated samples was compared to non-irradiated control samples for each patient. Patients were characterized by observed biological kinetic response: (a) fast phosphorylation increased by 2minutes and fell by 30minutes, (b) slow phosphorylation continued to increase to 30minutes and (c) none little change was observed or irradiated samples fell below controls. Total dose values were normalized to exam time for an averaged dose-rate in dose/sec for each exam. Relationships between patient biological responses and patient and exam parameters were investigated. Results: A clearer dose response at 30minutes is observed for young patients (<61yoa; R2>0.5) compared to old patients (>61yoa; R{sup 2}<0.11). Fast responding patients were significantly younger than slow responding patients (p<0.05). Unlike in vivo samples, age did not significantly affect the patient response ex vivo. Additionally, fast responding patients received exams with significantly smaller dose-rate than slow responding patients (p<0.05). Conclusion: Age is a significant factor in the biological response suggesting that DDR may be more rapid in a younger population and slower as the population ages. Lack of an agerelated response ex vivo suggests a systemic response to radiation not present when irradiated outside the body. Dose-rate affects the biological response suggesting that patient response may be related to scan timing and dose delivery within an exam protocol. All authors receive(d) funding from a Master Research Agreement from Siemens Healthcare with UCLA Radiological Sciences.

  17. Vampir-Mira-2015.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    application execute on a real system? Are there any imbalances in computation, IO or memory usage and how do they affect the parallel execution of my application? Typical...

  18. Model for Sustainable Urban Design With Expanded Sections on...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    energy usage and urban development patterns affect approximately 70% of that consumption. This document describes a model design for urban development and redevelopment ...

  19. Communication: Microsecond dynamics of the protein and water affect electron transfer in a bacterial bc{sub 1} complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Daniel R.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2015-04-28

    Cross-membrane electron transport between cofactors localized in proteins of mitochondrial respiration and bacterial photosynthesis is the source of all biological energy. The statistics and dynamics of nuclear fluctuations in these protein/membrane/water heterogeneous systems are critical for their energetic efficiency. The results of 13 ?s of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of the membrane-bound bc{sub 1} bacterial complex are analyzed here. The reaction is affected by a broad spectrum of nuclear modes, with the slowest dynamics in the range of time-scales ?0.1-1.6 ?s contributing half of the reaction reorganization energy. Two reorganization energies are required to describe protein electron transfer due to dynamical arrest of protein conformations on the observation window. This mechanistic distinction allows significant lowering of activation barriers for reactions in proteins.

  20. Mutations that affect structure and assembly of light-harvesting proteins in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain 6701

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, L.K.; Rayner, M.C.; Eiserling, F.A.

    1987-01-01

    The unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain 6701 was mutagenized with UV irradiation and screened for pigment changes that indicated genetic lesions involving the light-harvesting proteins of the phycobilisome. A previous examination of the pigment mutant UV16 showed an assembly defect in the phycocyanin component of the phycobilisome. Mutagenesis of UV16 produced an additional double mutant, UV16-40, with decreased phycoerythrin content. Phycocyanin and phycoerythrin were isolated from UV16-40 and compared with normal biliproteins. The results suggested that the UV16 mutation affected the alpha subunit of phycocyanin, while the phycoerythrin beta subunit from UV16-40 had lost one of its three chromophores. Characterization of the unassembled phycobilisome components in these mutants suggests that these strains will be useful for probing in vivo the regulated expression and assembly of phycobilisomes.

  1. Key regulatory drivers affecting shipments of mixed transuranic waste from Los Alamos National Laboratory to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schumann, P.B.; Bacigalupa, G.A.; Kosiewicz, S.T.; Sinkule, B.J.

    1997-02-01

    A number of key regulatory drivers affect the nature, scope, and timing of Los Alamos National Laboratory`s (LANL`s) plans for mixed transuranic (MTRU) waste shipments to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which are planned to commence as soon as possible following WIPP`s currently anticipated November, 1997 opening date. This paper provides an overview of some of the key drivers at LANL, particularly emphasizing those associated with the hazardous waste component of LANL`s MTRU waste (MTRU, like any mixed waste, contains both a radioactive and a hazardous waste component). The key drivers discussed here derive from the federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and its amendments, including the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCAU), and from the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Act (NMHWA). These statutory provisions are enforced through three major mechanisms: facility RCRA permits; the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Management Regulations, set forth in the New Mexico Administrative Code, Title 20, Chapter 4, Part 1: and compliance orders issued to enforce these requirements. General requirements in all three categories will apply to MTRU waste management and characterization activities at both WIPP and LANL. In addition, LANL is subject to facility-specific requirements in its RCRA hazardous waste facility permit, permit conditions as currently proposed in RCRA Part B permit applications presently being reviewed by the New Mexico Environment Department (NNED), and facility-specific compliance orders related to MTRU waste management. Likewise, permitting and compliance-related requirements specific to WIPP indirectly affect LANL`s characterization, packaging, record-keeping, and transportation requirements for MTRU waste. LANL must comply with this evolving set of regulatory requirements to begin shipments of MTRU waste to WIPP in a timely fashion.

  2. Factors affecting route selection and survival of steelhead kelts at Snake River dams in 2012 and 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harnish, Ryan A.; Colotelo, Alison H. A.; Li, Xinya; Fu, Tao; Ham, Kenneth D.; Deng, Zhiqun; Green, Ethan D.

    2015-03-31

    In 2012 and 2013, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a study that summarized the passage route proportions and route-specific survival rates of steelhead kelts that passed through Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) dams. To accomplish this, a total of 811 steelhead kelts were tagged with Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) transmitters. Acoustic receivers, both autonomous and cabled, were deployed throughout the FCRPS to monitor the downstream movements of tagged kelts. Kelts were also tagged with passive integrated transponder tags to monitor passage through juvenile bypass systems (JBS) and detect returning fish. The current study evaluated data collected in 2012 and 2013 to identify environmental, temporal, operational, individual, and behavioral variables that were related to forebay residence time, route of passage, and survival of steelhead kelts at FCRPS dams on the Snake River. Multiple approaches, including 3-D tracking, bivariate and multivariable regression modeling, and decision tree analyses were used to identify the environmental, temporal, operational, individual, and behavioral variables that had the greatest effect on forebay residence time, route of passage, and route-specific and overall dam passage survival probabilities for tagged kelts at Lower Granite (LGR), Little Goose (LGS), and Lower Monumental (LMN) dams. In general, kelt behavior and discharge appeared to work independently to affect forebay residence times. Kelt behavior, primarily approach location, migration depth, and “searching” activities in the forebay, was found to have the greatest influence on their route of passage. The condition of kelts was the single most important factor affecting their survival. The information gathered in this study may be used by dam operators and fisheries managers to identify potential management actions to improve in-river survival of kelts or collection methods for kelt reconditioning programs to aid the recovery of Snake River steelhead populations.

  3. State policies affecting natural gas consumption (Notice of inquiry issued on August 14, 1992). Summary of comments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemon, R.; Kamphuis-Zatopa, W.

    1993-03-25

    On August 14, 1992, the United States Department of Energy issued a Request for Comments Concerning State Policies Affecting Natural Gas Consumption. This Notice of (NOI) noted the increasing significance of the role played by states and sought to gain better understanding of how state policies impact the gas industry. The general trend toward a. more competitive marketplace for natural gas, as well as recent regulatory and legislative changes at the Federal level, are driving State regulatory agencies to reevaluate how they regulate natural gas. State action is having a significant impact on the use of natural gas for generating electricity, as well as affecting the cost-effective trade-off between conservation expenditures and gas use. Additionally, fuel choice has an impact upon the environment and national energy security. In light of these dimensions, the Department of Energy initiated this study of State regulation. The goals of this NOI are: (1) help DOE better understand the impact of State policies on the efficient use of gas; (2) increase the awareness of the natural gas industry and Federal and State officials to the important role of State policies and regulations; (3) create an improved forum for dialogue on State and Federal natural gas issues; and, (4) develop a consensus on an analytical agenda that would be most helpful in addressing the regulatory challenges faced by the States. Ninety-seven parties filed comments, and of these ninety-seven, fifteen parties filed reply comments. Appendix One lists these parties. This report briefly syntheses the comments received. The goal is to assist parties to judging the extent of consensus on the problems posed and the remedies suggested, aid in identifying future analytical analyses, and assist parties in assessing differences in strategies and regulatory philosophies which shape these issues and their resolution.

  4. Regional Algal Biofuel Production Potential in the Coterminous United States as Affected by Resource Availability Trade-offs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venteris, Erik R.; Skaggs, Richard; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Coleman, Andre M.

    2014-03-15

    The warm sunny climate and unoccupied arid lands in the American southwest are favorable factors for algae cultivation. However, additional resources affect the overall viability of specific sites and regions. We investigated the tradeoffs between growth rate, water, and CO2 availability and costs for two strains: N. salina and Chlorella sp. We conducted site selection exercises (~88,000 US sites) to produce 21 billion gallons yr-1 (BGY) of renewable diesel (RD). Experimental trials from the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bio-Products (NAABB) team informed the growth model of our Biomass Assessment Tool (BAT). We simulated RD production by both lipid extraction and hydrothermal liquefaction. Sites were prioritized by the net value of biofuel minus water and flue gas costs. Water cost models for N. salina were based on seawater and high salinity groundwater and for Chlorella, fresh and brackish groundwater. CO2 costs were based on a flue gas delivery model. Selections constrained by production and water were concentrated along the Gulf of Mexico and southeast Atlantic coasts due to high growth rates and low water costs. Adding flue gas constraints increased the spatial distribution, but the majority of sites remained in the southeast. The 21 BGY target required ~3.8 million hectares of mainly forest (41.3%) and pasture (35.7%). Exclusion in favor of barren and scrub lands forced most production to the southwestern US, but with increased water consumption (5.7 times) and decreased economic efficiency (-38%).

  5. Comparing bacterial community composition of healthy and dark spot-affected Siderastrea siderea in Florida and the Caribbean

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kellogg, Christina A.; Piceno, Yvette M.; Tom, Lauren M.; DeSantis, Todd Z.; Gray, Michael A.; Andersen, Gary L.; Mormile, Melanie R.

    2014-10-07

    Coral disease is one of the major causes of reef degradation. Dark Spot Syndrome (DSS) was described in the early 1990's as brown or purple amorphous areas of tissue on a coral and has since become one of the most prevalent diseases reported on Caribbean reefs. It has been identified in a number of coral species, but there is debate as to whether it is in fact the same disease in different corals. Further, it is questioned whether these macroscopic signs are in fact diagnostic of an infectious disease at all. The most commonly affected species in the Caribbean ismore » the massive starlet coral Siderastrea siderea. We sampled this species in two locations, Dry Tortugas National Park and Virgin Islands National Park. Tissue biopsies were collected from both healthy colonies and those with dark spot lesions. Microbial-community DNA was extracted from coral samples (mucus, tissue, and skeleton), amplified using bacterial-specific primers, and applied to PhyloChip G3 microarrays to examine the bacterial diversity associated with this coral. Samples were also screened for the presence of a fungal ribotype that has recently been implicated as a causative agent of DSS in another coral species, but the amplifications were unsuccessful. S. siderea samples did not cluster consistently based on health state (i.e., normal versus dark spot). Various bacteria, including Cyanobacteria and Vibrios, were observed to have increased relative abundance in the discolored tissue, but the patterns were not consistent across all DSS samples. Overall, our findings do not support the hypothesis that DSS in S. siderea is linked to a bacterial pathogen or pathogens. This dataset provides the most comprehensive overview to date of the bacterial community associated with the scleractinian coral S. siderea.« less

  6. The affect of erbium hydride on the conversion efficience to accelerated protons from ultra-shsort pulse laser irradiated foils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Offermann, D

    2008-09-04

    This thesis work explores, experimentally, the potential gains in the conversion efficiency from ultra-intense laser light to proton beams using erbium hydride coatings. For years, it has been known that contaminants at the rear surface of an ultra-intense laser irradiated thin foil will be accelerated to multi-MeV. Inertial Confinement Fusion fast ignition using proton beams as the igniter source requires of about 10{sup 16} protons with an average energy of about 3MeV. This is far more than the 10{sup 12} protons available in the contaminant layer. Target designs must include some form of a hydrogen rich coating that can be made thick enough to support the beam requirements of fast ignition. Work with computer simulations of thin foils suggest the atomic mass of the non-hydrogen atoms in the surface layer has a strong affect on the conversion efficiency to protons. For example, the 167amu erbium atoms will take less energy away from the proton beam than a coating using carbon with a mass of 12amu. A pure hydrogen coating would be ideal, but technologically is not feasible at this time. In the experiments performed for my thesis, ErH{sub 3} coatings on 5 {micro}m gold foils are compared with typical contaminants which are approximately equivalent to CH{sub 1.7}. It will be shown that there was a factor of 1.25 {+-} 0.19 improvement in the conversion efficiency for protons above 3MeV using erbium hydride using the Callisto laser. Callisto is a 10J per pulse, 800nm wavelength laser with a pulse duration of 200fs and can be focused to a peak intensity of about 5 x 10{sup 19}W/cm{sup 2}. The total number of protons from either target type was on the order of 10{sup 10}. Furthermore, the same experiment was performed on the Titan laser, which has a 500fs pulse duration, 150J of energy and can be focused to about 3 x 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}. In this experiment 10{sup 12} protons were seen from both erbium hydride and contaminants on 14 {micro} m gold foils. Significant improvements were also observed but possibly because of the depletion of hydrogen in the contaminant layer case.

  7. Thymidylate Synthase Gene Polymorphism Affects the Response to Preoperative 5-Fluorouracil Chemoradiation Therapy in Patients With Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hur, Hyuk; Kang, Jeonghyun; Kim, Nam Kyu; Min, Byung Soh; Lee, Kang Young; Shin, Sang Joon; Keum, Ki Chang; Choi, Junjeong; Kim, Hoguen; Choi, Sung Ho; Lee, Mi-Young

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: This study aims to correlate thymidylate synthase (TS) gene polymorphisms with the tumor response to preoperative 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty-four patients with rectal cancer treated with 5-FU-based preoperative CRT were prospectively enrolled in this study. Thymidylate synthase expression and TS gene polymorphisms were evaluated in tumor obtained before preoperative CRT and were correlated with the pathologic response, as assessed by histopathologic staging (pTNM) and tumor regression grade. Results: Patients exhibited 2R/3R and 3R/3R tandem repeat polymorphisms in the TS gene. With regard to TS expression in these genotypes, 2R/3RC and 3RC/3RC were defined as the low-expression group and 2R/3RG, 3RC/3RG, and 3RG/3RG as the high-expression group. There was no significant correlation between TS expression and tumor response. There was no significant difference in the tumor response between patients homozygous for 3R/3R and patients heterozygous for 2R/3R. However, 13 of 14 patients in the low-expression group with a G>C single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (2R/3RC [n = 5] or 3RC/3RC [n = 9]) exhibited a significantly greater tumor downstaging rate, as compared with only 12 of 30 patients in the high-expression group without the SNP (2R/3RG [n = 10], 3RC/3RG [n = 9], or 3RG/3RG [n = 11]) (p = 0.001). The nodal downstaging rate was also significantly greater in this low-expression group, as compared with the high-expression group (12 of 14 vs. 14 of 30, p = 0.014). However, there was no significant difference in the tumor regression grade between these groups. Conclusions: This study suggests that SNPs within the TS enhancer region affect the tumor response to preoperative 5-FU-based CRT in rectal cancer.

  8. Factors Affecting Route Selection and Survival of Steelhead Kelts at Snake River Dams in 2012 and 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harnish, Ryan A.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Li, Xinya; Ham, Kenneth D.; Deng, Zhiqun

    2014-12-15

    In 2012 and 2013, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a study that summarized the passage proportions and route-specific survival rates of steelhead kelts that passed through Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) dams. To accomplish this, a total of 811 steelhead kelts were tagged with Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) transmitters. Acoustic receivers, both autonomous and cabled, were deployed throughout the FCRPS to monitor the downstream movements of tagged-kelts. Kelts were also tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder tags to monitor passage through juvenile bypass systems and detect returning fish. The current study evaluated data collected in 2012 and 2013 to identify individual, behavioral, environmental and dam operation variables that were related to passage and survival of steelhead kelts that passed through FCRPS dams. Bayesian model averaging of multivariable logistic regression models was used to identify the environmental, temporal, operational, individual, and behavioral variables that had the highest probability of influencing the route of passage and the route-specific survival probabilities for kelts that passed Lower Granite (LGR), Little Goose (LGS), and Lower Monumental (LMN) dams in 2012 and 2013. The posterior probabilities of the best models for predicting route of passage ranged from 0.106 for traditional spill at LMN to 0.720 for turbine passage at LGS. Generally, the behavior (depth and near-dam searching activity) of kelts in the forebay appeared to have the greatest influence on their route of passage. Shallower-migrating kelts had a higher probability of passing via the weir and deeper-migrating kelts had a higher probability of passing via the JBS and turbines than other routes. Kelts that displayed a higher level of near-dam searching activity had a higher probability of passing via the spillway weir and those that did less near-dam searching had a higher probability of passing via the JBS and turbines. The side of the river in which kelts approached the dam and dam operations also affected route of passage. Dam operations and the size and condition of kelts were found to have the greatest effect on route-specific survival probabilities for fish that passed via the spillway at LGS. That is, longer kelts and those in fair condition had a lower probability of survival for fish that passed via the spillway weir. The survival of spillway weir- and deep-spill passed kelts was positively correlated with the percent of the total discharge that passed through turbine unit 4. Too few kelts passed through the traditional spill, JBS, and turbine units to evaluate survival through these routes. The information gathered in this study describes Snake River steelhead kelt passage behavior, rates, and distributions through the FCRPS as well as provide information to biologists and engineers about the dam operations and abiotic conditions that are related to passage and survival of steelhead kelts.

  9. Notice of Intent to Issue Funding Opportunity Announcement “Assisting Federal Facilities with Energy Conservation Technologies (AFFECT) 2016,” DE-FOA-0001574

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document announces the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy intention to issue, on behalf of the Federal Energy Management Program, a funding opportunity announcement titled "Assisting Federal Facilities with Energy Conservation Technologies (AFFECT) 2016."

