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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "af alkaline fly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Preferential Acidic, Alkaline and Neutral Solubility of Metallic Elements In Fly Ash  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Preferential Acidic, Alkaline and Neutral Solubility of Preferential Acidic, Alkaline and Neutral Solubility of Metallic Elements in Fly Ash Ann G. Kim 1 1 ORISE Research Fellow, National Energy Technology Laboratory, US Department of Energy, 626 Cochrans Mill Rd., Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 KEYWORDS: Coal Utilization By-Products, leaching, pH ABSTRACT In the US, over 100 million tons of coal utilization by-products (CUB) are generated annually. To determine if exposure of these materials to aqueous fluids poses an environmental threat, researchers at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have conducted extensive leaching tests. Five 1 kg samples of 35 PC fly ashes have been leached with acid, neutral and alkaline solutions at an approximate rate of 130 mL/d for 1 to 3 months. The leachates are

2

Toxicity mitigation and solidification of municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash using alkaline activated coal ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Incinerator fly ash (IFA) is added to an alkali activated coal fly ash (CFA) matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Means of stabilizing the incinerator ash for use in construction applications. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Concrete made from IFA, CFA and IFA-CFA mixes was chemically characterized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmentally friendly solution to IFA disposal by reducing its toxicity levels. - Abstract: Municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration is a common and effective practice to reduce the volume of solid waste in urban areas. However, the byproduct of this process is a fly ash (IFA), which contains large quantities of toxic contaminants. The purpose of this research study was to analyze the chemical, physical and mechanical behaviors resulting from the gradual introduction of IFA to an alkaline activated coal fly ash (CFA) matrix, as a mean of stabilizing the incinerator ash for use in industrial construction applications, where human exposure potential is limited. IFA and CFA were analyzed via X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Inductive coupled plasma (ICP) to obtain a full chemical analysis of the samples, its crystallographic characteristics and a detailed count of the eight heavy metals contemplated in US Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR). The particle size distribution of IFA and CFA was also recorded. EPA's Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) was followed to monitor the leachability of the contaminants before and after the activation. Also images obtained via Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), before and after the activation, are presented. Concrete made from IFA, CFA and IFA-CFA mixes was subjected to a full mechanical characterization; tests include compressive strength, flexural strength, elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio and setting time. The leachable heavy metal contents (except for Se) were below the maximum allowable limits and in many cases even below the reporting limit. The leachable Chromium was reduced from 0.153 down to 0.0045 mg/L, Arsenic from 0.256 down to 0.132 mg/L, Selenium from 1.05 down to 0.29 mg/L, Silver from 0.011 down to .001 mg/L, Barium from 2.06 down to 0.314 mg/L and Mercury from 0.007 down to 0.001 mg/L. Although the leachable Cd exhibited an increase from 0.49 up to 0.805 mg/L and Pd from 0.002 up to 0.029 mg/L, these were well below the maximum limits of 1.00 and 5.00 mg/L, respectively.

Ivan Diaz-Loya, E. [Alternative Cementitious Binders Laboratory (ACBL), Department of Civil Engineering, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Allouche, Erez N., E-mail: allouche@latech.edu [Alternative Cementitious Binders Laboratory (ACBL), Department of Civil Engineering, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Eklund, Sven; Joshi, Anupam R. [Department of Chemistry, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Kupwade-Patil, Kunal [Alternative Cementitious Binders Laboratory (ACBL), Department of Civil Engineering, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

3

Flying fish  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Flying fish Name: Prairie View Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: How does the flying fish get speed to fly? Replies: The "flying fish", like most fishes, gets its...

4

Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with a quantity of spray dryer ash (SDA) and water to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and form a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 40%, and in some cases less than 20%, of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. An optional alkaline activator may be mixed with the fly ash and SDA to facilitate the geopolymerization reaction. The alkaline activator may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

Boxley, Chett (Park City, UT)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

5

Demokratiudvikling og civilsamfundsorganisationer : et casestudie af betydningen af civilsamfundsorganisationers roller i udviklingen af demokrati i Kenya.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Demokratiudvikling og civilsamfundsorganisationer – et casestudie af betydningen af civilsamfundsorganisationers roller i udviklingen af demokrati i Kenya. Udgangspunkt for opgaven, er at undersřge hvilke roller… (more)

Bohn, Nanette Mia

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Blow Flies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Blow Flies Blow Flies Nature Bulletin No. 76 July 27, 1946 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation BLOW FLIES The big flies you sometimes find buzzing loudly and crazily around in your basement, garage, barn, or even your living room, are not overgrown house flies. They are blow flies. Of the several species in this region the most common are the Blue Bottle Fly, Green Bottle Fly, Black Blow Fly and Screw-Worm Fly. Adult flies do not grow after they emerge from the pupa case. They lay small white or ivory-colored oblong eggs which hatch, in a day or two at ordinary temperatures, into maggots. These feed and grow and shed their skins several times before they form a brown pupa case shaped like a medicine capsule. Inside this case a transformation takes place which results grown fly. In the case of the blow flies the whole process, from egg to adult fly, takes from 14 to 18 days.

7

Alkaline battery  

SciTech Connect

A zinc alkaline secondary battery is described having an excellent cycle characteristic, having a negative electrode which comprises a base layer of zinc active material incorporating cadmium metal and/or a cadmium compound and an outer layer made up of cadmium metal and/or a cadmium compound and applied to the surface of the base layer of zinc active material.

Furukawa, N.; Inoue, K.; Murakami, S.

1984-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

8

Evaluation of Leachate Chemistry from Coal Refuse Blended and Layered with Fly Ash.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Alkaline fly ash has been studied as a liming agent within coal refuse fills to reclaim acid-forming refuse. Previous studies focused on bulk blending ash… (more)

Hunt, Joseph Edward

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Flying Squirrels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Flying Squirrels Flying Squirrels Nature Bulletin No. 176-A January 23, 1965 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation FLYING SQUIRRELS Few people ever see a Flying Squirrel, although they are widely distributed throughout the wooded areas of the northern hemisphere and numerous in many localities. Unlike other squirrels, they sleep all day in their dens, coming out at dusk to feed and play during the night -- less in winter than in summer. They spend more time in the trees and less on the ground than any other squirrel. Most distinctive, of course, is their ability to glide thru the air. Flying squirrels do not fly. On each side of the body is a loose elastic membrane or fold of skin, covered with fur and extending from the wrist of the foreleg to the ankle of the hind leg, with a delicate rod of cartilage, attached only to the wrist, at the edge. Another membrane fills the triangular space between the foreleg and the neck and sides of the head. When the animal leaps outward from a tree, it spreads its legs so that, in the flaring membranes stretched between them, it appears almost square and flat -- shape and sails diagonally downward in a long swooping glide. Its long bushy tail, broad' and flat, is used as a rudder and as a brake to make the short graceful swoop upward when it lands on another tree.

10

URANIUM IN ALKALINE ROCKS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

combine to indicate uranium enrichment of an alkaline magma.uranium, the Ilfmaussaq intrusion contains an unusually high enrichment

Murphy, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

House Fly Ceiling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NA Date: NA Question: We are a public library and have had a question regarding house flies. The question is "How high in the atmosphere can a house fly, fly? Replies:...

12

Anodes for alkaline electrolysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of making an anode for alkaline electrolysis cells includes adsorption of precursor material on a carbonaceous material, conversion of the precursor material to hydroxide form and conversion of precursor material from hydroxide form to oxy-hydroxide form within the alkaline electrolysis cell.

Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev (Latham, NY)

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Zinc alkaline secondary battery  

SciTech Connect

A zinc alkaline secondary battery with improved service life in which a multi-layer separator is interposed between the negative and positive electrodes and the quantity of the alkaline electrolyte in the layer of the separator adjacent to the negative electrode is less than that of the electrolyte in the layer of the separator adjacent to the positive electrode.

Furukawa, N.; Nishizawa, N.

1983-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

14

Alkaline storage battery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An alkaline storage battery having located in a battery container a battery element comprising a positive electrode, a negative electrode, a separator and a gas ionizing auxiliary electrode, in which the gas ionizing electrode is contained in a bag of microporous film, is described.

Suzuki, S.

1984-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

15

Certified by: AF/A3O  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACCESSIBILITY: Publications and forms are available on the e-Publishing website at www.e-publishing.af.mil for downloading or ordering. RELEASABILITY: There are no releasability restrictions on this publication. OPR: AF/A10-O

unknown authors

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Forgasning af biomasse Den skjulte kemi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forgasning af biomasse Den skjulte kemi Helge Egsgaard Afdelingen for Planteforskning, Forskningscenter Risø Roskilde, Denmark #12;Forgasning af biomasse Biomassens hovedbestanddele · Cellulose · Hemi-cellulose Lignin #12;Forgasning af biomasse Lignin ­ en hypotetisk delstruktur CH HC OH CH3O O CH CH2OH HC O OH CH

17

Activation of fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fly ash is activated by heating a screened magnetic fraction of the ash in a steam atmosphere and then reducing, oxidizing and again reducing the hydrothermally treated fraction. The activated fly ash can be used as a carbon monoxide disproportionating catalyst useful in the production of hydrogen and methane.

Corbin, D.R.; Velenyi, L.J.; Pepera, M.A.; Dolhyj, S.R.

1986-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

18

Activation of fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fly ash is activated by heating a screened magnetic fraction of the ash in a steam atmosphere and then reducing, oxidizing and again reducing the hydrothermally treated fraction. The activated fly ash can be used as a carbon monoxide disproportionating catalyst useful in the production of hydrogen and methane.

Corbin, David R. (New Castle, DE); Velenyi, Louis J. (Lyndhurst, OH); Pepera, Marc A. (Northfield, OH); Dolhyj, Serge R. (Parma, OH)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

AOCS Official Method Af 1-54  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sampling AOCS Official Method Af 1-54 Methods Methods and Analyses Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION   SCOPE Applicable to flaxseed (see Notes, 2).

