National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for affect marine life

  1. Measuring Coastal Boating Noise to Assess Potential Impacts on Marine Life

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matzner, Shari; Jones, Mark E.

    2011-07-01

    Article requested for submission in Sea Technology Magazine describing the Underwater Noise From Small Boats. An Overlooked Component of the Acoustic Environment in Coastal Areas. Underwater noise and its effects on marine life deserve attention as human activity in the marine environment increases. Noise can affect fish and marine mammals in ways that are physiological, as in auditory threshold shifts, and behavioral, as in changes in foraging habits. One anthropogenic source of underwater noise that has received little attention to date is recreational boating. Coastal areas and archipelago regions, which play a crucial role in the marine ecosystem, are often subject to high levels of boat traffic. In order to better understand the noise produced by a small powerboat, a test was conducted in Sequim Bay, Washington, using an instrumented research vessel and multiple acoustic sensors. The broadband noise and narrowband peak levels were observed from two different locations while the boat was operated under various conditions. The results, combined with background noise levels, sound propagation and local boat traffic patterns, can provide a picture of the total boating noise to which marine life may be subjected.

  2. Identifying How Marine and Hydrokinetic Devices Affect Aquatic Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, G. F.; Copping, Andrea E.; Roberts, Jesse

    2011-04-24

    Significant research is under way to determine the potential environmental effects of marine and hydrokinetic energy systems. This research, being guided and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, is intended to address knowledge gaps and facilitate installation and operation of these systems.

  3. Accumulation of radionuclides in selected marine biota from Manjung...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the marine ecosystem can be adversely affect human health when it enters the food chain. ... Nuclear Science, Technology, and Engineering Conference 2014, Skudai, Johor ...

  4. Marine Services | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Marine Services Place: Florida Sector: Services Product: Marine Services is planning tidal energy projects off the coasts of California and Florida. References: Marine...

  5. Accumulation of radionuclides in selected marine biota from Manjung coastal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    area (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Accumulation of radionuclides in selected marine biota from Manjung coastal area Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Accumulation of radionuclides in selected marine biota from Manjung coastal area Distribution of radionuclides from anthropogenic activities has been intensively studied due to the accumulation of radionuclides in marine ecosystem. Manjung area is affected by rapid population growth and socio-economic development such as heavy

  6. How loads affect coiled tubing life

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, E.J. Inc., AK )

    1992-01-01

    Fatigue testing was performed on 1-3/4-in OD, 0.125 in. wall thickness (WT) coiled tubing using a standard coiled tubing unit (CTU) as shown in this paper. Testing was conducted under Prudhoe Bay, Alaska oil well, conditions to determine the effects of axial load, internal pressure and bending stress on the longevity, or usable running footage, that can be expected with larger diameter tubing. The CTU was rigged up in a standard configuration with injector head 50 ft off the ground, the worst case for bending on most currently available North Slope units. Internal pressure was supplied by a small triplex pump and the end of tubing was closed off with a fishing neck and bull plug. Weight, for the first four tests, was suspended from the coiled tubing by a special clamp. The tubing was cycled up and over the guide arch until a loss of internal coiled tubing pressure (CTP) occurred, or until the tubing became stuck in the stripper brass.

  7. Ice Nuclei in Marine Air: Biogenic Particles or Dust?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burrows, Susannah M.; Hoose, C.; Poschl, U.; Lawrence, M.

    2013-01-11

    Ice nuclei impact clouds, but their sources and distribution in the atmosphere are still not well known. Particularly little attention has been paid to IN sources in marine environments, although evidence from field studies suggests that IN populations in remote marine regions may be dominated by primary biogenic particles associated with sea spray. In this exploratory model study, we aim to bring attention to this long-neglected topic and identify promising target regions for future field campaigns. We assess the likely global distribution of marine biogenic ice nuclei using a combination of historical observations, satellite data and model output. By comparing simulated marine biogenic immersion IN distributions and dust immersion IN distributions, we predict strong regional differences in the importance of marine biogenic IN relative to dust IN. Our analysis suggests that marine biogenic IN are most likely to play a dominant role in determining IN concentrations in near-surface-air over the Southern Ocean, so future field campaigns aimed at investigating marine biogenic IN should target that region. Climate related changes in the abundance and emission of biogenic marine IN could affect marine cloud properties, thereby introducing previously unconsidered feedbacks that influence the hydrological cycle and the Earths energy balance. Furthermore, marine biogenic IN may be an important aspect to consider in proposals for marine cloud brightening by artificial sea spray production.

  8. Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Research & Development | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Research & Development Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Research & Development Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Research & Development Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Research &...

  9. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-07-01

    This fact sheet describes the Wind and Water Power Program's current approach to supporting the development and deployment of marine and hydrokinetic technologies.

  10. The Fate of Marine Bacterial Exopolysaccharide in Natural Marine Microbial

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Communities (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES The Fate of Marine Bacterial Exopolysaccharide in Natural Marine Microbial Communities « Prev Next » Title: The Fate of Marine Bacterial Exopolysaccharide in Natural Marine Microbial Communities Most marine bacteria produce exopolysaccharides (EPS), and bacterial EPS represent an important source of dissolved organic carbon in marine ecosystems. It was proposed that bacterial EPS rich in uronic acid is resistant to mineralization by microbes and

  11. The Fate of Marine Bacterial Exopolysaccharide in Natural Marine...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Marine Microbial Communities Most marine bacteria produce exopolysaccharides (EPS), and ... Bacterial community structure analysis indicated that the class Flavobacteria of the ...

  12. Marine Scotland | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Scotland Place: Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom Zip: EH14 1TY Product: Marine science, planning, policy and management body. References: Marine Scotland1 This article is...

  13. Seawind Marine | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Seawind Marine Jump to: navigation, search Name: Seawind Marine Place: Plymouth, England, United Kingdom Zip: PL1 5NE Sector: Services, Wind energy Product: Focused on project...

  14. Life Insurance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Life Insurance Life Insurance A comprehensive benefits package with plan options for health care and retirement to take care of our employees today and tomorrow. Contact Benefits...

  15. Marine & hydrokinetic technology development.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LiVecchi, Al; Jepsen, Richard Alan

    2010-06-01

    The Wind and Water Power Program supports the development of marine and hydrokinetic devices, which capture energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, the natural flow of water in rivers, and marine thermal gradients, without building new dams or diversions. The program works closely with industry and the Department of Energy's national laboratories to advance the development and testing of marine and hydrokinetic devices. In 2008, the program funded projects to develop and test point absorber, oscillating wave column, and tidal turbine technologies. The program also funds component design, such as techniques for manufacturing and installing coldwater pipes critical for ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) systems. Rigorous device testing is necessary to validate and optimize prototypes before beginning full-scale demonstration and deployment. The program supports device testing by providing technology developers with information on testing facilities. Technology developers require access to facilities capable of simulating open-water conditions in order to refine and validate device operability. The program has identified more than 20 tank testing operators in the United States with capabilities suited to the marine and hydrokinetic technology industry. This information is available to the public in the program's Hydrodynamic Testing Facilities Database. The program also supports the development of open-water, grid-connected testing facilities, as well as resource assessments that will improve simulations done in dry-dock and closed-water testing facilities. The program has established two university-led National Marine Renewable Energy Centers to be used for device testing. These centers are located on coasts and will have open-water testing berths, allowing researchers to investigate marine and estuary conditions. Optimal array design, development, modeling and testing are needed to maximize efficiency and electricity generation at marine and hydrokinetic power plants while mitigating nearby and distant impacts. Activities may include laboratory and computational modeling of mooring design or research on device spacing. The geographies, resources, technologies, and even nomenclature of the U.S. marine and hydrokinetic technology industry have yet to be fully understood or defined. The program characterizes and assesses marine and hydrokinetic devices, and then organizes the collected information into a comprehensive and searchable Web-based database, the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. The database, which reflects intergovernmental and international collaboration, provides industry with one of the most comprehensive and up-to-date public resources on marine and hydrokinetic devices.

  16. Ecotoxicology of tropical marine ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, E.C.; Gassman, N.J.; Firman, J.C.; Richmond, R.H.; Power, E.A.

    1997-01-01

    The negative effects of chemical contaminants on tropical marine ecosystems are of increasing concern as human populations expand adjacent to these communities. Watershed streams and ground water carry a variety of chemicals from agricultural, industrial, and domestic activities, while winds and currents transport pollutants from atmospheric and oceanic sources to these coastal ecosystems. The implications of the limited information available on impacts of chemical stressors on mangrove forests, seagrass meadows, and coral reefs are discussed in the context of ecosystem management and ecological risk assessment. Three classes of pollutants have received attention: heavy metals, petroleum, and synthetic organics. Heavy metals have been detected in all three ecosystems, causing physiological stress, reduced reproductive success, and outright mortality in associated invertebrates and fishes. Oil spills have been responsible for the destruction of entire coastal shallow-water communities, with recovery requiring years. Herbicides are particularly detrimental to mangroves and seagrasses and adversely affect the animal-algal symbioses in corals. Pesticides interfere with chemical cues responsible for key biological processes, including reproduction and recruitment of a variety of organisms. Information is lacking with regard to long-term recovery, indicator species, and biomarkers for tropical communities. Critical areas that are beginning to be addressed include the development of appropriate benchmarks for risk assessment, baseline monitoring criteria, and effective management strategies to protect tropical marine ecosystems in the face of mounting anthropogenic disturbance.

  17. Plymouth Marine Laboratory | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Marine Laboratory Jump to: navigation, search Name: Plymouth Marine Laboratory Place: United Kingdom Product: Carries out strategic and applied marine research. References:...

  18. First State Marine Wind | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    State Marine Wind Jump to: navigation, search Name First State Marine Wind Facility First State Marine Wind Sector Wind energy Facility Type Offshore Wind Facility Status Proposed...

  19. Leviathan Marine Development | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Marine Development Jump to: navigation, search Name: Leviathan Marine Development Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website: www.leviathanenergy.com This company is listed in the...

  20. New Microbiome Center to combine UChicago, Marine Biological Laboratory and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne expertise | Argonne National Laboratory Filamentous cyanobacteria from a tidal pond at Little Sippewissett salt marsh, Falmouth, Mass. Microbial communities - bacteria, viruses and fungi - affect every ecosystem on earth, including human bodies, oceans, our homes and the land around us, and are the focus of a new Microbiome Center jointly headed by Argonne, the Marine Biological Laboratory and the University of Chicago. (Image: S. Emil Ruff, Marine Biological Laboratory) Filamentous

  1. 2015 Marine Energy Technology Symposium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 3rd Annual Marine Energy Technology Symposium (METS) will be held as part of the inaugural International Marine Energy Conference. This conference takes place April 27-29, 2015, at the Capital...

  2. Marin Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zip: 94901 Sector: Solar Product: Marin Solar is a residential installer of photovoltaic systems. References: Marin Solar1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  3. Life With Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Students will describe ways in which technology affects the environment, both negatively and positively, and identify different forms of energy and their advantages/disadvantages. They will also determine the benefits as well as the environmental harms of using energy to improve our quality of life.

  4. Marine Energy Technology Symposium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Proceedings of the 2 nd Marine Energy Technology Symposium METS2014 April 15-18, 2014, Seattle, WA FIELD MEASUREMENT TEST PLAN TO DETERMINE EFFECTS OF HYDROKINETIC TURBINE DEPLOYMENT ON CANAL TEST SITE IN YAKIMA, WA, USA Budi Gunawan 1 , Jesse Roberts, Ann Dallman, Vincent Neary Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM, U.S. Shane Grovue Instream Energy Systems Vancouver, BC, CA Josh Mortensen, Bryan Heiner US Bureau of Reclamation Denver, CO, U.S. 1 Corresponding author:

  5. HERO Seattle Mariners

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HERO Seattle Mariners vs. St. Louis Cardinals Sunday, June 26, 2016 1:10 pm game time $65/person Payments over $250 must be cashier's check or cash $65/person includes bus ride, game ticket, snacks on the bus and pizza on the way home! Send payment to Linda Meigs (376-5785) @ A3-01 Enjoy Sunday afternoon at Safeco Field, cheering on your favorite team!

  6. Marine botany. Second edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dawes, C.J.

    1998-12-01

    Marine plants are a diverse group that include unicellular algae, seaweeds, seagrasses, salt marshes, and mangrove forests. They carry out a variety of ecological functions and serve as the primary producers in coastal wetlands and oceanic waters. The theme that connects such a wide variety of plants is their ecology, which was also emphasized in the 1981 edition. The goal of this revision is to present taxonomic, physiological, chemical, and ecological aspects of marine plants, their adaptations, and how abiotic and biotic factors interact in their communities. The data are presented in a concise, comparative manner in order to identify similarities and differences between communities such as salt marsh and mangroves or subtidal seaweeds and seagrasses. To accomplish this, the text is organized into five chapters that introduce the marine habitats, consider abiotic and biotic factors, and anthropogenic influences on the communities followed by seven chapters that deal with microalgae, seaweeds, salt marshes, mangroves, seagrasses, and coral reefs. Two appendixes are included; one presents simple field techniques and the other is a summary of seaweed uses.

  7. EO 13158: Marine Protected Areas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Executive Order will help protect the significant natural and cultural resources within the marine environment for the benefit of present and future generations by strengthening and expanding...

  8. Marin County- Solar Access Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Marin County's Energy Conservation Code is designed to assure new subdivisions provide for future passive or natural heating or cooling opportunities in the subdivision to the extent feasible. ...

  9. Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report covers the Wind and Water Power Technologies Office’s marine and hydrokinetic projects from fiscal years 2008 to 2015.

  10. International Marine Renewable Energy Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The International Marine Renewable Energy Conference (IMREC) offers researchers, technology developers, policy makers, NGOs, and industry representatives the opportunity to discuss financing...

  11. California Marine Life Protection Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ActLegal Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 2014 Legal Citation California Fish and Game Code Section 2850 et seq. DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:...

  12. Coiled tubing working life prediction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, J.

    1995-12-31

    Failure of coiled tubing, due to the repeated bending and plastic deformation of coiled tubing on and off the reel and gooseneck, is of great concern in coiled tubing operations. This paper discusses the coiled tubing working life based on one of the coiled tubing life models published in the literature, and compares the results with other models. Certain agreements are found among these models. A group of curves is presented to illustrate the coiled tubing working life affected by coiled tubing size and wall thickness, internal pressure, yield strength, reel diameter, gooseneck radius, operation condition (corrosion) and butt-welded connection (stress concentration). The results show that coiled tubing life can be greatly increased by increasing CT wall thickness and CT strength, while the coiled tubing working life decreases under high internal pressure, corrosion, and butt-weld conditions. These curves can be easily used in estimating coiled tubing life for the field use.

  13. Effects of Tidal Turbine Noise on Fish Hearing and Tissues - Draft Final Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halvorsen, Michele B.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2011-09-30

    Snohomish Public Utility District No.1 plans to deploy two 6 meter OpenHydro tidal turbines in Admiralty Inlet in Puget Sound, under a FERC pilot permitting process. Regulators and stakeholders have raised questions about the potential effect of noise from the turbines on marine life. Noise in the aquatic environment is known to be a stressor to many types of aquatic life, including marine mammals, fish and birds. Marine mammals and birds are exceptionally difficult to work with for technical and regulatory reasons. Fish have been used as surrogates for other aquatic organisms as they have similar auditory structures. This project was funded under the FY09 Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) to Snohomish PUD, in partnership with the University of Washington - Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center, the Sea Mammal Research Unit, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of this study will inform the larger research project outcomes. Proposed tidal turbine deployments in coastal waters are likely to propagate noise into nearby waters, potentially causing stress to native organisms. For this set of experiments, juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) were used as the experimental model. Plans exist for prototype tidal turbines to be deployed into their habitat. Noise is known to affect fish in many ways, such as causing a threshold shift in auditory sensitivity or tissue damage. The characteristics of noise, its spectra and level, are important factors that influence the potential for the noise to injure fish. For example, the frequency range of the tidal turbine noise includes the audiogram (frequency range of hearing) of most fish. This study was performed during FY 2011 to determine if noise generated by a 6-m diameter OpenHydro turbine might affect juvenile Chinook salmon hearing or cause barotrauma. Naturally spawning stocks of Chinook salmon that utilize Puget Sound are listed as threatened (http://www.nwr.noaa.gov/ESA-Salmon-Listings/Salmon-Populations/Chinook/CKPUG.cfm); the fish used in this experiment were hatchery raised and their populations are not in danger of depletion. After they were exposed to simulated tidal turbine noise, the hearing of juvenile Chinook salmon was measured and necropsies performed to check for tissue damage. Experimental groups were (1) noise exposed, (2) control (the same handling as treatment fish but without exposure to tidal turbine noise), and (3) baseline (never handled). Experimental results indicate that non-lethal, low levels of tissue damage may have occurred but that there were no effects of noise exposure on the auditory systems of the test fish.

  14. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies (Fact Sheet) | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies (Fact Sheet) Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies (Fact Sheet) This fact sheet describes the Wind and Water Power Program's current approach to...

  15. Seoul Marine Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Seoul Marine Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Seoul Marine Co Ltd Place: Gwangju, Korea (Republic) Sector: Solar Product: Korea-based solar project developer. References:...

  16. Marine and Hydrokinetic Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Contents 1 Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment and Characterization 2 CurrentTidalRiverine 3 Wave 4 Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Marine and Hydrokinetic...

  17. Resolute Marine Energy Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resolute Marine Energy Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Resolute Marine Energy Inc Address: 3 Post Office Square 3rd floor Place: Massachusetts Country: United States Zip:...

  18. Marine Hydroelectric Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Name: Marine Hydroelectric Company Address: 24040 Camino Del Avion A 107 Place: Monarch Beach Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Year Founded: 1983 Phone...

  19. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Computer Modeling Workshop The workshop brought together over 60 experts in marine energy technologies to disseminate technical information to the marine energy...

  20. Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fact sheet describes the Energy savings Performance Contract (ESPC) Success Story on how a comprehensive effort cuts energy use by 44% at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton in Camp Pendleton, California.

  1. Marine Hydrokinetic Advanced Materials program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Marine Fuel Choice for Ocean- Going Vessels within Emissions Control Areas June 2015 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Marine fuel choice for ocean going vessels within emissions control areas i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are

  2. Form:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Form Edit History Form:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Jump to: navigation, search Add a Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Input the name of your Marine and Hydrokinetic...

  3. Modeling transport and dilution of produced water and the resulting uptake and biomagnification in marine biota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rye, H.; Reed, M.; Slagstad, D.

    1996-12-31

    The paper explains the numerical modelling efforts undertaken in order to study possible marine biological impacts caused by releases of produced water from the Haltenbanken area outside the western coast of Norway. Acute effects on marine life from releases of produced water appear to be relatively small and confined to areas rather lose to the release site. Biomagnification may however be experienced for relatively low concentrations at larger distances from the release point. Such effects can he modeled by performing a step-wise approach which includes: The use of 3-D hydrodynamic models to determine the ocean current fields; The use of 3-D multi-source numerical models to determine the concentration fields from the produced water releases, given the current field; and The use of biologic models to simulate the behavior of and larvae (passive marine biota) and fish (active marine biota) and their interaction with the concentration field. The paper explains the experiences gained by using this approach for the calculation of possible influences on marine life below the EC{sub 50} or LC{sub 50} concentration levels. The models are used for simulating concentration fields from 5 simultaneous sources at the Haltenbank area and simulation of magnification in some marine species from 2 simultaneous sources in the same area. Naphthalenes and phenols, which are both present in the produced water, were used as the chemical substances in the simulations.

  4. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    DOE’s Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database provides up-to-date information on marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy, both in the U.S. and around the world. The database includes wave, tidal, current, and ocean thermal energy, and contains information on the various energy conversion technologies, companies active in the field, and development of projects in the water. Depending on the needs of the user, the database can present a snapshot of projects in a given region, assess the progress of a certain technology type, or provide a comprehensive view of the entire marine and hydrokinetic energy industry. Results are displayed as a list of technologies, companies, or projects. Data can be filtered by a number of criteria, including country/region, technology type, generation capacity, and technology or project stage. The database was updated in 2009 to include ocean thermal energy technologies, companies, and projects.

  5. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    DOEs Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database provides up-to-date information on marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy, both in the U.S. and around the world. The database includes wave, tidal, current, and ocean thermal energy, and contains information on the various energy conversion technologies, companies active in the field, and development of projects in the water. Depending on the needs of the user, the database can present a snapshot of projects in a given region, assess the progress of a certain technology type, or provide a comprehensive view of the entire marine and hydrokinetic energy industry. Results are displayed as a list of technologies, companies, or projects. Data can be filtered by a number of criteria, including country/region, technology type, generation capacity, and technology or project stage. The database was updated in 2009 to include ocean thermal energy technologies, companies, and projects.

  6. Marine Mammal Protection Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Marine Mammal Protection Act Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: Marine Mammal Protection ActLegal Abstract The...

  7. marine energy | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    marine energy Home Kch's picture Submitted by Kch(24) Member 15 July, 2014 - 07:07 MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft CBS current energy GMREC LCOE levelized cost of energy marine...

  8. Pure Marine Gen | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gen Jump to: navigation, search Name: Pure Marine Gen Place: Belfast, United Kingdom Zip: BT3 9DTN Product: Northern Ireland-based wave project developer. References: Pure Marine...

  9. Marine One Landing Exercise at Argonne

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-03-20

    Marine One and its support helicopters conduct a landing exercise at Argonne prior to the President's visit.

  10. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Instrumentation, Measurement, and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Computer Modeling Workshop | Department of Energy Technology Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop The workshop brought together over 60 experts in marine energy technologies to disseminate technical information to the marine energy community, and to collect information to help identify ways in which the development of a commercially viable marine energy industry can be

  11. Hawaii Marine Base Installs Solar Roofs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Harnessing sunlight to create renewable electricity at Hawaii's Marine Corps Base was considered too expensive to be practical -- until 2008.

  12. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Instrumentation, Measurement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop The workshop ...

  13. Sunnyvale Marine Climate Deep Retrofit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    German, A.; Siddiqui, A.; Dakin, B.

    2014-11-01

    The Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI) and Allen Gilliland of One Sky Homes collaborated on a marine climate retrofit project designed to meet both Passive House (PH) and Building America program standards. The scope included sealing, installing wall, roof and floor insulation (previously lacking), replacing windows, upgrading the heating and cooling system, and installing mechanical ventilation.

  14. Sunnyvale Marine Climate Deep Retrofit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    German, A.; Siddiqui, A.; Dakin, B.

    2014-11-01

    The Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI) and Allen Gilliland of One Sky Homes collaborated on a marine climate retrofit project designed to meet both Passive House (PH) and Building America (BA) program standards. The scope included sealing, installing wall, roof and floor insulation (previously lacking), replacing windows, upgrading the heating and cooling system, and installing.

  15. Concerns in Marine Renewable Energy Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, Sharon; Previsic, Mirko; Nelson, Peter; Woo, Sheri

    2010-06-17

    To accelerate the adoption of these emerging marine hydrokinetic technologies, navigational and environmental issues and concerns must be identified and addressed. As hydrokinetic projects move forward, various stakeholders will need to be engaged; one of the key issues that project proponents face as they engage stakeholders is that many conflicting uses and environmental issues are not well-understood. Much of this lack of understanding comes from a limited understanding of the technologies themselves. To address this issue, in September 2008, RE Vision consulting, LLC, was selected by the Department of Energy, under their market acceleration program, to apply a scenario-based assessment approach to the emerging hydrokinetic technology sector. The goal was to improve understanding of potential environmental and navigation impacts of these technologies and focus stakeholders on the critical issues. To meet this goal, the study established baseline scenarios for wave and tidal power conversion at potential future deployment sites. The scenarios captured variations in technical approaches and deployment scales and thus grounded the analysis in realistic constraints. The work conducted under this award provides an important foundation to other market acceleration activities carried out by the DOE and other stakeholders in this sector. The scenarios were then evaluated using a framework developed by H.T. Harvey & Associates to identify and characterize key environmental concerns and uncertainties. In collaboration with PCCI and the U.S. Coast Guard, navigation issues were assessed and guidelines developed to assure the safe operation of these systems. Finally, the work highlights “next steps” to take to continue development and adoption of marine hydrokinetic energy. Throughout the project, close collaboration with device developers, project developers and regulatory stakeholders was pursued to ensure that assumptions and constraints are realistic. Results concur with most of the permitting hurdles experienced by on-going projects in the U.S., and specific recommendations are provided for identifying and addressing them. While many areas of further research were identified, the study did not identify any major show-stoppers, largely because these technologies have a relatively low environmental risk-profile if compared to other activities routinely permitted in the marine environment. The frameworks and representative scenarios developed provide an objective and transparent tool for stakeholders, regulators and developers to assist in the decision-making process for siting wave and tidal energy plants, and meet our goal of improving understanding between all stakeholders. The final product consists of three reports: Report 1 - Wave Energy Scenarios. This report includes: A technology characterization of four different wave energy technologies, including major technical specifications, device performance, and technical siting considerations; A site characterization of two potential deployment sites located in Hawaii and California; Outlines of device installation, O&M and decommissioning activities; Navigational demarcation requirements; and, Deployment Scenarios, identifying all the major life-cycle-related impacts. Report 2 - Tidal Energy Scenarios. This report includes: A technology characterization of three tidal energy technologies, including major technical specifications, device performance, and technical siting considerations; A site characterization of one potential deployment location in the Puget Sound, Washington; Outlines of device installation, O&M and decommissioning activities; Navigational demarcation requirements; and, Deployment Scenarios, identifying all the major life-cycle-related impacts.Report 3 - Framework for Identifying Key Environmental Concerns. This report describes frameworks for identifying key environmental effects and applies them to the wave and tidal energy deployment scenarios described in the first two reports. It highlights critical issues and recommendations for future research.

  16. Anticipate-Affect

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Anticipate-Affect Anticipate-Affect Scientists are developing sophisticated modeling and research techniques to give them an advantage in their ability to anticipate and affect explosive-related threats or events. v Sophisticated modeling and research techniques to counter threats What conditions lead an individual or group toward committing political violence? Is it possible to accurately forecast who will become radicalized or even estimate when they might resort to violence? These and similar

  17. Sources and composition of submicron organic mass in marine aerosol particles: Marine Aerosol Organic Mass Composition

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Frossard, Amanda A.; Russell, Lynn M.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Elliott, Scott M.; Bates, Timothy S.; Quinn, Patricia K.

    2014-11-26

    Recent studies have proposed a variety of interpretations of the sources and composition of atmospheric marine aerosol particles (aMA) based on a range of physical and chemical measurements collected during open-ocean research cruises. To investigate the processes that affect marine organic particles, this study uses the characteristic functional group composition (from Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy) of aMAP from five ocean regions to show that: (i) The organic functional group composition of aMAP that can be identified as atmospheric primary marine (ocean-derived) aerosol (aPMA) is 6512% hydroxyl, 219% alkane, 66% amine, and 78% carboxylic acid functional groups. Contributions from photochemicalmorereactions add carboxylic acid groups (15%-25%), shipping effluent in seawater and ship emissions add additional alkane groups (up to 70%), and coastal emissions mix in alkane and carboxylic acid groups from coastal pollution sources. (ii) The organic composition of aPMA is nearly identical to model generated primary marine aerosol particles (gPMA) from bubbled seawater (55% hydroxyl, 32% alkane, and 13% amine functional groups), indicating that its overall functional group composition is the direct consequence of the organic constituents of the seawater source. (iii) While the seawater organic functional group composition was nearly invariant across all three ocean regions studied, the gPMA alkane group fraction increased with chlorophyll-a concentrations (r = 0.79). gPMA from productive seawater had a larger fraction of alkane functional groups (35%) compared to gPMA from non-productive seawater (16%), likely due to the presence of surfactants in productive seawater that stabilize the bubble film and lead to preferential drainage of the more soluble (lower alkane group fraction) organic components. gPMA has a hydroxyl group absorption peak location characteristic of monosaccharides and disaccharides, where the seawater OM hydroxyl group peak location is closer to that of polysaccharides. This may result from the larger saccharides preferentially remaining in the seawater during gPMA and aPMA productionless

  18. Global distribution and climate forcing of marine organic aerosol: 1. Model improvements and evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meskhidze, N.; Xu, J.; Gantt, Brett; Zhang, Yang; Nenes, Athanasios; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2011-11-23

    Marine organic aerosol emissions have been implemented and evaluated within the National Center of Atmospheric Research (NCAR)'s Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5) with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's 7-mode Modal Aerosol Module (MAM-7). Emissions of marine primary organic aerosols (POA), phytoplanktonproduced isoprene- and monoterpenes-derived secondary organic aerosols (SOA) and methane sulfonate (MS{sup -}) are shown to affect surface concentrations of organic aerosols in remote marine regions. Global emissions of submicron marine POA is estimated to be 7.9 and 9.4 Tg yr{sup -1}, for the Gantt et al. (2011) and Vignati et al. (2010) emission parameterizations, respectively. Marine sources of SOA and particulate MS{sup -} (containing both sulfur and carbon atoms) contribute an additional 0.2 and 5.1 Tg yr{sup -1}, respectively. Widespread areas over productive waters of the Northern Atlantic, Northern Pacific, and the Southern Ocean show marine-source submicron organic aerosol surface concentrations of 100 ngm{sup -3}, with values up to 400 ngm{sup -3} over biologically productive areas. Comparison of long-term surface observations of water insoluble organic matter (WIOM) with POA concentrations from the two emission parameterizations shows that despite revealed discrepancies (often more than a factor of 2), both Gantt et al. (2011) and Vignati et al. (2010) formulations are able to capture the magnitude of marine organic aerosol concentrations, with the Gantt et al. (2011) parameterization attaining better seasonality. Model simulations show that the mixing state of the marine POA can impact the surface number concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The largest increases (up to 20 %) in CCN (at a supersaturation (S) of 0.2 %) number concentration are obtained over biologically productive ocean waters when marine organic aerosol is assumed to be externally mixed with sea-salt. Assuming marine organics are internally-mixed with sea-salt provides diverse results with increases and decreases in the concentration of CCN over different parts of the ocean. The sign of the CCN change due to the addition of marine organics to seasalt aerosol is determined by the relative significance of the increase in mean modal diameter due to addition of mass, and the decrease in particle hygroscopicity due to compositional changes in marine aerosol. Based on emerging evidence for increased CCN concentration over biologically active surface ocean areas/periods, our study suggests that treatment of sea spray in global climate models (GCMs) as an internal mixture of marine organic aerosols and sea-salt will likely lead to an underestimation in CCN number concentration.

  19. Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment and Characterization |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy & Hydrokinetic » Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment and Characterization Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment and Characterization With more than 50% of the population living within 50 miles of coastlines, there is vast potential to provide clean, renewable electricity to communities and cities across the United States using marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) technologies. In order to understand the full potential for future electricity production that

  20. Marine and Hydrokinetic Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Characterization 2 CurrentTidalRiverine 3 Wave 4 Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment and Characterization To find out more...

  1. Hawaii National Marine Renewable Energy Center (HINMREC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocheleau, Richard

    2011-09-27

    Presentation from the 2011 Water Peer Review in which the principal investigator discusses project progress to develop in-water testing facility for marine and hydrokinetics energy devices.

  2. Marine Energy Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name: Marine Energy Corporation Abbreviation: MEC Address: 1308 Waugh Drive PMB 465 Place: Houston, Texas Country: United States...

  3. Shafir Civil Marine Engineering | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Engineering Jump to: navigation, search Name: Shafir Civil & Marine Engineering Place: Israel Sector: Services Product: Services include infrastructure works, contracting, bridge...

  4. Sustainable Marine Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kingdom Zip: PO32 6RF Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic, Renewable Energy Product: PLAT-O Year Founded: 2012 Phone Number: 019833297145 Website: www.sustainablemarine.com...

  5. Marine Current Turbines Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    United Kingdom Zip: BS34 8PD Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Product: Developer of tidal stream turbine technology for exploiting flowing water in general and tidal streams in...

  6. EO 13158: Marine Protected Areas (2000)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Executive Order will help protect the significant natural and cultural resources within the marine environment for the benefit of present and future generations by strengthening and expanding...

  7. Energy 101: Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-04-29

    See how marine and hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of the ocean's waves, tides, and currents and convert it into electricity to power our homes, buildings and cities.

  8. Marine Renewable Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: Marine Renewable Technologies Address: 319 Business Lane Suite 1000 Ashland VA 23005 Place: Ashland Zip: 23005 Region: United States...

  9. Energy 101: Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-06-26

    See how marine and hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of the ocean's waves, tides, and currents and convert it into electricity to power our homes, buildings and cities.

  10. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies Fact Sheet

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This fact sheet describes the Wind and Water Power Program's current approach to supporting the development and deployment of marine and hydrokinetic technologies.

  11. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-04-01

    This fact sheet describes the U.S. Department of Energy's Water Power Program. The program supports the development of advanced water power devices that capture energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, rivers, streams, and ocean thermal gradients. The program works to promote the development and deployment of these new technologies, known as marine and hydrokinetic technologies, to assess the potential extractable energy from rivers, estuaries, and coastal waters, and to help industry harness this renewable, emissions-free resource to generate environmentally sustainable and cost-effective electricity.

  12. 2010 MARINE MICROBES GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE (JULY 4-9, 2010 - TILTON SCHOOL, TILTON NH)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Kirchman

    2010-04-09

    Marine microbes include representatives from all three kingdoms of life and collectively carry out virtually all forms of metabolisms found on the planet. Because of this metabolic and genetic diversity, these microbes mediate many of the reactions making up global biogeochemical cycles which govern the flow of energy and material in the biosphere. The goal of this conference is to bring together approaches and concepts from studies of microbial evolution, genomics, ecology, and oceanography in order to gain new insights into marine microbes and their biogeochemical functions. The integration of scales, from genes to global cycles, will result in a better understanding of marine microbes and of their contribution to the carbon cycle and other biogeochemical processes.

  13. U.S. Marine Corp Logistics Base | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Marine Corp Logistics Base Jump to: navigation, search Name U.S. Marine Corp Logistics Base Facility U.S. Marine Corp Logistics Base Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind...

  14. Submersible Generator for Marine Hydrokinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert S. Cinq-Mars; Timothy Burke; Dr. James Irish; Brian Gustafson; Dr. James Kirtley; Dr. Aiman Alawa

    2011-09-01

    A submersible generator was designed as a distinct and critical subassembly of marine hydrokinetics systems, specifically tidal and stream energy conversion. The generator is designed to work with both vertical and horizontal axis turbines. The final product is a high-pole-count, radial-flux, permanent magnet, rim mounted generator, initially rated at twenty kilowatts in a two-meter-per-second flow, and designed to leverage established and simple manufacturing processes. The generator was designed to work with a 3 meter by 7 meter Gorlov Helical Turbine or a marine hydrokinetic version of the FloDesign wind turbine. The team consisted of experienced motor/generator design engineers with cooperation from major US component suppliers (magnetics, coil winding and electrical steel laminations). Support for this effort was provided by Lucid Energy Technologies and FloDesign, Inc. The following tasks were completed: • Identified the conditions and requirements for MHK generators. • Defined a methodology for sizing and rating MHK systems. • Selected an MHK generator topology and form factor. • Completed electromechanical design of submersible generator capable of coupling to multiple turbine styles. • Investigated MHK generator manufacturing requirements. • Reviewed cost implications and financial viability. • Completed final reporting and deliverables

  15. Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Adaptive Management in the Marine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Adaptive Management in the Marine Renewable Energy Industry Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Adaptive Management in the Marine Renewable Energy ...

  16. UK Centre for Marine Renewable Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Centre for Marine Renewable Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: UK Centre for Marine Renewable Energy Place: United Kingdom Sector: Renewable Energy Product: UK Centre for...

  17. Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Marine Renewable Energy Center Jump to: navigation, search Name: Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center Address: 4000 15th Ave Place: Seattle, Washington Zip: 98105...

  18. Sandia Energy - Biofouling Studies on Sandia's Marine Hydrokinetic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Marine Hydrokinetic Coatings Initiated at PNNL's Sequim Bay Sandia's Materials & Manufacturing Reliability Program has begun testing their novel marine hydrokinetic (MHK)...

  19. Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Marine Renewable Energy Test...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Marine Renewable Energy Test Centers and Environmental Effects Research Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Marine Renewable Energy Test Centers and...