  10. Beyond Renewable Portfolio Standards: An Assessment of Regional Supply and Demand Conditions Affecting the Future of Renewable Energy in the West

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (This page intentionally left blank) National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Beyond Renewable Portfolio Standards: An Assessment of Regional Supply and Demand Conditions Affecting the Future of Renewable Energy in the West David J. Hurlbut, Joyce McLaren, and Rachel Gelman National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared under Task No. AROE.2000 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy

  11. Beyond Renewable Portfolio Standards: An Assessment of Regional Supply and Demand Conditions Affecting the Future of Renewable Energy in the West; Executive Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Beyond Renewable Portfolio Standards: An Assessment of Regional Supply and Demand Conditions Affecting the Future of Renewable Energy in the West Executive Summary David J. Hurlbut, Joyce McLaren, and Rachel Gelman National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared under Task No. AROE.2000 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency &

  12. U.S. Department of Energy Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Cost Estimate and Fee Adequacy Report for Yucca Mountain Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today released a revised estimate of the total system life cycle cost for a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.  The 2007 total system life...

  13. CRAD, Assessment Criteria and Guidelines for Determining the Adequacy of Software Used in the Safety Analysis and Design of Defense Nuclear Facilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These guidelines and criteria provide a consistent overall framework for assessment of the processes that are currently in place to ensure that the software being used in the safety analysis and design of the SSCs in defense nuclear facilities is adequate. These reviews will be conducted only on software that is currently in use, not on software that was previously used as part of a safety analysis and design process.

  14. Factors Affecting the Survival of Upstream Migrant Adult Salmonids in the Columbia River Basin : Recovery Issues for Threatened and Endangered Snake River Salmon : Technical Report 9 of 11.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dauble, Dennis D.; Mueller, Robert P.

    1993-06-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is developing conservation planning documentation to support the National Marine Fisheries Service`s (NMFS) recovery plan for Columbia Basin salmonid stocks that are currently listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Information from the conservation planning documentation will be used as a partial scientific basis for identifying alternative conservation strategies and to make recommendations toward conserving, rebuilding, and ultimately removing these salmon stocks from the list of endangered species. This report describes the adult upstream survival study, a synthesis of biological analyses related to conditions affecting the survival of adult upstream migrant salmonids in the Columbia River system. The objective of the adult upstream survival study was to analyze existing data related to increasing the survival of adult migrant salmonids returning to the Snake River system. The fate and accountability of each stock during its upstream migration period and the uncertainties associated with measurements of escapement and survival were evaluated. Operational measures that affected the survival of adult salmon were evaluated including existing conditions, augmented flows from upstream storage release, and drawdown of mainstem reservoirs. The potential impacts and benefits of these measures to each ESA stock were, also described based on considerations of species behavior and run timing.

  15. Identification and preliminary characterization of global water resource issues which may be affected by CO/sub 2/-induced climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callaway, J.M.; Cohen, M.L.; Currie, J.W.

    1984-04-01

    The objectives were to: (1) identify, characterize, and define existing or projected regional and global water resource management issues which may be affected by CO/sub 2/-induced climate changes; and (2) develop research priorities for acquiring additional information about the potential effects of a CO/sub 2/-induced climate change on the availability and allocation of freshwater supplies. The research was broken into four work elements: (1) identification of water resource management issues on a global and regional basis; (2) identification of a subset of generic CO/sub 2/-related water resource management issues believed to have the highest probability of being affected, beneficially or adversely, by a CO/sub 2/-induced climate change; (3) selection of specific sites for examining the potential effect of a CO/sub 2/-induced climate change on these issues; and (4) conducting detailed case studies at these sites, the results from which will be used to identify future research and data needs in the area of water resources. This report summarizes the research related to the first three work elements. 6 figures, 9 tables.

  16. Factors Affecting the Risk of Brain Metastasis in Small Cell Lung Cancer With Surgery: Is Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation Necessary for Stage I-III Disease?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gong Linlin; Wang, Q.I.; Zhao Lujun; Yuan Zhiyong; Li Ruijian; Wang Ping

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The use of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) with surgical resection has not been fully identified. This study undertook to assess the factors affecting the risk of brain metastases in patients with stage I-III SCLC after surgical resection. The implications of PCI treatment for these patients are discussed. Methods and Materials: One hundred twenty-six patients treated with surgical resection for stage I-III SCLC from January 1998-December 2009 were retrospectively analyzed to elucidate the risk factors of brain metastases. Log-rank test and Cox regression model were used to determine the risk factors of brain metastases. Results: The median survival time for this patient population was 34 months, and the 5-year overall survival rate was 34.9%. For the whole group, 23.0% (29/126) of the patients had evidence of metastases to brain. Pathologic stage not only correlated with overall survival but also significantly affected the risk of brain metastases. The 5-year survival rates for patients with pathologic stages I, II, and III were 54.8%, 35.6%, and 14.1%, respectively (P=.001). The frequency of brain metastases in patients with pathologic stages I, II, and III were 6.25% (2/32), 28.2% (11/39), and 29.1% (16/55) (P=.026), respectively. A significant difference in brain metastases between patients with complete resection and incomplete resection was also observed (20.5% vs 42.9%, P=.028). The frequency of brain metastases was not found to be correlated with age, sex, pathologic type, induction chemotherapy, adjuvant chemotherapy, or adjuvant radiation therapy. Conclusions: Stage I SCLC patients with complete resection had a low incidence of brain metastases and a favorable survival rate. Stage II-III disease had a higher incidence of brain metastases. Thus, PCI might have a role for stage II-III disease but not for stage I disease.

  17. Usage possibilities of diesel aggregate for room heating and electric energy production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kegl, K.; Vor Ic, J.

    1998-07-01

    Article shows reasons for introduction of cogeneration generally. The present manner of heating and electricity connection at the Faculty of electrical engineering and computer science in Maribor is described. The idea is to build in the cogeneration complex in heating room next to the existent boilers. Gathered data of electricity and heat demand are presented. Paper deals with question of electrical, heat and fuel connections. Comparison between two types of cogeneration (motor and turbine) helps to make a decision: cogeneration with motor. Depending to the daily electricity demands diagram and arranged heating diagram the authors focused to the small cogeneration (around 200 kWe). Availability of natural gas at the placement of the cogeneration leads us to the gas motor but leaves the diesel engine possibility opened. A brief economical estimation includes common investment costs regarding to the savings of energy and fuel expenses. Payback time calculation gives precedence to the gas motor if diesel is used with motor instead of fuel oil. Except the energy savings there are greater benefits of the cogeneration: it can be good study case for students of electrotechnics as well as future mechanical engineers.

  18. Distributed Wireless Multi-Sensor Technologies, A Novel Approach to Reduce Motor Energy Usage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel Sexton

    2008-03-28

    This report is the final report for the General Electric Distributed Wireless Multi-Sensor Technologies project. The report covers the research activities and benefits surrounding wireless technology used for industrial sensing applications. The main goal of this project was to develop wireless sensor technology that would be commercialized and adopted by industry for a various set of applications. Many of these applications will yield significant energy savings. One application where there was significant information to estimate a potential energy savings was focused on equipment condition monitoring and in particular electric motor monitoring. The results of the testing of the technology developed are described in this report along with the commercialization activities and various new applications and benefits realized.

  19. Integration of Photovoltaics into Building Energy Usage through Advanced Control of Rooftop Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Starke, Michael R; Nutaro, James J; Irminger, Philip; Ollis, Benjamin; Kuruganti, Phani Teja; Fugate, David L

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a computational approach to forecast photovoltaic (PV) power in kW based on a neural network linkage of publicly available cloud cover data and on-site solar irradiance sensor data. We also describe a control approach to utilize rooftop air conditioning units (RTUs) to support renewable integration. The PV forecasting method is validated using data from a rooftop PV panel installed on the Distributed Energy, Communications, and Controls (DECC) laboratory at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The validation occurs in multiple phases to ensure that each component of the approach is the best representation of the actual expected output. The control of the RTU is based on model predictive methods.

  20. A possible usage of a CDK4 inhibitor for breast cancer stem cell-targeted therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Yu Kyeong; Lee, Jae Ho; Park, Ga-Young; Chun, Sung Hak; Han, Jeong Yun; Kim, Sung Dae; Lee, Janet; Center for Molecular Medicine, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon, Gyeonggi 440-746 ; Lee, Chang-Woo; Center for Molecular Medicine, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon, Gyeonggi 440-746; Samsung Advanced Institute for Health Sciences and Technology, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi 440-746 ; Yang, Kwangmo; Department of Radiation Oncology, Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Busan 619-953; Department of Radiation Oncology, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-709 ; Lee, Chang Geun

    2013-01-25

    Highlights: ? A CDK4 inhibitor may be used for breast cancer stem cell-targeted therapy. ? The CDK4 inhibitor differentiated the cancer stem cell population (CD24{sup ?}/CD44{sup +}) of MDA-MB-231. ? The differentiation of the cancer stem cells by the CDK4 inhibitor radiosensitized MDA-MB-231. -- Abstract: Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are one of the main reasons behind cancer recurrence due to their resistance to conventional anti-cancer therapies. Thus, many efforts are being devoted to developing CSC-targeted therapies to overcome the resistance of CSCs to conventional anti-cancer therapies and decrease cancer recurrence. Differentiation therapy is one potential approach to achieve CSC-targeted therapies. This method involves inducing immature cancer cells with stem cell characteristics into more mature or differentiated cancer cells. In this study, we found that a CDK4 inhibitor sensitized MDA-MB-231 cells but not MCF7 cells to irradiation. This difference appeared to be associated with the relative percentage of CSC-population between the two breast cancer cells. The CDK4 inhibitor induced differentiation and reduced the cancer stem cell activity of MDA-MB-231 cells, which are shown by multiple marker or phenotypes of CSCs. Thus, these results suggest that radiosensitization effects may be caused by reducing the CSC-population of MDA-MB-231 through the use of the CDK4 inhibitor. Thus, further investigations into the possible application of the CDK4 inhibitor for CSC-targeted therapy should be performed to enhance the efficacy of radiotherapy for breast cancer.

  1. PCB usage at the Grand Junction Area Office Facility. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, M.E.; Donivan, S.

    1982-06-01

    The development, implementation, and results of the polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) identification project at the Grand Junction Area Office (GJAO) are summarized. Methodology for the PCB analysis is described, and results are tabulated. Of the 51 transformers and disconnects in use at GJAO, 15 unites were determined to be PCB-contaminated or filled with PCBs. This number falls within EPA's estimate of 25 to 40 percent of all transformers in use being at least contaminated. Approximately 324 gallons of PCBs and 515 gallons of PCB-contaminated fluids are being used currently. No contaminated transformers or disconnects are in a position to contaminate food or feed products at the facility.

  2. Jefferson Lab's Education web site hits new high-usage record...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the pages accessed were from our Virginia Standards of Learning (SOL) Science, Math and Technology Practice Tests and our 'Who Wants to Win 1,000,000 Math and Science Quiz.'" ...

  3. Water Usage for In-Situ Oil Shale Retorting - A Systems Dynamics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and solutes from the subsurface as well as return the ground surface to its natural state. ... Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 02 ...

  4. "Table HC15.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... of Programmable Thermostats" "Reduces Temperature During Day" "Yes",18.6,1.2,0.8,1.4,2.4 "No",14.5,0.8,1.1,1,2.9 "Reduces Temperature at Night" "Yes",21.5,1.4,1,1.7,3.2 ...

  5. "Table HC12.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Midwest Census...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... "Use of Programmable Thermostats" "Reduces Temperature During Day" "Yes",18.6,4.7,3.5,1.2 "No",14.5,3.6,2.5,1.1 "Reduces Temperature at Night" "Yes",21.5,5.4,3.9,1.5 ...

  6. "Table HC10.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by U.S. Census...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... of Programmable Thermostats" "Adjusts Temperature During Day" "Yes",15.1,2.2,3.8,5.7,3.5 "No",9.9,0.6,3,3.7,2.5 "Adjusts Temperature at Night" "Yes",15.4,2.1,4,5.8,3.5 ...

  7. "Table HC11.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Northeast Census...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... "Use of Programmable Thermostats" "Reduces Temperature During Day" "Yes",18.6,3.8,2.9,0.9 "No",14.5,1.9,1.6,0.3 "Reduces Temperature at Night" "Yes",21.5,4.2,3.3,0.9 ...

  8. "Table HC13.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by South Census...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... of Programmable Thermostats" "Adjusts Temperature During Day" "Yes",15.1,5.7,3.5,0.5,1.8 "No",9.9,3.7,2.1,0.6,1 "Adjusts Temperature at Night" "Yes",15.4,5.8,3.4,0.5,1.9 ...

  9. "Table HC3.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Thermostats" "Reduces Temperature During Day" "Yes",18.6,16.2,14,0.8,0.5,0.4,0.6 "No",14.5,11.5,10,0.9,"Q",0.3,0.2 "Reduces Temperature at Night" "Yes",21.5,18.6,15.9,1....

  10. "Table HC11.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Northeast...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... "Use of Programmable Thermostats" "Adjusts Temperature During Day" "Yes",15.1,2.2,2,0.2 "No",9.9,0.6,0.6,"Q" "Adjusts Temperature at Night" "Yes",15.4,2.1,2,0.2 ...

  11. "Table HC15.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Four Most...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... of Programmable Thermostats" "Adjusts Temperature During Day" "Yes",15.1,0.6,1.1,1.6,2 "No",9.9,"Q",0.8,0.7,1.6 "Adjusts Temperature at Night" "Yes",15.4,0.6,1,1.7,2 ...

  12. "Table HC4.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Programmable Thermostats" "Reduces Temperature During Day" "Yes",18.6,2.3,0.7,0.2,0.6,0.7,"Q" "No",14.5,3,1.2,0.4,0.4,1,"Q" "Reduces Temperature at Night" "Yes",21.5,2.9,0.9,0.3,0....

  13. "Table HC14.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by West Census...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... "Use of Programmable Thermostats" "Adjusts Temperature During Day" "Yes",15.1,3.5,1.2,2.4 "No",9.9,2.5,0.7,1.8 "Adjusts Temperature at Night" "Yes",15.4,3.5,1.2,2.4 ...

  14. "Table HC7.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Household Income...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Thermostats" "Reduces Temperature During Day" "Yes",18.6,1.9,3.3,4,3.1,6.2,1.2,3.2 "No",14.5,2.3,3.1,2.5,2.4,4.2,1.3,3.5 "Reduces Temperature at Night" ...

  15. "Table HC9.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Climate Zone...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... of Programmable Thermostats" "Reduces Temperature During Day" "Yes",18.6,2,5.1,4,4.3,3.1 "No",14.5,1.3,3.2,3.2,4.1,2.9 "Reduces Temperature at Night" "Yes",21.5,2.2,5.6,4.7,5.2,3....

  16. "Table HC12.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Midwest Census...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... "Use of Programmable Thermostats" "Adjusts Temperature During Day" "Yes",15.1,3.8,2.5,1.2 "No",9.9,3,2.2,0.8 "Adjusts Temperature at Night" "Yes",15.4,4,2.7,1.3 ...

  17. "Table HC4.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Thermostats" "Adjusts Temperature During Day" "Yes",15.1,1.8,0.6,"Q",0.4,0.6,"Q" "No",9.9,1.5,0.5,"Q","Q",0.5,"Q" "Adjusts Temperature at Night" "Yes",15.4,1.8,0.6,"Q",...

  18. "Table HC13.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by South Census...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... of Programmable Thermostats" "Reduces Temperature During Day" "Yes",18.6,5.2,3.2,0.4,1.6 "No",14.5,4.7,2.7,0.6,1.3 "Reduces Temperature at Night" "Yes",21.5,6,3.5,0.6,1.9 ...

  19. "Table HC10.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by U.S. Census...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... of Programmable Thermostats" "Reduces Temperature During Day" "Yes",18.6,3.8,4.7,5.2,4.8 "No",14.5,1.9,3.6,4.7,4.4 "Reduces Temperature at Night" "Yes",21.5,4.2,5.4,6,5.9 ...

  20. "Table HC14.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by West Census...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... "Use of Programmable Thermostats" "Reduces Temperature During Day" "Yes",18.6,4.8,1.7,3.1 "No",14.5,4.4,0.9,3.4 "Reduces Temperature at Night" "Yes",21.5,5.9,1.9,3.9 ...

  1. "Table HC8.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Urban/Rural Location...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... of Programmable Thermostats" "Reduces Temperature During Day" "Yes",18.6,7.4,3.3,5.2,2.7 "No",14.5,6.4,2.1,3.3,2.7 "Reduces Temperature at Night" "Yes",21.5,8.5,3.6,6,3.4 ...

  2. A Practical and Cost Effective Demonstration of Efficient Energy Usage and Quality Management Using the NII

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-05-01

    In order to be competitive in the changing electric power industry, and to promote energy efficiency and conservation, electric power providers need to have access to information on the power system to a level of detail that has not been available in the past. This level of detail extends beyond the usual voltage, current, power, and energy quantities obtained from traditional utility SCADA systems.

  3. Energy Flow: Flow Charts Illustrating United States Energy Resources and Usage, from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Decision makers have long recognized the importance of visualizing energy and material flows in a way that distinguishes between resources, transformations and services. Research priorities can be defined in terms of changes to the flows, and the consequences of policy or technology shifts can be traced both upstream and downstream. The usefulness of this top-down view is limited by the level of detail that can be conveyed in a single image. We use two techniques to balance information content with readability. First we employe visualization techniques, such as those embodied in the energy Sankey diagram below (Figure 1), to display both qualitative (relative line weight) and quantitative (listed values) information in a reader-friendly package. The second method is to augment static images with dynamic, scalable digital content containing multiple layers (e.g. energy, carbon and economic data). This transitions the audience from that of a passive reader to an active user of the information. When used in conjunction these approaches enable relatively large, interconnected processes to be described and analyzed efficiently. [copied from the description at http://en.openei.org/wiki/LLNL_Energy_Flow_Charts#cite_note-1

  4. Water Usage for In-Situ Oil Shale Retorting A Systems Dynamics Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Earl D. Mattson; Larry Hull; Kara Cafferty

    2012-12-01

    A system dynamic model was construction to evaluate the water balance for in-situ oil shale conversion. The model is based on a systems dynamics approach and uses the Powersim Studio 9 software package. Three phases of an insitu retort were consider; a construction phase primarily accounts for water needed for drilling and water produced during dewatering, an operation phase includes the production of water from the retorting process, and a remediation phase water to remove heat and solutes from the subsurface as well as return the ground surface to its natural state. Throughout these three phases, the water is consumed and produced. Consumption is account for through the drill process, dust control, returning the ground water to its initial level and make up water losses during the remedial flushing of the retort zone. Production of water is through the dewatering of the retort zone, and during chemical pyrolysis reaction of the kerogen conversion. The major water consumption was during the remediation of the insitu retorting zone.

  5. "Table HC10.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by U.S. Census...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Turned Off",43.6,7.8,9.9,15.7,10.2 "Manually Put into Sleep Mode",19.4,3.9,4.9,6.3,4.3 "CPU Goes to Sleep When PC is Left On" "Yes",9.1,1.4,1.9,3.3,2.6 ...