20

Homemade Fly Killer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Homemade Fly Killer Homemade Fly Killer Name: Pam Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: What is a great homemade recipe for killing flies in the yard and house without endangering birds, dogs and cats? (we have many (flies, dogs, cats and birds, that is!!!!) Replies: Your best bet is one of the variants of traps. For example, the hanging strips of fly paper seem to stick a good number of flies. I have yet to see a bird dumb enough to run into and get stuck on one. Some of the funnel like traps (I've seen some for beetles, and yellow jackets) would likely work too if you stuck something attractive to flies inside. What you would do with captured flies, I'm not sure, but you definitely wouldn't want to leave it too long, if you put some real piece of food exposed inside as bait they would lay eggs on it, which would hatch as maggots, etc. There are ways to have the bait protected from any eggs (in a compartment screened off, for example). Then you could dunk the trap in water and leave it until they all died, or under an inverted bucket in a puddle of water with a lit candle, which would consume all the air and eventually choke them. You could just let them starve or dehydrate by leaving them in the trap, although that would take a while. The kids you teach maybe could think of other ways to kill them off without using toxic chemicals. Most of them would either be something mechanical (release into the blades of a high speed fan would be a little messy, but effective), or denial of the basics of life (air, water, food).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "af alkaline fly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Integrated Pest Management of Flies in Texas Dairies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication identifies and gives management strategies for various species of flies infesting Texas dairies, including houseflies, stable flies, horn flies, garbage flies and blow flies.

Stevenson, Douglas; Cocke, Jesse

2000-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

22

Flying Squirrel Captive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Flying Squirrel Captive Flying Squirrel Captive Name: Tammy Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: hello there, was looking around the internet for ideas on what to feed my daughters' pet flying squirrel when I happened across your page. When I saw the name Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation I decided to send an email because my name is also Eisenbeis. My question is what types of fruits and veggies should I feed him and is there anything he should not have? Replies: Hello, I have been taking care of flying squirrels for twenty years as part of our nature center display. We feed our flying squirrels Purina Mouse Chow with an occasional supplement of acorns, when they are available, and/or sunflower seeds. Sunflower seeds can be unhealthy if fed in too large a quantity. The high oil content can lead to hair loss. Also, changes in diet can lead to a loose droppings and a "messy" cage. Avoid feeding large quantities of any fresh foods and only add them a couple times a week, if you do.

23

AOCS Official Method Af 3-54  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oil Content AOCS Official Method Af 3-54 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads C210BF27896703EB20A63F030A6D6D4D DEFINITION ...

24

Venus Fly Trap Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Venus Fly Trap Experiment Venus Fly Trap Experiment Name: Jeremy Bailey Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: My name is Jeremy Bailey, and I am a student of Dorseyville Middle School. I have been working on a science project about Venus' Fly Traps. A recent addition to the project involved designing an experiment about something I found interesting about them. However, I don't know where to get them or how to grow them in the moderate climate of Pittsburgh. Also, I don't know how a successful experiment could be designed. Replies: Jeremy, I believe Venus Fly traps can be found 'in the wild' in the coastal floodplain of the Carolinas. As far as where to buy them, look in the phonebook yellow pages under plants or houseplants and do some calling. I live in eastern Pennsylvania, and over here they even sell them in hardware stores like Hechinger's and Home Depot (in their garden departments). I don't think you will have luck trying to grow them outside, our winters here are a bit too harsh for them. From what I recall they require substantial moisture and more moderate climes. You might try looking for houseplant books at your local library for more detailed information.

25

Flying Squirrels and Houses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Flying Squirrels and Houses Flying Squirrels and Houses Name: Kathy Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: How do you get rid of flying squirrels in the attic of a Cape style home that has limited access to the attic? There is blown in insulation so we cannot see to the end of the house where we hear them, nor can a person crawl in to see anything. We have used d-con bars, mouse traps and have-a-heart traps in the crawl spaces we can reach, but have caught nothing. Replies: Place a statue of an owl near the entrance the squirrels are using. Owls are their motal enemies and this technique works for birds as well. Steve Sample You will not be able to solve this problem until you find the way they go in and out. Usually the easiest way is to look for light coming in from outside while in the dark attic, but if you can't see it that way do a thorough search of the outside. A flying squirrel does not need a very big hole, maybe 2" or less diameter. They go out at night so once you find the hole close it up at night while they are out. Good luck.

26

Zinc electrode in alkaline electrolyte  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The zinc electrode in alkaline electrolyte is unusual in that supersaturated zincate solutions can form during discharge and spongy or mossy zinc deposits can form on charge at low overvoltages. The effect of additives on regular pasted ZnO electrodes and calcium zincate electrodes is discussed. The paper also reports on in situ x-ray absorption (XAS) results on mossy zinc deposits.

McBreen, J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

27

Insects and flies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Insects and flies Insects and flies Name: Carol L Giles Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: What would the world be like without insects? How long can a fly hibernate being that its life span is very short? Name the insect that has the longest life span. Replies: If all insects were to suddenly die, then the insect-eating small animals (e.g. chickens, bats, birds, frogs) would die, as would most flowering plants (apple trees, corn, potatoes), from a lack of insects to carry the pollen from male to female plant. Higher animals that ate the flowering plants or insect-eating animals would then die. Given these facts, and starting from the fact that insects themselves constitute the majority of the life on the planet, it's a safe bet that the sudden death of all insects would mean the death of most or perhaps nearly all the life on Earth. If on the other hand the insects died off slowly, or had never been, probably some other small life form of very similar habits would evolve to fill the niche.

28

Fra affald til bioethanol - forslag til alternativ udnyttelse og hĺndtering af affald til energiformĺl.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Specialets overordnede emner er en undersřgelse af, hvilke potentialer og muligheder der er for produktion af bioethanol pĺ basis af affald, og hvordan en sĺdan… (more)

Langgaard, Iben

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Speciation of Selenium, Arsenic, and Zinc in Class C Fly Ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major environmental concern associated with coal fly ash is the mobilization of trace elements that may contaminate water. To better evaluate proper use of fly ash, determine appropriate disposal methods, and monitor postdisposal conditions, it is important to understand the speciation of trace elements in fly ash and their possible environmental impact. The speciation of selenium, arsenic, and zinc was determined in five representative Class C fly ash samples from combustion of sub-bituminous Powder River Basin coal using synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy to provide an improved understanding of the mechanisms of trace element association with the fly ash. Selenium in all fly ash samples occurs predominantly as Se(IV), with the exception of one sample, in which there was a minor amount of Se(0). Se(0) is likely associated with the high content of unburned coal in the sample. Arsenic exists in the fly ash as a single phase most consistent with calcium pyroarsenate. In contrast, zinc occurs as two distinct species in the silicate glass matrix of the fly ash. This work demonstrates that residual carbon in fly ash may reduce potential Se mobility in the environment by retaining it as less soluble elemental Se instead of Se(IV). Further, this work suggests that As and Zn in Class C fly ash will display substantially different release and mobilization behaviors in aquatic environments. While As release will primarily depend upon the dissolution and hydrolysis of calcium pyroarsenate, Zn release will be controlled by the dissolution of alkaline aluminosilicate glass in the ash.

Luo, Yun; Giammar, Daniel E.; Huhmann, Brittany L.; Catalano, Jeffrey G. (WU)

2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

30

Electrochemistry of Enargite: Reactivity in Alkaline Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The reactivity of enargite samples from Montana, US and Quiruvilca, Peru were studied under alkaline conditions, pH range of 8-13, using a cyclic voltammetry ...

31

Alkaline and alkaline earth metal phosphate halides and phosphors  

SciTech Connect

Compounds, phosphor materials and apparatus related to nacaphite family of materials are presented. Potassium and rubidium based nacaphite family compounds and phosphors designed by doping divalent rare earth elements in the sites of alkaline earth metals in the nacaphite material families are descried. An apparatus comprising the phosphors based on the nacaphite family materials are presented herein. The compounds presented is of formula A.sub.2B.sub.1-yR.sub.yPO.sub.4X where the elements A, B, R, X and suffix y are defined such that A is potassium, rubidium, or a combination of potassium and rubidium and B is calcium, strontium, barium, or a combination of any of calcium, strontium and barium. X is fluorine, chlorine, or a combination of fluorine and chlorine, R is europium, samarium, ytterbium, or a combination of any of europium, samarium, and ytterbium, and y ranges from 0 to about 0.1.

Lyons, Robert Joseph; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Cleaver, Robert John

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

32

Integrated Fly Ash Pond Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is directed toward solving new challenges to meeting U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) discharge limits for ammonia and selected metals from coal-fired power plants. Based on the field and laboratory study of fly ash ponds at five operating coal-fired power plants, the physical, chemical, and biological processes that occur in fly ash sluicing systems are discussed and recommendations are made as to how to best manage the pond...

2009-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

33

Process for extracting technetium from alkaline solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates generally to a process for extracting technetium from nuclear wastes and more particularly to a process for extracting technetium from alkaline waste solutions containing technetium and high concentrations of alkali metal nitrates. A process for extracting technetium values from an aqueous alkaline solution containing at least one alkali metal hydroxide and at least one alkali metal nitrate comprises the steps of: contacting the aqueous alkaline solution with a solvent consisting of a crown ether in a diluent, the diluent being a water-immiscible organic liquid in which the crown ether is soluble, for a period of time sufficient to selectively extract the technetium values from the aqueous alkaline solution into the solvent; separating the solvent containing the technetium values from the aqueous alkaline solution; and stripping the technetium values from the solvent by contacting the solvent with water.

Moyer, B.A.; Sachleben, R.A.; Bonnesen, P.V.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

34

Identificering af teknologi gennem narrativer; 3D print.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Denne rapport arbejder med en gennemgang af den sĺkaldte 3D printer teknologi. Denne vil sćttes i sammenhćng med et teknologifilosofisk ’form of life ? forstĺelse… (more)

Petersen, Mikael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Laboratory-scale evaluation of secondary alkaline zinc batteries...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory-scale evaluation of secondary alkaline zinc batteries for electric vehicles Title Laboratory-scale evaluation of secondary alkaline zinc batteries for electric vehicles...

36

Alkaline sorbent injection for mercury control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mercury removal system for removing mercury from combustion flue gases is provided in which alkaline sorbents at generally extremely low stoichiometric molar ratios of alkaline earth or an alkali metal to sulfur of less than 1.0 are injected into a power plant system at one or more locations to remove at least between about 40% and 60% of the mercury content from combustion flue gases. Small amounts of alkaline sorbents are injected into the flue gas stream at a relatively low rate. A particulate filter is used to remove mercury-containing particles downstream of each injection point used in the power plant system.

