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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "affected restoration estimates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Estimation theoretical image restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, we have developed an extensive study to evaluate image restoration from a single image, colored or monochromatic. Using a mixture of Gaussian and Poisson noise process, we derived an objective function to ...

Dolne, Jean J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Cost Estimating Handbook for Environmental Restoration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental restoration (ER) projects have presented the DOE and cost estimators with a number of properties that are not comparable to the normal estimating climate within DOE. These properties include: An entirely new set of specialized expressions and terminology. A higher than normal exposure to cost and schedule risk, as compared to most other DOE projects, due to changing regulations, public involvement, resource shortages, and scope of work. A higher than normal percentage of indirect costs to the total estimated cost due primarily to record keeping, special training, liability, and indemnification. More than one estimate for a project, particularly in the assessment phase, in order to provide input into the evaluation of alternatives for the cleanup action. While some aspects of existing guidance for cost estimators will be applicable to environmental restoration projects, some components of the present guidelines will have to be modified to reflect the unique elements of these projects. The purpose of this Handbook is to assist cost estimators in the preparation of environmental restoration estimates for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) projects undertaken by DOE. The DOE has, in recent years, seen a significant increase in the number, size, and frequency of environmental restoration projects that must be costed by the various DOE offices. The coming years will show the EM program to be the largest non-weapons program undertaken by DOE. These projects create new and unique estimating requirements since historical cost and estimating precedents are meager at best. It is anticipated that this Handbook will enhance the quality of cost data within DOE in several ways by providing: The basis for accurate, consistent, and traceable baselines. Sound methodologies, guidelines, and estimating formats. Sources of cost data/databases and estimating tools and techniques available at DOE cost professionals.

NONE

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Site restoration: Estimation of attributable costs from plutonium-dispersal accidents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A nuclear weapons accident is an extremely unlikely event due to the extensive care taken in operations. However, under some hypothetical accident conditions, plutonium might be dispersed to the environment. This would result in costs being incurred by the government to remediate the site and compensate for losses. This study is a multi-disciplinary evaluation of the potential scope of the post-accident response that includes technical factors, current and proposed legal requirements and constraints, as well as social/political factors that could influence decision making. The study provides parameters that can be used to assess economic costs for accidents postulated to occur in urban areas, Midwest farmland, Western rangeland, and forest. Per-area remediation costs have been estimated, using industry-standard methods, for both expedited and extended remediation. Expedited remediation costs have been evaluated for highways, airports, and urban areas. Extended remediation costs have been evaluated for all land uses except highways and airports. The inclusion of cost estimates in risk assessments, together with the conventional estimation of doses and health effects, allows a fuller understanding of the post-accident environment. The insights obtained can be used to minimize economic risks by evaluation of operational and design alternatives, and through development of improved capabilities for accident response.

Chanin, D.I.; Murfin, W.B. [Technadyne Engineering Consultants, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Restore: Modeling Repair and Restoration Processes | Argonne...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Restore: Modeling Repair and Restoration Processes Restore: Modeling Repair and Restoration Processes Argonne's Restore software models complex sets of steps required to accomplish...

5

prairie restoration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Amount of Seed Amount of Seed Before you can restore your parcel, you must obtain seed. The amount of seed you will need is directly related to the size of your parcel. When our school did its restoration, the area available to us was a bit larger than a full sized tennis court, about 15 meters by 40 meters. When seed was spread, each square meter of soil needed, by volume, about 500 cubic centimeters of seed to cover it adequately. This is roughly equivalent to a full 8-ounce plastic cup of seed for each square meter quadrat.(A quadrat is a term used in field studies meaning a measured off square of conveniently sized dimensions.) All together the total amount of prairie matrix (a mixture of all types of prairie seeds) we needed, fit easily into about 2 large plastic trash can liners (30-gallon size). For another

6

Environmental Security and Restoration [EVS Program Area]  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environmental Security and Restoration Environmental Security and Restoration EVS focuses on environmental and human health aspects of homeland and national security, as well as restoration of sites contaminated with hazardous materials. Contamination in our environment - in air, water, and soil - contributes to health problems and affects the quality of our lives. The EVS Division confronts this challenge by addressing environmental and human health aspects of homeland and national security and by characterizing and restoring sites contaminated with hazardous materials. We integrate extensive expertise in engineering, health physics, hydrogeology, environmental science, chemistry, spatial analysis, database management, and computer programming to contribute to environmental security and restoration.

7

Past Restoration Fund Info  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Rates > Past Restoration Rates > Past Restoration Fund Info Past Restoration Fund Info FY 2013 Restoration Fund SNR Letter to Customers Regarding Revision to FY13 Restoration Fund Obligation Mid-Year Adjustment (June 19, 2013) (PDF - 1146 KB) SNR Letter to Customers Regarding FY13 Restoration Fund Obligation Mid-Year Adjustment (April 15, 2013) (PDF - 829 KB) SNR Letter to Customers Regarding Restoration Fund Obligations for FY 2013 (August 8, 2012) (PDF - 325 KB) FY 2012 Restoration Fund SNR Letter to Customers Regarding Restoration Fund Obligations for FY 2012 (August 9, 2011) (PDF - 340 KB) Mid Year Adjustment to the FY 2012 Restoration Fund Payment (April 18, 2012) (PDF - 174 KB) FY 2011 Restoration Fund SNR Letter to Customers Regarding Restoration Fund Obligations for FY 2011 (August 20, 2010) (PDF - 705 KB)

8

The health of Great Lakes habitats and wildlife depends upon the protection and restoration of ecosystems. A multitude of threats affect the health of Great Lakes habitats and wildlife, and many  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and implementation. AOC Land Acquisition Project The Great Lakes Areas of Concern (AOC) Land Acquisition Project, the AOC Land Acquisition Project also targets areas that are high priority for habitat restoration. The Land Acquisition Project provides GLRI funds so that state and local agencies can purchase land in AOCs

9

Installation restoration program: Hydrologic measurements with an estimated hydrologic budget for the Joliet Army Ammunition Plant, Joliet, Illinois. [Contains maps of monitoring well locations, topography and hydrologic basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrologic data were gathered from the 36.8-mi{sup 2} Joliet Army Ammunition Plant (JAAP) located in Joliet, Illinois. Surface water levels were measured continuously, and groundwater levels were measured monthly. The resulting information was entered into a database that could be used as part of numerical flow model validation for the site. Deep sandstone aquifers supply much of the water in the JAAP region. These aquifers are successively overlain by confining shales and a dolomite aquifer of Silurian age. This last unit is unconformably overlain by Pleistocene glacial tills and outwash sand and gravel. Groundwater levels in the shallow glacial system fluctuate widely, with one well completed in an upland fluctuating more than 17 ft during the study period. The response to groundwater recharge in the underlying Silurian dolomite is slower. In the upland recharge areas, increased groundwater levels were observed; in the lowland discharge areas, groundwater levels decreased during the study period. The decreases are postulated to be a lag effect related to a 1988 drought. These observations show that fluid at the JAAP is not steady-state, either on a monthly or an annual basis. Hydrologic budgets were estimated for the two principal surface water basins at the JAAP site. These basins account for 70% of the facility's total land area. Meteorological data collected at a nearby dam show that total measured precipitation was 31.45 in. and total calculated evapotranspiration was 23.09 in. for the study period. The change in surface water storage was assumed to be zero for the annual budget for each basin. The change in groundwater storage was calculated to be 0.12 in. for the Grant Creek basin and 0. 26 in. for the Prairie Creek basin. Runoff was 7.02 in. and 7.51 in. for the Grant Creek and Prairie Creek basins, respectively. The underflow to the deep hydrogeologic system in the Grant Creek basin was calculated to be negligible. 12 refs., 17 figs., 15 tabs.

Diodato, D.M.; Cho, H.E.; Sundell, R.C.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Ecological indicators for stream restoration success  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Exploitation of freshwater resources is essential for sustenance of human existence and alteration of rivers, lakes and wetlands has facilitated economic development for centuries. Consequently, freshwater biodiversity is critically threatened, with stream ecosystems being the most heavily affected. To improve the status of freshwater habitats, e.g. in the context of the European Water Framework Directive and the US Clean Water Act, it is essential to implement the most effective restoration measures and identify the most suitable indicators for restoration success. Herein, several active and passive bioindication approaches are reviewed in light of existing legal frameworks, current targets and applicable implementation of river restoration. Such approaches should move from the use of single biological indicators to more holistic ecological indicators simultaneously addressing communities, multiple life stages and habitat properties such as water quality, substrate composition and stream channel morphology. The proposed Proceeding Chain of Restoration (PCoR) can enable the integration of natural scientific, political and socioeconomic dimensions for restoration of aquatic ecosystems and associated services. Generally, an analysis that combines target species-based active bioindication with community-based passive bioindication and multivariate statistics seems to be most suitable for a holistic evaluation of restoration success, as well as for the monitoring of stream ecosystem health. Since the response of biological communities to changing environmental conditions can differ between taxonomic groups and rivers, assessments at the ecosystem scale should include several levels of biological organisation. A stepwise evaluation of the primary factors inducing disturbance or degradation is needed to integrate increasing levels of complexity from water quality assessments to the evaluation of ecological function. The proposed \\{PCoR\\} can provide a step-by-step guide for restoration ecologists, comprising all planning steps from the determination of the conservation objectives to the use of ecological indicators in post-restoration monitoring.

Joachim Pander; Juergen Geist

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Reuse and Restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the plaster used to mask the hack-marks left by Amarnas restoration “label,” Amarna hack-marks, and plaster.of the plaster used to mask the hack-marks left by Amarna

Brand, Peter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Constraint and Restoring Force  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Long-lived sensor network applications must be able to self-repair and adapt to changing demands. We introduce a new approach for doing so: Constraint and Restoring Force. CRF is a physics-inspired framework for computing ...

Beal, Jacob

2007-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

13

prairie restoration index  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Purpose Purpose This is the first section of a "How to" guide designed for those individuals interested in restoring an area of land back to native prairie. To better facilitate your search for specific information, select one or all of the main topics associated with prairie parcel restoration listed below. Index History/Introduction of Prairie Restoration Selecting a Site Starting/Planning Seedbed Preparation. Seed (Amount, Acquiring and Preparation) Planting Watering General Identification (Grasses, Forbs, Flowers, Keeping Track) Burning - Enriching Reference Materials, Burning Permit and Seed Sources Information Identification Keys - Grasses and Forbs Illustrated Guide to Native Prairie Species Watch List for Native Prairie Plants This report was written by Lawrence Cwik as part of his participation in

14

Restoring Native Grasslands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Brian Hays, Matthew Wagner, Fred Smeins and R. Neal Wilkins* Native Restoring Grasslands 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% Figure 1. Much of the native grassland in Texas has been converted to improved pas- tures (left) or cropland (right...

Hays, K. Brian; Wagner, Matthew; Smeins, Fred; Wilkins, Neal

2005-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

15

Restoration 2013 ACTION PLAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Study Taskforce, Lower Columbia Fish Recovery Board, Lower Columbia Estuary Partnership, National Marine are intended to guide or inform, as appropriate, the Actions Agencies (BPA/Corps), National Marine Fisheries was prepared by the BPA/Corps with review by and collaboration with regional restoration sponsors, researchers

16

Adaptive wiener image restoration kernel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and device for restoration of electro-optical image data using an adaptive Wiener filter begins with constructing imaging system Optical Transfer Function, and the Fourier Transformations of the noise and the image. A spatial representation of the imaged object is restored by spatial convolution of the image using a Wiener restoration kernel.

Yuan, Ding (Henderson, NV)

2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

17

Restoration of Large Damage Volumes in Polymers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Restoration of Large...regenerative power of tissues...synthetic system that restores...hours. After restoration of impact damage...tripodal ligand system based on the...Ed., CRC Handbook of Chemistry...construction. Restoration of Large...

S. R. White; J. S. Moore; N. R. Sottos; B. P. Krull; W. A. Santa Cruz; R. C. R. Gergely

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

18

MOUND Environmental Restoration Program  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

MOUND MOUND Environmental Restoration Program ._. I s ! I " ' Al /. i i : MOUND Environmental Restoration Program VlOUND I MOUND PLANT POTENTIAL RELEASE SITE PACKAGE Notice of Public Review Period hgram The following potential release site (PRS) packages will be available for public review ir he CERCLA Public Reading Room, 305 E. Central Ave., Miamisburg, Ohio beginning lune 17, 1997. Public comment will be accepted on these packages from June 17, 1997, .hrough July 18, 1997. PRS 30: Building 27 Propane Tank PRS 129/130: Former Solvent Storage Sites PRS 241: Soil Con@mination- - Main Hill Parking Lot Area PRS 307: Soil Contamination -.Buil.ding 29 PRS 318: PCB Tramformer and Capacitor Locations PRS 320-325: Former Sites -:Dayton Uqits 1-4/Dayton WarehousYScioto Facility

19

Factors influencing macrophyte growth and recovery following shoreline restoration activity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Macrophytes are increasingly being used worldwide for assessing aquatic ecological condition. Because their growth is influenced by physical habitat conditions, such as sediment quality and near-shore gradient, macrophytes may also be valuable indicators of shoreline restoration efforts. An extensive shoreline restoration project in a lake with a history of industrial activity provided the opportunity to examine macrophyte and sediment status as metrics of aquatic ecosystem health and response. We surveyed macrophyte beds in Muskegon Lake, Michigan over a 4-year period to assess the ecological benefits of the restoration project. Macrophyte biomass was affected strongly by the physical features of the individual sites, including hydrologic exposure (i.e., wind and wave action) and sediment organic matter, which contributed to a large degree of variability among the sites. Declines in macrophyte biomass the year following restoration suggested a short-term negative impact on macrophyte communities. Recovery to at least pre-restoration biomass was evident two years following restoration. However, concurrent changes at the reference sites, though to a lesser degree, also suggested a possible overriding environmental cause (i.e., water level, air temperature, precipitation) for the observed changes in macrophyte growth. Lake restoration projects are usually designed to improve water quality and enhance the fishery. Although both goals are influenced by macrophytes, the plants themselves are rarely a focal point of restoration. Our study allowed us to address this information gap; even after 4 years of sampling, it appears the timeline is too short to detect a definitive response to restoration, but our results provide important baseline information and lessons learned for future studies.

Mary E. Ogdahl; Alan D. Steinman

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Former Sites Restoration. Division  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

@j&s* **$r* :. .+:., @j&s* **$r* :. .+:., II' .,.. I .&i. , :"': T.1 . i *&+t&&., @i i -:.+; L I. * . . .p.isit-!'..r'ir~i _, +.&.., . I. :?I,?.* .L,! j?' aa&* pi 4 L', ..b,- ., .e /w.1( ,v_.c ~A&$?>*:, ,..:.' .1 > . . . . . *. ,.. .I., .( j .~.~:,;;,.".,Certificafion ,Dockef for The ;,il' t:i~>$:+-.. ~~y:Remeciial Action. Performed "' . ::;:cxcgt the @+zb Gate Site in . ;' ! ,Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 7.99 7- 7 992 -.. Department .of Energy Former Sites Restoration. Division . ,Oak Ridge Operations .Office _. February 7 994 @ Printed on recycledhcy&ble paper. CERTIFICATION DOCKET FOR THE REMEDIAL ACTION PERFORMED AT THE ELZA GAP SITE IN OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE, 1991-1992 FEBRUARY 1994 I Prepared for UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "affected restoration estimates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

prairie restoration plant ident  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Plant Identification Plant Identification Once your restoration is started and plants begin to germinate, the next issue you are faced with is the identification of what is growing. From my experience, the seeds you planted should start germinating after about a week to ten days. Of course, this is dependent on the weather conditions and the amount of moisture in the soil. If you are watering regularly, you will get growth much more quickly than if you are just waiting for nature to take its course. Identifying prairie plants as they germinate is very difficult. If you are an experienced botanist or an expert on prairie plants, your identification will still be a little more than an educated guess. In other words identifying prairie species from non-native species will take some time.

22

DECEMBER 2002 Restoration Ecology Vol. 10 No. 4, pp. 617626 617 2002 Society for Ecological Restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Restoration Does Facilitation of Faunal Recruitment Benefit Ecosystem Restoration? An Experimental Study restoration. Key words: aquatic insects, colonization, Gastropoda, inoculation, macroinvertebrates, marsh to a functioning ecosystem. Practices that enhance recruitment may increase the chances of restoration success

Cardinale, Bradley J.

23

Microtopography Recreation Benefits Ecosystem Restoration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Microtopography Recreation Benefits Ecosystem Restoration ... First, recreated microtopography alters rainfall redistribution and surface runoff path by adding topographic variation at fine scales. ... In conclusion, although recreating microtopography benefits ecosystem restoration, problems and perplexities still remain, partly due to the complexity of microtopography and the absence of systematic observations. ...

Wei Wei; Liding Chen; Lei Yang; F. Fred Samadani; Ge Sun

2012-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

24

River restoration Ellen Wohl,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, massive expenditures, and the burgeoning industry of aquatic and riparian restoration, river ecosystems. Introduction: Problem Statement [2] Continuing degradation of river ecosystems and loss of aquatic biodiversityRiver restoration Ellen Wohl,1 Paul L. Angermeier,2 Brian Bledsoe,3 G. Mathias Kondolf,4 Larry Mac

Poff, N. LeRoy

25

Restoration Monitoring-A Simple Photo Monitoring Method | Department...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Restoration Monitoring-A Simple Photo Monitoring Method Restoration Monitoring-A Simple Photo Monitoring Method Restoration Monitoring-A Simple Photo Monitoring Method Restoration...

26

Fuzzy rule-based methodology for residential load behaviour forecasting during power systems restoration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Inadequate load pickup during power system restoration can lead to overload and underfrequency conditions, and even restart the blackout process, due to thermal energy losses. Thus, load behaviour estimation during restoration is desirable to avoid inadequate pickups. This work describes an artificial intelligence method to aid the operator in taking decisions during system restoration by estimating residential load behaviour parameters such as overload in buses and the necessary time to recover steady-state power consumption. This method uses a fuzzy rule-based system to forecast the residential load, obtaining correct estimates with low computational cost. Test results using actual substation data are presented.

Lia Toledo Moreira Mota; Alexandre Assis Mota; Andre Luiz Morelato Franca

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Comprehensive Study of Image Restoration Algorithms.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Abstract Comprehensive Study of Image Restoration Algorithms By Lize Zong Master of Science in Electrical Engineering Image restoration is an important part of digital image-processing.… (more)

Zong, Lize

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

FAQS Job Task Analyses - Environmental Restoration | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Environmental Restoration FAQS Job Task Analyses - Environmental Restoration FAQS Job Task Analyses are performed on the Function Area Qualification Standards. The FAQS Job Task...

29

E-Print Network 3.0 - affecting fish passage Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

fish passage Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: affecting fish passage Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 NOAA Restoration Center supports...

30

E-Print Network 3.0 - affecting clean coal Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

; Environmental Management and Restoration Technologies 24 Impact of coal quality and gasifier technology on IGCC performance Summary: was little affected by coal type. The slurry...

31

Water Supply Analysis for Restoring the Colorado River Delta, Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Mexico. Potential water sources include reductions in local agricultural and urban water use through and urban water uses were estimated by two ancillary models. The results provide insights into economically promising water supplies for restoration activities. Quantifying the trade-off between agricultural

Pasternack, Gregory B.

32

eschweizerbartxxx Interactions between alien species and restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

eschweizerbartxxx Interactions between alien species and restoration of large-river ecosystems-river ecosystems that are the subject of restoration efforts also typically are heavily invaded by alien species interactions that link alien species and river restoration. Most obviously, restoration may be aimed

Pace, Michael L.

33

Environmental Restoration Projects  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Maturity Maturity Value Target Score Maturity Value Target Score A1 Cost Estimate H 7.5 2 15.0 5 37.5 A2 Cost Risk/Contingency Analysis P 3.0 1 3.0 5 15.0 A3 Funding Requirements/Profile H 7.5 2 15.0 5 37.5 A4 Independent Cost Estimate/Schedule Review P 3.0 N/A 0.0 5 15.0 A5 Life Cycle Cost P 3.0 1 3.0 5 15.0 A6 Forecast of Cost at Completion P 3.0 N/A 0.0 5 15.0 A7 Cost Estimate for Next Phase Work Scope P 3.0 5 15.0 5 15.0 Subtotal Cost 51.0 150.0 B1 Project Schedule H 7.5 2 15.0 5 37.5 B2 Major Milestones P 3.0 2 6.0 5 15.0 B3 Resource Loading P 3.0 1 3.0 5 15.0 B4 Critical Path Management H 7.5 1 7.5 5 37.5 B5 Schedule Risk/Contingency Analysis P 3.0 1 3.0 5 15.0 B6 Forecast of Schedule Completion P 3.0 N/A 0.0 5 15.0 B7 Schedule for Next Phase Work Scope P 3.0 5 15.0 5 15.0 Subtotal Schedule 49.5 150.0 C1 Preliminary Assessments/Site Investigation P 2.5 5 12.5 5 12.5 C2

34

Acoustical characteristics of restorative space on a university campus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper explores the nature sound environment and value of restorative space on University campuses in the United Kingdom that is separated from standard teaching venues. Questionnaire surveys were undertaken in the Atrium and Student Central at the University of Bradford and in the Library at Loughborough University to explore expectations and perceptions of restorative quality preferences values and use on non-teaching space. These spaces are used routinely by the students for social relaxation individual and group studies. Contemporaneous continuous measures of noise were undertaken at the survey locations. Noise levels in a social space on campus can be as high as 85 dB which affects the restorative quality of the space. The results of these surveys enabled us to explore the link between the acoustical characteristics of a space and its restorative quality and to identify key sounds which contribute to the value of a restorative space. The value of such spaces is reflected in the willingness to pay for quieter and greener spaces.

Kirill V. Horoshenkov

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Evaluate the Restoration Potential of Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Habitat, Status Report 2006.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Project 2003-038-00, Evaluate the restoration potential of Snake River fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat, began in FY04 (15 December 2003) and continues into FY06. This status report is intended to summarize accomplishments during FY04 and FY05. Accomplishments are summarized by Work Elements, as detailed in the Statement of Work (see BPA's project management database PISCES). This project evaluates the restoration potential of mainstem habitats for fall Chinook salmon. The studies address two research questions: 'Are there sections not currently used by spawning fall Chinook salmon within the impounded lower Snake River that possess the physical characteristics for potentially suitable fall Chinook spawning habitat?' and 'Can hydrosystem operations affecting these sections be adjusted such that the sections closely resemble the physical characteristics of current fall Chinook salmon spawning areas in similar physical settings?' Efforts are focused at two study sites: (1) the Ice Harbor Dam tailrace downstream to the Columbia River confluence, and (2) the Lower Granite Dam tailrace. Our previous studies indicated that these two areas have the highest potential for restoring Snake River fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat. The study sites will be evaluated under existing structural configurations at the dams (i.e., without partial removal of a dam structure), and alternative operational scenarios (e.g., varying forebay/tailwater elevations). The areas studied represent tailwater habitat (i.e., riverine segments extending from a dam downstream to the backwater influence from the next dam downstream). We are using a reference site, indicative of current fall Chinook salmon spawning areas in tailwater habitat, against which to compare the physical characteristics of each study site. The reference site for tailwater habitats is the section extending downstream from the Wanapum Dam tailrace on the Columbia River. Escapement estimates for fall of 2000 indicate more than 9000 adult fall Chinook salmon returned to this area, accounting for more than 2100 redds within a 5 km section of river.

Hanrahan, T.P. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

36

DARRP -Protecting and restoring natural resources nationwide Protecting and Restoring Natural Resources in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

responsible for the incident; develop innovative approaches and techniques for remediation and restoration Assessment, Remediation, and Restoration Program (DARRP) acts as a trustee for natural resources on behalf

37

Secretary Bodman Signs Order to Help Restore Electricity to East Texas More  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Order to Help Restore Electricity to East Order to Help Restore Electricity to East Texas More Quickly Secretary Bodman Signs Order to Help Restore Electricity to East Texas More Quickly September 28, 2005 - 10:58am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman today signed an order to authorize and direct CenterPoint Energy to temporarily connect and restore power to Entergy Gulf States, Inc. This action will allow thousands of Entergy customers to receive electricity while Entergy Gulf States, Inc., rebuilds its electricity transmission and distribution infrastructure. "In the aftermath of any disaster, it's critically important that we work together to restore life-saving and life-sustaining electricity to those people affected by the storm. By issuing this order, we make it possible

38

PERSPECTIVE Restoration of Ecosystem Services for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and so it is obscuring the fact that restoration projects, par- ticularly those in aquatic ecosystemsPERSPECTIVE Restoration of Ecosystem Services for Environmental Markets Margaret A. Palmer1,2 * and Solange Filoso1 Ecological restoration is an activity that ideally results in the return of an ecosystem

Palmer, Margaret A.

39

Technical Guidance for the Design and Implementation of Climate-Smart Restoration Projects Restoring the Great  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Guidance for the Design and Implementation of Climate-Smart Restoration Projects for the Design and Implementation of Climate- Smart Restoration Projects with Seven Case Studies. 2014. National for the Design and Implementation of Climate-Smart Restoration Projects ii Restoring the Great Lakes' Coastal

40

Oregon's Restoration Economy Restoring watersheds is a starting point for a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

15 20 25 30 Restoration: Labor-intensive Restoration: Average Transportation Infrastructure Energy activity in communities around Oregon, today and into the future. "As the restoration economy blossoms in natural assets for the benefit of communities and salmon Oxbow Mine Tailings Restoration Project, Middle

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "affected restoration estimates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

March 2014 ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION 32:1 59 Ecological Restoration Vol. 32, No. 1, 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

knowledge. Keywords: aquatic restoration, exotics, introduced species, Oncorhynchus clarkii, protected areas decide to restore the native ecosystems by eliminating introduced salmonid populations. GillnettingMarch 2014 ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION 32:1 � 59 Ecological Restoration Vol. 32, No. 1, 2014 ISSN 1522

Fraser, Dylan J.

42

FAQS Qualification Card - Environmental Restoration | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Environmental Restoration Environmental Restoration FAQS Qualification Card - Environmental Restoration A key element for the Department's Technical Qualification Programs is a set of common Functional Area Qualification Standards (FAQS) and associated Job Task Analyses (JTA). These standards are developed for various functional areas of responsibility in the Department, including oversight of safety management programs identified as hazard controls in Documented Safety Analyses (DSA). For each functional area, the FAQS identify the minimum technical competencies and supporting knowledge and skills for a typical qualified individual working in the area. FAQC-EnvironmentalRestoration.docx Description Environmental Restoration Qualification Card More Documents & Publications FAQS Qualification Card - General Technical Base

43

Estimating Administrative and Procedural Costs Natural Resource Restoration Settlements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

assessment costs incurred by natural resource trustee agencies (i.e., the federal, state, Indian tribe, and, trustee costs #12;The goal of natural resource damage assessment actions undertaken subsequent to the trustees, or some combination thereof. The damage assessment costs incurred by the natural resource

44

The land value impacts of wetland restoration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract U.S. regulations require offsets for aquatic ecosystems damaged during land development, often through restoration of alternative resources. What effect does large-scale wetland and stream restoration have on surrounding land values? Restoration effects on real estate values have substantial implications for protecting resources, increasing tax base, and improving environmental policies. Our analysis focuses on the three-county Raleigh–Durham–Chapel Hill, North Carolina region, which has experienced rapid development and extensive aquatic ecological restoration (through the state's Ecosystem Enhancement Program [EEP]). Since restoration sites are not randomly distributed across space, we used a genetic algorithm to match parcels near restoration sites with comparable control parcels. Similar to propensity score analysis, this technique facilitates statistical comparison and isolates the effects of restoration sites on surrounding real estate values. Compared to parcels not proximate to any aquatic resources, we find that, 1) natural aquatic systems steadily and significantly increase parcel values up to 0.75 mi away, and 2) parcels restoration sites have significantly lower sale prices, while 3) parcels >0.5 mi from EEP sites gain substantial amenity value. When we control for intervening water bodies (e.g. un-restored streams and wetlands), we find a similar inflection point whereby parcels aquatic ecosystem restoration programs and increased public information about their value.

Nikhil Kaza; Todd K. BenDor

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Environmental Security and Restoration | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environmental Security & Restoration Environmental Security & Restoration Argonne's work in environmental security and restoration addresses soil, surface water, sediment, and groundwater at contaminated sites. Argonne's work in environmental restoration addresses soil, surface water, sediment, and groundwater at contaminated sites, starting with environmental evaluations and planning projects. Assessments are also conducted of approaches for long-term stewardship of remediated sites with residual contamination. Remedies range from precise excavations to innovative combinations of engineered wetlands and phytoremediation. Argonne researchers conduct approaches for long-term stewardship of remediated sites with residual contamination. The objective of environmental security programs is to support efforts to reduce national

46

ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION QUALIFICATION STANDARD REFERENCE GUIDE  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Restoration Qualification Standard Reference Guide NOVEMBER 2009 i Table of Contents i FIGURES...................................................................................................................................... iv TABLES........................................................................................................................................ iv ACRONYMS ................................................................................................................................. v PURPOSE...................................................................................................................................... 1 SCOPE ...........................................................................................................................................

47

ARBORETUM RESTORATION PROJECT April 3rd, 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ARBORETUM RESTORATION PROJECT April 3rd, 2013 Prepared by Students of Field Methods in Hydrology .......................................................................................................25 4.2 Procedures............................................................................................................................40 5.1 Procedures

Pasternack, Gregory B.

48

Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Receiving and Processing Facility Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility Waste Treatment Plant Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility Email Email Page | Print Print...

49

EIS-0425: Mid-Columbia Coho Restoration, Washington | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EIS-0425: Mid-Columbia Coho Restoration, Washington EIS-0425: Mid-Columbia Coho Restoration, Washington EIS-0425: Mid-Columbia Coho Restoration, Washington Summary This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of DOE's Bonneville Power Administration's proposal to fund the construction, operation, and maintenance of a coho salmon restoration program sponsored by the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation to help mitigate impacts to fish affected by the Federal Columbia River Power System dams on the Columbia River. The Proposed Action would involve building a new, small, in-basin adult holding/spawning, incubation and rearing facility on the Wenatchee River at one of two potential sites; and constructing and improving several sites in both the Wenatchee and Methow river basins in north central Washington State.

50

EIS-0425: Mid-Columbia Coho Restoration, Washington | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

25: Mid-Columbia Coho Restoration, Washington 25: Mid-Columbia Coho Restoration, Washington EIS-0425: Mid-Columbia Coho Restoration, Washington Summary This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of DOE's Bonneville Power Administration's proposal to fund the construction, operation, and maintenance of a coho salmon restoration program sponsored by the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation to help mitigate impacts to fish affected by the Federal Columbia River Power System dams on the Columbia River. The Proposed Action would involve building a new, small, in-basin adult holding/spawning, incubation and rearing facility on the Wenatchee River at one of two potential sites; and constructing and improving several sites in both the Wenatchee and Methow river basins in north central Washington State.

51

Waste Generation Forecast for DOE-ORO`s Environmental Restoration OR-1 Project: FY 1994--FY 2001. Environmental Restoration Program, September 1993 Revision  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Waste Generation Forecast for DOE-ORO`s Environmental Restoration OR-1 Project. FY 1994--FY 2001 is the third in a series of documents that report current estimates of the waste volumes expected to be generated as a result of Environmental Restoration activities at Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Office (DOE-ORO), sites. Considered in the scope of this document are volumes of waste expected to be generated as a result of remedial action and decontamination and decommissioning activities taking place at these sites. Sites contributing to the total estimates make up the DOE-ORO Environmental Restoration OR-1 Project: the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Y-12 Plant, the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and the off-site contaminated areas adjacent to the Oak Ridge facilities (collectively referred to as the Oak Ridge Reservation Off-Site area). Estimates are available for the entire fife of all waste generating activities. This document summarizes waste estimates forecasted for the 8-year period of FY 1994-FY 2001. Updates with varying degrees of change are expected throughout the refinement of restoration strategies currently in progress at each of the sites. Waste forecast data are relatively fluid, and this document represents remediation plans only as reported through September 1993.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

The Role of Science in Ecosystem Restoration and Management: The South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Initiative  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Reuse Wastewater Seepage Management Surface Water Storage Reservoir Removing Barriers to SheetflowThe Role of Science in Ecosystem Restoration and Management: The South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Initiative Frank J. Mazzotti University of Florida Fort Lauderdale Research and Education Center

Mazzotti, Frank

53

Response and Restoration | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Restoration Restoration Response and Restoration Despite all of ISER's efforts to promote reliability and resiliency in the energy sector, domestic and global events will occur that will disrupt the sector and ISER must always be prepared to respond. In the face of both manmade and natural disasters, ISER applies cutting edge technical solutions and emergency management expertise to help overcome challenges inherent in quickly restoring an incredibly complex U.S. energy system. ISER plans, trains, and coordinates year round with all relevant stakeholders so that it can meet our nation's energy needs by deploying energy emergency responders to coordinate and facilitate system restoration activities with local, state, territorial, Federal, public and private sector stakeholders, in some cases, coordinating the utilization of certain

54

Restoration Tax Abatement (Louisiana) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Restoration Tax Abatement (Louisiana) Restoration Tax Abatement (Louisiana) Restoration Tax Abatement (Louisiana) < Back Eligibility Commercial Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Solar Buying & Making Electricity Wind Program Info State Louisiana Program Type Property Tax Incentive Provider Louisiana Economic Development Restoration Tax Abatement (RTA) Program provides five-year property tax abatement for the expansion, restoration, improvement, and development of existing commercial structures and owner-occupied residences. The program grants a five-year deferred assessment of the ad valorem property taxes on renovations and improvements. Equipment that becomes an integral part of the structure can qualify for this exemption. The structure must be located

55

Hurricane Response and Restoration | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hurricane Response and Restoration Hurricane Response and Restoration Hurricane Response and Restoration June 1, 2011 - 5:15pm Addthis Despite all of ISER's efforts to promote reliability and resiliency in the energy sector, domestic and global events will occur that will disrupt the sector and ISER must always be prepared to respond. In the face of both manmade and natural disasters, ISER applies cutting edge technical solutions and emergency management expertise to help overcome challenges inherent in quickly restoring an incredibly complex U.S. energy system. ISER plans, trains, and coordinates year round with all relevant stakeholders so that it can meet our nation's energy needs by deploying energy emergency responders to coordinate and facilitate system restoration activities with local, state, territorial, Federal, public and private

56

The Carolina Bay Restoration Project - Final Report 2000-2006.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Wetlands Mitigation Bank was established at SRS in 1997 as a compensatory alternative for unavoidable wetland losses. Prior to restoration activities, 16 sites included in the project were surveyed for the SRS Site Use system to serve as a protective covenant. Pre-restoration monitoring ended in Fall 2000, and post restoration monitoring began in the Winter/Spring of 2001. The total interior harvest in the 16 bays after harvesting the trees was 19.6 ha. The margins in the opencanopy, pine savanna margin treatments were thinned. Margins containing areas with immature forested stands (bay 5184 and portions of bay 5011) were thinned using a mechanical shredder in November 2001. Over 126 hectares were included in the study areas (interior + margin). Planting of two tree species and the transplanting of wetland grass species was successful. From field surveys, it was estimated that approximately 2700 Nyssa sylvatica and 1900 Taxodium distichum seedlings were planted in the eight forested bays resulting in an average planting density of ? 490 stems ha-1. One hundred seedlings of each species per bay (where available) were marked to evaluate survivability and growth. Wetland grass species were transplanted from donor sites on SRS to plots that ranged in size from 100 – 300 m2, depending on wetland size. On 0.75 and 0.6 meter centers, respectively, 2198 plugs of Panicum hemitomon and 3021 plugs Leersia hexandra were transplanted. New shoots originating from the stumps were treated with a foliar herbicide (Garlon® 4) during the summer of 2001 using backpack sprayers. Preliminary information from 2000-2004 regarding the hydrologic, vegetation and faunal response to restoration is presented in this status report.

Barton, Christopher

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

57

Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan Regulation Act (Florida) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan Regulation Act (Florida) Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan Regulation Act (Florida) Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan Regulation Act (Florida) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Florida Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Florida Department of Environmental Protection

58

Symmetry-restoring treatment of the pairing Hamiltonian in the quasiparticle representation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In analogy with a symmetry-restoring treatment of rotational invariance for deformed Hamiltonians, we discuss the case of a separable monopole pairing Hamiltonian in the quasiparticle basis. The results are compared to estimates of a conventional treatment based on the quasiparticle random phase approximation.

O. Civitarese and M. C. Licciardo

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Wild Life Restoration in the Forest Preserves  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Life Restoration in the Forest Preserves Life Restoration in the Forest Preserves Nature Bulletin No. 613 October 15, 1960 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist WILD LIFE RESTORATION IN THE FOREST PRESERVES The wealth of wildlife in the Cook County forest preserves rivals that in any of the other 101 Illinois counties, in spite of the fact that over half of the state's people are crowded within its boundaries. The large variety of birds, mammals and other animal life now in this county is possible largely because the Forest Preserve District protects their natural habitats, including many that have been restored. These include timbered rolling uplands, wooded stream valleys, prairie remnants, sand flats, marshes, and a hundred bodies of water. Protection, for as much as forty years, against fire, hunting, trapping and other destruction has allowed the natural comeback of these habitats and the build-up of wildlife populations.

60

Estimating Methods  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Based on the project's scope, the purpose of the estimate, and the availability of estimating resources, the estimator can choose one or a combination of techniques when estimating an activity or project. Estimating methods, estimating indirect and direct costs, and other estimating considerations are discussed in this chapter.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "affected restoration estimates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

La Jolla workshop Native plant restoration working group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and reduce resuspension. 6. Herbivory can be detrimental to native plant restoration. Herbivory differs among

62

DARRP -Protecting and restoring natural resources nationwide Protecting and Restoring Natural Resources in Guam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in fish consumption adviso- ries in some areas of Guam. What we do NOAA's Damage Assessment, Remediation resources to-- Work cooperatively with those responsible for the incident Develop innovative approaches and techniques for remediation and restoration Work with the public to select restoration options to compensate

63

330 September 2009 ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION 27:3 Ecological Restoration Vol. 27, No. 3, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, provide linear habitat connectivity, link aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, and create thermal refugia ecosystems to climate change. Such modifications may include accelerating the restoration of private lands decades, advances in the science and practice of restoring damaged riparian ecosystems have addressed

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

64

Restoration islands supplied by gas turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper describes how gas turbine based plants (open cycle and combined cycle) can be profitably used in power system restoration for supplying restoration areas. In recent times, in fact, several gas turbine sections entered the power system due to the improved efficiency of gas turbines and to the development of high efficiency combined-cycle plants. These units can be easily improved to provide black-start capability and can therefore largely increase the black-start capacity of the entire system. Restoration islands to be used for minimizing the time to supply critical areas, such as urban and industrial zones, can support the usual restoration paths designed to provide cranking power to large steam units. The paper presents the defining criteria for the procedures to be followed during restoration. An example referred to as an urban area is reported with simulation results. The Italian System Operator recently carried out some tests on an open cycle gas turbine aimed at checking the island operation of the unit. Some results are described.

S. Barsali; D. Poli; A. Praticò; R. Salvati; M. Sforna; R. Zaottini

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Adaptive management of coastal ecosystem restoration projects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There is a clear need to apply better and more effective management schemes to coastal ecosystem restoration projects. It is very common for aquatic ecosystem restoration projects not to meet their goals. Poor performance has led to a high degree of uncertainty about the potential success of any restoration effort. Under adaptive management, the knowledge gained through monitoring of the project and social policies is translated into restoration policy and program redesign. Planners and managers can utilize the information from the monitoring programs in an effective way to assure that project goals are met or that informed and objective decisions are made to address both ecological and societal needs. The three main ingredients of an effective adaptive management plan in a restoration project are: (1) a clear goal statement; (2) a conceptual model; and (3) a decision framework. The goal ‘drives’ the design of the project and helps guide the development of performance criteria. The goal statement and performance criteria provide the means by which the system can be judged. With the conceptual model, the knowledge base from the field of ecological science plays an active and critical role in designing the project to meet the goal. A system-development matrix provides a simple decision framework to view the alternative states for the system during development, incorporate knowledge gained through the monitoring program, and formulate a decision on actions to take if the system is not meeting its goal.