  20. MHK Technologies/Blue Motion Energy marine turbine | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Blue Motion Energy marine turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Blue Motion Energy marine turbine.jpg Technology Profile...

  1. DOE Announces Webinars on Instrumentation for Monitoring Marine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    renewable energy converters, characterizing the distribution and habitat use of marine animals in the vicinity of the converters, and measuring sound produced by marine...

  2. Executive Summit on Marine and Hydrokinetic Research and Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Executive Summit on Marine and Hydrokinetic Research and Development Agenda Executive Summit on Marine and Hydrokinetic Research and Development Agenda MHK-Summit-Agenda.jpg PDF ...

  3. ARM - Field Campaign - Marine ARM GPCI Investigation of Clouds...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsMarine ARM GPCI Investigation of Clouds (MAGIC) Campaign Links MAGIC Website ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Related Campaigns Marine ARM GPCI Investigation of Clouds...

  4. Aviation Enterprises Ltd see Marine Current Turbines Ltd | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Aviation Enterprises Ltd see Marine Current Turbines Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Aviation Enterprises Ltd see Marine Current Turbines Ltd Region: United Kingdom Sector:...

  5. New Request for Information on Strategy to Advance the Marine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    New Request for Information on Strategy to Advance the Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Industry New Request for Information on Strategy to Advance the Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy ...

  6. Life Cycle Cost Estimate

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    Life-cycle costs (LCCs) are all the anticipated costs associated with a project or program alternative throughout its life. This includes costs from pre-operations through operations or to the end of the alternative.This chapter discusses life cycle costs and the role they play in planning.

  7. Ecological Research Division, Marine Research Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    This report presents program summaries of the various projects sponsored during 1979 by the Marine Research Program of the Ecological Research Division. Program areas include the effects of petroleum hydrocarbons on the marine environment; a study of the baseline ecology of a proposed OTEC site near Puerto Rico; the environmental impact of offshore geothermal energy development; the movement of radionuclides through the marine environment; the environmental aspects of power plant cooling systems; and studies of the physical and biological oceangraphy of the continental shelves bordering the United States.

  8. Accumulation of radionuclides in selected marine biota from Manjung coastal area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdullah, Anisa Hamzah, Zaini; Wood, Ab. Khalik; Saat, Ahmad; Alias, Masitah

    2015-04-29

    Distribution of radionuclides from anthropogenic activities has been intensively studied due to the accumulation of radionuclides in marine ecosystem. Manjung area is affected by rapid population growth and socio-economic development such as heavy industrial activities including coal fired power plant, iron foundries, port development and factories, agricultural runoff, waste and toxic discharge from factories.It has radiological risk and toxic effect when effluent from the industries in the area containing radioactive materials either being transported to the atmosphere and deposited back over the land or by run off to the river and flow into coastal area and being absorbed by marine biota. Radionuclides presence in the marine ecosystem can be adversely affect human health when it enters the food chain. This study is focusing on the radionuclides [thorium (Th), uranium (U), radium-226 ({sup 226}Ra), radium-228 ({sup 228}Ra) and potassium-40 ({sup 40}K)] content in marine biota and sea water from Manjung coastal area. Five species of marine biota including Johnius dussumieri (Ikan Gelama), Pseudorhombus malayanus (Ikan Sebelah), Arius maculatus (Ikan Duri), Portunus pelagicus (Ketam Renjong) and Charybdis natator (Ketam Salib) were collected during rainy and dry seasons. Measurements were carried out using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICPMS). The results show that the concentration of radionuclides varies depends on ecological environment of respective marine biota species. The concentrations and activity concentrations are used for the assessment of potential internal hazard index (H{sub in}), transfer factor (TF), ingestion dose rate (D) and health risk index (HRI) to monitor radiological risk for human consumption.

  9. 200 kHz Commercial Sonar Systems Generate Lower Frequency Side Lobes Audible to Some Marine Mammals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Southall, Brandon; Carlson, Thomas J.; Xu, Jinshan; Martinez, Jayson J.; Weiland, Mark A.; Ingraham, John M.

    2014-04-15

    The spectral properties of pulses transmitted by three commercially available 200 kHz echo sounders were measured to assess the possibility that sound energy in below the center (carrier) frequency might be heard by marine mammals. The study found that all three sounders generated sound at frequencies below the center frequency and within the hearing range of some marine mammals and that this sound was likely detectable by the animals over limited ranges. However, at standard operating source levels for the sounders, the sound below the center frequency was well below potentially harmful levels. It was concluded that the sounds generated by the sounders could affect the behavior of marine mammals within fairly close proximity to the sources and that that the blanket exclusion of echo sounders from environmental impact analysis based solely on the center frequency output in relation to the range of marine mammal hearing should be reconsidered.

  10. Energy Department Announces $22 Million for Marine Energy Demonstration and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Monitoring Technology Projects | Department of Energy 2 Million for Marine Energy Demonstration and Environmental Monitoring Technology Projects Energy Department Announces $22 Million for Marine Energy Demonstration and Environmental Monitoring Technology Projects March 2, 2016 - 8:40am Addthis Image courtesy the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) Marine Sciences Laboratory. Image courtesy the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) Marine Sciences

  11. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The workshop brought together over 60 experts in marine energy technologies to disseminate technical information to the marine energy community, and to collect information to help identify ways in which the development of a commercially viable marine energy industry can be accelerated. The workshop was comprised of plenary sessions that reviewed the state of the marine energy industry.

  12. Program Evaluation: Program Life Cycle | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    parts of a program's life cycle (e.g., Creating a program, Program is underway, ... If major changes are occurring in external factors that may affect program outcomes (e.g., ...

  13. The Fate of Marine Bacterial Exopolysaccharide in Natural Marine Microbial Communities

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Fate of Marine Bacterial Exopolysaccharide in Natural Marine Microbial Communities CrossMark click for updates n OPEN ACCESS Citation: Zhang Z, Chen Y, Wang R, Cai R, Fu Y, Jiao N (2015) The Fate of Marine Bacterial Exopolysaccharide in Natural Marine Microbial Communities. PLoS ONE 10(11): e0142690. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0142690 Editor: Antonietta Quigg, Texas A&M University at Galveston, UNITED STATES Received: March 18,2015 Accepted: October 26,2015 Published: November 16,2015

  14. Structural Determination of Marine Bacteriogenic Manganese Oxides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    oxides precipitated around a spore (cell) of the marine Mn(II)-oxidizing bac-terium, Bacillus sp., strain SG-1. This cell is about 0.5 m diameter (small axis). Bacterial...

  15. Jack-up rig for marine drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, S. R.

    1981-05-26

    This invention relates to a mobile drilling platform of the jack -up type equipped with a special system which allows the said drilling platform to work as a drilling derrick and alternatively as a hoisting crane rig for marine service.

  16. ARM - Field Campaign - MASRAD: Marine Aerosol Properties

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsMASRAD: Marine Aerosol Properties Campaign Links AMF Point Reyes Website Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA....

  17. Life Extension Program

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    en NNSA, Air Force Complete Successful B61-12 Life Extension Program Development Flight Test at Tonopah Test Range http:nnsa.energy.govmediaroompressreleases...

  18. Life Extension Programs

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    B61-12 Life Extension Program Milestone: First Full-System Mechanical Environment Test Completed Successfully http:nnsa.energy.govmediaroompressreleasesb61lep

  19. Bibliography of marine turtles in Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Payne, S.F.

    1981-07-01

    Information on the organisms at proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites is required to assess the potential impacts of OTEC power plant operations. This bibliography is the product of a literature survey on marine turtles at two proposed OTEC sites in Hawaii. The OTEC sites are located off Keahole Point, Hawaii and Kahe Point, Oahu. The references included in this bibliography provide information on the distribution, ecology and biology of marine turtles in Hawaii.

  20. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Hydrokinetic Technologies Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies This fact sheet describes the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind and Water Power Program efforts to develop advanced water power devices that capture energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, rivers, streams, and ocean thermal gradients. PDF icon mhk_factsheet.pdf More Documents & Publications Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies Fact Sheet Water Power for a Clean Energy Future (Fact Sheet), Wind and Water Power Program

  1. Energy 101: Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Energy 101: Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Addthis Description See how marine and hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of the ocean's waves, tides, and currents and convert it into electricity to power our homes, buildings and cities. Topic Water Text Version Below is the text version for the Energy 101: Marine & Hydrokinetic Energy video. The words "Energy 101: Marine & Hydrokinetic Energy" appear onscreen. Montage of renewable energy

  2. 2014 Water Power Program Peer Review Compiled Presentations: Marine and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrokinetic Technologies | Department of Energy Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies 2014 Water Power Program Peer Review Compiled Presentations: Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies The U.S. Department of Energy Water Power Program conducted the 2014 peer review meeting on marine and hydrokinetic technologies February 24-27. The compiled 2014 Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies Peer Review Presentations listed below are available for download. Introduction Marine and Hydrokinetics

  3. Guides and Case Studies for Marine Climates | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Marine Climates Guides and Case Studies for Marine Climates Map of the Marine Climate Zone of the United States. This zone contains the far western Pacific coast stretching from the Canadian border to mid-California. The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a series of best practices and case studies to help builders improve whole-house energy performance in buildings found in marine climates. Best Practice Guides 40% Whole-House Energy Savings in Marine Climate - Volume 11 Optimized Climate

  4. DOE Offers Relief to Importers Affected by West Coast Port Closures |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Offers Relief to Importers Affected by West Coast Port Closures DOE Offers Relief to Importers Affected by West Coast Port Closures February 27, 2015 - 5:28pm Addthis Closures at 29 West Coast marine ports in February 2015 due to a labor dispute have resulted in significant delays for certain goods entering the United States through those ports. DOE issued an enforcement policy not to seek civil penalties for violations of the energy and water conservation standards

  5. Battery Life Data Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-07-01

    The FreedomCar Partnership has established life goals for batteries. Among them is a 15 year calendar life. The software and the underlying methodology attempt to predict cell and battery life using, at most, two years of test data. The software uses statistical models based on data from accelerated aging experiments to estimate cell life. The life model reflects the average cell performance under a given set of stress conditions with time. No specific form ofmore » the life model is assumed. The software will fit the model to experimental data. An error model, reflecting the cell-to-cell variability and measurement errors, is included in the software. Monte Carlo simulations, based on the developed models, are used to assess Lack-of-fit and develop uncertainty limis for the average cell life. The software has three operating modes: fit only, fit and simulation and simulation only. The user is given these options by means of means and alert boxes.« less

  6. Battery Life Predictive Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-12-31

    The Software consists of a model used to predict battery capacity fade and resistance growth for arbitrary cycling and temperature profiles. It allows the user to extrapolate from experimental data to predict actual life cycle.

  7. Life Extension Programs

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    in the U.S. and abroad.

    B61-12 Life Extension Program Undergoes First Full-Scale Wind Tunnel Test http:www.nnsa.energy.govmediaroompressreleaseswindtunnel

  8. Life Cycle Inventory Database

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Life Cycle Inventory (LCI) Database serves as a central repository for information about the total energy and resource impacts of developing and using various commercial building materials...

  9. Work/Life Balance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Workplace » Work/Life Balance /careers/_assets/images/careers-icon.jpg Work/Life Balance Explore the multiple dimensions of a career at Los Alamos Lab: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive environment that is rich in intellectual vitality and opportunities for growth. Complete suite of benefits to balance your career Enlarge poster enlarge Enlarge poster enlarge Enlarge poster enlarge Enlarge poster enlarge Enlarge poster enlarge Enlarge poster enlarge Enlarge poster enlarge

  10. Preface to Special Topic: Marine Renewable Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinto, F. T.; Iglesias, G.; Santos, P. R.; Deng, Zhiqun

    2015-12-30

    Marine renewable energy (MRE) is generates from waves, currents, tides, and thermal resources in the ocean. MRE has been identified as a potential commercial-scale source of renewable energy. This special topic presents a compilation of works selected from the 3rd IAHR Europe Congress, held in Porto, Portugal, in 2014. It covers different subjects relevant to MRE, including resource assessment, marine energy sector policies, energy source comparisons based on levelized cost, proof-of-concept and new-technology development for wave and tidal energy exploitation, and assessment of possible inference between wave energy converters (WEC).

  11. European Marine Energy Centre Ltd EMEC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Marine Energy Centre Ltd EMEC Jump to: navigation, search Name: European Marine Energy Centre Ltd (EMEC) Place: Stromness, United Kingdom Zip: KW16 3AW Product: EMEC aims to...

  12. The Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    The Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972 Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: The Marine Mammal Protection Act of...

  13. Scotrenewables Wind Power and Marine Power Ltd | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind Power and Marine Power Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Scotrenewables Wind Power and Marine Power Ltd Place: Orkey, Scotland, United Kingdom Zip: KW16 3AW Sector:...

  14. Global Marine Renewable Energy Conference (GMREC) | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Global Marine Renewable Energy Conference (GMREC) Home > Groups > Water Power Forum Kch's picture Submitted by Kch(24) Member 3 April, 2013 - 14:26 The 6th annual Global Marine...

  15. Adaptive Management in the Marine Renewable Energy Industry Webinar...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Adaptive Management in the Marine Renewable Energy Industry Webinar Adaptive Management in the Marine Renewable Energy Industry Webinar December 10, 2015 8:30AM to 10:00AM PST As...

  16. 50 CFR 18 - Marine Mammals | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    50 CFR 18 - Marine Mammals Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: 50 CFR 18 - Marine MammalsLegal Abstract These...

  17. NREL: Water Power Research - Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop The Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop was hosted by the NREL in Broomfield, Colorado from July 9 - 10, 2012. The workshop brought together over 60 experts in marine energy technologies to disseminate technical information to the marine energy community and to collect

  18. Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Research & Development | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy and Hydrokinetic Energy Research & Development Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Research & Development Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Research & Development The Water Power Program's marine and hydrokinetic research and development (R&D) efforts focus on advancing technologies that capture energy from the nation's oceans and rivers. Unlike hydropower, marine and hydrokinetics represent an emerging industry with hundreds of potentially viable technologies. The program is

  19. Marine Corps Base Quantico Achieves 85% Savings in Parking Lighting |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Quantico Achieves 85% Savings in Parking Lighting Marine Corps Base Quantico Achieves 85% Savings in Parking Lighting Marine Corps Base Quantico (MCBQ) in Virginia Marine Corps Base Quantico (MCBQ) in Virginia Document provides an overview of how the Marine Corps Base Quantico (MCBQ) achieved 85% energy savings in parking lighting at one of its parking lots as part of a major overhaul of its outdoor lighting (replacing 2,000 fixtures with light-emitting diode lights),

  20. Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Projects, Fiscal Years 2008-2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-03-24

    This report covers the Wind and Water Power Technologies Office's Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Projects from 2008 to 2014.

  1. Clouds, Precipitation, and Marine Boundary Layer Structure during the MAGIC

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Field Campaign (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Clouds, Precipitation, and Marine Boundary Layer Structure during the MAGIC Field Campaign Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Clouds, Precipitation, and Marine Boundary Layer Structure during the MAGIC Field Campaign The recent ship-based MAGIC (Marine ARM GCSS Pacific Cross-Section Intercomparison (GPCI) Investigation of Clouds) field campaign with the marine-capable Second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) deployed on the

  2. Field Mapping At Cascades Region (Ingebritsen & Mariner, 2010...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Cascades Region (Ingebritsen & Mariner, 2010) Exploration Activity Details...

  3. Method for disconnecting a marine drilling riser assembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beynet, P.A.

    1990-03-27

    This patent describes a method for disconnecting a marine riser assembly extending from a surface facility to a subsea wellhead. The marine riser assembly comprising a marine riser connected to a subsea wellhead utilizing a wellhead connector having an internal shoulder positioned above an upper edge of the subsea wellhead and having connector dogs for releaseably connecting the wellhead connector to the subsea wellhead.

  4. National Marine Renewable Energy Center (UH) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Marine Renewable Energy Center (UH) National Marine Renewable Energy Center (UH) National Marine Renewable Energy Center (UH) Office presentation icon 21_hinmrec_university_of_hawaii_rocheleau.ppt More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: EV Project: Solar-Assisted Charging Demo Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Emerging Lighting Technology

  5. Spongy icing in the marine environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lozowski, E.P.; Blackmore, R.Z.; Forest, T.W.; Shi, J.

    1996-12-01

    Newly formed marine ice accretions may include liquid brine amounts up to about 50% of the total accretion mass. Because they ignore this sponginess, traditional thermodynamic models of icing may significantly underestimate the total marine ice load. In an attempt to improve the capabilities of such models, the authors have undertaken experimental and theoretical research, directed at measuring and predicting the liquid fraction of ice accretions. The experimental work consisted of growing ice accretions on rotating cylinders in the Marine Icing Wind Tunnel at the University of Alberta, over a range of temperatures from {minus}2 C to {minus}25 C, and wind speeds from 19 to 30 m/s, at liquid water contents (3 to 9 g/m) typical of the marine spray environment. A calorimeter was used to measure the liquid fraction of the ice accretions. The experiments indicate that the liquid fraction is almost independent of the environmental conditions and ranges between about 32% and 47%. The authors have also developed a theoretical model of the morphology of the icing process which takes place under a falling supercooled liquid film. Comparisons between the model and experiments show that the model is able to predict accretion growth rate and sponginess with some degree of skill. However, there remain important aspects of the sponginess phenomenon which continue to elude them.

  6. Experts Offer Marines Energy-Efficiency Advice

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As an early adopter of cutting-edge technologies, the United States military is pioneering energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies in the field. Recently, the Commandant of the United States Marine Corps sent a team to visit bases and camps in Afghanistan to assess and make recommendations on the supply and use of energy and water.

  7. The Development of Open Water-lubricated Polycrystalline Diamond (PCD) Thrust Bearings for Use in Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Energy Machines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooley, Craig, H.; Khonsari, Michael,, M; Lingwall, Brent

    2012-11-28

    Polycrstalline diamond (PCD) bearings were designed, fabricated and tested for marine-hydro-kinetic (MHK) application. Bearing efficiency and life were evaluated using the US Synthetic bearing test facility. Three iterations of design, build and test were conducted to arrive at the best bearing design. In addition life testing that simulated the starting and stopping and the loading of real MHK applications were performed. Results showed polycrystalline diamond bearings are well suited for MHK applications and that diamond bearing technology is TRL4 ready. Based on life tests results bearing life is estimated to be at least 11.5 years. A calculation method for evaluating the performance of diamond bearings of round geometry was also investigated and developed. Finally, as part of this effort test bearings were supplied free of charge to the University of Alaska for further evaluation. The University of Alaska test program will subject the diamond bearings to sediment laden lubricating fluid.

  8. Characterization of household hazardous waste from Marin County, California, and New Orleans, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rathje, W.L.; Wilson, D.C.; Lambou, V.W.; Herndon, R.C.

    1987-09-01

    There is a growing concern that certain constituents of common household products, that are discarded in residential garbage, may be potentially harmful to human health and the environment by adversely affecting the quality of ground and surface water. A survey of hazardous wastes in residential garbage from Marin County, California, and New Orleans, Louisiana, was conducted in order to determine the amount and characteristics of such wastes that are entering municipal landfills. The results of the survey indicate that approximately 642 metric tons of hazardous waste are discarded per year for the New Orleans study area and approximately 259 metric tons are discarded per year for the Marin County study area. Even though the percent of hazardous household waste in the garbage discarded in both study areas was less than 1%, it represents a significant quantity of hazardous waste because of the large volume of garbage involved.

  9. Extend the Operating Life of Your Motor | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Extend the Operating Life of Your Motor Extend the Operating Life of Your Motor Certain components of motors degrade with time and operating stress. Electrical insulation weakens over time with exposure to voltage unbalance, over and undervoltage, voltage disturbances, and temperature. Contact between moving surfaces causes wear. Wear is affected by dirt, moisture, and corrosive fumes and is greatly accelerated when lubricant is misapplied, becomes overheated or contaminated, or is not replaced

  10. Marine algae and land plants share conserved phytochrome signaling systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duanmu, Deqiang; Bachy, Charles; Sudek, Sebastian; Wong, Chee -Hong; Jimenez, Valeria; Rockwell, Nathan C.; Martin, Shelley S.; Ngan, Chew Yee; Reistetter, Emily N.; van Baren, Marijke J.; Price, Dana C.; Wei, Chia -Lin; Reyes-Prieto, Adrian; Lagarias, J. Clark; Worden, Alexandra Z.

    2014-09-29

    Phytochrome photosensors control a vast gene network in streptophyte plants, acting as master regulators of diverse growth and developmental processes throughout the life cycle. In contrast with their absence in known chlorophyte algal genomes and most sequenced prasinophyte algal genomes, a phytochrome is found in Micromonas pusilla, a widely distributed marine picoprasinophyte (<2 µm cell diameter). Together with phytochromes identified from other prasinophyte lineages, we establish that prasinophyte and streptophyte phytochromes share core light-input and signaling-output domain architectures except for the loss of C-terminal response regulator receiver domains in the streptophyte phytochrome lineage. Phylogenetic reconstructions robustly support the presence of phytochrome in the common progenitor of green algae and land plants. These analyses reveal a monophyletic clade containing streptophyte, prasinophyte, cryptophyte, and glaucophyte phytochromes implying an origin in the eukaryotic ancestor of the Archaeplastida. Transcriptomic measurements reveal diurnal regulation of phytochrome and bilin chromophore biosynthetic genes in Micromonas. The expression of these genes precedes both light-mediated phytochrome redistribution from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and increased expression of photosynthesis-associated genes. Prasinophyte phytochromes perceive wavelengths of light transmitted farther through seawater than the red/far-red light sensed by land plant phytochromes. Prasinophyte phytochromes also retain light-regulated histidine kinase activity lost in the streptophyte phytochrome lineage. Our studies demonstrate that light-mediated nuclear translocation of phytochrome predates the emergence of land plants and likely represents a widespread signaling mechanism in unicellular algae.

  11. Marine algae and land plants share conserved phytochrome signaling systems

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Duanmu, Deqiang; Bachy, Charles; Sudek, Sebastian; Wong, Chee -Hong; Jimenez, Valeria; Rockwell, Nathan C.; Martin, Shelley S.; Ngan, Chew Yee; Reistetter, Emily N.; van Baren, Marijke J.; et al

    2014-09-29

    Phytochrome photosensors control a vast gene network in streptophyte plants, acting as master regulators of diverse growth and developmental processes throughout the life cycle. In contrast with their absence in known chlorophyte algal genomes and most sequenced prasinophyte algal genomes, a phytochrome is found in Micromonas pusilla, a widely distributed marine picoprasinophyte (<2 µm cell diameter). Together with phytochromes identified from other prasinophyte lineages, we establish that prasinophyte and streptophyte phytochromes share core light-input and signaling-output domain architectures except for the loss of C-terminal response regulator receiver domains in the streptophyte phytochrome lineage. Phylogenetic reconstructions robustly support the presence ofmore » phytochrome in the common progenitor of green algae and land plants. These analyses reveal a monophyletic clade containing streptophyte, prasinophyte, cryptophyte, and glaucophyte phytochromes implying an origin in the eukaryotic ancestor of the Archaeplastida. Transcriptomic measurements reveal diurnal regulation of phytochrome and bilin chromophore biosynthetic genes in Micromonas. The expression of these genes precedes both light-mediated phytochrome redistribution from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and increased expression of photosynthesis-associated genes. Prasinophyte phytochromes perceive wavelengths of light transmitted farther through seawater than the red/far-red light sensed by land plant phytochromes. Prasinophyte phytochromes also retain light-regulated histidine kinase activity lost in the streptophyte phytochrome lineage. Our studies demonstrate that light-mediated nuclear translocation of phytochrome predates the emergence of land plants and likely represents a widespread signaling mechanism in unicellular algae.« less

  12. biofouling studies on Sandia's marine hydrokinetic coatings

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    biofouling studies on Sandia's marine hydrokinetic coatings - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense

  13. Marine Energy Technology Symposium METS2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 rd Marine Energy Technology Symposium METS2015 April 27-29, 2015, Washington, D.C. DEVELOPMENT AND RELEASE OF THE OPEN-SOURCE WAVE CLIMATE ENVIRONMENT ASSESSMENT TOOL SNL-SWAN Aaron Porter Coast and Harbor Engineering A Division of Hatch Mott MacDonald Edmonds, WA, USA Kelley Ruehl and Chris Chartrand Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM, USA Helen Smith University of Exeter Exeter, England 1 Corresponding author: Aaronp@coastharboreng.com INTRODUCTION Accurately assessing potential

  14. Marine Energy Technology Symposium METS2016

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 rd Marine Energy Technology Symposium METS2016 April 25-27, 2016, Washington, D.C. FIBER OPTIC INSTRUMENTATION FOR MEASURING ROTOR STRAIN * Budi Gunawan Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA Vincent S. Neary Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA Peter Bachant Center for Ocean Renewable Energy University of New Hampshire Durham, NH, USA Martin Wosnik Center for Ocean Renewable Energy University of New Hampshire Durham, NH, USA * Corresponding author:

  15. LIFE IC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zip: S60 5WG Product: LIFE-IC is a UK national resource centre for the development of all new energy technology innovations. References: LIFE-IC1 This article is a stub. You can...

  16. Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center (OSUUW) | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center (OSUUW) Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center (OSUUW) Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center (OSUUW) Office presentation icon 22_nnmrec_batten_final.ppt More Documents & Publications NREL - FY09 Lab Call: Supporting Research and Testing for MHK Presentation from the 2011 Water Program Peer Review FY 09 Lab Call: Research & Assessment for MHK Development 2014 Water Power Program Peer Review Compiled

  17. Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Marine and Hydrokinetic Development

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    University Consortium | Department of Energy Marine and Hydrokinetic Development University Consortium Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Marine and Hydrokinetic Development University Consortium March 21, 2014 - 4:05am Addthis On March 21, 2014, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced a Notice of Intent to issue a funding opportunity titled "Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Research and Development University Consortium." The goal of this funding opportunity is to leverage

  18. Wind and Water Power Technologies Office Position Available: Marine and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrokinetic General Engineer | Department of Energy Wind and Water Power Technologies Office Position Available: Marine and Hydrokinetic General Engineer Wind and Water Power Technologies Office Position Available: Marine and Hydrokinetic General Engineer April 7, 2016 - 5:07pm Addthis The Wind and Water Power Technologies Office is seeking applicants for a new position available within the office. See below for more information. Job title: General Engineer-Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK)

  19. Energy 101: Marine & Hydrokinetic Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    101: Marine & Hydrokinetic Energy Energy 101: Marine & Hydrokinetic Energy August 13, 2013 - 10:54am Addthis See how marine and hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of the ocean's waves, tides, and currents and convert it into electricity to power our homes, buildings, and cities. The oceans represent a largely untapped renewable energy resource with potential to provide clean electricity to coastal communities and cities across the United States. In this edition of Energy 101,

  20. On the Interaction between Marine Boundary Layer Cellular Cloudiness and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Surface Heat Fluxes (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect On the Interaction between Marine Boundary Layer Cellular Cloudiness and Surface Heat Fluxes Citation Details In-Document Search Title: On the Interaction between Marine Boundary Layer Cellular Cloudiness and Surface Heat Fluxes The interaction between marine boundary layer cellular cloudiness and surface uxes of sensible and latent heat is investigated. The investigation focuses on the non-precipitating closed-cell state and the

  1. Differences between nonprecipitating tropical and trade wind marine shallow

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    cumuli (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES DOE PAGES Search Results Accepted Manuscript: Differences between nonprecipitating tropical and trade wind marine shallow cumuli This content will become publicly available on November 13, 2016 Title: Differences between nonprecipitating tropical and trade wind marine shallow cumuli In this study, marine nonprecipitating cumulus topped boundary layers (CTBLs) observed in a tropical and in a trade wind region are contrasted based on their cloud

  2. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Development and Testing | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Technology Development and Testing Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Development and Testing The Water Power Program supports the development of marine and hydrokinetic devices, which capture energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, the natural flow of water in rivers, and marine thermal gradients, without building new dams or diversions. In order to meet its generation goals, the program supports the design, development, testing, and demonstration of technologies that can capture

  3. Differences between nonprecipitating tropical and trade wind marine shallow

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    cumuli (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Differences between nonprecipitating tropical and trade wind marine shallow cumuli Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on November 13, 2016 Title: Differences between nonprecipitating tropical and trade wind marine shallow cumuli In this study, marine nonprecipitating cumulus topped boundary layers (CTBLs) observed in a tropical and in a trade wind region are contrasted based on their cloud macrophysical,

  4. Executive Summit on Marine and Hydrokinetic Research and Development Agenda

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    | Department of Energy Executive Summit on Marine and Hydrokinetic Research and Development Agenda Executive Summit on Marine and Hydrokinetic Research and Development Agenda MHK-Summit-Agenda.jpg PDF icon Executive Summit on Marine and Hydrokinetic Research and Development 2016 Agenda More Documents & Publications Community- and Facility-Scale Tribal Renewable Energy Project Development and Finance Workshop Agenda CX-005184: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-011388: Categorical

  5. Request for Information for Marine and Hydrokinetic Environmental

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Monitoring Technologies and Field Testing Opportunities | Department of Energy Request for Information for Marine and Hydrokinetic Environmental Monitoring Technologies and Field Testing Opportunities Request for Information for Marine and Hydrokinetic Environmental Monitoring Technologies and Field Testing Opportunities June 22, 2015 - 12:13pm Addthis The Energy Department's Water Power Program is seeking feedback from the marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) industry, academia, research

  6. Southeast National Marine Renewable Energy Center (FAU) | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Southeast National Marine Renewable Energy Center (FAU) Southeast National Marine Renewable Energy Center (FAU) Southeast National Marine Renewable Energy Center (FAU) File 20_snmrec-doe_peer_review_2011_final.pptx More Documents & Publications Dehlsen (TRL 5 6 System) - Aquantis C-Plane Ocean Current Turbine Project NREL - FY09 Lab Call: Supporting Research and Testing for MHK Presentation from the 2011 Water Program Peer Review Snohomish PUD No 1 (TRL 7 8 System) - Puget Sound

  7. ARM: ARM-standard Meteorological Instrumentation, Marine (Dataset) | Data

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Explorer ARM-standard Meteorological Instrumentation, Marine Title: ARM: ARM-standard Meteorological Instrumentation, Marine ARM-standard Meteorological Instrumentation, Marine Authors: Donna Holdridge ; Jenni Kyrouac Publication Date: 2012-10-05 OSTI Identifier: 1095605 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC05-00OR22725 Resource Type: Dataset Data Type: Numeric Data Research Org: Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Archive, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (US); Sponsoring Org:

  8. ARM: ARM-standard Meteorological Instrumentation, Marine, 1-second

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    resolution (Dataset) | Data Explorer ARM-standard Meteorological Instrumentation, Marine, 1-second resolution Title: ARM: ARM-standard Meteorological Instrumentation, Marine, 1-second resolution ARM-standard Meteorological Instrumentation, Marine, 1-second resolution Authors: Donna Holdridge ; Jenni Kyrouac Publication Date: 2012-10-05 OSTI Identifier: 1140238 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC05-00OR22725 Resource Type: Dataset Data Type: Numeric Data Research Org: Atmospheric Radiation Measurement

  9. Geothermal Life Cycle Calculator

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sullivan, John

    This calculator is a handy tool for interested parties to estimate two key life cycle metrics, fossil energy consumption (Etot) and greenhouse gas emission (ghgtot) ratios, for geothermal electric power production. It is based solely on data developed by Argonne National Laboratory for DOEs Geothermal Technologies office. The calculator permits the user to explore the impact of a range of key geothermal power production parameters, including plant capacity, lifetime, capacity factor, geothermal technology, well numbers and depths, field exploration, and others on the two metrics just mentioned. Estimates of variations in the results are also available to the user.

  10. Geothermal Life Cycle Calculator

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sullivan, John

    2014-03-11

    This calculator is a handy tool for interested parties to estimate two key life cycle metrics, fossil energy consumption (Etot) and greenhouse gas emission (ghgtot) ratios, for geothermal electric power production. It is based solely on data developed by Argonne National Laboratory for DOEs Geothermal Technologies office. The calculator permits the user to explore the impact of a range of key geothermal power production parameters, including plant capacity, lifetime, capacity factor, geothermal technology, well numbers and depths, field exploration, and others on the two metrics just mentioned. Estimates of variations in the results are also available to the user.

  11. Geothermal Life Cycle Calculator

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sullivan, John

    2014-03-11

    This calculator is a handy tool for interested parties to estimate two key life cycle metrics, fossil energy consumption (Etot) and greenhouse gas emission (ghgtot) ratios, for geothermal electric power production. It is based solely on data developed by Argonne National Laboratory for DOE’s Geothermal Technologies office. The calculator permits the user to explore the impact of a range of key geothermal power production parameters, including plant capacity, lifetime, capacity factor, geothermal technology, well numbers and depths, field exploration, and others on the two metrics just mentioned. Estimates of variations in the results are also available to the user.

  12. Ice Nuclei in Marine Air: Biogenic Particles or Dust? (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We assess the likely global distribution of marine biogenic ice nuclei using a combination of historical observations, satellite data and model output. By comparing simulated ...

  13. DOE Announces Webinars on Instrumentation for Monitoring Marine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Announces Webinars on Instrumentation for Monitoring Marine Renewable Energy Devices, Energy Efficiency in Correctional Facilities, and More DOE Announces Webinars on...

  14. Community Ice Sheet Model (CISM2) Development and Marine Ice...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Community Ice Sheet Model (CISM2) Development and Marine Ice Sheet Simulations Citation ... Sponsoring Org: DOELANL Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: ...

  15. Notice of Intent to Fund Marine and Hydrokinetic Instrumentation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Demonstrations at the Navy's Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) BOEM Issues First Renewable Energy Lease for MHK Technology Testing in Federal Waters

  16. Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Competitive Marine and Hydrokinetic...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Demonstrations at the Navy's Wave Energy Test Site (WETS)." ... development, prepared to build and test technology at close to full-scale in the ...

  17. Clouds, Precipitation, and Marine Boundary Layer Structure during...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    with the marine-capable Second ARM Mobile Facility ... factor triggering the systematic decoupling,more ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: ...

  18. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Policies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation Potentials and Policies...

  19. Detecting Drizzle in Marine Warm Clouds Using Visible, Infrared...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Drizzle in Marine Warm Clouds Using Visible, Infrared, and Microwave Satellite Data H. Shao and G. Liu Florida State University Tallahassee, Florida Introduction Determining the ...

  20. Geothermometry At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Mariner...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California R.O. Fournier, Michael L. Sorey, Robert H. Mariner, Alfred H. Truesdell (1979) Chemical and Isotopic Prediction of Aquifer Temperatures in the Geothermal System at Long...

  1. Executive Order 13158-Marine Protected Areas | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDF icon Executive Order 13158-Marine Protected Areas More Documents & Publications EO 13089 -- Coral Reef Protection ARPA-E Technical Support Memo Appendices Microsoft Word - ...

  2. Local Correlations and Multi-Fractal Behaviour in Marine Boundary...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Local Correlations and Multi-Fractal Behaviour in Marine Boundary Layer Cloud Dynamics N. Kitova and M. A. Mikhalev Institute of Electronics Bulgarian Academy of Sciences Sofia...

  3. Hawaii Marine Base Installs Solar Roofs | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Lorelei Laird Writer, Energy Empowers What does this project do? Marine Corps Base Hawaii replaced roofs on two buildings with polyvinyl chloride membrane 'cool' roofs and solar...

  4. Adaptive Management in the Marine Renewable Energy Industry Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As the marine renewable energy industry progresses, it is imperative for regulators and project developers to identify ways to address and cope with environmental uncertainties while still enabling...

  5. Request for Information for Marine and Hydrokinetic Environmental...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Energy Department's Water Power Program is seeking feedback from the marine and ... Through this request for information (RFI), the Water Power Program is seeking feedback ...

  6. The Effects of Electromagnetic Fields on Marine Animals Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As electricity is generated at sea by marine renewable energy technologies, it must be transported back to shore through undersea cables. As electricity is transmitted through the cables,...

  7. Energy Department Announces $22 Million for Marine Energy Demonstratio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy systems that generate electricity from waves, tides, and currents ... Advanced Components for Wave, Tidal, and Current Energy Systems 4 ...