Madden, Deborah A. (Boardman, OH); Holmes, Michael J. (Washington Township, Stark County, OH)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Alkaline sorbent injection for mercury control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mercury removal system for removing mercury from combustion flue gases is provided in which alkaline sorbents at generally extremely low stoichiometric molar ratios of alkaline earth or an alkali metal to sulfur of less than 1.0 are injected into a power plant system at one or more locations to remove at least between about 40% and 60% of the mercury content from combustion flue gases. Small amounts of alkaline sorbents are injected into the flue gas stream at a relatively low rate. A particulate filter is used to remove mercury-containing particles downstream of each injection point used in the power plant system.

Madden, Deborah A. (Boardman, OH); Holmes, Michael J. (Washington Township, Stark County, OH)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Process for extracting technetium from alkaline solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for extracting technetium values from an aqueous alkaline solution containing at least one alkali metal hydroxide and at least one alkali metal nitrate, the at least one alkali metal nitrate having a concentration of from about 0.1 to 6 molar. The solution is contacted with a solvent consisting of a crown ether in a diluent for a period of time sufficient to selectively extract the technetium values from the aqueous alkaline solution. The solvent containing the technetium values is separated from the aqueous alkaline solution and the technetium values are stripped from the solvent.

Moyer, Bruce A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sachleben, Richard A. (Knoxville, TN); Bonnesen, Peter V. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Growth and elemental accumulation by canola on soil amended with coal fly ash  

SciTech Connect

To explore the agronomic potential of an Australian coal fly ash, we conducted two glasshouse experiments in which we measured chlorophyll fluorescence, CO{sub 2} assimilation (A), transpiration, stomatal conductance, biomass accumulation, seed yield, and elemental uptake for canola (Brassica napus) grown on soil amended with an alkaline fly ash. In Experiment 1, application of up to 25 Mg/ha of fly ash increased A and plant weight early in the season before flowering and seed yield by up to 21%. However, at larger rates of ash application A, plant growth, chlorophyll concentration, and yield were all reduced. Increases in early vigor and seed yield were associated with enhanced uptake of phosphorus (P) by the plants treated with fly ash. Fly ash application did not influence accumulation of B, Cu, Mo, or Zn in the stems at any stage of plant growth or in the seed at harvest, except Mo concentration, which was elevated in the seed. Accumulation of these elements was mostly in the leaves, where concentrations of Cu and Mo increased with any amount of ash applied while that of B occurred only with ash applied at 625 Mg/ha. In Experiment 2, fly ash applied at 500 Mg/ha and mixed into the whole 30 cm soil core was detrimental to growth and yield of canola, compared with restricting mixing to 5 or 15 cm depth. In contrast, application of ash at 250 Mg/ha with increasing depth of mixing increased A and seed yield. We concluded that fly ash applied at not more than 25 Mg/ha and mixed into the top 10 to 15 cm of soil is sufficient to obtain yield benefits.

Yunusa, I.A.M.; Manoharan, V.; DeSilva, D.L.; Eamus, D.; Murray, B.R.; Nissanka, S.P. [University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

40

Fly ash chemical classification based on lime  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Typically, total lime content (CaO) of fly ash is shown in fly ash reports, but its significance is not addressed in US specifications. For certain applications a low lime ash is preferred. When a class C fly ash must be cementitious, lime content above 20% is required. A ternary S-A-C phase diagram pilot is given showing the location of fly ash compositions by coal rank and source in North America. Fly ashes from subbituminous coal from the Powder River Basin usually contain sufficient lime to be cementitious but blending with other coals may result in calcium being present in phases other than tricalcium aluminate. 9 refs., 1 fig.

Fox, J. [BASF Construction Chemicals, LLC (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "af alkaline fly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Alkaline earth filled nickel skutterudite antimonide thermoelectrics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermoelectric material including a body centered cubic filled skutterudite having the formula A.sub.xFe.sub.yNi.sub.zSb.sub.12, where A is an alkaline earth element, x is no more than approximately 1.0, and the sum of y and z is approximately equal to 4.0. The alkaline earth element includes guest atoms selected from the group consisting of Be, Mb, Ca, Sr, Ba, Ra and combinations thereof. The filled skutterudite is shown to have properties suitable for a wide variety of thermoelectric applications.

Singh, David Joseph

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

42

Compositional Analysis of Beneficiated Fly Ashes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Fly ash is a byproduct of combustion of coal in coal-fired powerplants through ... to be disposed of at a significant cost to power plant companies, and ...

1997-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

43

Novel Explosively Driven Flying Plate System  

SciTech Connect

The authors describe a new technique for driving thick flying plates to high velocities without spall and with excellent flatness over a uniformly large area.

Forest, C.A.; Rabie, R.L.; Bennett, L.; Vorthman, J.

1998-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

44

Deep Space Formation Flying Spacecraft Path Planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efficient algorithms for collision-free energy sub-optimal path planning for formations of spacecraft flying in deep space are presented. The idea is to introduce a set of way-points through which the spacecraft are required to pass, combined with ... Keywords: formation flying spacecraft, path planning for multiple mobile robot systems, trajectory generation

Cornel Sultan; Sanjeev Seereram; Raman K. Mehra

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Cement Additives from Fly Ash Opportunity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Device and Method for Separating Minerals, Carbon and Device and Method for Separating Minerals, Carbon and Cement Additives from Fly Ash Opportunity Research is currently active on the patented technology "Device and Method for Separating Minerals, Carbon, and Cement Additives from Fly Ash." The technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Depart- ment of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Overview This invention includes a device, along with a method, to recover and use fly ash as a source of high purity carbon, ash, and minerals. The device and associated method can isolate components of the fly ash based on size and electrical charge. By improving beneficiation and usage methods, fly ash can be transformed from a waste material to a valuable by-product. Recent shifts to low nitrogen

46

Alkaline earth cation extraction from acid solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An extractant medium for extracting alkaline earth cations from an aqueous acidic sample solution is described as are a method and apparatus for using the same. The separation medium is free of diluent, free-flowing and particulate, and comprises a Crown ether that is a 4,4'(5')[C.sub.4 -C.sub.8 -alkylcyclohexano]18-Crown-6 dispersed on an inert substrate material.

Dietz, Mark (Elmhurst, IL); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Alkaline injection for enhanced oil recovery: a status report  

SciTech Connect

In the past several years, there has been renewed interest in enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by alkaline injection. Alkaline solutions also are being used as preflushes in micellar/polymer projects. Several major field tests of alkaline flooding are planned, are in progress, or recently have been completed. Considerable basic research on alkaline injection has been published recently, and more is in progress. This paper summarizes known field tests and, where available, the amount of alkali injected and the performance results. Recent laboratory work, much sponsored by the U.S. DOE, and the findings are described. Alkaline flood field test plans for new projects are summarized.

Mayer, E.H.; Berg, R.L.; Carmichael, J.D.; Weinbrandt, R.M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with an activator solution sufficient to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and for a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 35% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash, and in some cases less than 10% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. The activator solution may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

Boxley, Chett (Park City, UT); Akash, Akash (Salt lake City, UT); Zhao, Qiang (Natick, MA)

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

49

Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with an activator solution sufficient to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and for a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 35% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash, and in some cases less than 10% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. The activator solution may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

Boxley, Chett; Akash, Akash; Zhao, Qiang

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

50

The influence of high quantity of fly ash on reducing the expansion due to ASR in the presence of alkalis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A testing program was devised to study the role of high volume fly ash (HVFA) in reducing the expansion caused by alkali-silica reaction (ASR). A series of modified ASTM C 1260 tests were performed, where the replacement of cement by Class F fly ash was 58% by mass of cement. A reactive siliceous aggregate was used. The influence of inherent alkalis in cement to the reaction was also studied. The test results confirm that HVFA significantly helps in controlling expansion caused by ASR. The test period was extended to 28 days to assess if more reproducible results can be obtained. The results indicate that reducing the alkalinity of the sodium hydroxide solution by 50%, to 0.5N is sufficient to determine the potential reactivity of aggregates. The reduction of alkalinity of sodium hydroxide to 0.25N, however, produced results, which were beyond interpretation. Concrete using High Volume Fly Ash was tested for strength to ascertain if the reactive aggregates or the percentage of internal alkalis in the cement influenced the strength. This report discusses the test results for only part of a broader research program in progress at the Texas Transportation Institute, Texas A&M University.

Mohidekar, Saleel D.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Effects of Alkaline Sorbents on ESP Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many energy companies need to reduce sulfur trioxide (SO3) emissions and/or sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions. Injection of an alkaline sorbent into the boiler or into the duct after the air heater is a relatively simple and inexpensive means of meeting this need. These processes can, however, have a negative effect on the performance of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) most plants are equipped with for particulate control. Hence, there is a need to understand and be able to predict the impact of these ...

2009-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

52

Noble metal alkaline zeolites for catalytic reforming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a method for producing a noble-metal containing zeolite suitable for catalytic reforming contacting a zeolite selected from alkaline faujasites and L zeolites and zeolites and zeolites isostructural thereto, with a noble-metal compound selected from Pt(acetylacetonate){sub 2} and Pd(acetylacetonate){sub 2} for a effective amount of time to incorporate Pt and/or Pd into the pore surface regions of the zeolite, but not to disperse the Pt and/or Pd throughout the entire zeolite; and calcining the so treated zeolite at a temperature from about 250 {degrees} C, to about 600 {degrees} C for an effective amount of time.

Schweizer, A.E.

1991-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

53

Flying Cloud Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flying Cloud Wind Farm Flying Cloud Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Flying Cloud Wind Farm Facility Flying Cloud Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner PPM Energy Inc Developer Clipper Windpower Energy Purchaser Alliant/IES Utilities Location West of Spirit Lake IA Coordinates 43.416975°, -95.422282° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.416975,"lon":-95.422282,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

54

Virtual reality treatment of flying phobia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flying phobia (FP) might become a very incapacitating and disturbing problem in a person's social, working, and private areas. Psychological interventions based on exposure therapy have proved to be effective, but given the particular nature of this ...

R. M. Banos; C. Botella; C. Perpina; M. Alcaniz; J. A. Lozano; J. Osma; M. Gallardo

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Alkaline chemistry of transuranium elements and technetium and the treatment of alkaline radioactive wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Goal of this survey is to generalize the known data on fundamental physical-chemical properties of TRUs and Tc, methods for their isolation, and to provide recommendations that will be useful for partitioning them from alkaline high-level wastes.