Ronald M Thom

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Notices Affected Public: Individuals and  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

23 Federal Register 23 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 23 / Thursday, February 3, 2011 / Notices Affected Public: Individuals and households; not-for-profit institutions; State, Local, or Tribal Government, State Educational Agencies or Local Educational Agencies. Total Estimated Number of Annual Responses: 22,760. Total Estimated Number of Annual Burden Hours: 8,725. Abstract: The study is being conducted as part of the National Assessment of Title I, mandated by Title I, Part E, Section 1501 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. The study is designed to identify school programs and instructional practices associated with improved language development, background knowledge, and comprehension outcomes for children in prekindergarten through third grade. Analyses will estimate the

67

Environmental Restoration Program Roadmap: Strategic program plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a strategic plan for accomplishing environmental restoration objectives at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). Waste Management (WM) for environmental restoration activities and integration of these activities into the PORTS WM operations is addressed in this document. The document provides detailed information concerning specific assumptions and activities required to meet DOE`s environmental restoration objectives at this site. Environmental contamination at PORTS consists mainly of spent solvents and low level radionuclides. Solvents were used for industrial metal cleaning operations required to maintain the process during operations. Plumes of groundwater contamination resulting from past disposal of these spent solvents in landfills and impoundments extend from several locations within the site. Also, two sludge impoundments associated with a chromate reduction facility were characterized as having soil and groundwater contaminated with hexavalent chromium.

Not Available

1992-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

68

Environmental Restoration Program Roadmap: Strategic program plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a strategic plan for accomplishing environmental restoration objectives at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). Waste Management (WM) for environmental restoration activities and integration of these activities into the PORTS WM operations is addressed in this document. The document provides detailed information concerning specific assumptions and activities required to meet DOE's environmental restoration objectives at this site. Environmental contamination at PORTS consists mainly of spent solvents and low level radionuclides. Solvents were used for industrial metal cleaning operations required to maintain the process during operations. Plumes of groundwater contamination resulting from past disposal of these spent solvents in landfills and impoundments extend from several locations within the site. Also, two sludge impoundments associated with a chromate reduction facility were characterized as having soil and groundwater contaminated with hexavalent chromium.

Not Available

1992-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

69

Site & Facility Restoration | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Restoration Restoration Site & Facility Restoration Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D) is the process of taking an active/excess/abandoned facility to a final disposition end state. Because of residual radioactivity, other hazardous constituents, and the physical condition of EM's facilities, D&D presents unique hazards that must be addressed from a safety, programmatic, environmental, and technological standpoint. Read more Soil & Groundwater Remediation The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) manages the largest groundwater and soil remediation effort in the world. The inventory at the DOE sites includes 6.5 trillion liters of contaminated groundwater, an amount equal to about four times the daily U.S. water consumption, and 40 million cubic

70

Process for restoring membrane permeation properties  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for restoring the selectivity of high-flee-volume, glassy polymer membranes for condensable components over less-condensable components or non-condensable components of a gas mixture. The process involves exposing the membrane to suitable sorbent vapor, such as propane or butane, thereby reopening the microvoids that make up the free volume. The selectivity of an aged membrane may be restored to 70-100% of its original value. The selectivity of a membrane which is known to age over time can also be maintained by keeping the membrane in a vapor environment when it is not in use.

Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA); Toy, Lora G. (San Francisco, CA); Casillas, Carlos G. (San Jose, CA)

1997-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

71

Process for restoring membrane permeation properties  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for restoring the selectivity of high-free-volume, glassy polymer membranes for condensable components over less-condensable components or non-condensable components of a gas mixture. The process involves exposing the membrane to suitable sorbent vapor, such as propane or butane, thereby reopening the microvoids that make up the free volume. The selectivity of an aged membrane may be restored to 70--100% of its original value. The selectivity of a membrane which is known to age over time can also be maintained by keeping the membrane in a vapor environment when it is not in use. 8 figs.

Pinnau, I.; Toy, L.G.; Casillas, C.G.

1997-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

72

NFWF Five Star & Urban Waters Restoration Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) is accepting applications for up to $2.1 million to develop community capacity to sustain local natural resources for future generations by providing modest financial assistance to diverse local partnership for wetland, riparian, forest and coastal habitat restoration, urban wildlife conservation, stormwater management as well as outreach, education and stewardship.

73

Method of restoring degraded solar cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Amorphous silicon solar cells have been shown to have efficiencies which degrade as a result of long exposure to light. Annealing such cells in air at a temperature of about 200 C for at least 30 minutes restores their efficiency. 2 figs.

Staebler, D.L.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Method of restoring degraded solar cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Amorphous silicon solar cells have been shown to have efficiencies which degrade as a result of long exposure to light. Annealing such cells in air at a temperature of about 200.degree. C. for at least 30 minutes restores their efficiency.

Staebler, David L. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

TOWARDS AFFECTIVE ALGORITHMIC COMPOSITION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TOWARDS AFFECTIVE ALGORITHMIC COMPOSITION Duncan Williams* , Alexis Kirke* , Eduardo Reck Miranda are driving an emerging field: affective algorithmic composition. Strate- gies for algorithmic composition within the last decade) implementing systems for algorithmic composition with the intention of targeting

Miranda, Eduardo Reck

76

Secretary Bodman Signs Order to Help Restore Electricity to East...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Signs Order to Help Restore Electricity to East Texas More Quickly Secretary Bodman Signs Order to Help Restore Electricity to East Texas More Quickly September 28, 2005 - 10:58am...

77

Final Strategic Plan Released by Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Taskforce  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Today (December 5) the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force released its final strategy for long-term restoration in the Gulf, a path forward based on input from states, tribes, federal...

78

Improving sampling designs for measuring restoration in aquatic habitats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Restoration of degraded habitat is an increasingly important toll for management. Unfortunately, much of the emphasis has been on restoring large structural elements of habitat (e.g. planting vegetation,removi...

M.G. Chapman

79

Eco-cultural Restoration of the Mesopotamian Marshes, Southern Iraq  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

If there is hope for restoring the Mesopotamian marshes of southern Iraq and Iran, it lies with two key...

Michelle Stevens; Hamid K. Ahmed Dr.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Enforcement Letter, Fernald Environmental Restoration- September 12, 1996  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Issued to the Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation related to the Radiation Control Technician Training Program at the Fernald Site

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "affected restoration estimates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

SCORE GUIDED AUDIO RESTORATION VIA GENERALISED COUPLED TENSOR FACTORISATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SCORE GUIDED AUDIO RESTORATION VIA GENERALISED COUPLED TENSOR FACTORISATION Umut S¸ims¸ekli, Y and piano roll representations to solve audio in- terpolation and restoration problem. The model when 50% of data frames are missing. Index Terms-- Audio Restoration, Coupled Tensor Fac- torisation 1

Cemgil, A. Taylan

82

Big Canyon Creek Ecological Restoration Strategy.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

He-yey, Nez Perce for steelhead or rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), are a culturally and ecologically significant resource within the Big Canyon Creek watershed; they are also part of the federally listed Snake River Basin Steelhead DPS. The majority of the Big Canyon Creek drainage is considered critical habitat for that DPS as well as for the federally listed Snake River fall chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) ESU. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resources Management-Watershed (Tribe), in an effort to support the continued existence of these and other aquatic species, have developed this document to direct funding toward priority restoration projects in priority areas for the Big Canyon Creek watershed. In order to achieve this, the District and the Tribe: (1) Developed a working group and technical team composed of managers from a variety of stakeholders within the basin; (2) Established geographically distinct sub-watershed areas called Assessment Units (AUs); (3) Created a prioritization framework for the AUs and prioritized them; and (4) Developed treatment strategies to utilize within the prioritized AUs. Assessment Units were delineated by significant shifts in sampled juvenile O. mykiss (steelhead/rainbow trout) densities, which were found to fall at fish passage barriers. The prioritization framework considered four aspects critical to determining the relative importance of performing restoration in a certain area: density of critical fish species, physical condition of the AU, water quantity, and water quality. It was established, through vigorous data analysis within these four areas, that the geographic priority areas for restoration within the Big Canyon Creek watershed are Big Canyon Creek from stream km 45.5 to the headwaters, Little Canyon from km 15 to 30, the mainstem corridors of Big Canyon (mouth to 7km) and Little Canyon (mouth to 7km). The District and the Tribe then used data collected from the District's stream assessment and inventory, utilizing the Stream Visual Assessment Protocol (SVAP), to determine treatment necessary to bring 90% of reaches ranked Poor or Fair through the SVAP up to good or excellent. In 10 year's time, all reaches that were previously evaluated with SVAP will be reevaluated to determine progress and to adapt methods for continued success. Over 400 miles of stream need treatment in order to meet identified restoration goals. Treatments include practices which result in riparian habitat improvements, nutrient reductions, channel condition improvements, fish habitat improvements, invasive species control, water withdrawal reductions, improved hydrologic alterations, upland sediment reductions, and passage barrier removal. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management Watershed Division (Tribe) developed this document to guide restoration activities within the Big Canyon Creek watershed for the period of 2008-2018. This plan was created to demonstrate the ongoing need and potential for anadromous fish habitat restoration within the watershed and to ensure continued implementation of restoration actions and activities. It was developed not only to guide the District and the Tribe, but also to encourage cooperation among all stakeholders, including landowners, government agencies, private organizations, tribal governments, and elected officials. Through sharing information, skills, and resources in an active, cooperative relationships, all concerned parties will have the opportunity to join together to strengthen and maintain a sustainable natural resource base for present and future generations within the watershed. The primary goal of the strategy is to address aquatic habitat restoration needs on a watershed level for resident and anadromous fish species, promoting quality habitat within a self-sustaining watershed. Seven objectives have been developed to support this goal: (1) Identify factors limiting quality

Rasmussen, Lynn; Richardson, Shannon

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Cognition and affect in the development of sense of place  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 1974a), both selfconscious and unselfconscious (Relph, 1976), and both cognitive and affective (Firey, 1945; Piaget and Weil, 1951). These definitions and charac- terizations are the beginning attempts at describing the processes by which sense... experience are greatly weakened in most contemporary cultures. The trend is toward an environment of few significant places--towards a placeless geography (Relph, 1976, 93, 117). As a result of this concern there is a trend to restore and encourage sense...

Engman, Dianne Lynn

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

84

Lost lake - restoration of a Carolina bay  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carolina bays are shallow wetland depressions found only on the Atlantic Coastal Plain. Although these isolated interstream wetlands support many types of communities, they share the common features of having a sandy margin, a fluctuating water level, an elliptical shape, and a northwest to southeast orientation. Lost Lake, an 11.3 hectare Carolina bay, was ditched and drained for agricultural production before establishment of the Savannah River Site in 1950. Later it received overflow from a seepage basin containing a variety of chemicals, primarily solvents and some heavy metals. In 1990 a plan was developed for the restoration of Lost Lake, and restoration activities were complete by mid-1991. Lost Lake is the first known project designed for the restoration and recovery of a Carolina bay. The bay was divided into eight soil treatment zones, allowing four treatments in duplicate. Each of the eight zones was planted with eight species of native wetland plants. Recolonization of the bay by amphibians and reptiles is being evaluated by using drift fences with pitfall traps and coverboard arrays in each of the treatment zones. Additional drift fences in five upland habitats were also established. Hoop turtle traps, funnel minnow traps, and dip nets were utilized for aquatic sampling. The presence of 43 species common to the region has been documented at Lost Lake. More than one-third of these species show evidence of breeding populations being established. Three species found prior to the restoration activity and a number of species common to undisturbed Carolina bays were not encountered. Colonization by additional species is anticipated as the wetland undergoes further succession.

Hanlin, H.G.; McLendon, J.P. [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States). Dept. of Biology and Geology; Wike, L.D. [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States). Dept. of Biology and Geology; [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Technology Center; Dietsch, B.M. [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States). Dept. of Biology and Geology; [Univ. of Georgia, Aiken, SC (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Russian: United States Environmental Restoration Workshop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Russian - United States Environmental Restoration Workshop, held in Washington, D.C., and Richland, Washington, from April 5 through 18, 1993, was the first extended collaborative information exchange between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Russian scientists at the site level. In addition to the Russian scientists, workshop participants included scientists and staff from DOE, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), the US Environmental Training Institute (USETI), universities, and the private sector. The first week (April 5 through 10) of the workshop took place in Washington, D.C., where the Russian and US participants were presented with a US perspective on environmental restoration and remediation issues from representatives in DOE and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The second week (April 11 through 18) occurred in Richland, Washington, where the participants were presented with site-specific environmental restoration and remediation issues related to Hanford Site cleanup. This report is a compilation of the presentations, discussions, and experiences shared during the second week of the workshop in Richland, Washington.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

S.M. Stoller Corporation and US Department of Energy PINELLAS ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

for: for: S.M. Stoller Corporation and US Department of Energy PINELLAS ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION PROJECT YOUNG - RAINEV STAR CENTER EVALUATION OF SUBSURFACE VAPOR INTRUSION BUILDING 100 LARGO, FLORIDA Prepared b y : 1 3 0 Research Lane, Suite 2 Guelph, Ontario N I G 5G3 GeoSyntec Project Number TR0 1 5 0 2 6 June 2 0 0 3 GeoSyntec Consultants TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 2. BACKGROUND .................................................................................................. 2 3. CONSIDERATION OF THE RECENT OSWER GUIDANCE DOCUMENT.. 4 4. APPROACH AND RATIONALE ....................................................................... 5 5 . ESTIMATED INDOOR AIR CONCENTRATIONS - ENTIRE BUILDING ... 6 6. ESTIMATED INDOOR AIR CONCENTRATIONS - BUILDING SUBSECTION ..................................................................................... .............. 8

87

Cost Estimator  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A successful candidate in this position will serve as a senior cost and schedule estimator who is responsible for preparing life-cycle cost and schedule estimates and analyses associated with the...

88

On-site vs off-site management of environmental restoration waste: A cost effectiveness analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Restoration Project is expected to generate relatively large volumes of hazardous waste as a result of cleanup operations. These volumes will exceed the Laboratories existing waste management capacity. This paper presents four options for managing remediation wastes, including three alternatives for on-site waste management utilizing a corrective action management unit (CAMU). Costs are estimated for each of the four options based on current volumetric estimates of hazardous waste. Cost equations are derived for each of the options with the variables being waste volumes, the major unknowns in the analysis. These equations provide a means to update cost estimates as volume estimates change. This approach may be helpful to others facing similar waste management decisions.

Morse, M.A. [Terradigm, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Aamodt, P.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Cox, W.B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Small Business Issues for Environmental Restoration Acquisitions  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Issues for Environmental Issues for Environmental Restoration Acquisitions The Department of Energy's best practices to reduce and eliminate barriers to small businesses entering into prime contracts for major environmental remediation acquisitions are as follows: Withholding of Payments Billing Cycles Allowability of Insurance Bonding Requirements WITHHOLDING OF PAYMENTS Under a cost reimbursement contract, the Federal Government makes payments conditionally, subject to a final audit. Typically, in a cost reimbursement contract, the Federal Government retains a portion of the payments made to the contractor so that, at the end of the contract, when the final audit is completed and actions are taken to close

90

Variational Iteration Method for Image Restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The famous Perona-Malik (P-M) equation which was at first introduced for image restoration has been solved via various numerical methods. In this paper we will solve it for the first time via applying a new numerical method called the Variational Iteration Method (VIM) and the correspondent approximated solutions will be obtained for the P-M equation with regards to relevant error analysis. Through implementation of our algorithm we will access some effective results which are deserved to be considered as worthy as the other solutions issued by the other methods.

Yahya, Keyvan; Azari, Hossein; Fard, Pouyan Rafiei

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

The Carolina Bay Restoration Project - Status Report II 2000-2004.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Wetlands Mitigation Bank was established at SRS in 1997 as a compensatory alternative for unavoidable wetland losses. Prior to restoration activities, 16 sites included in the project were surveyed for the SRS Site Use system to serve as a protective covenant. Pre-restoration monitoring ended in Fall 2000, and post restoration monitoring began in the Winter/Spring of 2001. The total interior harvest in the 16 bays after harvesting the trees was 19.6 ha. The margins in the opencanopy, pine savanna margin treatments were thinned. Margins containing areas with immature forested stands (bay 5184 and portions of bay 5011) were thinned using a mechanical shredder in November 2001. Over 126 hectares were included in the study areas (interior + margin). Planting of two tree species and the transplanting of wetland grass species was successful. From field surveys, it was estimated that approximately 2700 Nyssa sylvatica and 1900 Taxodium distichum seedlings were planted in the eight forested bays resulting in an average planting density of ? 490 stems ha-1. One hundred seedlings of each species per bay (where available) were marked to evaluate survivability and growth. Wetland grass species were transplanted from donor sites on SRS to plots that ranged in size from 100 – 300 m2, depending on wetland size. On 0.75 and 0.6 meter centers, respectively, 2198 plugs of Panicum hemitomon and 3021 plugs Leersia hexandra were transplanted. New shoots originating from the stumps were treated with a foliar herbicide (Garlon® 4) during the summer of 2001 using backpack sprayers. Preliminary information from 2000-2004 regarding the hydrologic, vegetation and faunal response to restoration is presented in this status report. Post restoration monitoring will continue through 2005. A final report to the Mitigation Bank Review Team will be submitted in mid-2006.

Barton, Christopher

2006-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

92

Four-quark condensates and chiral symmetry restoration in a resonance gas model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As an alternative to the two-quark condensate we propose a specific four-quark condensate as an order parameter of chiral symmetry restoration. We show that this four-quark condensate is closer connected to observable quantities. Within a resonance gas model we calculate the in-medium changes of two- and four-quark condensate as functions of temperature and baryo-chemical potential. In this way we estimate the line of chiral symmetry restoration in the temperature-potential plane and also as a function of energy and baryon density. It turns out that the line determined from the vanishing of the four-quark condensate is extremely constant as a function of the energy density.

Stefan Leupold

2006-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

93

Gulf of Mexico Regional Ecosystem Restoration Strategy, Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force, December 2011  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

c c Gulf of Mexico Regional Ecosystem Restoration Strategy Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force December 2011 G u l f C o a s t E c o s y s t e m R e s t o r a t i o n T a s k F o r c e Cover Photo Credits: Brown pelicans: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Volunteer planting marsh grass: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Steve Hillebrand Turtle: Texas Parks and Wildlife Department Wetlands: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Boats: Mississippi Development Authority, Tourism Division Nothing in this document is intended to create private rights of action or other enforceable individual legal rights. ©2011 Google Earth Map of Gulf of Mexico Coast US Gulf of Mexico Regional Ecosystem Restoration Strategy Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force December 2011 G u l f C o a s t E c o s y s t e m R e

94

Summary - Operational Issues at the Environmental Restoration...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

In 2006, events occurred that affected the operation of the automatic leachate transfer pumps and a technician confessed to having not performed compaction tests and to...

95

Secondary succession, community assembly and restoration in grasslands and savannas.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A final report made to the US Forest Service that addresses savannah restoration research findings from research conducted at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina.

Foster, Bryan, L.; Aschenbach, Todd

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

BPA employees help restore stream habitat for Earth Day  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

at a watershed restoration event held on Earth Day (May 1) at Beaver Creek in Troutdale, Ore. A team of employee volunteers joined representatives from SOLVE (Stop Oregon...

97

Lake restoration by reduction of nutrient loading: Expectations ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

aquatic science should read. The Louis ... edge of the ecosystems changes that resulted from this ... restoration case histories have been published during.

2000-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

98

Training, simulation, restoration expert system for power grid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper introduces some technology for training, simulation, restoration expert system of power grid, the structure of the system including function composition, hardware and software composition are discuss...

An Luo; Qian Chen

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Wind River Watershed Restoration 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During 2004, researchers from U.S. Geological Survey's Columbia River Research Laboratory (USGS-CRRL) collected temperature, flow, and habitat data to characterize physical habitat condition and variation within and among tributaries and mainstem sections in the Wind River subbasin. Juvenile salmonid population surveys were conducted within select study areas throughout the subbasin. We expanded our survey coverage of the mainstem Wind River to a reach in the vicinity of Carson National Fish Hatchery to assess effects of non-indigenous Chinook on native steelhead. These efforts add to a database of habitat and fish data collected in the Wind River since 1996. This research contributes to the Wind River Restoration Project, which includes active stream habitat restoration and monitoring of adult and juvenile steelhead populations. We maintained a network of 32 thermographs in the Wind River subbasin during 2004. Additionally, Underwood Conservation District provided us with data from seven thermographs that they maintained during 2004. Thermograph data are identifying areas with chronic high water temperatures and stream sections where high rates of warming are occurring. During 2004, water temperatures at 26 thermograph sites exceeded the 16 C limit for surface waters set by the Washington Department of Ecology. Water temperatures exceeded 20 C at five sites in the Trout Creek watershed. Our thermograph dataset includes information from as early as 1996 at some sites and has become a valuable long-term dataset, which will be crucial in determining bioenergetic relationships with habitat and life-histories. We have monitored salmonid populations throughout the Wind River subbasin by electrofishing and snorkeling. We electrofished four stream sections for population estimates during 2004. In these sections, and others where we simply collected fish without a population estimate, we tagged juvenile steelhead and Chinook salmon with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags to track growth and movement of individuals. We snorkeled nine stream sections during 2004. Juvenile steelhead populations have varied greatly between streams and between years. Numbers of age-0 steelhead have increased substantially since 2000 within the MINE reach (rkm 35.0-40.0) section of the upper Wind River. Because of potential negative interactions with steelhead, naturally spawned populations of introduced juvenile Chinook salmon are of concern in the mainstem of the Wind River. During 2004, we deployed over 3,000 PIT tags in the Wind River subbasin, primarily in juvenile steelhead, but also in juvenile Chinook. We are compiling a dataset of recapture information on these tagged fish as well as interrogation information from Bonneville Dam and other sites. The habitat and fish data collected have been used in Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment modeling efforts, the Wind River Subbasin Plan, and the Total Maximum Daily Load report from Washington Department of Ecology. Continued monitoring of changes in habitat, combined with data on fish populations, will help guide planning efforts of land and fish managers. As long-term active and passive restoration actions are implemented in the Wind River and its tributaries, these data will provide the ability to measure change. Because the Wind River subbasin has no steelhead hatchery or supplementation, these data will be useful to compare population trends in subbasins with hatchery or supplementation management.

Connolly, Patrick J.; Jezorek, Ian G. [U.S. Geological Survey

2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

100

Subsistence restoration project: Food safety testing. Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Restoration Project. Final report restoration project 94279  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to restore the confidence of subsistence users in their abilities to determine the safety of their resources. Methods included community meetings, collection and testing of subsistence resources samples for hydrocarbon contamination, accompanying community representatives on tours of the laboratory where tests were conducted and informational newsletters. Over the two years of the project combined, 228 composite samples of edible tissues from shellfish were tested. The bile of forty rockfish, six sockeye salmon, twelve seals, twenty-three ducks were tested for the presence of hydrocarbon metabolites. Edible tissue (blubber) from seals was also tested. Generally, the tests showed such low levels of hydrocarbons and their metabolites, as to be within the test`s margin of error. The project was partly successful in disseminating the subsistence food safety advice of the Oil Spill Health Task Force and in improving the level of trust in the results of hydrocarbon tests on the resources.

Miraglia, R.A.; Chartrand, A.W.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "affected restoration estimates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Dictionary construction in sparse methods for image restoration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sparsity-based methods have achieved very good performance in a wide variety of image restoration problems, including denoising, inpainting, super-resolution, and source separation. These methods are based on the assumption that the image to be reconstructed may be represented as a superposition of a few known components, and the appropriate linear combination of components is estimated by solving an optimization such as Basis Pursuit De-Noising (BPDN). Considering that the K-SVD constructs a dictionary which has been optimised for mean performance over a training set, it is not too surprising that better performance can be achieved by selecting a custom dictionary for each individual block to be reconstructed. The nearest neighbor dictionary construction can be understood geometrically as a method for estimating the local projection into the manifold of image blocks, whereas the K-SVD dictionary makes more sense within a source-coding framework (it is presented as a generalization of the k-means algorithm for constructing a VQ codebook), is therefore, it could be argued, less appropriate in principle, for reconstruction problems. One can, of course, motivate the use of the K-SVD in reconstruction application on practical grounds, avoiding the computational expense of constructing a different dictionary for each block to be denoised. Since the performance of the nearest neighbor dictionary decreases when the dictionary becomes sufficiently large, this method is also superior to the approach of utilizing the entire training set as a dictionary (and this can also be understood within the image block manifold model). In practical terms, the tradeoff is between the computational cost of a nearest neighbor search (which can be achieved very efficiently), or of increased cost at the sparse optimization.

Wohlberg, Brendt [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor | Environmental Restoration Projects |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

- Cleanup Actions - Cleanup Actions Since the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) was shut down in 1968, many actions have been taken as part of the complex decommissioning. The actions undertaken throughout the BGRR complex ensure that the structures that remain are in a safe and stable condition and prepared it for long-term surveillance and maintenance. Regulatory Requirements The decommissioning of the BGRR was conducted under the federal Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). In 1992, an Interagency Agreement (PDF) among the DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) became effective. The IAG provided the overall framework for conducting environmental restoration activities at

103

Factors Affecting Photosynthesis!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Factors Affecting Photosynthesis! Temperature Eppley (1972) Light Sverdrup's Critical Depth-493, but the general concept is still valid! ! #12;PB opt & Temperature! #12;Photosynthesis & Temperature! Remember: in the laboratory, we can measure photosynthesis versus irradiance (PvsE) and calculate Ek, Pmax, and alpha

Kudela, Raphael M.

104

Assess Plan Restore DEEPWATER HORIZON OIL SPILL NRDA TRUSTEES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

workers. Millions of gallons of oil spill into the Gulf of Mexico. BP agrees to provide $1 billionAssess Plan Restore DEEPWATER HORIZON OIL SPILL NRDA TRUSTEES Early Restoration, Phase III A guide DEEPWATER HORIZON OIL SPILL NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENT TRUSTEES OCTOBER 2014 2 On April 20, 2011

105

Recycling Energy to Restore Impaired Ankle Function during Human Walking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recycling Energy to Restore Impaired Ankle Function during Human Walking Steven H. Collins1 walking, largely at the transitions between steps. The ankle then acts to restore energy during push-off, which may be the reason that ankle impairment nearly always leads to poorer walking economy

Collins, Steven H.

106

Cost-Efficacy in Wetland Restoration Projects in Coastal Louisiana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ARTICLE Cost-Efficacy in Wetland Restoration Projects in Coastal Louisiana Joy Merino & Christiane, such as wetland loss, influence CWPPRA project selection for funding. We found that the program was selecting cost- effective projects overall. Cost efficacy varied significantly by restoration project type, with barrier

107

Adaptive Restoration of Airborne Daedalus AADS1268 ATM Thermal Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To incorporate the georegistration and restoration processes into airborne data processing in support of U.S. Department of Energy's nuclear emergency response task, we developed an adaptive restoration filter for airborne Daedalus AADS1268 ATM thermal data based on the Wiener filtering theory. Preliminary assessment shows that this filter enhances the detectability of small weak thermal anomalies in AADS1268 thermal images.

D. Yuan; E. Doak; P. Guss; A. Will

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 4934 (3 credits)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 4934 (3 credits) Spring 2014 Course Description This advanced ecosystem management course will begin with an overview of the ecological basis for plant in ecology and applied plant science, graduate students in the Masters of Science, Ecological Restoration

Slatton, Clint

109

Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 6934 (3 credits)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 6934 (3 credits) Spring 2014 Course Description This advanced ecosystem management course will begin with an overview of the ecological basis for plant in ecology and applied plant science, graduate students in the Masters of Science, Ecological Restoration

Watson, Craig A.

110

Constrained sinogram restoration for limited-angle Jerry L. Prince  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for further re- search. Subject terms: image reconstruction; computed tomography; regularization; limitedConstrained sinogram restoration for limited-angle tomography Jerry L. Prince The Johns Hopkins-437 Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 CONTENTS 1. Introduction 2. Limited-angle tomography 3. Sinogram restoration

Willsky, Alan S.

111

ORIGINAL PAPER The conservation value of restored landfill sites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL PAPER The conservation value of restored landfill sites in the East Midlands, UK landfill sites. However, this potential largely remains unexplored. In this study, birds were counted using point sampling on nine restored landfill sites in the East Midlands region of the UK during 2007

Northampton, University of

112

Historical Food Web Structure and Restoration of Native Aquatic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shields Avenue, Davis, California 95616, USA ABSTRACT Plans for the restoration of aquatic ecosystemsHistorical Food Web Structure and Restoration of Native Aquatic Communities in the Lake Tahoe in structuring aquatic ecosystems, either through trophic cascades or through the strong per capita influences

Vander Zanden, Jake

113

EA-1974: Wallooskee-Youngs Confluence Restoration Project, Clatsop County,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4: Wallooskee-Youngs Confluence Restoration Project, Clatsop 4: Wallooskee-Youngs Confluence Restoration Project, Clatsop County, Oregon EA-1974: Wallooskee-Youngs Confluence Restoration Project, Clatsop County, Oregon Summary Bonneville Power Administration is preparing an EA to assess the potential environmental impacts of the proposed restoration of a tidal marsh in the Columbia River Estuary, near Astoria in Clatsop County, Oregon. The project website is https://www.bpa.gov/goto/WallooskeeYoungs. Public Comment Opportunities Comments on the scope of the EA should be marked "Wallooskee-Youngs Confluence Restoration Project" and submitted by January 27, 2014, by one of the methods listed below. Comments will be posted in their entirety on BPA's website at www.bpa.gov/comments. Toll-free phone: 800-622-4519

114

Healthy Forests Restoration Act of 2003 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Healthy Forests Restoration Act of 2003 Healthy Forests Restoration Act of 2003 Jump to: navigation, search Statute Name Healthy Forests Restoration Act of 2003 Year 2003 Url [[File:|160px|link=]] Description References Healthy Forests Restoration Act of 2003 PDF[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. The Healthy Forests Initiative (or HFI), officially the Healthy Forests Restoration Act of 2003 (P.L. 108-148), is a law originally proposed by President George W. Bush in response to the widespread forest fires during the summer of 2002.[1] The main thrusts of the law are to thin overstocked stands, clear away vegetation and trees to create shaded fuel breaks, provide funding and guidance to reduce or eliminate hazardous fuels in National Forests, improve forest fire fighting, and research new methods to

115

Early development of wetland plant and invertebrate communities: effects and implications of restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/ecosystem perspective, and implementation of clear and obtainable goals is crucial for the long-term success of wetlands restoration (Ehrenfeld and Toth 1997, Race and Fonseca 1998, Ehrenfeld 2000, Kentula 2000, Choi 2004, Simenstad et al. 2006). 4 CHAPTER II... transplanting in June 2004. The 5 selected species were introduced into the randomly assigned species blocks using the input and assistance of LAERF staff and volunteers. Stems were planted at 0.15, 0.3, and 0.45 m below estimated mean water level at a...

Berg, Matthew D.

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

116

Many Factors Affect MPG  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Many Factors Affect Fuel Economy Many Factors Affect Fuel Economy How You Drive Vehicle Maintenance Fuel Variations Vehicle Variations Engine Break-In Vehicles in traffic Quick acceleration and heavy braking can reduce fuel economy by up to 33 percent on the highway and 5 percent around town. New EPA tests account for faster acceleration rates, but vigorous driving can still lower MPG. Excessive idling decreases MPG. The EPA city test includes idling, but more idling will lower MPG. Driving at higher speeds increases aerodynamic drag (wind resistance), reducing fuel economy. The new EPA tests account for aerodynamic drag up to highway speeds of 80 mph, but some drivers exceed this speed. Cold weather and frequent short trips can reduce fuel economy, since your engine doesn't operate efficiently until it is warmed up. In colder

117

Abstract--Restoration strategies that initiate autogenic succession--byusingrather than by combating naturalprocesses--  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pro- cesses essential in the establishment and maintenance of ecological systems. Landscape Dynamics be restored to restoration sites. Landscape dynamics can be directed toward restoration objectives improvement, and nutrient cycling problems; and (4) arrange landscape compo- nents to reduce detrimental

118

Restoration of semi-natural forest after clearcutting of conifer plantations in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We reviewed recent studies on the restoration of semi-natural forests after clearcutting of conifer plantations with specific reference to the importance ... restoration. For the restoration of semi-natural forests

Hiromi Yamagawa; Satoshi Ito; Toshio Nakao

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Artificial habitats and the restoration of degraded marine ecosystems and fisheries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The challenge to any ecological restoration effort is to define the condition or ... other words, to answer the question: “Restoration to what?” Examples of aquatic ecosystem restoration from Hong Kong (fisheries...

William Seaman

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Hangman Restoration Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress has been made in defining the level of work that needs to be accomplished in the Hangman Watershed in order to restore a viable riparian system and hydrology. The end goal is to use wildlife habitat to protect streams and provide water for instream fish habitats. In order to define the most expedient means of attaining that goal an Instream Flow/Watershed Hydrology Study was initiated. The study is intended to be comprehensive in order to determine the potential of increasing base flow with Hangman Watershed Streams and predict available fish habitats for the range of flow level possibilities. The Study Plan and work for the first field season was contracted and the Plan and end of field season reports are included with this Annual Report. The initial draft of the wildlife portion of the Monitoring and Evaluation Plan was completed and presented to the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority Wildlife Committee. The Committee felt that the Basin Hydrology Study needed to be closer to completion before the bulk of wildlife monitoring should be implemented. The extent of the landscape that must be restored in order to facilitate the needed stream flows may not be large enough to affect the population levels of the Plan's target species. The main result of the Committee review of the Monitoring and Evaluation Plan however, was that since the Hangman Restoration Project is not a HU driven wildlife mitigation project than the Wildlife Committee does not have a role to play since their focus is wildlife HU crediting projects. Further work on the wildlife portion of the Monitoring and Evaluation Plan is suspended until the crediting issues surrounding the Hangman Restoration Project are settled. Certain aspects of the Plan, such as the land bird, amphibian, reptile and beaver monitoring can be implemented in the spring of the coming year because monitoring these species and groups needs to be accomplished regardless of crediting status and baseline data is needed for these. Data from the Hangman Creek Watershed from portions upstream and east of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation were included in the Second Iteration of the Habitat Prioritization Plan. These data were gathered both by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe and Idaho's Department of Environmental Quality. The addition of this portion of the Watershed in the Prioritization Plan fills a gap that the lack of data left in the first draft of the Plan. The streams in these upper headwaters support remnant salmonid populations and are close enough to be integrated with the streams and trout populations on the Reservation. The addition of this area strengthens the base from which the Hangman Restoration Project can work to secure and expand resident fish populations. An extensive 2-year search for historic photos of the upper portion of the Hangman Watershed was completed during this annual funding cycle. The disappointing result is that few photographs were acquired. One excellent panoramic view of the Upper Hangman Watershed from Tekoa Mountain was recovered and photos of this view were taken for comparison. The task of finding historic photos has been removed from future Scopes of Work, however search for photos will continue as part of the Project's public outreach. The notable exception to the lack of historic photos is the purchase, digitizing and GIS registry of 1947 aerial photo coverage of the entire Hangman Creek Watershed east of the Washington/Idaho State Boarder. In addition, 1933 aerial photo coverage of most of this same area is being registered to our GIS system. These 1933 photos were available to the Tribe prior to the initiation of this Project; however these photos are being registered partly as a result of requests made from this Project. The process of developing a map of potential vegetation types for the Hangman Watershed has benefited from establishment of an Interagency Agreement with the U.S. Geologic Survey to hire a Scientific Advisor. The Scientific Advisor has assisted with the design of a scheme to sample remnant native vegetation within an

Coeur d'Alene Tribe

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "affected restoration estimates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

E-Print Network 3.0 - ancient woodland restoration Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Renewable Energy 3 Evaluating biodiversity in fragmented landscapes: applications of landscape ecology tools Summary: restoration management Amy Eycott The restoration of Planted...

122

E-Print Network 3.0 - affects stomatal conductance Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

total daily water use, estimates of mean daily stomatal conductance were not affected... on a leaf varies constantly, the rate of change in ... Source: Teskey, Robert O. -...

123

Habitat Restoration at the Salmon, Mississippi, Site | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Property Reuse » Habitat Restoration at Property Reuse » Habitat Restoration at the Salmon, Mississippi, Site Habitat Restoration at the Salmon, Mississippi, Site Habitat Restoration at the Salmon, Mississippi, Site The 1,470-acre Salmon, Mississippi, Site is located in Lamar County, approximately 20 miles southwest of Hattiesburg, in southwestern Mississippi. It is roughly square in shape, and each side is approximately 1.52 miles long. The site was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission and the U.S. Department of Defense for underground nuclear testing in the 1960s. The site was decontaminated, remediated, and decommissioned in 1972, and all buildings and equipment were removed at that time. Two small, shallow pockets of contamination were left for remediation by natural attenuation. A subsequent remedial investigation was completed in 1999. Final site

124

Energy Department and Federal Efforts to Support Utility Power Restoration  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Federal Efforts to Support Utility Power Federal Efforts to Support Utility Power Restoration Efforts Energy Department and Federal Efforts to Support Utility Power Restoration Efforts October 31, 2012 - 5:19pm Addthis 58,000 workers are currently repairing power lines across the Mid-Atlantic in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department 58,000 workers are currently repairing power lines across the Mid-Atlantic in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department Jen Stutsman Press Secretary, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? Restoring power is a top priority for the Obama Administration and the Department of Energy. As of 2 PM EDT today, utilities have restored power to nearly 2.4 million customers. This is a 28 percent decrease from the peak following the storm.

125

Energy Department and Federal Efforts to Support Utility Power Restoration  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Department and Federal Efforts to Support Utility Power Energy Department and Federal Efforts to Support Utility Power Restoration Efforts Energy Department and Federal Efforts to Support Utility Power Restoration Efforts October 31, 2012 - 5:19pm Addthis 58,000 workers are currently repairing power lines across the Mid-Atlantic in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department 58,000 workers are currently repairing power lines across the Mid-Atlantic in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department Jen Stutsman Press Secretary, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? Restoring power is a top priority for the Obama Administration and the Department of Energy. As of 2 PM EDT today, utilities have restored power to nearly 2.4 million customers.

126

DOE Awards Contract to Restoration Services, Inc. for Environmental  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Contract to Restoration Services, Inc. for Environmental Contract to Restoration Services, Inc. for Environmental Technical Services at Portsmouth Site DOE Awards Contract to Restoration Services, Inc. for Environmental Technical Services at Portsmouth Site June 25, 2008 - 2:15pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that Restoration Services, Inc. (RSI), has been awarded a task order for environmental technical services supporting the remediation and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D)of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) at DOE's Portsmouth Site in Pinkerton, Ohio. The time and materials task order under the Environmental Services GSA Federal Supply Schedule is valued at approximately $67 million over five years (a three-year base period with the option to extend it for another two years).

127

Final Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force Strategic Plan |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Final Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force Strategic Plan Final Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force Strategic Plan Final Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force Strategic Plan The natural resources of the Gulf's ecosystem are vital to many of the region's industries that directly support economic progress and job creation, including tourism and recreation, seafood production and sales, energy production and navigation and commerce. Among the key priorities of the strategy are: 1) Stopping the Loss of Critical Wetlands, Sand Barriers and Beaches The strategy recommends placing ecosystem restoration on an equal footing with historic uses such as navigation and flood damage reduction by approaching water resource management decisions in a far more comprehensive manner that will bypass harm to wetlands, barrier islands and beaches. The

128

EA-0941: Lower Yakima Valley Wetlands and Riparian Restoration Project,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

41: Lower Yakima Valley Wetlands and Riparian Restoration 41: Lower Yakima Valley Wetlands and Riparian Restoration Project, Washington EA-0941: Lower Yakima Valley Wetlands and Riparian Restoration Project, Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration to fund that portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement pertaining to the Lower Yakima Valley Wetlands and Riparian Restoration Project (Project) in a cooperative effort with the Yakama Indian Nation and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. The proposed action would allow the sponsors to ensure property and conduct wildlife management activities for the Project within the boundaries of the Yakama Indian Reservation. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time.