  8. Marine Projects International Ltd MPI formerly Mayflower Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Projects International Ltd MPI formerly Mayflower Energy Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Marine Projects International Ltd (MPI) (formerly Mayflower Energy Ltd) Place: United...

  9. Marine Hybrid Propulsion Market Revenue is anticipated to Reach...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ferry operators are the major adopters of marine hybrid propulsion systems across the world. These vessels primarily operate in coastal areas and inland waterways, where emission...

  10. Marine Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Association MHFCA | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Association MHFCA Jump to: navigation, search Name: Marine Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Association (MHFCA) Place: Leipzig, Germany Zip: D-04318 Sector: Hydro,...

  11. MHK Projects/Marine Hydrodynamics Laboratory at the University...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Marine Hydrodynamics Laboratory at the University of Michigan < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"map...

  12. Annotated bibliography: Marine geologic hazards of the Hawaiian Islands with special focus on submarine slides and turbidity currents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Normark, W.R.; Herring, H.H.

    1993-10-01

    This annotated bibliography was compiled to highlight the submarine geology of the Hawaiian Islands and identify known and potential marine geologic hazards with special emphasis on turbidity currents, submarine slides and tsunamis. Some references are included that are not specific to Hawaii but are needed to understand the geologic processes that can affect the integrity of submarine cables and other man-made structures. Entries specific to the Hawaiian Island area are shown in bold type.

  13. Genomes to Life Project Quartely Report October 2004.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heffelfinger, Grant S.; Martino, Anthony; Rintoul, Mark Daniel; Geist, Al; Gorin, Andrey; Xu, Ying; Palenik, Brian

    2005-02-01

    This SAND report provides the technical progress through October 2004 of the Sandia-led project, %22Carbon Sequestration in Synechococcus Sp.: From Molecular Machines to Hierarchical Modeling,%22 funded by the DOE Office of Science Genomes to Life Program. Understanding, predicting, and perhaps manipulating carbon fixation in the oceans has long been a major focus of biological oceanography and has more recently been of interest to a broader audience of scientists and policy makers. It is clear that the oceanic sinks and sources of CO2 are important terms in the global environmental response to anthropogenic atmospheric inputs of CO2 and that oceanic microorganisms play a key role in this response. However, the relationship between this global phenomenon and the biochemical mechanisms of carbon fixation in these microorganisms is poorly understood. In this project, we will investigate the carbon sequestration behavior of Synechococcus Sp., an abundant marine cyanobacteria known to be important to environmental responses to carbon dioxide levels, through experimental and computational methods. This project is a combined experimental and computational effort with emphasis on developing and applying new computational tools and methods. Our experimental effort will provide the biology and data to drive the computational efforts and include significant investment in developing new experimental methods for uncovering protein partners, characterizing protein complexes, identifying new binding domains. We will also develop and apply new data measurement and statistical methods for analyzing microarray experiments. Computational tools will be essential to our efforts to discover and characterize the function of the molecular machines of Synechococcus. To this end, molecular simulation methods will be coupled with knowledge discovery from diverse biological data sets for high-throughput discovery and characterization of protein-protein complexes. In addition, we will develop a set of novel capabilities for inference of regulatory pathways in microbial genomes across multiple sources of information through the integration of computational and experimental technologies. These capabilities will be applied to Synechococcus regulatory pathways to characterize their interaction map and identify component proteins in these - 4 - pathways. We will also investigate methods for combining experimental and computational results with visualization and natural language tools to accelerate discovery of regulatory pathways. The ultimate goal of this effort is develop and apply new experimental and computational methods needed to generate a new level of understanding of how the Synechococcus genome affects carbon fixation at the global scale. Anticipated experimental and computational methods will provide ever-increasing insight about the individual elements and steps in the carbon fixation process, however relating an organism's genome to its cellular response in the presence of varying environments will require systems biology approaches. Thus a primary goal for this effort is to integrate the genomic data generated from experiments and lower level simulations with data from the existing body of literature into a whole cell model. We plan to accomplish this by developing and applying a set of tools for capturing the carbon fixation behavior of complex of Synechococcus at different levels of resolution. Finally, the explosion of data being produced by high-throughput experiments requires data analysis and models which are more computationally complex, more heterogeneous, and require coupling to ever increasing amounts of experimentally obtained data in varying formats. These challenges are unprecedented in high performance scientific computing and necessitate the development of a companion computational infrastructure to support this effort. More information about this project, including a copy of the original proposal, can be found at www.genomes-to-life.org Acknowledgment We want to gratefully acknowledge the contributions of the GTL Project Te

  14. Design and implementation of a marine animal alert system to support Marine Renewable Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Fu, Tao; Ren, Huiying; Martinez, Jayson J.; Myers, Joshua R.; Matzner, Shari; Choi, Eric Y.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2013-08-08

    Power extracted from fast moving tidal currents has been identified as a potential commercial-scale source of renewable energy. Device developers and utilities are pursuing deployment of prototype tidal turbines to assess technology viability, site feasibility, and environmental interactions. Deployment of prototype turbines requires permits from a range of regulatory authorities. Ensuring the safety of marine animals, particularly those under protection of the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA) and the Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972 has emerged as a key regulatory challenge for initial MHK deployments. The greatest perceived risk to marine animals is from strike by the rotating blades of tidal turbines. Development of the marine mammal alert system (MAAS) was undertaken to support monitoring and mitigation requirements for tidal turbine deployments. The prototype system development focused on Southern Resident killer whales (SRKW), an endangered population of killer whales that frequents Puget Sound and is intermittently present in the part of the sound where deployment of prototype tidal turbines is being considered. Passive acoustics were selected as the primary means because of the vocal nature of these animals. The MAAS passive acoustic system consists of two-stage process involving the use of an energy detector and a spectrogram-based classifier to distinguish between SKRWs calls and noise. A prototype consisting of two 2D symmetrical star arrays separated by 20 m center to center was built and evaluated in the waters of Sequim Bay using whale call playback.

  15. Marine asset security and tracking (MAST) system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hanson, Gregory Richard; Smith, Stephen Fulton; Moore, Michael Roy; Dobson, Eric Lesley; Blair, Jeffrey Scott; Duncan, Christopher Allen; Lenarduzzi, Roberto

    2008-07-01

    Methods and apparatus are described for marine asset security and tracking (MAST). A method includes transmitting identification data, location data and environmental state sensor data from a radio frequency tag. An apparatus includes a radio frequency tag that transmits identification data, location data and environmental state sensor data. Another method includes transmitting identification data and location data from a radio frequency tag using hybrid spread-spectrum modulation. Another apparatus includes a radio frequency tag that transmits both identification data and location data using hybrid spread-spectrum modulation.

  16. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Marine Drive by Clifton View Homes |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Marine Drive by Clifton View Homes DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Marine Drive by Clifton View Homes DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Marine Drive by Clifton View

  17. Identification of an Archean marine oxygen oasis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riding, Dr Robert E; Fralick, Dr Philip; Liang, Liyuan

    2014-01-01

    The early Earth was essentially anoxic. A number of indicators suggest the presence of oxygenic photosynthesis 2700 3000 million years (Ma) ago, but direct evidence for molecular oxygen (O2) in seawater has remained elusive. Here we report rare earth element (REE) analyses of 2800 million year old shallowmarine limestones and deep-water iron-rich sediments at Steep Rock Lake, Canada. These show that the seawater from which extensive shallow-water limestones precipitated was oxygenated, whereas the adjacent deeper waters where iron-rich sediments formed were not. We propose that oxygen promoted limestone precipitation by oxidative removal of dissolved ferrous iron species, Fe(II), to insoluble Fe(III) oxyhydroxide, and estimate that at least 10.25 M oxygen concentration in seawater was required to accomplish this at Steep Rock. This agrees with the hypothesis that an ample supply of dissolved Fe(II) in Archean oceans would have hindered limestone formation. There is no direct evidence for the oxygen source at Steep Rock, but organic carbon isotope values and diverse stromatolites in the limestones suggest the presence of cyanobacteria. Our findings support the view that during the Archean significant oxygen levels first developed in protected nutrient-rich shallow marine habitats. They indicate that these environments were spatially restricted, transient, and promoted limestone precipitation. If Archean marine limestones in general reflect localized oxygenic removal of dissolved iron at the margins of otherwise anoxic iron-rich seas, then early oxygen oases are less elusive than has been assumed.

  18. Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Power-Take-Off Design for Optimal Performance and Low Impact on Cost-of-Energy: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beam, M.; Kline, B.; Elbing, B.; Straka, W.; Fontaine, A.; Lawson, M.; Li, Y.; Thresher, R.; Previsic, M.

    2013-02-01

    Marine hydrokinetic devices are becoming a popular method for generating marine renewable energy worldwide. These devices generate electricity by converting the kinetic energy of moving water, wave motion or currents, into electrical energy through the use of a power-take-off (PTO) system. Most PTO systems incorporate a mechanical or hydraulic drivetrain, power generator, and electric control/conditioning system to deliver the generated electric power to the grid at the required state. Like wind turbine applications, the PTO system must be designed for high reliability, good efficiency, and long service life with reasonable maintenance requirements, low cost, and an appropriate mechanical design for anticipated applied steady and unsteady loads. The ultimate goal of a PTO design is high efficiency and low maintenance and cost, with a low impact on the device cost-of-energy (CoE).

  19. Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Power-Take-Off Design for Optimal Performance and Low Impact on Cost-of-Energy: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beam, M.; Kline, B.; Elbing, B.; Straka, W.; Fontaine, A.; Lawson, M.; Li, Y.; Thresher, R.; Previsic, M.

    2012-04-01

    Marine hydrokinetic devices are becoming a popular method for generating marine renewable energy worldwide. These devices generate electricity by converting the kinetic energy of moving water, wave motion or currents, into electrical energy through the use of a Power-Take-Off (PTO) system. Most PTO systems incorporate a mechanical or hydraulic drive train, power generator and electric control/conditioning system to deliver the generated electric power to the grid at the required state. Like wind turbine applications, the PTO system must be designed for high reliability, good efficiency, and long service life with reasonable maintenance requirements, low cost and an appropriate mechanical design for anticipated applied steady and unsteady loads. The ultimate goal of a PTO design is high efficiency, low maintenance and cost with a low impact on the device Cost-of-Energy (CoE).

  20. 1st Advanced Marine Renewable Energy Instrumentation Experts Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-10-01

    The U.S. marine energy industry is actively pursuing development of offshore wind and marine hydrokinetic (MHK) energy systems. Experience in the wind energy sector demonstrates that new technology development requires thorough measurement and characterization of the environmental conditions prevalent at installation sites and of technology operating in the field. Presently, there are no turn-key instrumentation system solutions that meet the measurement needs of the marine energy industry. The 1st Advanced Marine Renewable Energy Instrumentation Experts Workshop brought together technical experts from government laboratories, academia, and industry representatives from marine energy, wind, offshore oil and gas, and instrumentation developers to present and discuss the instrumentation needs of the marine energy industry. The goals of the meeting were to: 1. Share the latest relevant knowledge among technical experts; 2. Review relevant state-of-the-art field measurement technologies and methods; 3. Review lessons learned from recent field deployments; 4. Identify synergies across different industries; 5. Identify gaps between existing and needed instrumentation capabilities; 6. Understand who are the leading experts; 7. Provide a forum where stakeholders from the marine energy industry could provide substantive input in the development of new marine energy field deployable instrumentation packages.

  1. Development of Marine Thermoelectric Heat Recovery Systems | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Discusses benefits of integration of thermoelectrics into the marine industry, research program milestones, and prototype TEG design and integration PDF icon wallace.pdf More Documents & Publications Development of Marine Thermoelectric Heat Recovery Systems PACCAR/Hi-Z Thermoelectric Generator Project Vehicular Thermoelectric Applications Session DEER 2009

  2. Development of Marine Thermoelectric Heat Recovery Systems | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Thermoelectric generator prototypes are evaluated in a dedicated hybrid vessel test platform fabricated from an encapsulated lifeboat to optimize performance and reliability for marine industry applications PDF icon wallace.pdf More Documents & Publications Development of Marine Thermoelectric Heat Recovery Systems Vehicular Thermoelectrics: The New Green Technology Bi-directional dc-dc Converter

  3. Environmentally Benign and Permanent Modifications to Prevent Biofouling on Marine and Hydrokinetic Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng Zhang

    2012-04-19

    Semprus Biosciences is developing environmentally benign and permanent modifications to prevent biofouling on Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) devices. Biofouling, including growth on external surfaces by bacteria, algae, barnacles, mussels, and other marine organisms, accumulate quickly on MHK devices, causing mechanical wear and changes in performance. Biofouling on crucial components of hydrokinetic devices, such as rotors, generators, and turbines, imposes substantial mass and hydrodynamic loading with associated efficiency loss and maintenance costs. Most antifouling coatings leach toxic ingredients, such as copper and tributyltin, through an eroding process, but increasingly stringent regulation of biocides has led to interest in the development of non-biocidal technologies to control fouling. Semprus Biosciences research team is developing modifications to prevent fouling from a broad spectrum of organisms on devices of all shapes, sizes, and materials for the life of the product. The research team designed and developed betaine-based polymers as novel underwater coatings to resist the attachment of marine organisms. Different betaine-based monomers and polymers were synthesized and incorporated within various coating formulations. The formulations and application methods were developed on aluminum panels with required adhesion strength and mechanical properties. The coating polymers were chemically stable under UV, hydrolytic and oxidative environments. The sulfobetaine formulations are applicable as nonleaching and stable underwater coatings. For the first time, coating formulations modified with highly packed sulfobetaine polymers were prepared and demonstrated resistance to a broad spectrum of marine organisms. Assays for comparing nonfouling performance were developed to evaluate protein adsorption and bacteria attachment. Barnacle settlement and removal were evaluated and a 60-day field test was performed. Silicone substrates including a commercial fouling release coating were used for comparison. Compared with the unmodified silicone substrates, the sulfobetaine-modified formulations were able to exhibit a 98% reduction in fibrinogen adsorption, 97.0% (E. coli), 99.6% (S. aureus), and 99.5% (C. lytica) reduction in bacteria attachment, and 100% reduction in barnacles cyprid attachment. In addition to the significant improvement in fouling resistance of various organisms, the 60-day field test also showed an evident efficacy from visual assessment, foul rating, and fouling removal test. The research confirmed that the novel antifouling mechanism of betaine polymers provides a new avenue for marine coating development. The developed coatings out-performed currently used nontoxic underwater coatings in a broad spectrum of fouling resistance. By further developing formulations and processing methods for specific devices, the technology is ready for the next stage of development with demonstration in MHK systems.

  4. Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Adaptive Management in the Marine Renewable Energy Industry

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On February 24, 2016, Environmental Interactions of Marine Renewable Energy Technologies hosted workshops on environmental impacts of marine renewable energy, in advance of the 2016 International...

  5. Targeting Net Zero Energy at Marine Corps Base Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Targeting Net Zero Energy at Marine Corps Base Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii: Assessment and Recommendations Targeting Net Zero Energy at Marine Corps Base Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii: Assessment...

  6. Life Events | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Life Events Life Events Life Events is a listing of common events that may occur during or after your Federal career. It's divided into three sections: me/my family, job, and retirement. When you click on a question, you will see what actions you may need to take for each of the following programs: Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Program, Federal Employees Dental and Vision Insurance Program (FEDVIP), Federal Flexible Spending Account Program (FSAFEDS), Federal Long Term Care Insurance

  7. Notices Affected Public: Individuals and

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    3 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 23 / Thursday, February 3, 2011 / Notices Affected Public: Individuals and households; not-for-profit institutions; State, Local, or Tribal Government, State Educational Agencies or Local Educational Agencies. Total Estimated Number of Annual Responses: 22,760. Total Estimated Number of Annual Burden Hours: 8,725. Abstract: The study is being conducted as part of the National Assessment of Title I, mandated by Title I, Part E, Section 1501 of the Elementary and

  8. Life Cycle Asset Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1998-10-14

    (The following directives are deleted or consolidated into this Order and shall be phased out as noted in Paragraph 2: DOE 1332.1A; DOE 4010.1A; DOE 4300.1C; DOE 4320.1B; DOE 4320.2A; DOE 4330.4B; DOE 4330.5; DOE 4540.1C; DOE 4700.1). This Order supersedes specific project management provisions within DOE O 430.1A, LIFE CYCLE ASSET MANAGEMENT. The specific paragraphs canceled by this Order are 6e(7); 7a(3); 7b(11) and (14); 7c(4),(6),(7),(11), and (16); 7d(4) and (8); 7e(3),(10), and (17); Attachment 1, Definitions (item 30 - Line Item Project, item 42 - Project, item 48 - Strategic System); and Attachment 2, Contractor Requirements Document (paragraph 1d regarding a project management system). The remainder of DOE O 430.1A remains in effect. Cancels DOE O 430.1. Canceled by DOE O 413.3.

  9. Marine power - Accomplishments of the 1970s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmitt, W.R.

    1982-08-01

    Considerable optimism prevailed at the decade's beginning that marine energy fluxes would be utilized widely and soon. Potential resources were overestimated and technical difficulties underestimated. Then leaping fuel prices were thought to give a competitive edge to renewable, fuel-free, power technologies. But since most renewable power is of low intensity and requires large conversion systems, costs are innately high and have been very sensitive to the inflation engendered by the 1973 oil embargo, staying well ahead of those of fossil-fueled power. The necessary low-pressure technology has proved difficult to master, and power utilities have been reluctant to invest in variable, undependable supplies. Prospects for power from the oceans were thus at a low ebb near the end of the Seventies. However, persevering efforts helped by more patient expectations have turned the prospects around and up again, and demonstration facilities are under test or construction for temperature-gradient, tidal, wave, and wind power.

  10. Impacts of electromagnetic fields associated with marine and hydrokinetic surrogate technologies on fish movements and behaviors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claisse, Jeremy T.; Pondella, Daniel J.; Williams, Chelsea M.; Zahn, Laurel A.; Williams, Jonathan P.

    2015-09-30

    Marine and hydrokinetic energy (MHK) and offshore wind devices are being developed and deployed in U.S. and international waters. Electric current flowing through subsea transmission cables associated with these devices will generate electromagnetic fields (EMF), which may interact with, and potentially impact, marine fishes. Some marine fishes can detect electric and/or magnetic fields and use them to navigate, orientate, and sense prey, mates and predators. Over the past five years there have been multiple comprehensive reviews and studies evaluating the potential vulnerability of marine fishes to EMF produced by MHK devices. Most documented effects involve sub-lethal behavioral responses of individual fish when in close proximity to EMF (e.g., fish being repelled by or attracted to fields). These reviews reach conclusions that the current state of research on this topic is still in its infancy and evaluations of potential impacts are associated with great uncertainty. A variety of MHK technologies are likely to be considered for deployment offshore of the Hawaiian Islands, and there is a need to be able to better predict and assess potential associated environmental impacts. The goal of this study was to provide a complementary piece to these previous reviews (e.g., Normandeau et al. 2011) by focusing on marine fish species in the Hawaii region. We compiled the relevant available information, then prioritized fish species as candidates for various paths of future research. To address this, we first developed a list of Hawaii Region Focal Species, which included fishes that are more likely to be sensitive to EMF. We then compiled species-specific information available in the literature on their sensitivity to EMF, as well as life history, movement and habitat use information that could inform an analysis of their likelihood of encountering EMF from subsea cables associated with MHK devices. Studies have only documented EMF sensitivity in 11 of the marine fish species in this region. There was also relatively little detailed information on fish movement and habitat use patterns for most of the focal species. Our last objective was to develop recommendations for research needs to close the important knowledge gaps. We describe species-independent baseline research that primarily consists of in situ quantification of EMF generated by MHK devices and undersea cables that can occur as pilot and commercial scale MHK devices are deployed in Hawaii. Then we propose a simple approach for prioritizing Hawaii Region Focal Species (ranked relative to each other) as candidates in multiple related research paths. The prioritization approach incorporates EMF sensitivity information with the likelihood of interacting with EMF generated undersea transmission cables associated with MHK devices. Finally, we discuss the types of research needed to help fill gaps in the scientific knowledge base for this region. These involve studies to better define species-specific EMF sensitivity thresholds under various environmental conditions, studies of life history, movement and habitat use patterns to improve our understanding of the likelihood and frequency fishes may be in the vicinity of EMF generated by subsea transmission cables, and studies of the potential for related population, community or ecosystem impacts. Many of these studies can and should occur opportunistically as pilot and commercial scale MHK devices are deployed in Hawaii.

  11. Statewide Power Problems May Affect SSRL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Statewide Power Problems May Affect SSRL The power crisis affecting California and the northwestern US may have some implication for SSRL users during the current run. As the...

  12. Scientific Solutions (TRL 5 6 Component)- Underwater Active Acoustic Monitoring Network for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Scientific Solutions (TRL 5 6 Component) - Underwater Active Acoustic Monitoring Network for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

  13. Evaluation of defatted and whole algae as feed ingredients for the marine shrimp, litopenaeus vannamei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, J. L.; Patnaik, S.; Gatlin, III, D. M.; Lawrence, A. L.

    2012-06-13

    Evaluation of defatted and whole algae as feed ingredients for the marine shrimp, litopenaeus vannamei

  14. Environmental Effects of Marine Energy Development Around the World. Annex IV Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea; Hanna, L.; Whiting, J.; Geerlofs, S.; Grear, M.; Blake, K.; Coffey, A.; Massaua, M.; Brown-Saracino, J.; Battey, H.

    2013-01-01

    This Annex IV report contains three case studies of specific interactions of marine energy devices with the marine environment addressing the physical interactions between animals and tidal turbines, the acoustic impact of marine energy devices on marine animals, and the effects of energy removal on physical systems.

  15. Marine Boundary Layer Cloud Observations in the Azores (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Marine Boundary Layer Cloud Observations in the Azores Citation Details ... Publication Date: 2012-11-01 OSTI Identifier: 1059795 Report Number(s): BNL--98829-2012-JA Journal ID: ISSN ...

  16. Peninsula Research Institute for Marine Renewable Energy PRIMaRE...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy PRIMaRE Jump to: navigation, search Name: Peninsula Research Institute for Marine Renewable Energy (PRIMaRE) Place: United Kingdom Sector: Renewable Energy Product: UK-based...

  17. DOE Announces Marine and Hydrokinetic Open Data Effort

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE’s Water Power Program is standing up a Marine and Hydrokinetics (MHK) Data Repository to manage the receipt, protection, and dissemination of scientific and technical data generated by DOE funded awards.

  18. Request for Information for Marine and Hydrokinetic Field Measurements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department’s Water Power Program is seeking feedback from the marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) industry regarding the verification and validation of advanced open source MHK design tools and models.

  19. Levelized Cost of Energy Analysis of Marine and Hydrokinetic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... open-ocean current turbine. The three WECs include a floating body point absorber, a pitching ... Although the marine resource is free, similar to wind and solar, the cost ...

  20. ARM - Field Campaign - Marine ARM GPCI Investigations of Clouds...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Marine ARM GPCI Investigations of Clouds (MAGIC): Cloud Properties from Zenith...

  1. ARM - Field Campaign - MArine Stratus Radiation Aerosol and Drizzle...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsMArine Stratus Radiation Aerosol and Drizzle (MASRAD) IOP Campaign Links Science Plan AMF Point Reyes Website AMF Point Reyes Data Plots ARM Data Discovery Browse Data...

  2. ARM - Field Campaign - Marine ARM GPCI Investigations of Clouds...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Marine ARM GPCI Investigations of Clouds (MAGIC): Parsivel Disdrometer support for...

  3. Field Investigations And Temperature-Gradient Drilling At Marine...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Investigations And Temperature-Gradient Drilling At Marine Corps Air-Ground Combat Center (Mcagcc), Twenty-Nine Palms, Ca Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

  4. Orkney Marine Energy Test Centre | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Test Centre Jump to: navigation, search Name: Orkney Marine Energy Test Centre Place: Orkney, United Kingdom Zip: KW16 3AW Product: Its aim is to stimulate and accelerate the...

  5. ARM - Field Campaign - Marine ARM GPCI Investigations of Clouds...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Browse Data Related Campaigns Marine ARM GPCI Investigation of Clouds (MAGIC) 2012.10.01, Lewis, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at...

  6. Genomes to life project quarterly report June 2004.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heffelfinger, Grant S.

    2005-01-01

    This SAND report provides the technical progress through June 2004 of the Sandia-led project, ''Carbon Sequestration in Synechococcus Sp.: From Molecular Machines to Hierarchical Modeling'', funded by the DOE Office of Science Genomes to Life Program. Understanding, predicting, and perhaps manipulating carbon fixation in the oceans has long been a major focus of biological oceanography and has more recently been of interest to a broader audience of scientists and policy makers. It is clear that the oceanic sinks and sources of CO{sub 2} are important terms in the global environmental response to anthropogenic atmospheric inputs of CO{sub 2} and that oceanic microorganisms play a key role in this response. However, the relationship between this global phenomenon and the biochemical mechanisms of carbon fixation in these microorganisms is poorly understood. In this project, we will investigate the carbon sequestration behavior of Synechococcus Sp., an abundant marine cyanobacteria known to be important to environmental responses to carbon dioxide levels, through experimental and computational methods. This project is a combined experimental and computational effort with emphasis on developing and applying new computational tools and methods. Our experimental effort will provide the biology and data to drive the computational efforts and include significant investment in developing new experimental methods for uncovering protein partners, characterizing protein complexes, identifying new binding domains. We will also develop and apply new data measurement and statistical methods for analyzing microarray experiments. Computational tools will be essential to our efforts to discover and characterize the function of the molecular machines of Synechococcus. To this end, molecular simulation methods will be coupled with knowledge discovery from diverse biological data sets for high-throughput discovery and characterization of protein-protein complexes. In addition, we will develop a set of novel capabilities for inference of regulatory pathways in microbial genomes across multiple sources of information through the integration of computational and experimental technologies. These capabilities will be applied to Synechococcus regulatory pathways to characterize their interaction map and identify component proteins in these pathways. We will also investigate methods for combining experimental and computational results with visualization and natural language tools to accelerate discovery of regulatory pathways. The ultimate goal of this effort is develop and apply new experimental and computational methods needed to generate a new level of understanding of how the Synechococcus genome affects carbon fixation at the global scale. Anticipated experimental and computational methods will provide ever-increasing insight about the individual elements and steps in the carbon fixation process, however relating an organism's genome to its cellular response in the presence of varying environments will require systems biology approaches. Thus a primary goal for this effort is to integrate the genomic data generated from experiments and lower level simulations with data from the existing body of literature into a whole cell model. We plan to accomplish this by developing and applying a set of tools for capturing the carbon fixation behavior of complex of Synechococcus at different levels of resolution. Finally, the explosion of data being produced by high-throughput experiments requires data analysis and models which are more computationally complex, more heterogeneous, and require coupling to ever increasing amounts of experimentally obtained data in varying formats. These challenges are unprecedented in high performance scientific computing and necessitate the development of a companion computational infrastructure to support this effort.

  7. Marine Corps Base Quantico Achieves 85% Savings in Parking Lighting

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Marine Corps Base Quantico Achieves 85% Savings in Parking Lighting LED Parking Lighting in Federal Facilities FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM With technical assistance from the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), the Marine Corps Base Quantico (MCBQ) recently undertook a major overhaul of its outdoor lighting, boosting safety and security throughout the site, while cutting energy costs and earning a national award in the process. The MCBQ replaced nearly 2,000 old and ineffcient street

  8. Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Databases and Systems Fact Sheet | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy (MHK) Databases and Systems Fact Sheet Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Databases and Systems Fact Sheet The following online information resources are designed to provide the public access to information pertaining to MHK technologies, projects, and research. PDF icon Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Databases and Systems Fact Sheet More Documents & Publications Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resourses Categorizing and Evaluating

  9. Deployment Effects of Marin Renewable Energy Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian Polagye; Mirko Previsic

    2010-06-17

    Given proper care in siting, design, deployment, operation and maintenance, marine and hydrokinetic technologies could become one of the more environmentally benign sources of electricity generation. In order to accelerate the adoption of these emerging hydrokinetic and marine energy technologies, navigational and environmental concerns must be identified and addressed. All developing hydrokinetic projects involve a wide variety of stakeholders. One of the key issues that site developers face as they engage with this range of stakeholders is that many of the possible conflicts (e.g., shipping and fishing) and environmental issues are not well-understood, due to a lack of technical certainty. In September 2008, re vision consulting, LLC was selected by the Department of Energy (DoE) to apply a scenario-based approach to the emerging wave and tidal technology sectors in order to evaluate the impact of these technologies on the marine environment and potentially conflicting uses. The project’s scope of work includes the establishment of baseline scenarios for wave and tidal power conversion at potential future deployment sites. The scenarios will capture variations in technical approaches and deployment scales to properly identify and characterize environmental impacts and navigational effects. The goal of the project is to provide all stakeholders with an improved understanding of the potential effects of these emerging technologies and focus all stakeholders onto the critical issues that need to be addressed. This groundwork will also help in streamlining siting and associated permitting processes, which are considered key hurdles for the industry’s development in the U.S. today. Re vision is coordinating its efforts with two other project teams funded by DoE which are focused on regulatory and navigational issues. The results of this study are structured into three reports: 1. Wave power scenario description 2. Tidal power scenario description 3. Framework for Identifying Key Environmental Concerns This is the second report in the sequence and describes the results of conceptual feasibility studies of tidal power plants deployed in Tacoma Narrows, Washington. The Narrows contain many of the same competing stakeholder interactions identified at other tidal power sites and serves as a representative case study. Tidal power remains at an early stage of development. As such, a wide range of different technologies are being pursued by different manufacturers. In order to properly characterize impacts, it is useful to characterize the range of technologies that could be deployed at the site of interest. An industry survey informs the process of selecting representative tidal power devices. The selection criteria is that such devices are at an advanced stage of development to reduce technical uncertainties and that enough data are available from the manufacturers to inform the conceptual design process of this study. Further, an attempt is made to cover the range of different technologies under development to capture variations in potential environmental effects. A number of other developers are also at an advanced stage of development including Verdant Power, which has demonstrated an array of turbines in the East River of New York, Clean Current, which has demonstrated a device off Race Rocks, BC, and OpenHydro, which has demonstrated a device at the European Marine Energy Test Center and is on the verge of deploying a larger device in the Bay of Fundy. MCT demonstrated their device both at Devon (UK) and Strangford Narrows (Northern Ireland). Furthermore OpenHydro, CleanCurrent, and MCT are the three devices being installed at the Minas Passage (Canada). Environmental effects will largely scale with the size of tidal power development. In many cases, the effects of a single device may not be measurable, while larger scale device arrays may have cumulative impacts that differ significantly from smaller scale deployments. In order to characterize these effects, scenarios are established at three deployment scales which nominally represent (1) a small pilot deployment, (2) an early, small commercial deployment, and (3) a large commercial scale plant. For the three technologies and scales at the selected site, this results in a total of nine deployment scenarios outlined in the report.

  10. Fire safety of LPG in marine transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinsen, W.E.; Johnson, D.W.; Welker, J.R.

    1980-08-01

    This report contains an analytical examination of cargo spill and fire hazard potential associated with the marine handling of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) as cargo. Principal emphasis was on cargo transfer operations for ships unloading at receiving terminals, and barges loading or unloading at a terminal. Major safety systems, including emergency shutdown systems, hazard detection systems, and fire extinguishment and control systems were included in the analysis. Spill probabilities were obtained from fault tree analyses utilizing composite LPG tank ship and barge designs. Failure rates for hardware in the analyses were generally taken from historical data on similar generic classes of hardware, there being very little historical data on the specific items involved. Potential consequences of cargo spills of various sizes are discussed and compared to actual LPG vapor cloud incidents. The usefulness of hazard mitigation systems (particularly dry chemical fire extinguishers and water spray systems) in controlling the hazards posed by LPG spills and spill fires is also discussed. The analysis estimates the probability of fatality for a terminal operator is about 10/sup -6/ to 10/sup -5/ per cargo transfer operation. The probability of fatality for the general public is substantially less.

  11. Implementing marine organic aerosols into the GEOS-Chem model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gantt, B.; Johnson, M. S.; Crippa, M.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Meskhidze, N.

    2014-09-09

    Marine organic aerosols (MOA) have been shown to play an important role in tropospheric chemistry by impacting surface mass, cloud condensation nuclei, and ice nuclei concentrations over remote marine and coastal regions. In this work, an online marine primary organic aerosol emission parameterization, designed to be used for both global and regional models, was implemented into the GEOS-Chem model. The implemented emission scheme improved the large underprediction of organic aerosol concentrations in clean marine regions (normalized mean bias decreases from -79% when using the default settings to -12% when marine organic aerosols are added). Model predictions were also in goodmore » agreement (correlation coefficient of 0.62 and normalized mean bias of -36%) with hourly surface concentrations of MOA observed during the summertime at an inland site near Paris, France. Our study shows that MOA have weaker coastal-to-inland concentration gradients than sea-salt aerosols, leading to several inland European cities having > 10% of their surface submicron organic aerosol mass concentration with a marine source. The addition of MOA tracers to GEOS-Chem enabled us to identify the regions with large contributions of freshly-emitted or aged aerosol having distinct physicochemical properties, potentially indicating optimal locations for future field studies.« less

  12. Implementing marine organic aerosols into the GEOS-Chem model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gantt, B.; Johnson, M. S.; Crippa, M.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Meskhidze, N.

    2015-03-17

    Marine-sourced organic aerosols (MOAs) have been shown to play an important role in tropospheric chemistry by impacting surface mass, cloud condensation nuclei, and ice nuclei concentrations over remote marine and coastal regions. In this work, an online marine primary organic aerosol emission parameterization, designed to be used for both global and regional models, was implemented into the GEOS-Chem (Global Earth Observing System Chemistry) model. The implemented emission scheme improved the large underprediction of organic aerosol concentrations in clean marine regions (normalized mean bias decreases from -79% when using the default settings to -12% when marine organic aerosols are added). Modelmore » predictions were also in good agreement (correlation coefficient of 0.62 and normalized mean bias of -36%) with hourly surface concentrations of MOAs observed during the summertime at an inland site near Paris, France. Our study shows that MOAs have weaker coastal-to-inland concentration gradients than sea-salt aerosols, leading to several inland European cities having >10% of their surface submicron organic aerosol mass concentration with a marine source. The addition of MOA tracers to GEOS-Chem enabled us to identify the regions with large contributions of freshly emitted or aged aerosol having distinct physicochemical properties, potentially indicating optimal locations for future field studies.« less

  13. Photovoltaics: Life-cycle Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fthenakis V. M.; Kim, H.C.

    2009-10-02

    Life-cycle analysis is an invaluable tool for investigating the environmental profile of a product or technology from cradle to grave. Such life-cycle analyses of energy technologies are essential, especially as material and energy flows are often interwoven, and divergent emissions into the environment may occur at different life-cycle-stages. This approach is well exemplified by our description of material and energy flows in four commercial PV technologies, i.e., mono-crystalline silicon, multi-crystalline silicon, ribbon-silicon, and cadmium telluride. The same life-cycle approach is applied to the balance of system that supports flat, fixed PV modules during operation. We also discuss the life-cycle environmental metrics for a concentration PV system with a tracker and lenses to capture more sunlight per cell area than the flat, fixed system but requires large auxiliary components. Select life-cycle risk indicators for PV, i.e., fatalities, injures, and maximum consequences are evaluated in a comparative context with other electricity-generation pathways.

  14. Workshop to develop deep-life continental scientific drilling projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kieft, T. L.; Onstott, T. C.; Ahonen, L.; Aloisi, V.; Colwell, F. S.; Engelen, B.; Fendrihan, S.; Gaidos, E.; Harms, U.; Head, I.; Kallmeyer, J.; Kiel Reese, B.; Lin, L.-H.; Long, P. E.; Moser, D. P.; Mills, H.; Sar, P.; Schulze-Makuch, D.; Stan-Lotter, H.; Wagner, D.; Wang, P.-L.; Westall, F.; Wilkins, M. J.