  6. "Table HC8.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Urban/Rural...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Turned Off",43.6,18.2,7.4,9.3,8.6 "Manually Put into Sleep Mode",19.4,6.9,3.3,5.3,3.9 "CPU Goes to Sleep When PC is Left On" "Yes",9.1,3.6,1.3,2.6,1.7 ...

  7. "Table HC14.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by West Census...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Completely Turned Off",43.6,10.2,2.8,7.4 "Manually Put into Sleep Mode",19.4,4.3,1.4,2.9 "CPU Goes to Sleep When PC is Left On" "Yes",9.1,2.6,0.9,1.7 "No",3.4,0.7,"Q",0.5 ...

  8. "Table HC4.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Turned Off",43.6,10.8,3.1,0.8,1.6,5,0.3 "Manually Put into Sleep Mode",19.4,4.2,1.2,0.4,0.8,1.8,"Q" "CPU Goes to Sleep When PC is Left On" "Yes",9.1,1.8,0.5,0.3,0.2,0.8,"Q" ...

  9. "Table HC11.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Northeast...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Completely Turned Off",43.6,7.8,5.7,2.1 "Manually Put into Sleep Mode",19.4,3.9,2.7,1.2 "CPU Goes to Sleep When PC is Left On" "Yes",9.1,1.4,1,0.4 "No",3.4,0.6,0.4,0.2 "Type ...

  10. "Table HC15.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Four Most...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Completely Turned Off",43.6,2.5,3.4,3,5.3 "Manually Put into Sleep Mode",19.4,1.1,0.9,1.5,2.1 "CPU Goes to Sleep When PC is Left On" "Yes",9.1,0.3,0.5,0.6,1.3 ...

  11. "Table HC9.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Climate Zone...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Turned Off",43.6,4.5,9.9,10.6,9.4,9.3 "Manually Put into Sleep Mode",19.4,1.8,5.2,4.8,4.2,3.5 "CPU Goes to Sleep When PC is Left On" "Yes",9.1,1.2,1.8,2.1,2.1,1.8 ...

  12. "Table HC7.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Household...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...ff",43.6,6.3,11.7,9.6,6.5,9.5,4.3,11.9 "Manually Put into Sleep Mode",19.4,1.9,3.6,4.4,2.9,6.6,1.2,3.7 "CPU Goes to Sleep When PC is Left On" "Yes",9.1,1,1.8,1.7,1.2,3.3,0.7,1.8 ...

  13. "Table HC12.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Midwest...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Completely Turned Off",43.6,9.9,6.9,3 "Manually Put into Sleep Mode",19.4,4.9,3.6,1.3 "CPU Goes to Sleep When PC is Left On" "Yes",9.1,1.9,1.1,0.7 "No",3.4,0.8,0.5,0.3 ...

  14. "Table HC13.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by South Census...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Turned Off",43.6,15.7,8.6,2.5,4.5 "Manually Put into Sleep Mode",19.4,6.3,3.4,0.8,2.1 "CPU Goes to Sleep When PC is Left On" "Yes",9.1,3.3,1.7,0.6,0.9 ...

  15. "Table HC3.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Off",43.6,32.9,27.5,1.6,0.8,0.9,2 "Manually Put into Sleep Mode",19.4,15.2,13.1,0.9,0.3,0.4,0.6 "CPU Goes to Sleep When PC is Left On" "Yes",9.1,7.3,6.6,0.3,"Q","Q",0.2 ...

  16. Alternate energy source usage methods for in situ heat treatment processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stone, Jr., Francis Marion; Goodwin, Charles R; Richard, Jr., James E

    2014-10-14

    Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method for providing power to one or more subsurface heaters is described herein. The method may include monitoring one or more operating parameters of the heaters, the intermittent power source, and a transformer coupled to the intermittent power source that transforms power from the intermittent power source to power with appropriate operating parameters for the heaters; and controlling the power output of the transformer so that a constant voltage is provided to the heaters regardless of the load of the heaters and the power output provided by the intermittent power source.

  17. Land O'Lakes Shaves Gas Usage through Steam System In-Plant Training

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Twelve participants from 6 different facilities learned and practiced energy efficiency assessment skills during the recent in-plant training at a Land O'Lakes dairy plant in Carlisle, Pennsylvania...

  18. "Table HC7.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Household...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ... for 2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ...

  19. A NOVEL CONCEPT FOR REDUCING WATER USAGE AND INCREASING EFFICIENCY IN POWER GENERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiao-Hung Chiang; Guy Weismantel

    2004-03-01

    The objective of the project is to apply a unique ice thermal storage (ITS) technology to cooling the intake air to gas turbines used for power generation. In Phase I, the work includes theoretical analysis, computer simulation, engineering design and cost evaluation of this novel ITS technology. The study includes two typical gas turbines (an industrial and an aeroderivative type gas turbine) operated at two different geographic locations: Phoenix, AZ and Houston, TX. Simulation runs are performed to generate data for both power output (KW) and heat rate (Btu/KWh) as well as water recovery (acre ft/yr) in terms of intake air temperature and humidity based on weather data and turbine performance curves. Preliminary engineering design of a typical equipment arrangement for turbine inlet air-cooling operation using the ITS system is presented. A cost analysis has been performed to demonstrate the market viability of the ITS technology. When the ITS technology is applied to gas turbines, a net power gain up to 40% and a heat rate reduction as much as 7% can be achieved. In addition, a significant amount of water can be recovered (up to 200 acre-ft of water per year for a 50 MW turbine). The total cost saving is estimated to be $500,000/yr for a 50 MW gas turbine generator. These results have clearly demonstrated that the use of ITS technology to cool the intake-air to gas turbines is an efficient and cost effective means to improve the overall performance of its power generation capacity with an important added benefit of water recovery in power plant operation. Thus, further development of ITS technology for commercial applications in power generation, particularly in coal-based IGCC power plants is warranted.

  20. Prediction and characterization of heat-affected zone formation in tin-bismuth alloys due to nickel-aluminum multilayer foil reaction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hooper, R. J.; Davis, C. G.; Johns, P. M.; Adams, D. P.; Hirschfeld, D.; Nino, J. C.; Manuel, M. V.

    2015-06-26

    Reactive multilayer foils have the potential to be used as local high intensity heat sources for a variety of applications. In this study, most of the past research effort concerning these materials have focused on understanding the structure-property relationships of the foils that govern the energy released during a reaction. To improve the ability of researchers to more rapidly develop technologies based on reactive multilayer foils, a deeper and more predictive understanding of the relationship between the heat released from the foil and microstructural evolution in the neighboring materials is needed. This work describes the development of a numerical modelmore » for the purpose of predicting heat affected zone size in substrate materials. The model is experimentally validated using a commercially available Ni-Al multilayer foils and alloys from the Sn-Bi binary system. To accomplish this, phenomenological models for predicting the variation of physical properties (i.e., thermal conductivity, density, and heat capacity) with temperature and composition in the Sn-Bi system were utilized using literature data.« less

  1. Detection of three nonsense mutations and one missense mutation in the interleukin-2 receptor [gamma] chain gene in SCIDX1 that differently affect the mRNA processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markiewicz, S.; Fischer, A.; Saint Basile, G. de ); Subtil, A.; Dautry-Varsat, A. )

    1994-05-01

    The interleukin-2 receptor [gamma] (IL-2R[gamma]) chain gene encodes a 64-kDa protein that not only composes the high-affinity form of the IL-2 binding receptor in association with the 2R [alpha] and [beta] chains, but also participates in at least the IL-4 and IL-7 receptor complexes. Mutations in this gene have recently been shown to cause X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCIDX1). This disease of the immune system results from an early block of T lymphocyte and natural killer (NK) cell differentiation, which leads to a severe cellular and humoral immune defect that is lethal unless treated by bone marrow transplantation. Analysis of the IL-2R[gamma] gene in SCIDX1 patients has revealed the presence of heterogeneous mutations principally located in the extracellular domain of the molecule. We report here three intraexonic mutations and one deletion in the IL-2R[gamma] gene in four SCIDX1 patients. These mutations appear to differentially affect RNA processing, either by decreasing IL-2R[gamma] mRNA level or by the skipping of a constitutive exon. 16 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Mapping Phase Transformations in the Heat-Affected-Zone of Carbon Manganese Steel Welds using Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elmer, J W; Wong, J; Ressler, T; Palmer, T A

    2002-02-12

    Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (SRXRD) was used to investigate phase transformations that occur in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds in AISI 1005 carbon-manganese steel. In situ SRXRD experiments performed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) probed the phases present in the HAZ during welding, and these real-time observations of the HAZ phases were used to construct a map of the phase transformations occurring in the HAZ. This map identified 5 principal phase regions between the liquid weld pool and the unaffected base metal. Regions of annealing, recrystallization, partial transformation and complete transformation to {alpha}-Fe, {gamma}-Fe, and {delta}-Fe phases were identified using SRXRD, and the experimental results were combined with a heat flow model of the weld and thermodynamic calculations to compare these results with the important phase transformation isotherms. From the resulting phase transformation map, the kinetics of phase transformations that occur under the highly non-isothermal heating and cooling cycles produced during welding of steels can be better understood and modeled.

  3. Mapping Phase Transformations in the Heat-Affected-Zone of Carbon Manganese Steel Welds using Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elmer, J W; Wong, J; Ressler, T; Palmer, T A

    2001-12-04

    Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (SRXRD) was used to investigate phase transformations that occur in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds in AISI 1005 carbon-manganese steel. In situ SRXRD experiments performed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) probed the phases present in the HAZ during welding, and these real-time observations of the HAZ phases were used to construct a map of the phase transformations occurring in the HAZ. This map identified 5 principal phase regions between the liquid weld pool and the unaffected base metal for the carbon-manganese steel studied in this investigation. Regions of annealing, recrystallization, partial transformation and complete transformation to {alpha}-Fe, {gamma}-Fe, and {delta}-Fe phases were identified using SRXRD, and the experimental results were combined with a heat flow model of the weld to investigate transformation kinetics under both positive and negative temperature gradients in the HAZ. From the resulting phase transformation map, the kinetics of phase transformations that occur under the highly non-isothermal heating and cooling cycles produced during welding of steels can now be better understood and modeled.

  4. Shift in the Equilibrium between On and Off States of the Allosteric Switch in Ras-GppNHp Affected by Small Molecules and Bulk Solvent Composition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holzapfel, Genevieve; Buhrman, Greg; Mattos, Carla

    2012-08-31

    Ras GTPase cycles between its active GTP-bound form promoted by GEFs and its inactive GDP-bound form promoted by GAPs to affect the control of various cellular functions. It is becoming increasingly apparent that subtle regulation of the GTP-bound active state may occur through promotion of substates mediated by an allosteric switch mechanism that induces a disorder to order transition in switch II upon ligand binding at an allosteric site. We show with high-resolution structures that calcium acetate and either dithioerythritol (DTE) or dithiothreitol (DTT) soaked into H-Ras-GppNHp crystals in the presence of a moderate amount of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) can selectively shift the equilibrium to the 'on' state, where the active site appears to be poised for catalysis (calcium acetate), or to what we call the 'ordered off' state, which is associated with an anticatalytic conformation (DTE or DTT). We also show that the equilibrium is reversible in our crystals and dependent on the nature of the small molecule present. Calcium acetate binding in the allosteric site stabilizes the conformation observed in the H-Ras-GppNHp/NOR1A complex, and PEG, DTE, and DTT stabilize the anticatalytic conformation observed in the complex between the Ras homologue Ran and Importin-{beta}. The small molecules are therefore selecting biologically relevant conformations in the crystal that are sampled by the disordered switch II in the uncomplexed GTP-bound form of H-Ras. In the presence of a large amount of PEG, the ordered off conformation predominates, whereas in solution, in the absence of PEG, switch regions appear to remain disordered in what we call the off state, unable to bind DTE.

  5. Parameters affecting the stability of the digestate from a two-stage anaerobic process treating the organic fraction of municipal solid waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trzcinski, Antoine P.; Stuckey, David C.

    2011-07-15

    This paper focused on the factors affecting the respiration rate of the digestate taken from a continuous anaerobic two-stage process treating the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW). The process involved a hydrolytic reactor (HR) that produced a leachate fed to a submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (SAMBR). It was found that a volatile solids (VS) removal in the range 40-75% and an operating temperature in the HR between 21 and 35 {sup o}C resulted in digestates with similar respiration rates, with all digestates requiring 17 days of aeration before satisfying the British Standard Institution stability threshold of 16 mg CO{sub 2} g VS{sup -1} day{sup -1}. Sanitization of the digestate at 65 {sup o}C for 7 days allowed a mature digestate to be obtained. At 4 g VS L{sup -1} d{sup -1} and Solid Retention Times (SRT) greater than 70 days, all the digestates emitted CO{sub 2} at a rate lower than 25 mg CO{sub 2} g VS{sup -1} d{sup -1} after 3 days of aeration, while at SRT lower than 20 days all the digestates displayed a respiration rate greater than 25 mg CO{sub 2} g VS{sup -1} d{sup -1}. The compliance criteria for Class I digestate set by the European Commission (EC) and British Standard Institution (BSI) could not be met because of nickel and chromium contamination, which was probably due to attrition of the stainless steel stirrer in the HR.

  6. Experimental and computational results on exciton/free-carrier ratio, hot/thermalized carrier diffusion, and linear/nonlinear rate constants affecting scintillator proportionality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Richard; Grim, Joel; Li, Qi; Ucer, K. B.; Bizarri, G. A.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Gao, Fei; Bhattacharya, Pijush; Tupitsyn, Eugene; Rowe, Emmanuel; Buliga, Vladimir M.; Burger, Arnold

    2013-10-01

    Models of nonproportional response in scintillators have highlighted the importance of parameters such as branching ratios, carrier thermalization times, diffusion, kinetic order of quenching, associated rate constants, and radius of the electron track. For example, the fraction ?eh of excitations that are free carriers versus excitons was shown by Payne and coworkers to have strong correlation with the shape of electron energy response curves from Compton-coincidence studies. Rate constants for nonlinear quenching are implicit in almost all models of nonproportionality, and some assumption about track radius must invariably be made if one is to relate linear energy deposition dE/dx to volume-based excitation density n (eh/cm3) in terms of which the rates are defined. Diffusion, affecting time-dependent track radius and thus density of excitations, has been implicated as an important factor in nonlinear light yield. Several groups have recently highlighted diffusion of hot electrons in addition to thermalized carriers and excitons in scintillators. However, experimental determination of many of these parameters in the insulating crystals used as scintillators has seemed difficult. Subpicosecond laser techniques including interband z scan light yield, fluence-dependent decay time, and transient optical absorption are now yielding experimental values for some of the missing rates and ratios needed for modeling scintillator response. First principles calculations and Monte Carlo simulations can fill in additional parameters still unavailable from experiment. As a result, quantitative modeling of scintillator electron energy response from independently determined material parameters is becoming possible on an increasingly firmer data base. This paper describes recent laser experiments, calculations, and numerical modeling of scintillator response.

  7. Comparing bacterial community composition of healthy and dark spot-affected Siderastrea siderea in Florida and the Caribbean

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kellogg, Christina A.; Piceno, Yvette M.; Tom, Lauren M.; DeSantis, Todd Z.; Gray, Michael A.; Andersen, Gary L.; Mormile, Melanie R.

    2014-10-07

    Coral disease is one of the major causes of reef degradation. Dark Spot Syndrome (DSS) was described in the early 1990's as brown or purple amorphous areas of tissue on a coral and has since become one of the most prevalent diseases reported on Caribbean reefs. It has been identified in a number of coral species, but there is debate as to whether it is in fact the same disease in different corals. Further, it is questioned whether these macroscopic signs are in fact diagnostic of an infectious disease at all. The most commonly affected species in the Caribbean is the massive starlet coral Siderastrea siderea. We sampled this species in two locations, Dry Tortugas National Park and Virgin Islands National Park. Tissue biopsies were collected from both healthy colonies and those with dark spot lesions. Microbial-community DNA was extracted from coral samples (mucus, tissue, and skeleton), amplified using bacterial-specific primers, and applied to PhyloChip G3 microarrays to examine the bacterial diversity associated with this coral. Samples were also screened for the presence of a fungal ribotype that has recently been implicated as a causative agent of DSS in another coral species, but the amplifications were unsuccessful. S. siderea samples did not cluster consistently based on health state (i.e., normal versus dark spot). Various bacteria, including Cyanobacteria and Vibrios, were observed to have increased relative abundance in the discolored tissue, but the patterns were not consistent across all DSS samples. Overall, our findings do not support the hypothesis that DSS in S. siderea is linked to a bacterial pathogen or pathogens. This dataset provides the most comprehensive overview to date of the bacterial community associated with the scleractinian coral S. siderea.

  8. Template:Clear | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    which may be affecting their formatting. It is shorthand for the following wiki-safe html:

    Usage It should be called in the following format:...

  9. Building America Top Innovations 2012: Tankless Gas Water Heater Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes Building America field testing that shed light on how real-world water usage affects energy saving estimates of high-efficiency water heating systems.

  10. Revegetation Plan for Areas of the Fitzner-Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve Affected by Decommissioning of Buildings and Infrastructure and Debris Clean-up Actions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downs, Janelle L.; Durham, Robin E.; Larson, Kyle B.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office is working to remove a number of facilities on the Fitzner Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve (ALE), which is part of the Hanford Reach National Monument. Decommissioning and removal of buildings and debris on ALE will leave bare soils and excavated areas that need to be revegetated to prevent erosion and weed invasion. Four main areas within ALE are affected by these activities (DOE 2009;DOE/EA-1660F): 1) facilities along the ridgeline of Rattlesnake Mountain, 2) the former Nike missile base and ALE HQ laboratory buildings, 3) the aquatic research laboratory at Rattlesnake Springs area, and 4) a number of small sites across ALE where various types of debris remain from previous uses. This revegetation plan addresses the revegetation and restoration of those land areas disturbed by decommissioning and removal of buildings, facilities and associated infrastructure or debris removal. The primary objective of the revegetation efforts on ALE is to establish native vegetation at each of the sites that will enhance and accelerate the recovery of the native plant community that naturally persists at that location. Revegetation is intended to meet the direction specified by the Environmental Assessment (DOE 2009; DOE/EA-1660F) and by Stipulation C.7 of the Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) for the Rattlesnake Mountain Combined Community Communication Facility and InfrastructureCleanup on the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve, Hanford Site, Richland Washington(DOE 2009; Appendix B). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under contract with CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CPRC) and in consultation with the tribes and DOE-RL developed a site-specific strategy for each of the revegetation units identified within this document. The strategy and implementation approach for each revegetation unit identifies an appropriate native species mix and outlines the necessary site preparation activities and specific methods for seeding and planting at each area. evegetation work is scheduled to commence during the first quarter of FY 2011 to minimize the amount of time that sites are unvegetated and more susceptible to invasion by non-native weedy annual species.