Delegard, C.H. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Peretrukhin, V.F.; Shilov, V.P.; Pikaev, A.K. [Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation). Inst. of Physical Chemistry

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

SP-19: Electrochemistry of Enargite: Reactivity in Alkaline Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The reactivity of enargite samples from Montana, US and Quiruvilca, Peru were studied under alkaline conditions, pH range of 8-13, using a cyclic voltammetry ...

57

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cell Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Energy Laboratory Anion Exchange Membranes for Fuel Cells, Prof. Andrew Herring, Colorado School of Mines Electrocatalysis in Alkaline Electrolytes, Prof. Sanjeev...

58

Rechargeable Zn-MnO sub 2 alkaline batteries  

SciTech Connect

In this paper progress in the development of rechargeable alkaline zinc-manganese dioxide cells is described. The advantages and limitations of the system are evaluated. Laboratory tests run on commercial primary alkaline cells as well as model simulations of a bipolar MnO{sub 2} electrode show that the rechargeable alkaline battery may be able to compete with lead-acid, nickel-cadmium, and secondary lithium cells for low- to moderate-rate applications. However, because of this poor performance at high rates and low temperatures, the alkaline MnO{sub 2} battery is not suitable for present automotive starting applications.

Wruck, W.J.; Reichman, B.; Bullock, K.R.; Kao, W.H. (Corporate Applied Research, Johnson Controls, Inc., Milwaukee, WI (US))

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Salt Fluxes for Alkali and Alkaline Earth Element Removal from ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 1, 2001... for Alkali and Alkaline Earth Element Removal from Molten Aluminum ... Solid chloride salts containing MgC2 can be used to remove alkali ...

60

Thermal Fly-height Control Slider Dynamics and Slider-Lubricant Interactions in Hard Disk Drives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3 Preliminary Experiments with Thermal Fly-height ControlConclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Thermal Fly-height5 Thermal Fly-height Control Slider Instability and Dynamics

Vangipuram Canchi, Sripathi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "af alkaline fly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Removal of plutonium and americium from alkaline waste solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High salt content, alkaline waste solutions containing plutonium and americium are contacted with a sodium titanate compound to effect removal of the plutonium and americium from the alkaline waste solution onto the sodium titanate and provide an effluent having a radiation level of less than 10 nCi per gram alpha emitters.

Schulz, Wallace W. (Richland, WA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Data:Af27066e-af77-4943-adce-cce11610e256 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

e-af77-4943-adce-cce11610e256 e-af77-4943-adce-cce11610e256 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Miami-Cass County Rural E M C Effective date: 2011/10/01 End date if known: Rate name: RATE SCHEDULE GSND-SINGLE PHASE GENERAL SERVICE NON-DEMAND Sector: Commercial Description: The Miami-Cass County Rural Electric Membership Corporation (REMC) shall charge and collect for general service non-demand electric service on the following bases of availability, application, character of service, monthly rate, minimum charge, purchased power cost adjustment clause, and tax adjustment.

63

Extraction of trace metals from fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for recovering silver, gallium and/or other trace metals from a fine grained industrial fly ash associated with a process for producing phosphorous, the fly ash having a silicate base and containing surface deposits of the trace metals as oxides, chlorides or the like, with the process being carried out by contacting the fly ash with AlCl.sub.3 in an alkali halide melt to react the trace metals with the AlCl.sub.3 to form compositions soluble in the melt and a residue containing the silicate and aluminum oxide or other aluminum precipitate, and separating the desired trace metal or metals from the melt by electrolysis or other separation techniques.

Blander, Milton (Palos Park, IL); Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Nagy, Zoltan (Woodridge, IL)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Extraction of trace metals from fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for recovering silver, gallium and/or other trace metals from a fine grained industrial fly ash associated with a process for producing phosphorous. The fly ash has a silicate base and contains surface deposits of the trace metals as oxides, chlorides or the like. The process is carried out by contacting the fly ash with AlCl/sub 3/ in an alkali halide melt to react the trace metals with the AlCl/sub 3/ to form compositions soluble in the melt and a residue containing the silicate and aluminum oxide or other aluminum precipitate, and separating the desired trace metal or metals from the melt by electrolysis or other separation techniques.

Blander, M.; Wai, C.M.; Nagy, Z.

1983-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

65

Development of High-Volume Fly Ash Blended Cements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-volume fly ash (HVFA) blended cement can be produced either by intergrinding fly ash with portland cement clinker or by blending dry fly ash with portland cement. Production of HVFA cement using the intergrinding method may be the most cost-effective and practical of the two approaches. This report documents the results of commercial-scale production of HVFA blended cements using up to 55 percent fly ash to replace the portland cement.

2001-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

66

Process for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification. The process involves acidifying the wastes with an oxidizing agent such as nitric acid, then adding formic acid as a reducing agent, and then mixing with glass formers to produce a melter feed. The nitric acid contributes nitrates that act as an oxidant to balance the redox of the melter feed, prevent reduction of certain species to produce conducting metals, and lower the pH of the wastes to a suitable level for melter operation. The formic acid reduces mercury compounds to elemental mercury for removal by steam stripping, and MnO.sub.2 to the Mn(II) ion to prevent foaming of the glass melt. The optimum amounts of nitric acid and formic acid are determined in relation to the composition of the wastes, including the concentrations of mercury (II) and MnO.sub.2, noble metal compounds, nitrates, formates and so forth. The process minimizes the amount of hydrogen generated during treatment, while producing a redox-balanced feed for effective melter operation and a quality glass product.

Hsu, Chia-lin W. (Augusta, GA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris to Alkaline Stress  

SciTech Connect

The response of exponentially growing Desulfovibrio vulgarisHildenborough to pH 10 stress was studied using oligonucleotidemicroarrays and a study set of mutants with genes suggested by microarraydata to be involved in the alkaline stress response deleted. The datashowed that the response of D. vulgaris to increased pH is generallysimilar to that of Escherichia coli but is apparently controlled byunique regulatory circuits since the alternative sigma factors (sigma Sand sigma E) contributing to this stress response in E. coli appear to beabsent in D. vulgaris. Genes previously reported to be up-regulated in E.coli were up-regulated in D. vulgaris; these genes included three ATPasegenes and a tryptophan synthase gene. Transcription of chaperone andprotease genes (encoding ATP-dependent Clp and La proteases and DnaK) wasalso elevated in D. vulgaris. As in E. coli, genes involved in flagellumsynthesis were down-regulated. The transcriptional data also identifiedregulators, distinct from sigma S and sigma E, that are likely part of aD. vulgaris Hildenborough-specific stress response system.Characterization of a study set of mutants with genes implicated inalkaline stress response deleted confirmed that there was protectiveinvolvement of the sodium/proton antiporter NhaC-2, tryptophanase A, andtwo putative regulators/histidine kinases (DVU0331 andDVU2580).

Stolyar, S.; He, Q.; He, Z.; Yang, Z.; Borglin, S.E.; Joyner, D.; Huang, K.; Alm, E.; Hazen, T.C.; Zhou, J.; Wall, J.D.; Arkin, A.P.; Stahl, D.A.

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

68

Process for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

According to its major aspects and broadly stated, the present invention is a process for treating alkaline waste materials, including high level radioactive wastes, for vitrification. The process involves adjusting the pH of the wastes with nitric acid, adding formic acid (or a process stream containing formic acid) to reduce mercury compounds to elemental mercury and MnO{sub 2} to the Mn(II) ion, and mixing with class formers to produce a melter feed. The process minimizes production of hydrogen due to noble metal-catalyzed formic acid decomposition during, treatment, while producing a redox-balanced feed for effective melter operation and a quality glass product. An important feature of the present invention is the use of different acidifying and reducing, agents to treat the wastes. The nitric acid acidifies the wastes to improve yield stress and supplies acid for various reactions; then the formic acid reduces mercury compounds to elemental mercury and MnO{sub 2}) to the Mn(II) ion. When the pH of the waste is lower, reduction of mercury compounds and MnO{sub 2}) is faster and less formic acid is needed, and the production of hydrogen caused by catalytically-active noble metals is decreased.

Hsu, Chia-lin W.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Method of increasing the sulfation capacity of alkaline earth sorbents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for increasing the sulfation capacity of alkaline earth carbonates to scrub sulfur dioxide produced during the fluidized bed combustion of coal in which partially sulfated alkaline earth carbonates are hydrated in a fluidized bed to crack the sulfate coating and convert the alkaline earth oxide to the hydroxide. Subsequent dehydration of the sulfate-hydroxide to a sulfate-oxide particle produces particles having larger pore size, increased porosity, decreased grain size and additional sulfation capacity. A continuous process is disclosed.

Shearer, J.A.; Turner, C.B.; Johnson, I.

1980-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

70

Method of increasing the sulfation capacity of alkaline earth sorbents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for increasing the sulfation capacity of alkaline earth carbonates to scrub sulfur dioxide produced during the fluidized bed combustion of coal in which partially sulfated alkaline earth carbonates are hydrated in a fluidized bed to crack the sulfate coating and convert the alkaline earth oxide to the hydroxide. Subsequent dehydration of the sulfate-hydroxide to a sulfate-oxide particle produces particles having larger pore size, increased porosity, decreased grain size and additional sulfation capacity. A continuous process is disclosed.