    2015-05-29

    The International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) has long espoused studies of deep subsurface life, and has targeted fundamental questions regarding subsurface life, including the following: "(1) What is the extent and diversity of deep microbial life and what are the factors limiting it? (2) What are the types of metabolism/carbon/energy sources and the rates of subsurface activity? (3) How is deep microbial life adapted to subsurface conditions? (4) How do subsurface microbial communities affect energy resources? And (5) how does the deep biosphere interact with the geosphere and atmosphere?" (Horsfield et al., 2014) Many ICDP-sponsored drilling projects have included a deep-life component; however, to date, not one project has been driven by deep-life goals, in part because geomicrobiologists have been slow to initiate deep biosphere-driven ICDP projects. Therefore, the Deep Carbon Observatory (DCO) recently partnered with the ICDP to sponsor a workshop with the specific aim of gathering potential proponents for deep-life-driven ICDP projects and ideas for candidate drilling sites. Twenty-two participants from nine countries proposed projects and sites that included compressional and extensional tectonic environments, evaporites, hydrocarbon-rich shales, flood basalts, Precambrian shield rocks, subglacial and subpermafrost environments, active volcano–tectonic systems, megafan deltas, and serpentinizing ultramafic environments. The criteria and requirements for successful ICDP applications were presented. Deep-life-specific technical requirements were discussed and it was concluded that, while these procedures require adequate planning, they are entirely compatible with the sampling needs of other disciplines. As a result of this workshop, one drilling workshop proposal on the Basin and Range Physiographic Province (BRPP) has been submitted to the ICDP, and several other drilling project proponents plan to submit proposals for ICDP-sponsored drilling workshops in 2016.

  15. Workshop to develop deep-life continental scientific drilling projects

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kieft, T. L.; Onstott, T. C.; Ahonen, L.; Aloisi, V.; Colwell, F. S.; Engelen, B.; Fendrihan, S.; Gaidos, E.; Harms, U.; Head, I.; et al

    2015-05-29

    The International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) has long espoused studies of deep subsurface life, and has targeted fundamental questions regarding subsurface life, including the following: "(1) What is the extent and diversity of deep microbial life and what are the factors limiting it? (2) What are the types of metabolism/carbon/energy sources and the rates of subsurface activity? (3) How is deep microbial life adapted to subsurface conditions? (4) How do subsurface microbial communities affect energy resources? And (5) how does the deep biosphere interact with the geosphere and atmosphere?" (Horsfield et al., 2014) Many ICDP-sponsored drilling projects have includedmore » a deep-life component; however, to date, not one project has been driven by deep-life goals, in part because geomicrobiologists have been slow to initiate deep biosphere-driven ICDP projects. Therefore, the Deep Carbon Observatory (DCO) recently partnered with the ICDP to sponsor a workshop with the specific aim of gathering potential proponents for deep-life-driven ICDP projects and ideas for candidate drilling sites. Twenty-two participants from nine countries proposed projects and sites that included compressional and extensional tectonic environments, evaporites, hydrocarbon-rich shales, flood basalts, Precambrian shield rocks, subglacial and subpermafrost environments, active volcano–tectonic systems, megafan deltas, and serpentinizing ultramafic environments. The criteria and requirements for successful ICDP applications were presented. Deep-life-specific technical requirements were discussed and it was concluded that, while these procedures require adequate planning, they are entirely compatible with the sampling needs of other disciplines. As a result of this workshop, one drilling workshop proposal on the Basin and Range Physiographic Province (BRPP) has been submitted to the ICDP, and several other drilling project proponents plan to submit proposals for ICDP-sponsored drilling workshops in 2016.« less

  16. The Fate of Marine Bacterial Exopolysaccharide in Natural Marine Microbial Communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Zilian; Chen, Yi; Wang, Rui; Cai, Ruanhong; Fu, Yingnan; Jiao, Nianzhi; Quigg, Antonietta

    2015-11-16

    Most marine bacteria produce exopolysaccharides (EPS), and bacterial EPS represent an important source of dissolved organic carbon in marine ecosystems. It was proposed that bacterial EPS rich in uronic acid is resistant to mineralization by microbes and thus has a long residence time in global oceans. To confirm this hypothesis, bacterial EPS rich in galacturonic acid was isolated from Alteromonas sp. JL2810. The EPS was used to amend natural seawater to investigate the bioavailability of this EPS by native populations, in the presence and absence of ammonium and phosphate amendment. The data indicated that the bacterial EPS could not be completely consumed during the cultivation period and that the bioavailability of EPS was not only determined by its intrinsic properties, but was also determined by other factors such as the availability of inorganic nutrients. During the experiment, the humic-like component of fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) was freshly produced. Bacterial community structure analysis indicated that the class Flavobacteria of the phylum Bacteroidetes was the major contributor for the utilization of EPS. This report is the first to indicate that Flavobacteria are a major contributor to bacterial EPS degradation. Finally, the fraction of EPS that could not be completely utilized and the FDOM (e.g., humic acid-like substances) produced de novo may be refractory and may contribute to the carbon storage in the oceans.

  17. Major marine source rocks and stratigraphic cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duval, B.C.

    1995-11-01

    The identification of continental encroachment cycles and subcycles by using sequence stratigraphy can assist explorationists in locating source rocks. The continental encroachment cycles are associated with the breakup of the supercontinents and fit a smooth long-term eustatic curve. They are first order, with a duration greater than 50 m.y., and are composed of transgressive and regressive phases inducing major changes in shoreline. The limit between the transgressive and regressive phases corresponds to a major downlap surface, and major marine source rocks are often found in association with this surface, particularly in the northern hemisphere. Potential {open_quotes}secondary{close_quotes} source rock intervals can also be sought by sequence stratigraphy because each continental encroachment cycle is composed of several subcycles, and the same configuration of a regressive forestepping phase overlying a transgressive backstepping phase also creates a downlap surface that may correspond with organic-rich intervals. The stratigraphic distribution of source rocks and related reserves fits reasonably well with continental encroachment cycles and subcycles. For instance, source rocks of Silurian, Upper Jurassic, and Middle-Upper Cretaceous are associated with eustatic highs and bear witness to this relationship. The recognition and mapping of such downlap surfaces is therefore a useful step to help map source rocks. The interpretation of sequence stratigraphy from regional seismic lines, properly calibrated with geochernical data whenever possible, can be of considerable help in the process. Several examples from around the world illustrate the power of the method: off-shore of eastern Venezuela, coastal basin of Angola, western Africa, the North Sea, south Algeria, and the North Caucasian trough.

  18. Marine boundary layer structure as observed by space-based Lidar

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Luo, T.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, D.

    2015-12-03

    The marine boundary layer (MBL) structure is important to the exchange of heat, momentum, and moisture between oceans and the low atmosphere and to the marine low cloud processes. This paper explores MBL structure over the eastern Pacific region with a new 4 year satellite-based dataset. The MBL aerosol lidar backscattering from the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) was used to identify the MBL top (BLH) and the mixing layer height (MLH). Results showed that MBL is generally decoupled with MLH / BLH ratio ranging from ? 0.5 to ? 0.8 and the MBL decoupling magnitude ismoremainly controlled by estimated inversion strength (EIS) that affects the cloud top entrainment process. The systematic differences between drizzling and non-drizzling stratocumulus tops, which may relate to the meso-scale circulations or gravity wave in MBL, also show dependence on EIS. Further analysis indicated that the MBL shows similar decoupled structure for clear sky and cumulus cloud-topped conditions, but is better mixed under stratiform cloud breakup and overcast conditions.less

  19. Compilation of selected marine radioecological data for the US Subseabed Program: Summaries of available radioecological concentration factors and biological half-lives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomez, L.S.; Marietta, M.G.; Jackson, D.W.

    1987-04-01

    The US Subseabed Disposal Program has compiled an extensive concentration factor and biological half-life data base from the international marine radioecological literature. A microcomputer-based data management system has been implemented to provide statistical and graphic summaries of these data. The data base is constructed in a manner which allows subsets to be sorted using a number of interstudy variables such as organism category, tissue/organ category, geographic location (for in situ studies), and several laboratory-related conditions (e.g., exposure time and exposure concentration). This report updates earlier reviews and provides summaries of the tabulated data. In addition to the concentration factor/biological half-life data base, we provide an outline of other published marine radioecological works. Our goal is to present these data in a form that enables those concerned with predictive assessment of radiation dose in the marine environment to make a more judicious selection of data for a given application. 555 refs., 19 figs., 7 tabs.

  20. Sources and composition of submicron organic mass in marine aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frossard, Amanda A.; Russell, Lynn M.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Elliott, Scott M.; Bates, Timothy S.; Quinn, Patricia K.

    2014-11-27

    Recent studies have proposed a variety of interpretations of the sources and composition of atmospheric marine aerosol particles (aMA) based on a range of physical and chemical measurements collected during open-ocean research cruises. To investigate the processes that affect marine organic particles, this study uses the characteristic functional group composition (from Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy) of aMAP from five ocean regions to show that: (i) The organic functional group composition of aMAP that can be identified as atmospheric primary marine (ocean-derived) aerosol (aPMA) is 65±12% hydroxyl, 21±9% alkane, 6±6% amine, and 7±8% carboxylic acid functional groups. Contributions from photochemical reactions add carboxylic acid groups (15%-25%), shipping effluent in seawater and ship emissions add additional alkane groups (up to 70%), and coastal emissions mix in alkane and carboxylic acid groups from coastal pollution sources. (ii) The organic composition of aPMA is nearly identical to model generated primary marine aerosol particles (gPMA) from bubbled seawater (55% hydroxyl, 32% alkane, and 13% amine functional groups), indicating that its overall functional group composition is the direct consequence of the organic constituents of the seawater source. (iii) While the seawater organic functional group composition was nearly invariant across all three ocean regions studied, the gPMA alkane group fraction increased with chlorophyll-a concentrations (r = 0.79). gPMA from productive seawater had a larger fraction of alkane functional groups (35%) compared to gPMA from non-productive seawater (16%), likely due to the presence of surfactants in productive seawater that stabilize the bubble film and lead to preferential drainage of the more soluble (lower alkane group fraction) organic components. gPMA has a hydroxyl group absorption peak location characteristic of monosaccharides and disaccharides, where the seawater OM hydroxyl group peak location is closer to that of polysaccharides. This may result from the larger saccharides preferentially remaining in the seawater during gPMA and aPMA production

  1. Sources and composition of submicron organic mass in marine aerosol particles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Frossard, Amanda A.; Russell, Lynn M.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Elliott, Scott M.; Bates, Timothy S.; Quinn, Patricia K.

    2014-11-27

    Recent studies have proposed a variety of interpretations of the sources and composition of atmospheric marine aerosol particles (aMA) based on a range of physical and chemical measurements collected during open-ocean research cruises. To investigate the processes that affect marine organic particles, this study uses the characteristic functional group composition (from Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy) of aMAP from five ocean regions to show that: (i) The organic functional group composition of aMAP that can be identified as atmospheric primary marine (ocean-derived) aerosol (aPMA) is 65±12% hydroxyl, 21±9% alkane, 6±6% amine, and 7±8% carboxylic acid functional groups. Contributions from photochemicalmore » reactions add carboxylic acid groups (15%-25%), shipping effluent in seawater and ship emissions add additional alkane groups (up to 70%), and coastal emissions mix in alkane and carboxylic acid groups from coastal pollution sources. (ii) The organic composition of aPMA is nearly identical to model generated primary marine aerosol particles (gPMA) from bubbled seawater (55% hydroxyl, 32% alkane, and 13% amine functional groups), indicating that its overall functional group composition is the direct consequence of the organic constituents of the seawater source. (iii) While the seawater organic functional group composition was nearly invariant across all three ocean regions studied, the gPMA alkane group fraction increased with chlorophyll-a concentrations (r = 0.79). gPMA from productive seawater had a larger fraction of alkane functional groups (35%) compared to gPMA from non-productive seawater (16%), likely due to the presence of surfactants in productive seawater that stabilize the bubble film and lead to preferential drainage of the more soluble (lower alkane group fraction) organic components. gPMA has a hydroxyl group absorption peak location characteristic of monosaccharides and disaccharides, where the seawater OM hydroxyl group peak location is closer to that of polysaccharides. This may result from the larger saccharides preferentially remaining in the seawater during gPMA and aPMA production« less

  2. Assessing the Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Development on Marine and Estuarine Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Jeffrey A.; Schultz, Irvin R.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Roesijadi, Guritno; Copping, Andrea E.

    2010-07-30

    The worlds oceans and estuaries offer an enormous potential to meet the nations growing demand for energy. The use of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) devices to harness the power of wave and tidal energy could contribute significantly toward meeting federal- and state-mandated renewable energy goals while supplying a substantial amount of clean energy to coastal communities. Locations along the eastern and western coasts of the United States between 40 and 70 north latitude are ideal for MHK deployment, and recent estimates of energy potential for the coasts of Washington, Oregon, and California suggest that up to 25 gigawatts could be generated from wave and tidal devices in these areas. Because energy derived from wave and tidal devices is highly predictable, their inclusion in our energy portfolio could help balance available sources of energy production, including hydroelectric, coal, nuclear, wind, solar, geothermal, and others.

  3. Powering the Future with LIFE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moses, E I; Diaz de la Rubia, T

    2009-04-28

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Leveraging the National Ignition Facility to meet the climate-energy challenge; (2) The journal into a new era of scientific discoveries; and (3) Safe and sustainable energy with LIFE (Laser Inertial Fusion Energy).

  4. Various mortars for anti-fouling purposes in marine environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanematsu, Hideyuki; Masuda, Tomoka; Miura, Yoko; Kuroda, Daisuke; Hirai, Nobumitsu; Yokoyama, Seiji

    2014-02-20

    The antifouling properties for some mortars with steel making slags were investigated by real marine immersion tests and a unique laboratory acceleration tests with a specially devised biofilm acceleration reactors. Mortars mixed with steel making slags containing abundant iron elements tended to form biofilm and also bifouling. The two kinds of biofilm formation tests were used in this study. Real immersion in marine environments and laboratory test with a specially devised biofilm acceleration reactor. The former evaluated the biofouling characteristics more properly, while the latter did the biofilm formation characteristics more effectively.

  5. Bioavailability of sediment-bound contaminants to marine organisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, B.; Neff, J.

    1993-09-01

    The bioavailability of sediment-bound contaminants to marine organisms indicates that there exists a potential for transfer of these contaminants through marine food webs to commercial fisheries products consumed by humans. However, there has been relatively little effort to combine and synthesize data on chemical/biological interactions between benthic animals and seagrasses and the sediments in which they reside on the one hand, and on the chemistry of bioaccumulation on the other. This report provides a conceptual basis for an approach to bioavailability and biomagnification of sediment-bound contaminants that reviews biological and chemical approaches.

  6. Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Marine Renewable Energy Test Centers and Environmental Effects Research

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Marine renewable energy test centers around the world have been successful in testing new technologies to ensure devices perform up to standards and are able to survive in the marine environment....

  7. Report to Congress on the Potential Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report focuses on potential impacts of marine and hydrokinetic technologies to aquatic environments (i.e. rivers, estuaries, and oceans), fish and fish habitats, ecological relationships, and other marine and freshwater aquatic resources.

  8. Take Marine Mammals Permit Application Form 3-200-43 | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to library Form: Take Marine Mammals Permit Application Form 3-200-43 Abstract Federal Fish and Wildlife permit application form for take TakeImportTransportExport of Marine...

  9. NREL Furthers U.S. Marine Corps Air Station Miramars Move Toward...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL Furthers U.S. Marine Corps Air Station Miramar's Move Toward Net Zero Energy The U.S. Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Miramar is striving toward its goal of becoming a "net ...

  10. Hanford Site Beryllium Questionnaire Affected Worker Questionnaire

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beryllium Questionnaire Affected Worker Questionnaire Page 1 of 15 Hanford Site Beryllium Interview Questionnaire Affected Worker Interview Date (MM/YYYY) Name (Last, First, MI) HID# DOB (MM/YYYY) Contractor/Employer Home Address City State Zip Code Home Phone Number ( ) - Alternate Phone Number ( ) - Hanford Site Beryllium Questionnaire Affected Worker Questionnaire Page 2 of 15 Hanford Work History Timeline Original Hire Date for the Hanford Site: (MM/YYYY) Contractor: Job Title: Bargaining

  11. Instrumentation for Monitoring around Marine Renewable Energy Converters: Workshop Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea E.; Polagye, Brian

    2014-01-31

    Report on workshop held in Seattle for DOE WWPTO on instrument needs for monitoring marine energy devices

  12. Analysis of Transportation and Logistics Challenges Affecting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Deployment of Larger Wind Turbines: Summary of Results Analysis of Transportation and Logistics Challenges Affecting the Deployment of Larger Wind Turbines: Summary of Results ...

  13. Chemistry, Life, and Earth Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ADCLES Chemistry, Life, and Earth Sciences The CLES Directorate is home to world class capabilities in chemistry, bioscience, and earth and environmental sciences. Structural protein research Structural protein research A wide range of protein folding research Field Instrument Deployments and Operations (FIDO) Field Instrument Deployments and Operations (FIDO) Atmospheric science research Quantum Dots Quantum Dots Quantum dot research for energy and light Contact Us Associate Director Nan Sauer

  14. A marine biogenic source of atmospheric ice-nucleating particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, T. W.; Ladino, L. A.; Alpert, Peter A.; Breckels, M. N.; Brooks, I. M.; Browse, J.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Carslaw, K. S.; Huffman, J. A.; Judd, C.; Kilthau, W. P.; Mason, R. H.; McFiggans, Gordon; Miller, L. A.; Najera, J.; Polishchuk, E. A.; Rae, S.; Schiller, C. L.; Si, M.; Vergara Temprado, J.; Whale, Thomas; Wong, J P S; Wurl, O.; Yakobi-Hancock, J. D.; Abbatt, JPD; Aller, Josephine Y.; Bertram, Allan K.; Knopf, Daniel A.; Murray, Benjamin J.

    2015-09-09

    The formation of ice in clouds is facilitated by the presence of airborne ice nucleating particles1,2. Sea spray is one of the major global sources of atmospheric particles, but it is unclear to what extent these particles are capable of nucleating ice3–11. Here we show that material in the sea surface microlayer, which is enriched in surface active organic material representative of that found in sub-micron sea- spray aerosol12–21, nucleates ice under conditions that occur in mixed-phase clouds and high-altitude ice clouds. The ice active material is likely biogenic and is less than ~0.2 ?m in size. We also show that organic material (exudate) released by a common marine diatom nucleates ice when separated from cells and propose that organic material associated with phytoplankton cell exudates are a candidate for the observed ice nucleating ability of the microlayer samples. By combining our measurements with global model simulations of marine organic aerosol, we show that ice nucleating particles of marine origin are dominant in remote marine environments, such as the Southern Ocean, the North Pacific and the North Atlantic.

  15. Marine Hydrokinetic Energy Regulators Workshop: Lessons from Wind

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, E. Ian

    2015-09-03

    Ian Baring-Gould presented these lessons learned from wind energy to an audience of marine hydrokinetic regulators. Lessons learned spanned the areas of technology advances, using collaborative approaches to involve key stakeholders; using baseline studies to measure and prioritize wildlife impacts, and look at avoidance and mitigation options early in the process.

  16. Geothermal Water Use: Life Cycle Water Consumption, Water Resource Assessment, and Water Policy Framework

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Schroeder, Jenna N.

    2014-06-10

    This report examines life cycle water consumption for various geothermal technologies to better understand factors that affect water consumption across the life cycle (e.g., power plant cooling, belowground fluid losses) and to assess the potential water challenges that future geothermal power generation projects may face. Previous reports in this series quantified the life cycle freshwater requirements of geothermal power-generating systems, explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids, and assessed future water demand by geothermal power plants according to growth projections for the industry. This report seeks to extend those analyses by including EGS flash, both as part of the life cycle analysis and water resource assessment. A regional water resource assessment based upon the life cycle results is also presented. Finally, the legal framework of water with respect to geothermal resources in the states with active geothermal development is also analyzed.

  17. Geothermal Water Use: Life Cycle Water Consumption, Water Resource Assessment, and Water Policy Framework

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Schroeder, Jenna N.

    This report examines life cycle water consumption for various geothermal technologies to better understand factors that affect water consumption across the life cycle (e.g., power plant cooling, belowground fluid losses) and to assess the potential water challenges that future geothermal power generation projects may face. Previous reports in this series quantified the life cycle freshwater requirements of geothermal power-generating systems, explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids, and assessed future water demand by geothermal power plants according to growth projections for the industry. This report seeks to extend those analyses by including EGS flash, both as part of the life cycle analysis and water resource assessment. A regional water resource assessment based upon the life cycle results is also presented. Finally, the legal framework of water with respect to geothermal resources in the states with active geothermal development is also analyzed.

  18. Assembling the Marine Metagenome, One Cell at a Time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woyke, Tanja; Xie, Gary; Copeland, Alex; Gonzalez, Jose M.; Han, Cliff; Kiss, Hajnalka; Saw, Jimmy H.; Senin, Pavel; Yang, Chi; Chatterji, Sourav; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Sieracki, Michael E.; Stepanauskas, Ramunas

    2010-06-24

    The difficulty associated with the cultivation of most microorganisms and the complexity of natural microbial assemblages, such as marine plankton or human microbiome, hinder genome reconstruction of representative taxa using cultivation or metagenomic approaches. Here we used an alternative, single cell sequencing approach to obtain high-quality genome assemblies of two uncultured, numerically significant marine microorganisms. We employed fluorescence-activated cell sorting and multiple displacement amplification to obtain hundreds of micrograms of genomic DNA from individual, uncultured cells of two marine flavobacteria from the Gulf of Maine that were phylogenetically distant from existing cultured strains. Shotgun sequencing and genome finishing yielded 1.9 Mbp in 17 contigs and 1.5 Mbp in 21 contigs for the two flavobacteria, with estimated genome recoveries of about 91percent and 78percent, respectively. Only 0.24percent of the assembling sequences were contaminants and were removed from further analysis using rigorous quality control. In contrast to all cultured strains of marine flavobacteria, the two single cell genomes were excellent Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) metagenome fragment recruiters, demonstrating their numerical significance in the ocean. The geographic distribution of GOS recruits along the Northwest Atlantic coast coincided with ocean surface currents. Metabolic reconstruction indicated diverse potential energy sources, including biopolymer degradation, proteorhodopsin photometabolism, and hydrogen oxidation. Compared to cultured relatives, the two uncultured flavobacteria have small genome sizes, few non-coding nucleotides, and few paralogous genes, suggesting adaptations to narrow ecological niches. These features may have contributed to the abundance of the two taxa in specific regions of the ocean, and may have hindered their cultivation. We demonstrate the power of single cell DNA sequencing to generate reference genomes of uncultured taxa from a complex microbial community of marine bacterioplankton. A combination of single cell genomics and metagenomics enabled us to analyze the genome content, metabolic adaptations, and biogeography of these taxa.

  19. Assembling The Marine Metagenome, One Cell At A Time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Gang; Han, Shunsheng; Kiss, Hajnalka; Saw, Jimmy; Senin, Pavel; Woyke, Tanja; Copeland, Alex; Gonzalez, Jose; Chatterji, Sourav; Cheng, Jan - Fang; Eisen, Jonathan A; Sieracki, Michael E; Stepanauskas, Ramunas

    2008-01-01

    The difficulty associated with the cultivation of most microorganisms and the complexity of natural microbial assemblages, such as marine plankton or human microbiome, hinder genome reconstruction of representative taxa using cultivation or metagenomic approaches. Here we used an alternative, single cell sequencing approach to obtain high-quality genome assemblies of two uncultured, numerically significant marine microorganisms. We employed fluorescence-activated cell sorting and multiple displacement amplification to obtain hundreds of micrograms of genomic DNA from individual, uncultured cells of two marine flavobacteria from the Gulf of Maine that were phylogenetically distant from existing cultured strains. Shotgun sequencing and genome finishing yielded 1.9 Mbp in 17 contigs and 1.5 Mbp in 21 contigs for the two flavobacteria, with estimated genome recoveries of about 91% and 78%, respectively. Only 0.24% of the assembling sequences were contaminants and were removed from further analysis using rigorous quality control. In contrast to all cultured strains of marine flavobacteria, the two single cell genomes were excellent Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) metagenome fragment recruiters, demonstrating their numerical significance in the ocean. The geographic distribution of GOS recruits along the Northwest Atlantic coast coincided with ocean surface currents. Metabolic reconstruction indicated diverse potential energy sources, including biopolymer degradation, proteorhodopsin photometabolism, and hydrogen oxidation. Compared to cultured relatives, the two uncultured flavobacteria have small genome sizes, few non-coding nucleotides, and few paralogous genes, suggesting adaptations to narrow ecological niches. These features may have contributed to the abundance of the two taxa in specific regions of the ocean, and may have hindered their cultivation. We demonstrate the power of single cell DNA sequencing to generate reference genomes of uncultured taxa from a complex microbial community of marine bacterioplankton. A combination of single cell genomics and metagenomics enabled us to analyze the genome content, metabolic adaptations, and biogeography of these taxa.

  20. The Radiative Role of Free Tropospheric Aerosols and Marine Clouds over the Central North Atlantic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazzoleni, Claudio; Kumar, Sumit; Wright, Kendra; Kramer, Louisa; Mazzoleni, Lynn; Owen, Robert; Helmig, Detlev

    2014-12-09

    The scientific scope of the project was to exploit the unique location of the Pico Mountain Observatory (PMO) located in the summit caldera of the Pico Volcano in Pico Island in the Azores, for atmospheric studies. The observatory, located at 2225m a.s.l., typically samples free tropospheric aerosols laying above the marine low-level clouds and long-range transported from North America. The broad purpose of this research was to provide the scientific community with a better understanding of fundamental physical processes governing the effects of aerosols on radiative forcing and climate; with the ultimate goal of improving our abilities to understand past climate and to predict future changes through numerical models. The project was 'exploratory' in nature, with the plan to demonstrate the feasibility of deploying for the first time, an extensive aerosol research package at PMO. One of the primary activities was to test the deployment of these instruments at the site, to collect data during the 2012 summer season, and to further develop the infrastructure and the knowledge for performing novel research at PMO in follow-up longer-term aerosol-cloud studies. In the future, PMO could provide an elevated research outpost to support the renewed DOE effort in the Azores that was intensified in 2013 with the opening of the new sea-level ARM-DOE Eastern North Atlantic permanent facility at Graciosa Island. During the project period, extensive new data sets were collected for the planned 2012 season. Thanks to other synergistic activities and opportunities, data collection was then successfully extended to 2013 and 2014. Highlights of the scientific findings during this project include: a) biomass burning contribute significantly to the aerosol loading in the North Atlantic free troposphere; however, long-range transported black carbon concentrations decreased substantially in the last decade. b) Single black carbon particles – analyzed off-line at the electron microscope – were often very compacted, suggesting cloud processing and exhibiting different optical properties from fresh emissions. In addition, black carbon was found to be sometimes mixed with mineral dust, affecting its optical properties and potential forcing. c) Some aerosols collected at PMO acted as ice nuclei, potentially contributing to cirrus cloud formation during their transport in the upper free troposphere. Identified good ice nuclei were often mineral dust particles. d) The free tropospheric aerosols studied at PMO have relevance to low level marine clouds due, for example, to synoptic subsidence entraining free tropospheric aerosols into the marine boundary layer. This has potentially large consequences on cloud condensation nuclei concentrations and compositions in the marine boundary layer; therefore, having an effect on the marine stratus clouds, with potentially important repercussions on the radiative forcing. The scientific products of this project currently include contributions to two papers published in the Nature Publishing group (Nature Communications and Scientific Reports), one paper under revision for Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, one in review in Geophysical Research Letters and one recently submitted to Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussion. In addition, four manuscripts are in advanced state of preparation. Finally, twenty-eight presentations were given at international conferences, workshops and seminars.

  1. Licensable Life Science Technologies | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Licensable Life Science Technologies A selection of biology-based technologies available for licensing PDF icon licensablebiologicaltechnologies...

  2. Title: The Life-cycle

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Life-cycle of Operons Authors: Morgan N. Price, Adam P. Arkin, and Eric J. Alm Author affiliation: Lawrence Berkeley Lab, Berkeley CA, USA and the Virtual Institute for Microbial Stress and Survival. A.P.A. is also affiliated with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the UC Berkeley Dept. of Bioengineering. Corresponding author: Eric Alm, ejalm@lbl.gov, phone 510-486-6899, fax 510-486-6219, address Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, 1 Cyclotron Road, Mailstop 977-152, Berkeley, CA 94720

  3. Clouds, aerosol, and precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer: An ARM mobile facility deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Robert; Luke, Ed; Wyant, Matthew; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Remillard, Jasmine; Kollias, Pavlos; Fletcher, Jennifer; Stemmler, Jayson; deSzoeke, S.; Yuter, Sandra; Miller, Matthew; Mechem, David; Tselioudis, George; Chiu, Christine; Mann, Julia; O Connor, Ewan; Hogan, Robin; Dong, Xiquan; Miller, Mark; Ghate, Virendra; Jefferson, Anne; Min, Qilong; Minnis, Patrick; Palinkonda, Rabindra; Albrecht, Bruce; Hannay, Cecile; Lin, Yanluan

    2014-04-27

    The Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) deployment at Graciosa Island in the Azores generated a 21-month (April 2009-December 2010) comprehensive dataset documenting clouds, aerosols, and precipitation using the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF). The scientific aim of the deployment is to gain improved understanding of the interactions of clouds, aerosols, and precipitation in the marine boundary layer. Graciosa Island straddles the boundary between the subtropics and midlatitudes in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean and consequently experiences a great diversity of meteorological and cloudiness conditions. Low clouds are the dominant cloud type, with stratocumulus and cumulus occurring regularly. Approximately half of all clouds contained precipitation detectable as radar echoes below the cloud base. Radar and satellite observations show that clouds with tops from 1-11 km contribute more or less equally to surface-measured precipitation at Graciosa. A wide range of aerosol conditions was sampled during the deployment consistent with the diversity of sources as indicated by back-trajectory analysis. Preliminary findings suggest important two-way interactions between aerosols and clouds at Graciosa, with aerosols affecting light precipitation and cloud radiative properties while being controlled in part by precipitation scavenging.The data from Graciosa are being compared with short-range forecasts made with a variety of models. A pilot analysis with two climate and two weather forecast models shows that they reproduce the observed time-varying vertical structure of lower-tropospheric cloud fairly well but the cloud-nucleating aerosol concentrations less well. The Graciosa site has been chosen to be a permanent fixed ARM site that became operational in October 2013.

  4. Clouds, aerosol, and precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer: An ARM mobile facility deployment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wood, Robert; Luke, Ed; Wyant, Matthew; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Remillard, Jasmine; Kollias, Pavlos; Fletcher, Jennifer; Stemmler, Jayson; deSzoeke, S.; Yuter, Sandra; et al

    2014-04-27

    The Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) deployment at Graciosa Island in the Azores generated a 21-month (April 2009-December 2010) comprehensive dataset documenting clouds, aerosols, and precipitation using the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF). The scientific aim of the deployment is to gain improved understanding of the interactions of clouds, aerosols, and precipitation in the marine boundary layer. Graciosa Island straddles the boundary between the subtropics and midlatitudes in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean and consequently experiences a great diversity of meteorological and cloudiness conditions. Low clouds are the dominant cloud type, with stratocumulusmore » and cumulus occurring regularly. Approximately half of all clouds contained precipitation detectable as radar echoes below the cloud base. Radar and satellite observations show that clouds with tops from 1-11 km contribute more or less equally to surface-measured precipitation at Graciosa. A wide range of aerosol conditions was sampled during the deployment consistent with the diversity of sources as indicated by back-trajectory analysis. Preliminary findings suggest important two-way interactions between aerosols and clouds at Graciosa, with aerosols affecting light precipitation and cloud radiative properties while being controlled in part by precipitation scavenging.The data from Graciosa are being compared with short-range forecasts made with a variety of models. A pilot analysis with two climate and two weather forecast models shows that they reproduce the observed time-varying vertical structure of lower-tropospheric cloud fairly well but the cloud-nucleating aerosol concentrations less well. The Graciosa site has been chosen to be a permanent fixed ARM site that became operational in October 2013.« less

  5. Technology development life cycle processes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck, David Franklin

    2013-05-01

    This report and set of appendices are a collection of memoranda originally drafted in 2009 for the purpose of providing motivation and the necessary background material to support the definition and integration of engineering and management processes related to technology development. At the time there was interest and support to move from Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) Level One (ad hoc processes) to Level Three. As presented herein, the material begins with a survey of open literature perspectives on technology development life cycles, including published data on %E2%80%9Cwhat went wrong.%E2%80%9D The main thrust of the material presents a rational expose%CC%81 of a structured technology development life cycle that uses the scientific method as a framework, with further rigor added from adapting relevant portions of the systems engineering process. The material concludes with a discussion on the use of multiple measures to assess technology maturity, including consideration of the viewpoint of potential users.

  6. Life extension system for fossil power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isreb, M.

    1996-11-01

    A general, multi-disciplinary life extension system for new and existing power plants has been absent in the literature. The present paper presents a general, multi-disciplinary life extension system for new and existing fossil power plants. The paper formulates the optimization problem framework for plants` components. The paper discusses the framework of the iterative process, objective functions, plant components, life extension constraints, new life or remnant life parameters and optimization techniques. Other system attributes discussed in the paper include: design invariant parameters, relationships between plant components and objective functions and a strategy for system sizing and simulation.

  7. Federal Employee Group Life Insurance (FEGLI) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Group Life Insurance (FEGLI) Federal Employee Group Life Insurance (FEGLI) The Federal Employees' Group Life Insurance (FEGLI) Program is a group term life insurance program for Federal and Postal employees and retirees. The Office of Personnel Management administers the Program and sets the premiums. OPM has a contract with the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company (MetLife) to provide this life insurance. The MetLife has an office called Office of Federal Employees' Group Life Insurance

  8. JEDI Marine and Hydrokinetic Model: User Reference Guide

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JCPOA NNSA Delivers Annual Reports to Congress on Progress for Stockpile Stewardship and Nuclear Nonproliferation WASHINGTON, D.C.-The Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) today released the annual reports outlining the strategic direction for two of its vital and enduring missions-maintaining a safe, secure and effective nuclear deterrent and reducing the threat

    JEDI Marine and Hydrokinetic Model: User Reference Guide Marshall Goldberg MRG &

  9. Investigations on Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Foil Structural Health

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Monitoring Presented at GMREC METS Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Foil Structural Health Monitoring Presented at GMREC METS - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power &

  10. Differences between nonprecipitating tropical and trade wind marine shallow cumuli

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghate, Virendra P.; Miller, Mark A.; Zhu, Ping

    2015-11-13

    In this study, marine nonprecipitating cumulus topped boundary layers (CTBLs) observed in a tropical and in a trade wind region are contrasted based on their cloud macrophysical, dynamical, and radiative structures. Data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) observational site previously operating at Manus Island, Papua New Guinea, and data collected during the deployment of ARM Mobile Facility at the island of Graciosa, in the Azores, were used in this study. The tropical marine CTBLs were deeper, had higher surface fluxes and boundary layer radiative cooling, but lower wind speeds compared to their trade wind counterparts. The radiative velocity scale was 50%-70% of the surface convective velocity scale at both locations, highlighting the prominent role played by radiation in maintaining turbulence in marine CTBLs. Despite greater thicknesses, the chord lengths of tropical cumuli were on average lower than those of trade wind cumuli, and as a result of lower cloud cover, the hourly averaged (cloudy and clear) liquid water paths of tropical cumuli were lower than the trade wind cumuli. At both locations ~70% of the cloudy profiles were updrafts, while the average amount of updrafts near cloud base stronger than 1 m s–1 was ~22% in tropical cumuli and ~12% in the trade wind cumuli. The mean in-cloud radar reflectivity within updrafts and mean updraft velocity was higher in tropical cumuli than the trade wind cumuli. Despite stronger vertical velocities and a higher number of strong updrafts, due to lower cloud fraction, the updraft mass flux was lower in the tropical cumuli compared to the trade wind cumuli. The observations suggest that the tropical and trade wind marine cumulus clouds differ significantly in their macrophysical and dynamical structures

  11. Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program Focus Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program Focus Life Cycle ...