129

Response to Hurricane Irene - Restoring Power on the East Coast |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Response to Hurricane Irene - Restoring Power on the East Coast Response to Hurricane Irene - Restoring Power on the East Coast Response to Hurricane Irene - Restoring Power on the East Coast September 2, 2011 - 3:15pm Addthis Response to Hurricane Irene – Restoring Power on the East Coast Patricia A. Hoffman Patricia A. Hoffman Assistant Secretary, Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability Hurricane Irene struck the East coast last Friday, making landfall in North Carolina. Over the weekend, the storm traveled up the East Coast and into the mid-Atlantic and New England areas of the U.S. In response to Irene, Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Virginia declared a State of

130

Sustainable Wetland Restoration Regenerating rare habitats in the New Forest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

important within the network, containing 75% of the valley mires in North West Europe. It has the largest on river banks, bog woodland, wet grassland and valley mires. To support their restoration, a total of 10

131

Biomarkers and predictors of restorative therapy effects after stroke  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hours after acute ischemic stroke. N Engl J Med. 2008; 359(the human brain after stroke. II. Restorative therapies.recovery from ischemic stroke. J Magn Reson Imaging. 2010;

Burke, Erin; Cramer, Steven C.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Protect and Restore Mill Creek Watershed : Annual Report CY 2005.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division approaches watershed restoration with a ridge-top to ridge-top approach. The Nez Perce Tribe and the Nez Perce National Forest (NPNF) have formed a partnership in completing watershed restoration activities, and through this partnership, more work is accomplished by sharing funding and resources in our effort. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Mill Creek watershed of the South Fork Clearwater River in 2000. Progress has been made in restoring the watershed through excluding cattle from critical riparian areas through fencing. Starting in FY 2002, continuing into 2004, trees were planted in riparian areas in the meadow of the upper watershed. In addition, a complete inventory of culverts at road-stream crossings was completed. Culverts have been prioritized for replacement to accommodate fish passage throughout the watershed, and one high priority culvert was replaced in 2004. Maintenance to the previously built fence was also completed.

McRoberts, Heidi

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

ISE 2012, Vienna USING RIVER RESTORATION OPERATIONS TO TEST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and hydroelectricity since the 19th century. A restoration program of the river started officially in 1998. It has, the Rhône River has been regulated for navigation, irrigation and hydroelectricity since the 19th century

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

134

Hanford Site waste management and environmental restoration integration plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site Waste Management and Environmental Restoration Integration Plan'' describes major actions leading to waste disposal and site remediation. The primary purpose of this document is to provide a management tool for use by executives who need to quickly comprehend the waste management and environmental restoration programs. The Waste Management and Environmental Restoration Programs have been divided into missions. Waste Management consists of five missions: double-shell tank (DST) wastes; single-shell tank (SST) wastes (surveillance and interim storage, stabilization, and isolation); encapsulated cesium and strontium; solid wastes; and liquid effluents. Environmental Restoration consists of two missions: past practice units (PPU) (including characterization and assessment of SST wastes) and surplus facilities. For convenience, both aspects of SST wastes are discussed in one place. A general category of supporting activities is also included. 20 refs., 14 figs., 7 tabs.

Merrick, D.L.

1990-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

135

DOE model conference on waste management and environmental restoration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reports dealing with current topics in waste management and environmental restoration were presented at this conference in six sessions. Session 1 covered the Hot Topics'' including regulations and risk assessment. Session 2 dealt with waste reduction and minimization; session 3 dealt with waste treatment and disposal. Session 4 covered site characterization and analysis. Environmental restoration and associated technologies wee discussed in session 5 and 6. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Richland Environmental Restoration Project management action process document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the prescribed means for providing direct input to the US Department of Energy Headquarters regarding the status, accomplishments, strategy, and issues of the Richland Environmental Restoration Project. The project mission, organizational interfaces, and operational history of the Hanford Site are provided. Remediation strategies are analyzed in detail. The document includes a status of Richland Environmental Restoration project activities and accomplishments, and it presents current cost summaries, schedules, and technical baselines.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Lower Columbia River and Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program Reference Site Study: 2011 Restoration Analysis - FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Reference Site (RS) study is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration [BPA], U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District [USACE], and U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinions (BiOp). While the RS study was initiated in 2007, data have been collected at relatively undisturbed reference wetland sites in the LCRE by PNNL and collaborators since 2005. These data on habitat structural metrics were previously summarized to provide baseline characterization of 51 wetlands throughout the estuarine and tidal freshwater portions of the 235-km LCRE; however, further analysis of these data has been limited. Therefore, in 2011, we conducted additional analyses of existing field data previously collected for the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP) - including data collected by PNNL and others - to help inform the multi-agency restoration planning and ecosystem management work underway in the LCRE.

Borde, Amy B.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Kaufmann, Ronald M.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Sagar, Jina; Buenau, Kate E.; Corbett, C.

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

138

Automatic noise estimation in images using local statistics. Additive and multiplicative cases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we focus on the problem of automatic noise parameter estimation for additive and multiplicative models and propose a simple and novel method to this end. Specifically we show that if the image to work with has a sufficiently great amount ... Keywords: Gaussian noise, Local statistics, Mode, Noise estimation, Restoration

Santiago Aja-Fernández; Gonzalo Vegas-Sánchez-Ferrero; Marcos Martín-Fernández; Carlos Alberola-López

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Summary of activities of the life cycle costing workshop conducted by the Environmental Restoration Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Enviromental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A five-day life cycle workshop was conducted by the Environmental Restoration (FR) Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to develop appropriate remediation scenarios for each Waste Area Grouping (WAG) at ORNL and to identify associated data needs (e.g., remedial investigations, special studies, and technology demonstrations) and required interfaces. Workshop participants represented the Department of Energy, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Bechtel National, Radian Corporation, EBASCO Corporation, and M-K Ferguson. The workshop was used to establish a technical basis for remediation activities at each WAG. The workshop results are documented in this report and provide the baseline for estimating the technical scope for each WAG. The scope and associated budgets and schedules will be summarized in baseline reports for each WAG, which, in turn, will be compiled into an overall strategy document for ORNL ER.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

18. Restoration of Puget Sound Rivers: Do We Know How to Do It?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as a whole before beginning restoration projects, restoring ecosystem processes, and using monitoring and services they provide. Despite calls for ecosystem or watershed restoration, rather than single to delay implementing the required changes in institutions and society that are needed to restore aquatic

Montgomery, David R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "affected restoration estimates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Estimation of Time-Domain Calibration Parameters to Restore MIMO-TDD Channel Reciprocity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an overcrowding of the radio spectrum, spurring research in innovative radio transmission techniques like cognitive radio (CR). CR enables coexistence of secondary (unlicensed) systems with primary licensed sys.unice.fr Abstract--Spatial interweave cognitive radio opportunistically exploits spatial holes to enable

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

142

Abstract--Over four million Americans are affected by stroke. Current theories of stroke rehabilitation point towards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract--Over four million Americans are affected by stroke. Current theories of stroke program reorganization and partial function restoration. A home system for stroke rehabilitation to train and neuroscience with information technology to create a home based application for stroke rehabilitation. One

Durfee, William K.

143

Benefits of On-Site Management of Environmental Restoration Wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) began assessing options under which to conduct the remediation of environmental restoration sites, it became clear that the standard routes for permanent disposal of waste contaminated with hazardous materials would be difficult. Publicly, local citizens' groups resisted the idea of large volumes of hazardous waste being transported through their communities. Regulations for the off-site disposal are complicated due to the nature of the environmental restoration waste, which included elevated tritium levels. Waste generated from environmental restoration at SNL/NM included debris and soils contaminated with a variety of constituents. Operationally, disposal of environmental restoration waste was difficult because of the everchanging types of waste generated during site remediation. As an alternative to standard hazardous waste disposal, SNL/NM proposed and received regulatory approval to construct a Corrective Action Management Unit (CAMU). By containing the remediation wastes on-site, SNL/NM's Environmental Restoration (ER) Program managed to eliminate transportation concerns from the public, worked with regulatory agencies to develop a safe, permanent disposal, and modified the waste disposal procedures to accommodate operational changes. SNL/NM accomplished the task and saved approximately $200 million over the life of the CAMU project, as compared to off-site disposal options.

Irwin, Michael J. ,P.E.; Wood, Craig, R.E.M.; Kwiecinski, Daniel, P.E.; Alanis, Saul

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

144

Environmental Restoration Program quality system requirements for the Hanford Site. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document defines the quality system requirements for the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, Environmental Restoration Program at the Hanford Site. The Quality System Requirements (OSR) for the Hanford Site integrates quality assurance requirements from the US Department of Energy Orders, the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement), and applicable industry standards into a single source document for the development of quality systems applicable to the Environmental Restoration Program activities. This document, based on fifteen criteria and divided intro three parts, provides user organizations with the flexibility to incorporate only those criteria and parts applicable to their specific scopes of work. The requirements of this document shall be applied to activities that affect quality based on a graded approach that takes into consideration the risk inherent in, as well as the importance of, specific items, services, and activities in terms of meeting ER Program objectives and customer expectations. The individual quality systems developed in accordance with this document are intended to provide an integrated management control system that assures the conduct of ER Program activities in a manner that protects human health and the environment.

Cote, R.F.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Chesapeake Bay Restoration Act (Maryland) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Restoration Act (Maryland) Restoration Act (Maryland) Chesapeake Bay Restoration Act (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Maryland Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Maryland Department of the Environment This legislation sets limits on development near Chesapeake Bay as well as on dredging and the deposition of dredged material into the bay. The legislation establishes the Cox Creek Citizens Oversight Committee (now mostly defunct); the Hart-Miller-Pleasure Island Oversight Committee, which provides oversight and monitoring of the future development, use, and

146

Secretary Chu: President's Energy Budget Creates Jobs, Restores America's  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Chu: President's Energy Budget Creates Jobs, Restores Chu: President's Energy Budget Creates Jobs, Restores America's Scientific Leadership and Puts Nation on the Path to Energy Independence Secretary Chu: President's Energy Budget Creates Jobs, Restores America's Scientific Leadership and Puts Nation on the Path to Energy Independence May 7, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis Washington D.C. --- U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today detailed President Barack Obama's $26.4 billion Fiscal Year 2010 budget request for the Department of Energy, highlighting the Administration's commitment to transformational discoveries, breakthrough science, and innovative technologies in the nation's effort to secure reliable, clean, safe and secure energy, create new jobs and fight climate change. While the budget makes important investments in energy independence and job creation, it

147

Protect and Restore Lolo Creek Watershed : Annual Report CY 2005.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division approaches watershed restoration with a ridge-top to ridge-top approach. Watershed restoration projects within the Lolo Creek watershed are coordinated with the Clearwater National Forest and Potlatch Corporation. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Lolo Creek watershed of the Clearwater River in 1996. Fencing to exclude cattle for stream banks, stream bank stabilization, decommissioning roads, and upgrading culverts are the primary focuses of this effort. The successful completion of the replacement and removal of several passage blocking culverts represent a major improvement to the watershed. These projects, coupled with other recently completed projects and those anticipated in the future, are a significant step in improving habitat conditions in Lolo Creek.

McRoberts, Heidi

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Hangman Restoration Project Year-End Report FY2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers the main goals of FY2008 from which the Work Elements were derived. The goals and products are listed by heading and the associated work elements are referenced in the text. A list of the FY2008 Work Elements is included as Appendix A. FY2008 witnessed the completion of the hntkwipn Management Plan and the first substantive efforts to restore the important habitats encompassed by the mitigation properties in the Upper Hangman Watershed. Native grasses were planted and germination was evaluated. Also, drain tiles that greatly altered the hydrologic function of the Sheep and Hangman Creek Flood Plains were removed and/or disrupted. Preparation for future restoration efforts were also made in FY2008. Designs were produced for the realignment of Sheep Creek and the decommissioning of seven drainage ditches within hntkwipn. A prioritization plan was drafted that greatly expands the area of focus for restoring native fish population in Hangman Creek.

Coeur d'Alene Tribe Department of Natural Resources.

2008-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

149

Formulation of functional theory for pairing with particle number restoration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The restoration of particle number within energy density functional theory is analyzed. It is shown that the standard method based on configuration mixing leads to a functional of both the projected and nonprojected densities. As an alternative that might be advantageous for mass models, nuclear dynamics, and thermodynamics, we propose to formulate the functional in terms directly of the one-body and two-body density matrices of the state with good particle number. Our approach does not contain the pathologies recently observed when restoring the particle number in an energy density functional framework based on transition density matrices and can eventually be applied with functionals having arbitrary density dependencies.

Hupin, Guillaume; Lacroix, Denis [Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds (GANIL), CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, Bvd Henri Becquerel, F-14076 Caen (France); Bender, Michael [Universite Bordeaux, Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, UMR5797, F-33175 Gradignan (France); CNRS/IN2P3, Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, UMR5797, F-33175 Gradignan (France)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

150

Materials and methods for autonomous restoration of electrical conductivity  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An autonomic conductivity restoration system includes a solid conductor and a plurality of particles. The particles include a conductive fluid, a plurality of conductive microparticles, and/or a conductive material forming agent. The solid conductor has a first end, a second end, and a first conductivity between the first and second ends. When a crack forms between the first and second ends of the conductor, the contents of at least a portion of the particles are released into the crack. The cracked conductor and the released contents of the particles form a restored conductor having a second conductivity, which may be at least 90% of the first conductivity.

Blaiszik, Benjamin J; Odom, Susan A; Caruso, Mary M; Jackson, Aaron C; Baginska, Marta B; Ritchey, Joshua A; Finke, Aaron D; White, Scott R; Moore, Jeffrey S; Sottos, Nancy R; Braun, Paul V; Amine, Khalil

2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

151

Environment, Environmental Restoration, and Waste Management Field Organization Directory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This directory was developed by the Office of Environmental Guidance, RCRA/CERCLA Division (EH-231) from an outgrowth of the Departments efforts to identify and establish the regulatory response lead persons in the Field Organizations. The directory was developed for intemal EH-231 use to identify both the DOE and DOE contractor Field Organizations in the Environment, Environmental Restoration and Waste Management areas. The Field Organization directory is divided into three substantive sections: (1) Environment; (2) Environmental Restoration; and (3) Waste Management which are organized to correspond to the management hierarchy at each Field Organization. The information provided includes the facility name and address, individual managers name, and telephone/fax numbers.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Summary - Operational Issues at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) at Hanford  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ERDF ERDF ETR Report Date: June 2007 ETR-6 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the Operational Issues at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility(ERDF) at Hanford Why DOE-EM Did This Review The ERDF is a large- scale disposal facility authorized to receive waste from Hanford cleanup activities. It contains double-lined cells with a RCRA Subtitle C- type liner and leachate collection system. By 2007, 6.8 million tons of waste with 39,000 Curies of radioactivity had been placed in the ERDF. In 2006, events occurred that affected the operation of the automatic leachate transfer pumps and a technician confessed to having not performed compaction tests and to falsification of the data.

153

Environmental Restoration and Waste Management manpower needs assessment: US Department of Energy complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study was conducted Pacific Northwest Laboratory and Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Inc. to assess the supply and demand for 53 scientific, engineering, and technical occupations relevant to the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste management (EM). These assessments were made by examining budget projections and the input of program/project and human resources managers throughout the DOE complex. Quantitative projections of full-time equivalent employees slots for each occupation have been developed for the 1993--1997 time frame. Qualitative assessments of the factors that affect recruitment, staffing, and retention are also reported. The implications of the study are discussed within the likely skills mix of the future workforce and the education and organization interventions most likely to address the needs of the DOE complex.

Holmes, C.W.; Lewis, R.E.; Hunt, S.T. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Finn, M.G. (Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Inc., TN (United States))

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Environmental Restoration and Waste Management manpower needs assessment: US Department of Energy complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study was conducted Pacific Northwest Laboratory and Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Inc. to assess the supply and demand for 53 scientific, engineering, and technical occupations relevant to the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste management (EM). These assessments were made by examining budget projections and the input of program/project and human resources managers throughout the DOE complex. Quantitative projections of full-time equivalent employees slots for each occupation have been developed for the 1993--1997 time frame. Qualitative assessments of the factors that affect recruitment, staffing, and retention are also reported. The implications of the study are discussed within the likely skills mix of the future workforce and the education and organization interventions most likely to address the needs of the DOE complex.

Holmes, C.W.; Lewis, R.E.; Hunt, S.T. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Finn, M.G. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Inc., TN (United States)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Early Restoration Plan Repositories STATE LIBRARY ADDRESS CITY ZIP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Calcasieu Parish Public Library Central Branch 301 W. Claude St. Lake Charles 70605 #12;STATE LIBRARYEarly Restoration Plan Repositories STATE LIBRARY ADDRESS CITY ZIP AL Dauphin Island Sea Laboratory. Walton 32548 FL Panama City Beach Public Library 125000 Hutchison Blvd Panama City Beach 32407 FL

156

Restoration of ecosystem services and biodiversity: conflicts and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, explicitly link the conservation of biodiversity with the provision of ecosys- tem services to support services might be at the expense of biodiversity conservation [8,9], whereas others have suggestedRestoration of ecosystem services and biodiversity: conflicts and opportunities James M. Bullock1

Rey Benayas, José María

157

Photochemical Restoration of Visual Responses in Blind Mice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- cating reconstitution of light signaling to brain circuits. AAQ and related photoswitch molecules present light to alter RGC firing in the absence of rods and cones, with the goal of restoring visual function be electronically controlled by an external camera to enable optical stimuli to trigger RGC firing. Retinal implants

Trauner, Dirk

158

Simulation speedup of ns-3 using checkpoint and restore  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Given that large-scale network simulations are a significant part of active research [6], and that such simulations are known to be computationally and resource intensive, it is still of interest to find innovative ways to achieve faster execution times ... Keywords: DMTCP, MPI, checkpoint, ns-3, restore, simulation

Kyle Harrigan; George Riley

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Environmental Restoration Program Roadmap: Strategic program plan. Addendum 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Addendum to the Portsmouth (PORTS) Environmental Restoration (ER) Roadmap expands on the FY 1992 strategic plan for PORTS by providing human resource loading, ADS linkages to resolution activities, and technology development information. Each of these topics is presented in a separate section.

none,

1992-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

160

Restoration of lowland conifer PAWS Ralph Harmer and Andrea Kiewitt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

24 Restoration of lowland conifer PAWS Ralph Harmer and Andrea Kiewitt Introduction During much predominantly on plantation forestry using fast growing, non-native conifer species. As a consequence there was a large expansion in forest cover due mainly to the afforestation of unwooded land in upland areas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "affected restoration estimates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Phase III Early Restoration Projects Alabama Florida Louisiana Mississippi Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

counties. The project includes reef designs to be constructed at various depths. The deep water "nearshore and limestone layers with spacers between the layers, in less than 20 feet deep water and within 950 feetPhase III Early Restoration Projects Alabama · Florida · Louisiana · Mississippi · Texas NOAA

162

Overview of the wisdom stakeholder workshop on restoration management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......the challenges of rural waste disposal and crisis management...Sustainable Restoration and Long-Term Management of Contaminated...countermeasures and rural waste disposal options was...planning for disposing of waste foodstuffs, and milk...the apparent lack of storage and processing facilities......

A. F. Nisbet; J. A. Mercer

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Graduate Assistantships in: Forest Tree Breeding and Restoration Genetics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(M.S. or Ph.D.) is offered to qualified students seeking training in forest tree breedingGraduate Assistantships in: Forest Tree Breeding and Restoration Genetics A Graduate Assistantship with The Hardwood Tree Improvement and Regeneration Center (HTIRC). Qualifications: Candidates should have well

164

Hydroecology and river restoration: Ripe for research and synthesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, particularly the cumulative effects of many small projects; to restore ecosystem processes under highly constrained conditions such as below dams or in urban settings; to push some aquatic ecosystems beyond water needs and sustaining the services that aquatic ecosystems provide remain one of the greatest

Palmer, Margaret A.

165

SolarPower Restoration Systems Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SolarPower Restoration Systems Inc SolarPower Restoration Systems Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name SolarPower Restoration Systems Inc Place Seminole, Florida Zip 33772 Sector Solar Product SolarPower Restoration Systems is pursuing Building Integrated Photovoltaics (BIPV) systems and large scale Photovoltaic Power (PV) Array Systems over concrete and other construction surfaces. Coordinates 32.726625°, -102.645054° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.726625,"lon":-102.645054,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

166

University College, London: Restoration of War-damaged Buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... was held in University College, London, to mark the restoration of the original College buildings in the main quadrangle, which were destroyed by enemy action during 1940-41. The ... another fifty thousand were almost completely gutted by fire. The destruction included all the historic buildings of the College and much else, including the Physics Laboratory and the Great Hall. ...

1954-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

167

ISSUES IN EVALUATING CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND ATTRIBUTING CARBON CREDITS TO GRASSLAND RESTORATION EFFORTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ISSUES IN EVALUATING CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND ATTRIBUTING CARBON CREDITS TO GRASSLAND RESTORATION examines biological carbon sequestration using a grassland restoration as a model system. Chapter 1 for biological carbon sequestration. In this analysis, we found that significantly greater soil carbon

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

168

Restoration of visual function following optic nerve regeneration in bluegill ~Lepomis macrochirus!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Restoration of visual function following optic nerve regeneration in bluegill ~Lepomis macrochirus with morphological examination to assess restoration of visual function following optic nerve crush in bluegill ~Lepomis macrochirus! pumpkinseed ~Lepomis gibbosus! hybrid sunfish. Regenerating optic nerve axons

Mensinger, Allen F.

169

A Review of Power Outages and Restoration Following the June 2012 Derecho  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report reviews power outages and restoration efforts following the June 29, 2012 Derecho and compares them to outages and restoration efforts following other spring and summer storms in the...

170

Center for Restorative Justice & Peacemaking An International Resource Center in Support of Restorative Justice Dialogue, Research, and Training  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for Restorative Justice & Peacemaking An International Resource Center in Support.624.4923 rjp@umn.edu www.rjp.umn.edu The Energy of Conflict and Conflict Resolution: More Than a Metaphor by Ted Lewis October 2013 In many respects, understanding how the energy of conflict and conflict

Blanchette, Robert A.

171

ROBUST VIDEO RESTORATION BY JOINT SPARSE AND LOW RANK MATRIX APPROXIMATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ROBUST VIDEO RESTORATION BY JOINT SPARSE AND LOW RANK MATRIX APPROXIMATION HUI JI, SIBIN HUANG, ZUOWEI SHEN, AND YUHONG XU Abstract. This paper presents a new video restoration scheme based domain, we formulate the video restoration problem as a joint sparse and low-rank matrix approximation

Shen, Zuowei

172

UPPER DES PLAINES RIVER AND TRIBUTARIES, IL & WI FLOOD RISK MANAGEMENT AND ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION PROJECT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

risk to residential and commercial structures and restore impaired aquatic ecosystems in the watershedUPPER DES PLAINES RIVER AND TRIBUTARIES, IL & WI FLOOD RISK MANAGEMENT AND ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION / National Ecosystem Restoration (NED/NER) Plan. The Recommended Plan includes five structural flood risk

US Army Corps of Engineers

173

ERDC/ELTR-13-9 Ecosystem Management and Restoration Research Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Native Plants for Vegetative Restoration of Aquatic Ecosystems EnvironmentalLaboratory Gary O. Dick, R and Establishment of Native Plants for Vegetative Restoration of Aquatic Ecosystems Gary O. Dick and R. MichaelERDC/ELTR-13-9 Ecosystem Management and Restoration Research Program Propagation and Establishment

US Army Corps of Engineers

174

Effect of geomorphic channel restoration on streamflow and groundwater in a snowmelt-dominated watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and groundwater to support the restoration of aquatic and riparian ecosystem structure and functionEffect of geomorphic channel restoration on streamflow and groundwater in a snowmelt is a common approach used to restore hydrologic function in degraded landscapes, but there has been little

Kotchen, Matthew J.

175

RESEARCH ARTICLE Does genetic diversity of restored sites differ from natural sites?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The goal of ecological restoration is to re-establish self-sustaining ecosystems that will resist future quantified the effect of restoration practices on genetic diversity in the submersed aquatic plant species efforts. Keywords Submersed aquatic vegetation Á SAV Á Genotypic diversity Á Restoration practice Á

Neel, Maile

176

Draft Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for managing treatment, storage, and disposal of radioactive and hazardous waste. Volume 3, Appendix A: Public response to revised NOI, Appendix B: Environmental restoration, Appendix C, Environmental impact analysis methods, Appendix D, Risk  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume three contains appendices for the following: Public comments do DOE`s proposed revisions to the scope of the waste management programmatic environmental impact statement; Environmental restoration sensitivity analysis; Environmental impacts analysis methods; and Waste management facility human health risk estimates.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Operational Issues at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility at Hanford  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hanford Operations Hanford Operations Evaluating Operational Issues at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility at Hanford By Craig H. Benson, PhD, PE; William H. Albright, PhD; and David P. Ray, PE Sponsored by: The Office of Engineering and Technology (EM-20) 17 June 2007 i TABLE OF CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ii ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS iv INTRODUCTION 1 BACKGROUND 1 Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility 1 Source of Concern 2 LINES OF INQUIRY 2 1. Validate Scope of Identified Problems 2 2. Assess Contractor Evaluation of the Elevated Leachate Level on the Landfill Liner 3 3. Evaluate Adequacy of Landfill Performance in View of the Discovered Falsified Compaction Data and Potential Leachate Level Problems 4

178

Forest Conservation and Restoration as a Response to Climate Change  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Conservation and Conservation and Restoration as a Response to Climate change National Energy Technology Laboratory May 14, 2001 Forest Conservation and Restoration as a Response to Climate change National Energy Technology Laboratory May 14, 2001 Today's presentation * Nature Conservancy background * Land Use and Climate Change * Project Experience * Key Issues and Research Needs The mission of The Nature Conservancy is to preserve plants, animals and natural communities that represent the diversity of life on Earth by protecting the lands and waters they need to survive. Conservancy Background * Largest private conservation organization * Founded in 1951 * Conserved more than 12 million acres in U.S., and millions more in Latin America, the Caribbean, and Asia/Pacific * 1.2 million members

179

Microsoft Word - WM Paper - Eco-Restoration Final.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

The Use of Ecological Restoration Principles To Achieve Remedy Protection At the Fernald Preserve and Weldon Spring Sites - 8354 J. Powell, F. Johnston, J. Homer Fernald Preserve 10995 Hamilton-Cleves Hwy. Harrison, Ohio 45030 Y. Deyo Weldon Spring 7295 Highway 94 South St. Charles, Missouri 63304 ABSTRACT At both the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fernald Preserve and the Weldon Spring Site, the development of ecological restoration goals and objectives was used to complement and even enhance achievement of selected remedies. Warm-season native grasses and forbs were used for revegetation of remediated areas. The hardiness and ability to establish in low-nutrient conditions make native grasses ideal candidates for reestablishment of vegetation in excavated areas. At the Fernald Preserve, native grasses

180

Richland Environmental Restoration Project management action process document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A critical mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the planning, implementation, and completion of environmental restoration programs at DOE facilities. An integral part of this mission involves the safe and cost-effective environmental restoration of the Hanford Site. For over 40 years the Hanford Site supported United States national defense programs, largely through the production of nuclear materials. One legacy of historical Hanford Site operations is a significant waste inventory of radioactive and/or regulated chemical materials. Releases of these materials have, in some cases, contaminated the Hanford Site environment. The DOE Richland Operations Office (RL) is responsible for protecting human health and the environment from potential Hanford Site environmental hazards by identifying, assessing, and mitigating risks posed by contaminated sites.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "affected restoration estimates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

NATURAL ATTENUATION FOR ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION IN NY/NJ HARBOR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have investigated the feasibility of using natural attenuation methods for ecosystem restoration in New York/New Jersey Harbor. Measurements were made of the most probable number of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in native sediments and in samples, which had been supplemented with an appropriate electron donor and electron acceptor. The results showed that the activity of the endogenous microbial population in the native sediment was high enough to make possible adequate chemical transformation rates. The bioavailability of the zinc in the sediments was measured using the BIOMET biosensor technique. The bioavailability of the zinc was effectively eliminated following the microbial activities. We concluded that natural attenuation could be used effectively in treating sediments from Newark Bay and surrounding waters and that the resultant materials could likely be used in environmental restoration projects of the type proposed for construction in South Kearny, NJ.

VAN DER LELIE,D.JONES,K.W.REID-GREEN,J.D.STERN,E.A.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

182

Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) program: An introduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This booklet introduces the reader to the mission and functions of a major new unit within the US Department of Energy (DOE): the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM). The Secretary of Energy established EM in November 1989, implementing a central purpose of DOE's first annual Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan, which had appeared three months earlier. The contents of this booklet, and their arrangement, reflect the annual update of the Five-Year Plan. The Five-Year Plan supports DOE's strategy for meeting its 30-year compliance and cleanup goal. This strategy involves: focusing DOE's activities on eliminating or reducing known or recognized potential risks to worker and public health and the environment, containing or isolating, removing, or detoxifying onsite and offsite contamination, and developing technology to achieve DOE's environmental goals.

Not Available

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Environmental Restoration Program (ERP)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ERP ERP ESG Home ERP Home Documents Photo Gallery Contact Us Links Environmental Restoration Program Welcome to the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) website dedicated to its Environmental Restoration Program (ERP). The ERP is part of a nationwide effort by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) to identify and clean up contaminated areas at its facilities. The mission of the ERP is to protect human health and the environment by investigating and cleaning up soil and groundwater contaminated by past activities at Berkeley Lab. Berkeley Lab operates its Hazardous Waste Handling Facility under a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Permit issued by the California Environmental Protection Agency Department of Toxic Substances

184

FAQS Job Task Analyses - Environmental Restoration Functional Area Qualification  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Restoration Functional Area Qualification Restoration Functional Area Qualification Job Task Analysis CONDUCTING THE JOB / TASK ANALYSIS Identify and evaluate tasks - Develop a comprehensive list of tasks that define the job. o A great starting point is the list of Duties and Responsibilities from the FAQS. o Give careful thought to additional tasks that could be considered. o Don't worry about deleting tasks at this point - that is a part of the process further down. - List the tasks (and their sources, e.g., Duties and Responsibilities #1) in the chart below. - Discuss each task as a group and come to a consensus pertaining to Importance and Frequency of the task (i.e., each team member can consent to the assigned value, even if they don't exactly agree with it). - When all values have been assigned, consider as a group deleting tasks

185

Watershed Restoration through Culture-Based Education and Community Outreach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

branched off and traveled to Thames, Canada. Other Oneidas stayed in the homelands. The map in Figure 2 shows the route the Oneidas took. Today there are three Oneida reservations: Oneida, New York; Oneida, Thames in Ontario, Canada; and Oneida... Club. RESTORATION PROJECTS The Duck Creek Fish Passage project involves the removal of two dams on Duck Creek and enhancement of the fish passage barrier at a third dam. This project will enhance the ability of lake fish in Green Bay to access...

Stevens, Margaret Rose

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

186

Psychrometric Testing Facility Restoration and Cooling Capacity Testing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair of Committee, Michael B. Pate Committee Members, Angie Hill Price Terry S. Creasy Head of Department, Dennis O?Neal August 2010 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering iii iii ABSTRACT... Psychrometric Testing Facility Restoration and Cooling Capacity Testing. (August 2010) Vincent Edward Cline, B.S., Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Michael B. Pate The Psychrometric Testing Facility at the Riverside Energy Efficiency...

Cline, Vincent E.

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

187

Restoration of surface-mined lands with rainfall harvesting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Strip mining for coal in the arid western US will remove grazing land as energy demands are met. Conventional resotration usually includes leveling the spoil banks and covering them with top soil, fertilizing, seeding and irrigation with well or river water. An overview of research on an alternate method of restoring this land is reported. From 1976 through 1981 studies were conducted on the use of water harvesting, the collection and use of rainfall runoff, to restore the vegetative productivity of strip mined lands in arid regions. These studies tested the technical and economic feasibility of using partially leveled spoil banks at strip mines as catchment areas to collect and direct runoff to the topsoiled valley floor where crops were cultivated. Information was collected on the efficiency of seven treatments to increase runoff from the catchment areas and on the productivity of seven crops. The experiments were conducted in arid areas of Washington, Arizona, and Colorado. It was concluded that water harvesting can replace or augment expensive and inadequate supplies of well and river water in arid regions with a suitable climate. These studies showed that some treatments provided adequate runoff to produce a useful crop in the valleys, thus making this alternative approach to restoration technically feasible. This approach was also potentially economically feasible where the treatment costs of the catchment areas were low, the treatment was effective, the crop was productive and valuable, and earthmoving costs were lower than with conventional restoration involving complete leveling of spoil banks. It was also concluded that water harvesting can be made more effective with further information on catchment area treatments, which crops are most adaptable to water harvesting, the optimum incline of the catchment areas and climatic influences on water harvesting.

Sauer, R.H.; Rickard, W.H.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Secretary Chu: President�s Energy Budget Creates Jobs, Restores  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Secretary Chu: President�s Energy Budget Creates Jobs, Restores America�s Scientific Leadership and Puts Nation on the Path to Energy Independence Secretary Chu: President�s Energy Budget Creates Jobs, Restores America�s Scientific Leadership and Puts Nation on the Path to Energy Independence Washington D.C. --- U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today detailed President Barack Obama�s $26.4 billion Fiscal Year 2010 budget request for the Department of Energy, highlighting the Administration�s commitment to transformational discoveries, breakthrough science, and innovative technologies in the nation�s effort to secure reliable, clean, safe and secure energy, create new jobs and fight climate change. While the budget makes important investments in energy independence and job creation, it also cuts back on programs that don�t work as well or are no longer needed. �The President�s budget for energy reflects his commitment to ending our dependence on foreign oil, restoring our scientific leadership and putting Americans back to work through investments in a new green energy economy,� Secretary Chu said. �It also demonstrates his commitment to using taxpayer dollars wisely � cutting spending on programs we don�t need so we can make strategic investments in our economic future.�

189

Opportunities for health and safety professionals in environmental restoration work  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The safety of workers in waste management and in environmental restoration work is regulated in large part by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). Many of the OSHA rules are given in Part 1910, Occupational Safety and Health Standards, of Title 29 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). Section 120 of 29 CFR 1910 specifically addresses hazardous waste operations and emergency response operations. The remainder of this discussion focuses on clean-up operations. The purpose of this paper is to review areas of employment opportunity in environmental restoration work for health and safety professionals. Safety and health risk analyses are mentioned as one area of opportunity, and these analyses are required by the standards. Site safety and health supervisors will be needed during field operations. Those who enjoy teaching might consider helping to meet the training needs that are mandated. Finally, engineering help both to separate workers from hazards and to improve personal protective equipment, when it must be worn, would benefit those actively involved in environmental restoration activities.

Norris, A.E.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Control of hardwood regeneration in restored carolina bay depression wetlands.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carolina bays are depression wetlands located in the coastal plain region of the eastern United States. Disturbance of this wetland type has been widespread, and many sites contain one or more drainage ditches. Restoration of bays is of interest because they are important habitats for rare flora and fauna. Previous bay restoration projects have identified flood-tolerant woody competitors in the seedbank and re-sprouting as impediments to the establishment of desired herbaceous wetland vegetation communities. We restored 3 bays on the Savannah River Site, South Carolina, by plugging drainage ditches, harvesting residual pine/hardwood stands within the bays, and monitoring the vegetative response of the seedbank to the hydrologic change. We applied a foliar herbicide on one-half of each bay to control red maple (Acerrubrum), sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua), and water oak (Quercus nigra) sprouting, and we tested its effectiveness across a hydrologic gradient in each bay. Hardwood regeneration was partially controlled by flooding in bays that exhibited long growing season hydroperiods. The findings also indicated that herbicide application was an effective means for managing hardwood regeneration and re-sprouting in areas where hydrologic control was ineffective. Herbicide use had no effect on species richness in the emerging vegetation community. In late-season drawdown periods, or in bays where hydroperiods are short, more than one herbicide application may be necessary.

Moser, Lee, J.; Barton, Christopher, D.; Blake, John, I.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Vehicle routing for the last mile of power system restoration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper studied a novel problem in power system restoration: the Power Restoration Vehicle Routing Problem (PRVRP). The goal of PRVRPs is to decide how coordinate repair crews effectively in order to recover from blackouts as fast as possible after a disaster has occurred. PRVRPs are complex problems that combine vehicle routing and power restoration scheduling problems. The paper proposed a multi-stage optimization algorithm based on the idea of constraint injection that meets the aggressive runtime constraints necessary for disaster recovery. The algorithms were validated on benchmarks produced by the Los Alamos National Laboratory, using the infrastructure of the United States. The disaster scenarios were generated by state-of-the-art hurricane simulation tools similar to those used by the National Hurricane Center. Experimental results show that the constraint-injection algorithms can reduce the blackouts by 50% or more over field practices. Moreover, the results show that the constraint-injection algorithm using large neighborhood search over a blackbox simulator provide competitive quality and scales better than using a MIP solver on the subproblems.

Bent, Russell W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Coffrin, Carleton [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Van Hentenryck, Pascal [BROWN UNIV.

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

192

Establishing a moss cover inhibits the germination of Typha latifolia, an invasive species, in restored peatlands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Invasion of Typha latifolia L. into man-made pools in restored North American peatlands may represent a serious barrier to the establishment of a plant community typical of natural pool edges. As no classical method of population management appears applicable in the context of peatlands, our aim was to determine the ability of three environmental factors to inhibit T. latifolia germination, namely peat type, shade level and moss cover. A split-plot experiment conducted in a growth chamber investigated the effects of three substrates (fibric peat, mesic peat and filter paper) and six shade levels (including total obscurity) on germination rates of T. latifolia. In a second, greenhouse experiment, the effect of three increments of moss cover (null, fragmented and full) growing on two peat types (fibric and mesic) was examined for six corresponding seedbeds. Our results show that peat type was the major factor affecting germination, as almost none occurred on fibric peat while germination rates reached 84% on mesic peat. However, germination on mesic peat decreased with increasing moss cover: the germination rate dropped from 36 ± 3% on bare peat to 1 ± 0% in full moss carpets. Germination of T. latifolia was initiated by very low light levels (as low as 6%) but was inhibited by total obscurity. The low pH of fibric peat as well as the modification of environmental factors (e.g. light or substrate access) by moss carpets appear to be factors explaining the results. Establishing a dense moss cover and digging pools to a depth that prevents the exposure of peat with a pH favorable to seed germination (above 4) might be efficient methods to reduce Typha latifolia invasions in restored peatland pools.

Bérenger Bourgeois; Sandrine Hugron; Monique Poulin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Internal Dose Estimates from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Appendix F Internal Dose Estimates from NTS Fallout F-1 #12;Radiation Dose to the Population;TABLE OF CONTENTS Page F- Part I. Estimates of Dose...........................................................................................40 Comparison to dose estimates from global fallout

194

Complex Forces Affect China's Biodiversity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

global efforts have been put into biodiversity conservation, but biodiversity loss continues rapidly in biodiversity conservation to the global level and help protect biodiversity in other developing countries Wiley & Sons, Ltd. #12;208 ConservationBiology COMPLEXITY OF INTERACTING FORCES AFFECTING BIODIVERSITY

195

Estimation of Density of Biodiesel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In addition, the numeric value for coefficient e is very small (?0.00001) and the nd(ave) of most biodiesels are not greater than 2. Therefore, the product of e × nd(ave) can be neglected without affecting the accuracy of the calculation and eq 30 is good for estimation of density of biodiesel. ... Interestingly, the %AAD for mixed biodiesel (0.38) is lower than those of pure (0.41%) and total biodiesels. ... (21) The model cannot differentiate a mixed biodiesel from pure biodiesels. ...