Shearer, John A. (Chicago, IL); Turner, Clarence B. (Shorewood, IL); Johnson, Irving (Clarendon Hills, IL)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

T.F.O.: tangible flying objects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the prototype of an augmented game that uses an enhanced Frisbee-Disc as an interaction device to explore the capability of flying tangible user interfaces for increasing the attractiveness of physical games. While playing with the disc, a ... Keywords: HCI, athletic-tangible interfaces, computer-supported collaborative gaming, interaction design, music performance, physical interaction design

Rinat Mustafin; Jan Wehner; Wolfgang Sattler; Kristian Gohlke

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cell Workshop Welcome and OverviewInnovation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cell Workshop Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cell Workshop Welcome and Overview Innovation for Our Energy Future Bryan Pivovar National Renewable Energy Laboratory AMFC Workshop May 8, 2011 Innovation for Our Energy Future 2 Welcome - Your participation is appreciated - Date of Workshop Innovation for Our Energy Future 3 Meeting Location Innovation for Our Energy Future Workshop Agenda SUNDAY, MAY 8, 2011 1:00 pm - 1:15 pm Welcome and Opening Remarks (Salon H) 1:15 pm - 1:45 pm Workshop Overview: Dr. Bryan Pivovar, NREL (Salon H) 1:45 pm - 2:15 pm Alkaline Membrane Research Overview: Prof. Andy Herring, Colorado School of Mines (Salon H) 2:15 pm - 2:45 pm Alkaline Electrocatalysis Research Overview: Prof. Sanjeev Mukerjee, Northeastern University (Salon H) 2:45 pm - 3:15 pm AMFCs: Tokuyama Perspective:

73

Data:Ec5914f7-12af-47cc-8af8-b4c1efdbbaf5 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

914f7-12af-47cc-8af8-b4c1efdbbaf5 914f7-12af-47cc-8af8-b4c1efdbbaf5 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Lower Yellowstone R E A, Inc Effective date: 2010/09/14 End date if known: Rate name: Schedule YL - 175 Watt Mercury Vapor light Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: Illinois State University Archive Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

74

Data:29e29f7e-56af-45af-b079-9612617f0108 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

f7e-56af-45af-b079-9612617f0108 f7e-56af-45af-b079-9612617f0108 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Central New Mexico El Coop, Inc Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Time of Use Residential Service w/o Electric Thermal Storage (rate 25 OFF) Sector: Residential Description: Any residential consumers without an ETS unit wishing to abide by the on peak off peak hours are eligible. Source or reference: http://cnmec.org/index.php?page=electric-rates Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh):

75

Data:92e68d5d-af6f-4314-af20-6d7e68dcee18 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d5d-af6f-4314-af20-6d7e68dcee18 d5d-af6f-4314-af20-6d7e68dcee18 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Burbank Water and Power, California (Utility Company) Effective date: 2012/06/19 End date if known: Rate name: Medium General Service- Three Phase (Special Demand Charge) Sector: Description: The Special Demand charge applies to devices and equipment that produce highly intermittent demands of short duration. These special demand loads include, but are not limited to resistance welding equipment, x-ray machines and bombarding transformers. Source or reference: http://www.burbankwaterandpower.com/electric/commercial-and-industrial-electric-rates

76

Data:Ec70b6df-58d8-452b-a40a-f0bc32af0aef | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

df-58d8-452b-a40a-f0bc32af0aef df-58d8-452b-a40a-f0bc32af0aef No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Village of Lyndonville, Vermont (Utility Company) Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Load Management (RE) Sector: Commercial Description: Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous

77

Forskere p Ris og DTU har udviklet en metode til fremstilling af bioethanol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

med halm som rĂĄstof. Under processen fremstilles der ogsĂĄ biogas som et biprodukt Bruger man biogas i to processer, som udnytter hinandens restprodukter uden at efterlade spildevand af betydning. Vi den nye metode til fremstilling af bioethanol, i en kombination med biogas, er denne

78

Manufacture of ceramic tiles from fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a process for forming glass-ceramic tiles. Fly ash containing organic material, metal contaminants, and glass forming materials is oxidized under conditions effective to combust the organic material and partially oxidize the metallic contaminants and the glass forming materials. The oxidized glass forming materials are vitrified to form a glass melt. This glass melt is then formed into tiles containing metallic contaminants.

Hnat, James G. (Collegeville, PA); Mathur, Akshay (Tampa, FL); Simpson, James C. (Perkiomenville, PA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Manufacture of ceramic tiles from fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a process for forming glass-ceramic tiles. Fly ash containing organic material, metal contaminants, and glass forming materials is oxidized under conditions effective to combust the organic material and partially oxidize the metallic contaminants and the glass forming materials. The oxidized glass forming materials are vitrified to form a glass melt. This glass melt is then formed into tiles containing metallic contaminants. 6 figs.

Hnat, J.G.; Mathur, A.; Simpson, J.C.

1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

80

Fly ash and concrete: a study determines whether biomass, or coal co-firing fly ash, can be used in concrete  

SciTech Connect

Current US national standards for using fly ash in concrete (ASTM C618) state that fly ash must come from coal combustion, thus precluding biomass-coal co-firing fly ash. The co-fired ash comes from a large and increasing fraction of US power plants due to rapid increases in co-firing opportunity fuels with coal. The fly ashes include coal fly ash, wood fly ash from pure wood combustion, biomass and coal co-fired fly ash SW1 and SW2. Also wood fly ash is blended with Class C or Class F to produce Wood C and Wood E. Concrete samples were prepared with fly ash replacing cement by 25%. All fly ash mixes except wood have a lower water demand than the pure cement mix. Fly ashes, either from coal or non coal combustion, increase the required air entraining agent (AEA) to meet the design specification of the mixes. If AEA is added arbitrarily without considering the amount or existence of fly ash results could lead to air content in concrete that is either too low or too high. Biomass fly ash does not impact concrete setting behaviour disproportionately. Switch grass-coal co-fired fly ash and blended wood fly ash generally lie within the range of pure coal fly ash strength. The 56 day flexure strength of all the fly ash mixes is comparable to that of the pure cement mix. The flexure strength from the coal-biomass co-fired fly ash does not differ much from pure coal fly ash. All fly ash concrete mixes exhibit lower chloride permeability than the pure cement mixes. In conclusion biomass coal co-fired fly ash perform similarly to coal fly ash in fresh and hardened concrete. As a result, there is no reason to exclude biomass-coal co-fired fly ash in concrete.

Wang, Shuangzhen; Baxter, Larry

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "af alkaline fly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Recovery of aluminum and other metal values from fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a method for improving the acid leachability of aluminum and other metal values found in fly ash which comprises sintering the fly ash, prior to acid leaching, with a calcium sulfate-containing composition at a temperature at which the calcium sulfate is retained in said composition during sintering and for a time sufficient to quantitatively convert the aluminum in said fly ash into an acid-leachable form.

McDowell, W.J.; Seeley, F.G.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Recovery of aluminum and other metal values from fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention described herein relates to a method for improving the acid leachability of aluminum and other metal values found in fly ash which comprises sintering the fly ash, prior to acid leaching, with a calcium sulfate-containing composition at a temperature at which the calcium sulfate is retained in said composition during sintering and for a time sufficient to quantitatively convert the aluminum in said fly ash into an acid-leachable form.

McDowell, William J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Seeley, Forest G. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Coal Fly Ash as Alternative Source of Smelter Grade Alumina  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, COM 2011. Symposium, COM 2011 (held with the World Gold Conference), POSTER SESSION. Presentation Title, Coal Fly Ash as

84

Kinetics of beneficiated fly ash by carbon burnout  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The presence of carbon in fly ash requires an increase in the dosage of the air-entraining admixture for concrete mix, and may cause the admixture to lose efficiency. Specifying authorities for the concrete producers have set maximum allowable levels of residual carbon. These levels are the so called Loss On Ignition (LOI). The concrete producers` day-to-day purchasing decisions sets the LOI at 4%. The objective of the project is to investigate the kinetics of oxidation of residual carbon present in coal fly ash as a possible first step toward producing low-carbon fly ash from high-carbon, low quality fly ash.

Okoh, J.M.; Dodoo, J.N.D.; Diaz, A. [Univ. of Maryland Eastern Shore, Princess Anne, MD (United States). Dept. of Natural Sciences; Ferguson, W.; Udinskey, J.R. Jr.; Christiana, G.A. [Delmarva Power, Wilmington, DE (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

85

Mechanical Activation of Deposited Fly Ash by Grinding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 1, 2007 ... According to laboratory experience the breaking of fly ash particles is required to increase its hydraulic potential (Opoczky, 2001). Aim of the ...

86

Fine limestone additions to regulate setting in high volume fly ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... [11] ASTM C618-08a. Standard specification for coal fly ash and raw or calcined natural pozzolan for use in concrete; 2008. ...

2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

87

Study on Aluminum Foam with Fly Ash Increase Viscosity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 1, 2007 ... Study on Aluminum Foam with Fly Ash Increase Viscosity by Yong Wang, Guang- chun Yao, and Bing Li. Publisher: TMS. Product Format: PDF.

88

Proportioning CLSM Using Fly Ash and GGBS - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Proportioning CLSM Using Fly Ash and GGBS. Author(s), Udayashankar B C, Raghavendra T. On-Site Speaker (Planned), Udayashankar  ...

89

Alkaline solution absorption of carbon dioxide method and apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a method for measuring the concentration of hydroxides (or pH) in alkaline solutions, using the tendency of hydroxides to adsorb CO{sub 2}. The method comprises passing CO{sub 2} over the surface of an alkaline solution in a remote tank before and after measurements of the CO{sub 2} concentration. Comparison of the measurements yields the adsorption fraction from which the hydroxide concentration can be calculated using a correlation of hydroxide or pH to adsorption fraction. A schematic is given of a process system according to a preferred embodiment of the invention. 2 figs.

Hobbs, D.T.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Research on separators for alkaline zinc batteries. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project is concerned with the research and development of a hybrid separator as an improved battery separator in alkaline zinc secondary batteries. Particular emphasis has been directed toward increasing the cycle life of zinc electrodes by controlling the permselectivity of the separator.

Yeo, R.S.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Process for the recovery of alumina from fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement in the lime-sinter process for recovering alumina from pulverized coal fly ash is disclosed. The addition of from 2 to 10 weight percent carbon and sulfur to the fly ash-calcium carbonate mixture increase alumina recovery at lower sintering temperatures.

Murtha, M.J.