  12. Bioaccumulation factor of {sup 137}Cs in some marine biotas from West Bangka Indonesia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suseno, Heny

    2014-03-24

    Radionuclides may be released from nuclear facilities to the marine environment. Concentrations of radionuclides within marine biotic systems can be influenced by a number of factors, including the type of biota, its source, the radionuclide, and specific characteristics of the sampled specimens and the marine environment (salinity, etc.). The bioconcentration factor for a marine organism is the ratio of the concentration of a radionuclide in that organism to the concentration found in its marine water environment - under conditions of equilibrium. Information on the bioaccumulation of Cs-137 in marine organisms is required to risk assessment evaluates the potential risks to human health. Bioaccumulation of Cs was investigated in marine biota from west Bangka such as Marine cat fish (Arius thalassinus), Baramundi (Lates calcarifer), Mackerel (Scomberomorus commerson), Striped eel catfish (Plotosus lineatus), eel tailed fish (Euristhmus microceps), Yellowtail fusilier (Caesio erythrogaster), Coastal crab (Scylla sp), White shrimp (Penaeus merguiensis) and marine bivalve mollusk (Anadara granosa). Muscle of these marine biota, sediments and water were assayed for Cs-137 by HPGe gamma spectrometer. The bioaccumulation factor for fishes were calculated by ratio of concentration Cs-137 in muscle biota to the its concentration in water. The bioaccumulation factor for mollusks were calculates by ratio of concentration Cs-137 in muscle biota to the its concentration in sediments. The bioaccumulation factor were range 4.99 to 136.34.

  13. Limited-life cartridge primers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Rosen, Robert S.

    2005-04-19

    A cartridge primer which utilizes an explosive that can be designed to become inactive in a predetermined period of time: a limited-life primer. The explosive or combustible material of the primer is an inorganic reactive multilayer (RML). The reaction products of the RML are sub-micron grains of non-corrosive inorganic compounds that would have no harmful effects on firearms or cartridge cases. Unlike use of primers containing lead components, primers utilizing RML's would not present a hazard to the environment. The sensitivity of an RML is determined by the physical structure and the stored interfacial energy. The sensitivity lowers with time due to a decrease in interfacial energy resulting from interdiffusion of the elemental layers. Time-dependent interdiffusion is predictable, thereby enabling the functional lifetime of an RML primer to be predetermined by the initial thickness and materials selection of the reacting layers.

  14. Limited-life cartridge primers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Rosen, R.S.

    1998-06-30

    A cartridge primer is described which utilizes an explosive that can be designed to become inactive in a predetermined period of time: a limited-life primer. The explosive or combustible material of the primer is an inorganic reactive multilayer (RML). The reaction products of the RML are sub-micron grains of non-corrosive inorganic compounds that would have no harmful effects on firearms or cartridge cases. Unlike use of primers containing lead components, primers utilizing RML`s would not present a hazard to the environment. The sensitivity of an RML is determined by the physical structure and the stored interfacial energy. The sensitivity lowers with time due to a decrease in interfacial energy resulting from interdiffusion of the elemental layers. Time-dependent interdiffusion is predictable, thereby enabling the functional lifetime of an RML primer to be predetermined by the initial thickness and materials selection of the reacting layers. 10 figs.

  15. Limited-life cartridge primers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Rosen, Robert S.

    1998-01-01

    A cartridge primer which utilizes an explosive that can be designed to become inactive in a predetermined period of time: a limited-life primer. The explosive or combustible material of the primer is an inorganic reactive multilayer (RML). The reaction products of the RML are sub-micron grains of non-corrosive inorganic compounds that would have no harmful effects on firearms or cartridge cases. Unlike use of primers containing lead components, primers utilizing RML's would not present a hazard to the environment. The sensitivity of an RML is determined by the physical structure and the stored interfacial energy. The sensitivity lowers with time due to a decrease in interfacial energy resulting from interdiffusion of the elemental layers. Time-dependent interdiffusion is predictable, thereby enabling the functional lifetime of an RML primer to be predetermined by the initial thickness and materials selection of the reacting layers.

  16. Life sciences and environmental sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    The DOE laboratories play a unique role in bringing multidisciplinary talents -- in biology, physics, chemistry, computer sciences, and engineering -- to bear on major problems in the life and environmental sciences. Specifically, the laboratories utilize these talents to fulfill OHER's mission of exploring and mitigating the health and environmental effects of energy use, and of developing health and medical applications of nuclear energy-related phenomena. At Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) support of this mission is evident across the spectrum of OHER-sponsored research, especially in the broad areas of genomics, structural biology, basic cell and molecular biology, carcinogenesis, energy and environment, applications to biotechnology, and molecular, nuclear and radiation medicine. These research areas are briefly described.

  17. Life sciences and environmental sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    The DOE laboratories play a unique role in bringing multidisciplinary talents -- in biology, physics, chemistry, computer sciences, and engineering -- to bear on major problems in the life and environmental sciences. Specifically, the laboratories utilize these talents to fulfill OHER`s mission of exploring and mitigating the health and environmental effects of energy use, and of developing health and medical applications of nuclear energy-related phenomena. At Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) support of this mission is evident across the spectrum of OHER-sponsored research, especially in the broad areas of genomics, structural biology, basic cell and molecular biology, carcinogenesis, energy and environment, applications to biotechnology, and molecular, nuclear and radiation medicine. These research areas are briefly described.

  18. Federal Employees' Group Life Insurance (FEGLI) | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the date of their appointment to elect additional Optional Insurance or to waive coverage entirely. Employees must be enrolled in Basic Life in order to elect Optional Insurance. ...

  19. Life Extension Programs | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NNSA, Air Force Complete Successful B61-12 Life Extension Program Development Flight Test at Tonopah Test Range WASHINGTON - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and ...

  20. Life Extension Program | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NNSA, Air Force Complete Successful B61-12 Life Extension Program Development Flight Test at Tonopah Test Range WASHINGTON - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and ...

  1. Extend the Operating Life of Your Motor

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    In such cases, motor life can be extended by purchasing special motors, such as those conforming to the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) 841 specifcations, ...

  2. Computing, Environment & Life Sciences Directorate Organization...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Intranet About Us Intranet Argonne National Laboratory Computing, Environment and Life Sciences Organizations Facilities and Institutes News Events About Us Organization...

  3. GREET Life-Cycle Analysis of Biofuels

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... and data to Billion Ton Study Sustainability Chapter in collaboration with other ... and academia use to assess life-cycle energy and environmental metrics of biofuels. ...

  4. Joint retrievals of cloud and drizzle in marine boundary layer clouds using

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ground-based radar, lidar and zenith radiances (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Published Article: Joint retrievals of cloud and drizzle in marine boundary layer clouds using ground-based radar, lidar and zenith radiances « Prev Next » Title: Joint retrievals of cloud and drizzle in marine boundary layer clouds using ground-based radar, lidar and zenith radiances Active remote sensing of marine boundary-layer clouds is challenging as drizzle drops often dominate the observed radar

  5. Joint retrievals of cloud and drizzle in marine boundary layer clouds using

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ground-based radar, lidar and zenith radiances (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Joint retrievals of cloud and drizzle in marine boundary layer clouds using ground-based radar, lidar and zenith radiances Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Joint retrievals of cloud and drizzle in marine boundary layer clouds using ground-based radar, lidar and zenith radiances Active remote sensing of marine boundary-layer clouds is challenging as drizzle drops often dominate the observed radar

  6. Joint retrievals of cloud and drizzle in marine boundary layer clouds using

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ground-based radar, lidar and zenith radiances (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Joint retrievals of cloud and drizzle in marine boundary layer clouds using ground-based radar, lidar and zenith radiances Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Joint retrievals of cloud and drizzle in marine boundary layer clouds using ground-based radar, lidar and zenith radiances Active remote sensing of marine boundary-layer clouds is challenging as drizzle drops often dominate the observed radar

  7. Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Sunnyvale Marine Climate Deep Retrofit |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Sunnyvale Marine Climate Deep Retrofit Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Sunnyvale Marine Climate Deep Retrofit The Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI) and Allen Gilliland of One Sky Homes collaborated on a marine climate retrofit project designed to meet both Passive House (PH) and Building America program standards. The scope included sealing, installing wall, roof and floor insulation (previously lacking), replacing

  8. Department of Energy Awards $37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Development | Department of Energy 37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Technology Development Department of Energy Awards $37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Technology Development September 9, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced selections for more than $37 million in funding to accelerate the technological and commercial readiness of emerging marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) technologies, which seek to

  9. Joint retrievals of cloud and drizzle in marine boundary layer clouds using

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ground-based radar, lidar and zenith radiances (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Published Article: Joint retrievals of cloud and drizzle in marine boundary layer clouds using ground-based radar, lidar and zenith radiances Title: Joint retrievals of cloud and drizzle in marine boundary layer clouds using ground-based radar, lidar and zenith radiances Active remote sensing of marine boundary-layer clouds is challenging as drizzle drops often dominate the observed radar reflectivity. We present a

  10. Marine Ice Nuclei Collections - MAGIC (MAGIC-IN) Final Campaign Summary

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Marine Ice Nuclei Collections - MAGIC (MAGIC-IN) Final Campaign Summary Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Marine Ice Nuclei Collections - MAGIC (MAGIC-IN) Final Campaign Summary This campaign augmented measurements obtained via deployment of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility's ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) in the Marine ARM GPCI1 Investigation of Clouds (MAGIC) field campaign. The measurements, comprised of

  11. Clouds, aerosol, and precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer: An ARM

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    mobile facility deployment (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Clouds, aerosol, and precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer: An ARM mobile facility deployment Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Clouds, aerosol, and precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer: An ARM mobile facility deployment The Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) deployment at Graciosa Island in the Azores generated a 21-month (April 2009-December 2010)

  12. Energy Department Awards $10.5 Million for Next-Generation Marine Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Systems | Department of Energy 0.5 Million for Next-Generation Marine Energy Systems Energy Department Awards $10.5 Million for Next-Generation Marine Energy Systems December 28, 2015 - 2:21pm Addthis The Energy Department today announced six organizations selected to receive up to $10.5 million to support the design and operation of innovative marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) systems through survivability and reliability-related improvements. As part of its MHK technology research and

  13. Environmental issues affecting clean coal technology deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, M.J.

    1997-12-31

    The author outlines what he considers to be the key environmental issues affecting Clean Coal Technology (CCT) deployment both in the US and internationally. Since the international issues are difficult to characterize given different environmental drivers in various countries and regions, the primary focus of his remarks is on US deployment. However, he makes some general remarks, particularly regarding the environmental issues in developing vs. developed countries and how these issues may affect CCT deployment. Further, how environment affects deployment depends on which particular type of clean coal technology one is addressing. It is not the author`s intention to mention many specific technologies other than to use them for the purposes of example. He generally categorizes CCTs into four groups since environment is likely to affect deployment for each category somewhat differently. These four categories are: Precombustion technologies such as coal cleaning; Combustion technologies such as low NOx burners; Postcombustion technologies such as FGD systems and postcombustion NOx control; and New generation technologies such as gasification and fluidized bed combustion.

  14. U.S. Marine Corps Stand at Forefront of Energy and Water Savings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This fact sheet is an overview of the U.S. Marine Corps Beaufort Air Station's energy and water savings accomplishments.

  15. Large-Scale Production of Marine Microalgae for Fuel and Feeds

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) 2015 Project Peer Review Large-Scale Production of Marine Microalgae for Fuel and Feeds March 24, 2015 Algae Platform Review Mark Huntley ...

  16. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Data | Department of Energy Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data The Wind Program hosted a two-day workshop on July 24-25, 2012 with scientists and regulators engaged in marine ecological survey, modeling, and database efforts pertaining to the waters of the Mid-Atlantic region. PDF icon Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data: Workshop to

  17. MHK Projects/Contra Rotating Marine Turbine CoRMaT | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Contra Rotating Marine Turbine CoRMaT < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps...

  18. MHK Projects/US Navy Wave Energy Technology WET Program at Marine...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    US Navy Wave Energy Technology WET Program at Marine Corps Base Hawaii MCBH < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map......

  19. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Protection (prepared by Geo-Marine, Inc.). 2010. New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection Baseline Studies Final Report. http:www.nj.govdepdsrocean-windreport.htm. ...

  20. U.S. Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton: Using The Sun For Hot Water And Electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-09-23

    Case study overview of integrated solar hot water/photovoltaic systems at the U.S. Marine Corps Camp Pendleton training pools.

  1. U.S. Marine Corps Stand at Forefront of Energy and Water Savings (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-12-01

    This fact sheet is an overview of the U.S. Marine Corps Beaufort Air Station's energy and water savings accomplishments.

  2. JEDI Marine and Hydrokinetic Model: User Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, M.; Previsic, M.

    2011-04-01

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impact Model (JEDI) for Marine and Hydrokinetics (MHK) is a user-friendly spreadsheet-based tool designed to demonstrate the economic impacts associated with developing and operating MHK power systems in the United States. The JEDI MHK User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in using and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the sources and parameters used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted.

  3. Prokaryotic diversity, distribution, and insights into their role in biogeochemical cycling in marine basalts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, Olivia U.; Di Meo-Savoie, Carol A.; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Zhou, Jizhong; Fisk, Martin R.; Giovannoni, Stephen J.

    2008-09-30

    We used molecular techniques to analyze basalts of varying ages that were collected from the East Pacific Rise, 9 oN, from the rift axis of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, and from neighboring seamounts. Cluster analysis of 16S rDNA Terminal Restriction Fragment Polymorphism data revealed that basalt endoliths are distinct from seawater and that communities clustered, to some degree, based on the age of the host rock. This age-based clustering suggests that alteration processes may affect community structure. Cloning and sequencing of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes revealed twelve different phyla and sub-phyla associated with basalts. These include the Gemmatimonadetes, Nitrospirae, the candidate phylum SBR1093 in the c, andin the Archaea Marine Benthic Group B, none of which have been previously reported in basalts. We delineated novel ocean crust clades in the gamma-Proteobacteria, Planctomycetes, and Actinobacteria that are composed entirely of basalt associated microflora, and may represent basalt ecotypes. Finally, microarray analysis of functional genes in basalt revealed that genes coding for previously unreported processes such as carbon fixation, methane-oxidation, methanogenesis, and nitrogen fixation are present, suggesting that basalts harbor previously unrecognized metabolic diversity. These novel processes could exert a profound influence on ocean chemistry.

  4. LIFE Materials: Phase Formation and Transformations in Transmutation Fuel Materials for the LIFE Engine Part I - Path Forward Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turchi, P A; Kaufman, L; Fluss, M

    2008-12-19

    The current specifications of the LLNL fusion-fission hybrid proposal, namely LIFE, impose severe constraints on materials, and in particular on the nuclear fissile or fertile nuclear fuel and its immediate environment. This constitutes the focus of the present report with special emphasis on phase formation and phase transformations of the transmutation fuel and their consequences on particle and pebble thermal, chemical, and mechanical integrities. We first review the work that has been done in recent years to improve materials properties under the Gen-IV project, and with in particular applications to HTGR and MSR, and also under GNEP and AFCI in the USA. Our goal is to assess the nuclear fuel options that currently exist together with their issues. Among the options, it is worth mentioning TRISO, IMF, and molten salts. The later option will not be discussed in details since an entire report (Volume 8 - Molten-salt Fuels) is dedicated to it. Then, in a second part, with the specific LIFE specifications in mind, the various fuel options with their most critical issues are revisited with a path forward for each of them in terms of research, both experimental and theoretical. Since LIFE is applicable to very high burn-up of various fuels, distinctions will be made depending on the mission, i.e., energy production or incineration. Finally a few conclusions are drawn in terms of the specific needs for integrated materials modeling and the in depth knowledge on time-evolution thermo-chemistry that controls and drastically affects the performance of the nuclear materials and their immediate environment. Although LIFE demands materials that very likely have not yet been fully optimized, the challenges are not insurmountable, and a well concerted experimental-modeling effort should lead to dramatic advances that should well serve other fission programs such as Gen-IV, GNEP, AFCI as well as the international fusion program, ITER.

  5. Effects of Ocean Ecosystem on Marine Aerosol-Cloud Interaction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Meskhidze, Nicholas; Nenes, Athanasios

    2010-01-01

    Using smore » atellite data for the surface ocean, aerosol optical depth (AOD), and cloud microphysical parameters, we show that statistically significant positive correlations exist between ocean ecosystem productivity, the abundance of submicron aerosols, and cloud microphysical properties over different parts of the remote oceans. The correlation coefficient for remotely sensed surface chlorophyll a concentration ([Chl- a ]) and liquid cloud effective radii over productive areas of the oceans varies between − 0.2 and − 0.6 . Special attention is given to identifying (and addressing) problems from correlation analysis used in the previous studies that can lead to erroneous conclusions. A new approach (using the difference between retrieved AOD and predicted sea salt aerosol optical depth, AOD diff ) is developed to explore causal links between ocean physical and biological systems and the abundance of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the remote marine atmosphere. We have found that over multiple time periods, 550 nm AOD diff (sensitive to accumulation mode aerosol, which is the prime contributor to CCN) correlates well with [Chl- a ] over the productive waters of the Southern Ocean. Since [Chl- a ] can be used as a proxy of ocean biological productivity, our analysis demonstrates the role of ocean ecology in contributing CCN, thus shaping the microphysical properties of low-level marine clouds.« less

  6. Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon Life History Investigations, Annual Report 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiffan, Kenneth F.; Connor, William P.; Bellgraph, Brian J.

    2009-09-15

    This study was initiated to provide empirical data and analyses on the dam passage timing, travel rate, survival, and life history variation of fall Chinook salmon that are produced in the Clearwater River. The area of interest for this study focuses on the lower four miles of the Clearwater River and its confluence with the Snake River because this is an area where many fish delay their seaward migration. The goal of the project is to increase our understanding of the environmental and biological factors that affect juvenile life history of fall Chinook salmon in the Clearwater River. The following summaries are provided for each of the individual chapters in this report.

  7. ACOUSTICAL IMAGING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOFT ROCK AND MARINE SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thurman E. Scott, Jr., Ph.D.; Younane Abousleiman, Ph.D.; Musharraf Zaman, Ph.D., P.E.

    2001-07-01

    Mechanically weak formations, such as chalks, high porosity sandstones, and marine sediments, pose significant problems for oil and gas operators. Problems such as compaction, subsidence, and loss of permeability can affect reservoir production operations. For example, the unexpected subsidence of the Ekofisk chalk in the North Sea required over one billion dollars to re-engineer production facilities to account for losses created during that compaction (Sulak 1991). Another problem in weak formations is that of shallow water flows (SWF). Deep water drilling operations sometimes encounter cases where the marine sediments, at shallow depths just below the seafloor, begin to uncontrollably flow up and around the drill pipe. SWF problems created a loss of $150 million for the Ursa development project in the U.S. Gulf Coast SWF (Furlow 1998a,b; 1999a,b). The goal of this project is to provide a database on both the rock mechanical properties and the geophysical properties of weak rocks and sediments. These could be used by oil and gas companies to detect, evaluate, and alleviate potential production and drilling problems. The results will be useful in, for example, pre-drill detection of events such as SWF's by allowing a correlation of seismic data (such as hazard surveys) to rock mechanical properties. The data sets could also be useful for 4-D monitoring of the compaction and subsidence of an existing reservoir and imaging the zones of damage. During the second quarter of the project the research team has: (1) completed acoustic sensor construction, (2) conducted reconnaissance tests to map the deformational behaviors of the various rocks, (3) developed a sample assembly for the measurement of dynamic elastic and poroelastic parameters during triaxial testing, and (4) conducted a detailed review of the scientific literature and compiled a bibliography of that review. During the first quarter of the project the research team acquired several rock types for testing including: (a) Danian chalk, (b) Cordoba Cream limestone, (c) Indiana limestone, (d) Ekofisk chalk, (e) Oil Creek sandstone, (f) unconsolidated Oil Creek sand, and (g) unconsolidated Brazos river sand. During the second quarter experiments were begun on these rock types. A series of reconnaissance experiments have been carried out on all but the Ekofisk (for which there is a preliminary data set already inhouse). A series of triaxial tests have been conducted on the Danian chalk, the Cordoba Cream limestone, the Indiana limestone, and sand samples to make a preliminary determination of the deformational mechanisms present in these samples.

  8. Complete braided adsorbent for marine testing to demonstrate 3g-U/kg-adsorbent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janke, Chris; Yatsandra, Oyola; Mayes, Richard; none,; Gill, Gary; Li-Jung, Kuo; Wood, Jordana; Sadananda, Das

    2014-04-30

    ORNL has manufactured four braided adsorbents that successfully demonstrated uranium adsorption capacities ranging from 3.0-3.6 g-U/kg-adsorbent in marine testing at PNNL. Four new braided and leno woven fabric adsorbents have also been prepared by ORNL and are currently undergoing marine testing at PNNL.

  9. 2014 Water Power Program Peer Review: Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies, Compiled Presentations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-02-01

    This document represents a collection of all presentations given during the EERE Wind and Water Power Program's 2014 Marine and Hydrokinetic Peer Review. The purpose of the meeting was to evaluate DOE-funded hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic R&D projects for their contribution to the mission and goals of the Water Power Program and to assess progress made against stated objectives.

  10. 1st Advanced Marine Renewable Energy Instrumentation Experts Workshop: April 5-7, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    The U.S. marine energy industry is actively pursuing development of offshore wind and marine hydrokinetic (MHK) energy systems. Experience in the wind energy sector demonstrates that new technology development requires thorough measurement and characterization of the environmental conditions prevalent at installation sites and of technology operating in the field. Presently, there are no turn-key instrumentation system solutions that meet the measurement needs of the marine energy industry. The 1st Advanced Marine Renewable Energy Instrumentation Experts Workshop brought together technical experts from government laboratories, academia, and industry representatives from marine energy, wind, offshore oil and gas, and instrumentation developers to present and discuss the instrumentation needs of the marine energy industry. The goals of the meeting were to: (1) Share the latest relevant knowledge among technical experts; (2) Review relevant state-of-the-art field measurement technologies and methods; (3) Review lessons learned from recent field deployments; (4) Identify synergies across different industries; (5) Identify gaps between existing and needed instrumentation capabilities; (6) Understand who are the leading experts; (7) Provide a forum where stakeholders from the marine energy industry could provide substantive input in the development of new marine energy field deployable instrumentation packages.

  11. Instrumentation for Monitoring around Marine Renewable Energy Converters: Workshop Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polagye, B. L.; Copping, A. E.; Brown-Saracino, J.; Suryan, R.; Kramer, S.; Smith, C.

    2014-01-14

    To better understand the state of instrumentation and capabilities for monitoring around marine energy converters, the U.S. Department of Energy directed Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center at the University of Washington to convene an invitation-only workshop of experts from around the world to address instrumentation needs.

  12. Work-Life Balance | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Work-Life Balance Balancing work and life means prioritizing what is important to you. Argonne supports employees who want to coordinate work, home and community activities. Lab-provided benefits that help you do that include on-site child care, a credit union, flexible work schedules, generous leave and vacation programs, and much more. A wide variety of social clubs at Argonne promote fellowship and diversity. You can work at Argonne and also have a life of interest and fulfillment. "I

  13. RoboRave brings science to life

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RoboRave brings science to life Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:May 2016 all issues All Issues » submit RoboRave brings science to life More than 300 students build robots, discover STEM fields. April 4, 2016 RoboRave brings science to life Programs such as RoboRave and Science Showdown provide opportunities for hundreds of Northern New Mexico students to explore STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) areas.

  14. Work and Life Balance | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Home > Impact > Flex Ability: Balancing Work with Life Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window) Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window) Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window) Flex Ability: Balancing Work with Life Achieving work/life balance is a much-talked-about topic. According to GE Healthcare's Kelly Piacsek, "GE hires people for what's inside their head-what they know-and

  15. 2008 Marine Microbes Gordon Research Conference (July 13-17, 2008)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Kirchman

    2009-09-16

    Marine microbes are very abundant and diverse. They play significant roles in all element cycles, both quantitatively and qualitatively. However, they are little known, as the continuous series of surprising discoveries in the last few years shows. In the present conference the main focus will be on how these microbes interact: with other cells of their own species, with other microbes and with large living beings, from biofilms to symbiants. Another important topic will be the exploration of marine microbial diversity based on the recently developed sequencing approaches and on efforts to obtain marine organisms in pure cultures. This conference will be the third in the Marine Microorganisms series. We hope it will contribute to enlarge the community of marine microbiologists and help in pointing the future directions of research even more than the two previous meetings.

  16. Exporting licensing regulations affecting US geothermal firms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-08-01

    This document presents a brief introduction and overview of the Department of Commerce's Export Administration Regulations which might affect potential US geothermal goods exporters. It is intended to make US geothermal firms officials aware of the existence of such regulations and to provide them with references, contacts and phone numbers where they can obtain specific and detailed information and assistance. It must be stressed however, that the ultimate responsibility for complying with the above mentioned regulations lies with the exporter who must consult the complete version of the regulations.

  17. DOE’s Deep Capabilities and Wide Possibilities Highlighted at Executive Summit on Marine and Hydrokinetic Research and Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    When it comes to marine and hydrokinetic technology development, the Department of Energy (DOE) offers deep capabilities and wide possibilities.

  18. Princeton Power Systems (TRL 5 6 Component)- Marine High-Voltage Power Conditioning and Transmission System with Integrated Energy Storage

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Princeton Power Systems (TRL 5 6 Component) - Marine High-Voltage Power Conditioning and Transmission System with Integrated Energy Storage

  19. Study of Factors Affecting Shrub Establishment on the Monticello...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Study of Factors Affecting Shrub Establishment on the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Cell Cover Study of Factors Affecting Shrub Establishment on the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Cell...

  20. Economic Conditions and Factors Affecting New Nuclear Power Deployment...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Economic Conditions and Factors Affecting New Nuclear Power Deployment Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Economic Conditions and Factors Affecting New Nuclear Power ...

  1. EO 13211: Regulations That Significantly Affect Energy Supply...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EO 13211: Regulations That Significantly Affect Energy Supply, Distribution, or Use EO 13211: Regulations That Significantly Affect Energy Supply, Distribution, or Use I am...

  2. Factors Affecting HCCI Combustion Phasing for Fuels with Single...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Affecting HCCI Combustion Phasing for Fuels with Single- and Dual-Stage Chemistry Factors Affecting HCCI Combustion Phasing for Fuels with Single- and Dual-Stage Chemistry 2004 ...

  3. Key Parameters Affecting DPF Performance Degradation and Impact...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Parameters Affecting DPF Performance Degradation and Impact on Lifetime Fuel Economy Key Parameters Affecting DPF Performance Degradation and Impact on Lifetime Fuel Economy ...

  4. Financial Incentives Available for Facilities Affected by the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Financial Incentives Available for Facilities Affected by the US EPA Boiler MACT Proposed Rule, December 2012 Financial Incentives Available for Facilities Affected by the US EPA ...

  5. Kenya-Affecting Electricity Policy through a Community Micro...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Affecting Electricity Policy through a Community Micro Hydro Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Kenya-Affecting Electricity Policy through a Community Micro Hydro Project...

  6. A Systematic Investigation of Parameters Affecting Diesel NOx...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Systematic Investigation of Parameters Affecting Diesel NOx Adsorber Catalyst Performance A Systematic Investigation of Parameters Affecting Diesel NOx Adsorber Catalyst ...

  7. Updating the LED Life Cycle Assessment

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Part 2: LED Manufacturing and Performance 7 Goal of the New Study Review new literature on the life- cycle assessment of LED products. Determine if newer A-19 products...

  8. Life Extension Programs | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Alvin Leung and Matt H. B61-12 Life Extension Program Undergoes First Full-Scale Wind Tunnel Test WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)...

  9. Techno-Economics & Life Cycle Assessment (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutta, A.; Davis, R.

    2011-12-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the techno-economic analysis (TEA) and life cycle assessment (LCA) capabilities at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and describes the value of working with NREL on TEA and LCA.

  10. Life at Argonne | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Apply for a Job Connect with Argonne LinkedIn Facebook Twitter YouTube Google+ More Social Media Life at Argonne What's it like to work at Argonne? You've come to a place...

  11. Life-Cycle Analysis of Geothermal Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The results and tools from this project will help GTP and stakeholders determine and communicate GT energy and GHG benefits and water impacts. The life-cycle analysis (LCA) approach is taken to address these effects.

  12. Environmentally Clean Mitigation of Undesirable Plant Life Using Lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubenchik, A M; McGrann, T J; Yamamoto, R M; Parker, J M

    2009-07-01

    This concept comprises a method for environmentally clean destruction of undesirable plant life using visible or infrared radiation. We believe that during the blossom stage, plant life is very sensitive to electromagnetic radiation, with an enhanced sensitivity to specific spectral ranges. Small doses of irradiation can arrest further plant growth, cause flower destruction or promote plant death. Surrounding plants, which are not in the blossoming stage, should not be affected. Our proposed mechanism to initiate this effect is radiation produced by a laser. Tender parts of the blossom possess enhanced absorptivity in some spectral ranges. This absorption can increase the local tissue temperature by several degrees, which is sufficient to induce bio-tissue damage. In some instances, the radiation may actually stimulate plant growth, as an alternative for use in increased crop production. This would be dependent on factors such as plant type, the wavelength of the laser radiation being used and the amount of the radiation dose. Practical, economically viable realization of this concept is possible today with the advent of high efficiency, compact and powerful laser diodes. The laser diodes provide an efficient, environmentally clean source of radiation at a variety of power levels and radiation wavelengths. Figure 1 shows the overall concept, with the laser diodes mounted on a movable platform, traversing and directing the laser radiation over a field of opium poppies.

  13. Preliminary studies to determine the shelf life of HEPA filters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilbert, H.; Fretthold, J.K.; Rainer, F.; Bergman, W.; Beason, D.

    1994-07-18

    We have completed a preliminary study using filter media tests and filter qualification tests to investigate the effect of shelf-life on HEPA filter performance. Our media studies showed that the tensile strength decreased with age, but the data were not sufficient to establish a shelf-life. Thermogravimetric analyses demonstrated that one manufacturer had media with low tensile strength due to insufficient binder. The filter qualification tests (heated air and overpressure) conducted on different aged filters showed that filter age is not the primary factor affecting filter performance; materials and the construction design have a greater effect. An unexpected finding of our study was that sub-standard HEPA filters have been installed in DOE facilities despite existing regulations and filter qualification tests. We found that the filter with low tensile strength failed the overpressure test. The same filter had passed the heated air test, but left the filter so structurally weak, it was prone to blowout. We recommend that DOE initiate a filter qualification program to prevent this occurrence.

  14. Maximizing the life cycle of plastics. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawkins, W. L.

    1980-02-01

    The Plastics Research Institute has conducted a coordinated research program designed to extend the useful life of plastics. Since feedstock for practically all synthetic plastics is derived from fossil fuel, every effort should be made to obtain the maximum useful life from these materials. Eventually, plastic scrap may be used as a fuel supplement, but this disposal route should be followed only after the scrap is no longer reusable in its polymeric form. The extent to which plastic scrap will be recovered and reused will be affected by the economic situation as well as the available supply of fossil fuel. The Institute's program was conducted at five major universities. Dedicated faculty members were assembled into a research team and met frequently with members of the Institute's Board of Trustees to review progress of the program. The research was conducted by graduate students in partial fulfillment of degree requirements. Summaries are presented of the following research projects: Improved Stabilization; Separation of Mixed Plastic Scrap; Compatibilizing Agents for Mixed Plastic Scrap; Controlled Degradation of Plastic Scrap; and Determination of Compatibility.

  15. Life-Cycle Assessment of Pyrolysis Bio-Oil Production*

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steele, Philip; Puettmann, Maureen E.; Penmetsa, Venkata Kanthi; Cooper, Jerome E.

    2012-07-01

    As part ofthe Consortium for Research on Renewable Industrial Materials' Phase I life-cycle assessments ofbiofuels, lifecycle inventory burdens from the production of bio-oil were developed and compared with measures for residual fuel oil. Bio-oil feedstock was produced using whole southern pine (Pinus taeda) trees, chipped, and converted into bio-oil by fast pyrolysis. Input parameters and mass and energy balances were derived with Aspen. Mass and energy balances were input to SimaPro to determine the environmental performance of bio-oil compared with residual fuel oil as a heating fuel. Equivalent functional units of 1 MJ were used for demonstrating environmental preference in impact categories, such as fossil fuel use and global warming potential. Results showed near carbon neutrality of the bio-oil. Substituting bio-oil for residual fuel oil, based on the relative carbon emissions of the two fuels, estimated a reduction in CO2 emissions by 0.075 kg CO2 per MJ of fuel combustion or a 70 percent reduction in emission over residual fuel oil. The bio-oil production life-cycle stage consumed 92 percent of the total cradle-to-grave energy requirements, while feedstock collection, preparation, and transportation consumed 4 percent each. This model provides a framework to better understand the major factors affecting greenhouse gas emissions related to bio-oil production and conversion to boiler fuel during fast pyrolysis.

  16. LIFE Target Fabrication Research Plan Sept 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miles, R; Biener, J; Kucheyev, S; Montesanti, R; Satcher, J; Spadaccini, C; Rose, K; Wang, M; Hamza, A; Alexander, N; Brown, L; Hund, J; Petzoldt, R; Sweet, W; Goodin, D

    2008-11-10

    The target-system for the baseline LIFE fast-ignition target was analyzed to establish a preliminary estimate for the costs and complexities involved in demonstrating the technologies needed to build a prototype LIFE plant. The baseline fast-ignition target upon which this analysis was developed is shown in Figure 1.0-1 below. The LIFE target-system incorporates requirements for low-cost, high throughput manufacture, high-speed, high accuracy injection of the target into the chamber, production of sufficient energy from implosion and recovery and recycle of the imploded target material residue. None of these functions has been demonstrated to date. Existing target fabrication techniques which lead to current 'hot spot' target costs of {approx}$100,000 per target and at a production rate of 2/day are unacceptable for the LIFE program. Fabrication techniques normally used for low-cost, low accuracy consumer products such as toys must be adapted to the high-accuracy LIFE target. This will be challenge. A research program resulting is the demonstration of the target-cycle technologies needed for a prototype LIFE reactor is expected to cost {approx}$51M over the course of 5 years. The effort will result in targets which will cost an estimated $0.23/target at a rep-rate of 20 Hz or about 1.73M targets/day.

  17. Marine pipeline dynamic response to waves from directional wave spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambrakos, K.F.

    1982-07-01

    A methodology has been developed to calculate the dynamic probabilistic movement and resulting stresses for marine pipelines subjected to storm waves. A directional wave spectrum is used with a Fourier series expansion to simulate short-crested waves and calculate their loads on the pipeline. The pipeline displacements resulting from these loads are solutions to the time-dependent beam-column equation which also includes the soil resistance as external loading. The statistics of the displacements for individual waves are combined with the wave statistics for a given period of time, e.g. pipeline lifetime, to generate probabilistic estimates for net pipeline movement. On the basis of displacements for specified probability levels the pipeline configuration is obtained from which pipeline stresses can be estimated using structural considerations, e.g. pipeline stiffness, end restraints, etc.

  18. Fatigue life improvement factors obtained by weld reinforcement and toe grinding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mullen, C.L.; Merwin, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    The potential of weld reinforcement and toe grinding techniques for improving the fatigue life of welded joints protected from seawater corrosion is quantified based on tests performed in air on welded plate specimens. Results are presented in terms of median fatigue life improvement factors and prediction intervals obtained by linear regression analysis. The significant improvements possible with weld reinforcement are shown to be caused partly by a slight alleviation of the stress concentration imposed by sharp angles at the weld toe. Variable improvements observed for toe ground welds are shown to be associated with the variable surface modifications which different tools impose on weld toes. Load and weld geometry are shown to be particulary important when bending stresses are applied to the weld toe, since reinforcement affects the bending moment at the toe section and toe grinding affects the conditions at the highly stressed outer fibers. 14 references.

  19. Mechanisms affecting swelling in alloys with precipitates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mansur, L.K.; Haynes, M.R.; Lee, E.H.

    1980-01-01

    In alloys under irradiation many mechanisms exist that couple phase instability to cavity swelling. These are compounded with the more familiar mechanisms associated with point defect behavior and the evolution of microstructure. The mechanisms may be classified according to three modes of operation. Some affect cavity swelling directly by cavity-precipitate particle association, others operate indirectly by precipitate-induced changes in sinks other than cavities and finally there are mechanisms that are mediated by precipitate-induced changes in the host matrix. The physics of one mechanism of each type is developed in detail and the results compared where possible to experimental measurements. In particular, we develop the theory necessary to treat the effects on swelling of precipitation-induced changes in overall sink density; precipitation-induced changes in point defect trapping by solute depletion and creation of precipitate particle-matrix interfacial trap sites.