Suriya Phankosol; Kaokanya Sudaprasert; Supathra Lilitchan; Kornkanok Aryusuk; Kanit Krisnangkura

2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

196

Cost Estimation Package  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This chapter focuses on the components (or elements) of the cost estimation package and their documentation.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

197

Community Relations Plan for Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) has applied to the California Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC), for renewal of its Hazardous Waste Handling Facility Permit. A permit is required under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations. The permit will allow LBL to continue using its current hazardous waste handling facility, upgrade the existing facility, and construct a replacement facility. The new facility is scheduled for completion in 1995. The existing facility will be closed under RCRA guidelines by 1996. As part of the permitting process, LBL is required to investigate areas of soil and groundwater contamination at its main site in the Berkeley Hills. The investigations are being conducted by LBL`s Environmental Restoration Program and are overseen by a number of regulatory agencies. The regulatory agencies working with LBL include the California Environmental Protection Agency`s Department of Toxic Substances Control, the California Regional Water Quality Control Board, the Bay Area Air Quality Management District, the East Bay Municipal Utilities District, and the Berkeley Department of Environmental Health. RCRA requires that the public be informed of LBL`s investigations and site cleanup, and that opportunities be available for the public to participate in making decisions about how LBL will address contamination issues. LBL has prepared this Community Relations Plan (CRP) to describe activities that LBL will use to keep the community informed of environmental restoration progress and to provide for an open dialogue with the public on issues of importance. The CRP documents the community`s current concerns about LBL`s Environmental Restoration Program. Interviews conducted between February and April 1993 with elected officials, agency staff, environmental organizations, businesses, site neighbors, and LBL employees form the basis for the information contained in this document.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

HAZARD CATEGORIZATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION SITES AT HANFORD WASHINGTON  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental restoration activities, defined here as work to identify and characterize contaminated sites and then contain, treat, remove or dispose of the contamination, now comprises a significant fraction of work in the DOE complex. As with any other DOE activity, a safety analysis must be in place prior to commencing restoration. The rigor and depth of this safety analysis is in part determined by the site's hazard category. This category in turn is determined by the facility's hazardous material inventory and the consequences of its release. Progressively more complicated safety analyses are needed as a facility's hazard category increases from radiological to hazard category three (significant local releases) to hazard category two (significant on-site releases). Thus, a facility's hazard category plays a crucial early role in helping to determine the level of effort devoted to analysis of the facility's individual hazards. Improper determination of the category can result in either an inadequate safety analysis in the case of underestimation of the hazard category, or an unnecessarily cumbersome analysis in the case of overestimation. Contaminated sites have been successfully categorized and safely restored or remediated at the former DOE production site at Hanford, Washington. This paper discusses various means used to categorize former plutonium production or support sites at Hanford. Both preliminary and final hazard categorization is discussed. The importance of the preliminary (initial) hazard categorization in guiding further DOE involvement and approval of the safety analyses is discussed. Compliance to DOE direction provided in ''Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports'', DOE-STD-1027-92, is discussed. DOE recently issued 10 CFR 830, Subpart B which codifies previous DOE safety analysis guidance and orders. The impact of 10 CFR 830, Subpart B on hazard categorization is also discussed.

BISHOP, G.E.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Year-in-Review: 2010 Year-in-Review: 2010 Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability U.S. Department of Energy August 2011 OE/ISER Report 8/31/11 i For Further Information This report was prepared by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability under the direction of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary, and William Bryan, Deputy Assistant Secretary. Specific questions about information in this report may be directed to Alice Lippert, Senior Technical Advisor (alice.lippert@hq.doe.gov). Contributors include Mindi Farber-DeAnda, Robert Laramey, Carleen Lewandowski, Max

200

Backscattering from dental restorations and splint materials during therapeutic radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Models were constructed to simulate as closely as possible the human oral cavity. Radiation absorbed doses were determined for controls and various test situations involving the presence of dental restorative and splint materials during cobalt-60 irradiation of the models. Adjacent gold full crowns and adjacent solid dental silver amalgam cores both increased the dose to the interproximal gingivae by 20%. Use of orthodontic full bands for splinting the jaws increased the dose to the buccal tissues by an average of 10%. Augmentation of dose through backscatter radiation was determined to be only slight for intracoronal amalgam fillings and stainless steel or plastic bracket splints.

Farman, A.G.; Sharma, S.; George, D.I.; Wilson, D.; Dodd, D.; Figa, R.; Haskell, B.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "affected restoration estimates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Sandy River Delta Habitat Restoration Project, Annual Report 2001.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Sandy River Delta is located at the confluence of the Sandy and Columbia Rivers, just east of Troutdale, Oregon. It comprises about 1,400 land acres north of Interstate 84, managed by the USDA Forest Service, and associated river banks managed by the Oregon Division of State Lands. Three islands, Gary, Flag and Catham, managed by Metro Greenspaces and the State of Oregon lie to the east, the Columbia River lies to the north and east, and the urbanized Portland metropolitan area lies to the west across the Sandy River. Sandy River Delta was historically a wooded, riparian wetland with components of ponds, sloughs, bottomland woodland, oak woodland, prairie, and low and high elevation floodplain. It has been greatly altered by past agricultural practices and the Columbia River hydropower system. Restoration of historic landscape components is a primary goal for this land. The Forest Service is currently focusing on restoration of riparian forest and wetlands. Restoration of open upland areas (meadow/prairie) would follow substantial completion of the riparian and wetland restoration. The Sandy River Delta is a former pasture infested with reed canary grass, blackberry and thistle. The limited over story is native riparian species such as cottonwood and ash. The shrub and herbaceous layers are almost entirely non-native, invasive species. Native species have a difficult time naturally regenerating in the thick, competing reed canary grass, Himalayan blackberry and thistle. A system of drainage ditches installed by past owners drains water from historic wetlands. The original channel of the Sandy River was diked in the 1930's, and the river diverted into the ''Little Sandy River''. The original Sandy River channel has subsequently filled in and largely become a slough. The FS acquired approximately 1,400 acres Sandy River Delta (SRD) in 1991 from Reynolds Aluminum (via the Trust for Public Lands). The Delta had been grazed for many years but shortly after FS acquisition grazing was terminated while a master plan and Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) were developed for the site. During the following three years, the vegetation changed dramatically as a result of cessation of grazing. The dramatic changes included the explosive increases of reed canary grass monocultures in wet areas and the expansion of Himalayan blackberries throughout the site.

Kelly, Virginia; Dobson, Robin L.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Pacific Lamprey Research and Restoration : Annual Report 1997.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The once abundant stocks of Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) above Bonneville Dam are currently depressed (Close et al. 1995). It is likely that many of the same factors that led to the decline of wild stocks of Columbia River Pacific salmon and steelhead have impacted Pacific lamprey populations as well. The Pacific Lamprey Research and Restoration Project, funded by Bonneville Power Administration, is a cooperative effort between the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, the Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, and Oregon State University with the goal to increase Pacific lamprey stocks above Bonneville Dam.

Jackson, Aaron D.; Hatch, Douglas R.; Close, David A.

1998-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

203

Active Estimation of Object Dynamics Parameters with Tactile Sensors   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The estimation of parameters that affect the dynamics of objects—such as viscosity or internal degrees of freedom—is an important step in autonomous and dexterous robotic manipulation of objects. However, accurate and ...

Saal, Hannes; Ting, Jo-Anne; Vijayakumar, Sethu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Check Estimates and Independent Costs  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Check estimates and independent cost estimates (ICEs) are tools that can be used to validate a cost estimate. Estimate validation entails an objective review of the estimate to ensure that estimate criteria and requirements have been met and well documented, defensible estimate has been developed. This chapter describes check estimates and their procedures and various types of independent cost estimates.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

205

Demand for Electric Power in Norway : Estimating price and substitution elasticities.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The main goal of this master thesis is to estimate how the prices of electricity and heating oil affect the aggregate demand for electric power… (more)

Øyan, Ola Hagen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Analysis of Transportation and Logistics Challenges Affecting...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of Transportation and Logistics Challenges Affecting the Deployment of Larger Wind Turbines: Summary of Results Analysis of Transportation and Logistics Challenges Affecting...

207

Audit of Environmental Restoration at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. IG-0410  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

John C. Layton John C. Layton Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Report on "Audit of Environmental Restoration at the Los Alamos National Laboratory" BACKGROUND: The Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) Environmental Restoration Program was primarily monitored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). However, in 1995, the Department of Energy (DOE) and Los Alamos adopted a performance-based management approach to contracting to hold Los Alamos more accountable for its Environmental Restoration Program. At Los Alamos, the Environmental Restoration Program's mission is to remediate sites contaminated with various forms of hazardous,

208

E-Print Network 3.0 - anadromous salmon restoration Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: Creek Watershed Restoration Juneau, Alaska Duck Creek is a small, anadromous fish stream located... Sediment removal from channel Wetlands revegetation NOAA...

209

Clark Fork River Delta Restoration Project 1 Finding of No Significant...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Clark Fork River Delta Restoration Project Finding of No Significant Impact Bonneville Power Administration DOEEA-1969 July 2014 SUMMARY Bonneville Power Administration (BPA)...

210

The Fun Never Stops--Ten Years of Environmental Restoration Success at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of the many contributors to the success of the Environmental Restoration Project at Sandia National Laboratories between 1992 and 2002.

Nimick, F. B.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

211

modes are nearly completely restored after ther-mal treatment. Similarly, electronic transitions in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

modes are nearly completely restored after ther- mal treatment. Similarly, electronic transitions, 338 (2003). 13. D. Chattopadhyay, I. Galeska, F. Papadimitrakopoulos, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 125, 3370

Stüwe, Jogy

212

E-Print Network 3.0 - antidepressant restores hippocampo-hypothalamic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

WINNER: AMST 501 - TIM YATES Misery and Restoration: 40 Years of Antidepressant Advertising Source: de Lijser, Peter - Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California...

213

Successes, Failures and Suggested Future Directions for Ecosystem Restoration of the Middle Sacramento River, California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2001. River restoration and flood protection: controversy orflows: modelling and experimental floods in a dryland river.status of terrestrial and flood- plain resources (including

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Radiation Dose Estimates from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Summary: Radiation Dose Estimates from Hanford Radioactive Material Releases to the Air- tantly, what radiation dose people may have received. An independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP, additionalProjectworkcouldresultin revisions of these dose estimates. April 21, 1994 Companion

215

State Energy Production Estimates  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

State Energy Production Estimates 1960 Through 2012 2012 Summary Tables Table P1. Energy Production Estimates in Physical Units, 2012 Alabama 19,455 215,710 9,525 0 Alaska 2,052...

216

Types of Cost Estimates  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The chapter describes the estimates required on government-managed projects for both general construction and environmental management.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

217

External Dose Estimates from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Appendix G External Dose Estimates from Global Fallout G-1 #12;External Radiation Exposure-MQ-003539 March 15, 2000 G-2 #12;Abstract This report provides estimates of the external radiation-62. Estimates are given on a county by county basis for each month from 1953-1972. The average population dose

218

External Dose Estimates from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Appendix E External Dose Estimates from NTS Fallout E-1 #12;External Radiation Exposure. 1, 1999) E-2 #12;Abstract This report provides estimates of the external radiation exposure of this report to: "Prepare crude estimates of the doses from external irradiation received by the American

219

Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) study, Ambient water toxicity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) personnel and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) personnel conducted a study during the week of January 25-February 1, 1994, as described in the Statement of Work (SOW) document. The organisms specified for testing were larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, and the daphnid, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Surface water samples were collected by TVA Field Engineering personnel from Clinch River Mile 9.0, Poplar Creek Mile 1.0, and Poplar Creek Mile 2.9 on January 24, 26, and 28. Samples were partitioned (split) and provided to the CR-ERP and TVA toxicology laboratories for testing. Exposure of test organisms to these samples resulted in no toxicity (survival or growth) to fathead minnows; however, toxicity to daphnids (significantly reduced reproduction) was demonstrated in undiluted samples from Poplar Creek Mile 1.0 in testing conducted by TVA based on hypothesis testing of data. Point estimation (IC{sub 25}) analysis of the data, however, showed no toxicity in PCM 1.0 samples.

Simbeck, D.J.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Post-dam sediment dynamics and processes in the Colorado River estuary: Implications for habitat restoration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

River-sea connectivity is essential for restoring ecosystem services in the Colorado River delta. The mixing of river water and seawater sustains biodiversity and provides brackish-water nursery grounds for both commercially important and endangered marine species. The Colorado River no longer reaches the sea except during particularly high tides and anomalously wet years. The river's relict channel is now obstructed by an accumulation of sediments deposited during flood tides; ebb flows are not strong enough to keep the channel open. Landsat 5-TM and Landsat-7 scenes from the Colorado River delta and tide prediction tables were used to reconstruct river-sea connectivity and geomorphic processes after 50 years of extensive human manipulation of the Colorado River. Historical documentation, previous topographic surveys and sediment cores were used to estimate sedimentation rates in the lower river channel. Satellite images and tide charts show that currently the river reaches the sea or the sea reaches the river about 12 days per year, unlike 10 years ago when a year-round connection existed. Reduction in connectivity results from the evolution of a tidal sandbar located within the bedload convergence zone, about 35 km upstream from the river's mouth. Historical documentation and sediment core analyses suggest sedimentation rates in the range of 10–21 cm per year. With the current conditions prevailing, active management – dredging – is required and needs to occur once every 5–10 years to reconnect the remaining riparian wetlands in the Colorado River to the Gulf of California.

Hector A. Zamora; Steven M. Nelson; Karl W. Flessa; Ritsuo Nomura

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "affected restoration estimates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

ANL Technical Support Program for DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management; Annual report, October 1992--September 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is an overview of the progress during FY 1993 for the Technical Support Program that is part of the ANL Technology Support Activity for DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM). The purpose is to evaluate, before hot start-up of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP), factors that are anticipated to affect glass reaction in an unsaturated environment typical of what may be expected for the candidate Yucca Mountain repository site. Specific goals for the testing program include the following: reviewing and evaluating available data on parameters that will be important in establishing the long-term performance of glass in a repository environment; performing tests to further quantify the effects of important variables where there are deficiencies in the available data; and initiating long-term tests to determine glass performance under a range of conditions applicable to repository disposal.

Bates, J.K.; Bourcier, W.L.; Bradley, C.R. [and others

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Aquatic macrophyte and animal communities in a recently restored brackish marsh: possible influences of restoration design and the invasive plant species Myriophyllum spicatum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kruskal-Wallis non-parametric test determined that temporal variations in fauna and SAV community composition was greater than any restoration effect. Discriminant Function Analyses (DFAs) determined two to three key faunal species that best predicted...

Bell, Michael Thomas

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

223

Biofilm Bacterial Community Structure in Streams Affected by Acid Mine Drainage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...that any restoration activities...36), aquatic invertebrates...on aquatic ecosystems, the effects...extent of ecosystem degradation...ecological restoration in streams...successful restoration of any degraded ecosystem requires...

Gavin Lear; Dev Niyogi; Jon Harding; Yimin Dong; Gillian Lewis

2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

224

Notices LIST OF AFFECTED PROGRAMS  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

90 Federal Register 90 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 175 / Friday, September 9, 2011 / Notices LIST OF AFFECTED PROGRAMS CFDA No. and name Publication date and FEDERAL REG- ISTER citation Original deadline for transmittal of applications Revised deadline for transmittal of applications Original deadline for inter-govern- mental review Extended dead- line for inter-gov- ernmental review 84.215N: Promise Neighborhoods Program- Implementation. 7/6/2011 76 FR 39615. 9/06/2011 9/13/2011 11/03/2011 11/10/2011 84.215P: Promise Neighborhoods Program- Planning. 7/06/2011 76 FR 39630. 9/06/2011 9/13/2011 11/03/2011 11/10/2011 Electronic Access to This Document The official version of this document is the document published in the Federal Register. Free Internet access to the official edition of the Federal

225

Nevada Environmental Restoration Project Natfonal Nuclenr Security Adminlstratlon  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Natfonal Nuclenr Security Adminlstratlon Natfonal Nuclenr Security Adminlstratlon Amchitka Island Surface Closure Report Revision No.: 1 July 2003 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. Environmental Restoration L Available for public sale, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22 16 1 Phone: 800.553.6847 Fax: 703.605.6900 Email: orders@,ntis,fedworld.~ov Online ordering: htt~:/hZww.ntis.~ov/ordering. htm Available electronically at htt~://www.doe.nov/bridge Available for a processing fee to U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 3783 1-0062 Phone: 865.576.8401

226

Jefferson Lab Science Series - The Restoration of the USS Monitor  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A TACT-ful Chemical Musical A TACT-ful Chemical Musical Previous Video (A TACT-ful Chemical Musical) Science Series Video Archive Next Video (Einstein for Everyone) Einstein for Everyone The Restoration of the USS Monitor David Krop - Conservation Project Manager, The Mariner's Museum March 2, 2010 The ongoing efforts to conserve and exhibit the iconic Civil War ironclad USS Monitor at The Mariners' Museum will be discussed. The presentation will cover past conservation accomplishments by conservators and NOAA specialists, current activities in the lab, and future plans to bring back to life one of the world's most famous warships. Learn about the complex methods and procedures used to treat the ship's revolving gun turret, steam engine, Dahlgren guns and carriages, as well as numerous small artifacts

227

Nevada Environmental Restoration Project Amchitka Mud Pit Sites  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Amchitka Mud Pit Sites Amchitka Mud Pit Sites 2006 Post-Closure Monitoring and Inspection Report Amchitka Island, Alaska Revision No.: 0 September 2006 Environmental Restoration Project U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Available for public sale, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Cornrn&ce National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22 1 6 1 Phone: 800.553.6847 Fax: 703.605.6900 Email: orders@,ntis. aov Online ordering: htt~://www. ntis. nov/orderinn. htm Available electronically at htt~://www. osti. godbridge Available for a processing fee to U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information

228

Ecological risks of DOE`s programmatic environmental restoration alternatives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report assesses the ecological risks of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Restoration Program. The assessment is programmatic in that it is directed at evaluation of the broad programmatic alternatives outlined in the DOE Implementation Plan. It attempts to (1) characterize the ecological resources present on DOE facilities, (2) describe the occurrence and importance of ecologically significant contamination at major DOE facilities, (3) evaluate the adverse ecological impacts of habitat disturbance caused by remedial activities, and (4) determine whether one or another of the programmatic alternatives is clearly ecologically superior to the others. The assessment focuses on six representative facilities: the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL); the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP); the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), including the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Y-12 plant, and K-25 plant; the Rocky Flats Plant; the Hanford Reservation; and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Pacific Lamprey Research and Restoration : Annual Report 1996.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The once abundant stocks of Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) above Bonneville Dam are currently depressed (Close et al. 1995). It is likely that many of the same factors that led to the decline of wild stocks of Columbia River Pacific salmon and steelhead have impacted Pacific lamprey populations. The Pacific lamprey is an important part of the food web of North Pacific ecosystems, both as predator and prey. Lamprey (a.k.a. eels) are also a valuable food and culture resource for American Indian Tribes of the Pacific Northwest. Depressed Pacific lamprey runs have impacted treaty secured fishing opportunities by forcing tribal members to gather this traditional food in lower Columbia River locations. The Pacific Lamprey Research and Restoration Project, funded by Bonneville Power Administration, is a cooperative effort between the Confederated Tribes of The Umatilla Indian Reservation, the Columbia River Intertribal Fish Commission, and Oregon State University with the goal to increase Pacific lamprey stocks above Bonneville Dam. The initial objectives of the project are to determine the past and current abundance of Pacific lamprey stocks in major mid Columbia tributaries and at various hydroelectric facilities, and to determine factors limiting Pacific lamprey abundance and distribution. Ultimately, Pacific lamprey restoration plans will be developed and implemented. Part (A)-CTUIR: (1) determine past and present abundance and distribution in NE Oregon and SE Washington tributaries; and (2) determine limiting habitat factors. Part (B)-CRITFC: (1) adult abundance monitoring at Columbia and Snake River dams; (2) juvenile abundance monitoring at Columbia and Snake River dams; and (3) juvenile passage impediments and needed improvements at Columbia and Snake River dams. Part (C)- OSU: (1) adult passage impediments and needed improvements at Columbia and Snake River dams; and (2) juvenile passage impediments and needed improvements at Columbia and Snake River dams.

Jackson, Aaron D.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

PROJECT SUMMARY The proposed research program uses the restoration and conservation of biodiversity in woodlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROJECT SUMMARY The proposed research program uses the restoration and conservation of biodiversity and conservation planning process relates to biodiversity outcomes in complex metropolitan landscapes. Chicago, restoration and management of biodiversity on 360,000 acres of open space in the greater Chicago metropolitan

Illinois at Chicago, University of

231

FINDING THE GLOBAL MINIMUM FOR BINARY IMAGE RESTORATION Tony F. Chan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- est. In this paper we define the restored image as the global min- imizer of the total-variation (TVFINDING THE GLOBAL MINIMUM FOR BINARY IMAGE RESTORATION Tony F. Chan , Selim Esedo¯glu and Mila and there are no general methods to calculate the global minimum, while local minimziers are very often of limited inter

Esedoglu, Selim

232

Prioritization of fish assemblages with a view to conservation and restoration on a large scale European  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prioritization of fish assemblages with a view to conservation and restoration on a large scale The hierarchical organization of important sites for the conservation or the restoration of fish communities, we developed a methodology, which is easy to implement in different locations. Based on the fish

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

233

An analysis of the nutrient removal capacity of agriculturally impacted vs. restored riparian wetlands.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An analysis of the nutrient removal capacity of agriculturally impacted vs. restored riparian removal capacity of agriculturally impacted vs. restored riparian wetlands. Chad Yaindl Lafayette College the consequences of agriculture on streams, solute addition experiments were performed on four streams: a cranberry

Vallino, Joseph J.

234

One-Two-Three Punch Clobbers Toxic Algae, Restores Fremont Lake  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One-Two-Three Punch Clobbers Toxic Algae, Restores Fremont Lake Final Report Fremont Lake #20 Water-two-three punch to knockout toxic algae and restore water quality in Nebraska's numerous sandpit lakes. "It seems to help rid the too-often toxic algae prone Fremont State Lakes of the oily green scum that can close them

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

235

Journal of Contemporary Water researCh & eduCationUCOWR Geomorphology and Restoration Ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecology David R. Montgomery Quaternary Research Center and Department of Earth & Space Sciences University of restoration ecology? I have struggled with this question over the past of the potential for geomorphology to contribute to restoration ecology requires conceptual and educational shifts

Montgomery, David R.

236

Lebanese Science Journal, Vol. 8, No. 1, 2007 19 APPLICATION OF RESTORATION ECOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lebanese Science Journal, Vol. 8, No. 1, 2007 19 APPLICATION OF RESTORATION ECOLOGY PRINCIPLES, France ckhater@cnrs.edu.lb (Received 23 June 2006 - Accepted 1 March 2007) ABSTRACT Restoration ecology is an emerging science dealing with applied ecology and aiming at "helping nature to recreate itself

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

237

Author's personal copy Kaly UL and Jones GP (1998) Mangrove restoration: A potential tool for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Texas, USA. Marine Ecology ­ Progress Series 151: 165­179. Mitsch WJ and Gosselink JG (2000) Wetlands-year monitoring study. Restoration Ecology 12: 29­35. Thayer GW (ed.) (1992) Restoring the Nation and Kreeger DA (eds.) (2000) Concepts and Controversies in Tidal Marsh Ecology. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic

Langerhans, Brian

238

Comparison between effective Hamiltonians in symmetry restoring theories: Intrinsic excitations in superfluid nuclei  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The comparison between effective Hamiltonians, constructed within the framework of symmetry restoring methods, is discussed for the case of intrinsic two-quasiparticle excitations in superfluid nuclei. Particularly, the meaning of currently adopted approximations, i.e., number symmetry restoring effective interactions and ideal quasiparticle representation in gauge space, is discussed in connection with an intrinsic symmetry breaking mechanism in the number variable.

O. Civitarese and M. C. Licciardo

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

2 Hydroecology and river restoration: 3 Ripe for research and synthesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

some aquatic 13 ecosystems beyond ``restoration'' to boost their ability to perform functions of value and ecological processes. 25 Meeting human water needs and sustaining the services that 26 aquatic ecosystems2 Hydroecology and river restoration: 3 Ripe for research and synthesis 4 Margaret A. Palmer1

Palmer, Margaret A.

240

PRIMARY RESEARCH PAPER Short-term responses of decomposers to flow restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

flow. Our results indicate that some aquatic ecosystem variables can return to a more natural statePRIMARY RESEARCH PAPER Short-term responses of decomposers to flow restoration in Fossil Creek projects, although numerous, rarely include complete sets of data before and after restoration

LeRoy, Carri J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "affected restoration estimates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

FISH HABITAT OPTIMIZATION TO PRIORITIZE RIVER RESTORATION DECISIONS S. E. NULLa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are now increasingly managed to support aquatic ecosystems and fisheries, in addition to traditional humanFISH HABITAT OPTIMIZATION TO PRIORITIZE RIVER RESTORATION DECISIONS S. E. NULLa * and J. R. LUNDb restoration alternatives for improving fish habitat by evaluating tradeoffs between fish production

Pasternack, Gregory B.

242

Stream Restoration in the Upper Midwest, U.S.A. Gretchen G. Alexander1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that dollars are well spent and restoration effective- ness is maximized. Key words: ecosystem management, monitoring, restora- tion, stream improvement, watershed. Introduction Aquatic ecosystems are being impairedStream Restoration in the Upper Midwest, U.S.A. Gretchen G. Alexander1 and J. David Allan1

Allan, David

243

Opportunities for Academic Training in the Science and Practice of Restoration within  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

interest in ecosystem restoration, there is a corresponding need for trained professionals who under- stand ensemble of practi- ces involved in the restoration of degraded ecosystems'') (Higgs 2005) have matured ecosystems has become a primary focus of natu- ral resource management of both terrestrial and aquatic

Nelson, Cara

244

MEDITERRANEAN CLIMATE STREAMS Review Paper Maintaining and restoring hydrologic habitat connectivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to habitat loss and significant declines in aquatic biodiversity. Often the health of freshwater ecosystems for mediterranean species recovery. Keywords River restoration Á Ecosystem functions model Á GIS Á SacramentoMEDITERRANEAN CLIMATE STREAMS Review Paper Maintaining and restoring hydrologic habitat

Merenlender, Adina

245

Defining a Stream Restoration Body of Knowledge as a Basis for National Certification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to improving ecosystem function and enhancing aquatic biodiversity (Wohl et al. 2005). Despite the abundanceForum Defining a Stream Restoration Body of Knowledge as a Basis for National Certification Sue L-7900.0000814 Introduction The practice of stream restoration has become widely accepted as an essential component

Curran, Joanna C.

246

The use of Bayesian networks to guide investments in flow and catchment restoration for impaired river  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

support tool for considering the influence of multiple stressors on aquatic ecosystems and the relative have been made in some countries to release water as environ- mental flows intended to restore aquaticThe use of Bayesian networks to guide investments in flow and catchment restoration for impaired

Poff, N. LeRoy

247

Summary of activities of the life cycle costing workshop conducted by the Environmental Restoration Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A five-day life cycle workshop was conducted by the Environmental Restoration (FR) Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to develop appropriate remediation scenarios for each Waste Area Grouping (WAG) at ORNL and to identify associated data needs (e.g., remedial investigations, special studies, and technology demonstrations) and required interfaces. Workshop participants represented the Department of Energy, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Bechtel National, Radian Corporation, EBASCO Corporation, and M-K Ferguson. The workshop was used to establish a technical basis for remediation activities at each WAG. The workshop results are documented in this report and provide the baseline for estimating the technical scope for each WAG. The scope and associated budgets and schedules will be summarized in baseline reports for each WAG, which, in turn, will be compiled into an overall strategy document for ORNL ER.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Quantum Tunneling Affects Engine Performance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is demonstrated that the effect of quantum tunneling corrections for the reaction HO2 + HO2 = H2O2 + O2 can have a noticeable impact on the performance of a high-fidelity model of a compression-ignition (e.g., diesel) engine, and that an accurate prediction of ignition delay time for the engine model requires an accurate estimation of the tunneling correction for this reaction. ... In this Letter we have demonstrated that a detailed understanding of the chemical dynamics of elementary reactions, including quantum tunneling, is necessary for an accurate description of the performance of compression-ignition engine models, and that something as fundamental as quantum tunneling corrections could make a noticeable difference on such a complex model. ... combustion and emissions in diesel engines. ...

Sibendu Som; Wei Liu; Dingyu D. Y. Zhou; Gina M. Magnotti; Raghu Sivaramakrishnan; Douglas E. Longman; Rex T. Skodje; Michael J. Davis

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

249

Clark Fork River Delta Restoration Project Draft Environmental...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

delta has been affected by shoreline erosion, which has resulted from a variety of factors such as: * Raised Lake Pend Oreille summer levels that result from operations of the...

250

Operational restoration of the Pen Branch bottomland hardwood and swamp wetlands - the research setting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Swamp is a 3020 Ha forested wetland on the floodplain of the Savannah River and is located on the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, SC. Historically the swamp consisted of approximately 50 percent bald cypress-water tupelo stands, 40 percent mixed bottomland hardwood stands, and 10 percent shrub, marsh, and open water. Creek corridors were typical of Southeastern bottomland hardwood forests. The hydrology was controlled by flooding of the Savannah River and by flow from four creeks that drain into the swamp prior to flow into the Savannah River. Upstream dams have caused some alteration of the water levels and timing of flooding within the floodplain. Major impacts to the swamp hydrology occurred with the completion of the production reactors and one coal-fired powerhouse at the SRS in the early 1950's. Water was pumped from the Savannah River, through secondary heat exchangers of the reactors, and discharged into three of the tributary streams that flow into the swamp. Flow in one of the tributaries, Pen Branch, was typically 0.3 m3 s-1 (10-20) cfs prior to reactor pumping and 11.0 m3 s-1 (400 cfs) during pumping. This continued from 1954 to 1988 at various levels. The sustained increases in water volume resulted in overflow of the original stream banks and the creation of additional floodplains. Accompanying this was considerable erosion of the original stream corridor and deposition of a deep silt layer on the newly formed delta. Heated water was discharged directly into Pen Branch and water temperature in the stream often exceeded 65 degrees C. The nearly continuous flooding of the swamp, the thermal load of the water, and the heavy silting resulted in complete mortality of the original vegetation in large areas of the floodplain. In the years since pumping was reduced, early succession has begun in some affected areas. Most of this has been herbs, grasses, and shrubs. Areas that have seedlings are generally willow thickets that support a lower diversity of wildlife. No volunteer seedlings of heavy-seeded hardwoods or cypress have been found in the corridor areas. Research was conducted to determine methods to reintroduce tree species characteristic of more mature forested wetlands. Three restoration strategies were formulated to deal with the differing conditions of the Upper Corridor, the Lower Corridor, and the Delta regions of the impacted area. Site preparation and planting of each area with mixtures of tree species were carried out to speed the restoration of the ecosystem. Species composition and selection were altered based on the current and expected hydrological regimes that the reforestation areas will be experiencing. Because of the operational design of the restoration project, a research program naturally followed to document the success. Many of those efforts are detailed here.

Nelson, E.A.

2000-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

251

U.S. Department of Energy worker health risk evaluation methodology for assessing risks associated with environmental restoration and waste management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes a worker health risk evaluation methodology for assessing risks associated with Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM). The methodology is appropriate for estimating worker risks across the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex at both programmatic and site-specific levels. This document supports the worker health risk methodology used to perform the human health risk assessment portion of the DOE Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) although it has applications beyond the PEIS, such as installation-wide worker risk assessments, screening-level assessments, and site-specific assessments.

Blaylock, B.P.; Legg, J.; Travis, C.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Center for Risk Management; Simek, M.A.; Sutherland, J. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Scofield, P.A. [Office of Environmental Compliance and Documentation (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Back–to–the–future: a fresh policy initiative for fisheries and a restoration ecology for ocean ecosystems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...developments in ecosystem modelling, and...science-based restoration ecology aimed...fisheries and aquatic ecosystems (Pitcher et al...process for the restoration of fisheries and aquatic ecosystems. (Modified from...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

The Use of Ecological Restoration Principles To Achieve Remedy Protection at the Fernald Preserve and Weldon Spring Sites  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Use of Ecological Restoration Principles To Achieve Remedy Protection at the Fernald Preserve and Weldon Spring Sites

254

Affective objectives in a programming languages course  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper discusses the use of affective objectives in upper-level computer science courses. The use of affective objectives can enrich student experiences, support student motivation, and enhance the achievement of the cognitive objectives. The paper ... Keywords: BNF, affective objectives, internalization, memory models, parameter passing, programming languages, syntax diagrams, value

David Langan; Leo F. Denton; Dawn McKinney

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

A Review of Power Outages and Restoration Following the June 2012 Derecho |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A Review of Power Outages and Restoration Following the June 2012 A Review of Power Outages and Restoration Following the June 2012 Derecho A Review of Power Outages and Restoration Following the June 2012 Derecho August 7, 2012 - 11:16am Addthis The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability has released a report that reviews power outages and restoration efforts following the June 29, 2012 Derecho and compares them to outages and restoration efforts following other spring and summer storms in the Ohio Valley and Mid-Atlantic regions. View the Report. Addthis Related Articles Salazar, Chu Announce Major Offshore Wind Initiatives A Review of Power Outages and Restoration Following the June 2012 Derecho Response to Hurricane Irene - Restoring Power on the East Coast President Barack Obama listens to Acting Energy Secretary Daniel B. Poneman during a meeting with electric utility CEOs and trade association representatives at the Department of Energy in Washington, D.C., May 8, 2013. | Official White House Photo by Pete Souza.

256

Ecological outcomes and evaluation of success in passively restored southeastern depressional wetlands.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract: Depressional wetlands may be restored passively by disrupting prior drainage to recover original hydrology and relying on natural revegetation. Restored hydrology selects for wetland vegetation; however, depression geomorphology constrains the achievable hydroperiod, and plant communities are influenced by hydroperiod and available species pools. Such constraints can complicate assessments of restoration success. Sixteen drained depressions in South Carolina, USA, were restored experimentally by forest clearing and ditch plugging for potential crediting to a mitigation bank. Depressions were assigned to alternate revegetation methods representing desired targets of herbaceous and wet-forest communities. After five years, restoration progress and revegetation methods were evaluated. Restored hydroperiods differed among wetlands, but all sites developed diverse vegetation of native wetland species. Vegetation traits were influenced by hydroperiod and the effects of early drought, rather than by revegetation method. For mitigation banking, individual wetlands were assessed for improvement from pre-restoration condition and similarity to assigned reference type. Most wetlands met goals to increase hydroperiod, herb-species dominance, and wetland-plant composition. Fewer wetlands achieved equivalence to reference types because some vegetation targets were incompatible with depression hydroperiods and improbable without intensive management. The results illustrated a paradox in judging success when vegetation goals may be unsuited to system constraints.

De Steven, Diane; Sharitz, Rebecca R.; Barton, Christopher, D.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Introduction Estimation paramtrique (exemples)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction Estimation paramétrique (exemples) FARMAN : Laboratoire SATIE Jean-Pierre Barbot J.P. Barbot Séminaires FARMAN (Traitement du Signal) - 1/36 #12;Introduction Estimation paramétrique (exemples de paramètres de synchronisation (VDSL 2) J.P. Barbot Séminaires FARMAN (Traitement du Signal) - 2

258

Internal Dose Estimates from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Appendix H Internal Dose Estimates from Global Fallout H-1 #12;Radiation Dose to the Population. 263-MQ-008090 September 30, 2000 H-2 #12;Radiation Dose to the Population of the Continental United Site Part I. Estimates of Dose Lynn R. Anspaugh Lynn R. Anspaugh, Consulting Salt Lake City, UT Report

259

Estimating Specialty Costs  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Specialty costs are those nonstandard, unusual costs that are not typically estimated. Costs for research and development (R&D) projects involving new technologies, costs associated with future regulations, and specialty equipment costs are examples of specialty costs. This chapter discusses those factors that are significant contributors to project specialty costs and methods of estimating costs for specialty projects.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

260

Lower Red River Meadow Restoration Project : Biennial Report 1996-97.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Red River has been straightened and the riparian vegetation corridor eliminated in several reaches within the watershed. The river responded by incision resulting in over-steepened banks, increased sedimentation, elevated water temperatures, depressed groundwater levels, reduced floodplain function, and degraded fish habitat. The Lower Red River Meadow Restoration Project is a multi-phase ecosystem enhancement effort that restores natural physical and biological processes and functions to stabilize the stream channel and establish high quality habitats for fish and wildlife. A natural channel restoration philosophy guides the design and on the ground activities, allowing the channel to evolve into a state of dynamic equilibrium. Two years of planning, two years of restoration in Phases I and II, and one year post-restoration monitoring are complete. By excavating new bends and reconnecting historic meanders, Phase I and II channel realignment increased channel length by 3,060 feet, decreased channel gradient by 25 percent, and increased sinuosity from 1.7 to 2.3. Cross-sectional shapes and point bars were modified to maintain deep pool habitat at low flow and to reconnect the meadow floodplain. Improved soil moisture conditions will help sustain the 31,500 native riparian plantings reestablished within these two phases. Overall, short-term restoration performance was successful. Analyses of long-term parameters document either post-restoration baseline conditions or early stages of evolution toward desired conditions. An adaptive management strategy has helped to improve restoration designs, methods, and monitoring. Lessons learned are being transferred to a variety of audiences to advance the knowledge of ecological restoration and wise management of watersheds.

LRK Communications; Wildlife Habitat Institute; Pocket Water, Inc.

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "affected restoration estimates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Restoration of Secondary Containment in Double Shell Tank (DST) Pits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cracks found in many of the double-shell tank (DST) pump and valve pits bring into question the ability of the pits to provide secondary containment and remain in compliance with State and Federal regulations. This study was commissioned to identify viable options for maintain/restoring secondary containment capability in these pits. The basis for this study is the decision analysis process which identifies the requirements to be met and the desired goals (decision criteria) that each option will be weighed against. A facilitated workshop was convened with individuals knowledgeable of Tank Farms Operations, engineering practices, and safety/environmental requirements. The outcome of this workshop was the validation or identification of the critical requirements, definition of the current problem, identification and weighting of the desired goals, baselining of the current repair methods, and identification of potential alternate solutions. The workshop was followed up with further investigations into the potential solutions that were identified in the workshop and through other efforts. These solutions are identified in the body of this report. Each of the potential solutions were screened against the list of requirements and only those meeting the requirements were considered viable options. To expand the field of viable options, hybrid concepts that combine the strongest features of different individual approaches were also examined. Several were identified. The decision analysis process then ranked each of the viable options against the weighted decision criteria, which resulted in a recommended solution. The recommended approach is based upon installing a sprayed on coating system.

SHEN, E.J.

2000-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

262

Application of safeguards technology in DOE's environmental restoration program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the last two decades, the Department of Energy's Office of Safeguards and Security (DOE/OSS) has supported the research and development of safeguards systems analysis methodologies and nondestructive assay (NDS) technology for characterizing, monitoring, and accounting nuclear materials. This paper discusses methodologies and NDA instrumentation developed by the DOE/OSS program that could be applied in the Environmental Restoration Program. NDA instrumentation could be used for field measurements during site characterization and to monitor nuclear materials, heavy metals, and other hazardous materials during site remediation. Systems methodologies can minimize the expenditure of resources and help specify appropriate combinations of NDA instrumentation and chemical analyses to characterize a variety of materials quickly and reduce personnel exposure in hazardous environments. A training program is available to teach fundamental and advanced principles and approaches to characterize and quantify nuclear materials properly and to organize and analyze measurement information for decision making. The ability to characterize the overall volume and distribution of materials at a waste site is difficult because of the inhomogeneous distribution of materials, the requirement for extreme sensitivity, and the lack of resources to collect and chemically analyze a sufficient number of samples. Using a systems study approach based on statistical sampling, the resources necessary to characterize a site can be enhanced by appropriately combining in situ and field NDA measurements with laboratory analyses. 35 refs., 1 figs., 2 tabs.