1983-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

92

Discrete mechanics, optimal control and formation flying spacecraft  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Discrete mechanics, optimal control and formation flying spacecraft Oliver Junge Center-Bl¨obaum partially supported by the CRC 376 Oliver Junge Discrete mechanics, optimal control and formation flying spacecraft p.1 #12;Outline mechanical optimal control problem direct discretization of the variational

Patrick, George

93

The recycling of the coal fly ash in glass production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recycling of fly ash obtained from the combustion of coal in thermal power plant has been studied. Coal fly ash was vitrified by melting at 1773 K for 5 hours without any additives. The properties of glasses produced from coal fly ash were investigated by means of Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) techniques. DTA study indicated that there was only one endothermic peak at 1003 K corresponding to the glass transition temperature. XRD analysis showed the amorphous state of the glass sample produced from coal fly ash. SEM investigations revealed that the coal fly ash based glass sample had smooth surface. The mechanical, physical and chemical properties of the glass sample were also determined. Recycling of coal fly ash by using vitrification technique resulted to a glass material that had good mechanical, physical and chemical properties. Toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) results showed that the heavy metals of Pb, Cr, Zn and Mn were successfully immobilized into the glass. It can be said that glass sample obtained by the recycling of coal fly ash can be taken as a non-hazardous material. Overall, results indicated that the vitrification technique is an effective way for the stabilization and recycling of coal fly ash.

Erol, M.M.; Kucukbayrak, S.; Ersoy-Mericboyu, A. [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

94

Development of an alkaline/surfactant/polymer compositional reservoir simulator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mathematical formulation of a generalized three-dimensional compositional reservoir simulator for high-pH chemical flooding processes is presented in this work. The model assumes local thermodynamic equilibrium with respect to both reaction chemistry and phase behavior and calculates equilibrium electrolyte and phase compositions as a function of time and position. The reaction chemistry considers aqueous electrolytic chemistry, precipitation/dissolution of minerals, ion exchange reactions on matrix surface, reaction of acidic components of crude oil with the bases in the aqueous solution and cation exchange reactions with the micelles. The simulator combines this detailed reaction chemistry associated with these processes with the extensive physical and flow property modeling schemes of an existing chemical flood simulator (UTCHEM) to model the multiphase, multidimensional displacement processes. The formulation of the chemical equilibrium model is quite general and is adaptable to simulate a variety of chemical descriptions. In addition to its use in the simulation of high-pH chemical flooding processes, the model will find application in the simulation of other reactive flow problems like the ground water contamination, reinjection of produced water, chemical waste disposal, etc. in one, two or three dimensions and under multiphase flow conditions. In this work, the model is used to simulate several hypothetical cases of high-pH chemical floods, which include cases from a simple alkaline preflush of a micellar/polymer flood to surfactant enhanced alkaline-polymer flooding and the results are analyzed. Finally, a few published alkaline, alkaline-polymer and surfactant-alkaline-polymer corefloods are simulated and compared with the experimental results.

Bhuyan, D.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Management of lignite fly ash for improving soil fertility and crop productivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lignite fly ash (LFA), being alkaline and endowed with excellent pozzolanic properties, a silt loam texture, and plant nutrients, has the potential to improve soil quality and productivity. Long-term field trials with groundnut, maize, and sun hemp were carried out to study the effect of LFA on growth and yield. Before crop I was sown, LFA was applied at various doses with and without press mud (an organic waste from the sugar industry, used as an amendment and source of nutrients). LFA with and without press mud was also applied before crops III and V were cultivated. Chemical fertilizer, along with gypsum, humic acid, and bioferfertilizer, was applied in all treatments, including the control. With one-time and repeat applications of LFA (with and without press mud), yield increased significantly (7.0-89.0%) in relation to the control crop. The press mud enhanced the yield (3.0-15.0%) with different LFA applications. One-time and repeat application of LFA (alone and in combination with press mud) improved soil quality and the nutrient content of the produce. The highest dose of LFA (200 t/ha) with and without press mud showed the best residual effects (eco-friendly increases in the yield of succeeding crops). Some increase in trace- and heavy metal contents and in the level of gamma-emitters in soil and crop produce, but well within permissible limits, was observed. Thus, LFA can be used on a large scale to boost soil fertility and productivity with no adverse effects on the soil or crops, which may solve the problem of bulk disposal of fly ash in an eco-friendly manner.

Ram, L.C.; Srivastava, N.K.; Jha, S.K.; Sinha, A.K.; Masto, R.E.; Selvi, V.A. [Central Fuel Research Institute, Dhanbad (India)

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

96

Behavior of Ammoniated Fly Ash: Effects of Ammonia on Fly Ash Handling, Disposal, and End-Use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The implementation of ammonia-based nitrogen oxides (NOx) control technologies has had the undesired side effect of creating potential problems for operating units due to ammonia-contaminated fly ash. The work described in this report is a continuation of long-term EPRI efforts to address various industry concerns associated with ammoniated fly ash.

2002-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

97

Computer Modeling Illuminates Degradation Pathways of Cations in Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cells (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cation degradation insights obtained by computational modeling could result in better performance and longer lifetime for alkaline membrane fuel cells.

Not Available

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Bringing Fruit Flies in from the Cold  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Environmental Sustainability Award to Three from APS DOE Environmental Sustainability Award to Three from APS 2009 Chemistry Nobel to APS Users The First Experiment at the LCLS Linda Young Named to Head X-ray Science Division $7.9 M in ARRA Funding Brings New Instrumentation to the APS APS News Archives: 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed Bringing Fruit Flies in from the Cold DECEMBER 21, 2009 Bookmark and Share See the video of synchrotron x-ray visualization of ice formation in insects during lethal and non-lethal freezing at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m07CKU1XGdk Based on the University of Western Ontario press release Using a microscope the size of a football field, researchers from The University of Western Ontario, the University of Nevada-Las Vegas, Argonne

99

Data:23b41af2-2415-47d2-bc22-5a97e43af5d5 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b41af2-2415-47d2-bc22-5a97e43af5d5 b41af2-2415-47d2-bc22-5a97e43af5d5 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Lexington, North Carolina (Utility Company) Effective date: 2013/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Area Lighting- 400W Metal Halide- Shoe-Box Single Sector: Lighting Description: Available to the individual Customer at locations on the City's distribution system. Source or reference: http://www.lexingtonnc.net/publicutilities/downloads/Current%20Electric%20Rates.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh)

100

Data:F96ac3e8-89af-42ed-af3b-e45b3976a771 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ac3e8-89af-42ed-af3b-e45b3976a771 ac3e8-89af-42ed-af3b-e45b3976a771 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: GreyStone Power Corporation Effective date: 2011/08/01 End date if known: Rate name: Residential Farm Service Sector: Residential Description: Source or reference: http://www.greystonepower.com/UploadedFiles/pdf/residential%20farm%20service%20rate.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring:

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101

Data:56e44dc6-465e-4aae-af68-4af7ee096040 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

e44dc6-465e-4aae-af68-4af7ee096040 e44dc6-465e-4aae-af68-4af7ee096040 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Columbia River Peoples Ut Dist Effective date: 2011/10/01 End date if known: Rate name: Outdoor Area Lighting 100w Sodium Vapor Area Light Style Sector: Lighting Description: Applicability To outdoor area lighting service on Customer property. Character of Service Lighting service from dusk to dawn daily, by means of PUD-owned luminaries mounted on PUD-owned poles. Maintenance by the PUD includes lamp, photo cell and fixture replacement as needed. Individual lamps will be replaced on burnout as soon as reasonably possible after notification by the Customer and subject to the PUD's operating schedules and requirements.

102

Data:6c090157-d973-44af-af2e-bed1b0127d90 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0157-d973-44af-af2e-bed1b0127d90 0157-d973-44af-af2e-bed1b0127d90 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Columbus Southern Power Co Effective date: 2012/03/09 End date if known: Rate name: Residential Optional Demand Service(Load Management Water Heating Energy Charge) Sector: Residential Description: Availability of this provision is limited to those customers served under this provision as of December 31,2000. For residential customers who install a Company-approved load management water heating system which consumes electrical energy primarily during off-peak hours specified by the Company and stores hot water for use during on-peak hours, of minimum capacity of 80 gallons, the last 250 KWH of use in any month shall be billed at the load management water heating energy charge.

103

Data:3afb299a-f590-437a-af7b-510d756d3879 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

afb299a-f590-437a-af7b-510d756d3879 afb299a-f590-437a-af7b-510d756d3879 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Wake Electric Membership Corp Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: NC GreenPower Sector: Description: * Flat rate buy = ($4.00 per block) / (100 kwh per block) NC GreenPower is an independent, nonprofit organization established to improve North Carolina's environment through voluntary contributions toward renewable energy. A landmark initiative approved by the N.C. Utilities Commission, NC GreenPower is the first statewide green energy program in the nation administered independently by a nonprofit organization and supported by all of the state's utilities. The program is designed to improve the environment by encouraging the development of renewable energy resources through consumers' voluntary contributions to NC GreenPower.For as little as $4 a month, you can help NC GreenPower build up the supply of green energy. Your $4 contribution each month will add one block of 100 kilowatt-hours of green power to the North Carolina power grid.

104

Data:17c9c9ef-1c18-4fd8-af1a-0c4b993dd5af | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ef-1c18-4fd8-af1a-0c4b993dd5af ef-1c18-4fd8-af1a-0c4b993dd5af No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Frankfort, Indiana (Utility Company) Effective date: 1997/10/27 End date if known: Rate name: OL Outdoor Lighting 175 watt Mercury Vapor Sector: Lighting Description: Available only for continuous year-round service for outdoor lighting to any residential, farm, commercial, or industrial customer located adjacent to an electric distribution line of utility. Outdoor lighting service using lamps available under this schedule and controlled by a photoelectric relay. Source or reference: http://www.amlegal.com/nxt/gateway.dll/Indiana/frankfort_in/cityoffrankfortindianacodeofordinances?f=templates$fn=default.htm$3.0$vid=amlegal:frankfort_in

105

Data:1024a868-af5f-4450-994a-f94f20b28281 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4a868-af5f-4450-994a-f94f20b28281 4a868-af5f-4450-994a-f94f20b28281 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Butler Rural El Coop Assn, Inc Effective date: 2009/08/01 End date if known: Rate name: Commercial Large Rates: LOAD CONTROL Sector: Commercial Description: To be eligible for the Load Control Rate, the consumer is required to reduce load (demand) during the months of July and August to no more than 25% of its billing demand in service between the hours of 3:00 p.m. and 9:00 p.m. If metering data indicates that the consumer's load during this period exceeded twenty-five (25%) percent of the monthly billing demand, the Consumer may not be eligible to be billed under this schedule and may be billed under the standard General Service Large rate schedule. The Consumer may request service under this tariff effective July 1 of any year. The Consumer agrees to remain on the tariff for a minimum of 12 months unless the Consumer leaves the Cooperative's lines or is disqualified as mentioned above.