  11. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in the United States. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feurer, D.A.; Weaver, C.L.; Gallagher, K.C.; Hejna, D.; Rielley, K.J.

    1980-01-01

    This report is a summary of a series of preliminary reports describing the laws and regulatory programs of the United states and each of the 50 states affecting the siting and operation of energy generating facilities likely to be used in Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES). A brief summary of public utility regulatory programs, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority is presented in this report to identify how such programs and authority may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES. Subsequent reports will (1) describe public utility rate regulatory procedures and practices as they might affect an ICES, (2) analyze each of the aforementioned regulatory programs to identify impediments to the development of ICES, and (3) recommend potential changes in legislation and regulatory practices and procedures to overcome such impediments.

  12. Evaluation of the effects of underground water usage and spillage in the Exploratory Studies Facility; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, E.; Sobolik, S.R.

    1993-12-01

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is studying Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada as a potential site for a high-level radioactive waste repository. Analyses reported herein were performed to support the design of site characterization activities so that these activities will have a minimal impact on the ability of the site to isolate waste and a minimal impact on underground tests performed as part of the characterization process. These analyses examine the effect of water to be used in the underground construction and testing activities for the Exploratory Studies Facility on in situ conditions. Underground activities and events where water will be used include construction, expected but unplanned spills, and fire protection. The models used predict that, if the current requirements in the Exploratory Studies Facility Design Requirements are observed, water that is imbibed into the tunnel wall rock in the Topopah Springs welded tuff can be removed over the preclosure time period by routine or corrective ventilation, and also that water imbibed into the Paintbrush Tuff nonwelded tuff will not reach the potential waste storage area.

  13. Variables Affecting Economic Development of Wind Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

    2008-02-01

    Report on the specific factors driving wind-power-related economic development and on the impact of specific economic development variables on new wind project economic benefits.

  14. Variables Affecting Economic Development of Wind Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

    2008-07-01

    NREL's JEDI Wind model performed an analysis of wind-power-related economic development drivers. Economic development benefits for wind and coal were estimated using NREL's JEDI Wind and JEDI Coal models.

  15. SGP CART Site Affected by Ice Storm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Gulf of Mexico. A cold, shallow air mass already over Oklahoma and Kansas set up a temperature inversion in the atmosphere, with warmer air temperatures aloft than at ground...

  16. How loads affect coiled tubing life

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, E.J. Inc., AK )

    1992-01-01

    Fatigue testing was performed on 1-3/4-in OD, 0.125 in. wall thickness (WT) coiled tubing using a standard coiled tubing unit (CTU) as shown in this paper. Testing was conducted under Prudhoe Bay, Alaska oil well, conditions to determine the effects of axial load, internal pressure and bending stress on the longevity, or usable running footage, that can be expected with larger diameter tubing. The CTU was rigged up in a standard configuration with injector head 50 ft off the ground, the worst case for bending on most currently available North Slope units. Internal pressure was supplied by a small triplex pump and the end of tubing was closed off with a fishing neck and bull plug. Weight, for the first four tests, was suspended from the coiled tubing by a special clamp. The tubing was cycled up and over the guide arch until a loss of internal coiled tubing pressure (CTP) occurred, or until the tubing became stuck in the stripper brass.

  17. Relicensing and Environmental Issues Affecting Hydropower

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1998-01-01

    This article presents an overview of the hydropower industry and summarizes two recent events that have greatly influenced relicensing and environmental issues.

  18. Analysis of Transportation and Logistics Challenges Affecting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Technologies that enable larger wind turbines on taller towers create opportunities for ... of "no hazard" from the FAA for installations of turbines slightly taller than 500 ft. ...

  19. How temperature and pressure affect clear brines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hubbard, J.T.

    1984-04-01

    The correct application of the expansivity and compressibility of brine fluids under the influence of temperature and pressure is needed to calculate the actual hydrostatic pressure in a well. Well operations can benefit by reducing unintentional overbalance, lessening fluid losses, and lowering recommended fluid densities, hence reducing fluid costs. Since the early 1970s, the effects of temperature and pressure on the density of clear brine fluids have been questioned. As early as 1973, studies were started to define density loss with increased temperature in zinc bromide brines. This article describes a continuing study, begun in 1978, which has characterized the expansivity and compressibility of single salt brine solutions, such as are used in workover and completion fluids.

  20. How Changing Energy Markets Affect Manufacturing

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01

    The market for natural gas has been changing for quite some time. As part of natural gas restructuring, gas pipelines were opened to multiple users. Manufacturers or their representatives could go directly to the wellhead to purchase their natural gas, arrange the transportation, and have the natural gas delivered either by the local distribution company or directly through a connecting pipeline.

  1. Reformulated Gasoline Market Affected Refiners Differently, 1995

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1996-01-01

    This article focuses on the costs of producing reformulated gasoline (RFG) as experienced by different types of refiners and on how these refiners fared this past summer, given the prices for RFG at the refinery gate.

  2. Adequacy of bonds to ensure reclamation of surface mines. Hearing before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Government Operations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, June 26, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Jed Christensen, Director of the Office of Surface Mining's Reclamation and Enforcement Department, and Michael Gryschowiec of the General Accounting Office (GAO) were the principal witnesses at a hearing held to examine the effects of Section 509 of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977. At issue was the bonding program and unhappiness on the part of landowners who want their land restored and coal operators who are having difficulty obtaining bonds for reclamation. Gryschowiec described the GAO's review of the bonding system for funding reclamation, and its finding that existing bonds are inadequate. Christensen focused his testimony on efforts to improve the bonding process, including a bond estimating handbook, extensive oversight of State bonding and permitting procedures, and evaluation of the bond pooling system. Correspondence and statements submitted for the record follow the testimony.

  3. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin activates the aryl hydrocarbon receptor and alters sex steroid hormone secretion without affecting growth of mouse antral follicles in vitro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karman, Bethany N., E-mail: bklement@illinois.edu; Basavarajappa, Mallikarjuna S., E-mail: mbshivapur@gmail.com; Craig, Zelieann R., E-mail: zelieann@illinois.edu; Flaws, Jodi A., E-mail: jflaws@illinois.edu

    2012-05-15

    The persistent environmental contaminant, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is an ovarian toxicant. These studies were designed to characterize the actions of TCDD on steroidogenesis and growth of intact mouse antral follicles in vitro. Specifically, these studies tested the hypothesis that TCDD exposure leads to decreased sex hormone production/secretion by antral follicles as well as decreased growth of antral follicles in vitro. Since TCDD acts through binding to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), and the AHR has been identified as an important factor in ovarian function, we also conducted experiments to confirm the presence and activation of the AHR in our tissue culture system. To do so, we exposed mouse antral follicles for 96 h to a series of TCDD doses previously shown to have effects on ovarian tissues and cells in culture, which also encompass environmentally relevant and pharmacological exposures (0.1100 nM), to determine a dose response for TCDD in our culture system for growth, hormone production, and expression of the Ahr and Cyp1b1. The results indicate that TCDD decreases progesterone, androstenedione, testosterone, and estradiol levels in a non-monotonic dose response manner without altering growth of antral follicles. The addition of pregnenolone substrate (10 ?M) restores hormone levels to control levels. Additionally, Cyp1b1 levels were increased by 34 fold regardless of the dose of TCDD exposure, evidence of AHR activation. Overall, these data indicate that TCDD may act prior to pregnenolone formation and through AHR transcriptional control of Cyp1b1, leading to decreased hormone levels without affecting growth of antral follicles. -- Highlights: ?TCDD disrupts sex steroid hormone levels, but not growth of antral follicles. ?Pregnenolone co-treatment by-passes TCDD-induced steroid hormone disruption. ?TCDD affects steroid hormone levels through an AHR pathway in antral follicles.

  4. Subtle Changes in Peptide Conformation Profoundly Affect Recognition of the Non-Classical MHC Class I Molecule HLA-E by the CD94?NKG2 Natural Killer Cell Receptors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoare, Hilary L.; Sullivan, Lucy C.; Clements, Craig S.; Ely, Lauren K.; Beddoe, Travis; Henderson, Kate N.; Lin, Jie; Reid, Hugh H.; Brooks, Andrew G.; Rossjohn, Jamie

    2008-03-31

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-E is a non-classical major histocompatibility complex class I molecule that binds peptides derived from the leader sequences of other HLA class I molecules. Natural killer cell recognition of these HLA-E molecules, via the CD94-NKG2 natural killer family, represents a central innate mechanism for monitoring major histocompatibility complex expression levels within a cell. The leader sequence-derived peptides bound to HLA-E exhibit very limited polymorphism, yet subtle differences affect the recognition of HLA-E by the CD94-NKG2 receptors. To better understand the basis for this peptide-specific recognition, we determined the structure of HLA-E in complex with two leader peptides, namely, HLA-Cw*07 (VMAPRALLL), which is poorly recognised by CD94-NKG2 receptors, and HLA-G*01 (VMAPRTLFL), a high-affinity ligand of CD94-NKG2 receptors. A comparison of these structures, both of which were determined to 2.5-{angstrom} resolution, revealed that allotypic variations in the bound leader sequences do not result in conformational changes in the HLA-E heavy chain, although subtle changes in the conformation of the peptide within the binding groove of HLA-E were evident. Accordingly, our data indicate that the CD94-NKG2 receptors interact with HLA-E in a manner that maximises the ability of the receptors to discriminate between subtle changes in both the sequence and conformation of peptides bound to HLA-E.

  5. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in North Carolina. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    Under the Public Utilities Act of 1965, utilities in North Carolina are regulated by the State's Utility Commission. The Commission consists of seven members who are appointed by the governor, subject to confirmation by the General Assembly sitting in joint session. The Commissioners serve eight year terms and the governor designates one of the commissioners as chairman. The Commission has an office of the executive director, who is appointed to a six year term by the governor subject to confirmaion by the General Assembly. The executive director heads the Commission's public staff. The public staff's duties include reviewing, investigating, and making recommendations on utility rates and services and intervention on behalf of the public in proceedings affecting consumer rates and generating plant certification. The Commission has the same power to regulate the operation of privately-owned public utilities within municipalities as it has to control those ouside. The only power over privately-owned utilities reserved to the municipalities is the power to grant franchises. A municipality may maintain its own utility systems, and such systems are not subject to the control and jurisdiction of the Commission. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  6. Direct Observations of the (Alpha to Gamma) Transformation at Different Input Powers in the Heat Affected Zone of 1045 C-Mn Steel Arc Welds Observed by Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, T A; Elmer, J W

    2005-03-16

    Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (SRXRD) experiments have been performed during Gas Tungsten Arc (GTA) welding of AISI 1045 C-Mn steel at input powers ranging from 1000 W to 3750 W. In situ diffraction patterns taken at discreet locations across the width of the heat affected zone (HAZ) near the peak of the heating cycle in each weld show regions containing austenite ({gamma}), ferrite and austenite ({alpha}+{gamma}), and ferrite ({alpha}). Changes in input power have a demonstrated effect on the resulting sizes of these regions. The largest effect is on the {gamma} phase region, which nearly triples in width with increasing input power, while the width of the surrounding two phase {alpha}+{gamma} region remains relatively constant. An analysis of the diffraction patterns obtained across this range of locations allows the formation of austenite from the base metal microstructure to be monitored. After the completion of the {alpha} {yields} {gamma} transformation, a splitting of the austenite peaks is observed at temperatures between approximately 860 C and 1290 C. This splitting in the austenite peaks results from the dissolution of cementite laths originally present in the base metal pearlite, which remain after the completion of the {alpha} {yields} {gamma} transformation, and represents the formation of a second more highly alloyed austenite constituent. With increasing temperatures, carbon, originally present in the cementite laths, diffuses from the second newly formed austenite constituent to the original austenite constituent. Eventually, a homogeneous austenitic microstructure is produced at temperatures of approximately 1300 C and above, depending on the weld input power.

  7. Repeated in utero and lactational 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin exposure affects male gonads in offspring, leading to sex ratio changes in F{sub 2} progeny

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ikeda, Masahiko [University of Shizuoka, Graduate School of Nutritional and Environmental Sciences, 52-1, Yada, Shizuoka, 422 8526 (Japan) and CREST, Japan Science and Technology Corporation, Kawaguchi, 332-0012 (Japan)]. E-mail: ikedam@ys2.u-shizuoka-ken.ac.jp; Tamura, Masashi [University of Shizuoka, Graduate School of Nutritional and Environmental Sciences, 52-1, Yada, Shizuoka, 422 8526 (Japan); Yamashita, Junko [University of Shizuoka, Graduate School of Nutritional and Environmental Sciences, 52-1, Yada, Shizuoka, 422 8526 (Japan); Suzuki, Chinatsu [University of Shizuoka, Graduate School of Nutritional and Environmental Sciences, 52-1, Yada, Shizuoka, 422 8526 (Japan); Tomita, Takako [University of Shizuoka, Graduate School of Nutritional and Environmental Sciences, 52-1, Yada, Shizuoka, 422 8526 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Corporation, Kawaguchi, 332-0012 (Japan)

    2005-08-15

    The effects of in utero and lactational 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) on the reproductive system of male rat offspring (F{sub 1}) and the sex ratio of the subsequent generation (F{sub 2}) were examined. Female Holtzman rats were gavaged with an initial loading dose of 400 ng/kg TCDD prior to mating, followed by weekly maintenance doses of 80 ng/kg during mating, pregnancy, and the lactation period. Maternal exposure to TCDD had no significant effects on fetus/pup (F{sub 1}) mortality, litter size, or sex ratio on gestation day (GD) 20 or postnatal day (PND) 2. The TCDD concentration in maternal livers and adipose tissue on GD20 was 1.21 and 1.81 ng/kg, respectively, and decreased at weaning to 0.72 in the liver and 0.84 in the adipose tissue. In contrast, the TCDD concentration in pup livers was 1.32 ng/kg on PND2 and increased to 1.80 ng/kg at weaning. Ventral prostate weight of male offspring was significantly decreased by TCDD exposure on PND28 and 120 compared with that of controls. Weight of the testes, cauda epididymides, and seminal vesicle, and sperm number in the cauda epididymis were not changed by TCDD exposure at PND120. TCDD- or vehicle-exposed male offspring were mated with unexposed females. The sex ratio (percentage of male pups) of F{sub 2} offspring was significantly reduced in the TCDD-exposed group compared with controls. These results suggest that in utero and lactational TCDD exposures affect the development of male gonads in offspring (F{sub 1}), leading to changes in the sex ratio of the subsequent generation (F{sub 2})

  8. Benzo[a]pyrene affects Jurkat T cells in the activated state via the antioxidant response element dependent Nrf2 pathway leading to decreased IL-2 secretion and redirecting glutamine metabolism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murugaiyan, Jayaseelan; Rockstroh, Maxie; Wagner, Juliane; Baumann, Sven; Schorsch, Katrin; Trump, Saskia; Lehmann, Irina; Bergen, Martin von; Tomm, Janina M.

    2013-06-15

    There is a clear evidence that environmental pollutants, such as benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), can have detrimental effects on the immune system, whereas the underlying mechanisms still remain elusive. Jurkat T cells share many properties with native T lymphocytes and therefore are an appropriate model to analyze the effects of environmental pollutants on T cells and their activation. Since environmental compounds frequently occur at low, not acute toxic concentrations, we analyzed the effects of two subtoxic concentrations, 50 nM and 5 ?M, on non- and activated cells. B[a]P interferes directly with the stimulation process as proven by an altered IL-2 secretion. Furthermore, B[a]P exposure results in significant proteomic changes as shown by DIGE analysis. Pathway analysis revealed an involvement of the AhR independent Nrf2 pathway in the altered processes observed in unstimulated and stimulated cells. A participation of the Nrf2 pathway in the change of IL-2 secretion was confirmed by exposing cells to the Nrf2 activator tBHQ. tBHQ and 5 ?M B[a]P caused similar alterations of IL-2 secretion and glutamine/glutamate metabolism. Moreover, the proteome changes in unstimulated cells point towards a modified regulation of the cytoskeleton and cellular stress response, which was proven by western blotting. Additionally, there is a strong evidence for alterations in metabolic pathways caused by B[a]P exposure in stimulated cells. Especially the glutamine/glutamate metabolism was indicated by proteome pathway analysis and validated by metabolite measurements. The detrimental effects were slightly enhanced in stimulated cells, suggesting that stimulated cells are more vulnerable to the environmental pollutant model compound B[a]P. - Highlights: B[a]P affects the proteome of Jurkat T cells also at low concentrations. Exposure to B[a]P (50 nM, 5 ?M) did not change Jurkat T cell viability. Both B[a]P concentrations altered the IL-2 secretion of stimulated cells. 608 different protein spots of Jurkat T cells were quantified using 2-DE-DIGE. Pathway analysis identified Nrf2 and AhR pathway as regulated.

  9. H. UNREVIEWED SAFETY QUESTIONS

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 Department of Energy Pt. 835 H. UNREVIEWED SAFETY QUESTIONS 1. The USQ process is an important tool to evaluate whether changes affect the safety basis. A contractor must use the USQ proc- ess to ensure that the safety basis for a DOE nuclear facility is not undermined by changes in the facility, the work performed, the associated hazards, or other factors that support the adequacy of the safety basis. 2. The USQ process permits a contractor to make physical and procedural changes to a nuclear

  10. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix J: Recreation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Columbia River System Operation Review

    1995-11-01

    This Appendix J of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System discusses impacts on the recreational activities in the region. Major sections include the following: scope and processes; recreation in the Columbia River Basin today - by type, location, participation, user characteristics, factors which affect usage, and managing agencies; recreation analysis procedures and methodology; and alternatives and their impacts.

  11. Computer-Based Procedures for Field Workers in Nuclear Power Plants: Development of a Model of Procedure Usage and Identification of Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katya Le Blanc; Johanna Oxstrand

    2012-04-01

    The nuclear industry is constantly trying to find ways to decrease the human error rate, especially the human errors associated with procedure use. As a step toward the goal of improving procedure use performance, researchers, together with the nuclear industry, have been looking at replacing the current paper-based procedures with computer-based procedure systems. The concept of computer-based procedures is not new by any means; however most research has focused on procedures used in the main control room. Procedures reviewed in these efforts are mainly emergency operating procedures and normal operating procedures. Based on lessons learned for these previous efforts we are now exploring a more unknown application for computer based procedures - field procedures, i.e. procedures used by nuclear equipment operators and maintenance technicians. The Idaho National Laboratory and participants from the U.S. commercial nuclear industry are collaborating in an applied research effort with the objective of developing requirements and specifications for a computer-based procedure system to be used by field workers. The goal is to identify the types of human errors that can be mitigated by using computer-based procedures and how to best design the computer-based procedures to do so. This paper describes the development of a Model of Procedure Use and the qualitative study on which the model is based. The study was conducted in collaboration with four nuclear utilities and five research institutes. During the qualitative study and the model development requirements and for computer-based procedures were identified.