Eccleston, G.W.; Baker, M.P.; Hansen, W.R.; Lucas, M.C.; Markin, J.T.; Phillips, J.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Environmental monitoring, restoration and assessment: What have we learned  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Twenty-Eighth Hanford Symposium on Health and the Environment was held in Richland, Washington, October 16--19, 1989. The symposium was sponsored by the US Department of Energy and the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, operated by Battelle Memorial Institute. The symposium was organized to review and evaluate some of the monitoring and assessment programs that have been conducted or are currently in place. Potential health and environmental effects of energy-related and other industrial activities have been monitored and assessed at various government and private facilities for over three decades. Most monitoring is required under government regulations; some monitoring is implemented because facility operators consider it prudent practice. As a result of these activities, there is now a substantial radiological, physical, and chemical data base for various environmental components, both in the United States and abroad. Symposium participants, both platform and poster presenters, were asked to consider, among other topics, the following: Has the expenditure of millions of dollars for radiological monitoring and assessment activities been worth the effort How do we decide when enough monitoring is enough Can we adequately assess the impacts of nonradiological components -- both inorganic and organic -- of wastes Are current regulatory requirements too restrictive or too lenient Can monitoring and assessment be made more cost effective Papers were solicited in the areas of environmental monitoring; environmental regulations; remediation, restoration, and decommissioning; modeling and dose assessment; uncertainty, design, and data analysis; and data management and quality assurance. Individual reports are processed separately for the databases.

Gray, R.H. (ed.)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Restoring a disappearing ecosystem: the Longleaf Pine Savanna.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) savannas of the southeastern United States contain some of the worlds most diverse plant communities, along with a unique complement of wildlife. Their traditionally open canopy structure and rich understory of grasses and herbs were critical to their vigor. However, a long history of land-use practices such as logging, farming, and fire exclusion have reduced this once-widespread ecosystem to only 3 percent of its original range. At six longleaf pine plantations in South Carolina, Tim Harrington with the Pacific Northwest Research Station and collaborators with the Southern Research Station used various treatments (including prescribed burns, tree thinning, and herbicide applications) to alter the forest structure and tracked how successful each one was in advancing savanna restoration over a 14-year period. They found that typical planting densities for wood production in plantations create dense understory shade that excludes many native herbaceous species important to savannas and associated wildlife. The scientists found that although tree thinning alone did not result in sustained gains, a combination of controlled burning, thinning, and herbicide treatments to reduce woody plants was an effective strategy for recovering the savanna ecosystem. The scientists also found that these efforts must be repeated periodically for enduring benefits.

Harrington, Timothy B. [USFS; Miller, Karl V. [University of Georgia; Park, Noreen

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Moses Lake Fishery Restoration Project : FY 1999 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Moses Lake Project consists of 3 phases. Phase 1 is the assessment of all currently available physical and biological information, the collection of baseline biological data, the formulation of testable hypotheses, and the development of a detailed study plan to test the hypotheses. Phase 2 is dedicated to the implementation of the study plan including data collection, hypotheses testing, and the formulation of a management plan. Phase 3 of the project is the implementation of the management plan, monitoring and evaluation of the implemented recommendations. The project intends to restore the failed recreational fishery for panfish species (black crappie, bluegill and yellow perch) in Moses Lake as off site mitigation for lost recreational fishing opportunities for anadromous species in the upper Columbia River. This report summarizes the results of Phase 1 investigations and presents the study plan directed at initiating Phase 2 of the project. Phase 1of the project culminates with the formulation of testable hypotheses directed at investigating possible limiting factors to the production of panfish in Moses Lake. The limiting factors to be investigated will include water quality, habitat quantity and quality, food limitations, competition, recruitment, predation, over harvest, environmental requirements, and the physical and chemical limitations of the system in relation to the fishes.

None given

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Restoration and testing of an HTS fault current controller  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A three-phase, 1200 A, 12.5 kV fault current controller using three HTS 4 mH coils, was built by industry and tested in 1999 at the Center Substation of Southern California Edison in Norwalk, CA. During the testing, it appeared that each of the three single-phase units had experienced a voltage breakdown, one externally and two internally. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was asked by DOE to restore the operation of the fault current controller provided the HTS coils had not been damaged during the initial substation tests. When the internally-failed coil vacuum vessels were opened it became evident that in these two vessels, a flashover had occurred at the high voltage bus section leading to the terminals of the superconducting coil. An investigation into the failure mechanism resulted in six possible causes for the flashover. Based on these causes, the high voltage bus was completely redesigned. Single-phase tests were successfully performed on the modified unit at a 13.7 kV LANL substation. This paper presents the postulated voltage flashover failure mechanisms, the new high voltage bus design which mitigates the failure mechanisms, the sequence of tests used to validate the new design, and finally, the results of variable load and short-circuit tests with the single-phase unit operating on the LANL 13.7 kV substation.

Waynert, J. A. (Joseph A.); Boenig, H. (Heinrich E.); Mielke, C. H. (Charles H.); Willis, J. O. (Jeffrey O.); Burley, B. L. (Burt L.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Sandy River Delta Habitat Restoration : Annual Report, January 2008 - March 2009.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the period 2008-2009, there were 2 contracts with BPA. One (38539) was dealing with the restoration work for 2007 and the other (26198) was an extension on the 2006 contract including the NEPA for Dam removal on the old channel of the Sandy River. For contract 38539, the Sandy River Delta Habitat Restoration project continued its focus on riparian hardwood reforestation with less emphasis on wetlands restoration. Emphasis was placed on Sundial Island again due to the potential removal of the dike and the loss of access in the near future. AshCreek Forest Management was able to leverage additional funding from grants to help finance the restoration effort; this required a mid year revision of work funded by BPA. The revised work not only continued the maintenance of restored hardwood forests, but was aimed to commence the restoration of the Columbia River Banks, an area all along the Columbia River. This would be the final restoration for Sundial Island. The grant funding would help achieve this. Thus by 2011, all major work will have been completed on Sundial Island and the need for access with vehicles would no longer be required. The restored forests continued to show excellent growth and development towards true riparian gallery forests. Final inter-planting was commenced, and will continue through 2010 before the area is considered fully restored. No new wetland work was completed. The wetlands were filled by pumping in early summer to augment the water levels but due to better rainfall, no new fuel was required to augment existing. Monitoring results continued to show very good growth of the trees and the restoration at large was performing beyond expectations. Weed problems continue to be the most difficult issue. The $100,000 from BPA planned for forest restoration in 2008, was augmented by $25,000 from USFS, $120,000 from OR150 grant, $18,000 from LCREP, and the COE continued to add $250,000 for their portion. Summary of the use of these funds are displayed in Table 1 (page 5). Work on the restoration of the original Sandy River channel (dam removal, contract 26198) continued slowly. The draft EA was completed and sent out for review. The COE has decided to finish the NEPA with the intent to complete the project.

Dobson, Robin [USDA Forest Service, Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area

2009-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

268

Relative Habitat Value Of Alternative Substrates Used In Oyster Reef Restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

like to the my advisor, Dr. Jennifer Pollack, and my committee members, Drs. Paul Montagna and Lee Smee for their help and guidance in completing this thesis. I would also like to thank the Coastal Conservation and Restoration Ecology Lab: Jaimie... to differences in shapes of material (e.g. flat shells versus more rounded river rock). A study by Rodney and Paynter (2006) comparing macrofaunal assemblages on natural and restored reefs in Chesapeake Bay showed that restored reefs had an order of magnitude...

George, Lindsey Marie

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

269

Summary of available waste forecast data for the Environmental Restoration Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report identifies patterns of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Restoration (ER) waste generation that are predicted by the current ER Waste Generation Forecast data base. It compares the waste volumes to be generated with the waste management capabilities of current and proposed treatment, storage, or disposal (TSD) facilities. The scope of this report is limited to wastes generated during activities funded by the Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Environmental Restoration (EM-40) and excludes wastes from the decontamination and decommissioning of facilities. Significant quantities of these wastes are expected to be generated during ER activities. This report has been developed as a management tool supporting communication and coordination of waste management activities at ORNL. It summarizes the available data for waste that will be generated as a result of remediation activities under the direction of the U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office and identifies areas requiring continued waste management planning and coordination. Based on the available data, it is evident that most remedial action wastes leaving the area of contamination can be managed adequately with existing and planned ORR waste management facilities if attention is given to waste generation scheduling and the physical limitations of particular TSD facilities. Limited use of off-site commercial TSD facilities is anticipated, provided the affected waste streams can be shown to satisfy the requirements of the performance objective for certification of non-radioactive hazardous waste and the waste acceptance criteria of the off-site facilities. Ongoing waste characterization will be required to determine the most appropriate TSD facility for each waste stream.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

DOE Transfers $5 million to NREL, Jobs to be Restored | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Transfers $5 million to NREL, Jobs to be Restored Transfers $5 million to NREL, Jobs to be Restored DOE Transfers $5 million to NREL, Jobs to be Restored February 20, 2006 - 12:06pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - At the direction of Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman, $5 million was transferred to Midwest Research Institute, the operating contractor for the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), over the weekend. DOE has been informed that the NREL lab director will use these funds to immediately restore all of the jobs that were cut earlier this month due to budget shortfalls. "The programs at NREL are critically important to realizing the President's vision to diversify and strengthen our nation's energy mix," Secretary Bodman said. "The action we are taking today will allow the dedicated

271

Self-Healing of Structural Damage to Restore Performance of Electrical  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Self-Healing of Structural Damage to Self-Healing of Structural Damage to Restore Performance of Electrical Circuits Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) EFRCs Home Centers Research Science Highlights Highlight Archives News & Events Publications Contact BES Home 04.27.12 Self-Healing of Structural Damage to Restore Performance of Electrical Circuits Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Scientific Achievement Designed chemical interactions of liquid-metal-filled microcapsules target areas of microstructural damage and restore conductive pathways. Significance and Impact Selective self-healing mechanism extends the lifetime and reliability of electronic devices including battery electrodes. Research Details Liquid Indium-Gallium metal-filled microcapsules restore nearly 99% of the

272

Recovery Act Workers Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites, Help Reduce  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites, Help Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites, Help Reduce Cold War Footprint Recovery Act Workers Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites, Help Reduce Cold War Footprint The Hanford Site is looking greener these days after American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers revegetated 166 acres across 12 waste sites, planting over 1,100 pounds of seeds and about 280,000 pounds of mulch. The largest of the sites, known as the BC Control Area, is an approximately 13-square-mile area associated with a waste disposal system used during Hanford operations. Recovery Act Workers Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites, Help Reduce Cold War Footprint More Documents & Publications 2011 ARRA Newsletters Workers at Hanford Site Achieve Recovery Act Legacy Cleanup Goals Ahead of

273

EA-1932: Bass Lake Native Fish Restoration, Eureka, Lincoln County, Montana  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA was initiated to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a BPA proposal to fund Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks to help restore native fish populations to the Tobacco River and Lake Koocanusa. The project has been cancelled.

274

Restoring Forests and Associated Ecosystem Services on Appalachian Coal Surface Mines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Surface coal mining in Appalachia has caused extensive replacement of forest with ... forests have not been restored on most Appalachian mined lands because traditional reclamation practices, encouraged by ... sc...

Carl E. Zipper; James A. Burger; Jeffrey G. Skousen…

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Restoration of the Mississippi Delta: Lessons from Hurricanes Katrina and Rita  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...flood-protection infrastructure, agriculture, urban development, commercial and...the Louisiana Coastal Area (LCA) Ecosystem Restoration Study (58). The LCA Study produced detailed quantitative...to prepare a scaled-back LCA Plan that was submitted to Congress...

John W. Day; Jr.; Donald F. Boesch; Ellis J. Clairain; G. Paul Kemp; Shirley B. Laska; William J. Mitsch; Kenneth Orth; Hassan Mashriqui; Denise J. Reed; Leonard Shabman; Charles A. Simenstad; Bill J. Streever; Robert R. Twilley; Chester C. Watson; John T. Wells; Dennis F. Whigham

2007-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

276

NPTool: a Matlab software for nonnegative image restoration with Newton projection methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Several image restoration applications require the solution of nonnegatively constrained minimization problems whose objective function is typically constituted by the sum of a data fit function and a regulari...

Germana Landi; Elena Loli Piccolomini

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

An Experimental Burn to Restore a Moth-Killed Boreal Conifer Forest, Krasnoyarsk Region, Russia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mechanical treatment and prescribed fire were used to restore a mixed conifer stand (Picea-Abies-Pinus) following mortality from an outbreak of Siberian moth (Dendrolimus superans sibiricus). Moth-killed stands o...

E. N. Valendik; J. C. Brissette…

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Restoring a Degraded Rangeland: Using Fire and Herbivory to Control Opuntia Cacti Encroachment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Innovative restoration strategies are critically needed in the South Texas Plains for controlling increased Opuntia cacti invasions. Using a replicated and randomized experimental study, I have examined the effects of fire seasonality and herbivory...

Sosa, Gabriela

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

279

Final report, National Fish and Wildlife Foundation Grant Midewin Tallgrass Prairie Restoration Fund Proposal 11439  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Final report, National Fish and Wildlife Foundation Grant Midewin Tallgrass Prairie Restoration with another wind- pollinated species group (viz., oaks). All goals were achieved in the course of this work

Hipp, Andrew

280

200206100 Restoration Potlatch River Watershed/Request for Expanded SOW 1 Table 1. Proposal Metadata  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

restore steelhead to a robust, self-sustaining population in the Potlatch River watershed (Chapter 7, page, farming, or housing, and these uses continue, which precludes natural or passive rehabilitation from

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "affected restoration estimates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

A regional restoration grants program to promote preservation and enhancement of urban natural areas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Greenspaces Habitat Restoration Program, a partnership between Metro and US Fish and Wildlife Service in Portland, Oregon was created in 1992, as a component of The Metro Greenspaces and Open Spaces Progra...

Esther Lev

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Binary Restoration of Thin Objects in Multidimensional Imagery Jeffrey E. Boyd  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Binary Restoration of Thin Objects in Multidimensional Imagery Jeffrey E. Boyd Department becomes trivial. Such is the case #12; Boyd and Meloche, PAMI, Vol. 20, No. 6, p647--651, June 98. 2 (a

Boyd, Jeffrey E.

283

Colonisation of Introduced Timber by Algae and Invertebrates, and its Potential Role in Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As part of a habitat restoration experiment wood substrates (red gum) were introduced to two lowland streams of SE Australia in which habitat has been severely degraded by deposition of sand eroded from higher...

Nicholas R. Bond; Sergi Sabater; Alena Glaister; Simon Roberts…

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

United States of America, Department of Energy Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Advisory Committee Public Meeting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a transcript of the public hearing of the US DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Advisory Committee held in Golden, Colorado June 16--18, 1993.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Analysis and restoration of a 1960s ear vacuum tube AM-FM reflex receiver  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis details the analysis, restoration, and evaluation of a 1960s era vacuum tube AM-FM reflex receiver. External influences such as tax laws necessitated clever designs to minimize the use of expensive vacuum tubes ...

Golden, Adam J

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

EA-1969: Clark Fork River Delta Restoration Project, Bonner County, Idaho  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Bonneville Power Administration is preparing an environmental assessment to analyze the potential effects of a proposal to restore wetland and riparian (riverbank) habitat and to reduce erosion in the Clark Fork River delta located in Bonner County, Idaho.

287

Effects of hay management and native species sowing on grassland community structure, biomass, and restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

abandoned HILD hay field in eastern Kansas to evaluate effects of fertilization, haying, and native species sowing on community dynamics, biomass, and potential for restoration to native LIHD hay meadow. Fertilized plots maintained dominance by introduced...

Foster, Brian L.; Kindscher, Kelly; Houseman, Greg R.; Murphy, Cheryl A.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

State Emissions Estimates  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Estimates of state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions Estimates of state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions Because energy-related carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) constitutes over 80 percent of total emissions, the state energy-related CO 2 emission levels provide a good indicator of the relative contribution of individual states to total greenhouse gas emissions. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) emissions estimates at the state level for energy-related CO 2 are based on data contained in the State Energy Data System (SEDS). 1 The state-level emissions estimates are based on energy consumption data for the following fuel categories: three categories of coal (residential/commercial, industrial, and electric power sector); natural gas; and ten petroleum products including-- asphalt and road oil, aviation gasoline, distillate fuel, jet fuel, kerosene, liquefied petroleum gases

289

Cost Estimating Guide  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Guide provides uniform guidance and best practices that describe the methods and procedures that could be used in all programs and projects at DOE for preparing cost estimates. No cancellations.

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

290

: Helmholtz machine estimation .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Helmholtz machine density estimation . . : . . . (supervised learning) , (active learning) (query learning) [1, 3]. . (unsupervised learning), . , [5]. . Helmholtz machine , . Helmholtz machine : Helmholtz machine [2] . Helmholtz machine (generative network) (recognition network) . , , . Helmholtz machine (self

291

A silver staining technique for investigating wear of restorative dental composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A silver staining technique was developed to demonstrate microdefects in dental restorative composites. Fine silver particles were preferentially introduced into the damaged region to provide optical contrast between the damaged and the undamaged regions. The amount of silver deposition determined with an electron probe microanalyzer, provided an indication of the extent of damage within the dental composites. Examples to demonstrate this technique were given with one clinically worn dental composite restoration and one in vitro worn composite sample.

Wu, W.; Cobb, E.N.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

On the breaking and restoration of symmetries within the nuclear energy density functional formalism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review the notion of symmetry breaking and restoration within the frame of nuclear energy density functional methods. We focus on key differences between wave-function- and energy-functional-based methods. In particular, we point to difficulties encountered within the energy functional framework and discuss new potential constraints on the underlying energy density functional that could make the restoration of broken symmetries better formulated within such a formalism. We refer to Ref.~\\cite{duguet10a} for details.

T. Duguet; J. Sadoudi

2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

293

An internship with the Galveston Bay Foundation emphasizing Coastal Marsh Restoration with Spartina alterniflora  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Record of Study An Internship with the Galveston Bay Foundation Emphasizing Coastal Marsh Restoration with Spartina alterrsiflora A PROFESSIONAL PAPER by Joey Mahmoud Submitted to the College of Agriculture of Texas ASM University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF AGRICULTURE May 1996 Rangeland Ecology and Management An Internship with the Galveston Bay Foundation Emphasizing Coastal Marsh Restoration with Spartina alterniflora A PROFESSIONAL PAPER...

Mahmoud, Joey

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

294

A.R. River Environmental Restoration Project (SWL) 37-18, 37-25  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-14, 28-36, 28-46, 28-61 Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration Baltimore District (NAB) 4-23 Galveston DistrictA A.R. River Environmental Restoration Project (SWL) 37-18, 37-25 Aberdeen and Vicinity, SD (NWO-9 Aquatic Plant Control Charleston District (SAC) 7-2, 7-9, 7-12, Galveston District (SWG) 40-3, 40-25, 40

US Army Corps of Engineers

295

A.R. River Environmental Restoration Project (SWL) 37-18, 37-25  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) 28-15, 28-53, 28-67 Appomattox River, VA (NAO) 5-3, 5-20 Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration BaltimoreI-1 A A.R. River Environmental Restoration Project (SWL) 37-18, 37-25 A.W. Kerr Scott Dam) 3-25 Savannah District (SAS) 8-8 Aquatic Plant Control Galveston District (SWG) 40-3, 46-28, 40

US Army Corps of Engineers

296

Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Products, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystems Services  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. During this quarter we worked on methodologies for analyzing carbon in mine soils. A unique property of mine soils is the presence of coal and carboniferous rock particles that are present in mine soils in various sizes, quantities, and qualities. There is no existing method in the literature that may be of use for quantitative estimation of soil organic carbon (SOC) in mine soils that can successfully differentiate between pedogenic and geogenic carbon forms. In this report we present a detailed description of a 16-step method for measuring SOC in mine soils designed for and tested on a total of 30 different mine soil mixtures representing a wide spectrum of mine soils in the hard-rock region of the Appalachian coalfield. The proposed method is a combination of chemical procedure for carbonates removal, a thermal procedure for pedogenic C removal, and elemental C analysis procedure at 900 C. Our methodology provides a means to correct for the carbon loss from the more volatile constituents of coal fragments in the mine soil samples and another correction factor for the protected organic matter that can also remain unoxidized following thermal pretreatment. The correction factors for coal and soil material-specific SOM were based on carbon content loss from coal and SOM determined by a parallel thermal oxidation analysis of pure ground coal fragments retrieved from the same mined site as the soil samples and of coal-free soil rock fragments of sandstone and siltstone origin.

James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

2006-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

297

Migratory birds affect stability of intertidal sediments.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An ecological cascade effect: Migratory birds affect stability of ... tion) effect changes in coastal and estuarine .... ship would be expected if the cohesion was.

1999-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

298

E-Print Network 3.0 - affecting pcr-based estimates Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

from the January 2007 issue of Summary: - time PCR is now possible (1,10,13). A survey by Pappu et al. (13), using a PCR-based detection assay... were tested with the PCR-based...

299

ANL technical support program for DOE environmental restoration and waste management. Annual report, October 1993--September 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A program was established for DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) to evaluate factors that are anticipated to affect waste glass reaction during repository disposal, especially in an unsaturated environment typical of what may be expected for the proposed Yucca Mountain repository site. This report covers progress in FY 1994 on the following tasks: (1) Critical Reviews of important parameters that affect the reactivity of glass in an unsaturated environment are being prepared. (2) A series of tests is ongoing to evaluate the reactivity of fully radioactive glasses in a high-level waste repository environment and compare it to the reactivity of synthetic, nonradioactive glasses of similar composition. (3) The effect of radiation upon the durability of waste glasses at a high SA/V ratio and a high gas-to-liquid volume ratio has been assessed. (4) A series of tests is being performed to compare the extent of reaction of nuclear waste glasses at various SA/V ratios. Such differences in the SA/V ratio may significantly affect glass durability. At long-term periods and high SA/V ratios, acceleration in glass reaction has been observed. (5) Tests were initiated on West Valley Reference 6 (WV6) glass and on the Environmental Assessment (EA) glass. (6) Tests with the actinide-doped West Valley glass ATM-10 have been in progress for over seven years as a part of work for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). (7) Analytical electron microscopy (AEM) is being used to assess the glass/water reaction pathway by identifying intermediate phases that appear on the reacting glass. Also, colloids from the leach solutions are being studied using AEM.

Bates, J.K.; Brown, N.R.; Buck, E.C. [and others

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The restoration of wetland salmon habitat in the tidal portion of the Columbia River is occurring at an accelerating pace and is anticipated to improve habitat quality and effect hydrological reconnection between existing and restored habitats. Currently multiple groups are applying a variety of restoration strategies in an attempt to emulate historic estuarine processes. However, the region lacks both a standardized means of evaluating the effectiveness of individual projects as well as methods for determining the cumulative effects of all restoration projects on a regional scale. This project is working to establish a framework to evaluate individual and cumulative ecosystem responses to restoration activities in order to validate the effectiveness of habitat restoration activities designed to benefit salmon through improvements to habitat quality and habitat opportunity (i.e. access) in the Columbia River from Bonneville Dam to the ocean. The review and synthesis of approaches to measure the cumulative effects of multiple restoration projects focused on defining methods and metrics of relevance to the CRE, and, in particular, juvenile salmon use of this system. An extensive literature review found no previous study assessing the cumulative effects of multiple restoration projects on the fundamental processes and functions of a large estuarine system, although studies are underway in other large land-margin ecosystems including the Florida Everglades and the Louisiana coastal wetlands. Literature from a variety of scientific disciplines was consulted to identify the ways that effects can accumulate (e.g., delayed effects, cross-boundary effects, compounding effects, indirect effects, triggers and thresholds) as well as standard and innovative tools and methods utilized in cumulative effects analyses: conceptual models, matrices, checklists, modeling, trends analysis, geographic information systems, carrying capacity analysis, and ecosystem analysis. Potential indicators for detecting a signal in the estuarine system resulting from the multiple projects were also reviewed, i.e. organic matter production, nutrient cycling, sedimentation, food webs, biodiversity, salmon habitat usage, habitat opportunity, and allometry. In subsequent work, this information will be used to calculate the over net effect on the ecosystem. To evaluate the effectiveness of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary, a priority of this study has been to develop a set of minimum ecosystem monitoring protocols based on metrics important for the CRE. The metrics include a suite of physical measurements designed to evaluate changes in hydrological and topographic features, as well as biological metrics that will quantify vegetation and fish community structure. These basic measurements, intended to be conducted at all restoration sites in the CRE, will be used to (1) evaluate the effectiveness of various restoration procedures on target metrics, and (2) provide the data to determine the cumulative effects of many restoration projects on the overall system. A protocol manual is being developed for managers, professional researchers, and informed volunteers, and is intended to be a practical technical guide for the design and implementation of monitoring for the effects of restoration activities. The guidelines are intended to standardize the collection of data critical for analyzing the anticipated ecological change resulting from restoration treatments. Field studies in 2005 are planned to initiate the testing and evaluation of these monitoring metrics and protocols and initiate the evaluation of higher order metrics for cumulative effects.

Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Roegner, Curtis; Thom, Ronald M.; Dawley, Earl M.; Whiting, Allan H.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Anderson, Michael G.; Ebberts, Blaine

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "affected restoration estimates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Weekly Coal Production Estimation Methodology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Weekly Coal Production Estimation Methodology Step 1 (Estimate total amount of weekly U.S. coal production) U.S. coal production for the current week is estimated using a ratio...

302

REQUESTS FOR RETIREMENT ESTIMATE  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

REQUEST FOR RETIREMENT ANNUITY ESTIMATE REQUEST FOR RETIREMENT ANNUITY ESTIMATE Instructions: Please read and answer the following questions thoroughly to include checking all applicable boxes. Unanswered questions may delay processing. Print and Fax back your request form to 202.586.6395 or drop request to GM-169. The request will be assigned to your servicing retirement specialist. They will confirm receipt of your request. SECTION A Request Submitted _____________________ ______________________ ________________________ _____________________ Name (last, first, middle) Last four SSN Date of Birth ___________________________ _________________________ __________________________ Organization Office Telephone Number Fax Number

303

Estimating SCR installation costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The EUCG surveyed 72 separate US installations of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems at coal-fired units totalling 41 GW of capacity to identify the systems' major cost drivers. The results, summarized in this article, provide excellent first-order estimates and guidance for utilities considering installing the downstream emissions-control technology. 4 figs., 1 tab.

Marano, M.; Sharp, G. [American Electric Power (United States)

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

SPACE TECHNOLOGY Actual Estimate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SPACE TECHNOLOGY TECH-1 Actual Estimate Budget Authority (in $ millions) FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 FY.7 247.0 Exploration Technology Development 144.6 189.9 202.0 215.5 215.7 214.5 216.5 Notional SPACE TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW .............................. TECH- 2 SBIR AND STTR

305

Evaluation of Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the seventh and final annual report of a project (2004–2010) addressing evaluation of the cumulative effects of habitat restoration actions in the 235-km-long lower Columbia River and estuary. The project, called the Cumulative Effects (CE) study, was conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District by a collaboration of research agencies led by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. We achieved the primary goal of the CE study to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat actions in the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program. We delivered 1) standard monitoring protocols and methods to prioritize monitoring activities; 2) the theoretical and empirical basis for a CE methodology using levels-of-evidence; 3) evaluations of cumulative effects using ecological relationships, geo-referenced data, hydrodynamic modeling, and meta-analyses; and 4) an adaptive management process to coordinate and coalesce restoration efforts in the LCRE. A solid foundation has been laid for future comprehensive evaluations of progress made by the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program to understand, conserve, and restore ecosystems in the lower Columbia River and estuary.

Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Roegner, G. Curtis; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Skalski, John R.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl; Coleman, Andre M.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Breithaupt, Stephen A.; Cameron, April; Corbett, C.; Donley, Erin E.; Jay, D. A.; Ke, Yinghai; Leffler, K.; McNeil, C.; Studebaker, Cindy; Tagestad, Jerry D.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Restore McComas Meadows; Meadow Creek Watershed, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division approaches watershed restoration with a ridge-top to ridge-top approach. Watershed restoration projects within the Meadow Creek watershed are coordinated and cost shared with the Nez Perce National Forest. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Meadow Creek watershed of the South Fork Clearwater River in 1996. Progress has been made in restoring the watershed by excluding cattle from critical riparian areas through fencing, planting trees in riparian areas within the meadow and its tributaries, prioritizing culverts for replacement to accommodate fish passage, and decommissioning roads to reduce sediment input. During this contract period work was completed on two culvert replacement projects; Doe Creek and a tributary to Meadow Creek. Additionally construction was also completed for the ditch restoration project within McComas Meadows. Monitoring for project effectiveness and trends in watershed conditions was also completed. Road decommissioning monitoring, as well as stream temperature, sediment, and discharge were completed.

McRoberts, Heidi (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

FEMP Releases AFFECT Funding Opportunity Announcement  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

On November 5, 2013, the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) on the EERE Exchange titled "Assisting Federal Facilities with Energy Conservation Technologies (AFFECT)."

308

Oak Ridge Reservation Federal Facility Agreement. Quarterly report for the Environmental Restoration Program. Volume 4: July--September 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents significant accomplishments for the Oak Ridge Reservation`s environmental restoration projects for the fourth quarter of FY 1996.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

The potential use of surfactant and cosolvent soil washing as adjuvant for in-situ aquifer restoration.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The use of surfactant and aqueous cosolvent soil washing for the restoration of contaminated aquifers was investigated by laboratory experimentation and literature review. The effect… (more)

Ziegenfuss, Philip Scott

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Use of Cost Estimating Relationships  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Cost Estimating Relationships (CERs) are an important tool in an estimator's kit, and in many cases, they are the only tool. Thus, it is important to understand their limitations and characteristics. This chapter discusses considerations of which the estimator must be aware so the Cost Estimating Relationships can be properly used.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

311

Reinforcing flood–risk estimation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...publication of the Flood estimation handbook, studies of ood risk are now...especially for its neglect of the physics of catchment pro- cesses of...recommended in the Flood estimation handbook (Institute of Hydrology 1999...estimates. The Flood estimation handbook (Institute of Hydrology 1999...

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Los Alamos PC estimating system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Los Alamos Cost Estimating System (QUEST) is being converted to run on IBM personal computers. This very extensive estimating system is capable of supporting cost estimators from many different and varied fields. QUEST does not dictate any fixed method for estimating. QUEST supports many styles and levels of detail estimating. QUEST can be used with or without data bases. This system allows the estimator to provide reports based on levels of detail defined by combining work breakdown structures. QUEST provides a set of tools for doing any type of estimate without forcing the estimator to use any given method. The level of detail in the estimate can be mixed based on the amount of information known about different parts of the project. The system can support many different data bases simultaneously. Estimators can modify any cost in any data base.

Stutz, R.A.; Lemon, G.D.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Hurricane Season: Restoring Power after a Big Storm | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hurricane Season: Restoring Power after a Big Storm Hurricane Season: Restoring Power after a Big Storm Hurricane Season: Restoring Power after a Big Storm June 5, 2012 - 4:01pm Addthis Hurricane Irene made landfall on the coast of North Carolina as a Category 1 hurricane during the 2011 Atlantic hurricane season. It was the ninth named storm, first hurricane, and first major hurricane of the 2011 hurricane season. | Photo courtesy of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Hurricane Irene made landfall on the coast of North Carolina as a Category 1 hurricane during the 2011 Atlantic hurricane season. It was the ninth named storm, first hurricane, and first major hurricane of the 2011 hurricane season. | Photo courtesy of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. William Bryan William Bryan

314

NPP Estimation for Grasslands  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NPP for Grasslands NPP for Grasslands Introduction The Oak Ridge DAAC Net Primary Production (NPP) Database includes field measurements from grassland study sites worldwide. The following brief review and discussion is intended to explain the complexity of NPP estimates derived from grassland measurements. There is no single answer to the question, "What is the productivity of the ecosystem at study site A?"; rather there may be range of estimates of NPP, depending upon what data were actually collected and how these data are processed. Although some of these methods for determining NPP for grasslands may be applicable to other vegetation types (e.g., semi-deserts, tundra, or some crops), methods for forests, in particular, are significantly different. Nevertheless, it should be possible to answer the question, "Is this modelled value of NPP reasonable for this ecosystem type at this location?"

315

Selective depredation of planted hardwood seedlings by wild pigs in a wetland restoration area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Following the planting of several thousand hardwood seedlings in a 69-ha wetland restoration area in west-central South Carolina, wild pigs (Sus scrofa) depredated a large percentage of the young trees. This planting was undertaken as part of a mitigation effort to restore a bottomland hardwood community in the corridor and delta of a third order stream that had been previously impacted by the discharge of heated nuclear reactor effluent. The depredated restoration areas had been pretreated with both herbicide and control burning prior to planting the hardwood seedlings. After discovery of the wild pig damage, these areas were surveyed on foot to assess the magnitude of the depredation on the planted seedling crop. Foraging by the local wild pigs in the pretreatment areas selectively impacted only four of the nine hardwood species used in this restoration effort. Based on the surveys, the remaining five species did not appear to have been impacted at all. A variety of reasons could be used to explain this phenomenon. The pretreatment methodology is thought to have been the primary aspect of the restoration program that initially led the wild pigs to discover the planted seedlings. In addition, it is possible that a combination of other factors associated with odor and taste may have resulted in the selective depredation. Future wetland restoration efforts in areas with wild pigs should consider pretreatment methods and species to be planted. If pretreatment methods and species such as discussed in the present study must be used, then the prior removal of wild pigs from surrounding lands will help prevent depredations by this non-native species.

Mayer, J.J.

1999-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

316

Testing a passive revegetation approach for restoring Coastal Plain depression wetlands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract Restoration of coastal plain depressions, a biologically significant and threatened wetland type of the southeastern United States, has received little systematic research. Within the context of an experimental project designed to evaluate several restoration approaches, we tested whether successful revegetation can be achieved by passive methods (recruitment from seed banks or seed dispersal) that allow for wetland ‘‘self-design’’ in response to hydrologic recovery. For 16 forested depressions that historically had been drained and altered, drainage ditches were plugged to reestablish natural ponding regimes, and the successional forest was harvested to open the sites and promote establishment of emergent wetland vegetation. We sampled seed bank and vegetation composition 1 year before restoration and monitored vegetation response for 3 years after. Following forest removal and ditch plugging, the restored wetlands quickly developed a dense cover of herbaceous plant species, of which roughly half were wetland species. Seed banks were a major source of wetland species for early revegetation. However, hydrologic recovery was slowed by a prolonged drought, which allowed nonwetland plant species to establish from seed banks and dispersal or to regrow after site harvest. Some nonwetland species were later suppressed by ponded conditions in the third year, but resprouting woody plants persisted and could alter the future trajectory of revegetation. Some characteristic wetland species were largely absent in the restored sites, indicating that passive methods may not fully replicate the composition of reference systems. Passive revegetation was partially successful, but regional droughts present inherent challenges to restoring depressional wetlands whose hydrologic regimes are strongly controlled by rainfall variability.

De Steven, Diane; Sharitz, Rebecca R.; Singer, Julian H.; Barton, Christopher D.

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Variables Affecting Economic Development of Wind Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NREL's JEDI Wind model performed an analysis of wind-power-related economic development drivers. Economic development benefits for wind and coal were estimated using NREL's JEDI Wind and JEDI Coal models.

Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Guidance document for the preparation of waste management plans for the Environmental Restoration Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A project waste management (WM) plan is required for all Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program remedial investigation, decommission and decontamination (D&D), and remedial action (RA) activities. The project WM plan describes the strategy for handling, packaging, treating, transporting, characterizing, storing, and/or disposing of waste produced as part of ORNL ER Program activities. The project WM plan also contains a strategy for ensuring worker and environmental protection during WM activities.

Clark, C. Jr.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Assess Current and Potential Salmonid Production in Rattlesnake Creek in Association with Restoration Efforts, US Geological Survey Report, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was designed to document existing habitat conditions and fish populations within the Rattlesnake Creek watershed (White Salmon River subbasin, Washington) before major habitat restoration activities are implemented and prior to the reintroduction of salmon and steelhead above Condit Dam. Returning adult salmon Oncorhynchus spp. and steelhead O. mykiss have not had access to Rattlesnake Creek since 1913. An assessment of resident trout populations should serve as a good surrogate for evaluation of factors that would limit salmon and steelhead production in the watershed. Personnel from United States Geological Survey's Columbia River Research Laboratory (USGS-CRRL) attended to three main objectives of the Rattlesnake Creek project. The first objective was to characterize stream and riparian habitat conditions. This effort included measures of water quality, water quantity, stream habitat, and riparian conditions. The second objective was to determine the status of fish populations in the Rattlesnake Creek drainage. To accomplish this, we derived estimates of salmonid population abundance, determined fish species composition, assessed distribution and life history attributes, obtained tissue samples for genetic analysis, and assessed fish diseases in the watershed. The third objective was to use the collected habitat and fisheries information to help identify and prioritize areas in need of restoration. As this report covers the fourth year of a five-year study, it is largely restricted to describing our efforts and findings for the first two objectives.

Allen, M. Brady; Connolly, Patrick J.; Jezorek, Ian G. (US Geological Survey, Western Fisheries Research Center, Columbia River Research Laboratory, Cook, WA)

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

White Sturgeon Mitigation & Restoration in the Columbia & Snake River Upstream from Bonneville Dam  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) Summary: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is proposing to fund the White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam Project. The project proposes to continue to carry out harvest monitoring and stock status updates coordinated with fisheries management planning, annual young-of-the year recruitment indexing, research, experimental artificial propagation, and transport of white sturgeon to less densely populated areas of the river(s). Additionally, release of hatchery-reared juveniles is proposed to evaluate release

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "affected restoration estimates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

US - Former Soviet Union environmental restoration and waste management activities, March 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy Agreement was signed between DOE and the Ministry of Atomic Energy for the Russian Federation and provides a mechanism for cooperation in research, development, and safe utilization of nuclear energy. Under the umbrella of this agreement, DOE and the former Ministry of Atomic Power and Industry signed a Memorandum of Cooperation in the areas of environmental restoration and waste management in September 1990. This document discusses the environmental situation, science and technology process, technical projects (separations, contaminant transport, waste treatment, environmental restoration), scientist exchanges, enhanced data transfer, the US-Russia industry partnership (conference, centers), and future actions.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

A review of "The Restoration: England in the 1660s." by N.H. Keeble  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

80 SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY NEWS N.H. Keeble. The Restoration: England in the 1660s. History of Early Modern England series. Oxford: Blackwell, 2002. xvi + 270 pp. $34.95. Review by TY M. REESE, UNIVERSITY OF NORTH DAKOTA. N.H. Keeble...80 SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY NEWS N.H. Keeble. The Restoration: England in the 1660s. History of Early Modern England series. Oxford: Blackwell, 2002. xvi + 270 pp. $34.95. Review by TY M. REESE, UNIVERSITY OF NORTH DAKOTA. N.H. Keeble...

Ty M. Reese

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Grays River Watershed Restoration Status Report 2007, May 1, 2007 - October 30, 2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Project 2003-013-00, 'Grays River Watershed Restoration', began in FY04 and continues into FY09. This status report is intended to summarize accomplishments during the period 1 May 2007 through 30 October 2008. Accomplishments are summarized by Work Elements, as detailed in the Statement of Work (see BPA's project management database PISCES). The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is collaborating with the Columbia River Estuary Task Force (CREST) on implementation of the Grays River Restoration Project. The Grays River is vitally important to the recovery of Lower Columbia River (LCR) chum salmon because it currently has the most viable population remaining in the LCR region. The Grays River watershed is also important to the recovery of salmon and steelhead in the LCR ecosystem. Today, numbers of naturally spawning salmon and steelhead have declined to levels far below historical numbers because of habitat limiting factors that include but are not limited to the lack of habitat connectivity, diversity, channel stability, riparian function and altered stream flow conditions. The objective of this project is to restore habitat-forming processes to enhance salmon and steelhead populations in the Grays River, following recommendations developed during the FY04-06 BPA-sponsored Grays River Watershed Assessment (BPA Project No. 2003-013-00). Specifically, this project will be the first step in restoring channel structure and function that will increase instream habitat diversity, channel stability, and riparian integrity in the critical response reach upstream and adjacent to critical salmon spawning areas of the Grays River. The major component of this strategy is the planning, design, installation, and monitoring of engineered logjams (ELJ) that will rejuvenate historic channel and floodplain processes. Additional restoration measures include reforesting the riparian corridor to enhance future large woody debris recruitment and investigation of conservation activities within ecologically critical areas. These activities include land acquisition and levee removal to protect critical areas and reconnect floodplain areas. Finally, monitoring integrated with restoration activities is proposed to evaluate restoration effectiveness and allow for adaptive management of future restoration treatments in the project area as well as other degraded watersheds in the Lower Columbia River.