  20. Various factors affect coiled tubing limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Y.S.

    1996-01-15

    Safety and reliability remain the primary concerns in coiled tubing operations. Factors affecting safety and reliability include corrosion, flexural bending, internal (or external) pressure and tension (or compression), and mechanical damage due to improper use. Such limits as coiled tubing fatigue, collapse, and buckling need to be understood to avoid disaster. With increased use of coiled tubing, operators will gain more experience. But at the same time, with further research and development of coiled tubing, the manufacturing quality will be improved and fatigue, collapse, and buckling models will become more mature, and eventually standard specifications will be available. This paper reviews the uses of coiled tubing and current research on mechanical behavior of said tubing. It also discusses several models used to help predict fatigue and failure levels.

  1. Cylinder surface, temperature may affect LPG odorization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McWilliams, H.

    1988-01-01

    A study of possible odorant fade in propane by the Arthur D. Little Co. (Boston) has indicated that oxidation of interior surfaces of LPG containers may cause the odorant, ethyl mercaptan, to fade. The oxidation, ferous oxide, is a black, easily oxidizable powder that is the monoxide of iron. The study, contracted for by the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), is part of that agency's study of residential LP-gas systems. Another study is currently underway by an NLPGA task force headed by Bob Reid of Petrolane (Long Beach, Calif.). It may not be finished until the end of next year. Recently, the Propane Gas Association of Canada completed a study of odorant fade with the conclusion that much more study is needed on the subject. In addition to the cylinder surface problem, the CPSC study indicated that ambient temperatures might also affect the presence of odorant in product. This article reviews some of the results.

  2. Assisting Federal Facilities with Energy Conservation Technologies (AFFECT)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Funding Opportunity | Department of Energy Technical Assistance » Assisting Federal Facilities with Energy Conservation Technologies (AFFECT) Funding Opportunity Assisting Federal Facilities with Energy Conservation Technologies (AFFECT) Funding Opportunity The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides project assistance through the AFFECT funding opportunity. AFFECT provides grants for the development of capital projects to increase the energy efficiency and renewable energy

  3. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.; Lawson, M.; Rooney, S.

    2013-02-01

    The Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop was hosted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Broomfield, Colorado, July 9–10, 2012. The workshop brought together over 60 experts in marine energy technologies to disseminate technical information to the marine energy community, and to collect information to help identify ways in which the development of a commercially viable marine energy industry can be accelerated. The workshop was comprised of plenary sessions that reviewed the state of the marine energy industry and technical sessions that covered specific topics of relevance. Each session consisted of presentations, followed by facilitated discussions. During the facilitated discussions, the session chairs posed several prepared questions to the presenters and audience to encourage communication and the exchange of ideas between technical experts. Following the workshop, attendees were asked to provide written feedback on their takeaways from the workshop and their best ideas on how to accelerate the pace of marine energy technology development. The first four sections of this document give a general overview of the workshop format, provide presentation abstracts, supply discussion session notes, and list responses to the post-workshop questions. The final section presents key findings and conclusions from the workshop that suggest what the most pressing MHK technology needs are and how the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and national laboratory resources can be utilized to assist the marine energy industry in the most effective manner.

  4. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.; Lawson, M.; Rooney, S.

    2013-02-01

    The Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop was hosted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Broomfield, Colorado, July 9-10, 2012. The workshop brought together over 60 experts in marine energy technologies to disseminate technical information to the marine energy community and collect information to help identify ways in which the development of a commercially viable marine energy industry can be accelerated. The workshop was comprised of plenary sessions that reviewed the state of the marine energy industry and technical sessions that covered specific topics of relevance. Each session consisted of presentations, followed by facilitated discussions. During the facilitated discussions, the session chairs posed several prepared questions to the presenters and audience to encourage communication and the exchange of ideas between technical experts. Following the workshop, attendees were asked to provide written feedback on their takeaways and their best ideas on how to accelerate the pace of marine energy technology development. The first four sections of this document give a general overview of the workshop format, provide presentation abstracts and discussion session notes, and list responses to the post-workshop questions. The final section presents key findings and conclusions from the workshop that suggest how the U.S. Department of Energy and national laboratory resources can be utilized to most effectively assist the marine energy industry.

  5. EA-1965: Florida Atlantic University Southeast National Marine Renewable Energy Center’s Offshore Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing Project, Florida

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy (DOE), through its Wind and Water Power Technologies Office (WWPTO), is proposing to provide federal funding to Florida Atlantic University’s South-East National Marine Renewable Energy Center (FAU SNMREC) to support the at sea testing of FAU SNMREC’s experimental current generation turbine and the deployment and operation of their Small-Scale Ocean Current Turbine Test Berth, sited on the outer continental shelf (OCS) in waters off the coast of Ft Lauderdale, Florida. SNMREC would demonstrate the test berth site readiness by testing their pilot-scale experimental ocean current turbine unit at that location. The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) conducted an Environmental Assessment to analyze the impacts associated with leasing OCS lands to FAU SNMREC, per their jurisdictional responsibilities under the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act. DOE was a cooperating agency in this process and based on the EA, DOE issued a Finding of No Significant Impact.

  6. Page 5, Federal Employees' Group Life Insurance (FEGLI)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 of 11 Previous Page Federal Employees' Group Life Insurance (FEGLI) Initial Enrollment Period All Employees in eligible positions are automatically enrolled in Basic Life...

  7. Thermal and Mechanical Design Aspects of the LIFE Engine (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Laser Inertial confinement fusion - Fission Energy (LIFE) engine encompasses the components of a LIFE power plant responsible for converting the thermal energy of fusion and ...

  8. LIFE: The Case for Early Commercialization of Fusion Energy ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: LIFE: The Case for Early Commercialization of Fusion Energy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: LIFE: The Case for Early Commercialization of Fusion Energy ...

  9. Prediction of packaging seal life using thermoanalytical techniques...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Prediction of packaging seal life using thermoanalytical techniques Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Prediction of packaging seal life using thermoanalytical ...

  10. FATIGUE LIFE PREDICTION FOR STEELS IN PULSATING IRRADIATED SYSTEMS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: FATIGUE LIFE PREDICTION FOR STEELS IN PULSATING IRRADIATED SYSTEMS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: FATIGUE LIFE PREDICTION FOR STEELS IN PULSATING ...

  11. Closing the Lithium-ion Battery Life Cycle: Poster handout |...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Closing the Lithium-ion Battery Life Cycle: Poster handout Title Closing the Lithium-ion Battery Life Cycle: Poster handout Publication Type Miscellaneous Year of Publication 2014...

  12. Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program Focus Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program Focus Polymer ...

  13. Residual Stresses for Structural Analysis and Fatigue Life Prediction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Life Prediction in Vehicle Components: Success stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program Residual Stresses for Structural Analysis and Fatigue Life ...

  14. Life Cycle Assessment of Renewable Hydrogen Production viaWind...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Renewable Hydrogen Production via WindElectrolysis: Milestone Completion Report Life ... Analysis Activities at National Renewable Energy Laboratory Life Cycle Assessment of ...

  15. Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program Focus Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program Focus ...

  16. Life Cycle Assessment of Hydrogen Production via Natural Gas...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen Production via Natural Gas Steam Reforming Life Cycle Assessment of Hydrogen Production via Natural Gas Steam Reforming A life cycle assessment of hydrogen production via ...

  17. ESPC Best Practices from Life of Contract Field Reviews | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Best Practices from Life of Contract Field Reviews ESPC Best Practices from Life of Contract Field Reviews Presentation discusses energy savings performance contract (ESPC) project ...

  18. ESPC Best Practices from Life of Contract Field Reviews

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ESPC Best Practices from Life of Contract Field Reviews August , 2012 Federal Energy ... FEMP has now established "Life of Contract" service functions to help agencies manage and ...

  19. Bioproduct Life Cycle Analysis with the GREETTM Model

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioproduct Life Cycle Analysis with the GREET TM Model Jennifer B. Dunn Biofuel Life Cycle Analysis Team Lead Systems Assessment Group Argonne National Laboratory Biomass 2014 July ...

  20. Bioproduct Life Cycle Analysis with the GREET Model | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioeconomy Bioproduct Life Cycle Analysis with the GREETTM Model Jennifer B. Dunn, Biofuel Life Cycle Analysis Team Lead, Argonne National Laboratory PDF icon ...

  1. Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products PDF icon ...

  2. Long life lithium batteries with stabilized electrodes (Patent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Long life lithium batteries with stabilized electrodes Title: Long life lithium batteries with stabilized electrodes The present invention relates to non-aqueous electrolytes ...

  3. Organosilicon-Based Electrolytes for Long-Life Lithium Primary...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Long-Life Lithium Primary Batteries Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Organosilicon-Based Electrolytes for Long-Life Lithium Primary Batteries This report describes ...

  4. Long life lithium batteries with stabilized electrodes (Patent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Data Explorer Search Results Long life lithium batteries with stabilized electrodes Title: Long life lithium batteries with stabilized electrodes The present invention relates to ...

  5. Clean Anodic Lithium Films for Longer Life, Rechargeable Lithium...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Clean Anodic Lithium Films for Longer Life, Rechargeable Lithium Ion Batteries Lawrence ... use in safe, stable lithium ion batteries with high energy densities and good cycle life. ...

  6. Longer Life Lithium Ion Batteries with Silicon Anodes - Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Longer Life Lithium Ion Batteries with Silicon Anodes Lawrence Berkeley National ... Researchers have developed a new technology to advance the life of lithium-ion batteries. ...

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office - AVTA: All Electric USPS Long Life...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    USPS Long Life Vehicle Conversions Vehicle Technologies Office - AVTA: All Electric USPS Long Life Vehicle Conversions The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing ...

  8. How the Weatherization Assistance Program Changed Jasmine's Life...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    How the Weatherization Assistance Program Changed Jasmine's Life How the Weatherization Assistance Program Changed Jasmine's Life February 19, 2015 - 4:45pm Addthis The Rocky...

  9. Regulatory Assistance, Stakeholder Outreach, and Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning Activities in Support of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geerlofs, Simon H.; Copping, Andrea E.; Van Cleve, Frances B.; Blake, Kara M.; Hanna, Luke A.

    2011-09-30

    This fiscal year 2011 progress report summarizes activities carried out under DOE Water Power Task 2.1.7, Permitting and Planning. Activities under Task 2.1.7 address the concerns of a wide range of stakeholders with an interest in the development of the marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy industry, including regulatory and resource management agencies, tribes, nongovernmental organizations, and industry. Objectives for Task 2.1.7 are the following: • to work with stakeholders to streamline the MHK regulatory permitting process • to work with stakeholders to gather information on needs and priorities for environmental assessment of MHK development • to communicate research findings and directions to the MHK industry and stakeholders • to engage in spatial planning processes in order to further the development of the MHK industry. These objectives are met through three subtasks, each of which is described in this report: • 2.1.7.1—Regulatory Assistance • 2.1.7.2—Stakeholder Outreach • 2.1.7.3—Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning. As MHK industry partners work with the regulatory community and stakeholders to plan, site, permit, and license MHK technologies, they have an interest in a predictable, efficient, and transparent process. Stakeholders and regulators have an interest in processes that result in sustainable use of ocean space with minimal effects to existing ocean users. Both stakeholders and regulators have an interest in avoiding legal challenges by meeting the intent of federal, state, and local laws that govern siting and operation of MHK technologies. The intention of work under Task 2.1.7 is to understand and work to address these varied interests, reduce conflict, identify efficiencies, and ultimately reduce the regulatory costs, time, and potential environmental impacts associated with developing, siting, permitting, and deploying MHK systems.

  10. Impact of the 3Cs of Batteries on PHEV Value Proposition: Cost, Calendar Life, and Cycle Life (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pesaran, A.; Smith, K.; Markel, T.

    2009-06-01

    Battery cost, calendar life, and cycle life are three important challenges for those commercializing plug-in hybrid electric vehicles; battery life is sensitive to temperature and solar loading.

  11. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Clifton View Homes, Marine Drive and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Port Hadlcok, Coupeville and Port Hadlock WA | Department of Energy Marine Drive and Port Hadlcok, Coupeville and Port Hadlock WA DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Clifton View Homes, Marine Drive and Port Hadlcok, Coupeville and Port Hadlock WA Case study of two DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning custom homes in the marine climate that got HERS 39 and 38 without PV or HERS 2-12 and -9 with PV, with 6.5" SIP walls and 10.25" SIP roof; 11.75 ICF around slab, R-20 rigid

  12. ARM: Marine W-band (95 GHz) ARM Cloud Radar, filtered spectral data,

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    co-polarized mode (Dataset) | Data Explorer Marine W-band (95 GHz) ARM Cloud Radar, filtered spectral data, co-polarized mode Title: ARM: Marine W-band (95 GHz) ARM Cloud Radar, filtered spectral data, co-polarized mode Marine W-band (95 GHz) ARM Cloud Radar, filtered spectral data, co-polarized mode Authors: Joseph Hardin ; Bradley Isom ; Karen Johnson ; Nitin Bharadwaj Publication Date: 2013-06-28 OSTI Identifier: 1150244 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC05-00OR22725 Resource Type: Dataset Data

  13. Effects of biogenic silica on acoustic and physical properties of clay-rich marine sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tribble, J.S.; Mackenzie, F.T.; Urmos, J.; O'Brien, D.K.; Manghnani, M.H. )

    1992-06-01

    The physical properties of marine sediments are influenced by compaction and diagenesis during burial. Changes in mineralogy, chemistry, density, porosity, and microfabric all affect a sediment's acoustic and electrical properties. Sediments from the Japan Trench illustrate the dependence of physical properties on biogenic silica content. Increased opal-A content is correlated with increased porosity and decreased grain density and compressional velocity. Variations with depth in opal-A concentration are therefore reflected in highly variable and, at times, inverse velocity-depth gradients. The diagenetic conversion of opal-A to opal-CT and finally to quartz was investigated at a site in the San Miguel Gap, California. Distinct changes in microfabric, particularly in the porosity distribution, accompany the diagenetic reactions and contribute to a sharp velocity discontinuity at the depth of the opal-A to opal-CT conversion. Evaluation of this reaction at several sites indicates a systematic dependence on temperature and age in clay-rich and moderately siliceous sediments. In ocean margin regions, sediments are buried rapidly, and opal-A may be converted to opal-CT in less than 10 m.y. Temperatures of conversion range from 30{degree} to 50{degree}C. Much longer times (>40 m.y.) are required to complete the conversion in open ocean deposits which are exposed to temperatures less than 15{degree}C. In the absence of silica diagenesis, velocity-depth gradients of most clay-rich and moderately siliceous sediments fall in the narrow range of 0.15 to 0.25 km/s/km which brackets the gradient (0.18 km/s/km) determined for a type pelagic clay section. Relationships such as these can be useful in unraveling the history of a sediment sequence, including the evolution with time of reservoir properties and seismic signatures.

  14. Evaluating Effects of Stressors from Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea E.; Blake, Kara M.; Hanna, Luke A.; Brandt, Charles A.; Ward, Jeffrey A.; Brandenberger, Jill M.; Gill, Gary A.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Elster, Jennifer L.; Jones, Mark E.; Watson, Bruce E.; Jepsen, Richard A.; Metzinger, Kurt

    2012-09-30

    Potential environmental effects of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy development are not well understood, yet regulatory agencies are required to make decisions in spite of substantial uncertainty about environmental impacts and their long-term consequences. An understanding of risks associated with interactions between MHK installations and aquatic receptors, including animals, habitats, and ecosystems, can help define key uncertainties and focus regulatory actions and scientific studies on interactions of most concern. During FY 2012, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) continued to follow project developments on the two marine and hydrokinetic projects reviewed for Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES) screening analysis in FY 2011: a tidal project in the Gulf of Maine using Ocean Renewable Power Company TidGenTM turbines and a wave project planned for the coast of Oregon using Aquamarine Oyster surge devices. The ERES project in FY 2012 also examined two stressorreceptor interactions previously identified through the screening process as being of high importance: 1) the toxicity effects of antifouling coatings on MHK devices on aquatic resources and 2) the risk of a physical strike encounter between an adult killer whale and an OpenHydro turbine blade. The screening-level assessment of antifouling paints and coatings was conducted for two case studies: the Snohomish County Public Utility District No. 1 (SnoPUD) tidal turbine energy project in Admiralty Inlet, Puget Sound, Washington, and the Ocean Power Technologies (OPT) wave buoy project in Reedsport, Oregon. Results suggest minimal risk to aquatic biota from antifouling coatings used on MHK devices deployed in large estuaries or open ocean environments. For the strike assessment of a Southern Resident Killer Whale (SRKW) encountering an OpenHydro tidal turbine blade, PNNL teamed with colleagues from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to carry out an analysis of the mechanics and biological consequences of different blade strike scenarios. Results of these analyses found the following: 1) a SRKW is not likely to experience significant tissue injury from impact by an OpenHydro turbine blade; and 2) if whale skin behaves similarly to the materials considered as surrogates for the upper dermal layers of whale skin, it would not be torn by an OpenHydro blade strike. The PNNL/SNL analyses could not provide insight into the potential for more subtle changes to SRKWs from an encounter with a turbine, such as changes in behavior, or inform turbine interactions for other whales or other turbines. These analyses were limited by the available time frame in which results were needed and focused on the mechanical response of whale tissues and bone to blade strike. PNNL proposes that analyses of additional turbine designs and interactions with other marine mammals that differ in size, body conformation, and mass be performed.

  15. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Wind Program hosted a two-day workshop on July 24-25, 2012 with scientists and regulators engaged in marine ecological survey, modeling, and database efforts pertaining to the ...

  16. 50 CFR 18.27 - Regulations Governing Small Takes of Marine Mammals...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    taking of small numbers of marine mammals by U.S. citizens who engage in a specified activity within a specified geographical region. Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect...

  17. Live Webinar on the Funding Opportunity for Marine and Hydrokinetic Research and Development University Consortium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On April 24, 2014 from 1:00 - 2:30 PM EDT, the Water Power Program will hold a live webinar to provide information to potential applicants for the Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Research and...

  18. Energy Department Announces $10.5 Million for Next-Generation Marine Energy Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department today announced $10.5 million in available funding to support the design and operation of innovative marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) systems through survivability and reliability-related testing of these systems.

  19. Funding Opportunity Announcement for a Marine and Hydrokinetic Development University Consortium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department announced $4 million to engage America’s research universities in the effort to accelerate the development of the emerging marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy industry in the United States.

  20. Marine Ice Nuclei Collections … MAGIC (MAGIC-IN) Final Campaign...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... low Chlorophyll-a (with the exception of near-shore) ocean regions, which exist along the MAGIC transect. Current analyses suggest that INP numbers in the marine boundary ...

  1. Global and regional modeling of clouds and aerosols in the marine...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A diverse collection of models are used to simulate the marine boundary layer in the southeast Pacific region during the period of the October-November 2008 VOCALS REx (VAMOS Ocean ...

  2. U.S. Navy Marine Diesel Engines and the Environment - Part 3...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 U.S. Navy Marine Diesel Engines and the Environment - Part 3 2002 DEER Conference ... High Fuel Economy Heavy-Duty Truck Engine The Maritime Administration's Energy and ...

  3. Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Final Campaign Report (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) Final Campaign Report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) Final Campaign Report The extensive coverage of low clouds over the subtropical eastern oceans greatly impacts the current climate. In addition, the response of low clouds to changes in atmospheric greenhouse gases and

  4. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technology Readiness Initiative TIDAL ENERGY SYSTEM FOR ON-SHORE POWER GENERATION

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Marine & Hydrokinetic Technology Readiness Initiative TIDAL ENERGY SYSTEM FOR ON-SHORE POWER GENERATION Marine & Hydrokinetic Technology Readiness Initiative DE-EE0003636 TIDAL ENERGY SYSTEM FOR ON-SHORE POWER GENERATION Final Technical Report: June 26, 2012 Awardee: SUNLIGHT PHOTONICS INC. 600 Corporate Court South Plainfield, NJ 07080 Sub Awardee: NASA - JET PROPULSION LAB. 4800 Oak Grove Blvd. Pasadena, CA 91109 Principal Investigator: Dr. Allan J. Bruce, Sunlight Photonics Inc.

  5. Community Ice Sheet Model (CISM2) Development and Marine Ice Sheet

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Simulations (Conference) | SciTech Connect Community Ice Sheet Model (CISM2) Development and Marine Ice Sheet Simulations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Community Ice Sheet Model (CISM2) Development and Marine Ice Sheet Simulations Authors: Lipscomb, William [1] ; Leguy, Gunter [1] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory Publication Date: 2015-06-17 OSTI Identifier: 1186039 Report Number(s): LA-UR-15-24514 DOE Contract Number: AC52-06NA25396 Resource Type:

  6. Lease Issuance for Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing on the Outer Continental Shelf

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Interior Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Office of Renewable Energy Programs OCS EIS/EA BOEM 2013-01140 Lease Issuance for Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing on the Outer Continental Shelf Offshore Florida Revised Environmental Assessment OCS EIS/EA BOEM 2013-01140 Lease Issuance for Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing on the Outer Continental Shelf Offshore Florida Revised Environmental Assessment Author Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Office of Renewable Energy Programs

  7. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Energy (MHK) Databases and Systems Fact Sheet Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Databases and Systems Fact Sheet The following online information resources are designed to provide the public access to information pertaining to MHK technologies, projects, and research. PDF icon Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Databases and Systems Fact Sheet More Documents & Publications Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resourses 2014 Water Power Program

  8. The Radiative Role of Free Tropospheric Aerosols and Marine Clouds over the

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Central North Atlantic (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect The Radiative Role of Free Tropospheric Aerosols and Marine Clouds over the Central North Atlantic Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Radiative Role of Free Tropospheric Aerosols and Marine Clouds over the Central North Atlantic The scientific scope of the project was to exploit the unique location of the Pico Mountain Observatory (PMO) located in the summit caldera of the Pico Volcano in Pico Island in the Azores, for

  9. 2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner Marine Corps Recruit

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    San Diego | Department of Energy Marine Corps Recruit San Diego 2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner Marine Corps Recruit San Diego PDF icon fewm13_usmc_mcdepotsandiego_highres.pdf PDF icon fewm13_usmc_mcdepotsandiego.pdf More Documents & Publications Save Energy Now Assessment Helps Expand Energy Management Program at Shaw Industries 2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners Chris Manis, Randy Monohan, Laura Nelson, Mark Rodriguez, and Mick Wasco CX-003226:

  10. Quality of Work Life brochure | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quality of Work Life brochure PDF icon 2013_08_29 hr_worklifepolicies brochure

  11. Fire safety of LPG in marine transportation. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinsen, W.E.; Johnson, D.W.; Welker, J.R.

    1980-06-01

    This report contains an analytical examination of cargo spill and fire hazard potential associated with the marine handling of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) as cargo. Principal emphasis was on cargo transfer operations for ships unloading at receiving terminals, and barges loading or unloading at a terminal. Major safety systems, including emergency shutdown systems, hazard detection systems, and fire extinguishment and control systems were included in the analysis. Spill probabilities were obtained from fault tree analyses utilizing composite LPG tank ship and barge designs. Failure rates for hardware in the analyses were generally taken from historical data on similar generic classes of hardware, there being very little historical data on the specific items involved. Potential consequences of cargo spills of various sizes are discussed and compared to actual LPG vapor cloud incidents. The usefulness of hazard mitigation systems (particularly dry chemical fire extinguishers and water spray systems) in controlling the hazards posed by LPG spills and spill fires is also discussed. The analysis estimates the probability of fatality for a terminal operator is about 10/sup -6/ to 10/sup -5/ per cargo transfer operation. The probability of fatality for the general public is substantially less.

  12. Mathematical model of marine diesel engine simulator for a new methodology of self propulsion tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izzuddin, Nur; Sunarsih,; Priyanto, Agoes

    2015-05-15

    As a vessel operates in the open seas, a marine diesel engine simulator whose engine rotation is controlled to transmit through propeller shaft is a new methodology for the self propulsion tests to track the fuel saving in a real time. Considering the circumstance, this paper presents the real time of marine diesel engine simulator system to track the real performance of a ship through a computer-simulated model. A mathematical model of marine diesel engine and the propeller are used in the simulation to estimate fuel rate, engine rotating speed, thrust and torque of the propeller thus achieve the target vessel’s speed. The input and output are a real time control system of fuel saving rate and propeller rotating speed representing the marine diesel engine characteristics. The self-propulsion tests in calm waters were conducted using a vessel model to validate the marine diesel engine simulator. The simulator then was used to evaluate the fuel saving by employing a new mathematical model of turbochargers for the marine diesel engine simulator. The control system developed will be beneficial for users as to analyze different condition of vessel’s speed to obtain better characteristics and hence optimize the fuel saving rate.

  13. Battery Technology Life Verification Testing and Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jon P. Christophersen; Gary L. Hunt; Ira Bloom; Ed Thomas; Vince Battaglia

    2007-12-01

    A critical component to the successful commercialization of batteries for automotive applications is accurate life prediction. The Technology Life Verification Test (TLVT) Manual was developed to project battery life with a high level of statistical confidence within only one or two years of accelerated aging. The validation effort that is presently underway has led to several improvements to the original methodology. For example, a newly developed reference performance test revealed a voltage path dependence effect on resistance for lithium-ion cells. The resistance growth seems to depend on how a target condition is reached (i.e., by a charge or a discharge). Second, the methodology for assessing the level of measurement uncertainty was improved using a propagation of errors in the fundamental measurements to the derived response (e.g., resistance). This new approach provides a more realistic assessment of measurement uncertainty. Third, the methodology for allocating batteries to the test matrix has been improved. The new methodology was developed to assign batteries to the matrix such that the average of each test group would be representative of the overall population. These changes to the TLVT methodology will help to more accurately predict a battery technologys life capability with a high degree of confidence.

  14. Workplace Charging Success: MetLife | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    MetLife Workplace Charging Success: MetLife October 2, 2014 - 6:26pm Addthis Workplace Charging Success: MetLife MetLife is talking the "green" talk and walking the walk. The insurance company has long encouraged its policyholders to live environmentally-conscious lifestyles, and continues to embrace emerging technologies, work with green products, and utilize environmentally-friendly services. As part of their commitment to environmental sustainability, MetLife provides alternative

  15. FEMP Releases AFFECT Funding Opportunity Announcement | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy AFFECT Funding Opportunity Announcement FEMP Releases AFFECT Funding Opportunity Announcement November 5, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis On November 5, 2013, the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) on the EERE Exchange titled "Assisting Federal Facilities with Energy Conservation Technologies (AFFECT)." The AFFECT FOA (DE-FOA-0000901) will provide direct funding to U.S. Federal agencies for the development of combined heat and

  16. US NRC-Sponsored Research on Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility of Dry Storage Canister Materials in Marine Environments - 13344

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oberson, Greg; Dunn, Darrell; Mintz, Todd; He, Xihua; Pabalan, Roberto; Miller, Larry

    2013-07-01

    At a number of locations in the U.S., spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is maintained at independent spent fuel storage installations (ISFSIs). These ISFSIs, which include operating and decommissioned reactor sites, Department of Energy facilities in Idaho, and others, are licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) under Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 72. The SNF is stored in dry cask storage systems, which most commonly consist of a welded austenitic stainless steel canister within a larger concrete vault or overpack vented to the external atmosphere to allow airflow for cooling. Some ISFSIs are located in marine environments where there may be high concentrations of airborne chloride salts. If salts were to deposit on the canisters via the external vents, a chloride-rich brine could form by deliquescence. Austenitic stainless steels are susceptible to chloride-induced stress corrosion cracking (SCC), particularly in the presence of residual tensile stresses from welding or other fabrication processes. SCC could allow helium to leak out of a canister if the wall is breached or otherwise compromise its structural integrity. There is currently limited understanding of the conditions that will affect the SCC susceptibility of austenitic stainless steel exposed to marine salts. NRC previously conducted a scoping study of this phenomenon, reported in NUREG/CR-7030 in 2010. Given apparent conservatisms and limitations in this study, NRC has sponsored a follow-on research program to more systematically investigate various factors that may affect SCC including temperature, humidity, salt concentration, and stress level. The activities within this research program include: (1) measurement of relative humidity (RH) for deliquescence of sea salt, (2) SCC testing within the range of natural absolute humidity, (3) SCC testing at elevated temperatures, (4) SCC testing at high humidity conditions, and (5) SCC testing with various applied stresses. Results to date indicate that the deliquescence RH for sea salt is close to that of MgCl{sub 2} pure salt. SCC is observed between 35 and 80 deg. C when the ambient (RH) is close to or higher than this level, even for a low surface salt concentration. (authors)

  17. 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE LIFE EXTENSION SURVEILLANCE PROGRAM RESULTS SUMMARY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daugherty, W.; Dunn, K.; Hackney, B.; Hoffman, E.; Skidmore, E.

    2011-01-06

    Results from the 9975 Surveillance Program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) are summarized for justification to extend the life of the 9975 packages currently stored in the K-Area Materials Storage (KAMS) facility from 10 years to 15 years. This justification is established with the stipulation that surveillance activities will continue throughout this extended time to ensure the continued integrity of the 9975 materials of construction and to further understand the currently identified degradation mechanisms. The current 10 year storage life was developed prior to storage. A subsequent report was later used to extend the qualification of the 9975 shipping packages for 2 years for shipping plus 10 years for storage. However the qualification for the storage period was provided by the monitoring requirements of the Storage and Surveillance Program. This report summarizes efforts to determine a new safe storage limit for the 9975 shipping package based on the surveillance data collected since 2005 when the surveillance program began. KAMS is a zero-release facility that depends upon containment by the 9975 to meet design basis storage requirements. Therefore, to confirm the continued integrity of the 9975 packages while stored in KAMS, a 9975 Storage and Surveillance Program was implemented alongside the DOE required Integrated Surveillance Program (ISP) for 3013 plutonium-bearing containers. The 9975 Storage and Surveillance Program performs field surveillance as well as accelerated aging tests to ensure any degradation due to aging, to the extent that could affect packaging performance, is detected in advance of such degradation occurring in the field. The Program has demonstrated that the 9975 package has a robust design that can perform under a variety of conditions. As such the primary emphasis of the on-going 9975 Surveillance Program is an aging study of the 9975 Viton(reg.sign) GLT containment vessel O-rings and the Celotex(reg.sign) fiberboard thermal insulation at bounding conditions of radiation and elevated temperatures. Other materials of construction, however, are also discussed.

  18. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Development Risk Management Framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snowberg, David; Weber, Jochem

    2015-09-01

    Over the past decade, the global marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) industry has suffered a number of serious technological and commercial setbacks. To help reduce the risks of industry failures and advance the development of new technologies, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed an MHK Risk Management Framework. By addressing uncertainties, the MHK Risk Management Framework increases the likelihood of successful development of an MHK technology. It covers projects of any technical readiness level (TRL) or technical performance level (TPL) and all risk types (e.g. technological risk, regulatory risk, commercial risk) over the development cycle. This framework is intended for the development and deployment of a single MHK technology—not for multiple device deployments within a plant. This risk framework is intended to meet DOE’s risk management expectations for the MHK technology research and development efforts of the Water Power Program (see Appendix A). It also provides an overview of other relevant risk management tools and documentation.1 This framework emphasizes design and risk reviews as formal gates to ensure risks are managed throughout the technology development cycle. Section 1 presents the recommended technology development cycle, Sections 2 and 3 present tools to assess the TRL and TPL of the project, respectively. Section 4 presents a risk management process with design and risk reviews for actively managing risk within the project, and Section 5 presents a detailed description of a risk registry to collect the risk management information into one living document. Section 6 presents recommendations for collecting and using lessons learned throughout the development process.

  19. Natural Organobromine in Marine Sediments: New Evidence of Biogeochemical Br Cycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A Leri; J Hakala; M Marcus; A Lanzirotti; C Reddy; S Myneni

    2011-12-31

    Organobromine (Br{sub org}) compounds, commonly recognized as persistent, toxic anthropogenic pollutants, are also produced naturally in terrestrial and marine systems. Several enzymatic and abiotic bromination mechanisms have been identified, as well as an array of natural Br{sub org} molecules associated with various marine organisms. The fate of the carbon-bromine functionality in the marine environment, however, remains largely unexplored. Oceanographic studies have noted an association between bromine (Br) and organic carbon (C{sub org}) in marine sediments. Even so, there has been no direct chemical evidence that Br in the sediments exists in a stable form apart from inorganic bromide (Br{sub inorg}), which is widely presumed conservative in marine systems. To investigate the scope of natural Br{sub org} production and its fate in the environment, we probed Br distribution and speciation in estuarine and marine sediments using in situ X-ray spectroscopy and spectromicroscopy. We show that Br{sub org} is ubiquitous throughout diverse sedimentary environments, occurring in correlation with C{sub org} and metals such as Fe, Ca, and Zn. Analysis of sinking particulate carbon from the seawater column links the Br{sub org} observed in sediments to biologically produced Br{sub org} compounds that persist through humification of natural organic matter (NOM). Br speciation varies with sediment depth, revealing biogeochemical cycling of Br between organic and inorganic forms as part of the burial and degradation of NOM. These findings illuminate the chemistry behind the association of Br with Corg in marine sediments and cast doubt on the paradigmatic classification of Br as a conservative element in seawater systems.

  20. Life Redefined: Microbes Built with Arsenic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, Sam

    2011-03-22

    Life can survive in many harsh environments, from extreme heat to the presence of deadly chemicals. However, life as we know it has always been based on the same six elements -- carbon, oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen, sulfur and phosphorus. Now it appears that even this rule has an exception. In the saline and poisonous environment of Mono Lake, researchers have found a bacterium that can grow by incorporating arsenic into its structure in place of phosphorus. X-ray images taken at SLAC's synchrotron light source reveal that this microbe may even use arsenic as a building block for DNA. Please join us as we describe this discovery, which rewrites the textbook description of how living cells work.

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: Careers: Life at Sandia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Life at Sandia Karla Software Developer and Mechanical Engineer "There is always something new and exciting to learn. Sandia gives me the opportunity to collaborate with the best scientists and engineers in bioscience, climate, microsystems, and combustion." Karla - Software Developer and Mechanical Engineer Kelsey Aerospace Engineer "Sandia provides amazing educational opportunities and career path flexibility. All of my teammates are motivated and passionate about our work. I

  2. Tropical Cloud Life Cycle and Overlap Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tropical Cloud Life Cycle and Overlap Structure Vogelmann, Andrew Brookhaven National Laboratory Jensen, Michael Brookhaven National Laboratory Kollias, Pavlos Brookhaven National Laboratory Luke, Edward Brookhaven National Laboratory Boer, Erwin LUEBEC Category: Cloud Properties The profile of cloud microphysical properties and how the clouds are overlapped within a vertical column have a profound impact on the radiative transfer and subsequent general circulation model simulations. We will

  3. DOE ESPC Life of Contract Plan Template

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document describes the energy savings performance contract (ESPC) Life of Contract (LOC) Plan template. It provides guidance to agency personnel during the post installation performance period of a Department of Energy's (DOEs) Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC) project. This document will assist the agency in effective ESPC project administration and management. It is intended to be a guide and may be modified by the agency to fit specific needs and procedures.

  4. Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Development Technical Support and General Environmental Studies Report on Outreach to Stakeholders for Fiscal Year 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea E.; Geerlofs, Simon H.

    2010-01-22

    Report on activities working with stakeholders in the emerging marine and hydrokinetic energy industry during FY09, for DOE EERE Office of Waterpower.

  5. NOAA and U.S. Department of Energy Expand Efforts to Increase Energy Efficiency at National Marine Sanctuaries

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    HONOLULU, HI - Through the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Marine Sanctuary Program (NMSP) and the U.S....

  6. Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Devices, Potential Navigational Hazards and Mitigation Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cool, Richard, M.; Hudon, Thomas, J.; Basco, David, R.; Rondorf, Neil, E.