  12. High-volume, high-value usage of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) by-products in underground mines Phase 1: Laboratory investigations. Quarterly report, July 1994--September 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-01

    During the quarter a second series of samples were collected and partially characterized chemically and mineralogically. The samples were collected at the disposal site operated by Freeman United Coal Co. The second collection was necessary because of deterioration due to hydration of the original samples. A study of the hydration characteristics was completed during the quarter. Important reactions included the immediate formation of ettringite and portlandite. The hydration and transformation was found to be a slow process. A second phase of gypsum formation from ettringite deterioration was identified. The slow hydration of anhydrite with its resultant swell is a potential problem which will be addressed further. Geotechnical characterization, during the quarter included completion of the preliminary characterization, analysis of the findings, experimentation with sample preparation for the final characterization/mix design, and design of the final experimental program. The analysis of the coals collected during the core drilling and hydrologic planning were completed. Also during the quarter a meeting was held with representatives of the shotcrete industry to discuss transport systems for emplacement. The pros and cons of pneumatic and hydraulic systems were discussed and plans formulated for further investigations.

  13. Design of Electric Drive Vehicle Batteries for Long Life and Low Cost: Robustness to Geographic and Consumer-Usage Variation (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, K.; Markel, T.; Kim, G. H.; Pesaran, A.

    2010-10-01

    This presentation describes a battery optimization and trade-off analysis for Li-ion batteries used in EVs and PHEVs to extend their life and/or reduce cost.

  14. Identification and Control of Factors that Affect EGR Cooler...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    cause exhaust gas recirculation cooler fouling were identified through extensive literature search and controlled experiment was devised to study the impact of a few key...

  15. Reheating dynamics affects non-perturbative decay of spectator fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enqvist, Kari; Lerner, Rose N.; Rusak, Stanislav E-mail: rose.lerner@helsinki.fi

    2013-11-01

    The behaviour of oscillating scalar spectator fields after inflation depends on the thermal background produced by inflaton decay. Resonant decay of the spectator is often blocked by large induced thermal masses. We account for the finite decay width of the inflaton and the protracted build-up of the thermal bath to determine the early evolution of a homogeneous spectator field ? coupled to the Higgs Boson ? through the term g{sup 2}?{sup 2}?{sup 2}, the only renormalisable coupling of a new scalar to the Standard Model. We find that for very large higgs-spectator coupling g?>10{sup ?3}, the resonance is not always blocked as was previously suggested. As a consequence, the oscillating spectator can decay quickly. For other parameter values, we find that although qualitative features of the thermal blocking still hold, the dynamics are altered compared to the instant decay case. These findings are important for curvaton models, where the oscillating field must be relatively long lived in order to produce the curvature perturbation. They are also relevant for other spectator fields, which must decay sufficiently early to avoid spoiling the predictions of baryogenesis and nucleosynthesis.

  16. Fact #890: September 14, 2015 Gasoline Prices Are Affected by...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3.517 3.566 4.072 4.208 May 26, 2014 3.796 3.807 3.712 3.708 3.512 3.563 4.061 4.184 Jun 02, 2014 3.793 3.800 3.695 3.771 3.517 3.563 4.062 4.176 Jun 09, 2014 3.792 3.798 3.674...

  17. Factors affecting coking pressures in tall coke ovens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grimley, J.J.; Radley, C.E.

    1995-12-01

    The detrimental effects of excessive coking pressures, resulting in the permanent deformation of coke oven walls, have been recognized for many years. Considerable research has been undertaken worldwide in attempts to define the limits within which a plant may safely operate and to quantify the factors which influence these pressures. Few full scale techniques are available for assessing the potential of a coal blend for causing wall damage. Inference of dangerous swelling pressures may be made however by the measurement of the peak gas pressure which is generated as the plastic layers meet and coalesce at the center of the oven. This pressure is referred to in this report as the carbonizing pressure. At the Dawes Lane cokemaking plant of British Steel`s Scunthorpe Works, a large database has been compiled over several years from the regulator measurement of this pressure. This data has been statistically analyzed to provide a mathematical model for predicting the carbonizing pressure from the properties of the component coals, the results of this analysis are presented in this report.

  18. Control of mechanically activated polymersome fusion: Factors affecting fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, Ian M.; Paxton, Walter F.

    2014-12-15

    Previously we have studied the mechanically-activated fusion of extruded (200 nm) polymer vesicles into giant polymersomes using agitation in the presence of salt. In this study we have investigated several factors contributing to this phenomenon, including the effects of (i) polymer vesicle concentration, (ii) agitation speed and duration, and iii) variation of the salt and its concentration. It was found that increasing the concentration of the polymer dramatically increases the production of giant vesicles through the increased collisions of polymersomes. Our investigations also found that increasing the frequency of agitation increased the efficiency of fusion, though ultimately limited the size of vesicle which could be produced due to the high shear involved. Finally it was determined that salt-mediation of the fusion process was not limited to NaCl, but is instead a general effect facilitated by the presence of solvated ionic compounds, albeit with different salts initiating fusion at different concentration.

  19. Control of mechanically activated polymersome fusion: Factors affecting fusion

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Henderson, Ian M.; Paxton, Walter F.

    2014-12-15

    Previously we have studied the mechanically-activated fusion of extruded (200 nm) polymer vesicles into giant polymersomes using agitation in the presence of salt. In this study we have investigated several factors contributing to this phenomenon, including the effects of (i) polymer vesicle concentration, (ii) agitation speed and duration, and iii) variation of the salt and its concentration. It was found that increasing the concentration of the polymer dramatically increases the production of giant vesicles through the increased collisions of polymersomes. Our investigations also found that increasing the frequency of agitation increased the efficiency of fusion, though ultimately limited the sizemore » of vesicle which could be produced due to the high shear involved. Finally it was determined that salt-mediation of the fusion process was not limited to NaCl, but is instead a general effect facilitated by the presence of solvated ionic compounds, albeit with different salts initiating fusion at different concentration.« less

  20. Mercury control challenge for industrial boiler MACT affected facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-09-15

    An industrial coal-fired boiler facility conducted a test program to evaluate the effectiveness of sorbent injection on mercury removal ahead of a fabric filter with an inlet flue gas temperature of 375{sup o}F. The results of the sorbent injection testing are essentially inconclusive relative to providing the facility with enough data upon which to base the design and implementation of permanent sorbent injection system(s). The mercury removal performance of the sorbents was significantly less than expected. The data suggests that 50 percent mercury removal across a baghouse with flue gas temperatures at or above 375{sup o}F and containing moderate levels of SO{sub 3} may be very difficult to achieve with activated carbon sorbent injection alone. The challenge many coal-fired industrial facilities may face is the implementation of additional measures beyond sorbent injection to achieve high levels of mercury removal that will likely be required by the upcoming new Industrial Boiler MACT rule. To counter the negative effects of high flue gas temperature on mercury removal with sorbents, it may be necessary to retrofit additional boiler heat transfer surface or spray cooling of the flue gas upstream of the baghouse. Furthermore, to counter the negative effect of moderate or high SO{sub 3} levels in the flue gas on mercury removal, it may be necessary to also inject sorbents, such as trona or hydrated lime, to reduce the SO{sub 3} concentrations in the flue gas. 2 refs., 1 tab.

  1. Identifying How Marine and Hydrokinetic Devices Affect Aquatic Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, G. F.; Copping, Andrea E.; Roberts, Jesse

    2011-04-24

    Significant research is under way to determine the potential environmental effects of marine and hydrokinetic energy systems. This research, being guided and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, is intended to address knowledge gaps and facilitate installation and operation of these systems.

  2. affects on the transport of airborne emissions. This information...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Precipitation, barometric pressure, and solar radiation Vertical temperature gradient ... Direction (deg) Peak I-sec Gust (mls) - - Solar Radiation ( m d a ) Mean Daily ...

  3. Site-Selective Ionization in Nanoclusters Affects Subsequent...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    graphene sheets. Researchers from Western Michigan University, Berkeley Lab, and other international research facilities investigated charge-transfer processes and subsequent...

  4. Factors affecting the remotely sensed response of coniferous forest plantations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danson, F.M. ); Curran, P.J. )

    1993-01-01

    Remote sensing of forest biophysical properties has concentrated upon forest sites with a wide range of green vegetation amount and thereby leaf area index and canopy cover. However, coniferous forest plantations, an important forest type in Europe, are managed to maintain a large amount of green vegetation with little spatial variation. Therefore, the strength of the remotely sensed signal will, it is hypothesized, be determined more by the structure of this forest than by its cover. Airborne Thematic Mapper (ATM) and SPOT-1 HRV data were used to determine the effects of this structural variation on the remotely sensed response of a coniferous forest plantation in the United Kingdom. Red and near infrared radiance were strongly and negatively correlated with a range of structural properties and with the age of the stands but weakly correlated with canopy cover. A composite variable, related to the volume of the canopy, accounted for over 75% of the variation in near infrared radiance. A simple model that related forest structural variables to the remotely sensed response was used to understand and explain this response from a coniferous forest plantation.

  5. Economic Conditions and Factors Affecting New Nuclear Power Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, Thomas J.

    2014-10-01

    This report documents work performed in support of the US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Advanced Small Modular Reactor (AdvSMR) program. The report presents information and results from economic analyses to describe current electricity market conditions and those key factors that may impact the deployment of AdvSMRs or any other new nuclear power plants. Thus, this report serves as a reference document for DOE as it moves forward with its plans to develop advanced reactors, including AdvSMRs. For the purpose of this analysis, information on electricity markets and nuclear power plant operating costs will be combined to examine the current state of the nuclear industry and the process required to successfully move forward with new nuclear power in general and AdvSMRs in particular. The current electricity market is generally unfavorable to new nuclear construction, especially in deregulated markets with heavy competition from natural gas and subsidized renewables. The successful and profitable operation of a nuclear power plant (or any power plant) requires the rate at which the electricity is sold to be sufficiently greater than the cost to operate. The wholesale rates in most US markets have settled into values that provide profits for most operating nuclear power plants but are too low to support the added cost of capital recovery for new nuclear construction. There is a strong geographic dependence on the wholesale rate, with some markets currently able to support new nuclear construction. However, there is also a strong geographic dependence on pronuclear public opinion; the areas where power prices are high tend to have unfavorable views on the construction of new nuclear power plants. The use of government-backed incentives, such as subsidies, can help provide a margin to help justify construction projects that otherwise may not seem viable. Similarly, low interest rates for the project will also add a positive margin to the economic analysis. In both cases, the profitable price point is decreased, making more markets open to profitable entry. Overall, the economic attractiveness of a nuclear power construction project is not only a function of its own costs, but a function of the market into which it is deployed. Many of the market characteristics are out of the control of the potential nuclear power plant operators. The decision-making process for the power industry in general is complicated by the short-term market volatility in both the wholesale electricity market and the commodity (natural gas) market. Decisions based on market conditions today may be rendered null and void in six months. With a multiple-year lead time, nuclear power plants are acutely vulnerable to market corrections.

  6. Research Finds Vitamin D Deficiency Affects Bone Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the formation of new bone mass. In children, vitamin D deficiency can lead to rickets. In adults, vitamin D deficiency causes osteomalacia, a softening of the bones associated with...

  7. EO 13211: Regulations That Significantly Affect Energy Supply...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Distribution, or Use I am requiring that agencies shall prepare a Statement of Energy Effects when undertaking certain agency actions. As described more fully below, such...

  8. Analysis Of Factors Affecting Natural Source Slf Electromagnetic...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    The Super Low Frequency (SLF) electromagnetic exploration was performed by using a nature source SLF electromagnetic detector at two geothermal wells in Peking University. The...

  9. Regression analysis of technical parameters affecting nuclear power plant performances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghazy, R.; Ricotti, M. E.; Trueco, P.

    2012-07-01

    Since the 80's many studies have been conducted in order to explicate good and bad performances of commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs), but yet no defined correlation has been found out to be totally representative of plant operational experience. In early works, data availability and the number of operating power stations were both limited; therefore, results showed that specific technical characteristics of NPPs were supposed to be the main causal factors for successful plant operation. Although these aspects keep on assuming a significant role, later studies and observations showed that other factors concerning management and organization of the plant could instead be predominant comparing utilities operational and economic results. Utility quality, in a word, can be used to summarize all the managerial and operational aspects that seem to be effective in determining plant performance. In this paper operational data of a consistent sample of commercial nuclear power stations, out of the total 433 operating NPPs, are analyzed, mainly focusing on the last decade operational experience. The sample consists of PWR and BWR technology, operated by utilities located in different countries, including U.S. (Japan)) (France)) (Germany)) and Finland. Multivariate regression is performed using Unit Capability Factor (UCF) as the dependent variable; this factor reflects indeed the effectiveness of plant programs and practices in maximizing the available electrical generation and consequently provides an overall indication of how well plants are operated and maintained. Aspects that may not be real causal factors but which can have a consistent impact on the UCF, as technology design, supplier, size and age, are included in the analysis as independent variables. (authors)

  10. The microbe-mediated mechanisms affecting topsoil carbon stock...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. Warming has been shown to cause soil carbon (C) loss in...

  11. Financial Incentives Available for Facilities that are Affected...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    US EPA "National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Major Sources: Industrial, Commercial, and Institutional Boilers and Process Heaters; Proposed Rule" December...

  12. Induction frequency affects cortico-striatal synaptic plasticity...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SAND2014-18960J 540597 DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Elsevier (www.elsevier.com) - Journal Publishing Company...

  13. Consideration of Factors Affecting Strip Effluent PH and Sodium Content

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.

    2015-07-29

    A number of factors were investigated to determine possible reasons for why the Strip Effluent (SE) can sometimes have higher than expected pH values and/or sodium content, both of which have prescribed limits. All of the factors likely have some impact on the pH values and Na content.

  14. Reassessment of selected factors affecting siting of Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, R.E.; Hanson, A.L.; Mubayi, V.; Nourbakhsh, H.P.

    1997-02-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has performed a series of probabilistic consequence assessment calculations for nuclear reactor siting. This study takes into account recent insights into severe accident source terms and examines consequences in a risk based format consistent with the quantitative health objectives (QHOs) of the NRC`s Safety Goal Policy. Simplified severe accident source terms developed in this study are based on the risk insights of NUREG-1150. The results of the study indicate that both the quantity of radioactivity released in a severe accident as well as the likelihood of a release are lower than those predicted in earlier studies. The accident risks using the simplified source terms are examined at a series of generic plant sites, that vary in population distribution, meteorological conditions, and exclusion area boundary distances. Sensitivity calculations are performed to evaluate the effects of emergency protective action assumptions on the risk of prompt fatality and latent cancers fatality, and population relocation. The study finds that based on the new source terms the prompt and latent fatality risks at all generic sites meet the QHOs of the NRC`s Safety Goal Policy by margins ranging from one to more than three orders of magnitude. 4 refs., 17 figs., 24 tabs.

  15. FCV Learning Demonstration: Factors Affecting Fuel Cell Degradation (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, J.; Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.

    2008-06-18

    Presentation on the NREL Fuel Cell Vehicle learning demonstration prepared for the 2008 ASME Fuel Cell Conference.

  16. TIMESCALES ON WHICH STAR FORMATION AFFECTS THE NEUTRAL INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stilp, Adrienne M.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Warren, Steven R.; Skillman, Evan; Ott, Juergen; Dolphin, Andrew E.

    2013-08-01

    Turbulent neutral hydrogen (H I) line widths are often thought to be driven primarily by star formation (SF), but the timescale for converting SF energy to H I kinetic energy is unclear. As a complication, studies on the connection between H I line widths and SF in external galaxies often use broadband tracers for the SF rate, which must implicitly assume that SF histories (SFHs) have been constant over the timescale of the tracer. In this paper, we compare measures of H I energy to time-resolved SFHs in a number of nearby dwarf galaxies. We find that H I energy surface density is strongly correlated only with SF that occurred 30-40 Myr ago. This timescale corresponds to the approximate lifetime of the lowest mass supernova progenitors ({approx}8 M{sub Sun }). This analysis suggests that the coupling between SF and the neutral interstellar medium is strongest on this timescale, due either to an intrinsic delay between the release of the peak energy from SF or to the coherent effects of many supernova explosions during this interval. At {Sigma}{sub SFR} > 10{sup -3} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}, we find a mean coupling efficiency between SF energy and H I energy of {epsilon} = 0.11 {+-} 0.04 using the 30-40 Myr timescale. However, unphysical efficiencies are required in lower {Sigma}{sub SFR} systems, implying that SF is not the primary driver of H I kinematics at {Sigma}{sub SFR} < 10{sup -3} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}.

  17. Examining How Radiative Fluxes Are Affected by Cloud and Particle...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    the Earth will change as emissions from fossil fuel combustion change, climate models calculate a complex and changing mix of clouds and emissions that interact with solar energy. ...

  18. Key Parameters Affecting DPF Performance Degradation and Impact...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Characteristics and Effects of Lubricant Additive Chemistry and Exhaust Conditions on ... Experiments on the Effects of LubricantAdditive (Low-Ash, Ashless) Characteristics on ...

  19. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Subject: 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY ... COST; GOVERNMENT POLICIES; IMPLEMENTATION; OWNERSHIP; POWER GENERATION; STATE ...

  20. One in five online scholarly articles affected by 'reference...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    content drift to which references to web resources included in STM articles are subject. ... "For more than 70 percent of papers that link to web pages, revisiting the originally ...

  1. Gut microbes affect circadian rhythms in mice, study says | Argonne...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    was supported by the National Institute of Health's (NIH) National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; the Peter and Carol Goldman Family Research Fund;...

  2. How Does Wind Affect Coal? Cycling, Emissions, and Costs (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lew, D.; Brinkman, G.; Milligan, M.

    2011-05-01

    This presentation describes in general fashion what the emissions and economic impacts of wind power generation on fossil power plants looks like and also offers some mitigation ideas.

  3. Agriculture-related radiation dose calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furr, J.M.; Mayberry, J.J.; Waite, D.A.