Hanrahan, Tim [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2008-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

324

Evaluation of Life History Diversity, Habitat Connectivity, and Survival Benefits Associated with Habitat Restoration Actions in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, Annual Report 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the 2010 research conducted under the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) project EST-P-09-1, titled Evaluation of Life History Diversity, Habitat Connectivity, and Survival Benefits Associated with Habitat Restoration Actions in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, and known as the 'Salmon Benefits' study. The primary goal of the study is to establish scientific methods to quantify habitat restoration benefits to listed salmon and trout in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) in three required areas: habitat connectivity, early life history diversity, and survival (Figure ES.1). The general study approach was to first evaluate the state of the science regarding the ability to quantify benefits to listed salmon and trout from habitat restoration actions in the LCRE in the 2009 project year, and then, if feasible, in subsequent project years to develop quantitative indices of habitat connectivity, early life history diversity, and survival. Based on the 2009 literature review, the following definitions are used in this study. Habitat connectivity is defined as a landscape descriptor concerning the ability of organisms to move among habitat patches, including the spatial arrangement of habitats (structural connectivity) and how the perception and behavior of salmon affect the potential for movement among habitats (functional connectivity). Life history is defined as the combination of traits exhibited by an organism throughout its life cycle, and for the purposes of this investigation, a life history strategy refers to the body size and temporal patterns of estuarine usage exhibited by migrating juvenile salmon. Survival is defined as the probability of fish remaining alive over a defined amount of space and/or time. The objectives of the 4-year study are as follows: (1) develop and test a quantitative index of juvenile salmon habitat connectivity in the LCRE incorporating structural, functional, and hydrologic components; (2) develop and test a quantitative index of the early life history diversity of juvenile salmon in the LCRE; (3) assess and, if feasible, develop and test a quantitative index of the survival benefits of tidal wetland habitat restoration (hydrologic reconnection) in the LCRE; and (4) synthesize the results of investigations into the indices for habitat connectivity, early life history diversity, and survival benefits.

Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sather, Nichole K.; Skalski, J. R.; Dawley, Earl M.; Coleman, Andre M.; Ostrand, Kenneth G.; Hanson, Kyle C.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Donley, Erin E.; Ke, Yinghai; Buenau, Kate E.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Townsend, Richard L.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Waste generation forecast for DOE-ORO`s Environmental Restoration OR-1 Project: FY 1995-FY 2002, September 1994 revision  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comprehensive waste-forecasting task was initiated in FY 1991 to provide a consistent, documented estimate of the volumes of waste expected to be generated as a result of U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations (DOE-ORO) Environmental Restoration (ER) OR-1 Project activities. Continual changes in the scope and schedules for remedial action (RA) and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities have required that an integrated data base system be developed that can be easily revised to keep pace with changes and provide appropriate tabular and graphical output. The output can then be analyzed and used to drive planning assumptions for treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities. The results of this forecasting effort and a description of the data base developed to support it are provided herein. The initial waste-generation forecast results were compiled in November 1991. Since the initial forecast report, the forecast data have been revised annually. This report reflects revisions as of September 1994.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Collier, K.J., B.D. Clarkson, B.M.T.A. Aldridge, and B.J. Hicks. 2008. Can urban streams be restored? Linking vegetation restoration with urban  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be restored? Linking vegetation restoration with urban stormwater mitigation. Proceedings of the NZWWA.collier@ew.govt.nz ABSTRACT Urban streams globally are characterised by degraded habitat conditions and low aquatic comprehensive fishing surv ey of the City's streams. Brenda is currently employed as an Environmental Consultant

Waikato, University of

327

Estimating Corn Grain Yields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Background Moisture stress caused by drought will reduce corn grain yields by dis- rupting kernel development, lowering grade, and impeding grain fill. Kernel development of the corn plant is most affected by drought during early vegeta- tive growth stages... stages of development (V8 and V9) also cause the corn plant to develop fewer kernels and to abort developing pollen tubes and kernels. The result is fewer filled rows and fewer developed kernels within each row of an ear, and an overall reduction...

Blumenthal, Jurg M.; Thompson, Wayne

2009-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

328

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic affects head Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Department, University of Florida Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Environmental Management and Restoration Technologies 2 ARSENIC HYPERACCUMULATION BY Pteris...

329

R E V I E W A R T I C L E Agro-Successional Restoration as a Strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as a transition phase early in forest restoration, could be used more widely to overcome socioe- conomic periods of cultivation (a few years to several decades), and complexity of species planted. The management extending the management period of restoration, offsetting some management costs, providing food security

Holl, Karen

330

NAME: McAllis Point Estuarine Habitat Restoration LOCATION: City of Galveston/Galveston County/Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NAME: McAllis Point Estuarine Habitat Restoration LOCATION: City of Galveston/Galveston County/Texas ACRES: 75 acres NON-FEDERAL SPONSOR: Texas General Land Office PROJECT DESCRIPTION: This project Galveston Island. Estuarine habitat to be restored includes salt marsh, soft bottom/sand flat, uplands

US Army Corps of Engineers

331

The effect of cranberry cultivation and restoration on nutrient uptake, cycling, and decomposition in three streams on Cape Cod  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, cranberry cultivation, restoration Introduction Humans manipulate and alter whole ecosystems in order, and are necessary to maintaining a healthy environment. They link aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, and filterThe effect of cranberry cultivation and restoration on nutrient uptake, cycling, and decomposition

Vallino, Joseph J.

332

6th European Conference on Ecological Restoration Ghent, Belgium, 8-12/09/2008 A GEOMORPHIC APPROACH FOR THE ECOLOGICAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

supports unique bio and geodiversity in Spain, with distinctive aquatic ecosystems (a Natural Park and two6th European Conference on Ecological Restoration Ghent, Belgium, 8-12/09/2008 1 A GEOMORPHIC APPROACH FOR THE ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION OF KAOLIN MINES AT THE UPPER TAGUS NATURAL PARK (SPAIN) MARTÍN

333

Restoration, Ecosystem John P McCarty and Joy B Zedler  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, regional and historical context, and sustainable cul- tural practices." This approach presents is frequently required. In many cases, the species that make up a community can be estab- lished but healthy restoration is the process of assisting the recovery and management of ecological integrity. Ecological

McCarty, John P.

334

Early Restoration Plan (Phase III FERP)Repositories STATE LIBRARY ADDRESS CITY ZIP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Public Library Central Branch 301 W. Claude St. Lake Charles 70605 29. LA Iberia Parish Library 445 EEarly Restoration Plan (Phase III FERP)Repositories STATE LIBRARY ADDRESS CITY ZIP 1. AL Dauphin. Mobile 36606 6. AL City of Bayou La Batre Public Library 12747 Padgett Switch Road Irvington 36544 7. FL

335

Site specific plan. [Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (FYP) covers the period for FY 1989 through FY 1995. The plan establishes a Department of Energy -- Headquarters (DOE-HQ) agenda for cleanup and compliance against which overall progress can be measured. The FYP covers three areas: Corrective Activities, Environmental Restoration, and Waste Management Operations. Corrective Activities are those activities necessary to bring active or standby facilities into compliance with local, state, and federal environmental regulations. Environmental restoration activities include the assessment and cleanup of surplus facilities and inactive waste sites. Waste management operations includes the treatment, storage, and disposal of wastes which are generated as a result of ongoing operations. This Site Specific Plan (SSP) has been prepared by the Savannah River Site (SRS) in order to show how environmental restoration and waste management activities that were identified during the preparation of the FYP will be implemented, tracked, and reported. The SSP describes DOE Savannah River (DOE-SR) and operating contractor, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), organizations that are responsible, for undertaking the activities identified in this plan. The SSP has been prepared in accordance with guidance received from DOE-HQ. DOE-SR is accountable to DOE-HQ for the implementation of this plan. 8 refs., 46 figs., 23 tabs.

Hutchison, J.; Jernigan, G.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Threshold Concepts and Their Use in Rangeland Management and Restoration: The Good,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management via potential-based land classification sys- tems and associated state-and-transition models (STMsThreshold Concepts and Their Use in Rangeland Management and Restoration: The Good, the Bad properties in time or space. In rangeland management, thresholds reflect changes in vegetation and soils

337

Fuel Treatment, Prescribed Fire, and Fire Restoration: Are the Benefits Worth It?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fuel Treatment, Prescribed Fire, and Fire Restoration: Are the Benefits Worth It? Chairs: Susan Husari and Melanie Miller #12;Applying Simulation and Optimization to Plan Fuel Treatments at Landscape Scales1 J. Greg Jones,2 Jimmie D. Chew,2 Hans R. Zuuring3 Abstract Fuel treatment activities are analyzed

Standiford, Richard B.

338

Restoration As Mitigation: Analysis of Stream Mitigation for Coal Mining Impacts in Southern Appalachia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

being implemented in southern Appalachia for coal mining are not meeting the objectives of the CleanRestoration As Mitigation: Analysis of Stream Mitigation for Coal Mining Impacts in Southern of information about 434 stream mitigation projects from 117 permits for surface mining in Appalachia. Data from

Palmer, Margaret A.

339

Hydrodynamic Modeling Analysis of Union Slough Restoration Project in Snohomish River, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A modeling study was conducted to evaluate additional project design scenarios at the Union Slough restoration/mitigation site during low tide and to provide recommendations for finish-grade elevations to achieve desired drainage. This was accomplished using the Snohomish River hydrodynamic model developed previously by PNNL.

Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping

2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

340

Louisiana Coastal Area (LCA) Ecosystem Restoration, LA Six Conditionally Authorized Projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Louisiana Coastal Area (LCA) Ecosystem Restoration, LA Six Conditionally Authorized Projects 27 August 2010 Abstract: In 2004, USACE completed the Louisiana Coastal Area (LCA) Near-Term Report measures are needed to sustain coastal ecosystems, the LCA Near-Term Report was developed to identify cost

US Army Corps of Engineers

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "affected restoration estimates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Protocols for Monitoring Habitat Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Protocols for monitoring salmon habitat restoration projects are essential for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' environmental efforts in the Columbia River estuary. This manual provides state-of-the science data collection and analysis methods for landscape features, water quality, and fish species composition, among others.

Roegner, G. Curtis; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Thom, Ronald M.; Dawley, Earl M.; Whiting, Allan H.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Johnson, Gary E.

2008-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

342

Torsional shear oscillations in the neutron star crust driven by the restoring force of elastic stresses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......vibrations restored by forces of intrinsic stresses...about which of the above forces plays the dominant role...driven by the Lorentz force, which can be represented...represents one of two fundamental (mutually orthogonal...Stegun I. A., 1964, Handbook of Mathematical Functions......

S. I. Bastrukov; H.-K. Chang; J. Takata; G.-T. Chen; I. V. Molodtsova

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Improving the Accuracy of Diffusion MR Tractography Using RESTORE Lin-Ching Chang1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Improving the Accuracy of Diffusion MR Tractography Using RESTORE Lin-Ching Chang1,2 , Carlo Pierpaoli2 1 Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science The Catholic University of America, Bethesda, MD, USA Abstract Diffusion magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is an effective tool in the assessment

344

MEMANTINE PROTECTS AGAINST LPS-INDUCED NEUROINFLAMMATION, RESTORES BEHAVIORALLY-INDUCED GENE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MEMANTINE PROTECTS AGAINST LPS-INDUCED NEUROINFLAMMATION, RESTORES BEHAVIORALLY-INDUCED GENE of Arc, and c) spatial memory deficits. Memantine, a low to moderate affinity open channel uncompetitive and memantine (10 mg/kg/day memantine s.c.). The re- sults reported here demonstrate that memantine reduces OX6

Wenk, Gary

345

Phase III Proposed Early Restoration Project Alabama Florida Louisiana Mississippi Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be constructed at various depths. The deep water "nearshore reefs" would have a single, prefabricated modular, in less than 20 feet deep water and within 950 feet of shore. Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Natural ResourcePhase III Proposed Early Restoration Project Alabama · Florida · Louisiana · Mississippi · Texas

346

THE CRESCENT BYPASS: A RIPARIAN RESTORATION PROJECT ON THE KINGS RIVER (FRESNO COUNTY)1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE CRESCENT BYPASS: A RIPARIAN RESTORATION PROJECT ON THE KINGS RIVER (FRESNO COUNTY)1 Jonathan A-24, 1988; Davis, California. 2 Staff Biologist and Environmental Division Chief, respectively, Kings River Conservation District, Fresno, Calif. Abstract: The Kings River Conservation District planted over 1200 plants

Standiford, Richard B.

347

Dragonflies of freshwater pools in lignite spoil heaps: Restoration management, habitat structure and conservation value  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although numerous studies of several terrestrial groups have revealed high conservation potential of post-industrial sites, freshwater habitats in post-mining sites still remain little explored. Here we present a study of dragonflies (Odonata) colonizing 61 freshwater pools newly established at 9 lignite spoil heaps in the north-western Czech Republic, Central Europe. We aimed mainly on effects of the three prevailing pool restoration methods (spontaneously inundated depressions at non-reclaimed sites, at reclaimed sites; and novel technically constructed ponds) along with several factors of the local habitat and surrounding landscape on species richness, conservation values, and species composition of the dragonfly communities. By recording of 32 species of lentic dragonflies (including 8 threatened ones) and 2 additional threatened lotic species, we documented the conservation value of post-industrial habitats also for aquatic arthropods. None of the three restoration methods supported dragonfly communities of distinctly higher conservation value then did the two others, each method generated habitats for different threatened species. Similar patterns were revealed also for vegetation heterogeneity, bottom substrate, water shading, and surrounding terrestrial habitats. We thus conclude that a mosaic-like combination of the restoration methods and creating of heterogeneous water pools will be most effective for restoring of freshwater biodiversity in highly degraded sites.

Filip Harabiš; Filip Tichanek; Robert Tropek

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

NAME: Elkhorn Slough Tidal Marsh Restoration: Building Resilience with the Beneficial Reuse of Sediment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Sediment LOCATION: Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Monterey County, California ACRES will add sediment to subsided historic marshes in Elkhorn Slough. The marsh will be restored through the placement of sediment from a levee capacity maintenance project along the Pajaro River. The proposed project

US Army Corps of Engineers

349

TAX BREAK Chemical makers call on Congress to restore federal R&D tax credit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemical manufacturers and other U.S. businesses are urging Congress to pass legislation before the end of the year to restore and expand the federal research and development tax credit, which expired at the end of 2005."ACC strongly supports bipartisan ...

GLENN HESS

2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

350

RATS: restoration-aware trace signal selection for post-silicon validation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Post-silicon validation is one of the most important and expensive tasks in modern integrated circuit design methodology. The primary problem governing post-silicon validation is the limited observability due to storage of a small number of signals in ... Keywords: post-silicon validation, restoration, trace buffer, trace signals

Kanad Basu; Prabhat Mishra

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Re: BPA FY 07-09 Project Proposal #200711200 Teanaway Watershed Protection and Restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Re: BPA FY 07-09 Project Proposal #200711200 Teanaway Watershed Protection and Restoration Kittitas draft province recommendations). The conservation easements acquisition costs qualify for funding by BPA $1,020,000 BPA Fish & Wildlife Expense Budget (as recommended) $1,024,000 BPA Capital Budget (for

352

STRATEGIES FOR ASSISTING THE MARSH DWELLERS AND RESTORING THE MARSHLANDS IN SOUTHERN IRAQ  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STRATEGIES FOR ASSISTING THE MARSH DWELLERS AND RESTORING THE MARSHLANDS IN SOUTHERN IRAQ INTERIM of Engineers and resident advisor to the Ministry of Water Resources; Christopher Milligan, USAID/Iraq; Robert MacLeod, USAID/Iraq; Carl Maxwell, USAID/CPA South; Whitney Sims, USAID/Iraq; Susan Bradley and Donna

353

Inexact Restoration method for minimization problems arising in electronic structure calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inexact Restoration method for minimization problems arising in electronic structure calculations arising in electronic structure calculations. The solution of the problem is the closed-shell density structure calculation consists of finding the wave functions from which the spatial electronic distribution

Martínez, José Mario

354

FOR 4110/5159 Ecology and Restoration of the Longleaf Pine Ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FOR 4110/5159 Ecology and Restoration of the Longleaf Pine Ecosystem 3 credits Spring 2013 Instructors: Dr. Debbie Miller, Ph.D. Associate Professor Wildlife Ecology and Conservation 5988 Hwy. 90, Bldg description: History, structure, function and ecological and economic importance of longleaf pine ecosystems

Slatton, Clint

355

6. Implement projects to restore injured NOAA trustresources and associated services.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

resources more quickly and more effectively. Through such innovative partnerships, NOAA is reversing approach. From Injury to Restoration, NOAA is There NOAA's Damage Assessment, Remediation, and Resto of and evaluation of risk to NOAA trust resources during cleanup or remediation by coordinating with and advising

356

Theme: A: Restoration Thematic Session (LeS): ThS_A1: Footprint assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of this innovative technology is to enable the remediation of large brownfields areas, for which no real operationalTheme: A: Restoration Thematic Session (LeS): ThS_A1: Footprint assessment SUSTAINABLE REMEDIATION STRATEGIES: A MULTICRITERIA ANALYSIS TO SELECT AND COMPARE REMEDIATION TECHNIQUES IN A SUSTAINABILITY

Boyer, Edmond

357

LANDSCAPE PERCEPTION IN FLUVIAL ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION PROJECTS: CONTRIBUTIONS AND PERSPECTIVES FOR THE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 LANDSCAPE PERCEPTION IN FLUVIAL ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION PROJECTS: CONTRIBUTIONS AND PERSPECTIVES FOR THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE LANDSCAPE EUROPEAN CONVENTION Cottet Marylise*, Rivière-Honegger Anne, Piégay Hervé.cottet@univ-lyon3.fr Introduction The European Landscape Convention instituted, at the beginning of the 2000s, a new

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

358

In Cooperation with the National Park Service Water Quality Program Biogeochemical Processes in an Urban, Restored  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In Cooperation with the National Park Service Water Quality Program Biogeochemical Processes in an Urban, Restored Wetland of San Francisco Bay, California, 2007­ 2009: Methods and Data for Plant, Sediment, and Water Parameters By Lisamarie Windham-Myers, Mark C. Marvin-DiPasquale, Jennifer L. Agee, Le

359

Surfactant Organic Molecules Restore Magnetism in Metal-Oxide Nanoparticle Surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Surfactant Organic Molecules Restore Magnetism in Metal-Oxide Nanoparticle Surfaces Juan Salafranca, Nashville, Tennessee 37235, United States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: The properties of magnetic nanoparticles tend to be depressed by the unavoidable presence of a magnetically inactive surface layer. However

Pennycook, Steve

360

Parameter Estimation Through Ignorance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamical modelling lies at the heart of our understanding of physical systems. Its role in science is deeper than mere operational forecasting, in that it allows us to evaluate the adequacy of the mathematical structure of our models. Despite the importance of model parameters, there is no general method of parameter estimation outside linear systems. A new relatively simple method of parameter estimation for nonlinear systems is presented, based on variations in the accuracy of probability forecasts. It is illustrated on the Logistic Map, the Henon Map and the 12-D Lorenz96 flow, and its ability to outperform linear least squares in these systems is explored at various noise levels and sampling rates. As expected, it is more effective when the forecast error distributions are non-Gaussian. The new method selects parameter values by minimizing a proper, local skill score for continuous probability forecasts as a function of the parameter values. This new approach is easier to implement in practice than alternative nonlinear methods based on the geometry of attractors or the ability of the model to shadow the observations. New direct measures of inadequacy in the model, the "Implied Ignorance" and the information deficit are introduced.

Hailiang Du; Leonard A. Smith

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "affected restoration estimates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Environmental Triggers that Affect Children's Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Triggers that Affect Children's Health A Clean Environment Can Lead to Better Health! An online course for child care providers and parents, presented by the Texas AgriLife Extension Service Children's Health Course developed by Janie L. Harris, M.Ed. Extension Housing and Environment Specialist

362

Environmental issues affecting clean coal technology deployment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The author outlines what he considers to be the key environmental issues affecting Clean Coal Technology (CCT) deployment both in the US and internationally. Since the international issues are difficult to characterize given different environmental drivers in various countries and regions, the primary focus of his remarks is on US deployment. However, he makes some general remarks, particularly regarding the environmental issues in developing vs. developed countries and how these issues may affect CCT deployment. Further, how environment affects deployment depends on which particular type of clean coal technology one is addressing. It is not the author`s intention to mention many specific technologies other than to use them for the purposes of example. He generally categorizes CCTs into four groups since environment is likely to affect deployment for each category somewhat differently. These four categories are: Precombustion technologies such as coal cleaning; Combustion technologies such as low NOx burners; Postcombustion technologies such as FGD systems and postcombustion NOx control; and New generation technologies such as gasification and fluidized bed combustion.

Miller, M.J. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

363

Does Daylight Savings Time Affect Traffic Accidents?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper studies the effect of changes in accident pattern due to Daylight Savings Time (DST). The extension of the DST in 2007 provides a natural experiment to determine whether the number of traffic accidents is affected by shifts in hours...

Deen, Sophia 1988-

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

364

Factors Affecting PMU Installation Costs (October 2014)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Energy investigated the major cost factors that affected PMU installation costs for the synchrophasor projects funded through the Recovery Act Smart Grid Programs. The data was compiled through interviews with the nine projects that deployed production grade synchrophasor systems.

365

The ecological value of stream restoration measures: An evaluation on ecosystem and target species scales  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Stream restoration is widely applied for conservation of freshwater ecosystems, but systematic comparisons on the effects of different techniques are rare. In this study, we systematically evaluated two types of gravel introduction, substratum raking and the placement of boulders in six streams. We compared indicator-based and multi-scale approaches that simultaneously assess effects on target species, different taxonomic groups and on ecosystem scale. Gravel introduction had by far the strongest effects on macroinvertebrates (increase of species density and numbers of individuals), periphyton (increase of cell numbers) and macrophytes (decrease of coverage, species numbers and biomass), followed by substratum raking. The placement of boulders had no significant long-term effects on aquatic communities. Over all investigated restoration treatments, fish community composition only changed significantly in 50% of the study rivers depending on the occurrence of species sensitive to the structures introduced by the restoration treatments. These were lithophilic, rheophilic and invertivorous fishes, comprising several species listed in the Red List of endangered species, which used the added 16–32 mm gravel as juvenile habitat. Areas with introduced gravel were also most frequently used by spawning Salmo trutta, Thymallus thymallus and Phoxinus phoxinus. In contrast, active bioindication using Salmo trutta eggs indicated that none of the restoration treatments was sufficient to enhance habitat conditions in deeper substratum layers throughout the egg incubation period. Our results suggest that instream restoration measures can contribute to freshwater biodiversity conservation, but reproductive success of species depending on long-term improvement of interstitial water quality cannot be achieved without considering catchment effects and natural substratum dynamics.

Melanie Mueller; Joachim Pander; Juergen Geist

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Submerged aquatic vegetation and bulrush in Lake Okeechobee as indicators of greater Everglades ecosystem restoration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lake Okeechobee, Florida, located in the middle of the larger Kissimmee River-Lake Okeechobee-Everglades ecosystem in South Florida, serves a variety of ecosystem and water management functions including fish and wildlife habitat, flood control, water supply, and source water for environmental restoration. As a result, the ecological status of Lake Okeechobee plays a significant role in defining the overall success of the greater Everglades ecosystem restoration initiative. One of the major ecological indicators of Lake Okeechobee condition focuses on the near-shore and littoral zone regions as characterized by the distribution and abundance of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) and giant bulrush (Scirpus californicus (C.A. Mey.) Steud.). The objective of this study is to present a stoplight restoration report card communication system, common to all 11 indicators noted in this special journal issue, as a means to convey the status of SAV and bulrush in Lake Okeechobee. The report card could be used by managers, policy makers, scientists and the public to effectively evaluate and distill information about the ecological status in South Florida. Our assessment of the areal distribution of SAV in Lake Okeechobee is based on a combination of empirical SAV monitoring and output from a SAV habitat suitability model. Bulrush status in the lake is related to a suitability index linked to adult survival and seedling establishment metrics. Overall, presentation of these performance metrics in a stoplight format enables an evaluation of how the status of two major components of Lake Okeechobee relates to the South Florida restoration program, and how the status of the lake influences restoration efforts in South Florida.

Matthew C. Harwell; Bruce Sharfstein

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Effective hardware for connection and repair of polyethylene pipelines using ultrasonic modification and heat shrinkage. Part 1. Aspects of connection and restoration of polymeric pipelines for gas transport  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Aspects of the connection and restoration of polymeric pipelines for gas transport with the use of ... obtained, which can be used for the repair and restoration of polymeric pipelines, and to reduce the level of...

A. E. Kolosov; O. S. Sakharov; V. I. Sivetskii…

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Estimating the Spatial Distribution of Population without Power during Extreme Weather Events  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One challenge in emergency preparedness and response during extreme weather events such as hurricanes and ice storms is estimating how many people may be without power and how long they could be without power. In this presentation, we will discuss a method for estimating the spatial distribution of people without power during extreme weather events. The method is based on a directional nearest-neighbor approach in which grid cells representing substation locations acquire other grid cells representing customers/population demand with respect to the capacity of each substation. We also present a method for estimating restoration time in case of an outage. The application of these methods during the 2008 hurricane season will also be discussed.

Omitaomu, Olufemi A [ORNL; Fernandez, Steven J [ORNL; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Cost Estimating, Analysis, and Standardization  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish policy and responsibilities for: (a) developing and reviewing project cost estimates; (b) preparing independent cost estimates and analysis; (c) standardizing cost estimating procedures; and (d) improving overall cost estimating and analytical techniques, cost data bases, cost and economic escalation models, and cost estimating systems. Cancels DOE O 5700.2B, dated 8-5-1983; DOE O 5700.8, dated 5-27-1981; and HQ 1130.1A, dated 12-30-1981. Canceled by DOE O 5700.2D, dated 6-12-1992

1984-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

370

Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity Markets - EAC 2011 Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity Markets - EAC 2011 The purpose of this report is to assist the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in 1) establishing a framework for understanding the role electricity storage resources (storage) can play in wholesale and retail electricity markets, 2) assessing the value of electricity storage in a variety of regions or markets, 3) analyzing current and potential issues that can affect the valuation of storage by investors at the wholesale and retail level, and 4) identifying areas for future research and development for electricity storage technologies and applications. EAC - Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity

371

Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity Markets - EAC 2011 Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity Markets - EAC 2011 The purpose of this report is to assist the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in 1) establishing a framework for understanding the role electricity storage resources (storage) can play in wholesale and retail electricity markets, 2) assessing the value of electricity storage in a variety of regions or markets, 3) analyzing current and potential issues that can affect the valuation of storage by investors at the wholesale and retail level, and 4) identifying areas for future research and development for electricity storage technologies and applications. EAC - Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity

372

Variables Affecting Economic Development of Wind Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Variables Affecting Economic Variables Affecting Economic Development of Wind Energy E. Lantz and S. Tegen National Renewable Energy Laboratory Presented at WINDPOWER 2008 Houston, Texas June 1-4, 2008 Conference Paper NREL/CP-500-43506 July 2008 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Midwest Research Institute (MRI), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-99GO10337. Accordingly, the US Government and MRI retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

373

1995 Reformulated Gasoline Market Affected Refiners Differently  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 Reformulated Gasoline Market Affected 5 Reformulated Gasoline Market Affected Refiners Differently by John Zyren, Charles Dale and Charles Riner Introduction The United States has completed its first summer driving season using reformulated gasoline (RFG). Motorists noticed price increases at the retail level, resulting from the increased cost to produce and deliver the product, as well as from the tight sup- ply/demand balance during the summer. This arti- cle focuses on the costs of producing RFG as experienced by different types of refiners and on how these refiners fared this past summer, given the prices for RFG at the refinery gate. RFG Regulatory Requirements The use of RFG is a result of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA). The CAAA cover a wide range of programs aimed at improving air qual-

374

Commercial Building HVAC: How it Affects People  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Commercial Building HVAC: How it Affects People Commercial Building HVAC: How it Affects People Speaker(s): William Fisk Date: November 13, 2000 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: David Faulkner Commercial building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems are designed primarily to maintain a reasonable level of thermal comfort while limiting first costs and energy consumption. However, research conducted predominately within the last decade suggests that commercial building HVAC significantly influences human outcomes other than thermal comfort, including the health, satisfaction, and work performance of the building's occupants. This presentation will review the relationships of these outcomes with HVAC system type, filtration system efficiency, indoor air temperature, and outside air ventilation rate.

375

R E S E A R C H A R T I C L E Restoration of Native Plant Communities after Road  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

recognized as a crit- ical first step in the restoration of terrestrial and aquatic habitats. However reduce erosion and sedimentation, contributing to the restoration of disturbed ecosystems (Madej 2001R E S E A R C H A R T I C L E Restoration of Native Plant Communities after Road Decommissioning

Nelson, Cara

376

Development of a Hydrodynamic and Transport model of Bellingham Bay in Support of Nearshore Habitat Restoration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, a hydrodynamic model based on the unstructured-grid finite volume coastal ocean model (FVCOM) was developed for Bellingham Bay, Washington. The model simulates water surface elevation, velocity, temperature, and salinity in a three-dimensional domain that covers the entire Bellingham Bay and adjacent water bodies, including Lummi Bay, Samish Bay, Padilla Bay, and Rosario Strait. The model was developed using Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s high-resolution Puget Sound and Northwest Straits circulation and transport model. A sub-model grid for Bellingham Bay and adjacent coastal waters was extracted from the Puget Sound model and refined in Bellingham Bay using bathymetric light detection and ranging (LIDAR) and river channel cross-section data. The model uses tides, river inflows, and meteorological inputs to predict water surface elevations, currents, salinity, and temperature. A tidal open boundary condition was specified using standard National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) predictions. Temperature and salinity open boundary conditions were specified based on observed data. Meteorological forcing (wind, solar radiation, and net surface heat flux) was obtained from NOAA real observations and National Center for Environmental Prediction North American Regional Analysis outputs. The model was run in parallel with 48 cores using a time step of 2.5 seconds. It took 18 hours of cpu time to complete 26 days of simulation. The model was calibrated with oceanographic field data for the period of 6/1/2009 to 6/26/2009. These data were collected specifically for the purpose of model development and calibration. They include time series of water-surface elevation, currents, temperature, and salinity as well as temperature and salinity profiles during instrument deployment and retrieval. Comparisons between model predictions and field observations show an overall reasonable agreement in both temporal and spatial scales. Comparisons of root mean square error values for surface elevation, velocity, temperature, and salinity time series are 0.11 m, 0.10 m/s, 1.28oC, and 1.91 ppt, respectively. The model was able to reproduce the salinity and temperature stratifications inside Bellingham Bay. Wetting and drying processes in tidal flats in Bellingham Bay, Samish Bay, and Padilla Bay were also successfully simulated. Both model results and observed data indicated that water surface elevations inside Bellingham Bay are highly correlated to tides. Circulation inside the bay is weak and complex and is affected by various forcing mechanisms, including tides, winds, freshwater inflows, and other local forcing factors. The Bellingham Bay model solution was successfully linked to the NOAA oil spill trajectory simulation model “General NOAA Operational Modeling Environment (GNOME).” Overall, the Bellingham Bay model has been calibrated reasonably well and can be used to provide detailed hydrodynamic information in the bay and adjacent water bodies. While there is room for further improvement with more available data, the calibrated hydrodynamic model provides useful hydrodynamic information in Bellingham Bay and can be used to support sediment transport and water quality modeling as well as assist in the design of nearshore restoration scenarios.

Wang, Taiping; Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang

2010-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

377

Modeling of hydroecological feedbacks predicts distinct classes of landscape pattern, process, and restoration potential in shallow aquatic ecosystems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is widely recognized that interactions between vegetation and flow cause the emergence of channel patterns that are distinct from the standard Schumm classification of river channels. Although landscape pattern is known to be linked to ecosystem services such as habitat provision, pollutant removal, and sustaining biodiversity, the mechanisms responsible for the development and stability of different landscape patterns in shallow, vegetated flows have remained poorly understood. Fortunately, recent advances have made possible large-scale models of flow through vegetated environments that can be run over a range of environmental variables and over timescales of millennia. We describe a new, quasi-3D cellular automata model that couples simulations of shallow-water flow, bed shear stresses, sediment transport, and vegetation dynamics in an efficient manner. That efficiency allowed us to apply the model widely in order to determine how different hydroecological feedbacks control landscape pattern and process in various types of wetlands and floodplains. Distinct classes of landscape pattern were uniquely associated with specific types of allogenic and autogenic drivers in wetland flows. Regular, anisotropically patterned wetlands were dominated by allogenic processes (i.e., processes driven by periodic high water levels and flow velocities that redistribute sediment), relative to autogenic processes (e.g., vegetation production, peat accretion, and gravitational erosion). These anistropically patterned wetlands are therefore particularly prone to hydrologic disturbance. Other classes of wetlands that emerged from simulated interactions included maze-patterned, amorphous, and topographically noisy marshes, open marsh with islands, banded string-pool sequences perpendicular to flow, parallel deep and narrow channels flanked by marsh, and ridge-and-slough patterned marsh oriented parallel to flow. Because vegetation both affects and responds to the balance between the transport capacity of the flow and sediment supply, these vegetated systems exhibit a feedback that is not dominant in most rivers. Consequently, unlike in most rivers, it is not possible to predict the “channel pattern” of a vegetated landscape based only on discharge characteristics and sediment supply; the antecedent vegetation pattern and vegetation dynamics must also be known. In general, the stability of different wetland pattern types is most strongly related to factors controlling the erosion and deposition of sediment at vegetation patch edges, the magnitude of sediment redistribution by flow, patch elevation relative to water level, and the variability of erosion rates in vegetation patches with low flow-resistance. As we exemplify in our case-study of the Everglades ridge and slough landscape, feedback between flow and vegetation also causes hysteresis in landscape evolution trajectories that will affect the potential for landscape restoration. Namely, even if the hydrologic conditions that historically produced higher flows are restored, degraded portions of the ridge and slough landscape are unlikely to revert to their former patterning. As wetlands and floodplains worldwide become increasingly threatened by climate change and urbanization, the greater mechanistic understanding of landscape pattern and process that our analysis provides will improve our ability to forecast and manage the behavior of these ecosystems.

Laurel G. Larsen; Judson W. Harvey

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Financial Incentives Available for Facilities Affected by the...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Financial Incentives Available for Facilities Affected by the US EPA Boiler MACT Proposed Rule, December 2012 Financial Incentives Available for Facilities Affected by the US EPA...

379

Factors Affecting HCCI Combustion Phasing for Fuels with Single...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Affecting HCCI Combustion Phasing for Fuels with Single- and Dual-Stage Chemistry Factors Affecting HCCI Combustion Phasing for Fuels with Single- and Dual-Stage Chemistry 2004...

380

Environmental Statements, Availability, Etc., Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8679 8679 Thursday June 1, 1995 Part III Department of Energy Environmental Statements, Availability, Etc.; Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs: Notice 28680 Federal Register / Vol. 60, No. 105 / Thursday, June 1, 1995 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Record of decision. SUMMARY: The Department of Energy has issued a Record of Decision on Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs. The Record of Decision includes a Department-wide decision to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "affected restoration estimates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Factors Affecting UV-Induced Superhydrophilic Conversion of a TiO2 Surface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Factors Affecting UV-Induced Superhydrophilic Conversion of a TiO2 Surface ... Particularly, the maximum extrema in spectral dependence of the efficiency of photoinduced hydrophilic conversion correspond to the energies of the first indirect and first direct electronic band-to-band transitions in TiO2. ... To estimate the efficiency of the photoinduced surface hydrophilic conversion, we used two parameters: initial rate of contact angle alteration and initial rate of surface energy alteration. ...

Alexei V. Emeline; Aida V. Rudakova; Munetoshi Sakai; Taketoshi Murakami; Akira Fujishima

2013-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

382

Automotive advertising copy test. Final report. [Mileage estimates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this research project was to explore the following issues: (1) mileage recall/recognition of miles per gallon/highway mileage estimates in print ads by advertisement readers; (2) determine consumer expectations and believability of advertised mileage guidelines; (3) measure recall/comprehension of mileage disclaimers; and (4) determine how consumers utilize published mileage estimates. The evidence from this study points to a public which is quite familiar with the EPA mileage estimates, in terms of using them as guidelines and in finding them to be helpful. Most adults also appear to be knowledgeable about factors which can affect car performance and, therefore, anticipate that, within certain tolerances, their actual mileage will differ from the EPA estimates. Although the consumer has been educated regarding fuel estimates, there is a very strong suggestion from this research that typical automobile print advertising does a less than an effective job in generating awareness of specific EPA estimates as well as their attendant disclaimer. Copy strategy and execution have a critical impact on recall of the EPA mileage estimates. 18 tables.

Not Available

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

UNCORRECTED 2 Factors affecting land reconversion plans following a payment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to prevent soil and wind erosion, restore wildlife habitat, 63improve water quality, and counter the trend, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, 6 Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48823, USA 7 b Department of Agricultural Food and Resource Economics and Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Michigan State University

Lupi, Frank

384

DOE/NV-441 Nevada Environmental Restoration Project Rulison Drilling Effluent  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Ru\-- 7-2-4@ Ru\-- 7-2-4@ DOE/NV-441 Nevada Environmental Restoration Project Rulison Drilling Effluent Pond Site Long-Term Groundwater Monitoring Plan July 1996 Environmental Restoration U.S. Department of Energy This report has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available in paper copy and microfiche. Number of pages in this report: 5 1 DOE and DOE contractors cari obtain copies of this report from: Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 3783 1. (61 5) 576-8401. This report is publicly available from the Department of Commerce, National Technical Information Service, 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, VA 22 16 1. (703) 487-4650. RULISON DRILLING EFFLUENT POND SITE LONG-TERM GROUNDWATER MONITORING PLAN DOE Nevada Operations Office

385

Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Quarterly Progress Report, Sitewide, January through March 2004  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

44 44 2004 GJ - - U.S. Department of Energy Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Sitewide Environmental Monitoring Quarterly Progress Report for the Young-Rainey STAR Center January Through March 2004 April 2004 Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management N00074400 DOE-LM/GJ644-2004 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Sitewide Environmental Monitoring Quarterly Progress Report for the Young - Rainey STAR Center January through March 2004 April 2004 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491

386

S M Stoller Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project - Young- Rainey Star Center  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project - Young- Rainey Star Center Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project - Young- Rainey Star Center 7030-226 Accutest Job Number: F29125 Sampling Date: 01/06/05 Report to: S M Stoller Cathy.Kelleher@gjo.doe.gov ATTN: Cathy Kelleher Total number of pages in report: Certifications: FL (DOH E83510), NC (573), NJ (FL002), MA (FL946), IA (366), LA (03051), KS (E-10327), SC, AK This report shall not be reproduced, except in its entirety, without the written approval of Accutest Laboratories. Southeast * 4405 Vineland Road * Suite C-15 * Orlando, FL 32811 * tel: 407-425-6700 * fax: 407-425-0707 * http://www.accutest.com Test results contained within this data package meet the requirements of the National Environmental Laboratory Accreditation Conference and/or state specific certification programs as applicable.