    2009-12-01

    On April 15, 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement for Advanced Water Power Projects which included a Topic Area for Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Market Acceleration Projects. Within this Topic Area, DOE identified potential navigational impacts of marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy technologies and measures to prevent adverse impacts on navigation as a sub-topic area. DOE defines marine and hydrokinetic technologies as those capable of utilizing one or more of the following resource categories for energy generation: ocean waves; tides or ocean currents; free flowing water in rivers or streams; and energy generation from the differentials in ocean temperature. PCCI was awarded Cooperative Agreement DE-FC36-08GO18177 from the DOE to identify the potential navigational impacts and mitigation measures for marine hydrokinetic technologies. A technical report addressing our findings is available on this Science and Technology Information site under the Product Title, "Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Technologies: Potential Navigational Impacts and Mitigation Measures". This product is a brochure, primarily for project developers, that summarizes important issues in that more comprehensive report, identifies locations where that report can be downloaded, and identifies points of contact for more information.

  7. FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT: Underwater Active Acoustic Monitoring Network For Marine And Hydrokinetic Energy Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Peter J.; Edson, Patrick L.

    2013-12-20

    This project saw the completion of the design and development of a second generation, high frequency (90-120 kHz) Subsurface-Threat Detection Sonar Network (SDSN). The system was deployed, operated, and tested in Cobscook Bay, Maine near the site the Ocean Renewable Power Company TidGen™ power unit. This effort resulted in a very successful demonstration of the SDSN detection, tracking, localization, and classification capabilities in a high current, MHK environment as measured by results from the detection and tracking trials in Cobscook Bay. The new high frequency node, designed to operate outside the hearing range of a subset of marine mammals, was shown to detect and track objects of marine mammal-like target strength to ranges of approximately 500 meters. This performance range results in the SDSN system tracking objects for a significant duration - on the order of minutes - even in a tidal flow of 5-7 knots, potentially allowing time for MHK system or operator decision-making if marine mammals are present. Having demonstrated detection and tracking of synthetic targets with target strengths similar to some marine mammals, the primary hurdle to eventual automated monitoring is a dataset of actual marine mammal kinematic behavior and modifying the tracking algorithms and parameters which are currently tuned to human diver kinematics and classification.

  8. Interaction of marine and fluvial clastic sedimentation, central Italy, Tyrrhenian coast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evangelista, S.; Full, W.E.; Tortora, P.

    1989-03-01

    An integrated approach was used to study the interaction of fluvial, beach, and marine processes on sedimentation at the west-central coast of Italy along the Tyrrhenian Sea. The study area, 120 km northwest of Rome, is bounded on the north by Mt. Argentario, on the east by Pleistocene volcanics, on the south by the St. Augustine River, and on the west by the 50-mn bathymetric isopleth. The primary tools used included field work, textural analysis, high-resolution marine seismic, SEM, and Fourier shape analysis. Field work revealed incised streams, potentially relict beach ridges and lagoons, and relatively steep nearshore marine slopes in the northern portions of the study area. The result of the shape analysis performed on 56 samples was the definition of four end members. Each end member reflects a sedimentation process. Three end members were directly associated with fluvial sedimentation, and the fourth reflected marine processes. The seismic data along with the SEM analysis strongly supported the interpretation of four processes that dominate the recent sedimentation history. The sand interpreted to be associated with marine processes was found to represent the smoothest end member. SEM analysis suggests that the smoothing is not due to abrasion but to plastering associated with biologic processes (digestion.) and/or with silica precipitation associated with clay alteration at the freshwater/saltwater interface.

  9. Factors Affecting PMU Installation Costs (October 2014) | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Factors Affecting PMU Installation Costs (October 2014) Factors Affecting PMU Installation Costs (October 2014) The Department of Energy investigated the major cost factors that affected PMU installation costs for the synchrophasor projects funded through the Recovery Act Smart Grid Programs. The data was compiled through interviews with the nine projects that deployed production grade synchrophasor systems. The study found that while the costs associated with PMUs as stand-alone

  10. Attainable Burnup in a LIFE Engine Loaded with Depleted Uranium...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Attainable Burnup in a LIFE Engine Loaded with Depleted Uranium The Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy (LIFE) system uses a laser-based fusion source for electricity ...

  11. Lithium / Sulfur Cells with Long Cycle Life and High Specific...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lithium Sulfur Cells with Long Cycle Life and High Specific Energy Lawrence Berkeley ... Song, M-K., Zhang, Y., Cairns, E.J., "A long-life, high-rate lithiumsulfur cell: a ...

  12. U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database Roadmap (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deru, M.

    2009-08-01

    Life cycle inventory data are the primary inputs for conducting life cycle assessment studies. Studies based on high-quality data that are consistent, accurate, and relevant allow for robust, defensible, and meaningful results.

  13. U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database Roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2009-08-01

    Life cycle inventory data are the primary inputs for conducting life cycle assessment studies. Studies based on high-quality data that are consistent, accurate, and relevant allow for robust, defensible, and meaningful results.

  14. Day4 Energy Certus Life Cycle JV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Day4 Energy Certus Life Cycle JV Jump to: navigation, search Name: Day4 Energy & Certus Life Cycle JV Place: Italy Product: JV company will develop photovoltaic power projects in...

  15. Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products Part 2: LED Manufacturing and Performance Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Life-Cycle ...

  16. Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products This March 28, ...

  17. Life-Cycle Analysis Results of Geothermal Systems in Comparison...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Life-Cycle Analysis Results of Geothermal Systems in Comparison to Other Power Systems A life-cycle energy and greenhouse gas emissions analysis has been conducted with Argonne ...

  18. Bioproduct Life Cycle Analysis with the GREET Model

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 2B—Integration of Supply Chains II: Bioproducts—Enabling Biofuels and Growing the Bioeconomy Bioproduct Life Cycle Analysis with the GREET Model Jennifer B. Dunn, Biofuel Life Cycle Analysis Team Lead, Argonne National Laboratory

  19. Indirect Benefits (Increased Roof Life and HVAC Savings) from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Indirect Benefits (Increased Roof Life and HVAC Savings) from a Solar PV System at the San Jos Convention Center Indirect Benefits (Increased Roof Life and HVAC Savings) from a ...

  20. Life-Cycle Analysis Results of Geothermal Systems in Comparison...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Life-Cycle Analysis Results of Geothermal Systems in Comparison to Other Power Systems Life-Cycle Analysis Results of Geothermal Systems in Comparison to Other Power Systems A ...

  1. Full Useful Life (120,000 miles) Exhaust Emission Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Full Useful Life (120,000 miles) Exhaust Emission Performance of a NOx Adsorber and Diesel ... with Ultralow-Sulfur Fuel Full Useful Life (120,000 miles) Exhaust Emission ...

  2. GREET Development and Applications for Life-Cycle Analysis of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Development and Applications for Life-Cycle Analysis of VehicleFuel Systems Michael Wang, ... (a.k.a. vehicle cycle) for a complete life-cycle analysis (LCA) Establish a ...

  3. GREET Development and Applications for Life-Cycle Analysis of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    GREET Development and Applications for Life-Cycle Analysis of VehicleFuel Systems GREET Development and Applications for Life-Cycle Analysis of VehicleFuel Systems 2013 DOE ...

  4. GREET Bioenergy Life Cycle Analysis and Key Issues for Woody...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    GREET Bioenergy Life Cycle Analysis and Key Issues for Woody Feedstocks GREET Bioenergy Life Cycle Analysis and Key Issues for Woody Feedstocks Breakout Session 2D-Building Market ...

  5. Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products Part I: Review of the Life-Cycle Energy Consumption of Incandescent, Compact Fluorescent, and LED ...

  6. Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil-Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah Michael Vanden Berg; Paul Anderson; Janae Wallace;...

  7. Ecosystem carbon storage capacity as affected by disturbance...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and tausub 1 is the residence time of the carbon pool affected by disturbances (biomass pool in this study). The disturbance regime is characterized by the mean disturbance...

  8. Fact #890: September 14, 2015 Gasoline Prices Are Affected by...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Gasoline Prices Are Affected by Changes in Refinery Output File fotw890web.xlsx More Documents & Publications Fact 858 February 2, 2015 Retail Gasoline Prices in 2014 ...

  9. The microbe-mediated mechanisms affecting topsoil carbon stock...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    affecting topsoil carbon stock in Tibetan grasslands Warming has been shown to cause soil carbon (C) loss in northern grasslands owing to accelerated microbial decomposition...

  10. 90 Seconds of Discovery: Biofuel Catalyst Life and Plugs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zacher, Alan; Olarte, Mariefel

    2014-06-11

    Scientist at PNNL are working to extend the life of the catalysts used in the production of biomass fuels.

  11. 90 Seconds of Discovery: Biofuel Catalyst Life and Plugs

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Zacher, Alan; Olarte, Mariefel

    2014-06-12

    Scientist at PNNL are working to extend the life of the catalysts used in the production of biomass fuels.

  12. Levelized Cost of Energy Analysis of Marine and Hydrokinetic Reference Models: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenne, D. S.; Yu, Y. H.; Neary, V.

    2015-04-24

    In 2010 the U.S. Department of Energy initiated the development of six marine energy converter reference models. The reference models are point designs of well-known marine energy converters. Each device was designed to operate in a specific marine resource, instead of a generic device that can be deployed at any location. This method allows each device to be used as a benchmark for future reference model to benchmark future devices. The six designs consist of three current energy converters and three wave energy converters. The reference model project has generated both technical and economic data sets that are available in the public domain. The methodology to calculate the levelized cost of energy for the reference model project and an overall comparison of the cost of energy from these six reference-model designs are presented in this paper.

  13. Deployment Effects of Marine Renewable Energy Technologies: Wave Energy Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mirko Previsic

    2010-06-17

    Given proper care in siting, design, deployment, operation and maintenance, wave energy conversion could become one of the more environmentally benign sources of electricity generation. In order to accelerate the adoption of these emerging hydrokinetic and marine energy technologies, navigational and environmental concerns must be identified and addressed. All developing hydrokinetic projects involve a wide variety of stakeholders. One of the key issues that site developers face as they engage with this range of stakeholders is that, due to a lack of technical certainty, many of the possible conflicts (e.g., shipping and fishing) and environmental issues are not well-understood,. In September 2008, re vision consulting, LLC was selected by the Department of Energy (DoE) to apply a scenario-based assessment to the emerging hydrokinetic technology sector in order to evaluate the potential impact of these technologies on the marine environment and navigation constraints. The project’s scope of work includes the establishment of baseline scenarios for wave and tidal power conversion at potential future deployment sites. The scenarios capture variations in technical approaches and deployment scales to properly identify and characterize environmental effects and navigational effects. The goal of the project is to provide all stakeholders with an improved understanding of the potential range of technical attributes and potential effects of these emerging technologies and focus all stakeholders on the critical issues that need to be addressed. By identifying and addressing navigational and environmental concerns in the early stages of the industry’s development, serious mistakes that could potentially derail industry-wide development can be avoided. This groundwork will also help in streamlining siting and associated permitting processes, which are considered key hurdles for the industry’s development in the U.S. today. Re vision is coordinating its efforts with two other project teams funded by DoE which are focused on regulatory issues (Pacific Energy Ventures) and navigational issues (PCCI). The results of this study are structured into three reports: (1) Wave power scenario description (2) Tidal power scenario description (3) Framework for Identifying Key Environmental Concerns This is the first report in the sequence and describes the results of conceptual feasibility studies of wave power plants deployed in Humboldt County, California and Oahu, Hawaii. These two sites contain many of the same competing stakeholder interactions identified at other wave power sites in the U.S. and serve as representative case studies. Wave power remains at an early stage of development. As such, a wide range of different technologies are being pursued by different manufacturers. In order to properly characterize potential effects, it is useful to characterize the range of technologies that could be deployed at the site of interest. An industry survey informed the process of selecting representative wave power devices. The selection criteria requires that devices are at an advanced stage of development to reduce technical uncertainties, and that enough data are available from the manufacturers to inform the conceptual design process of this study. Further, an attempt is made to cover the range of different technologies under development to capture variations in potential environmental effects. Table 1 summarizes the selected wave power technologies. A number of other developers are also at an advanced stage of development, but are not directly mentioned here. Many environmental effects will largely scale with the size of the wave power plant. In many cases, the effects of a single device may not be measurable, while larger scale device arrays may have cumulative impacts that differ significantly from smaller scale deployments. In order to characterize these effects, scenarios are established at three deployment scales which nominally represent (1) a small pilot deployment, (2) a small commercial deployment, and (3) a large commercial scale plant. It is important to understand that the purpose of this study was to establish baseline scenarios based on basic device data that was provided to use by the manufacturer for illustrative purposes only.

  14. Incorporating Genomics and Bioinformatics across the Life Sciences Curriculum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ditty, Jayna L.; Kvaal, Christopher A.; Goodner, Brad; Freyermuth, Sharyn K.; Bailey, Cheryl; Britton, Robert A.; Gordon, Stuart G.; Heinhorst, Sabine; Reed, Kelynne; Xu, Zhaohui; Sanders-Lorenz, Erin R.; Axen, Seth; Kim, Edwin; Johns, Mitrick; Scott, Kathleen; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.

    2011-08-01

    Undergraduate life sciences education needs an overhaul, as clearly described in the National Research Council of the National Academies publication BIO 2010: Transforming Undergraduate Education for Future Research Biologists. Among BIO 2010's top recommendations is the need to involve students in working with real data and tools that reflect the nature of life sciences research in the 21st century. Education research studies support the importance of utilizing primary literature, designing and implementing experiments, and analyzing results in the context of a bona fide scientific question in cultivating the analytical skills necessary to become a scientist. Incorporating these basic scientific methodologies in undergraduate education leads to increased undergraduate and post-graduate retention in the sciences. Toward this end, many undergraduate teaching organizations offer training and suggestions for faculty to update and improve their teaching approaches to help students learn as scientists, through design and discovery (e.g., Council of Undergraduate Research [www.cur.org] and Project Kaleidoscope [www.pkal.org]). With the advent of genome sequencing and bioinformatics, many scientists now formulate biological questions and interpret research results in the context of genomic information. Just as the use of bioinformatic tools and databases changed the way scientists investigate problems, it must change how scientists teach to create new opportunities for students to gain experiences reflecting the influence of genomics, proteomics, and bioinformatics on modern life sciences research. Educators have responded by incorporating bioinformatics into diverse life science curricula. While these published exercises in, and guidelines for, bioinformatics curricula are helpful and inspirational, faculty new to the area of bioinformatics inevitably need training in the theoretical underpinnings of the algorithms. Moreover, effectively integrating bioinformatics into courses or independent research projects requires infrastructure for organizing and assessing student work. Here, we present a new platform for faculty to keep current with the rapidly changing field of bioinformatics, the Integrated Microbial Genomes Annotation Collaboration Toolkit (IMG-ACT). It was developed by instructors from both research-intensive and predominately undergraduate institutions in collaboration with the Department of Energy-Joint Genome Institute (DOE-JGI) as a means to innovate and update undergraduate education and faculty development. The IMG-ACT program provides a cadre of tools, including access to a clearinghouse of genome sequences, bioinformatics databases, data storage, instructor course management, and student notebooks for organizing the results of their bioinformatic investigations. In the process, IMG-ACT makes it feasible to provide undergraduate research opportunities to a greater number and diversity of students, in contrast to the traditional mentor-to-student apprenticeship model for undergraduate research, which can be too expensive and time-consuming to provide for every undergraduate. The IMG-ACT serves as the hub for the network of faculty and students that use the system for microbial genome analysis. Open access of the IMG-ACT infrastructure to participating schools ensures that all types of higher education institutions can utilize it. With the infrastructure in place, faculty can focus their efforts on the pedagogy of bioinformatics, involvement of students in research, and use of this tool for their own research agenda. What the original faculty members of the IMG-ACT development team present here is an overview of how the IMG-ACT program has affected our development in terms of teaching and research with the hopes that it will inspire more faculty to get involved.

  15. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Solar Photovoltaics (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-11-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently led the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) Harmonization Project, a study that helps to clarify inconsistent and conflicting life cycle GHG emission estimates in the published literature and provide more precise estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from PV systems.

  16. Curiosity rover zaps Mars for life signs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Curiosity rover zaps Mars for life signs Mars rover depends on three LANL technologies Curiosity zaps Mars for vital signs: Designed by Lab team, ChemCam looks for crucial elements such as carbon, nitrogen and oxygen. July 30, 2012 Curiosity rover zapping rocks on Mars Power up! The third part of the "LANL Visits Mars" trio is an essential component of the heat-producing Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator unit. It powers the rover and keeps the instruments from

  17. Long life lithium batteries with stabilized electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Amine, Khalil; Liu, Jun; Vissers, Donald R.; Lu, Wenquan

    2009-03-24

    The present invention relates to non-aqueous electrolytes having electrode stabilizing additives, stabilized electrodes, and electrochemical devices containing the same. Thus the present invention provides electrolytes containing an alkali metal salt, a polar aprotic solvent, and an electrode stabilizing additive. In some embodiments the additives include a substituted or unsubstituted cyclic or spirocyclic hydrocarbon containing at least one oxygen atom and at least one alkenyl or alkynyl group. When used in electrochemical devices with, e.g., lithium manganese oxide spinel electrodes or olivine or carbon-coated olivine electrodes, the new electrolytes provide batteries with improved calendar and cycle life.

  18. Cultivation of macroscopic marine algae and fresh water aquatic weeds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryther, J.H.

    1982-02-01

    The ORCA clone of the red seaweed Gracilaria tikvahiae has been in culture continuously for over two years. Yield for the past year has averaged 12 g ash-free dry wt/m/sup 2/ .day (17.5 t/a.y) in suspended 2600-1 aluminum tank cultures with four exchanges of enriched seawater per day and continuous aeration. Yields from nonintensive pond-bottom culture, similar to commercial Gracilaria culture methods in Taiwan, averaged 3 g afdw/m/sup 2/.day in preliminary experiments. Rope and spray cultures were not successful. Yields of water hyacinths from March 1978 to March 1979 averaged 25 g afdw/m/sup 2/.day (37 t/a.y). Season, nutrient availability (form and quantity) and stand density were found to affect the relative proportions of structural and nonstructural tissue in water hyacinths and thereby significantly affect digestibility of and methane production by the plants. Pennywort (Hydrocotyle) grew poorly in winter and its annual yield averaged only one-third that of water hyacinth. Water lettuce (Pistia) appears more comparable to hyacinths in preliminary studies and its yields will be monitored throughout a complete year. Stable, continuous anaerobic digestion of both water hyacinths and Gracilaria has been maintained with an average gas production from both species of 0.4 1/g volatile solids at 60% methane.

  19. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saracino-Brown, Jocelyn; Smith, Courtney; Gilman, Patrick

    2013-07-01

    The Wind Program hosted a two-day workshop on July 24-25, 2012 with scientists and regulators engaged in marine ecological survey, modeling, and database efforts pertaining to the waters of the Mid-Atlantic region. The workshop was planned by Federal agency, academic, and private partners to promote collaboration between ongoing offshore ecological survey efforts, and to promote the collaborative development of complementary predictive models and compatible databases. The meeting primarily focused on efforts to establish and predict marine mammal, seabird, and sea turtle abundance, density, and distributions extending from the shoreline to the edge of the Exclusive Economic Zone between Nantucket Sound, Massachusetts and Cape Hatteras, North Carolina.

  20. A marine biogenic source of atmospheric ice-nucleating particles (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect A marine biogenic source of atmospheric ice-nucleating particles Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A marine biogenic source of atmospheric ice-nucleating particles The formation of ice in clouds is facilitated by the presence of airborne ice nucleating particles1,2. Sea spray is one of the major global sources of atmospheric particles, but it is unclear to what extent these particles are capable of nucleating ice3-11. Here we show that material in the sea

  1. The development of CACTUS : a wind and marine turbine performance simulation code.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barone, Matthew Franklin; Murray, Jonathan

    2010-12-01

    CACTUS (Code for Axial and Cross-flow TUrbine Simulation) is a turbine performance simulation code, based on a free wake vortex method, under development at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) as part of a Department of Energy program to study marine hydrokinetic (MHK) devices. The current effort builds upon work previously done at SNL in the area of vertical axis wind turbine simulation, and aims to add models to handle generic device geometry and physical models specific to the marine environment. An overview of the current state of the project and validation effort is provided.

  2. DOE Tour of Zero: Marine Drive by Clifton View Homes | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Marine Drive by Clifton View Homes DOE Tour of Zero: Marine Drive by Clifton View Homes Addthis 1 of 10 Clifton View Homes built this 2,408-square-foot zero energy home in Coupeville, Washington, to the performance criteria of the U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) program. 2 of 10 The ultra-efficient home has 7.84 kW of solar electric panels on the roof, which contribute to zero utility bills for the homeowners. The roof is built with structural insulated panels (SIPs) that

  3. DOE Tour of Zero: Marine Drive by Clifton View Homes | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Marine Drive by Clifton View Homes DOE Tour of Zero: Marine Drive by Clifton View Homes 1 of 10 Clifton View Homes built this 2,408-square-foot zero energy home in Coupeville, Washington, to the performance criteria of the U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) program. 2 of 10 The ultra-efficient home has 7.84 kW of solar electric panels on the roof, which contribute to zero utility bills for the homeowners. The roof is built with structural insulated panels (SIPs) that are

  4. Calibrated Blade-Element/Momentum Theory Aerodynamic Model of the MARIN Stock Wind Turbine: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goupee, A.; Kimball, R.; de Ridder, E. J.; Helder, J.; Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.

    2015-04-02

    In this paper, a calibrated blade-element/momentum theory aerodynamic model of the MARIN stock wind turbine is developed and documented. The model is created using open-source software and calibrated to closely emulate experimental data obtained by the DeepCwind Consortium using a genetic algorithm optimization routine. The provided model will be useful for those interested in validating interested in validating floating wind turbine numerical simulators that rely on experiments utilizing the MARIN stock wind turbine—for example, the International Energy Agency Wind Task 30’s Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration Continued, with Correlation project.

  5. Report to Congress on the Potential Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, Glenn

    2009-12-01

    This report focuses on potential impacts of marine and hydrokinetic technologies to aquatic environments (i.e. rivers, estuaries, and oceans), fish and fish habitats, ecological relationships, and other marine and freshwater aquatic resources. The report does not address impacts to terrestrial ecosystems and organisms that are common to other electricity-generating technologies (e.g., construction and maintenance of transmission lines) or possible effects on the human environment, including: human use conflicts, aesthetics, viewsheds, noise in the terrestrial environment, light, recreation, transportation, navigation, cultural resources, socioeconomic impacts.

  6. Species profiles: Life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (South Florida)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zale, A.V.; Merrifield, S.G. )

    1989-07-01

    Species profiles are literature summaries of the taxonomy, morphology, distribution, life history, habitats, and environmental requirements of coastal species of fishes and aquatic invertebrates. They are designed to assist in environmental impact assessment. The tarpon and ladyfish are popular gamefishes. Adults spawn offshore. Larval and juvenile stages inhabit coastal marshes and mangroves. Both species are thermophilic (preferring warm water), euryhaline (tolerant of a wide range of salinity), and are capable of surviving at low oxygen concentrations. Wetlands destruction and degradation negatively affect these species by reducing nursery areas. 3 figs.

  7. Assessing regional scale predictions of aerosols, marine stratocumulus, and their interactions during VOCALS-REx using WRF-Chem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang Q.; Lee Y.; Gustafson Jr., W. I.; Fast, J. D.; Wang, H.; Easter, R. C.; Morrison, H.; Chapman, E. G.; Spak, S. N.; Mena-Carrasco, M. A.

    2011-12-02

    This study assesses the ability of the recent chemistry version (v3.3) of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-Chem) model to simulate boundary layer structure, aerosols, stratocumulus clouds, and energy fluxes over the Southeast Pacific Ocean. Measurements from the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) and satellite retrievals (i.e., products from the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES), and GOES-10) are used for this assessment. The Morrison double-moment microphysics scheme is newly coupled with interactive aerosols in the model. The 31-day (15 October-16 November 2008) WRF-Chem simulation with aerosol-cloud interactions (AERO hereafter) is also compared to a simulation (MET hereafter) with fixed cloud droplet number concentrations in the microphysics scheme and simplified cloud and aerosol treatments in the radiation scheme. The well-simulated aerosol quantities (aerosol number, mass composition and optical properties), and the inclusion of full aerosol-cloud couplings lead to significant improvements in many features of the simulated stratocumulus clouds: cloud optical properties and microphysical properties such as cloud top effective radius, cloud water path, and cloud optical thickness. In addition to accounting for the aerosol direct and semi-direct effects, these improvements feed back to the simulation of boundary-layer characteristics and energy budgets. Particularly, inclusion of interactive aerosols in AERO strengthens the temperature and humidity gradients within the capping inversion layer and lowers the marine boundary layer (MBL) depth by 130 m from that of the MET simulation. These differences are associated with weaker entrainment and stronger mean subsidence at the top of the MBL in AERO. Mean top-of-atmosphere outgoing shortwave fluxes, surface latent heat, and surface downwelling longwave fluxes are in better agreement with observations in AERO, compared to the MET simulation. Nevertheless, biases in some of the simulated meteorological quantities (e.g., MBL temperature and humidity) and aerosol quantities (e.g., underestimations of accumulation mode aerosol number) might affect simulated stratocumulus and energy fluxes over the Southeastern Pacific, and require further investigation. The well-simulated timing and outflow patterns of polluted and clean episodes demonstrate the model's ability to capture daily/synoptic scale variations of aerosol and cloud properties, and suggest that the model is suitable for studying atmospheric processes associated with pollution outflow over the ocean. The overall performance of the regional model in simulating mesoscale clouds and boundary layer properties is encouraging and suggests that reproducing gradients of aerosol and cloud droplet concentrations and coupling cloud-aerosol-radiation processes are important when simulating marine stratocumulus over the Southeast Pacific.

  8. Life Cycle Nitrogen Trifluoride Emissions from Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fthenakis, V.

    2010-10-25

    Amorphous- and nanocrystalline-silicon thin-film photovoltaic modules are made in high-throughput manufacturing lines that necessitate quickly cleaning the reactor. Using NF{sub 3}, a potent greenhouse gas, as the cleaning agent triggered concerns as recent reports reveal that the atmospheric concentrations of this gas have increased significantly. We quantified the life-cycle emissions of NF{sub 3} in photovoltaic (PV) manufacturing, on the basis of actual measurements at the facilities of a major producer of NF{sub 3} and of a manufacturer of PV end-use equipment. From these, we defined the best practices and technologies that are the most likely to keep worldwide atmospheric concentrations of NF{sub 3} at very low radiative forcing levels. For the average U.S. insolation and electricity-grid conditions, the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from manufacturing and using NF{sub 3} in current PV a-Si and tandem a-Si/nc-Si facilities add 2 and 7 g CO{sub 2eq}/kWh, which can be displaced within the first 1-4 months of the PV system life.

  9. Siting Study Framework and Survey Methodology for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Projects in Offshore Southeast Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinick, Charles

    2011-09-26

    Presentation from the 2011 Water Peer Review in which principal investigator discusses project progess to Investigate areas offshore southeast Florida that appeared most suitable for siting of marine and hydrokinetic energy conversion facilities that may be proposed in the Atlantic Ocean offshore of southeast Florida.

  10. U.S. Marine Corps Stand at Forefront of Energy and Water Savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-12-01

    Located in the heart of South Carolina, the U.S. Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Beaufort is among the militarys most important installations. Located on 6,900 acres 70 miles southwest of Charleston, the installation has established an energy- and water-saving culture that explores and implements new strategies and management approaches aimed at surpassing presidential mandates.

  11. TEE-0072- In the Matter of B&B Marine, Inc.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On October 15, 2010, B&B Marine, Inc. (B&B) filed an Application for Exception with the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) of the Department of Energy (DOE). The firm requests that it be...

  12. Marine plankton as an indicator of low-level radionuclide contamination in the Southern Ocean

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsh, K.V.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1984-07-01

    We have initiated an investigation of the utility of marine plankton as bioconcentrating samplers of low-level marine radioactivity in the southern hemisphere. A literature review shows that both freshwater and marine plankton have trace element and radionuclide concentration factors (relative to water) of up to 10/sup 4/. In the years 1956-1958, considerable work was done on the accumulation and distribution of a variety of fission and activation products produced by the nuclear tests in the Marshall Islands. Since then, studies have largely been confined to a few selected radionuclides, and by far most of this work has been done in the northern hemisphere. We participated in Operation Deepfreeze 1981, collecting 32 plankton samples from the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Glacier on its Antarctic cruise, while Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories concurrently sampled air, water, rain and fallout. We were able to measure concentrations of the naturally occurring radionuclides /sup 7/Be, /sup 40/K and the U and th series, and we believe that we have detected low levels of /sup 144/Ce and /sup 95/Nb in seven samples ranging as far south as 68/sup 0/. There is a definite association between the radionuclide content of plankton and air filters, suggesting that aerosol resuspension of marine radioactivity may be occurring. Biological identification of the plankton suggests a possible correlation between radionuclide concentration and foraminifera content of the samples. 38 references, 7 figures, 3 tables.

  13. Existing Whole-House Case Study: Sunnyvale Marine Climate Deep Retrofit - Sunnyvale, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-03-01

    In this project, the Building America team Alliance for Residential Building Innovation and Allen Gilliland of One Sky Homes collaborated on a marine climate retrofit project designed to meet both Passive House and Building America program standards. The scope included sealing, installing wall, roof and floor insulation (previously lacking), replacing windows, and upgrading the heating and cooling system.

  14. ARM - Field Campaign - 2005 MASE-MArine Stratus Experiment-Pt...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : 2005 MASE-MArine Stratus Experiment-Pt. Reyes, CA 2005.07.05 - 2005.07.27 Lead...

  15. Environmental effects of marine energy development around the world. Annex IV Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea; Hanna, Luke; Whiting, Johnathan; Geerlofs, Simon; Grear, Molly; Blake, Kara ); Coffey, Anna; Massaua, Meghan; Brown-Saracino, Jocelyn; Battey, Hoyt )

    2013-01-15

    Annex IV is an international collaborative project to examine the environmental effects of marine energy devices among countries through the International Energy Agency’s Ocean Energy Systems Initiative (OES). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) serves as the Operating Agent for the Annex, in partnership with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM; formerly the Minerals Management Service), the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), and National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Numerous ocean energy technologies and devices are being developed around the world, and the few data that exist about the environmental effects of these technologies are dispersed among countries and developers. The purpose of Annex IV is to facilitate efficient government oversight of the development of ocean energy systems by compiling and disseminating information about the potential environmental effects of marine energy technologies and to identify methods of monitoring for these effects. Beginning in 2010, this three-year effort produced a publicly available searchable online database of environmental effects information (Tethys). It houses scientific literature pertaining to the environmental effects of marine energy systems, as well as metadata on international ocean energy projects and research studies. Two experts’ workshops were held in Dublin, Ireland (September 2010 and October 2012) to engage with international researchers, developers, and regulators on the scope and outcomes of the Annex IV project. Metadata and information stored in the Tethys database and feedback obtained from the two experts’ workshops were used as resources in the development of this report. This Annex IV final report contains three case studies of specific interactions of marine energy devices with the marine environment that survey, compile, and analyze the best available information in one coherent location. These case studies address 1) the physical interactions between animals and tidal turbines; 2) the acoustic impact of marine energy devices on marine animals; and 3) the effects of energy removal on physical systems. Each case study contains a description of environmental monitoring efforts and research studies, lessons learned, and analysis of remaining information gaps. The information collected through the Annex IV effort and referenced in this report, can be accessed on the Tethys database at http://mhk.pnnl.gov/wiki/index.php/Tethys_ Home.

  16. Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Technologies: Potential Navigational Impacts and Mitigation Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cool, Richard, M.; Hudon, Thomas, J.; Basco, David, R.; Rondorf, Neil, E.

    2009-12-10

    On April 15, 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement for Advanced Water Power Projects which included a Topic Area for Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Market Acceleration Projects. Within this Topic Area, DOE identified potential navigational impacts of marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy technologies and measures to prevent adverse impacts on navigation as a sub-topic area. DOE defines marine and hydrokinetic technologies as those capable of utilizing one or more of the following resource categories for energy generation: ocean waves; tides or ocean currents; free flowing water in rivers or streams; and energy generation from the differentials in ocean temperature. PCCI was awarded Cooperative Agreement DE-FC36-08GO18177 from the DOE to identify the potential navigational impacts and mitigation measures for marine hydrokinetic technologies, as summarized herein. The contract also required cooperation with the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) and two recipients of awards (Pacific Energy Ventures and reVision) in a sub-topic area to develop a protocol to identify streamlined, best-siting practices. Over the period of this contract, PCCI and our sub-consultants, David Basco, Ph.D., and Neil Rondorf of Science Applications International Corporation, met with USCG headquarters personnel, with U.S. Army Corps of Engineers headquarters and regional personnel, with U.S. Navy regional personnel and other ocean users in order to develop an understanding of existing practices for the identification of navigational impacts that might occur during construction, operation, maintenance, and decommissioning. At these same meetings, “standard” and potential mitigation measures were discussed so that guidance could be prepared for project developers. Concurrently, PCCI reviewed navigation guidance published by the USCG and international community. This report summarizes the results of this effort, provides guidance in the form of a checklist for assessing the navigational impacts of potential marine and hydrokinetic projects, and provides guidance for improving the existing navigational guidance promulgated by the USCG in Navigation Vessel Inspection Circular 02 07. At the request of the USCG, our checklist and mitigation guidance was written in a generic nature so that it could be equally applied to offshore wind projects. PCCI teleconferenced on a monthly basis with DOE, Pacific Energy Ventures and reVision in order to share information and review work products. Although the focus of our effort was on marine and hydrokinetic technologies, as defined above, this effort drew upon earlier work by the USCG on offshore wind renewable energy installations. The guidance provided herein can be applied equally to marine and hydrokinetic technologies and to offshore wind, which are collectively referred to by the USCG as Renewable Energy Installations.

  17. Life assessments of a boiler economizer unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lichti, K.A.; Thomas, C.W.; Wilson, P.T.; Julian, W.

    1997-09-01

    An economizer which experienced pitting corrosion during a cleaning accident was subject to recurring corrosion fatigue failures. A condition assessment was undertaken to assess the risk of further failures through metallurgical assessment, extreme value pitting assessments, and on-site NDT condition assessment with on-site extreme value pitting analysis. This was followed by a fatigue life assessment in accordance with PD6493. Condition assessment work and lifetime prediction progressed from initial failure investigation through to final recommendations in a stepwise process. Each stage of the work was followed by a review of the findings and an economic assessment of the alternative options i.e. continue with assessment, full economizer replacement or partial replacement. Selective replacement of a portion of the economizer was recommended.

  18. Evaluation of HEPA filter service life

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fretthold, J.K.; Stithem, A.R.

    1997-07-14

    Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), has approximately 10,000 High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filters installed in a variety of filter plenums. These ventilation/filtration plenum systems are used to control the release of airborne particulate contaminates to the environment during normal operations and potential accidents. This report summarizes the results of destructive and non-destructive tests on HEPA filters obtained from a wide variety of ages and service conditions. These tests were performed to determine an acceptable service life criteria for HEPA filters used at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). A total of 140 filters of various ages (1972 to 1996) and service history (new, aged unused, used) were tested. For the purpose of this report, filter age from manufacture date/initial test date to the current sample date was used, as opposed to the actual time a filter was installed in an operating system.

  19. Improving thermocouple service life in slagging gasifiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, James P.; Kwong, Kyei-Sing; Powell, Cynthia A.; Thomas, Hugh; Krabbe, Rick

    2005-01-01

    The measurement of temperature within slagging gasifiers for long periods of time is difficult/impossible because of sensor failure or blockage of inputs used to monitor gasifier temperature. One of the most common means of temperature measurement in a gasifier is physically, through the use of thermocouples in a gasifier sidewall. These units can fail during startup, standby, or during the first 40-90 days of gasifier service. Failure can be caused by a number of issues; including thermocouple design, construction, placement in the gasifier, gasifier operation, and molten slag attack of the materials used in a thermocouple assembly. Lack of temperature control in a gasifier can lead to improper preheating, slag buildup on gasifier sidewalls, slag attack of gasifier refractories used to line a gasifier, or changes in desired gas output from a gasifier. A general outline of thermocouple failure issues and attempts by the Albany Research Center to improve the service life of thermocouples will be discussed.