    1987-10-01

    Estimates of radiation dose to the public must be made at each stage in the identification and qualification process leading to siting a high-level nuclear waste repository. Specifically considering the ingestion pathway, this paper examines questions of reliability and adequacy of dose calculations in relation to five stages of data availability (geologic province, region, area, location, and mass balance) and three methods of calculation (population, population/food production, and food production driven). Calculations were done using the model PABLM with data for the Permian and Palo Duro Basins and the Deaf Smith County area. Extra effort expended in gathering agricultural data at succeeding environmental characterization levels does not appear justified, since dose estimates do not differ greatly; that effort would be better spent determining usage of food types that contribute most to the total dose; and that consumption rate and the air dispersion factor are critical to assessment of radiation dose via the ingestion pathway. 17 refs., 9 figs., 32 tabs.

  4. Environmental assessment for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Big Hill facility storage of commercial crude oil project, Jefferson County, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-03-01

    The Big Hill SPR facility located in Jefferson County, Texas has been a permitted operating crude oil storage site since 1986 with benign environmental impacts. However, Congress has not authorized crude oil purchases for the SPR since 1990, and six storage caverns at Big Hill are underutilized with 70 million barrels of available storage capacity. On February 17, 1999, the Secretary of Energy offered the 70 million barrels of available storage at Big Hill for commercial use. Interested commercial users would enter into storage contracts with DOE, and DOE would receive crude oil in lieu of dollars as rental fees. The site could potentially began to receive commercial oil in May 1999. This Environmental Assessment identified environmental changes that potentially would affect water usage, power usage, and air emissions. However, as the assessment indicates, changes would not occur to a major degree affecting the environment and no long-term short-term, cumulative or irreversible impacts have been identified.

  5. A primer on the energy efficiency of computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koomey, Jonathan G.

    2015-03-30

    The efficiency of computing at peak output has increased rapidly since the dawn of the computer age. This paper summarizes some of the key factors affecting the efficiency of computing in all usage modes. While there is still great potential for improving the efficiency of computing devices, we will need to alter how we do computing in the next few decades because we are finally approaching the limits of current technologies.

  6. Model for Sustainable Urban Design With Expanded Sections on Distributed

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Resources, February 2004 | Department of Energy Model for Sustainable Urban Design With Expanded Sections on Distributed Energy Resources, February 2004 Model for Sustainable Urban Design With Expanded Sections on Distributed Energy Resources, February 2004 U.S. cities and towns now account for over 80% of our national energy usage and urban development patterns affect approximately 70% of that consumption. This document describes a model design for urban development and redevelopment

  7. Release of organic chelating agents from solidified decontamination wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piciulo, P.L.; Adams, J.W.; Milian, L.W.

    1986-01-01

    In order to provide technical information needed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to evaluate the adequacy of near-surface disposal of decontamination wastes, Brookhaven National Laboratory has measured the release of organic complexing agents from simulated decontamination resin wastes solidified in cement and vinyl ester-styrene. The simulated waste consisted of either mixed bed ion-exchange resins or anion exchange resins equilibrated with EDTA, oxalic acid, citric acid, picolinic acid, formic acid, simulated LOMI reagent or the LND-101A decontamination reagent. The standard procedure ANS 16.1 appeared to be adequate for determining a leachability index for organic acids for comparing the leach resistance of decontamination waste forms. Leachability indexes appeared to be specific for each organic acid. Further, the apparent diffusivities were generally less than those observed for Cs releases from cement wastes forms. The finder material and the composition of the simulated wastes affected the release of the reagents.

  8. BWR/4 loss of feedwater transient analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, M.S.; Levine, M.M.; Shier, W.G.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of a series of loss of feedwater (LOF) transients for a typical BWR/4 reactor. These calculations were prompted by the events that occurred during the TMI incident and hence include various assumed failures in the safety/relief valve system and the assumed inoperability of various safety systems. This analysis provides transient results necessary to evaluate the potential for core uncovery and excessive average fuel temperatures which can then be used in the evaluation of the adequacy of the engineered safety features and the plant operating procedures. The RELAP5/MOD1 computer code was used for this analysis. The version of the code is designated as Cycle 13 with additional modifications provided by INEL. The modifications affect the jet pump model, interphase drag model and separator model.

  9. Northeast United States U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the Northeast United States U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Energy Infrastructure Modeling and Analysis Division November 2013 Northeast U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Adequacy Assessment, 2013 2 Preface In 2005-06, the U.S. DOE Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) conducted a study on the adequacy of interstate natural gas pipeline capacity serving the northeastern

  10. DOE Announces Publication of Three Reports by the DOE Electricity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    address issues surrounding generation and transmission adequacy, energy efficiency and demand response, deployment of energy storage technologies, and deployment of smart grid...

  11. Enforcement Letter, Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC- March 17, 2008

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Issued to Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC, related to Procedural Adequacy and Adherence in Transuranic Waste Characterization and Shipping at the Idaho National Laboratory

  12. Summary of Decisions - October 29, 2012 - November 2, 2012 |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    denying a FOIA appeal (Appeal) of a determination issued by the DOE's Oak Ridge Office (ORO). The Appellant, the Advanced Technology Corporation, contested the adequacy of ORO's...

  13. FOIA Cases | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Jr. (Appellant) from a determination issued to him by the DOE's Oak Ridge Office (ORO). In the Appeal, the Appellant challenged the adequacy of the search for responsive...

  14. Summary - Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and surface water Hg remediation strategy for adequacy in reducing Hg levels in the fish and to indentify opportunities to achieve cost and technical improvements andor to...

  15. Southwestern Power Administration One West Third Street

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Power Administration (Southwestern) has completed its 2014 review of the continuing adequacy of the existing hydroelectric power rates for the Sam Rayburn Dam Hydropower Project. ...

  16. Southwestern Power Administration One West Third Street

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that Southwestern Power Administration (Southwestern) has completed its 2015 review of the continuing adequacy of the existing hydroelectric power rates for the Integrated System. ...

  17. Summary - WTP HLW Waste Vitrification Facility

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ( adequacy (W processing H corrosion res stainless ste Testing activ contacted wi halogens), s Testing the p blending liqu requirements established. maturity of certain key...

  18. Audit Letter Report: OAS-L-09-06 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the adequacy of its internal controls and determining whether they conform to the principles and standards established by the Office of Management and Budget and the Government...

  19. Revised RTG source term and dose rate shielding evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, H.J., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-31

    A source term was developed for the RTG and the adequacy with regards to shielding of the shipping container in which it will be transported was evaluated.

  20. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    the cycle of either rebuilding crude oil or refined products may continue. East Coast Propane Supply Situation Industry concern over the adequacy of propane supply in the East...

  1. Microsoft Word - Prelim Needs Assessment v 13 for publics.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Council's adequacy standard procedure, each utility is allotted a share of Independent Power Producer (IPP) generation, seasonal imports from out-of-the-region, and non-firm...

  2. Pre-Award Accounting System Survey

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PRE-AWARD ACCOUNTING SYSTEM SURVEY Applicant: Funding Opportunity AnnouncementSolicitation No.: This accounting system review is designed to determine the adequacy and suitability...

  3. Regulatory Considerations for Developing Generation Projects...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Coordinating Interstate ElectricTransmission Siting: An Introduction to the Debate DOE EAC Electricity Adequacy Report. Transmission Chapter DRAFT- September 18, 2008...

  4. Title 44 Part 60 Criteria for Land Management and Use | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Title 44 Part 60 Criteria for Land Management and UseLegal Abstract Sets forth the criteria by which the Federal Insurance Administrator will determine the adequacy...

  5. DOE Announces Publication of Three Reports by the DOE Electricity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    They address issues surrounding generation and transmission adequacy, energy efficiency and demand response, deployment of energy storage technologies, and deployment of smart grid ...

  6. BPA Resource Program, public workshop presentation, 3/17/08

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    need Adequacy constraints are used again later in process to screen candidate resource strategies (any strategy must first be adequate to address the need) Indicator measures of...

  7. RAPID/Roadmap/9-FD-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of information in the EIS or EA. question, with reasonable basis, the adequacy of, methodology for, or assumptions used for the environmental analysis. present new information...

  8. We Know the AFC Process

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    California Energy Commission Process DATA ADEQUACY *AFC Submitted *Adequacy Review EVENTS AFC ACCEPTED DISCOVERY *Informational Hearing/Site Visit *Data Request/Response *Public Workshops HEARINGS *Evidentiary Hearings *Adjudicatory Hearings ANALYSIS *Preliminary Staff Assessment (PSA) *Public Review Period *Preconference Hearing Workshop *Prehearing Conference *Final Staff Assessment (FSA) DECISION *Presiding Members Report *Public Review Revised (45 days) *Proposed Decision *Public Review

  9. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    found 4 items Energy Usage Remove Energy Usage filter Energy Literacy Principle 2 Remove Energy Literacy Principle 2 filter Consumption Remove Consumption filter Filter by...

  10. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Literacy Principle 2 Remove Energy Literacy Principle 2 filter Energy Usage Remove Energy Usage filter Consumption Remove Consumption filter Filter by Resource Type All...

  11. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Education & Training Remove Education & Training filter Energy Usage Remove Energy Usage filter High School (9-12) Teachers Remove High School (9-12) Teachers filter Filter by...

  12. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Education & Training Remove Education & Training filter Energy Usage Remove Energy Usage filter Middle School (6-8) Teachers Remove Middle School (6-8) Teachers filter Filter...

  13. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    eereeducationdownloadswatt-does-it-cost-use-it Current search Search found 1 item Energy Usage Remove Energy Usage filter Energy Economy Remove Energy Economy filter High...

  14. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    eereeducationdownloadswatt-does-it-cost-use-it Current search Search found 1 item Energy Usage Remove Energy Usage filter Education & Training Remove Education & Training...

  15. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Usage Remove Energy Usage filter Download Remove Download filter Water Remove Water filter Filter by Resource Type All Results (2) Lesson Plan (2) Filter by Topic: All...

  16. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Usage Remove Energy Usage filter Renewables Remove Renewables filter Water Remove Water filter Filter by Resource Type All Results (2) Lesson Plan (2) Filter by Topic: All...

  17. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    educationdownloadsenergy-production Current search Search found 1 item Water Remove Water filter Energy Usage Remove Energy Usage filter Energy Literacy Principle 4 Remove...

  18. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Current search Search found 1 item Energy Usage Remove Energy Usage filter Water Remove Water filter Energy Literacy Principle 4 Remove Energy Literacy Principle 4 filter Filter...

  19. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 item Energy Literacy Principle 4 Remove Energy Literacy Principle 4 filter Water Remove Water filter Energy Usage Remove Energy Usage filter Filter by Resource Type All Results...

  20. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Renewables Remove Renewables filter Energy Usage Remove Energy Usage filter Water Remove Water filter Filter by Resource Type All Results (2) Lesson Plan (2) Filter by Topic: All...

  1. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Search found 1 item Energy Usage Remove Energy Usage filter Bioenergy Remove Bioenergy filter Water Remove Water filter Filter by Resource Type All Results (1) Lesson Plan (1)...

  2. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Search found 1 item Bioenergy Remove Bioenergy filter Energy Usage Remove Energy Usage filter Water Remove Water filter Filter by Resource Type All Results (1) Lesson Plan (1)...

  3. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    found 3 items Energy Usage Remove Energy Usage filter Energy Literacy Principle 7 Remove Energy Literacy Principle 7 filter Consumption Remove Consumption filter Filter by...

  4. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Literacy Principle 7 Remove Energy Literacy Principle 7 filter Energy Usage Remove Energy Usage filter Consumption Remove Consumption filter Filter by Resource Type All...

  5. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    downloadselectrolysis-water Current search Search found 1 item Energy Usage Remove Energy Usage filter Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Remove Hydrogen & Fuel Cells filter Filter...

  6. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    based on bonus points earned for meeting the minimum requirements for certification as an Earth Advantage home, which includes an evaluation of energy usage, water usage, and air...

  7. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing ... Members","5 or More Members" "Lighting Usage Indicators" "Total U.S. Housing ...

  8. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ... in Buildings With--" "Lighting Usage Indicators",,"Detached","Attached"...

  9. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Lighting Usage Indicators by UrbanRural Location, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"UrbanRural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" "Lighting Usage ...

  10. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    y-electricity-consumption-and-efficiency Current search Search found 2 items Water Remove Water filter Energy Usage Remove Energy Usage filter Filter by Resource Type All Results...

  11. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Current search Search found 2 items Download Remove Download filter Water Remove Water filter Energy Usage Remove Energy Usage filter Filter by Resource Type All Results...

  12. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Download Remove Download filter Energy Usage Remove Energy Usage filter Water Remove Water filter Filter by Resource Type All Results (2) Lesson Plan (2) Filter by Topic: All...

  13. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Search found 1 item Energy Usage Remove Energy Usage filter Environmental Cleanup Remove Environmental Cleanup filter Science Education Remove Science Education filter Filter by...

  14. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    found 1 item Energy Usage Remove Energy Usage filter Science Education Remove Science Education filter Environmental Cleanup Remove Environmental Cleanup filter Filter by...

  15. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Current search Search found 2 items Energy Usage Remove Energy Usage filter Building Design Remove Building Design filter Filter by Resource Type All Results...

  16. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Search found 2 items Download Remove Download filter Energy Usage Remove Energy Usage filter Building Design Remove Building Design filter Filter by Resource Type All Results...

  17. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Advantage home, which includes an evaluation of energy usage, water usage, and air quality guidelines. Conservation features can also include passive solar design. Eligibility:...

  18. Chemical expansion affected oxygen vacancy stability in different oxide structures from first principles calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aidhy, Dilpuneet S.; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2015-03-01

    We study the chemical expansion for neutral and charged oxygen vacancies in fluorite, rocksalt, perovskite and pyrochlores materials using first principles calculations. We show that the neutral oxygen vacancy leads to lattice expansion whereas the charged vacancy leads to lattice contraction. In addition, we show that there is a window of strain within which an oxygen vacancy is stable; beyond that range, the vacancy can become unstable. Using CeO2|ZrO2 interface structure as an example, we show that the concentration of oxygen vacancies can be manipulated via strain, and the vacancies can be preferentially stabilized. These results could serve as guiding principles in predicting oxygen vacancy stability in strained systems and in the design of vacancy stabilized materials.

  19. AFFECT Notice of Intent June 27, 2013 CO and Legal Comments July...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Document details the Assisting Federal Facilities with Energy Conservation Technologies ... Funding Opportunity Announcement-Smart Grid Investment Grants National Laboratory ...

  20. Study of Plant Cell Wall Polymers Affected by Metal Accumulation Using Stimulated Raman Scattering Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Shi-You

    2015-03-02

    This project aims to employ newly-developed chemical imaging techniques to measure, in real-time, the concentration, dynamics and spatial distribution of plant cell wall polymers during biomass growth with inoculation of transgenic symbiotic fungi, and to explore a new pathway of delivering detoxified metal to plant apoplast using transgenic symbiotic fungi, which will enhance metal accumulation from soil, and potentially these metals may in turn be used as catalysts to improve the efficiency of biomass conversion to biofuels. The proposed new pathway of biomass production will: 1) benefit metal and radionuclide contaminant mobility in subsurface environments, and 2) potentially improve biomass production and process for bioenergy

  1. Factors affecting the recognition of faults exposed in exploratory trenches. Bulletin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonilla, M.G.; Lienkaemper, J.J.

    1991-01-01

    During excavation of the reactor shaft at the proposed Bodega Head nuclear reactor in California, a fault was found in the sediments overlying bedrock. This apparent lack of a complete connection with the bedrock fault led to disagreement as to whether the fault in the sediments was of tectonic or landslide origin. The report provides information on some of the conditions under which fault strands in trench walls are either difficult to see or die out, and the frequency of occurrence of these phenomena. Information is also provided on the widths of fault zones, on the deformation of the hanging wall and footwall of dip-slip faults, and on the frequency of occurrence of pebble rotation, open fissures, gouge, slickensides, mixing, fault breccia, fault rubble, crushing, polishing, water barriers, and liquefaction effects. Short summaries of information relating to fault strands that are poorly expressed or that die out have already been published (Bonilla and Lienkaemper, 1988, 1990).

  2. Analysis of how changed federal regulations and economic incentives affect financing of geothermal projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyers, D.; Wiseman, E.; Bennett, V.

    1980-11-04

    The effects of various financial incentives on potential developers of geothermal electric energy are studied and the impact of timing of plant construction costs on geothermal electricity costs is assessed. The effect of the geothermal loan guarantee program on decisions by investor-owned utilities to build geothermal electric power plants was examined. The usefulness of additional investment tax credits was studied as a method for encouraging utilities to invest in geothermal energy. The independent firms which specialize in geothermal resource development are described. The role of municipal and cooperative utilities in geothermal resource development was assessed in detail. Busbar capital costs were calculated for geothermal energy under a variety of ownerships with several assumptions about financial incentives. (MHR)

  3. Mineral Dissolution and Secondary Precipitation on Quartz Sand in Simulated Hanford Tank Solutions Affecting Subsurface Porosity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Guohui; Um, Wooyong

    2012-11-23

    Highly alkaline nuclear waste solutions have been released from underground nuclear waste storage tanks and pipelines into the vadose zone at the U.S. Department of Energys Hanford Site in Washington, causing mineral dissolution and re-precipitation upon contact with subsurface sediments. High pH caustic NaNO3 solutions with and without dissolved Al were reacted with quartz sand through flow-through columns stepwise at 45, 51, and 89C to simulate possible reactions between leaked nuclear waste solution and primary subsurface mineral. Upon reaction, Si was released from the dissolution of quartz sand, and nitrate-cancrinite [Na8Si6Al6O24(NO3)2] precipitated on the quartz surface as a secondary mineral phase. Both steady-state dissolution and precipitation kinetics were quantified, and quartz dissolution apparent activation energy was determined. Mineral alteration through dissolution and precipitation processes results in pore volume and structure changes in the subsurface porous media. In this study, the column porosity increased up to 40.3% in the pure dissolution column when no dissolved Al was present in the leachate, whereas up to a 26.5% porosity decrease was found in columns where both dissolution and precipitation were observed because of the presence of Al in the input solution. The porosity change was also confirmed by calculation using the dissolution and precipitation rates and mineral volume changes.

  4. Superconducting accelerator cavity with a heat affected zone having a higher RRR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brawley, John (Grafton, VA); Phillips, H. Lawrence (Hayes, VA)

    2000-01-01

    An improved method for welding accelerator cavities without the need for time consuming and expensive faying surface treatments comprising electron beam welding such cavities in a vacuum welding chamber within a vacuum envelope and using the following welding parameters: a beam voltage of between about 45 KV and 55 KV; a beam current between about 38 ma and 47 ma; a weld speed of about 15 cm/min; and a sharp focus and a rhombic raster of between about 9 KHz and 10 Khz. A welded cavity made according to the method of the present invention is also described.

  5. Estrous cycle affects the neurochemical and neurobehavioral profile of carvacrol-treated female rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trabace, L.; Zotti, M.; Morgese, M.G.; Tucci, P.; Colaianna, M.; Schiavone, S.; Avato, P.; Cuomo, V.