387

A Review of Power Outages and Restoration Following the June 2012 Derecho  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

August 2012 August 2012 A Review of Power Outages and Restoration Following the June 2012 Derecho Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability U.S. Department of Energy For Further Information This report was prepared by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability under the direction of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary, and William Bryan, Deputy Assistant Secretary. Specific questions about this report may be directed to Alice Lippert, Senior Technical Advisor (alice.lippert@hq.doe.gov). (Cover image from the National Weather Service) OE/ISER 8/6/2012 1 Background On June 29, 2012, a major storm system known as a derecho ("deh-REY-cho") formed and

388

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Project Information Project Title: T-1-21 Restoration  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1-21 Restoration 1-21 Restoration Date: 12-22-2010 DOE Code: Contractor Code: Project Lead : Bernard Winfree Project Overview 1. What are the environmental The existing building will be removed from the site. A backhoe will be used to dig up the manifold piping, impacts? after all possible fluids have been sucked out of the piping. We will then cut off the pipes at the lowest 2. What is the legal location? possible point At this time a com posit soil sample will be taken of the area. When the samples come back under the established limits, we will backfill the hole with the existing materials and recontour the site to 3. What is the duration of the project? perexisting conditions. Reseeding will be initiated when the proper seed mix is established. This is an

389

S M Stoller Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project - Young- Rainey Star Center  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project - Young- Rainey Star Center Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project - Young- Rainey Star Center 110406202 Accutest Job Number: F33039 Sampling Date: 07/06/05 Report to: S M Stoller Cathy.Kelleher@gjo.doe.gov ATTN: Cathy Kelleher Total number of pages in report: Certifications: FL (DOH E83510), NC (573), NJ (FL002), MA (FL946), IA (366), LA (03051), KS (E-10327), SC, AK This report shall not be reproduced, except in its entirety, without the written approval of Accutest Laboratories. Southeast * 4405 Vineland Road * Suite C-15 * Orlando, FL 32811 * tel: 407-425-6700 * fax: 407-425-0707 * http://www.accutest.com Test results contained within this data package meet the requirements of the National Environmental Laboratory Accreditation Conference and/or state specific certification programs as applicable.

390

ITEP: A survey of innovative environmental restoration technologies in the Netherlands and France  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The International Technology Exchange Program (ITEP) of the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for promoting the import of innovative technologies to better address EM`s needs and the export of US services into foreign markets to enhance US competitiveness. Under this program, potentially innovative environmental restoration technologies, either commercially available or under development in the Netherlands and France, were identified, described, and evaluated. It was found that 12 innovative environmental restoration technologies, which are either commercially available or under development in the Netherlands and France, may have some benefit for the DOE EM program and should be considered for transfer to the United States.

Roberds, W.J.; Voss, C.F.; Hitchcock, S.A. [Golder Associates, Inc., Redmond, WA (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Method for in-situ restoration of platinum resistance thermometer calibration  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is provided for in-situ restoration of platinum resistance thermometers (PRT's) that have undergone surface oxide contamination and/or stain-related damage causing decalibration. The method, which may be automated using a programmed computer control arrangement, consists of applying a dc heating current to the resistive sensing element of the PRT of sufficient magnitude to heat the element to an annealing temperature and maintaining the temperature for a specified period to restore the element to a stress-free calibration condition. The process anneals the sensing element of the PRT without subjecting the entire PRT assembly to the annealing temperature and may be used in the periodic maintenance of installed PRT's. 1 fig.

Carroll, R.M.

1987-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

392

White Sturgeon Mitigation & Restoration in the Columbia & Snake River Upstream from Bonneville Dam  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

29, 2003 29, 2003 To: People Interested in the Project to Mitigate and Restore White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has prepared the Final Environmental Assessment (EA), which includes a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI), for the White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam Project. The document is enclosed for your information. Background: Since 1986, State, Federal, and Tribal fisheries agencies have been gathering data and studying habitats, movements, population dynamics, feeding, and distribution of white sturgeon in the Columbia River system. With the decline in anadromous salmonid runs there has been an increase in the importance of the white sturgeon fisheries. The Oregon Department of

393

Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Products, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystem Services  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, and Pennsylvania mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, one each in Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots is 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site is 13.5 acres. During the reporting period we determined that by grinding the soil samples to a finer particle size of less than 250 ?m (sieve No. 60), the effect of mine soil coal particle size on the extent to which these particles will be oxidized during the thermal treatment of the carbon partitioning procedure will be eliminated, thus making the procedure more accurate and precise. In the second phase of the carbon sequestration project, we focused our attention on determining the sample size required for carbon accounting on grassland mined fields in order to achieve a desired accuracy and precision of the final soil organic carbon (SOC) estimate. A mine land site quality classification scheme was developed and some field-testing of the methods of implementation was completed. The classification model has been validated for softwoods (white pine) on several reclaimed mine sites in the southern Appalachian coal region. The classification model is a viable method for classifying post-SMCRA abandoned mined lands into productivity classes for white pine. A thinning study was established as a random complete block design to evaluate the response to thinning of a 26-year-old white pine stand growing on a reclaimed surface mine in southwest Virginia. Stand parameters were projected to age 30 using a stand table projection. Site index of the stand was found to be 32.3 m at base age 50 years. Thinning rapidly increased the diameter growth of the residual trees to 0.84 cm yr{sup -1} compared to 0.58 cm yr{sup -1} for the unthinned treatment; however, at age 26, there was no difference in volume or value per hectare. At age 30, the unthinned treatment had a volume of 457.1 m{sup 3} ha{sup -1} but was only worth $8807 ha{sup -1}, while the thinned treatment was projected to have 465.8 m{sup 3} ha{sup -1}, which was worth $11265 ha{sup -1} due to a larger percentage of the volume being in sawtimber size classes.

James A. Burger

2005-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

394

Power of the people: Restoring impaired water bodies with stakeholder-driven WPPs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the Pecos River Basin WPP. TWRI is currently managing two projects to improve the water quality of Buck Creek, a small creek in the Texas Panhandle?s Red River Basin. Both of these projects are funded by the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation... the water body and educating landowners on the benefits and usefulness of certain best management practices. ?Developing landowner- and stakeholder-driven plans to restore water quality is a great approach to addressing water quality impairments...

Foust, Maragaret

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Power of the people: Restoring impaired water bodies with stakeholder-driven WPPs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the Pecos River Basin WPP. TWRI is currently managing two projects to improve the water quality of Buck Creek, a small creek in the Texas Panhandle?s Red River Basin. Both of these projects are funded by the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation... the water body and educating landowners on the benefits and usefulness of certain best management practices. ?Developing landowner- and stakeholder-driven plans to restore water quality is a great approach to addressing water quality impairments...

Foust, Margaret

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

A watershed blueprint: partners work together to restore Arroyo Colorado's health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with TCEQ and the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board (TSSWCB). In 2007 the partnership published one of the first watershed protection plans (WPPs) in the state. The plan is a blueprint for restoring the health of the Arroyo Colorado.... ?There has been much progress toward protecting the Arroyo Colorado Watershed,? said Jaime Flores, the watershed coordinator. ?And we have been successful in garnering local support from volunteers as well as through collaborative events...

Wythe, K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

A watershed blueprint: Partners work together to restore Arroyo Colorado's health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with TCEQ and the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board (TSSWCB). In 2007 the partnership published one of the first watershed protection plans (WPPs) in the state. The plan is a blueprint for restoring the health of the Arroyo Colorado.... ?There has been much progress toward protecting the Arroyo Colorado Watershed,? said Jaime Flores, the watershed coordinator. ?And we have been successful in garnering local support from volunteers as well as through collaborative events...

Wythe, Kathy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

EA-1973: Kootenai River Restoration at Bonners Ferry, Boundary County, Idaho  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is preparing an EA to assess the potential environmental impacts of funding the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho to restore portions of the Kootenai River near the town of Bonners Ferry, Idaho. The proposed project involves installing structures on the river banks, excavating areas in the river to create deeper pools, and developing and enhancing islands that would be planted with native vegetation.

399

An Economic Analysis of Stream Restoration in an Urban Watershed: Austin, Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

County Appraisal District (TCAD), for providing relevant real estate data and making this research analysis possible. Thank you Dr. Ronald Kaiser and Dr. Val Silvy for continuous encouragement and making my study possible in the Water Program. Thank... to the bank stabilization within 600 feet were selected as restoration site. In addition, each housing value was joined with the ArcMap and matched up with housing ID number provided by the TCAD. Figure 10 shows the selection of houses along the Walnut...

Huang, Chi-Ying

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

400

Exporting licensing regulations affecting US geothermal firms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents a brief introduction and overview of the Department of Commerce's Export Administration Regulations which might affect potential US geothermal goods exporters. It is intended to make US geothermal firms officials aware of the existence of such regulations and to provide them with references, contacts and phone numbers where they can obtain specific and detailed information and assistance. It must be stressed however, that the ultimate responsibility for complying with the above mentioned regulations lies with the exporter who must consult the complete version of the regulations.

Not Available

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "affected restoration estimates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Is climate change affecting human health?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

First principles suggest that climate change is affecting human health, based on what is understood about the relationships between the mean and variability of temperature, precipitation, and other weather variables and climate-sensitive health outcomes, and the magnitude of climate change that has occurred. However, the complexity of these relationships and the multiple drivers of climate-sensitive health outcomes makes the detection and attribution of changing disease patterns to climate change very challenging. Nevertheless, efforts to do so are vital for informing policy and for prioritizing adaptation and mitigation options.

Kristie L Ebi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 12. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 664 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the twelfth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types -- technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions -- have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Decontamination and Decommissioning Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (7) Technical Measurements Center, and (8) Environmental Restoration Program. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects, analyzes, and disseminates information on environmental restoration and remedial actions. RAPIC staff and resources are available to meet a variety of information needs. Contact the center at FTS 624-7764 or (615) 574-7764.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Standard Review Plan for Environmental Restoration Program Quality Management Plans. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) Manual Environmental Restoration Program Quality System Requirements (QSR) for the Hanford Site, defines all quality requirements governing Hanford Environmental Restoration (ER) Program activities. The QSR requires that ER Program participants develop Quality Management Plans (QMPs) that describe how the QSR requirements will be implemented for their assigned scopes of work. This standard review plan (SRP) describes the ER program participant responsibilities for submittal of QMPs to the RL Environmental Restoration Division for review and the RL methodology for performing the reviews of participant QMPS. The SRP serves the following functions: acts as a guide in the development or revision of QMPs to assure that the content is complete and adequate; acts as a checklist to be used by the RL staff in their review of participant QMPs; acts as an index or matrix between the requirements of the QSR and implementing methodologies described in the QMPs; decreases the time and subjectivity of document reviews; and provides a formal, documented method for describing exceptions, modifications, or waivers to established ER Program quality requirements.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Hardwood re-sprout control in hydrologically restored Carolina Bay depression wetlands.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carolina bays are isolated depression wetlands located in the upper coastal plain region of the eastern Unites States. Disturbance of this wetland type has been widespread, and many sites contain one or more drainage ditches as a result of agricultural conversion. Restoration of bays is of interest because they are important habitats for rare flora and fauna species. Previous bay restoration projects have identified woody competitors in the seedbank and re-sprouting as impediments to the establishment of herbaceous wetland vegetation communities. Three bays were hydrologically restored on the Savannah River Site, SC, by plugging drainage ditches. Residual pine/hardwood stands within the bays were harvested and the vegetative response of the seedbank to the hydrologic change was monitored. A foliar herbicide approved for use in wetlands (Habitat® (Isopropylamine salt of Imazapyr)) was applied on one-half of each bay to control red maple (Acer rubrum L.), sweet gum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.), and water oak (Quercus nigra L.) sprouting. The effectiveness of the foliar herbicide was tested across a hydrologic gradient in an effort to better understand the relationship between depth and duration of flooding, the intensity of hardwood re-sprout pressure, and the need for hardwood management practices such as herbicide application.

Moser, Lee, Justin

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Final report on decommissioning boreholes and wellsite restoration, Gulf Coast Interior Salt Domes of Mississippi  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1978, eight salt domes in Texas, Louisiana, and Mississippi were identified for study as potential locations for a nuclear waste repository as part of the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) program. Three domes were selected in Mississippi for ``area characterization`` phase study as follows: Lampton Dome near Columbia, Cypress Creek Dome near New Augusta, and Richton Dome near Richton. The purpose of the studies was to acquire geologic and geohydrologic information from shallow and deep drilling investigations to enable selection of sites suitable for more intensive study. Eleven deep well sites were selected for multiple-well installations to acquire information on the lithologic and hydraulic properties of regional aquifers. In 1986, the Gulf Coast salt domes were eliminated from further consideration for repository development by the selection of three candidate sites in other regions of the country. In 1987, well plugging and restoration of these deferred sites became a closeout activity. The primary objectives of this activity are to plug and abandon all wells and boreholes in accordance with state regulations, restore all drilling sites to as near original condition as feasible, and convey to landowners any wells on their property that they choose to maintain. This report describes the activities undertaken to accomplish these objectives, as outlines in Activity Plan 1--2, ``Activity Plan for Well Plugging and Site Restoration of Test Hole Sites in Mississippi.``

Not Available

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Molecular analysis of intestinal bacterial communities in Cipangopaludina chinensis used in aquatic ecological restorations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High pollutant concentrations have led to the breakout of planktonic bloom and the breakdown of the ecosystem in several bodies of water in China. Some restoration projects using constructed wetlands have been enacted to increase the water clarity and rebuild the aquatic ecosystem in these bodies of water. Cipangopaludina chinensis were usually placed to manage the particles and microbes adhering to the surface of the aquatic plants in the wetlands. In the current study, the intestinal bacteria in C. chinensis collected from three restoration projects in Shanghai, China were investigated using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and 16S rRNA gene clone library analyses. The species affiliated to Firmicutes were proven the dominant species in the intestinal bacterial population in C. chinensis. The most dominant phylotypes are closely related to Pseudobutyrivibrio ruminis and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii. Furthermore, significant differences between the intestinal bacterial community constructs and different structures were found in C. chinensis collected from different restoration projects. This information on the intestinal bacteria of C. chinensis is helpful in further understanding the function of these mollusks and in screening for useful bacterial strains.

Kejun Li

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 496: Buried Rocket Site, Antelope Lake, Tonopah Test Range  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) plan details the activities necessary to close Corrective Action Unit 496: Buried Rocket Site, Antelope Lake. CAU 496 consists of one site located at the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

The Effect of Equilibrating Mounted Dental Stone Casts in Maximum Intercuspation on the Occlusal Harmony of an Indirect Restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this study was to determine if equilibration of dental stone casts mounted in maximum intercuspation can improve occlusal harmony of a cast gold restoration. A dentoform mounted on an articulator with crown preparation on tooth #19...

Benson, Peter Andrew

2013-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

409

Ecosystem response to changes in water level of Lake Ontario marshes: lessons from the restoration of Cootes Paradise Marsh  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A general understanding of how aquatic vegetation responds to water-level fluctuations is needed to guide restoration of Great Lakes coastal wetlands because inter-annual and seasonal variations often confound...

Patricia Chow-Fraser

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

FCV Learning Demonstration: Factors Affecting Fuel Cell Degradation (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presentation on factors affecting fuel cell degradation in the DOE Fuel Cell Vehicle learning demonstation.

Kurtz, J.; Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

411

USING HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGERY TO ASSIST FEDERAL FOREST MONITORING AND RESTORATION PROJECTS IN THE SOUTHERN ROCKY MOUNTAINS, COLORADO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

catastrophic wildfires. Many of the restoration techniques that were proposed do not differ greatly from what is currently being applied by various governmental agencies in Colorado. The most relevant research publications related to forest monitoring... USING HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGERY TO ASSIST FEDERAL FOREST MONITORING AND RESTORATION PROJECTS IN THE SOUTHERN ROCKY MOUNTAINS, COLORADO BY Kyle Wamser Submitted to the graduate degree program in Department of Geography and the Faculty...

Wamser, William Kyle

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

412

Examples of Cost Estimation Packages  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Estimates can be performed in a variety of ways. Some of these are for projects for an undefined scope, a conventional construction project, or where there is a level of effort required to complete the work. Examples of cost estimation packages for these types of projects are described in this appendix.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

413

5, 30473104, 2005 Estimates of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

parametrisations, one relating convective preciptation (CP scheme) to lightning flash15 distributionsACPD 5, 3047­3104, 2005 Estimates of lightning NOx production K. F. Boersma et al. Title Page Discussions Estimates of lightning NOx production from GOME satellite observations K. F. Boersma, H. J. Eskes

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

414

Energy Expenditure Estimation DEMO Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of accelerometry. An average smart phone contains an inertial sensor and today we hardly leave our home without itEnergy Expenditure Estimation DEMO Application Bozidara Cvetkovi´c1,2 , Simon Kozina1,2 , Bostjan://www.mps.si Abstract. The paper presents two prototypes for the estimation of hu- man energy expenditure during normal

LuÂ?trek, Mitja

415

Cosmological parameter estimation: impact of CMB aberration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The peculiar motion of an observer with respect to the CMB rest frame induces an apparent deflection of the observed CMB photons, i.e. aberration, and a shift in their frequency, i.e. Doppler effect. Both effects distort the temperature multipoles a{sub lm}'s via a mixing matrix at any l. The common lore when performing a CMB based cosmological parameter estimation is to consider that Doppler affects only the l = 1 multipole, and neglect any other corrections. In this paper we reconsider the validity of this assumption, showing that it is actually not robust when sky cuts are included to model CMB foreground contaminations. Assuming a simple fiducial cosmological model with five parameters, we simulated CMB temperature maps of the sky in a WMAP-like and in a Planck-like experiment and added aberration and Doppler effects to the maps. We then analyzed with a MCMC in a Bayesian framework the maps with and without aberration and Doppler effects in order to assess the ability of reconstructing the parameters of the fiducial model. We find that, depending on the specific realization of the simulated data, the parameters can be biased up to one standard deviation for WMAP and almost two standard deviations for Planck. Therefore we conclude that in general it is not a solid assumption to neglect aberration in a CMB based cosmological parameter estimation.

Catena, Riccardo [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Notari, Alessio, E-mail: riccardo.catena@theorie.physik.uni-goettingen.de, E-mail: notari@ffn.ub.es [Departament de Física Fondamental i Institut de Ciéncies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franqués 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

E-Print Network 3.0 - affect estrogen sorption Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Ecology ; Environmental Management and Restoration Technologies 3 In: Aquatic Ecosystem Research Trends ISBN 978-1-60692-772-4 Editor: George H. Nairne, pp. 2009 Nova...

417

Summary of operations and performance of the Murdock site restoration project in 2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes the performance of the groundwater and surface water restoration systems installed by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Murdock, Nebraska, during the third full year of system operation, from January 1 through December 31, 2008. Performance in June 2005 through December 2007 was reported previously (Argonne 2007, 2008). In the Murdock project, several innovative technologies are being used to remove carbon tetrachloride contamination from a shallow aquifer underlying the town, as well as from water naturally discharged to the surface at the headwaters of a small creek (a tributary to Pawnee Creek) north of the town (Figure 1.1). The restoration activities at Murdock are being conducted by the CCC/USDA as a non-time-critical removal action under the regulatory authority and supervision of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region VII. Argonne National Laboratory assisted the CCC/USDA by providing technical oversight for the restoration effort and facilities during this review period. Included in this report are the results of all sampling and monitoring activities performed in accord with the EPA-approved Monitoring Plan for this site (Argonne 2006), as well as additional investigative activities conducted during the review period. The annual performance reports for the Murdock project assemble information that will become part of the five-year review and evaluation of the remediation effort. This review will occur in 2010. This document presents overviews of the treatment facilities (Section 2) and site operations and activities (Section 3), then describes the groundwater, surface water, vegetation, and atmospheric monitoring results (Section 4) and modifications and costs during the review period (Section 5). Section 6 summarizes the current period of operation. A gallery of photographs of the Murdock project is in Appendix A.

LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

2009-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

418

Computational and experimental investigation of scour past laboratory models of stream restoration rock structures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Local scour of the streambed around three models of stream restoration rock structures, including a rock vane, a cross vane, and a J-hook vane, is investigated via laboratory experiments and numerical simulations. In the experimental study, a physical model of each rock structure is constructed via an assembly of rocks and installed in a straight mobile sand bed flume. Continuous bed topography measurements provide insight into the time evolution of the scour patterns downstream of the structures and yield comprehensive data sets for validating the numerical simulations in terms of scour patterns, maximum scour depths, and bar migration dynamics. The numerical simulations are carried out using the coupled, hydro-morphodynamic Curvilinear Immersed Boundary (CURVIB) method of Khosronejad et al. (2011) [17]. The mobile channel bed and the individual rocks comprising a stream restoration structure are discretized with an unstructured triangular mesh and treated as sharp-interface immersed boundaries embedded in the background curvilinear mesh used to discretize the flow domain. For each case, simulations are carried out solving both the unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (URANS) equations closed with the k–? model and filtered Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) equations closed with the dynamic Smagorinski subgrid scale model. Both the URANS and LES models yield flow and scour patterns in reasonable agreement with the measurements with the LES results being consistently in better overall agreement with the measurements. To our knowledge, the present study is the first attempt to simulate local scour patterns around realistic model of stream restoration rock structures by taking into account and directly modeling their arbitrarily complex geometrical features.

Ali Khosronejad; Craig Hill; Seokkoo Kang; Fotis Sotiropoulos

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Reinforcing flood–risk estimation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...However, most ood-risk estimates support decisions...charac- ter. These are investment decisions, where the...current level of ood risk, making improvements...generated a national ood-risk map with a high political and societal impact...

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Estimation of resources and reserves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This report analyzes the economics of resource and reserve estimation. Current concern about energy problems has focused attention on how we measure available energy resources. One reads that we have an eight-year oil ...

Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Energy Laboratory.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "affected restoration estimates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Issues affecting the prediction of glass reactivity in an unsaturated environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Prior to the licensing of a high-level waste repository, the US Department of Energy (DOE) will seek to initiate hot startup of the high-level waste glass processing facilities at Savannah River and West Valley. To provide confidence that issues related to glass reactivity and disposal are evaluated prior to startup, the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management branch of DOE is studying important physical parameters that will affect glass reaction in a repository environment and is developing a modeling approach to predict glass performance. In this report, results are presented comparing the reactivity of fully radioactive glass with simulated glass of the same nominal composition. While differences in elemental releases between the glass types are observed, the differences are moderated with time and can be related to the dominant reaction mechanism. Additionally, the relationship between glass surface area and the volume of leachate (SA/V) is evaluated. The reactivity at differentSA/V is dominated by solution pH and reaction affinity, with an increase in reactivity observed at long reaction times. Finally, data are presented which provide necessary parameters for the application of predictive modeling. In particular, forward reaction rate constants are presented, for a 165-frit based glass and a simple analogue, and a list of secondary phases observed during glass reaction under a variety of conditions is compiled.

J.K. Bates; W.L. Ebert; X. Feng; W.L. Bourcier

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Environmental restoration at the Pantex Plant. Quarterly progress report, April 12, 1995--June 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the Work Plans for activities associated with Environmental Restoration of the perched aquifer and contaminated soils at the Pantex Plant. The Higher Education Consortium/Pantex Research Laboratory is participating in the Consortium Grant to evaluate subsurface remediation alternatives for the perched aquifer at the Pantex Plant. Research activities will develop site characterization data and evaluate remediation alternatives for the perched aquifer and the overlying vadose zone. The work plans cover research activities for the remainder of FY95, and proposed activities for FY96 and thereafter. A separate document will present more detailed plans for FY96 activities and budget requirements.

Charbeneau, R.J.

1995-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

423

A review of "The Making of Restoration Poetry" by Paul Hammond  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reviews 31 Paul Hammond. The Making of Restoration Poetry. Cambridge: D. S. Brewer, 2006. xxiii + 230 pp. + 12 illus. $90.00. Review by matthew spencer, university of north carolina, chapel hill. Paul Hammond?s new book gathers related essays... to its great practitioner. Why did Dryden turn so frequently to translation? Was it because he wanted to give to the English language the poems that meant the most to reviews 33 him and spoke most for him? No. Or at least, not so simply that...

Spencer, Matthew

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Oak Ridge Reservation Site Management Plan for the Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This site management for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program implements the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) (EPA 1990), also known as an Interagency Agreement (IAG), hereafter referred to as the Agreement.'' The Department of Energy (DOE), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), hereafter known as the Parties,'' entered into this Agreement for the purpose of coordinating remediation activities undertaken on the ORR to comply with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) as amended by the Superfund Amendments, the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). 7 refs., 17 figs.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Metal uptake by agricultural plant species grown in sludge-amended soil following ecosystem restoration practices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The disposal of municipal sewage sludge is an important environmental problem presently facing society. Because sludge is rich in plant nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorous, land application as a fertilizer has been proposed as a cost-effective means of disposal. This method of disposal, however, is frequently the subject of public health concern since municipal sludge may contain heavy metals that potentially could be introduced into the human food chain. This study examined metal concentrations in two agricultural species at a study site where ecosystem restoration practices (liming and tilling) had been conducted for 5 years following 11 years of sludge enrichment. 11 refs., 2 tabs.

Peles, J.D.; Barrett, G.W. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)] [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Brewer, S.R. [Miami Univ., Oxford, OH (United States)] [Miami Univ., Oxford, OH (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Factors affecting water quality in Cherokee Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose was to: (1) define reservoir problems related to water quality conditions; (2) identify the probable causes of these problems; and (3) recommend procedures for achieving needed reservoir water quality improvements. This report presents the project findings to date and suggests steps for upgrading the quality of Cherokee Reservoir. Section II presents background information on the characteristics of the basin, the reservoir, and the beneficial uses of the reservoir. Section III identifies the impacts of existing reservoir water quality on uses of the reservoir for water supply, fishery resources, recreation, and waste assimilation. Section IV presents an assessment of cause-effect relationships. The factors affecting water quality addressed in Section IV are: (1) reservoir thermal stratification and hydrodynamics; (2) dissolved oxygen depletion; (3) eutrophication; (4) toxic substances; and (5) reservoir fisheries. Section V presents a preliminary evaluation of alternatives for improving the quality of Cherokee Reservoir. Section VI presents preliminary conclusions and recommendations for developing and implementing a reservoir water quality management plan. 7 references, 22 figures, 21 tables.

Iwanski, M.L.; Higgins, J.M.; Kim, B.R.; Young, R.C.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Chapter 6 - Subsea Cost Estimation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter provides guidelines for cost estimation during a project feasibility study, where the accuracy range is between ± 30% for subsea field development projects. Subsea cost refers to the cost of the whole project, which generally includes the capital expenditures (CAPEX) and operation expenditures (OPEX) of the subsea field development. The feasibility studies are performed before execution of the project, which may include three phases as shown in the figure: prefield development; conceptual/feasibility study; and front-end engineering design (FEED). Cost estimations are made for several purposes, and the methods used for the estimations as well as the desired amount of accuracy will be different. The cost estimation classifications according to Association for the Advancement of Cost Engineering (AACE): level of project definition: expressed as percentage of complete definition; end usage: typical purpose of estimation; methodology: typical estimating method; expected accuracy range: typical ± range relative to best index of 1; and preparation effort: typical degree of effort relative to least cost index of 1.

Yong Bai; Qiang Bai

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Assisting Federal Facilities with Energy Conservation Technologies (AFFECT) Funding Opportunity  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

FEMP provides project assistance through the Assisting Federal Facilities with Energy Conservation Technologies (AFFECT) funding opportunity. AFFECT provides grants for the development of capital projects to increase the energy efficiency and renewable energy investments at Federal agency facilities.

429

Enhanced Oil Recovery Affects the Future Energy Mix | GE Global...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Affects the Future Energy Mix Enhanced Oil Recovery Affects the Future Energy Mix Trevor Kirsten 2012.11.19 One of the fascinating things about my job is contemplating questions...

430

Review of critical factors affecting crude corrosivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lower quality opportunity crudes are now processed in most refineries and the source of the crudes may vary daily. These feedstocks, if not properly handled, can result in reduction in service life of equipment as well as costly failure and downtime. Analytical tools are needed to predict their high temperature corrosivity toward distillation units. Threshold in total sulfur and total acid number (TAN) have been used for many years as rules of thumb for predicting crude corrosivity, However, it is now realized that they are not accurate in their predictive ability. Crudes with similar composition and comparable with respect to process considerations have been found to be entirely different in their impact on corrosion. Naphthenic acid content, sulfur content, velocity, temperature, and materials of construction are the main factors affecting the corrosion process, Despite progress made in elucidating the role of the different parameters on the crude corrosivity process, the main problem is in calculating their combined effect, especially when the corroding stream is such a complex mixture. The TAN is usually related directly to naphthenic acid content. However, discrepancies between analytical methods and interference of numerous components of the crude itself lead to unreliable reported content of naphthenic acid. The sulfur compounds, with respect to corrosivity, appear to relate more to their decomposition at elevated temperature to form hydrogen sulfide than to their total content in crude. This paper reviews the present situation regarding crude corrosivity in distillation units, with the aim of indicating the extent of available information, and areas where further research is necessary.

Tebbal, S.; Kane, R.D. [CLI International, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Stray-light restoration of full-disk CaII K solar observations: a case study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AIMS: We investigate whether restoration techniques, such as those developed for application to current observations, can be used to remove stray-light degradation effects on archive CaII K full-disk observations. We analyze to what extent these techniques can recover homogeneous time series of data. METHODS:We develop a restoration algorithm based on a method presented by Walton & Preminger (1999). We apply this algorithm to data for both present-day and archive CaII K full-disk observations, which were acquired using the PSPT mounted at the Rome Observatory, or obtained by digitization of Mt Wilson photographic-archive spectroheliograms. RESULTS:We show that the restoring algorithm improves both spatial resolution and photometric contrast of the analyzed solar observations. We find that the improvement in spatial resolution is similar for analyzed recent and archive data. On the other hand, the improvement of photometric contrast is quite poor for the archive data, with respect to the one obtained for the present-day images. We show that the quality of restored archive data depends on the photographic calibration applied to the original observations. In particular, photometry can be recovered with a restoring algorithm if the photographic-calibration preserves the intensity information stored in the original data, principally outside the solar-disk observations.

Serena Criscuoli; Ilaria Ermolli

2008-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

432

Key acoustical issues associated with the renovation and restoration of the Southern Theatre, Columbus, Ohio  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For an acoustics designer of performing arts facilities the renovation and restoration of a landmarked facility can be frustrating as there are rarely opportunities to alter the original architecture and therefore alter the original acoustics. The Southern Theatre renovation and restoration was somewhat unique with respect to the extent to which the theater interior was altered to address code issues and to incorporate HVAC systems. The Southern Theatre originally opened in 1896. The stagehouse main floor and second balcony were rebuilt as part of the renovation. The second balcony which originally had a separate entrance from the street was redeveloped to incorporate contemporary theater seating as well as some additional technical support spaces including control rooms and new lighting positions. With the wide scope of the renovation came the opportunity to introduce some important acoustic improvements. Among the key issues discussed are the acoustical design of a unique silent air supply system and design of an unusual enclosure for music ensembles that develops the lower volume of the stagehouse as a partially coupled reverberation chamber.

David W. Kahn; Ronald T. Eligator

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

An amplifier-shaper-discriminator with baseline restoration for the ATLAS transition radiation tracker  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ASDBLR is a bipolar integrated circuit that provides eight channels of amplifier, shaper, discriminator and baseline restorer on a 6.17 by 4.78 mm silicon substrate. It is designed for use in the straw-based Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) of the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Competing requirements for short measurement time ({approx}8ns), good double pulse resolution ({approx}40ns), low power (<30mW/ch), and low operational threshold ({approx}1.5fC) led to the choice of a largely differential circuit which includes detector tail compensation. A capacitively-coupled baseline restorer eliminates effective threshold shifts that would otherwise occur at the high per-wire hit rates (up to 20MHz). A full-scale dynamic range of 200fC and two discriminators will separate threshold adjusts allow the ASDBLR to function both as a tracker and a TR photon detector. Selectable ion-tail compensation makes the circuit compatible with both CF4 and Xe-based gases.

Bevensee, B.; Newcomer, F.M.; Van Berg, R.; Williams, H.H. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Sulimar Queen environmental restoration project closure package Sandia environmental stewardship exemplar.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In March 2008, Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia), in partnership with the Bureau of Land Management, Roswell Field Office, completed its responsibilities to plug and abandon wells and restore the surface conditions for the Sulimar Queens Unit, a 2,500 acre oil field, in Chaves County, Southeast New Mexico. Sandia assumed this liability in an agreement to obtain property to create a field laboratory to perform extensive testing and experimentation on enhanced oil recovery techniques for shallow oil fields. In addition to plugging and abandoning 28 wells, the project included the removal of surface structures and surface reclamation of disturbed lands associated with all plugged and abandoned wells, access roads, and other auxiliary facilities within unit boundaries. A contracting strategy was implemented to mitigate risk and reduce cost. As the unit is an important wildlife habitat for prairie chickens, sand dune lizards, and mule deer, the criteria for the restoration and construction process were designed to protect and enhance the wildlife habitat. Lessons learned from this project include: (1) extreme caution should be exercised when entering agreements that include future liabilities, (2) partnering with the regulator has huge benefits, and (3) working with industry experts, who were familiar with the work, and subcontractors, who provided the network to complete the project cost effectively.

Tillman, Jack B.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Case Study of Urban Residential Remediation and Restoration in Port Hope, Canada - 13250  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Canadian Municipality of Port Hope, Ontario, is located some 100 km east of Toronto and has been the location of radium and/or uranium refining since the 1930's. Historically, these activities involved materials containing radium-226, uranium, arsenic and other contaminants generated by the refining process. In years past, properties and sites in Port Hope became contaminated from spillage during transportation, unrecorded, un-monitored or unauthorized diversion of contaminated fill and materials, wind and water erosion and spread from residue storage areas. Residential properties in Port Hope impacted by radioactive materials are being addressed by the Canadian federal government under programs administered by the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Office (LLRWMO) and the Port Hope Area Initiative Management Office (PHAIMO). Issues that currently arise at these properties are addressed by the LLRWMO's Interim Waste Management Program (IWM). In the future, these sites will be included in the PHAIMO's Small Scale Sites (SSS) remedial program. The LLRWMO has recently completed a remediation and restoration program at a residential property in Port Hope that has provided learnings that will be applicable to the PHAIMO's upcoming SSS remedial effort. The work scope at this property involved remediating contaminated refinery materials that had been re-used in the original construction of the residence. Following removal of the contaminated materials, the property was restored for continued residential use. This kind of property represents a relatively small, but potentially challenging subset of the portfolio of sites that will eventually be addressed by the SSS program. (authors)

Geddes, Brian [AMEC Environment and Infrastructure, 140 Quarry Park Blvd., Calgary, AB, T2C 3G3 (Canada)] [AMEC Environment and Infrastructure, 140 Quarry Park Blvd., Calgary, AB, T2C 3G3 (Canada); DeJong, John [AMEC Environment and Infrastructure, Port Hope, ON (Canada)] [AMEC Environment and Infrastructure, Port Hope, ON (Canada); Owen, Michael [Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Office, 196 Toronto Road, Port Hope, ON, L1A 3V5 (Canada)] [Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Office, 196 Toronto Road, Port Hope, ON, L1A 3V5 (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Implementation Plan. Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In accordance with the Department of Energy`s National Environmental Policy Act implementing procedures in Volume 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Section 1021,312, the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Implementation Plan has two primary purposes: to provide guidance for the preparation of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement and to record the issues resulting from the scoping and the extended public participation process. The Implementation Plan identifies and discusses the following: background of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities, the purpose of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, and the relationship of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement to other Departmental initiatives (Chapter 1); need and purposes for action (Chapter 2); scoping process and results of the public participation program in defining the scope of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, including a summary of the comments received and their disposition (Chapter 3); planned scope and content of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (Chapter 4); consultations with other agencies and the role of cooperating agencies (Chapter 5); planned schedule of major Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement milestones (Chapter 6); and responsibilities for preparation of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (Chapter 7).

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Energy Security and Restoration Exercise Program/Best Practices and Information Sharing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first year of this cooperative agreement focused on the following elements: curriculum development and presentation, curriculum maintenance, enhancements, and effectiveness, and smart card initiative. During the second year of this grant, with redirection from DOE, the IUOE modified its mission statement under the cooperative agreement. It states: 'The mission of the IUOE is to provide expertise to provide best practices, information sharing, and develop scenarios and conduct exercises ranging in size and complexity from table top to national level to prepare all stakeholders to protect and restore energy infrastructure should an event, terrorist or natural, occur'. The Program developed a number of products under this Cooperative Agreement. These products include: FOSTER (Facility Operations Safety Training Event Response) Curriculum and Training Models, Alternative Energy Supply - Generators Training Module, Liquefied Natural Gas Training Module, Education Program - Distributed Generations, Compendium of Resources and References, Energy Security and Restoration Training Manual, Manual of Situations and Scenarios Developed for Emergency Exercises, Manual of Best Practices/Lessons Learned for Energy Load Management, Training Plan, Strategic Information and Exercise Plan, National Certification Plan Report, and a Smart Card Project Report.

Barbara McCabe; John Kovach

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

438

Aquatic ecosystem protection and restoration: advances in methods for assessment and evaluation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many methods and criteria are available to assess aquatic ecosystems, and this review focuses on a set that demonstrates advancements from community analyses to methods spanning large spatial and temporal scales. Basic methods have been extended by incorporating taxa sensitivity to different forms of stress, adding measures linked to system function, synthesizing multiple faunal groups, integrating biological and physical attributes, spanning large spatial scales, and enabling simulations through time. These tools can be customized to meet the needs of a particular assessment and ecosystem. Two case studies are presented to show how new methods were applied at the ecosystem scale for achieving practical management goals. One case used an assessment of biotic structure to demonstrate how enhanced river flows can improve habitat conditions and restore a diverse fish fauna reflective of a healthy riverine ecosystem. In the second case, multitaxonomic integrity indicators were successful in distinguishing lake ecosystems that were disturbed, healthy, and in the process of restoration. Most methods strive to address the concept of biological integrity and assessment effectiveness often can be impeded by the lack of more specific ecosystem management objectives. Scientific and policy explorations are needed to define new ways for designating a healthy system so as to allow specification of precise quality criteria that will promote further development of ecosystem analysis tools.

Mark B Bain; Amy L Harig; Daniel P Loucks; Reuben R Goforth; Katherine E Mills

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Product, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystem Services  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concentrations of CO{sub 2} in the Earth’s atmosphere have increased dramatically in the past 100 years due to deforestation, land use change, and fossil fuel combustion. These humancaused, higher levels of CO{sub 2} may enhance the atmospheric greenhouse effect and may contribute to climate change. Many reclaimed coal-surface mine areas in the eastern U.S. are not in productive use. Reforestation of these lands could provide societal benefits, including sequestration of atmospheric carbon. The goal of this project was to determine the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on the tens of thousands of hectares of mined land and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from large-scale application of forest restoration procedures. We developed a mine soil quality model that can be used to estimate the suitability of selected mined sites for carbon sequestration projects. Across the mine soil quality gradient, we tested survival and growth performance of three species assemblages under three levels of silvicultural. Hardwood species survived well in WV and VA, and survived better than the other species used in OH, while white pine had the poorest survival of all species at all sites. Survival was particularly good for the site-specific hardwoods planted at each site. Weed control plus tillage may be the optimum treatment for hardwoods and white pine, as any increased growth resulting from fertilization may not offset the decreased survival that accompanied fertilization. Grassland to forest conversion costs may be a major contributor to the lack of reforestation of previously reclaimed mine lands in the Appalachian coal-mining region. Otherwise profitable forestry opportunities may be precluded by these conversion costs, which for many combinations of factors (site class, forest type, timber prices, regeneration intensity, and interest rate) result in negative land expectation values. Improved technology and/or knowledge of reforestation practices in these situations may provide opportunities to reduce the costs of converting many of these sites as research continues into these practices. It also appears that in many cases substantial payments, non-revenue values, or carbon values are required to reach “profitability” under the present circumstances. It is unclear when, or in what form, markets will develop to support any of these add-on values to supplement commercial forestry revenues. However, as these markets do develop, they will only enhance the viability of forestry on reclaimed mined lands, although as we demonstrate in our analysis of carbon payments, the form of the revenue source may itself influence management, potentially mitigating some of the benefits of reforestation. For a representative mined-land resource base, reforestation of mined lands with mixed pine-hardwood species would result in an average estimated C accumulation in forms that can be harvested for use as wood products or are likely to remain in the soil C pool at ~250 Mg C ha{sup -1} over a 60 year period following reforestation. The “additionality” of this potential C sequestration was estimated considering data in scientific literature that defines C accumulation in mined-land grasslands over the long term. Given assumptions detailed in the text, these lands have the potential to sequester ~180 Mg C ha{sup -1}, a total of 53.5 x 10{sup 6} Mg C, over 60 years, an average of ~900,000 Mg C / yr, an amount equivalent to about 0.04% of projected US C emissions at the midpoint of a 60-year period (circa 2040) following assumed reforestation. Although potential sequestration quantities are not great relative to potential national needs should an energy-related C emissions offset requirement be developed at some future date, these lands are available and unused for other economically valued purposes and many possess soil and site properties that are well-suited to reforestation. Should such reforestation occur, it would also produce ancillary benefits by providing env

James A. Burger

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

440

Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating Impacts of Air Sealing and Mechanical Ventilation Title Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating Impacts of Air Sealing and Mechanical Ventilation Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5796E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Logue, Jennifer M., William J. N. Turner, Iain S. Walker, and Brett C. Singer Date Published 06/2012 Abstract Changing the rate of airflow through a home affects the annual thermal conditioning energy.Large-scale changes to airflow rates of the housing stock can significantly alter the energy consumption of the residential energy sector. However, the complexity of existing residential energy models hampers the ability to estimate the impact of policy changes on a state or nationwide level. The Incremental Ventilation Energy (IVE) model developed in this study was designed to combine the output of simple airflow models and a limited set of home characteristics to estimate the associated change in energy demand of homes. The IVE model was designed specifically to enable modelers to use existing databases of home characteristics to determine the impact of policy on ventilation at a population scale. In this report, we describe the IVE model and demonstrate that its estimates of energy change are comparable to the estimates of a well-validated, complex residential energy model when applied to homes with limited parameterization. Homes with extensive parameterization would be more accurately characterized by complex residential energy models. The demonstration included a range of home types, climates, and ventilation systems that cover a large fraction of the residential housing sector.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "affected restoration estimates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

7 - Estimation of Radiation Doses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Radiation doses to the Japanese population from inhalation of contaminated air, external irradiation, terrestrial and marine food contamination are estimated and compared with other sources of anthropogenic (global fallout, Chernobyl accident), natural (radionuclides in food, cosmic radiation) and medical applications (X-ray tests, CT-tests, etc.) of ionizing radiation. The estimated doses from inhalation, ingestion of terrestrial and marine food, and radiation exposure from radioactive clouds and deposited radionuclides were generally below the levels which could cause health damage of the Japanese population, as well as of the world population. The estimated total radiation doses to fish and shellfish in coastal waters during the largest radionuclide releases were by a factor of 10 lower than the baseline safe level postulated for the marine organisms, therefore no harmful effects are expected for the marine ecosystem as well.