106

High Volume Fly Ash Blended Cements: Status Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At present, the production of high-volume fly ash (HVFA) concrete involves the addition of large volumes of fly ash as a separate ingredient at a ready-mixed concrete batch plant. This necessitates additional storage silos and quality control at the job site. In order to resolve these issues, CANMET, in partnership with Electric Power Research Institute, U.S.A., undertook a major research project to develop blended cements incorporating high volumes of ASTM Class fly ash. The blended cements are made by ...

1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

107

Recovery of iron oxide from coal fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high quality iron oxide concentrate, suitable as a feed for blast and electric reduction furnaces is recovered from pulverized coal fly ash. The magnetic portion of the fly ash is separated and treated with a hot strong alkali solution which dissolves most of the silica and alumina in the fly ash, leaving a solid residue and forming a precipitate which is an acid soluble salt of aluminosilicate hydrate. The residue and precipitate are then treated with a strong mineral acid to dissolve the precipitate leaving a solid residue containing at least 90 weight percent iron oxide.

Dobbins, Michael S. (Ames, IA); Murtha, Marlyn J. (Ames, IA)

1983-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

108

Improving chemical flood efficiency with micellar/alkaline/polymer processes  

SciTech Connect

A laboratory study was undertaken to find more efficient, lower-cost chemical systems for the recovery of waterflood residual oil. The authors' investigation emphasized alkaline-augmented processes because alkali is much less expensive than surfactant. The strategy was to replace some of or all the high-cost surfactants in a micellar formulation with lower-cost alkali and still maintain the high tertiary oil recoveries obtained with micellar flooding. Baseline oil recoveries in Berea corefloods were determined for two interfacially active crude oils with micellar/polymer (MP) and alkaline/polymer (AP) systems. A combination process was then developed in which a small micellar slug is injected first, followed by a larger AP slug. This process is referred to as a micellar/alkaline/polymer (MAP) flood. Phase-behavior studies guided the design and optimization of all three chemical processes in the coreflood experiments. Detailed effluent analyses and in-situ mobility measurements provided information about possible oil recovery mechanisms.

Shuler, P.J.; Kuehne, D.L.; Lerner, R.M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Hydrometallurgical recovery of germanium from coal gasification fly ash. Solvent extraction method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article is concerned with a simple hydrometallurgical method for the selective recovery of germanium from fly ash (FA) generated in an integrated gasification with combined cycle (IGCC) process. The method is based on the leaching of FA with water and a subsequent concentration and selective separation of germanium by a solvent method. Regarding the leaching step, the different operational conditions studied were liquid/solid (L/S) ratio and time of contact. The solvent extraction method was based on germanium complexation with catechol (CAT) in an aqueous solution followed by the extraction of the Ge-CAT complex with an extracting organic reagent diluted in an organic solvent. The main factors examined during the extraction tests were aqueous phase/organic phase (AP/OP) volumetric ratio, aqueous phase pH, amounts of reagents, and time of contact. Germanium extraction yields were higher than 90%. Alkaline and acid stripping of organic extracts were studied obtaining the best results with 1M NaOH (85%). A high-purity germanium solution was obtained. Experimental data presented in this work show that the extraction of germanium by the solvent method designed can be selective toward germanium, and this element can be effectively separated from arsenic, molybdenum, nickel, antimony, vanadium, and zinc.

Arroyo, F.; Fernandez-Pereira, C. [University of Seville, Seville (Spain)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

110

www.mdpi.com/journal/ijms Fly Ash-based Geopolymer Lightweight Concrete Using Foaming Agent  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: In this paper, we report the results of our investigation on the possibility of producing foam concrete by using a geopolymer system. Class C fly ash was mixed with an alkaline activator solution (a mixture of sodium silicate and NaOH), and foam was added to the geopolymeric mixture to produce lightweight concrete. The NaOH solution was prepared by dilute NaOH pellets with distilled water. The reactives were mixed to produce a homogeneous mixture, which was placed into a 50 mm mold and cured at two different curing temperatures (60 °C and room temperature), for 24 hours. After the curing process, the strengths of the samples were tested on days 1, 7, and 28. The water absorption, porosity, chemical composition, microstructure, XRD and FTIR analyses were studied. The results showed that the sample which was cured at 60 °C (LW2) produced the maximum compressive strength for all tests, (11.03 MPa, 17.59 MPa, and 18.19 MPa) for days 1, 7, and 28, respectively. Also, the water absorption and porosity of LW2 were reduced by 6.78 % and 1.22 % after 28 days, respectively. The SEM showed that the LW2 sample had a denser matrix than LW1. This was because LW2 was heat cured, which caused the

Mohd Mustafa; Al Bakri Abdullah; Kamarudin Hussin; Mohamed Bnhussain; Khairul Nizar Ismail; Zarina Yahya; Rafiza Abdul Razak

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

THE IMPACT OF DISSOLVED SALTS ON PASTES CONTAINING FLY ASH, CEMENT AND SLAG  

SciTech Connect

The degree of hydration of a mixture of cementitious materials (Class F fly ash, blast furnace slag and portland cement) in highly concentrated alkaline salt solutions is enhanced by the addition of aluminate to the salt solution. This increase in the degree of hydration, as monitored with isothermal calorimetry, leads to higher values of dynamic Young's modulus and compressive strength and lower values of total porosity. This enhancement in performance properties of these cementitious waste forms by increased hydration is beneficial to the retention of the radionuclides that are also present in the salt solution. The aluminate ions in the solution act first to retard the set time of the mix but then enhance the hydration reactions following the induction period. In fact, the aluminate ions increase the degree of hydration by {approx}35% over the degree of hydration for the same mix with a lower aluminate concentration. An increase in the blast furnace slag concentration and a decrease in the water to cementitious materials ratio produced mixes with higher values of Young's modulus and lower values of total porosity. Therefore, these operational factors can be fine tuned to enhance performance properties of cementitious waste form. Empirical models for Young modulus, heat of hydration and total porosity were developed to predict the values of these properties. These linear models used only statistically significant compositional and operational factors and provided insight into those factors that control these properties.

Harbour, J.; Edwards, T.; Williams, V.

2009-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

112

Functionality of alkaline cooked corn bran on tortilla texture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of pericarp and nixtamalized corn bran (NCB) level on corn tortilla attributes was evaluated. The effect of varying pH (4, 9 and 11) on fresh and dry mesa flour (pH 5, 7 and 10) tortillas was also evaluated. Nixtamal was washed at three different levels to obtain tortillas containing about 0, 50 and 100% pericarp. Fumaric acid and lime solutions were used to produce acidic and alkaline tortillas respectively. Tortilla texture was evaluated at 0, 1 and 7 days of storage objectively using a texture analyzer and subjectively using a solvability test. As pericarp content and pH increased tortillas were softer, more flexible and extensible with a darker yellow color. Acidic tortillas were harder with a white color. Pericarp improved texture of tortillas during storage. Commercial corn bran was alkaline treated to obtain NCB with functionality similar to nixtamalized corn pericarp. Dry masa flour (DMF) (1 kg) was mixed with 0, 50 and 100 g dry basis of NCB and processed into tortillas. Tortillas containing NCB had a pH of 9, were more flexible and rollable than control tortillas. Alkaline pH tortillas puffed during baking; these tortillas were yellow with a soft, moist texture. Tortillas containing nixtamalized rice and wheat brans were soft and flexible. A sensory panel found that tortillas containing nixtamalized cereal brans had a strong alkaline flavor and aroma and a blistered surface, with a soft, moist texture. NCB tortillas had the highest overall acceptability scores. Pericarp from nixtamal and alkaline pH slowed the staling mechanisms of tortillas. Nixtamalized commercial brans significantly improved the texture of corn tortillas during storage and enhanced the color, flavor and aroma of DMF tortillas. Nixtamalized cereal brans can be used as an effective additive to extend shelf stability of tortillas and enhance the flavor of DMF products. Tortillas containing NCB could be used in products such as wraps and fried tacos where the bright color and stronger flavor could be an advantage.

Guajardo Flores, Sara

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Factors Controlling the Solubility of Mercury Adsorbed on Fly Ash  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

N:\R&D_Projects_Partial\FlyAsh&CCBs\Meetings\2005_04_WorldOfCoalAsh\AnnKim\HgSol N:\R&D_Projects_Partial\FlyAsh&CCBs\Meetings\2005_04_WorldOfCoalAsh\AnnKim\HgSol ubility_Paper.doc Factors Controlling the Solubility of Mercury Adsorbed on Fly Ash Ann G. Kim 1 and Karl Schroeder 2 1 ORISE Research Fellow, National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy, 626 Cochrans Mill Rd., Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 2 Research Group Leader, National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy, 626 Cochrans Mill Rd., Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 KEYWORDS Coal Utilization By-Products, leaching, activated carbon, pH ABSTRACT It is expected that increased controls on Hg emissions will shift the environmental burden from the flue gas to the solid coal utilization by-products (CUB), such as fly ash and flue-gas

114

Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specifications required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs.

Liskowitz, John W. (Belle Mead, NJ); Wecharatana, Methi (Parsippany, NJ); Jaturapitakkul, Chai (Bangkok, TH); Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E. (late of Livingston, NJ)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specification required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs. 33 figs.

Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

1998-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

116

Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specification required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs.

Liskowitz, John W. (Belle Mead, NJ); Wecharatana, Methi (Parsippany, NJ); Jaturapitakkul, Chai (Bangkok, TH); Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E. (late of Livingston, NJ)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specifications required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs. 33 figs.

Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

1997-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

118

Guideline for Control and Prevention of Fly Ash Erosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boiler tube failures (BTFs) represent the largest portion of availability loss in the fossil boiler industry at about 4%. Approximately 25% of all tube failures are due to fly ash erosion (FAE).

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

119

Optical properties of fly ash. Volume 2, Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research performed under this contract was divided into four tasks under the following headings: Task 1, Characterization of fly ash; Task 2, Measurements of the optical constants of slags; Task 3, Calculations of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions; and Task 4, Measurements of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions. Tasks 1 and 4 constituted the Ph.D. research topic of Sarbajit Ghosal, while Tasks 2 and 3 constituted the Ph.D. research topic of Jon Ebert. Together their doctoral dissertations give a complete account of the work performed. This final report, issued in two volumes consists of an executive summary of the whole program followed by the dissertation of Ghosal and Ebert. Volume 2 contains the dissertation of Ebert which covers the measurements of the optical constants of slags, and calculations of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions. A list of publications and conference presentations resulting from the work is also included.