  20. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Life Cycle Cost Assessment, Final Technical Report, 30 May 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martel, Laura; Smith, Paul; Rizea, Steven; Van Ryzin, Joe; Morgan, Charles; Noland, Gary; Pavlosky, Rick; Thomas, Michael

    2012-06-30

    The Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Life Cycle Cost Assessment (OLCCA) is a study performed by members of the Lockheed Martin (LM) OTEC Team under funding from the Department of Energy (DOE), Award No. DE-EE0002663, dated 01/01/2010. OLCCA objectives are to estimate procurement, operations and maintenance, and overhaul costs for two types of OTEC plants: -Plants moored to the sea floor where the electricity produced by the OTEC plant is directly connected to the grid ashore via a marine power cable (Grid Connected OTEC plants) -Open-ocean grazing OTEC plant-ships producing an energy carrier that is transported to designated ports (Energy Carrier OTEC plants) Costs are developed using the concept of levelized cost of energy established by DOE for use in comparing electricity costs from various generating systems. One area of system costs that had not been developed in detail prior to this analysis was the operations and sustainment (O&S) cost for both types of OTEC plants. Procurement costs, generally referred to as capital expense and O&S costs (operations and maintenance (O&M) costs plus overhaul and replacement costs), are assessed over the 30 year operational life of the plants and an annual annuity calculated to achieve a levelized cost (constant across entire plant life). Dividing this levelized cost by the average annual energy production results in a levelized cost of electricity, or LCOE, for the OTEC plants. Technical and production efficiency enhancements that could result in a lower value of the OTEC LCOE were also explored. The thermal OTEC resource for Oahu, Hawai’i and projected build out plan were developed. The estimate of the OTEC resource and LCOE values for the planned OTEC systems enable this information to be displayed as energy supplied versus levelized cost of the supplied energy; this curve is referred to as an Energy Supply Curve. The Oahu Energy Supply Curve represents initial OTEC deployment starting in 2018 and demonstrates the predicted economies of scale as technology and efficiency improvements are realized and larger more economical plants deployed. Utilizing global high resolution OTEC resource assessment from the Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization (OTEEV) project (an independent DOE project), Global Energy Supply Curves were generated for Grid Connected and Energy Carrier OTEC plants deployed in 2045 when the predicted technology and efficiencies improvements are fully realized. The Global Energy Supply Curves present the LCOE versus capacity in ascending order with the richest, lowest cost resource locations being harvested first. These curves demonstrate the vast ocean thermal resource and potential OTEC capacity that can be harvested with little change in LCOE.

  1. Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil-Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Water-relat...

  2. Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil-Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Water-re...

  3. How the Koontz Decision May Affect Climate Change Policy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Please join us for a Sept. 10 webinar to discuss the Supreme Court's controversial decision in Koontz v. St. Johns River Water Management District and explore how the decision may affect the...

  4. Enhanced Oil Recovery Affects the Future Energy Mix | GE Global...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enhanced Oil Recovery Affects the Future Energy Mix Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new...

  5. Federal Energy Management Program Issues 2016 AFFECT Funding Opportunity Announcement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On May 26, 2016, the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) issued a funding opportunity announcement (FOA) on the EERE Exchange titled Assisting Federal Facilities with Energy Conservation Technologies (AFFECT) 2016.

  6. Applying Human Factors during the SIS Life Cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avery, K.

    2010-05-05

    Safety Instrumented Systems (SIS) are widely used in U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) nonreactor nuclear facilities for safety-critical applications. Although use of the SIS technology and computer-based digital controls, can improve performance and safety, it potentially introduces additional complexities, such as failure modes that are not readily detectable. Either automated actions or manual (operator) actions may be required to complete the safety instrumented function to place the process in a safe state or mitigate a hazard in response to an alarm or indication. DOE will issue a new standard, Application of Safety Instrumented Systems Used at DOE Nonreactor Nuclear Facilities, to provide guidance for the design, procurement, installation, testing, maintenance, operation, and quality assurance of SIS used in safety significant functions at DOE nonreactor nuclear facilities. The DOE standard focuses on utilizing the process industry consensus standard, American National Standards Institute/ International Society of Automation (ANSI/ISA) 84.00.01, Functional Safety: Safety Instrumented Systems for the Process Industry Sector, to support reliable SIS design throughout the DOE complex. SIS design must take into account human-machine interfaces and their limitations and follow good human factors engineering (HFE) practices. HFE encompasses many diverse areas (e.g., information display, user-system interaction, alarm management, operator response, control room design, and system maintainability), which affect all aspects of system development and modification. This paper presents how the HFE processes and principles apply throughout the SIS life cycle to support the design and use of SIS at DOE nonreactor nuclear facilities.

  7. One in five online scholarly articles affected by 'reference rot'

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    One in five online scholarly articles affected by 'reference rot' Alumni Link: Opportunities, News and Resources for Former Employees Latest Issue:September 2015 all issues All Issues » submit One in five online scholarly articles affected by 'reference rot' Los Alamos authors focus on reference rot, the combination of link rot and content drift to which references to web resources included in STM articles are subject. March 1, 2015 From left, Los Alamos National Laboratory authors Lyudmila

  8. TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes Affecting

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Performance of a Salt Repository for Disposal of Heat-Generating Nuclear Waste | Department of Energy TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes Affecting Performance of a Salt Repository for Disposal of Heat-Generating Nuclear Waste TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes Affecting Performance of a Salt Repository for Disposal of Heat-Generating Nuclear Waste The document describes the initial work on designing and developing requirements for a total

  9. Analysis of Transportation and Logistics Challenges Affecting the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Deployment of Larger Wind Turbines: Summary of Results | Department of Energy Analysis of Transportation and Logistics Challenges Affecting the Deployment of Larger Wind Turbines: Summary of Results Analysis of Transportation and Logistics Challenges Affecting the Deployment of Larger Wind Turbines: Summary of Results The objectives of this study were to identify the transportation and logistics challenges, assess the associated impacts, and provide recommendations for strategies and

  10. One in five online scholarly articles affected by 'reference rot'

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scholarly articles affected by 'reference rot' One in five online scholarly articles affected by 'reference rot' Los Alamos authors focus on reference rot, the combination of link rot and content drift to which references to web resources included in STM articles are subject. January 26, 2015 From left, Los Alamos National Laboratory authors Lyudmila Balakireva, Herbert Van De Sompel and Harihar Shankar, and Martin Klein and Robert Sanderson (on computer screens). Their work was published in the

  11. Economic Conditions and Factors Affecting New Nuclear Power Deployment

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Economic Conditions and Factors Affecting New Nuclear Power Deployment Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Economic Conditions and Factors Affecting New Nuclear Power Deployment This report documents work performed in support of the US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy's Advanced Small Modular Reactor (AdvSMR) program. The report presents information and results from economic analyses to describe current electricity market conditions

  12. Characterization of microstructural strengthening in the heat-affected zone

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of a blast-resistant naval steel | Energy Frontier Research Centers microstructural strengthening in the heat-affected zone of a blast-resistant naval steel Home Author: X. Yu, J. Caron, S. S. Babu, J. C. Lippold, D. Isheim, D. N. Seidman Year: 2010 Abstract: The influence of simulated heat-affected zone thermal cycles on the microstructural evolution in a blast-resistant naval steel was investigated by dilatometry, microhardness testing, optical microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction

  13. Site-Selective Ionization in Nanoclusters Affects Subsequent Fragmentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site-Selective Ionization in Nanoclusters Affects Subsequent Fragmentation Site-Selective Ionization in Nanoclusters Affects Subsequent Fragmentation Print Wednesday, 30 June 2010 00:00 Understanding charge-transfer processes at the atomic level of nanoscale systems is of the utmost importance for designing nanodevices based on quantum-dot structures, nanotubes, or two-dimensional graphene sheets. Researchers from Western Michigan University, Berkeley Lab, and other international research

  14. SITING PROTOCOLS FOR MARINE AND HYDROKINETIC ENERGY PROJECTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kopf, Steven; Klure, Justin; Hofford, Anna; McMurray, Greg; Hampton, Therese

    2012-07-15

    Project Objective: The purpose of this project is to identify and address regulatory issues that affect the cost, time and the management of potential effects as it relates to siting and permitting advanced water power technologies. Background: The overall goal of this effort is to reduce the cost, time and effort of managing potential effects from the development advanced water power projects as it relates to the regulatory process in siting and permitting. To achieve this goal, a multi-disciplinary team will collect and synthesize existing information regarding regulatory processes into a user-friendly online format. In addition, the team will develop a framework for project planning and assessment that can incorporate existing and new information. The team will actively collaborate and coordinate with other efforts that support or influence regulatory process. Throughout the process, the team will engage in an iterative, collaborative process for gathering input and testing ideas that involves the relevant stakeholders across all sectors at the national, regional, and all state levels.

  15. Natural thorium isotopes in marine sediment core off Labuan port

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hafidz, B. Y.; Asnor, A. S.; Terence, R. C.; Mohamed, C. A. R.

    2014-02-12

    Sediment core was collected from Labuan port and analyzed to determine the radioactivity of thorium (Th) isotopes. The objectives of this study are to determine the possible sources of Th isotopes at Labuan port and estimates the sedimentation rate based on {sup 228}Th/{sup 232}Th model. The results suggest the {sup 230}Th and {sup 232}Th might be originated from terrestrial sedimentary rock while {sup 228}Th originated by authigenic origin. High ratio value of {sup 230}Th/{sup 232}Th detected at the top surface sediment indicates the increasing of {sup 230}Th at the recent years which might be contributed from the anthropogenic sources. The sedimentation rate of core sediment from Labuan Port was successfully estimated by using {sup 228}Th/{sup 232}Th model. The result show high sedimentation rate with 4.67 cm/year indicates rapid deposition occurred at this study area due to the high physical activity at the Labuan port. By assume the constant sedimentation rate at this area; we estimated the age of 142 cm core sediment obtained from Labuan port is 32 years started from 1981 to 2012. This chronology will be used in forthcoming research to investigate the historical profile of anthropogenic activities affecting the Labuan port.

  16. Global Distribution and Climate Forcing of Marine Organic Aerosol - Part 2: Effects on Cloud Properties and Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gantt, Brett; Xu, Jun; Meskhidze, N.; Zhang, Yang; Nenes, Athanasios; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2012-07-25

    A series of simulations with the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) with a 7-mode Modal Aerosol Model were conducted to assess the changes in cloud microphysical properties and radiative forcing resulting from marine organic aerosols. Model simulations show that the anthropogenic aerosol indirect forcing (AIF) predicted by CAM5 is decreased in absolute magnitude by up to 0.09 Wm{sup -2} (7 %) when marine organic aerosols are included. Changes in the AIF from marine organic aerosols are associated with small global increases in low-level incloud droplet number concentration and liquid water path of 1.3 cm{sup -3} (1.5 %) and 0.22 gm{sup -2} (0.5 %), respectively. Areas especially sensitive to changes in cloud properties due to marine organic aerosol include the Southern Ocean, North Pacific Ocean, and North Atlantic Ocean, all of which are characterized by high marine organic emission rates. As climate models are particularly sensitive to the background aerosol concentration, this small but non-negligible change in the AIF due to marine organic aerosols provides a notable link for ocean-ecosystem marine low-level cloud interactions and may be a candidate for consideration in future earth system models.

  17. Life-cycle environmental analysis--A three dimensional view

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutherlin, K.L.; Black, R.E. )

    1993-01-01

    Both the US Air Force and the US Army have recently increased their emphasis on life-cycles of weapons systems. Along with that emphasis, there has also been an increase in emphasis in life-cycle National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation. Conflicts and inefficiencies arise when a weapon system is fielded and prompts the need for a site-specific environmental analysis. In their research and experience, the authors found no real link between life-cycle environmental analysis and site-specific environmental analyses required at various points within the life-cycle of a weapon. This other look at the relation between life-cycle and site-specific environmental analyses has the potential to increase efficiency in NEPA compliance actions and save tax dollars in the process. The authors present a three-dimensional model that relates life-cycle analyses to site-specific analyses.

  18. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Perspective on Exporting Liquefied Natural Gas

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    from the United States | Department of Energy Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Perspective on Exporting Liquefied Natural Gas from the United States Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Perspective on Exporting Liquefied Natural Gas from the United States This analysis calculates the life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for regional coal and imported natural gas power in Europe and Asia. The primary research questions are as follows: *How does exported liquefied natural gas (LNG) from the U.S. compare

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: Careers: Work-Life Balance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Work-Life Balance People in park Your life is not just work We understand your time matters - that's why Sandia is flexible in many ways. Sandia encourages employees to have a healthy, multidimensional lifestyle and achieve a personal balance between home, work, and community life. We offer flexible work arrangements that serve as alternatives to the traditional workweek. Sandia also provides a fulfilling professional environment, a network of employee support resources, and an array of health

  20. LIFE: The Case for Early Commercialization of Fusion Energy (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: LIFE: The Case for Early Commercialization of Fusion Energy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: LIFE: The Case for Early Commercialization of Fusion Energy This paper presents the case for early commercialization of laser inertial fusion energy (LIFE). Results taken from systems modeling of the US electrical generating enterprise quantify the benefits of fusion energy in terms of carbon emission, nuclear waste and plutonium production

  1. Building Life Cycle Cost Programs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building Life Cycle Cost Programs Building Life Cycle Cost Programs The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) developed the Building Life Cycle Cost (BLCC) Programs to provide computational support for the analysis of capital investments in buildings. They include BLCC5, the Energy Escalation Rate Calculator, Handbook 135, and the Annual Supplement to Handbook 135. BLCC5 Program Register and download. BLCC 5.3-15 (for Windows or Mac OS X). BLCC version 5.3-15 contains the

  2. Prospective Longitudinal Assessment of Quality of Life for Liver Cancer

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Prospective Longitudinal Assessment of Quality of Life for Liver Cancer Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Prospective Longitudinal Assessment of Quality of Life for Liver Cancer Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Purpose: To evaluate quality of life (QoL), an important outcome owing to poor long-term survival,

  3. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Perspective on Exporting Liquefied Natural Gas

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    from the United States | Department of Energy Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Perspective on Exporting Liquefied Natural Gas from the United States Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Perspective on Exporting Liquefied Natural Gas from the United States On May 29, 2014, the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy announced the availability for public review and comment the report Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Perspective on Exporting Liquefied Natural Gas from the United States (LCA GHG Report).

  4. Battery Calendar Life Estimator Manual Modeling and Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jon P. Christophersen; Ira Bloom; Ed Thomas; Vince Battaglia

    2012-10-01

    The Battery Life Estimator (BLE) Manual has been prepared to assist developers in their efforts to estimate the calendar life of advanced batteries for automotive applications. Testing requirements and procedures are defined by the various manuals previously published under the United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC). The purpose of this manual is to describe and standardize a method for estimating calendar life based on statistical models and degradation data acquired from typical USABC battery testing.

  5. Long-term affected energy production of waste to energy technologies identified by use of energy system analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muenster, M.; Meibom, P.

    2010-12-15

    Affected energy production is often decisive for the outcome of consequential life-cycle assessments when comparing the potential environmental impact of products or services. Affected energy production is however difficult to determine. In this article the future long-term affected energy production is identified by use of energy system analysis. The focus is on different uses of waste for energy production. The Waste-to-Energy technologies analysed include co-combustion of coal and waste, anaerobic digestion and thermal gasification. The analysis is based on optimization of both investments and production of electricity, district heating and bio-fuel in a future possible energy system in 2025 in the countries of the Northern European electricity market (Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Finland and Germany). Scenarios with different CO{sub 2} quota costs are analysed. It is demonstrated that the waste incineration continues to treat the largest amount of waste. Investments in new waste incineration capacity may, however, be superseded by investments in new Waste-to-Energy technologies, particularly those utilising sorted fractions such as organic waste and refuse derived fuel. The changed use of waste proves to always affect a combination of technologies. What is affected varies among the different Waste-to-Energy technologies and is furthermore dependent on the CO{sub 2} quota costs and on the geographical scope. The necessity for investments in flexibility measures varies with the different technologies such as storage of heat and waste as well as expansion of district heating networks. Finally, inflexible technologies such as nuclear power plants are shown to be affected.

  6. Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; LIFE CYCLE; ...

  7. NETL - Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: NETL - Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis 2005 Baseline Model AgencyCompany Organization: National Energy Technology...

  8. LIFE Materials: Fuel Cycle and Repository Volume 11

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaw, H; Blink, J A

    2008-12-12

    The fusion-fission LIFE engine concept provides a path to a sustainable energy future based on safe, carbon-free nuclear power with minimal nuclear waste. The LIFE design ultimately offers many advantages over current and proposed nuclear energy technologies, and could well lead to a true worldwide nuclear energy renaissance. When compared with existing and other proposed future nuclear reactor designs, the LIFE engine exceeds alternatives in the most important measures of proliferation resistance and waste minimization. The engine needs no refueling during its lifetime. It requires no removal of fuel or fissile material generated in the LIFE engine. It leaves no weapons-attractive material at the end of life. Although there is certainly a need for additional work, all indications are that the 'back end' of the fuel cycle does not to raise any 'showstopper' issues for LIFE. Indeed, the LIFE concept has numerous benefits: (1) Per unit of electricity generated, LIFE engines would generate 20-30 times less waste (in terms of mass of heavy metal) requiring disposal in a HLW repository than does the current once-through fuel cycle. (2) Although there may be advanced fuel cycles that can compete with LIFE's low mass flow of heavy metal, all such systems require reprocessing, with attendant proliferation concerns; LIFE engines can do this without enrichment or reprocessing. Moreover, none of the advanced fuel cycles can match the low transuranic content of LIFE waste. (3) The specific thermal power of LIFE waste is initially higher than that of spent LWR fuel. Nevertheless, this higher thermal load can be managed using appropriate engineering features during an interim storage period, and could be accommodated in a Yucca-Mountain-like repository by appropriate 'staging' of the emplacement of waste packages during the operational period of the repository. The planned ventilation rates for Yucca Mountain would be sufficient for LIFE waste to meet the thermal constraints of the repository design. (4) A simple, but arguably conservative, estimate for the dose from a repository containing 63,000 MT of spent LIFE fuel would have similar performance to the currently planned Yucca Mountain Repository. This indicates that a properly designed 'LIFE Repository' would almost certainly meet the proposed Nuclear Regulatory Commission standards for dose to individuals, even though the waste in such a repository would have produced 20-30 times more generated electricity than the reference case for Yucca Mountain. The societal risk/benefit ratio for a LIFE repository would therefore be significantly better than for currently planned repositories for LWR fuel.

  9. Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Part 2: LED Manufacturing and Performance Scholand, Michael; Dillon, Heather E. 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; LIFE CYCLE;...

  10. Parameter Study of the LIFE Engine Nuclear Design (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    LLNL is developing the nuclear fusion based Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) power plant concept. The baseline design uses a depleted uranium (DU) fission fuel blanket with a ...

  11. Characterization of High Level Waste from a Hybrid LIFE Engine...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Characterization of High Level Waste from a Hybrid LIFE Engine for Enhanced Repository Performance Authors: Beckett, E ; Fratoni, M Publication Date: 2010-08-25 OSTI ...

  12. Prospective Longitudinal Assessment of Quality of Life for Liver...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Cancer Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Prospective Longitudinal Assessment of Quality of Life for Liver Cancer ...

  13. Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... life-cycle environmental impact of the LED lamps is favorable when compared to CFLs and incandescent lamps, recycling will likely gain importance as consumer adoption increases. ...

  14. NREL: U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database Home Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. Life-Cycle Inventory Database Buildings Research Photo of a green field with an ocean in the background. U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database NREL and its partners created the U.S. Life Cycle Inventory (LCI) Database to help life cycle assessment (LCA) practitioners answer questions about environmental impact. This database provides individual gate-to-gate, cradle-to-gate and cradle-to-grave accounting of the energy and material flows into and out of the environment that are associated with

  15. Delaware Company Breathes New Life into Old Post Office Building |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Company Breathes New Life into Old Post Office Building Delaware Company Breathes New Life into Old Post Office Building November 26, 2013 - 12:51pm Addthis Thanks to the Energy Department, Delaware-based Brandywine CAD Design was able to breathe new life into a local historic building while saving on its energy costs. | Photo courtesy of Brandywine CAD Design. Thanks to the Energy Department, Delaware-based Brandywine CAD Design was able to breathe new life into a local

  16. Analysis of Energy, Environmental and Life Cycle Cost Reduction...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Environmental and Life Cycle Cost Reduction Potential of Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP) in Hot and Humid Climate Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on...

  17. GREET Bioenergy Life Cycle Analysis and Key Issues for Woody...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioenergy Life Cycle Analysis and Key Issues for Woody Feedstocks Michael Wang Systems Assessment Section Energy Systems Division Argonne National Laboratory Biomass 2014 ...

  18. Crivelli, Silvia; Meza, Juan 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES Ernest...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    folding via divide-and-conquer optimization Oliva, Ricardo; Crivelli, Silvia; Meza, Juan 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley NationalLaboratory, Berkeley, CA...

  19. Computing, Environment and Life Sciences | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Intranet About Us Intranet Argonne National Laboratory Computing, Environment and Life Sciences Organizations Facilities and Institutes News Events Advancing the Frontiers of...

  20. Harmonizing Technological Innovation and End-of-Life Strategy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Mangold & R. Simon 2015 Pearson Economics 2013 7 Launch Growth Maturity Decline Time Revenue Product Life Span Technology Pulse Estimated U.S. consumer electronic sales 1980 to...

  1. High Performance Builder Spotlight: LifeStyle Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-01-01

    LifeStyle Homes of Melbourne, Florida, is aiming for affordable net zero energy homes with help from Building America research partner Florida Solar Energy Center.

  2. Recommendations for Maximizing Battery Life in Photovoltaic Systems...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Recommendations for Maximizing Battery Life in Photovoltaic Systems: A Review of Lessons Learned Notes, observations and recommendations about the use of batteries in small ...

  3. Staying active - for life | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Staying active - for life Staying active - for life Posted: July 9, 2015 - 4:20pm Print version Allison Roberts was one of the more than 800 CNS employees who participated in Active for Life. More than 800 CNS employees participated in the Active for Life Challenge April 1-June 3. This 10-week program encourages people to be more active and eat healthier foods on a regular basis. "It was terrific to see people out walking around the plant, in the gyms in town or participating in group

  4. Preliminary design study of small long life boiling water reactor...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    boiling water reactor (BWR) with tight lattice thorium nitride fuel Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Preliminary design study of small long life boiling water reactor ...

  5. Screening Risk Assessment for Possible Radionuclides in the Amchitka Marine Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NNSA /NV

    2002-10-31

    As part of its environmental stewardship program the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is reevaluating three sites where underground nuclear tests were conducted in the deep subsurface of Amchitka Island, Alaska. The tests (i.e., Long Shot, Milrow, and Cannikin) were conducted in 1965, 1969, and 1971, respectively. Extensive investigations were conducted on these tests and their effect on the environment. Evaluations at the time of testing indicated limited release of radionuclides and absence of risk related to the testing; however, these are being reevaluated under the current DOE environmental stewardship program. A screening risk assessment of potential radionuclide release into the marine environment is an important part of this reevaluation. The risk assessment is one of three interrelated activities: a groundwater model and this screening risk assessment, both of which guide the decisions in the third activity, the site closure plan. Thus, the overall objective of the work is to understand, and subsequently manage, any risk to humans and the environment through a closure and long-term stewardship plan. The objective of this screening risk assessment is to predict whether possible releases of radionuclides at the ocean floor would represent potential risks to Native Alaskans by consumption of marine subsistence species. In addition, risks were predicted for consumers of commercial catches of marine organisms. These risks were calculated beginning with estimates of possible radionuclide release at the seafloor (from a groundwater modeling study), into the seawater, through possible uptake by marine organisms, and finally possible consumption by humans. The risk assessment model has 11 elements, progressing from potential release at the seafloor through water and food chains to human intake. Data for each of these elements were systematically found and synthesized from many sources, and represent the best available knowledge. Whenever precise data were lacking, the most conservative data were selected. Conservative assumptions and values were used for radionuclide uptake factors and for marine food ingestion rates by human receptors. The dispersion of material in the marine environment utilized a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-approved model (CORMIX). In addition, the screening level of 1 x 10{sup -6} or 1 excess cancer in 1 million is considered by the EPA to be below the level of concern. The end result, as presented in this report, is a highly conservative estimate of potential risks that are well below the EPA's most conservative risk threshold for both subsistence users and commercial-catch consumers.

  6. Extended life aluminide fuel. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, L.G.; Beeston, J.M.

    1986-06-01

    As the price of fuel fabrication, shipment of both new and spent fuel, and fuel reprocessing continue to rise at a rapid rate, researchers look for alternate methods to keep reactor fuel costs within their limited funding. Extended fuel element lifetimes, without jeopardizing reactor safety, can reduce fuel costs by up to a factor of two. The Extended Life Aluminide (ELAF) program was started at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) as a joint project of the United States Department of Energy (DOE), the University of Missouri, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology research reactors. Fuel plates of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) type construction were fabricated at Atomics International and irradiated in the ATR at the INEL. Four fuel matrix compositions were tested (i.e., 50 vol% UAl/sub x/ cores for reference, and 40, 45 and 50 vol% UAl/sub 2/ cores). The 50 vol% UAl/sub 2/ cores contained up to 3 grams U-235 per cm/sup 3/ of core. Three plates of each composition were irradiated to peak burnup levels of 3 x 10/sup 21/ fission/cm/sup 3/ of core. The only observed damage was due to external corrosion at similar rates experienced by UAl/sub x/ fuel elements in test reactors.

  7. Phase Formation and Transformations in Transmutation Fuel Materials for the LIFE Engine Part I - Path Forward

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turchi, P E; Kaufman, L; Fluss, M J

    2008-11-10

    The current specifications of the LLNL fusion-fission hybrid proposal, namely LIFE, impose severe constraints on materials, and in particular on the nuclear fissile or fertile nuclear fuel and its immediate environment. This constitutes the focus of the present report with special emphasis on phase formation and phase transformations of the transmutation fuel and their consequences on particle and pebble thermal, chemical and mechanical integrities. We first review the work that has been done in recent years to improve materials properties under the Gen-IV project, and with in particular applications to HTGR and MSR, and also under GNEP and AFCI in the USA. Our goal is to assess the nuclear fuel options that currently exist together with their issues. Among the options, it is worth mentioning TRISO, IMF, and molten salts. The later option will not be discussed in details since an entire report is dedicated to it. Then, in a second part, with the specific LIFE specifications in mind, the various fuel options with their most critical issues are revisited with a path forward for each of them in terms of research, both experimental and theoretical. Since LIFE is applicable to very high burn-up of various fuels, distinctions will be made depending on the mission, i.e., energy production or incineration. Finally a few conclusions are drawn in terms of the specific needs for integrated materials modeling and the in depth knowledge on time-evolution thermochemistry that controls and drastically affects the performance of the nuclear materials and their immediate environment. Although LIFE demands materials that very likely have not yet been fully optimized, the challenge are not insurmountable and a well concerted experimental-modeling effort should lead to dramatic advances that should well serve other fission programs such as Gen-IV, GNEP, AFCI as well as the international fusion program, ITER.

  8. Building America Residential System Research Results: Achieving 30% Whole House Energy Savings Level in Marine Climates; January 2006 - December 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, R.; Hendron, R.; Eastment, M.; Jalalzadeh-Azar, A.

    2006-12-01

    This report summarizes research results for the 30% energy savings level and demonstrates that lead builders can successfully provide 30% homes in the Marine Climate Region on a cost-neutral basis.

  9. Final Report Recommended Actions to Reduce Electrical Peak Loads at the Marine Corps Air Station at Camp Pendleton, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hail, John C.; Brown, Daryl R.; McCullough, Jeffrey J.; Underhill, Ronald M.

    2001-05-08

    PNNL conducted a walk-through audit of Marine Corps Air Station at Camp Pendleton. The audit inspected a significant portion of the site and identified a large number of similar energy saving opportunities across all building types.

  10. Live Webinar on the Marine and Hydrokinetic Demonstrations at The Navy's Wave Energy Test Site Funding Opportunity Announcement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On Wednesday, May 7, 2014 from 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM EDT the Water Power Program will hold an informational webinar on the Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Demonstrations at The Navy's Wave Energy Test...

  11. Post-Remediation Biomonitoring of Pesticides in Marine Waters Near the United Heckathorn Site, Richmond, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antrim, Liam D.; Kohn, Nancy P.

    2000-09-05

    Marine sediment remediation at the United Heckathorn Superfund Site was completed in April 1997. Water and mussel tissues were sampled in January 1998 from four stations near Lauritzen Canal in Richmond, California, for the first post-remediation monitoring of marine areas near the United Heckathorn Site. Dieldrin and DDT were analyzed in water samples, tissue samples from resident mussels, and tissue samples from transplanted mussels deployed for 4 months. Concentrations of dieldrin and total DDT in water and total DDT in tissue were compared to pre-remediation data available from the California State Mussel Watch program (tissues) and the Ecological Risk Assessment for the United Heckathorn Superfund Site (tissues and water). Biomonitoring results indicated that pesticides were still bioavailable in the water column, and have not been reduced from pre-remediation levels. Annual biomonitoring will continue to assess the effectiveness of remedial actions at the United Heckathorn Site.

  12. Molecular biology in marine science: Scientific questions, technological approaches, and practical implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    This report describes molecular techniques that could be invaluable in addressing process-oriented problems in the ocean sciences that have perplexed oceanographers for decades, such as understanding the basis for biogeochemical processes, recruitment processes, upper-ocean dynamics, biological impacts of global warming, and ecological impacts of human activities. The coupling of highly sophisticated methods, such as satellite remote sensing, which permits synoptic monitoring of chemical, physical, and biological parameters over large areas, with the power of modern molecular tools for ``ground truthing`` at small scales could allow scientists to address questions about marine organisms and the ocean in which they live that could not be answered previously. Clearly, the marine sciences are on the threshold of an exciting new frontier of scientific discovery and economic opportunity.

  13. Final Report: Transport and its regulation in Marine Microorganisms: A Genomic Based Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian Palenik; Bianca Brahamsha; Ian Paulsen

    2009-09-03

    This grant funded the analysis and annotation of the genomes of Synechococcus and Ostreococcus, major marine primary producers. Particular attention was paid to the analysis of transporters using state of the art bioinformatics analyses. During the analysis of the Synechococcus genome, some of the components of the unique bacterial swimming apparatus of one species of Synechococcus (Clade III, strain WH8102) were determined and these included transporters, novel giant proteins and glycosyltransferases. This grant funded the analysis of gene expression in Synechococcus using whole genome microarrays. These analyses revealed the strategies by which marine cyanobacteria respond to environmental conditions such as the absence of phosphorus, a common limiting nutrient, and the interaction of Synechococcus with other microbes. These analyses will help develop models of gene regulation in cyanobacteria and thus help predict their responses to changes in environmental conditions.

  14. Data Quality Objectives Supporting Radiological Air Emissions Monitoring for the Marine Sciences Laboratory, Sequim Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, J. M.; Meier, Kirsten M.; Snyder, Sandra F.; Antonio, Ernest J.; Fritz, Brad G.; Poston, Theodore M.

    2012-12-27

    This document of Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) was prepared based on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Guidance on Systematic Planning Using the Data Quality Objectives Process, EPA, QA/G4, 2/2006 (EPA 2006), as well as several other published DQOs. The intent of this report is to determine the necessary steps required to ensure that radioactive emissions to the air from the Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) headquartered at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratorys Sequim Marine Research Operations (Sequim Site) on Washington States Olympic Peninsula are managed in accordance with regulatory requirements and best practices. The Sequim Site was transitioned in October 2012 from private operation under Battelle Memorial Institute to an exclusive use contract with the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Pacific Northwest Site Office.

  15. Observing the Sparks of Life | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Observing the Sparks of Life December 31, 2013 Observing the Sparks of Life EFRC researchers isolate a photosynthetic complex - arguably the most important bit of organic chemistry on the planet - in its complete functioning state. http://science.energy.gov/discovery-and-innovation/stories/2013/127045/ In the News

  16. Developing High Capacity, Long Life Anodes | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon es020_amine_2011_p.pdf More Documents & Publications Developing A New High Capacity Anode With Long Cycle Life Developing High Capacity, Long Life Anodes Development of High Capacity Anode for Li-ion Batteries

  17. Research Finds Vitamin D Deficiency Affects Bone Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Finds Vitamin D Deficiency Affects Bone Quality Research Finds Vitamin D Deficiency Affects Bone Quality Print Wednesday, 30 April 2014 00:00 Vitamin D deficiency is a widespread medical condition that plays a major role in human bone health. Scientists know that a lack of vitamin D can cause bone diseases such as rickets and osteomalacia. Now a team of researchers working at the ALS has also found that vitamin D deficiency plays a significant role in the bone-aging process. Low levels

  18. he Impact of Primary Marine Aerosol on Atmospheric Chemistry, Radiation and Climate: A CCSM Model Development Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keene, William C.; Long, Michael S.

    2013-05-20

    This project examined the potential large-scale influence of marine aerosol cycling on atmospheric chemistry, physics and radiative transfer. Measurements indicate that the size-dependent generation of marine aerosols by wind waves at the ocean surface and the subsequent production and cycling of halogen-radicals are important but poorly constrained processes that influence climate regionally and globally. A reliable capacity to examine the role of marine aerosol in the global-scale atmospheric system requires that the important size-resolved chemical processes be treated explicitly. But the treatment of multiphase chemistry across the breadth of chemical scenarios encountered throughout the atmosphere is sensitive to the initial conditions and the precision of the solution method. This study examined this sensitivity, constrained it using high-resolution laboratory and field measurements, and deployed it in a coupled chemical-microphysical 3-D atmosphere model. First, laboratory measurements of fresh, unreacted marine aerosol were used to formulate a sea-state based marine aerosol source parameterization that captured the initial organic, inorganic, and physical conditions of the aerosol population. Second, a multiphase chemical mechanism, solved using the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry??s MECCA (Module Efficiently Calculating the Chemistry of the Atmosphere) system, was benchmarked across a broad set of observed chemical and physical conditions in the marine atmosphere. Using these results, the mechanism was systematically reduced to maximize computational speed. Finally, the mechanism was coupled to the 3-mode modal aerosol version of the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM v3.6.33). Decadal-scale simulations with CAM v.3.6.33, were run both with and without reactive-halogen chemistry and with and without explicit treatment of particulate organic carbon in the marine aerosol source function. Simulated results were interpreted (1) to evaluate influences of marine aerosol production on the microphysical properties of aerosol populations and clouds over the ocean and the corresponding direct and indirect effects on radiative transfer; (2) atmospheric burdens of reactive halogen species and their impacts on O3, NOx, OH, DMS, and particulate non-sea-salt SO42-; and (3) the global production and influences of marine-derived particulate organic carbon. The model reproduced major characteristics of the marine aerosol system and demonstrated the potential sensitivity of global, decadal-scale climate metrics to multiphase marine-derived components of Earth??s troposphere. Due to the combined computational burden of the coupled system, the currently available computational resources were the limiting factor preventing the adequate statistical analysis of the overall impact that multiphase chemistry might have on climate-scale radiative transfer and climate.

  19. Marine Ice Nuclei Collections - MAGIC (MAGIC-IN) Final Campaign Summary

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    0 Marine Ice Nuclei Collections - MAGIC (MAGIC-IN) Final Campaign Summary PJ DeMott TCJ Hill February 2016 CLIMATE RESEARCH FACILITY DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed,

  20. SELECTING SPECIES FOR MARINE ASSESSMENT OF RADIONUCLIDES AROUND AMCHITKA: PLANNING FOR DIVERSE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Monitoring and Assessment (2006) 123: 371-391 DOI: 10.1007/~10661-006-9203-2 @ Springer 2006 SELECTING SPECIES FOR MARINE ASSESSMENT OF RADIONUCLIDES AROUND AMCHITKA: PLANNING FOR DIVERSE GOALS AND INTERESTS JOANNA BURGER*, MICHAEL GOCHFELD and STEPHEN JEWETT Rutgers University ('author for correspondence, e-mail: burger@biology.rutgers.edu) (Received 27 October 2005; accepted 16 January 2006) Abstract. Considerable attention has been devoted to selecting bioindicator species as part of moni-