    2011-09-01

    Carvacrol is the major constituent of essential oils from aromatic plants. It showed antimicrobial, anticancer and antioxidant properties. Although it was approved for food use and included in the chemical flavorings list, no indication on its safety has been estimated. Since the use of plant extracts is relatively high among women, aim of this study was to evaluate carvacrol effects on female physiology and endocrine profiles by using female rats in proestrus and diestrus phases. Serotonin and metabolite tissue content in prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens, after carvacrol administration (0.15 and 0.45 g/kg p.o.), was measured. Drug effects in behavioral tests for alterations in motor activity, depression, anxiety-related behaviors and endocrine alterations were also investigated. While in proestrus carvacrol reduced serotonin and metabolite levels in both brain areas, no effects were observed in diestrus phase. Only in proestrus phase, carvacrol induced a depressive-like behavior in forced swimming test, without accompanying changes in ambulation. The improvement of performance in FST after subchronic treatment with fluoxetine (20 mg/kg) suggested a specific involvement of serotonergic system. No differences were found across the groups with regard to self-grooming behavior. Moreover, in proestrus phase, carvacrol reduced only estradiol levels without binding hypothalamic estradiol receptors. Our study showed an estrous-stage specific effect of carvacrol on depressive behaviors and endocrine parameters, involving serotonergic system. Given the wide carvacrol use not only as feed additive, but also as cosmetic essence and herbal remedy, our results suggest that an accurate investigation on the effects of its chronic exposure is warranted. - Highlights: > Carvacrol induced a depressive-like phenotype in rats, depending on ovarian cyclicity. > Carvacrol selectively reduced serotonin content in female rats in proestrus phase. > Carvacrol reduced serotonin levels in areas belonging to the emotional circuit. > Carvacrol reduced plasma estradiol levels only during the proestrus phase.

  6. Environmental factors affecting long-term stabilization of radon suppression covers for uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, J.K.; Long, L.W.; Reis, J.W.

    1982-04-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is investigating the use of a rock armoring blanket (riprap) to mitigate wind and water erosion of an earthen radon suppression cover applied to uranium mill tailings. To help determine design stresses for the tailings piles, environmental parameters are characterized for the five active uranium-producing regions on a site-specific basis. Only conventional uranium mills that are currently operating or that are scheduled to open in the mid 1980s are considered. Available data indicate that flooding has the most potential for disrupting a tailings pile. The arid regions of the Wyoming Basins and the Colorado Plateau are subject to brief storms of high intensity. The Texas Gulf Coast has the highest potential for extreme precipitation from hurricane-related storms. Wind data indicate average wind speeds from 3 to 6 m/sec for the sites, but extremes of 40 m/sec can be expected. Tornado risks range from low to moderate. The Colorado Plateau has the highest seismic potential, with maximum acceleration caused by earthquakes ranging from 0.2 to 0.4 g. Any direct effect from volcanic eruption is negligible, as all mills are located 90 km or more from an igneous or hydrothermal system.

  7. Structure and function of subsurface microbial communities affecting radionuclide transport and bio-immobilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stucki, Joseph William

    2013-05-13

    The purpose of this study was to provide comparative information regarding the changes in clay structure that occur due to biotic or abiotic reduction, as probed by variable-temperature Mössbauer spectroscopy.

  8. Tensions in collaborative cyber security and how they affect incident detection and response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fink, Glenn A.; McKinnon, Archibald D.; Clements, Samuel L.; Frincke, Deborah A.

    2009-12-01

    Security often requires collaboration, but when multiple stakeholders are involved, it is typical for their priorities to differ or even conflict with one another. In todays increasingly networked world, cyber security collaborations may span organizations and countries. In this chapter, we address collaboration tensions, their effects on incident detection and response, and how these tensions may potentially be resolved. We present three case studies of collaborative cyber security within the U.S. government and discuss technical, social, and regulatory challenges to collaborative cyber security. We suggest possible solutions, and present lessons learned from conflicts. Finally, we compare collaborative solutions from other domains and apply them to cyber security collaboration. Although we concentrate our analysis on collaborations whose purpose is to achieve cyber security, we believe that this work applies readily to security tensions found in collaborations of a general nature as well.

  9. Factors Affecting the Stability of Biodiesel Sold in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormick, R. L.; Ratcliff, M.; Moens, L.; Lawrence, R.

    2006-01-01

    As part of a survey of biodiesel quality and stability in the United States, 27 biodiesel (B100) samples were collected from blenders and distributor nationwide. For this sample set, 85% met all of the requirements of the industry standard for biodiesel, ASTM D6751.

  10. Investigating the Fundamental Scientific Issues Affecting the Long-term Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spangler, Lee; Cunningham, Alfred; Barnhart, Elliot; Lageson, David; Nall, Anita; Dobeck, Laura; Repasky, Kevin; Shaw, Joseph; Nugent, Paul; Johnson, Jennifer; Hogan, Justin; Codd, Sarah; Bray, Joshua; Prather, Cody; McGrail, B.; Oldenburg, Curtis; Wagoner, Jeff; Pawar, Rajesh

    2014-09-30

    The Zero Emissions Research and Technology (ZERT) collaborative was formed to address basic science and engineering knowledge gaps relevant to geologic carbon sequestration. The original funding round of ZERT (ZERT I) identified and addressed many of these gaps. ZERT II has focused on specific science and technology areas identified in ZERT I that showed strong promise and needed greater effort to fully develop. Specific focal areas of ZERT II included:  Continued use of the unique ZERT field site to test and prove detection technologies and methods developed by Montana State University, Stanford, University of Texas, several private sector companies, and others. Additionally, transport in the near surface was modelled.  Further development of near-surface detection technologies that cover moderate area at relatively low cost (fiber sensors and compact infrared imagers).  Investigation of analogs for escape mechanisms including characterization of impact of CO2 and deeper brine on groundwater quality at a natural analog site in Chimayo, NM and characterization of fracture systems exposed in outcrops in the northern Rockies.  Further investigation of biofilms and biomineralization for mitigation of small aperture leaks focusing on fundamental studies of rates that would allow engineered control of deposition in the subsurface.  Development of magnetic resonance techniques to perform muti-phase fluid measurements in rock cores.  Laboratory investigation of hysteretic relative permeability and its effect on residual gas trapping in large-scale reservoir simulations.  Further development of computational tools including a new version (V2) of the LBNL reactive geochemical transport simulator, TOUGHREACT, extension of the coupled flow and stress simulation capabilities in LANL’s FEHM simulator and an online gas-mixtureproperty estimation tool, WebGasEOS Many of these efforts have resulted in technologies that are being utilized in other field tests or demonstration projects.

  11. How state preparation can affect a quantum experiment: Quantum process tomography for open systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuah, Aik-meng; Modi, Kavan; Rodriguez-Rosario, Cesar A.; Sudarshan, E. C. G. [Center for Complex Quantum Systems, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2007-10-15

    We study the effects of the preparation of input states in a quantum tomography experiment. We show that maps arising from a quantum process tomography experiment (called process maps) differ from the well-known dynamical maps. The difference between the two is due to the preparation procedure that is necessary for any quantum experiment. We study two preparation procedures: stochastic preparation and preparation by measurements. The stochastic preparation procedure yields process maps that are linear, while the preparations using von Neumann measurements lead to nonlinear processes and can only be consistently described by a bilinear process map. A process tomography recipe is derived for preparation by measurement for qubits. The difference between the two methods is analyzed in terms of a quantum process tomography experiment. A verification protocol is proposed to differentiate between linear processes and bilinear processes. We also emphasize that the preparation procedure will have a nontrivial effect for any quantum experiment in which the system of interest interacts with its environment.

  12. Factors Affecting the Disposal Capacity of a Repository at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nutt, W.M.; Peters, M.T.; Wigeland, R.A.; Kouts, C.; Kim, D.; Gomberg, S.

    2007-07-01

    The development of a repository at Yucca Mountain is proceeding in accordance with the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA). The current design of the proposed repository emplaces 63,000 metric tons of heavy metal (MTHM) of commercial spent nuclear fuel and 7,000 MTHM-equivalent of Department of Energy-owned spent nuclear fuel and high level nuclear waste. Efforts are underway to complete the pre-closure and postclosure safety analyses in accordance with 10 CFR 63. This will be included in a license application for construction of the repository that is currently planned to be submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) no later than June of 2008. The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) aims to 'recycle nuclear fuel using new proliferation-resistant technologies to recover more energy and reduce waste'. The Nation's decision to choose to recycle spent nuclear fuel in an advanced nuclear fuel cycle, such as that being considered under the GNEP, would present the opportunity to change the current approach for managing and disposing nuclear waste. The total amount of waste that could be disposed in a repository at Yucca Mountain would be a key component of a new waste management strategy should a decision be made in the future to utilize the proposed Yucca Mountain repository to dispose of wastes generated under the GNEP. (authors)

  13. Risk communication with Fukushima residents affected by the Fukushima Daiichi accident at whole-body counting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunji, I.; Furuno, A.; Yonezawa, R.; Sugiyama, K.

    2013-07-01

    After the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident, the Tokai Research and Development Center of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) have had direct dialogue as risk communication with Fukushima residents who underwent whole-body counting examination (WBC). The purpose of the risk communication was to exchange information and opinions about radiation in order to mitigate Fukushima residents' anxiety and stress. Two kinds of opinion surveys were performed: one survey evaluated residents' views of the nuclear accident itself and the second survey evaluated the management of WBC examination as well as the quality of JAEA's communication skills on risks. It appears that most Fukushima residents seem to have reduced their anxiety level after the direct dialogue. The results of the surveys show that Fukushima residents have the deepest anxiety and concern about their long-term health issues and that they harbor anger toward the government and TEPCO. On the other hand, many WBC patients and patients' relatives have expressed gratitude for help in reducing their feelings of anxiety.

  14. Analysis of Transportation and Logistics Challenges Affecting the Deployment of Larger Wind Turbines: Summary of Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cotrell, J.; Stehly, T.; Johnson, J.; Roberts, J. O.; Parker, Z.; Scott, G.; Heimiller, D.

    2014-01-01

    There is relatively little literature that characterizes transportation and logistics challenges and the associated effects on U.S. wind markets. The objectives of this study were to identify the transportation and logistics challenges, assess the associated impacts, and provide recommendations for strategies and specific actions to address the challenges. The authors primarily relied on interviews with wind industry project developers, original equipment manufacturers, and transportation and logistics companies to obtain the information and industry perspectives needed for this study. They also reviewed published literature on trends and developments in increasing wind turbine size, logistics, and transportation issues.

  15. Analysis of Transportation and Logistics Challenges Affecting the Deployment of Larger Wind Turbines: Summary of Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Cotrell, T. Stehly, J. Johnson, J. O. Roberts, Z. Parker, G. Scott, and D. Heimiller

    2014-01-28

    The objectives of this study were to identify the transportation and logistics challenges, assess the associated impacts, and provide recommendations for strategies and specific actions to address the challenges.

  16. The microbe-mediated mechanisms affecting topsoil carbon stock in Tibetan grasslands

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yue, Haowei; Wang, Mengmeng; Wang, Shiping; Gilbert, Jack A.; Sun, Xin; Wu, Linwei; Lin, Qiaoyan; Hu, Yigang; Li, Xiangzhen; He, Zhili; et al

    2015-02-17

    Warming has been shown to cause soil carbon (C) loss in northern grasslands owing to accelerated microbial decomposition that offsets increased grass productivity. Yet, a multi-decadal survey indicated that the surface soil C stock in Tibetan alpine grasslands remained relatively stable. To investigate this inconsistency, we analyzed the feedback responses of soil microbial communities to simulated warming by soil transplant in Tibetan grasslands. Microbial functional diversity decreased in response to warming, whereas microbial community structure did not correlate with changes in temperature. The relative abundance of catabolic genes associated with nitrogen (N) and C cycling decreased with warming, most notablymore » in genes encoding enzymes associated with more recalcitrant C substrates. By contrast, genes associated with C fixation increased in relative abundance. The relative abundance of genes associated with urease, glutamate dehydrogenase and ammonia monoxygenase (ureC, gdh and amoA) were significantly correlated with N2O efflux. These results suggest that unlike arid/semiarid grasslands, Tibetan grasslands maintain negative feedback mechanisms that preserve terrestrial C and N pools. To examine whether these trends were applicable to the whole plateau, we included these measurements in a model and verified that topsoil C stocks remained relatively stable. Thus, by establishing linkages between microbial metabolic potential and soil biogeochemical processes, we conclude that long-term C loss in Tibetan grasslands is ameliorated by a reduction in microbial decomposition of recalcitrant C substrates.« less

  17. Tested by Fire - How two recent Wildfires affected Accelerator Operations at LANL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spickermann, Thomas

    2012-08-01

    In a little more than a decade two large wild fires threatened Los Alamos and impacted accelerator operations at LANL. In 2000 the Cerro Grande Fire destroyed hundreds of homes, as well as structures and equipment at the DARHT facility. The DARHT accelerators were safe in a fire-proof building. In 2011 the Las Conchas Fire burned about 630 square kilometers (250 square miles) and came dangerously close to Los Alamos/LANL. LANSCE accelerator operations Lessons Learned during Las Conchas fire: (1) Develop a plan to efficiently shut down the accelerator on short notice; (2) Establish clear lines of communication in emergency situations; and (3) Plan recovery and keep squirrels out.

  18. Is the acceleration of anomalous cosmic rays affected by the geometry of the termination shock?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senanayake, U. K.; Florinski, V. E-mail: vaf0001@uah.edu

    2013-12-01

    Historically, anomalous cosmic rays (ACRs) were thought to be accelerated at the solar-wind termination shock (TS) by the diffusive shock acceleration process. When Voyager 1 crossed the TS in 2004, the measured ACR spectra did not match the theoretical prediction of a continuous power law, and the source of the high-energy ACRs was not observed. When the Voyager 2 crossed the TS in 2007, it produced similar results. Several possible explanations have since appeared in the literature, but we follow the suggestion that ACRs are still accelerated at the shock, only away from the Voyager crossing points. To investigate this hypothesis closer, we study ACR acceleration using a three-dimensional, non-spherical model of the heliosphere that is axisymmetric with respect to the interstellar flow direction. We then compare the results with those obtained for a spherical TS. A semi-analytic model of the plasma and magnetic field backgrounds is developed to permit an investigation over a wide range of parameters under controlled conditions. The model is applied to helium ACRs, whose phase-space trajectories are stochastically integrated backward in time until a pre-specified, low-energy boundary, taken to be 0.5 MeV n{sup 1} (the so-called injection energy), is reached. Our results show that ACR acceleration is quite efficient on the heliotail-facing part of the TS. For small values of the perpendicular diffusion coefficient, our model yields a positive intensity gradient between the TS and about midway through the heliosheath, in agreement with the Voyager observations.

  19. Financial Incentives Available for Facilities Affected by the US EPA Boiler MACT Proposed Rule, December 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Overview of incentives for which larger boilers and then CHP systems qualify; Federal incentive programs are discussed and state, utility and local‐level programs.

  20. Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low Dose & Low Dose-Rate Radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bedford, Joel

    2014-04-18

    Our laboratory has, among other things, developed and used the gamma H2AX focus assay and other chromosomal and cell killing assays to show that differences in this DNA double strand break (dsb) related response can be clearly and distinctly demonstrated for cells which are mildly hyper-radiosensitive such as those associated with A-T heterozygosity. We have found this level of mild hypersensitivity for cells from some 20 to 30 % of apparently normal individuals and from apparently normal parents of Retinoblastoma patients. We found significant differences in gene expression in somatic cells from unaffected parents of Rb patients as compared with normal controls, suggesting that these parents may harbor some as yet unidentified genetic abnormality. In other experiments we sought to determine the extent of differences in normal human cellular reaponses to radiation depending on their irradiation in 2D monolayer vs 3D organized acinar growth conditions. We exmined cell reproductive death, chromosomal aberration induction, and the levels of ?-H2AX foci in cells after single acute gamma-ray doses and immediately after 20 hours of irradiation at a dose rate of 0.0017 Gy/min. We found no significant differences in the dose-responses of these cells under the 2D or 3D growth conditions. While this does not mean such differences cannot occur in other situations, it does mean that they do not generally or necessarily occur. In another series of studies in collaboration with Dr Chuan Li, with supprt from this current grant. We reported a role for apoptotic cell death in promoting wound healing and tissue regeneration in mice. Apoptotic cells released growth signals that stimulated the proliferation of progenitor or stem cells. In yet another collaboration with Dr, B. Chen with funds from this grant, the relative radiosensitivity to cell killing as well as chromosomal instability of 13 DNA-PKcs site-directed mutant cell lines (defective at phosphorylation sites or kinase activity) were examined after exposure of synchronized G1 cells to 137Cs c rays. DNA-PKcs mutant cells defective in phosphorylation at multiple sites withinthe T2609 cluster or within the PI3K domain displayed extreme radiosensitivity. Cells defective at the S2056 cluster or T2609 single site alone were only mildly radiosensitive, but cells defective at even one site in both the S2056 and T2609 clusters were maximally radiosensitive. Thus a synergism between the capacity for phosphorylation at the S2056 and T2609 clusterswas found to be critical for induction of radiosensitivity.

  1. Energy-efficient housing alternatives: a predictive model of factors affecting household perceptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schreckengost, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    The major purpose of this investigation was to assess the impact of household socio-economic factors, dwelling characteristics, energy conservation behavior, and energy attitudes on the perceptions of energy-efficient housing alternatives. Perceptions of passive solar, active solar, earth sheltered, and retrofitted housing were examined. Data used were from the Southern Regional Research Project, S-141, Housing for Low and Moderate Income Families. Responses from 1804 households living in seven southern states were analyzed. A conceptual model was proposed to test the hypothesized relationships which were examined by path analysis. Perceptions of energy efficient housing alternatives were found to be a function of selected household and dwelling characteristics, energy attitude, household economic factors, and household conservation behavior. Age and education of the respondent, family size, housing-income ratio, utility income ratio, energy attitude, and size of the dwelling unit were found to have direct and indirect effects on perceptions of energy-efficient housing alternatives. Energy conservation behavior made a significant direct impact with behavioral energy conservation changes having the most profound influence. Conservation behavior was influenced by selected household and dwelling characteristics, energy attitude, and household economic factors.