Pavel P. Povinec; Katsumi Hirose; Michio Aoyama

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Estimated Cost Description Determination Date:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and posted 2/10/2011 and posted 2/10/2011 *Title, Location Estimated Cost Description Determination Date: uncertain Transmittal to State: uncertain EA Approval: uncertain $50,000 FONSI: uncertain Determination Date: uncertain Transmittal to State: uncertain EA Approval: uncertain FONSI: uncertain Total Estimated Cost $70,000 Attachment: Memo, Moody to Marcinowski, III, SUBJECT: NEPA 2011 APS for DOE-SRS, Dated: Annual NEPA Planning Summary Environmental Assessments (EAs) Expected to be Initiated in the Next 12 Months Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) Jan-11 Estimated Schedule (**NEPA Milestones) South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) issued a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Industrial Stormwater General Permit (IGP) # SCR000000 November 12, with an effective date of January

443

Inferring Group Processes from Computer-Mediated Affective Text Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Political communications in the form of unstructured text convey rich connotative meaning that can reveal underlying group social processes. Previous research has focused on sentiment analysis at the document level, but we extend this analysis to sub-document levels through a detailed analysis of affective relationships between entities extracted from a document. Instead of pure sentiment analysis, which is just positive or negative, we explore nuances of affective meaning in 22 affect categories. Our affect propagation algorithm automatically calculates and displays extracted affective relationships among entities in graphical form in our prototype (TEAMSTER), starting with seed lists of affect terms. Several useful metrics are defined to infer underlying group processes by aggregating affective relationships discovered in a text. Our approach has been validated with annotated documents from the MPQA corpus, achieving a performance gain of 74% over comparable random guessers.

Schryver, Jack C [ORNL; Begoli, Edmon [ORNL; Jose, Ajith [Missouri University of Science and Technology; Griffin, Christopher [Pennsylvania State University

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Heat-affected zone and ablation rate of copper ablated with femtosecond laser  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe the experimental and molecular dynamics simulation study of crystalline copper (Cu) ablation using femtosecond lasers. This study is focused on the heat-affected zone after femtosecond laser ablation and the laser ablation rate. As a result of the x-ray diffraction measurement on the ablated surface, the crystallinity of the surface is partially changed from a crystal structure into an amorphous one. At the laser fluences below the ablation threshold, the entire laser energy coupled to the Cu target is absorbed, while during the fluence regime over the threshold fluence, the ablation rate depends on the absorption coefficient, and the residual energy which is not used for the ablation, is left in the Cu substrate. The heat-affected zone at the fluences below the threshold is estimated to be greater than that over the threshold fluence. In addition, the laser ablation of Cu is theoretically investigated by a two-temperature model and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to explain the heat-affected zone and ablation rate. The MD simulation takes into account the electron temperature and thermal diffusion length calculated by the two-temperature model. Variation in the lattice temperature with time and depth is calculated by the MD simulation coupled with the two-temperature model. The experimental ablation rate and the heat-affected zone are theoretically well explained.

Hirayama, Yoichi; Obara, Minoru [Department of Electronics and Electrical Engineering, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan)

2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

445

Final environmental assessment and Finding-of-No-Significant-Impact - drum storage facility for interim storage of materials generated by environmental restoration operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0995, for the construction and operation of a drum storage facility at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, Colorado. The proposal for construction of the facility was generated in response to current and anticipated future needs for interim storage of waste materials generated by environmental restoration operations. A public meeting was held on July 20, 1994, at which the scope and analyses of the EA were presented. The scope of the EA included evaluation of alternative methods of storage, including no action. A comment period from July 5, 1994 through August 4, 1994, was provided to the public and the State of Colorado to submit written comment on the EA. No written comments were received regarding this proposed action, therefore no comment response is included in the Final EA. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action would not significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Regulatory Influences That Will Likely Affect Success of Plug-in Hybrid and Battery Electric Vehicles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Influences That Will Likely Influences That Will Likely Affect Success of Plug-in Hybrid and Battery Electric Vehicles By Dan Santini Argonne National Laboratory dsantini@anl.gov Clean Cities Coordinators' Webinar Sept. 16, 2010 Vehicle fuel use regulation/policy measures differ. Which should measure plug-in success?  Corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) ratings do not represent real world fuel use. However, the range ratings of EVs and PHEVs are based on CAFE tests.  "Window sticker" information on vehicle fuel use predicts more gasoline and electricity use than CAFE ratings. - The GREET model (basis of GHG saving estimates) is based on real world fuel use

447

Estimate sequence methods: extensions and approximations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aug 11, 2009 ... Estimate sequence methods: extensions and approximations ... or both, and draw some guidelines on the design of further estimate sequence ...

Michel Baes

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

448

BPA Metering Services Editing and Estimating Procedures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Editing and Estimating Interval Data 1. Introduction This section defines the meter interval data editing and estimation techniques performed by BPA's Metering Services...

449

ORISE: Radiation Dose Estimates and Other Compendia  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

downloaded free from the Adobe website. Early Internal and External Dose Magnitude Estimation (PDF) This article addresses methods that can be used to rapidly estimate internal...

450

Mississippi Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Mississippi Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

451

California Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) California Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

452

Pennsylvania Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Pennsylvania Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

453

Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization |...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Summary Notes from 28 May 2008 Generic Technical Issue...

454

GAO Cost Estimating and Assessment Guide Twelve Steps of a High-Quality Cost Estimating Process  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

GAO Cost Estimating and Assessment Guide GAO Cost Estimating and Assessment Guide Twelve Steps of a High-Quality Cost Estimating Process Step Description Associated task 1 Define estimate's purpose Determine estimate's purpose, required level of detail, and overall scope; Determine who will receive the estimate 2 Develop estimating plan Determine the cost estimating team and develop its master schedule; Determine who will do the independent cost estimate; Outline the cost estimating approach; Develop the estimate timeline 3 Define program characteristics In a technical baseline description document, identify the program's

455

The Muzzi marsh: a case study and analysis of wetland restoration decision-making in San Francisco Bay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE MUZZI MARSH: A CASE STUDY AND ANALYSIS OF WETLAND RESTORATION DECISION-MAKING IN SAN FRANCISCO SAY A Thesis by WILLIAM JOSEPH RRAH Subm1tted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University i n part1 al fulf11 l ment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1982 Major Subject: Management THE NUZ71 NPRSH: A CASF STUDY AND ANALYSIS UF ~WETLAND RESTORATION DECISION-NP, KIN( IN SAN FRANCISCO BAY A Thesis hy blI L LIAM JOSEPH BRAH Approved as to style and content hy: C...

Brah, William Joseph

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

456

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 425: Area 9 Main Lake Construction Debris Disposal Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the action necessary for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 425, Area 9 Main Lake Construction Debris Disposal Area. This CAU is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). This site will be cleaned up under the SAFER process since the volume of waste exceeds the 23 cubic meters (m{sup 3}) (30 cubic yards [yd{sup 3}]) limit established for housekeeping sites. CAU 425 is located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS) 09-08-001-TA09, Construction Debris Disposal Area (Figure 1). CAS 09-08-001-TA09 is an area that was used to collect debris from various projects in and around Area 9. The site is located approximately 81 meters (m) (265 feet [ft]) north of Edwards Freeway northeast of Main Lake on the TTR. The site is composed of concrete slabs with metal infrastructure, metal rebar, wooden telephone poles, and concrete rubble from the Hard Target and early Tornado Rocket sled tests. Other items such as wood scraps, plastic pipes, soil, and miscellaneous nonhazardous items have also been identified in the debris pile. It is estimated that this site contains approximately 2280 m{sup 3} (3000 yd{sup 3}) of construction-related debris.

K. B. Campbell

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Data collection and analysis in support of the US Department of Energy Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement waste management alternatives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is a report on work in progress in support of the US Department of Energy Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has been providing technical support in the areas of waste characterization; waste treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facility descriptions (developed jointly with EG&G, Idaho); analysis of potential accidents at TSD facilities; and waste transportation risk assessment. Support efforts encompass the following six waste types: high-level waste; transuranic waste; low-level waste; greater-than Class-C low-level waste; low-level mixed waste; and hazardous waste. Treatment, storage, and disposal facility descriptions cover the following parameters: resource requirements, cost, staffing, capacity, by-products, and effluents. The variations in these parameters effected by the proposed alternatives are estimated. Selection of proposed initiating events, characterization of source terms, and descriptions of scenarios are covered in the accident analysis portion of the ANL work. The transportation risk assessment portion includes both off-site and on-site transportation of both radioactive and hazardous wastes for all waste management alternatives under consideration in the EM PEIS.

Coley, R.F.; Avci, H.I.; Habegger, L.J.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Methodology and computational framework used for the US Department of Energy Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement accident analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A methodology, computational framework, and integrated PC-based database have been developed to assess the risks of facility accidents in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement. The methodology includes the following interrelated elements: (1) screening of storage and treatment processes and related waste inventories to determine risk-dominant facilities across the DOE complex, (2) development and frequency estimation of the risk-dominant sequences of accidents, and (3) determination of the evolution of and final compositions of radiological or chemically hazardous source terms predicted to be released as a function of the storage inventory or treatment process throughput. The computational framework automates these elements to provide source term input for the second part of the analysis which includes (1) development or integration of existing site-specific demographics and meteorological data and calculation of attendant unit-risk factors and (2) assessment of the radiological or toxicological consequences of accident releases to the general public and to the occupational work force.

Mueller, C.; Roglans-Ribas, J.; Folga, S.; Huttenga, A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Jackson, R.; TenBrook, W.; Russell, J. [Science Applications International Corp., Golden, CO (United States)]|[Science Applications International Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Cost Estimates for New Molecules  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cost Estimates for New Molecules ... Once this has been carried out, the projected cost/kilogram for the new drug substance (if only raw material costs and no manufacturing/overhead/labour costs are considered) may well come down by a factor of 10 or even 100, and this is often more acceptable to management trying to make strategic decisions about potential profitability. ...

Trevor Laird

2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

460

Characterization Of State Estimation Biases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The control and operation of an electric power system is based on the ability to determine the state of the system in real time. State estimation (SE) has been introduced in the 1960s to achieve this objective. The initial implementation was based on ...

A. P. Sakis Meliopoulos; George K. Stefopoulos

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "affected restoration estimates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Trades Estimate Guide September, 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

labor hours are provided using "industry standard" hours. Each trade has an hourly recharge rate. Here are a few examples of why our shops estimates may be considered high. HVAC & SHEET METAL · In the HVAC area. This work can include: required engineering and design, new HVAC equipment to accommodate design

Rose, Michael R.

462

ERROR ESTIMATIONS FOR INDIRECT MEASUREMENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 1 ERROR ESTIMATIONS FOR INDIRECT MEASUREMENTS: RANDOMIZED VS. DETERMINISTIC ALGORITHMS difficult or even impossible to directly measure the quantity in which we are interested: e.g., we cannot directly measure a distance to a distant galaxy or the amount of oil in a given well. Since we cannot

Kreinovich, Vladik

463

2012 Proved Reserves Estimation Methodology  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

-366 11,933 Estimated 818 124 759 0 0 19 0 0 236 1,693 1,658 Imputation for nonresponse Unit and item nonresponse on the EIA-23 is imputed for using the same ratio function that is...

464

HYPERPARAMETER ESTIMATION FOR EMISSION COMPUTED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HYPERPARAMETER ESTIMATION FOR EMISSION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY DATA A. López (a) , R. Molina (b) (a limited due to several factors. These factors include the need of greater computational time than to the projection data to obtain two-dimensional slices or cross sections (images) of activity distribution. #12

Granada, Universidad de

465

Environmental Restoration Program project management plan for the DOE Oak Ridge Field Office Major System Acquisition OR-1. Revision 1, Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the early 1940s, the Manhattan Project was conducted in a regulatory and operational environment less sophisticated than today. Less was known of the measures needed to protect human health and safety and the environment from the dangers posed by radioactive and hazardous wastes, and experience in dealing with these hazardous materials has grown slowly. Certain hazards were recognized and dealt with from the beginning. However, the techniques used, though standard practices at the time, are now known to have been inadequate. Consequently, the DOE has committed to an aggressive program for cleaning up the environment and has initiated an Environmental Restoration Program involving all its field offices. The objective of this program is to ensure that inactive and surplus DOE facilities and sites meet current standards to protect human health and the environment. The objective of these activities is to ensure that risks posed to human health and safety and the environment by inactive sites and surplus facilities contaminated with radioactive, hazardous, and/or mixed wastes are either eliminated or reduced to prescribed safe levels. This Project Management Plan for Major System Acquisition OR-1 Project documents, communicates, and contributes to the evolution of, the management organizations, systems, and tools necessary to carry out effectively the long-range complex cleanup of the DOE sites on the Oak Ridge Reservation, and at the Paducah, Kentucky, and Piketon, Ohio, uranium enrichment plants managed by the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Field Office; the cleanup of off-site contamination resulting from past releases; and the Decontamination and Decommissioning of surplus DOE facilities at these installations.

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Livermore, Los Alamos Team for Artificial Retina Project to Help Restore Vision for Many  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9 9 6 www.federallabs.org Livermore, Los Alamos Team for Artificial Retina Project to Help Restore Vision for Many signals in the eye that the brain uses to create a visual image. As a core member of the team, Los Alamos National Laboratory is developing and applying techniques for the functional imaging of physiological and prosthetic stimulation in neural tissue to characterize information encoding and processing by the retina and to validate the efficacy of electrical stimulation. Coupled experimental studies and computer simulations are being used to investigate the biophysical and physiological properties of retinal neuronal tissue. In clinical trials, patients with vision loss were able to successfully identify objects, increase mobility, and

467

S M Stoller Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project - Young - Rainey Star Center  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

6/06 6/06 Technical Report for S M Stoller Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project - Young - Rainey Star Center 110406202 Accutest Job Number: F43553 Sampling Date: 09/07/06 Report to: U.S. Dept of Energy, Grand Jct Office 2597 B 3/4 Road Grand Juction, CO 81503 ATTN: Contracts Department, PO# 24231 x Total number of pages in report: Certifications: FL (DOH E83510), NC (573), NJ (FL002), MA (FL946), IA (366), LA (03051), KS (E-10327), SC, AK This report shall not be reproduced, except in its entirety, without the written approval of Accutest Laboratories. Southeast * 4405 Vineland Road * Suite C-15 * Orlando, FL 32811 * tel: 407-425-6700 * fax: 407-425-0707 * http://www.accutest.com Test results contained within this data package meet the requirements of the National Environmental Laboratory Accreditation Conference

468

ORNLIRASA-95117 LIFE SCIENCES DIVISION Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Non-Defense Programs  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

95117 95117 LIFE SCIENCES DIVISION Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Non-Defense Programs (Activity No. EX 20 20 01 0; ADS1310AA) Results of the Independent Radiological Verification Survey at the Former Chapman Valve Manufacturing Company, Indian Orchard, Massachusetts (cIooo1v) R. E. Rodriguez and C. A. Johnson Date issued -May 1997 Investigation Team R. D. Foley-Measurement Applications and Development Manager M. E. Murray-FUSRAP Project Director R. E. Rodriguez-Field Survey Team Leader Survey Team Members R. C. Gosslee V. P. Patania R. E. Rodriguez Work performed by the Measurement Applications and Development Group Prepared by the OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6285 managed by LOCKHEED MARTIN ENERGY RESEARCH CORP.

469

Recovery Act Workers Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites, Help Reduce Cold War Footprint  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Recovery Act Workers Recovery Act Workers Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites, Help Reduce Cold War Footprint RICHLAND, Wash. - The Hanford Site is looking greener these days after American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers revegetated 166 acres across 12 waste sites, planting over 1,100 pounds of seeds and about 280,000 pounds of mulch. The largest of the sites, known as the BC Control Area, is an approximately 13-square-mile area associated with a waste disposal system used during Hanford operations. Recovery Act workers remediated and reseeded a densely contaminated 140- acre portion of that area after disposing of more than 370,000 tons of contaminated soil. Recovery Act workers employed by DOE contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company have remediated 61 waste sites,

470

Audit of Fuel Processing Restoration Property, WR-B-96-04  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

FUEL PROCESSING FUEL PROCESSING RESTORATION PROPERTY The Office of Inspector General wants to make the distribution of its reports as customer friendly and cost effective as possible. Therefore, this report will be available electronically through the Internet five to seven days after publication at the following alternative addresses: Department of Energy Headquarters Gopher gopher.hr.doe.gov Department of Energy Headquarters Anonymous FTP vm1.hqadmin.doe.gov U.S. Department of Energy Human Resources and Administration Home Page http://www.hr.doe.gov/refshelf.html Your comments would be appreciated and can be provided on the Customer Response Form attached to the report. This report can be obtained from the U.S. Department of Energy

471

Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Quarterly Progress Report, 4.5 Acre January through March 2004  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

January through March 2004 January through March 2004 April 2004 Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management DOE LM/ 645 2004 GJ - - N0074500 DOE-LM/GJ645-2004 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Quarterly Progress Report 4.5 Acre Site January through March 2004 April 2004 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado Document Number N0074500 Contents U.S. Department of Energy 4.5 Acre Site Quarterly Progress Report

472

Hangman Restoration Project : Annual Report, August 1, 2001 - July 31, 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The construction of hydroelectric facilities in the Columbia Basin resulted in the extirpation of anadromous fish stocks in Hangman Creek and its tributaries within the Coeur d'Alene Reservation. Thus, the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe was forced to rely more heavily on native fish stocks such as redband trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss garideini), westslope cutthroat trout (O. clarki lewisii) and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) as well as local wildlife populations. Additionally, the Tribe was forced to convert prime riparian habitat into agricultural lands to supply sustenance for their changed needs. Wildlife habitats within the portion of the Hangman Creek Watershed that lies within the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation have been degraded from a century of land management practices that include widespread conversion of native habitats to agricultural production and intensive silvicultural practices. Currently, wildlife and fish populations have been marginalized and water quality is significantly impaired. In the fall of 2000 the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Wildlife Program, in coordination with the Tribal Fisheries Program, submitted a proposal to begin addressing the degradations to functioning habitats within the Coeur d'Alene Reservation in the Hangman Watershed. That proposal led to the implementation of this project during BPA's FY2001 through FY2003 funding cycle. The project is intended to protect, restore and/or enhance priority riparian, wetland and upland areas within the headwaters of Hangman Creek and its tributaries in order to promote healthy self-sustaining fish and wildlife populations. A key goal of this project is the implementation of wildlife habitat protection efforts in a manner that also secures areas with the potential to provide stream and wetland habitats essential to native salmonid populations. This goal is critical in our efforts to address both resident fish and wildlife habitat needs in the Hangman Watershed. All proposed implementation activities are conducted in the headwaters of the system and are expected to prove beneficial to the natural functions of the entire Hangman Watershed. The following is the FY2001 annual report of Project activities and is submitted as partial fulfillment of Operation and Maintenance Task 2.a. The Objectives and Tasks for this first year were designed to position this Project for a long-term habitat restoration effort. As such, efforts were largely directed at information gathering and project orientation. The major task for this first year was development of a Habitat Prioritization Plan (attached) to guide implementation efforts by selecting areas that will be of greatest benefit to the native ecology. Completion of the first year tasks has positioned the project to move forward with implementing restoration activities using the latest information to accomplish the greatest possible results. The Project will be looking to implement on-the-ground protection and restoration efforts in the coming fiscal year using the data and information gathered in the last fiscal year. Continually refining our understanding of the natural watershed functions and fish and wildlife habitats within the Project Area will result in an increase in the efficiency of project implementation. Research and data gathering efforts will remain a strong emphasis in the coming fiscal year, as it will throughout the life of this Project.

Green, Gerald I.; Coeur D'Alene Tribe.

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Natural hazards phenomena mitigation with respect to seismic hazards at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides information on the seismic hazard for design of the proposed Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF), a facility designed for the disposal of wastes generated during the cleanup of Hanford Site aggregate areas. The preferred ERDF site is located south and east of 200 East and 200 West Areas. The Washington State Groundwater Protection Program (WAC 173-303-806 (4)(a)(xxi)) requires that the characteristics of local and regional hydrogeology be defined. A plan for that work has been developed (Weekes and Borghese 1993). In addition, WAC 173-303-282 provides regulatory guidance on siting a dangerous waste facility, and US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.28 requires consideration of natural phenomena hazards mitigation for DOE sites and facilities. This report provides information to evaluate the ERDF site with respect to seismic hazard. The ERDF will be a Corrective Action Management Unit (CAMU) as defined by 40 CFR 260.10.

Reidel, S.P.

1994-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

474

The Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management: Project performance study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) of the US Department of Energy commissioned Independent Project Analysis, Inc. (IPA) to perform this Project Performance Study to provide a quantitative analysis determining how well EM develops and executes environmental remediation and waste management projects. The approach consisted of collecting detailed data on a sample of 65 completed and ongoing EM projects conducted since 1984. These data were then compared with key project characteristics and outcomes from 233 environmental remediation projects (excluding EM) in IPA`s Environmental Remediation Database and 951 projects In IPA`s Capital Projects Database. The study establishes the standing of the EM system relative to other organizations, and suggests areas and opportunities for improvement.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Los Alamos National Laboratory Environmental Restoration Project quarterly technical report, April--June 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly report describes the technical status of activities in the Los Alamos National Laboratory Environmental Restoration (ER) Project. Each activity is identified by an activity data sheet number, a brief title describing the activity or the technical area where the activity is located, and the name of the project leader. The Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) portion of the facility operating permit requires the submission of a technical progress report on a quarterly basis. This report, submitted to fulfill the permit`s requirement, summarizes the work performed and the results of sampling and analysis in the ER Project. Suspect waste found include: Radionuclides, high explosives, metals, solvents and organics. The data provided in this report have not been validated. These data are considered ``reviewed data.``

Not Available

1994-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

476

Environmental management 1994. Progress and plans of the environmental restoration and waste management program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy currently faces one of the largest environmental challenges in the world. The Department`s Environmental Restoration and Waste Management program is responsible for identifying and reducing risks and managing waste at 137 sites in 34 States and territories where nuclear energy or weapons research and production resulted in radioactive, hazardous, and mixed waste contamination. The number of sites continues to grow as facilities are transferred to be cleaned up and closed down. The program`s main challenge is to balance technical and financial realities with the public`s expectations and develop a strategy that enables the Department to meet its commitments to the American people. This document provides a closer look at what is being done around the country. Included are detailed discussions of the largest sites in the region, followed by site activities organized by state, and a summary of activities at FUSRAP and UMTRA sites in the region.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Non-thermal atmospheric plasmas in dental restoration: Improved resin adhesive penetration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractObjective To investigate the influence of non-thermal plasma treatment on the penetration of a model dental adhesive into the demineralized dentine. Methods Prepared dentine surfaces were conditioned with Scotchbond Universal etchant for 15 s and sectioned equally perpendicular to the etched surfaces. The separated halves were randomly selected for treatment with an argon plasma brush (input current 6 mA, treatment time 30 s) or gentle argon air blowing (treatment time 30 s, as control). The plasma-treated specimens and control specimens were applied with a model adhesive containing 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloxypropoxy) phenyl]-propane (BisGMA) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) (mass ratio of 30/70), gently air-dried for 5 s, and light-cured for 20 s. Cross-sectional specimens were characterized using micro-Raman spectral mapping across the dentine, adhesive/dentine interface, and adhesive layer at 1-?m spatial resolution. SEM was also employed to examine the adhesive/dentine interfacial morphology. Results The micro-Raman result disclosed that plasma treatment significantly improved the penetration of the adhesive, evidenced by the apparently higher content of the adhesive at the adhesive/dentine interface as compared to the control. Specifically, the improvement of the adhesive penetration using plasma technique was achieved by dramatically enhancing the penetration of hydrophilic monomer (HEMA), while maintaining the penetration of hydrophobic monomer (BisGMA). Morphological observation at the adhesive/dentine interface using SEM also confirmed the improved adhesive penetration. The results further suggested that plasma treatment could benefit polymerization of the adhesive, especially in the interface region. Conclusion The significant role of the non-thermal plasma brush in improving the adhesive penetration into demineralized dentine has been demonstrated. The results obtained may offer a better prospect of using plasma in dental restoration to optimize adhesion between tooth substrate and restorative materials.

Ying Zhang; Qingsong Yu; Yong Wang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Evaluation of the Restorative Care Education and Training Program for Nursing Homes*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Les soins de re?tablissement visent a ? rompre le cycle de la de?pendance et du de?clin fonctionnel dans les maisons de soins infirmiers en re?pondant aux besoins particuliers des divers re?sidents. Le programme RCET (Restorative Care Education and Training) comprend un atelier de cinq semaines ainsi qu’un manuel d’information destine ? autant aux superviseurs qu’aux prestataires de soins directs. Ce document de?crit l’approche du programme RCET et pre?sente la mise en œuvre, les proce?de?s et les re?sultats d’une e?valuation quasi-expe?rimentale portant sur 42 re?sidents qui ont rec?u des soins re?guliers dans six lieux d’intervention diffe?rents et six e?tablissements de « liste d’attente ». Les donne?es de base ont permis de confirmer que le personnel mettait surtout l’accent sur les re?sidents qui souffraient de handicaps fonctionnels substantiels. En quatre mois, les re?sidents qui ont rec?u des soins de re?tablissement ont vu plusieurs de leurs indicateurs relatifs aux re?sultats fonctionnels s’ame?liorer de fac?on conside?rable, tandis que dans le groupe de contro?le, les sujets voyaient plusieurs de leurs fonctions de?cliner. Les entrevues mene?es aupre?s de la direction de l’e?tablissement et du personnel ayant participe ? a ? l’e?tude ont permis de de?gager certaines orientations visant a? modifier le programme RCET, ainsi que certaines perspectives relatives aux possibilite?s et aux de?fis a ? relever afin de mettre en œuvre des activite?s de soins de re?tablissement dans des maisons de soins infirmiers. Restorative care attempts to break the cycle of dependency and functional decline in nursing homes by addressing

C. Shanthi; Jacob Johnson; Anita M. Myers; Gareth R. Jones; Clara Fitzgerald; Darien-alexis Lazowski; Paul Stolee; J. B. Orange; Nicole Segall; Nancy A. Ecclestone

479

Preliminary standard review guide for Environmental Restoration/Decontamination and Decommissioning safety analyses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The review guide is based on the shared experiences, approaches, and philosophies of the Environmental Restoration/Decontamination and Decommissioning (ER/D&D) subgroup members. It is presented in the form of a review guide to maximize the benefit to both the safety analyses practitioner and reviewer. The guide focuses on those challenges that tend to be unique to ER/D&D cleanup activities. Some of these experiences, approaches, and philosophies may find application or be beneficial to a broader spectrum of activities such as terminal cleanout or even new operations. Challenges unique to ER/D&D activities include (1) consent agreements requiring activity startup on designated dates; (2) the increased uncertainty of specific hazards; and (3) the highly variable activities covered under the broad category of ER/D&D. These unique challenges are in addition to the challenges encountered in all activities; e.g., new and changing requirements and multiple interpretations. The experiences in approaches, methods, and solutions to the challenges are documented from the practitioner and reviewer`s perspective, thereby providing the viewpoints on why a direction was taken and the concerns expressed. Site cleanup consent agreements with predetermined dates for restoration activity startup add the dimension of imposed punitive actions for failure to meet the date. Approval of the safety analysis is a prerequisite to startup. Actions that increase expediency are (1) assuring activity safety; (2) documenting that assurance; and (3) acquiring the necessary approvals. These actions increase the timeliness of startup and decrease the potential for punitive action. Improvement in expediency has been achieved by using safety analysis techniques to provide input to the line management decision process rather than as a review of line management decisions. Expediency is also improved by sharing the safety input and resultant decisions with reviewers and regulators.

Ellingson, D.R.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Estimating Excess Mortality in Post-Invasion Iraq  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...is unlikely to be developed or maintained, and as conditions deteriorate, it may become increasingly unlikely that bodies can be counted at all. In Iraq, there is also a strong cultural imperative that bodies be put to rest quickly, which may affect the ability to arrive at accurate estimates. Although... In a military invasion and ongoing war, the likelihood of obtaining good demographic data plummets. Catherine Brownstein and John Brownstein discuss the accuracy of the data from the Iraq Family Health Survey. Dr. Mohamed Ali discusses violence-related ...

Brownstein C.A.; Brownstein J.S.

2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "affected restoration estimates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Error estimates and specification parameters for functional renormalization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a strategy for estimating the error of truncated functional flow equations. While the basic functional renormalization group equation is exact, approximated solutions by means of truncations do not only depend on the choice of the retained information, but also on the precise definition of the truncation. Therefore, results depend on specification parameters that can be used to quantify the error of a given truncation. We demonstrate this for the BCS–BEC crossover in ultracold atoms. Within a simple truncation the precise definition of the frequency dependence of the truncated propagator affects the results, indicating a shortcoming of the choice of a frequency independent cutoff function.

Schnoerr, David [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Boettcher, Igor, E-mail: I.Boettcher@thphys.uni-heidelberg.de [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Pawlowski, Jan M. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany) [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung mbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Wetterich, Christof [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

482

~ SEFS Student and Academic Services ~ Anderson 116/130 ~ sefsadv@uw.edu ~ 2065433077~ Updated 3/13/2013 Restoration Ecology and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

@uw.edu ~ 2065433077~ Updated 3/13/2013 Restoration Ecology and Environmental Horticulture Option://www.sefs.washington.edu/academicprograms/undergrad/esrm Students in the Restoration Ecology and Environmental Horticulture (REEH) option learn and apply fundamental concepts of biology, plant science, and ecology. This disciplinary knowledge, with supporting

Anderson, Richard

483

R E S E A R C H A R T I C L E Grassland Restoration on Landfill Sites in the East  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

R E S E A R C H A R T I C L E Grassland Restoration on Landfill Sites in the East Midlands, United landfill sites are comparable to reference sites of exist- ing wildlife value. Floral characteristics nine pairs of restored landfill sites and reference sites in the East Mid- lands of the United Kingdom

Northampton, University of

484

SciTech Connect: Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil-Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

485

Buildings Energy Data Book: 4.4 Legislation Affecting Energy...  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 Executive Order 13423, Provisions Affecting Energy Consumption in Federal Buildings Source(s): -- Requires Federal agencies to improve energy efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas...

486

Estimating Externalities of Natural Gas Fuel Cycles, Report 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes methods for estimating the external costs (and possibly benefits) to human health and the environment that result from natural gas fuel cycles. Although the concept of externalities is far from simple or precise, it generally refers to effects on individuals' well being, that result from a production or market activity in which the individuals do not participate, or are not fully compensated. In the past two years, the methodological approach that this report describes has quickly become a worldwide standard for estimating externalities of fuel cycles. The approach is generally applicable to any fuel cycle in which a resource, such as coal, hydro, or biomass, is used to generate electric power. This particular report focuses on the production activities, pollution, and impacts when natural gas is used to generate electric power. In the 1990s, natural gas technologies have become, in many countries, the least expensive to build and operate. The scope of this report is on how to estimate the value of externalities--where value is defined as individuals' willingness to pay for beneficial effects, or to avoid undesirable ones. This report is about the methodologies to estimate these externalities, not about how to internalize them through regulations or other public policies. Notwithstanding this limit in scope, consideration of externalities can not be done without considering regulatory, insurance, and other considerations because these institutional factors affect whether costs (and benefits) are in fact external, or whether they are already somehow internalized within the electric power market. Although this report considers such factors to some extent, much analysis yet remains to assess the extent to which estimated costs are indeed external. This report is one of a series of reports on estimating the externalities of fuel cycles. The other reports are on the coal, oil, biomass, hydro, and nuclear fuel cycles, and on general methodology.

Barnthouse, L.W.; Cada, G.F.; Cheng, M.-D.; Easterly, C.E.; Kroodsma, R.L.; Lee, R.; Shriner, D.S.; Tolbert, V.R.; Turner, R.S.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Waste management programmatic environmental impact statement methodology for estimating human health risks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has produced large quantities of radioactive and hazardous waste during years of nuclear weapons production. As a result, a large number of sites across the DOE Complex have become chemically and/or radiologically contaminated. In 1990, the Secretary of Energy charged the DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste management (EM) with the task of preparing a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). The PEIS should identify and assess the potential environmental impacts of implementing several integrated Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM) alternatives. The determination and integration of appropriate remediation activities and sound waste management practices is vital for ensuring the diminution of adverse human health impacts during site cleanup and waste management programs. This report documents the PEIS risk assessment methodology used to evaluate human health risks posed by WM activities. The methodology presents a programmatic cradle to grave risk assessment for EM program activities. A unit dose approach is used to estimate risks posed by WM activities and is the subject of this document.

Bergenback, B. [Midwest Technical, Inc. (United States); Blaylock, B.P.; Legg, J.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

NAME: Molokai Fish Pond & Fringing Reef Restoration LOCATION: Kaunakakai, Island of Molokai (Maui County), Hawai'i  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NAME: Molokai Fish Pond & Fringing Reef Restoration LOCATION: Kaunakakai, Island of Molokai (Maui fish ponds on the fringing reef of the Hawaiian island of Molokai. Mangroves were planted in 1902 conditions and threaten to take over the reef flats and fish ponds. EXPECTED BENEFITS: Fine sediment flushed

US Army Corps of Engineers

489

STREAMLINED APPROACH FOR ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION PLAN FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 116: AREA 25 TEST CELL C FACILITYNEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan identifies the activities required for the closure of Corrective Action Unit 116, Area 25 Test Cell C Facility. The Test Cell C Facility is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site approximately 25 miles northwest of Mercury, Nevada.

NONE

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Deterioration processes on archaeological sites of Chellah and Oudayas (world cultural heritage, Rabat, Morocco): restoration test and recommendations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...abundant and variable in shape and size. Plasters (often one superimposed over another...mineralogical composition between the outer plasters (samples S-27 and S-28; tab. 5...phyllosilicates (tab. 6) employed to colour the plaster used for restoration. Sample S-42...

Lahcen Asebriy; Taj-Eddine Cherkaoui; Iz-Eddine El Amrani El Hassani; Roberto Franchi; Francesco Guerrera; Manuel Martín-Martín; Claudia Guerrera Patamìa; Giuliana Raffaelli; Pedro Robles-Marín; Julian Tejera De Leon; Francisco J. Alcalá

491

NAME: Sears Point Tidal Restoration Project LOCATION: Near Petaluma, CA, in the San Pablo Bay and Tolay Creek Watersheds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of estuarine habitat comprised of deep and shallow water habitat, mudflats, salt marsh, and wetlandNAME: Sears Point Tidal Restoration Project LOCATION: Near Petaluma, CA, in the San Pablo Bay PROJECT DESCRIPTION: Sears Point, the proposed project site, consists of approximately 960 acres of diked

US Army Corps of Engineers

492

Sediment Decontamination For Navigational And Environmental Restoration In NY/NJ Harbor Case Study: Passaic River, New Jersey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sediment Decontamination For Navigational And Environmental Restoration In NY/NJ Harbor ­ Case, Arlington, VA 22230 Sediments in the NY/NJ Harbor are widely contaminated with toxic organic and inorganic compounds. Decontamination of these sediments is one tool that can be used to cope with the problems posed

Brookhaven National Laboratory

493

Summary of the landfill remediation problems and technology needs of the Oak Ridge Reservation Environmental Restoration Programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the following topics: brief description of the Oak Ridge Reservation Environmental Restoration Program; descriptions of representative waste burials at each site; ongoing, planned, or potential remediation; known or anticipated remediation problems; potential applications for robotics in the remediation of Oak Ridge Reservation landfills.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Restoration of Short Periods of Missing Energy Use and Weather Data Using Cubic Spline and Fourier Series Approaches: Qualitative Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The paper presents seventeen approaches that use cubic splines and Fourier series for restoring short term missing data in time series of building energy use and weather data. The study is based on twenty samples of hourly data, each at least one...

Baltazar, J. C.; Claridge, D. E.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Restoration of Short Periods of Missing Energy Use and Weather Data Using Cubic Spline and Fourier Series Approaches: Qualitative Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents seventeen approaches that use cubic splines and Fourier series for restoring short term missing data in time series of building energy use and weather data. The study is based on twenty samples of hourly data, each at least one...

Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Claridge, D. E.

496

Stock type performance in addressing top-down and bottom-up factors for the restoration of indigenous trees  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the initial size and biomass of seedlings. Inversely, in plantations exposed to deer, the apparency hypothesis.07) that had been almost twice their biomass at the onset of plantation. The overall browsing occurrence Exclosure Competition Plantation White-tailed deer a b s t r a c t Using planted trees to restore

Laval, Université

497

Statistical Estimation of Circuit Timing Vulnerability Due to Leakage-Induced Power Grid Voltage Drop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Statistical Estimation of Circuit Timing Vulnerability Due to Leakage-Induced Power Grid Voltage voltage drops on the power grid that can affect circuit timing. We propose a statistical analysis supply voltage to circuit devices is referred to as the power grid. The consequences of power grid

Najm, Farid N.

498

Measurement enhancement for state estimation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the control center receives the system-wide device information and measurement data through the Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) system. However, the information and measurement data provided by SCADA may not always be accurate and reliable... estimation use the measurement data from SCADA system, the status information about the circuit breakers (CB), switches and transformer taps, as well as the parameters of transmission lines, transformers, shunts capacitors/reactors and other devices...

Chen, Jian

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

499

Solar sky radiation estimation techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Empirical correlations suggested by various authors, for estimating monthly mean daily diffuse irradiation, are compared statistically to test their applicability to the southern African region. The correlations are compared by calculating root mean square error, mean bias error and mean percentage error. The correlations suggested by Gopinathan and Gladius Lewis are found to be most accurate for the southern African region. Equations suggested by Iqbal give poor results and cannot be employed for the region.

Gopinathan, K.K. (National Univ. of Lesotho, Roma (South Africa))

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z