  2. STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF SUBSURFACE MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES AFFECTING RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT AND BIOIMMOBILIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel E. Kostka; Lee Kerkhof; Kuk-Jeong Chin; Martin Keller; Joseph W. Stucki

    2011-06-15

    The objectives of this project were to: (1) isolate and characterize novel anaerobic prokaryotes from subsurface environments exposed to high levels of mixed contaminants (U(VI), nitrate, sulfate), (2) elucidate the diversity and distribution of metabolically active metal- and nitrate-reducing prokaryotes in subsurface sediments, and (3) determine the biotic and abiotic mechanisms linking electron transport processes (nitrate, Fe(III), and sulfate reduction) to radionuclide reduction and immobilization. Mechanisms of electron transport and U(VI) transformation were examined under near in situ conditions in sediment microcosms and in field investigations at the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (ORFRC), in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, where the subsurface is exposed to mixed contamination predominated by uranium and nitrate. A total of 20 publications (16 published or 'in press' and 4 in review), 10 invited talks, and 43 contributed seminars/ meeting presentations were completed during the past four years of the project. PI Kostka served on one proposal review panel each year for the U.S. DOE Office of Science during the four year project period. The PI leveraged funds from the state of Florida to purchase new instrumentation that aided the project. Support was also leveraged by the PI from the Joint Genome Institute in the form of two successful proposals for genome sequencing. Draft genomes are now available for two novel species isolated during our studies and 5 more genomes are in the pipeline. We effectively addressed each of the three project objectives and research highlights are provided. Task I - Isolation and characterization of novel anaerobes: (1) A wide range of pure cultures of metal-reducing bacteria, sulfate-reducing bacteria, and denitrifying bacteria (32 strains) were isolated from subsurface sediments of the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (ORFRC), where the subsurface is exposed to mixed contamination of uranium and nitrate. These isolates which are new to science all show high sequence identity to sequences retrieved from ORFRC subsurface. (2) Based on physiological and phylogenetic characterization, two new species of subsurface bacteria were described: the metal-reducer Geobacter daltonii, and the denitrifier Rhodanobacter denitrificans. (3) Strains isolated from the ORFRC show that Rhodanobacter species are well adapted to the contaminated subsurface. Strains 2APBS1 and 116-2 grow at high salt (3% NaCl), low pH (3.5) and tolerate high concentrations of nitrate (400mM) and nitrite (100mM). Strain 2APBS1 was demonstrated to grow at in situ acidic pHs down to 2.5. (4) R. denitrificans strain 2APBS1 is the first described Rhodanobacter species shown to denitrify. Nitrate is almost entirely converted to N2O, which may account for the large accumulation of N2O in the ORFRC subsurface. (5) G. daltonii, isolated from uranium- and hydrocarbon-contaminated subsurface sediments of the ORFRC, is the first organism from the subsurface clade of the genus Geobacter that is capable of growth on aromatic hydrocarbons. (6) High quality draft genome sequences and a complete eco-physiological description are completed for R. denitrificans strain 2APBS1 and G. daltonii strain FRC-32. (7) Given their demonstrated relevance to DOE remediation efforts and the availability of detailed genotypic/phenotypic characterization, Rhodanobacter denitrificans strain 2APBS1 and Geobacter daltonii strain FRC-32 represent ideal model organisms to provide a predictive understanding of subsurface microbial activity through metabolic modeling. Tasks II and III-Diversity and distribution of active anaerobes and Mechanisms linking electron transport and the fate of radionuclides: (1) Our study showed that members of genus Rhodanobacter and Geobacter are abundant and active in the uranium and nitrate contaminated subsurface. In the contaminant source zone of the Oak Ridge site, Rhodanobacter spp. are the predominant, active organisms detected (comprising 50% to 100% of rRNA detected). (2) We demonstrated for the first time that the function of microbial communities can be quantified in subsurface sediments using messenger RNA assays (molecular proxies) under in situ conditions. (3) Active Geobacteraceae were identified and phylogenetically characterized from the cDNA of messenger RNA extracted from ORFRC subsurface sediment cores. Multiple clone sequences were retrieved from G. uraniireducens, G. daltonii, and G. metallireducens. (4) Results show that Geobacter strain FRC-32 is capable of growth on benzoate, toluene and benzene as the electron donor, thereby providing evidence that this strain is physiologically distinct from other described members of the subsurface Geobacter clade. (5) Fe(III)-reducing bacteria transform structural Fe in clay minerals from their layer edges rather than from their basal surfaces.

  3. Impact of Biodiesel on Ash Emissions and Lubricant Properties Affecting Fuel Economy and Engine Wear

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  4. EO 13211: Regulations That Significantly Affect Energy Supply, Distribution, or Use

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    I am requiring that agencies shall prepare a Statement of Energy Effects when undertaking certain agency actions. As described more fully below, such Statements of Energy Effects shall describe the...

  5. Affordability and other factors affecting the purchase of energy-efficient manufactured homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hattrup, M.P.; Lee, A.D.; Sandahl, L.J.; Onisko, S.A.

    1993-06-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) conducted this study to evaluate the manufactured home owner`s purchase decision process and to provide Bonneville with a better understanding of how consumers view a manufactured home`s affordability and energy efficiency. This study addresses manufactured homes built under the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) standards; these homes are sometimes referred to as HUD-code homes or mobile homes. Manufactured home owners in Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington were included in this analysis. This report adds to the information presented in Sandahl et al. (1992), which discussed the practices of lenders, appraisers, and dealers -- all of whom play a key role in the manufactured home market due to the impact their practices have on the overall affordability of manufactured homes. This report focuses exclusively on the most important, and probably least understood, player -- the home buyer. The primary data were collected via a mail survey sent to 1,550 manufactured home owners in Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington in late 1992. A 71% response rate was achieved; 1,106 usable responses were received. This study focuses on the Pacific Northwest but presents information that may be relevant to other parts of the country.

  6. Alternative S2 Hinge Regions of the Myosin Rod Affect Myofibrillar Structure and Myosin Kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Mark S.; Dambacher, Corey M.; Knowles, Aileen F.; Braddock, Joan M.; Farman, Gerrie P.; Irving, Thomas C.; Swank, Douglas M.; Bernstein, Sanford I.; Maughan, David W.

    2009-07-01

    The subfragment 2/light meromyosin 'hinge' region has been proposed to significantly contribute to muscle contraction force and/or speed. Transgenic replacement of the endogenous fast muscle isovariant hinge A (exon 15a) in Drosophila melanogaster indirect flight muscle with the slow muscle hinge B (exon 15b) allows examination of the structural and functional changes when only this region of the myosin molecule is different. Hinge B was previously shown to increase myosin rod length, increase A-band and sarcomere length, and decrease flight performance compared to hinge A. We applied additional measures to these transgenic lines to further evaluate the consequences of modifying this hinge region. Structurally, the longer A-band and sarcomere lengths found in the hinge B myofibrils appear to be due to the longitudinal addition of myosin heads. Functionally, hinge B, although a significant distance from the myosin catalytic domain, alters myosin kinetics in a manner consistent with this region increasing myosin rod length. These structural and functional changes combine to decrease whole fly wing-beat frequency and flight performance. Our results indicate that this hinge region plays an important role in determining myosin kinetics and in regulating thick and thin filament lengths as well as sarcomere length.

  7. Sensitivity Analysis of Parameters Affecting Protection of Water Resources at Hanford WA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DAVIS, J.D.

    2002-02-08

    The scope of this analysis was to assess the sensitivity of contaminant fluxes from the vadose zone to the water table, to several parameters, some of which can be controlled by operational considerations.

  8. Permafrost problems as they affect gas pipelines (the frost heave problem)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipsett, G.B.

    1980-01-01

    The major problems associated with the construction of a large diameter gas pipeline in a permafrost region are outlined in this presentation. Data pertains to the design and construction of the Alaska Highway Gas Pipeline Project. One of the main problems is maintaining the permafrost in its frozen state. Large diameter pipelines operating at high capacity are heat generators. Therefore, it is necessary to refrigerate the gas to ensure that it remains below 0/sup 0/C at all points in the pipeline system. The pipeline also passes through unfrozen ground where the potential for frost heave exists. The conditions under which frost heave occurs are listed. The extent and location of potential frost heave problem areas must be determined and a frost heave prediction method must be established before construction begins. Another task involves development of design criteria for the pipeline/soil interaction analysis. Remedial methods for use during the operational phase are also discussed. (DMC)

  9. Solubility of aluminum and silica in Spodic horizons as affected by drying and freezing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simonsson, M.; Berggren, D.; Gustafsson, J.P.

    1999-10-01

    The release of toxic Al{sup 3+} is one of the most serious consequences of anthropogenic soil acidification. Therefore, the mechanisms controlling Al solubility have been a topic of intense research for more than a decade. For convenience, soil samples are often dried before storage and experimental use. However, the literature offers examples of drying that results in changes in pH, solubility of organic matter, and dissolution rates of Al. In this study, the authors examined the solubility of Al and Si in fresh soil and in soil that had been dried or deep-frozen. Five Spodosol B horizon soils were subjected to batch titrations, where portions of each soil were equilibrated with solutions with varying concentrations of acid or base added. Extractions with acid oxalate and Na pyrophosphate indicated the presence of imogolite-type materials (ITM) in three of the soils. In the other two soils most secondary solid-phase Al was associated with humic substances. Deep-freezing did not significantly change pH nor the concentration of Al or Si as compared with fresh soil. Drying, on the other hand, yielded pH increases of up to 0.3 units at a given addition of acid or base, whereas Al{sup 3+} changed only slightly, implying a higher Al solubility in all of the soils. Furthermore, dissolved silica increased by up to 200% after drying, except in a soil that almost completely lacked oxalate-extractable Si. The authors suggest that drying enhanced the dissolution of ITM by disrupting soil organic matter, thus exposing formerly coated mineral surfaces. In the soil where dissolved Si did not change with drying, it has been demonstrated that Al-humus complexes controlled Al solubility. They suggest that fissures in the organic material caused by drying may have exposed formerly occluded binding sites that had a higher Al saturation than had sites at the surface of humus particles.

  10. miRNA-205 affects infiltration and metastasis of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhouquan; Department of Tumor, SenGong Hospital of Shaanxi, Xian 710300 ; Liao, Hehe; Deng, Zhiping; Yang, Po; Du, Ning; Zhanng, Yunfeng; Ren, Hong

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: We detected expression of miR-205 in breast cancer cell lines and tissue samples. We suggest miR-205 is downregulated in human breast cancer tissues and MCF7 cells. We suggest the lower expression of miR-205 play a role in breast cancer onset. These data suggest that miR-205 directly targets HER3 in human breast cancer. -- Abstract: Background: An increasing number of studies have shown that miRNAs are commonly deregulated in human malignancies, but little is known about the function of miRNA-205 (miR-205) in human breast cancer. The present study investigated the influence of miR-205 on breast cancer malignancy. Methods: The expression level of miR-205 in the MCF7 breast cancer cell line was determined by quantitative (q)RT-PCR. We then analyzed the expression of miR-205 in breast cancer and paired non-tumor tissues. Finally, the roles of miR-205 in regulating tumor proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and target gene expression were studied by MTT assay, flow cytometry, qRT-PCR, Western blotting and luciferase assay. Results: miR-205 was downregulated in breast cancer cells or tissues compared with normal breast cell lines or non-tumor tissues. Overexpression of miR-205 reduced the growth and colony-formation capacity of MCF7 cells by inducing apoptosis. Overexpression of miR-205 inhibited MCF7 cell migration and invasiveness. By bioinformation analysis, miR-205 was predicted to bind to the 3? untranslated regions of human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)3 mRNA, and upregulation of miR-205 reduced HER3 protein expression. Conclusion: miR-205 is a tumor suppressor in human breast cancer by post-transcriptional inhibition of HER3 expression.

  11. Visual display of reservoir parameters affecting enhanced oil recovery. Quarterly report, July 1995--September 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, J.R.

    1995-10-01

    Research continued on reservoir characterization. An atlas of thin section petrology of reservoir samples from the Southern San Joaquin Basin was acquired. One-dimensional modeling activities were initiated. Results of a modeling study of Elk Hills is described.

  12. June 24 Webinar Will Discuss How Environmental Laws and Regulations Affect Tribal Energy Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy, in partnership with Western Area Power Administration (Western), will present the next Tribal Renewable Energy Series webinar, Regulatory Impacts for Renewable Energy Projects on Indian Lands, on Wednesday, June 24, 2015, from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Mountain time.

  13. The microbe-mediated mechanisms affecting topsoil carbon stock in Tibetan grasslands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yue, Haowei; Wang, Mengmeng; Wang, Shiping; Gilbert, Jack A.; Sun, Xin; Wu, Linwei; Lin, Qiaoyan; Hu, Yigang; Li, Xiangzhen; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong; Yang, Yunfeng

    2015-02-17

    Warming has been shown to cause soil carbon (C) loss in northern grasslands owing to accelerated microbial decomposition that offsets increased grass productivity. Yet, a multi-decadal survey indicated that the surface soil C stock in Tibetan alpine grasslands remained relatively stable. To investigate this inconsistency, we analyzed the feedback responses of soil microbial communities to simulated warming by soil transplant in Tibetan grasslands. Microbial functional diversity decreased in response to warming, whereas microbial community structure did not correlate with changes in temperature. The relative abundance of catabolic genes associated with nitrogen (N) and C cycling decreased with warming, most notably in genes encoding enzymes associated with more recalcitrant C substrates. By contrast, genes associated with C fixation increased in relative abundance. The relative abundance of genes associated with urease, glutamate dehydrogenase and ammonia monoxygenase (ureC, gdh and amoA) were significantly correlated with N2O efflux. These results suggest that unlike arid/semiarid grasslands, Tibetan grasslands maintain negative feedback mechanisms that preserve terrestrial C and N pools. To examine whether these trends were applicable to the whole plateau, we included these measurements in a model and verified that topsoil C stocks remained relatively stable. Thus, by establishing linkages between microbial metabolic potential and soil biogeochemical processes, we conclude that long-term C loss in Tibetan grasslands is ameliorated by a reduction in microbial decomposition of recalcitrant C substrates.

  14. Consideration of factors affecting strip effluent pH and sodium content

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.

    2015-07-29

    A number of factors were investigated to determine possible reasons for why the Strip Effluent (SE) can sometimes have higher than expected pH values and/or sodium content, both of which have prescribed limits. All of the factors likely have some impact on the pH values and Na content.

  15. Method and apparatus for affecting a recirculation zone in a cross flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bathina, Mahesh (Andhra Pradesh, IN); Singh, Ramanand (Uttar Pradesh, IN)

    2012-07-17

    Disclosed is a cross flow apparatus including a surface and at least one outlet located at the surface. The cross flow apparatus further includes at least one guide at the surface configured to direct an intersecting flow flowing across the surface and increase a velocity of a cross flow being expelled from the at least one outlet downstream from the at least one outlet.

  16. Analysis of Transportation and Logistics Challenges Affecting the Deployment of Larger Wind Turbines: Summary of Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The objectives of this study were to identify the transportation and logistics challenges, assess the associated impacts, and provide recommendations for strategies and specific actions to address wind challenges.

  17. Different Factors Affecting Short Circuit Behavior of a Wind Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Samaan, Nader A.; Gevorgian, Vahan; Li, Jun; Pasupulati, Subbaiah

    2010-12-21

    A wind power plant consists of a large number of turbines interconnected by underground cable. A pad-mount transformer at each turbine steps up the voltage from generating voltage (690 V) to a medium voltage (34.5 kV). All turbines in the plant are connected to the substation transformer where the voltage is stepped up to the transmission level. An important aspect of wind power plant (WPP) impact studies is to evaluate the short-circuit (SC) current contribution of the plant into the transmission network under different fault conditions. This task can be challenging to protection engineers due to the topology differences between different types of wind turbine generators (WTGs) and the conventional generating units. This paper investigates the short circuit behavior of a wind power plant for different types of faults. The impact of wind turbine types, the transformer configuration, and the reactive compensation capacitor will be investigated. The voltage response at different buses will be observed. Finally, the SC line currents will be presented along with its symmetrical components.

  18. Different Factors Affecting Short Circuit Behavior of a Wind Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Samaan, Nader A.; Gevorgian, Vahan; Li, Jun; Pasupulati, Subbaiah

    2013-01-31

    A wind power plant consists of a large number of turbines interconnected by underground cable. A pad-mount transformer at each turbine steps up the voltage from generating voltage (690 V) to a medium voltage (34.5 kV). All turbines in the plant are connected to the substation transformer where the voltage is stepped up to the transmission level. An important aspect of wind power plant (WPP) impact studies is to evaluate the short-circuit (SC) current contribution of the plant into the transmission network under different fault conditions. This task can be challenging to protection engineers due to the topology differences between different types of wind turbine generators (WTGs) and the conventional generating units. This paper investigates the short circuit behavior of a wind power plant for different types of faults. The impact of wind turbine types, the transformer configuration, and the reactive compensation capacitor will be investigated. The voltage response at different buses will be observed. Finally, the SC line currents will be presented along with its symmetrical components.

  19. Factors affecting strength of agglomerates formed during spray drying of nanophase powders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maskara, A.; Smith, D.M.

    1994-12-31

    Nanosized silica particles dispersed in various solvents were spray dried and the change in size distribution, agglomerate strength, and strength distribution was determined. The effect of solvent surface tension, pH, and particle surface chemistry on strength of agglomerates formed during spray drying was studied for particle sizes between 15 and 500 nm. Alcohol/water mixtures having different surface tension, and water at different pH levels, were employed to separate the effects of capillary pressure and surface hydroxyl condensation reactions. The agglomerate strength was determined using an ultrasonic measurement technique. The particle size was determined using sedimentation. The strength and strength distribution of agglomerates was found to depend on the solvent surface tension, solubility (pH), and primary particle size.

  20. Parameters affecting the resilience of scale-free networks to random failures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Link, Hamilton E.; LaViolette, Randall A.; Lane, Terran; Saia, Jared

    2005-09-01

    It is commonly believed that scale-free networks are robust to massive numbers of random node deletions. For example, Cohen et al. in (1) study scale-free networks including some which approximate the measured degree distribution of the Internet. Their results suggest that if each node in this network failed independently with probability 0.99, most of the remaining nodes would still be connected in a giant component. In this paper, we show that a large and important subclass of scale-free networks are not robust to massive numbers of random node deletions. In particular, we study scale-free networks which have minimum node degree of 1 and a power-law degree distribution beginning with nodes of degree 1 (power-law networks). We show that, in a power-law network approximating the Internet's reported distribution, when the probability of deletion of each node is 0.5 only about 25% of the surviving nodes in the network remain connected in a giant component, and the giant component does not persist beyond a critical failure rate of 0.9. The new result is partially due to improved analytical accommodation of the large number of degree-0 nodes that result after node deletions. Our results apply to power-law networks with a wide range of power-law exponents, including Internet-like networks. We give both analytical and empirical evidence that such networks are not generally robust to massive random node deletions.