Self, S.A.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

KINETICS OF FLY ASH BENEFICIATION BY CARBON BURNOUT  

SciTech Connect

Surface area analyses performed on fly ash samples reveal that the surface area is controlled by carbon content. The higher surface areas found in large particles are due to the presence of highly porous carbonaceous particles. Adsorption-desorption isotherms and t-plots of fly ash samples indicate that fly ash is porous. BJH Adsorption/Desorption pore size analysis reveal that pore diameters are independent of sieve size. They appear to be dependent only on the nature of the material which confers porosity. Based on the results of Brown and Dykstra (41) it is reasonable to assume that calculations of reaction rates at temperatures above 550 C were confounded by weight losses from processes other than carbon oxidation and, therefore, are not useful in determination of the temperature dependence of carbon oxidation in fly ash. The results of the present study indicate that temperatures below 550 C should be used for future studies in order to satisfactorily assess the temperature dependence of carbon oxidation in fly ash. Furthermore, it is also advisable that percent carbon determinations be performed on fly ash samples after the oxidation reactions to determine whether all carbon present in fly ash is oxidized. This will ensure that reaction rates are representative of the complete oxidation of carbon. An inverse relationship was determined between reaction rates and oxygen concentration for this study. As discussed, this may be due to volatilization of volatiles from fly ash and ease of transport of products away from the reaction sites by the action of the vacuum applied to the samples. A more accurate determination of oxygen dependence of carbon oxidation can be accomplished by the use of specialty gases containing different concentrations of oxygen which could eliminate the need to apply vacuum to the samples.

Dr. Joseph N.D. Dodoo; Dr. Joseph M. Okoh

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "af alkaline fly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The Effect of Ammonia on Mercury Partitioning in Fly Ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Management options and environmental assessments for fly ash are driven primarily by their physical and chemical characteristics. This report describes the results of a laboratory study on the leaching of mercury from several paired fly ash samples from facilities employing powdered activated carbon (PAC) injection for mercury control. While previous EPRI research has shown that mercury leaching from ash with PAC is negligible, it has also been found that ammonia complexes can increase the mobility of so...

2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

122

Fundamental Study of Low NOx Combustion Fly Ash Utilization  

SciTech Connect

This study is principally concerned with characterizing the organic part of coal combustion fly ashes. High carbon fly ashes are becoming more common as by-products of low-NOx combustion technology, and there is need to learn more about this fraction of the fly ash. The project team consists of two universities, Brown and Princeton, and an electrical utility, New England Power. A sample suite of over forty fly ashes has been gathered from utilities across the United States, and includes ashes from a coals ranging in rank from bituminous to lignite. The characterizations of these ashes include standard tests (LOI, Foam Index), as well as more detailed characterizations of their surface areas, porosity, extractability and adsorption behavior. The ultimate goal is, by better characterizing the material, to enable broadening the range of applications for coal fly ash re-use beyond the current main market as a pozzolanic agent for concretes. The potential for high carbon-content fly ashes to substitute for activated carbons is receiving particular attention. The work performed to date has already revealed how very different the surfaces of different ashes produced by the same utility can be, with respect to polarity of the residual carbon. This can help explain the large variations in acceptability of these ashes as concrete additives.

E. M. Suubert; I. Kuloats; K. Smith; N. Sabanegh; R.H. Hurt; W. D. Lilly; Y. M. Gao

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Use of Class C Fly Ash in High-Volume Fly Ash Concrete Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although the use of fly ash in concrete is a well-established practice, the volume of high-calcium Class C ash used lags behind that of low-calcium Class F ash. Because Class C may be the only type of ash produced in some western states, this disparity can significantly limit its use potential. The literature results presented in this report represent the first phase of a longer term research effort to provide technical information supporting the increased use of Class C ash in concrete applications.

2007-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

124

Data:550a4af8-0641-4b10-af62-e97b1098be9d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0641-4b10-af62-e97b1098be9d 0641-4b10-af62-e97b1098be9d No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Caddo Electric Coop, Inc Effective date: 2007/05/01 End date if known: Rate name: Security Lighting 175-Watt MVL,One light Sector: Lighting Description: - Available to all consumers located on or adjacent to cooperative's single-phase or three-phase lines. - Subject to power cost adjustment,tax adjustment and rate revisions. Source or reference: Rate binder # 4 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh):

125

Data:74af0974-c282-4e32-af9f-5c8cdaee65e6 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

974-c282-4e32-af9f-5c8cdaee65e6 974-c282-4e32-af9f-5c8cdaee65e6 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Indiana Michigan Power Co (Michigan) Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: ECLS - 150 Watt HPS Sector: Lighting Description: Energy Conversation Lighting Service Available for streetlighting service to municipalities, counties, and other governmental subdivisions. This rate is applicable for service that is supplied through new or rebuilt streetlight systems, including extension of streetlighting systems to additional locations where service is requested by customer.

126

Data:145af94d-d25c-47af-9526-54c9b7d74c8e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d-d25c-47af-9526-54c9b7d74c8e d-d25c-47af-9526-54c9b7d74c8e No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Sacramento Municipal Utility District Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: SL-TSF Sector: Lighting Description: Energy charge only applicable if unit is greater than 70 Watts. Source or reference: https://www.smud.org/en/residential/customer-service/rate-information/rates-rules-regulations.htm Source Parent: Comments FRA= Solar surcharge Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months):

127

2011 Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cell Workshop Final Report  

SciTech Connect

A workshop addressing the current state-of-the-art in alkaline membrane fuel cells (AMFCs) was held May 8-9, 2011, at the Crystal Gateway Marriott in Arlington, Virginia. This workshop was the second of its kind, with the first being held December 11-13, 2006, in Phoenix, Arizona. The 2011 workshop and associated workshop report were created to assess the current state of AMFC technology (taking into account recent advances), investigate the performance potential of AMFC systems across all possible power ranges and applications, and identify the key research needs for commercial competitiveness in a variety of areas.

Pivovar, B.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

World Catalog of the Beach-Fly Family Canacidae (Diptera)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lessoni Australia NA EU556308 EU556266 Autropeplea ollula Philippines NA NA U82067 Autropeplea tomentosa, Quifangondo AF503573 AM921961 AY029550 Bullastra cumingiana Philippines, Luzon NA EU556314 U82068 Fossaria HQ283241 Lymnaea fuscus Germany, Westfallen AJ626855 AJ319622 NA Lymnaea gen. sp. Hawaii, Kauai NA NA

Mathis, Wayne N.

129

A new antifouling hybrid CDP formulation with ethyl heptanoate: evaluation of AF performance at Ayajin harbor, east coast of Korea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Antifouling (AF) efficiency of a nontoxic aliphatic ester, ethyl heptanoate was evaluated against spores of a fouling alga Ulva pertusa and a ship fouling diatom Amphora coffeaeformis. Based on the nontoxic AF activity exhibited in the laboratory bioassays, ... Keywords: antifouling, ethyl heptanoate, fouling resistance, hybrid controlled depletion paint (CDP), zinc pyrithione

M. Sidharthan; Sang Mok Jung; Haridatta Bhatta Rai; Ji Hyun Lee; Chi Young Lim; Young-Kyu Kang; N. S. Park; H. W. Shin

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Leaching of Mixtures of Biochar and Fly Ash  

SciTech Connect

Increasing atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases, especially CO2, and their effects on global temperature have led to interest in the possibility of carbon storage in terrestrial environments.2, 5, 6 Both the residual char from biomass pyrolysis7-9, 12 (biochar) and fly ash from coal combustion1, 13, 14 have the potential to significantly expand terrestrial sequestration options. Both biochar and fly ash also have potentially beneficial effects on soil properties. Fly ash has been shown to increase porosity, water-holding capacity, pH, conductivity, and dissolved SO42-, CO32-, Cl- and basic cations.10, 11, 16 Adding biochar to soil generally raises pH, increases total nitrogen and total phosphorous, encourages greater root development, improves cation exchange capacity and reduces available aluminum.3, 17 Combinations of these benefits likely lead to the observed increased yields for crops including corn and sugarcane.17 with biochar addition to soil. In addition, it has been found that soils with added biochar emit lower amounts of other greenhouse gases (methane and nitrous oxide) 8, 17 than do unammended soils. Biochar and fly ash amendments may be useful in promoting terrestrial carbon sequestration on currently underutilized and degraded lands. For example, about 1% of the US surface lands consist of previously mined lands or highway rights-of-way.18 Poorly managed lands could count for another 15% of US area. Biochar and fly ash amendments could increase productivity of these lands and increase carbon storage in the soil Previous results showed minimal leaching of organic carbon and metals from a variety of fly ashes.15 Here, we are examining the properties of mixtures of biochar, fly ash, and soil and evaluating leaching of organic carbon and metals from the mixtures.

Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL; Porat, Iris [ORNL; Phillips, Jana Randolph [ORNL; Amonette, J. E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Drake, Meghan M [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Transpassive electrodissolution of depleted uranium in alkaline electrolytes  

SciTech Connect

To aid in removal of oralloy from the nuclear weapons stockpile, scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility are decontaminating oralloy parts by electrodissolution in neutral to alkaline electrolytes composed of sodium nitrate and sodium sulfate. To improve the process, electrodissolution experiments were performed with depleted uranium to understand the effects of various operating parameters. Sufficient precipitate was also produced to evaluate the feasibility of using ultrafiltration to separate the uranium oxide precipitates from the electrolyte before it enters the decontamination fixture. In preparation for the experiments, a potential-pH diagram for uranium was constructed from thermodynamic data for fully hydrated species. Electrodissolution in unstirred solutions showed that uranium dissolution forms two layers, an acidic bottom layer rich in uranium and an alkaline upper layer. Under stirred conditions results are consistent with the formation of a yellow precipitate of composition UO{sub 3}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O, a six electron process. Amperometric experiments showed that current efficiency remained near 100% over a wide range of electrolytes, electrolyte concentrations, pH, and stirring conditions.

Weisbrod, K.R.; Schake, A.R.; Morgan, A.N.; Purdy, G.M.; Martinez, H.E.; Nelson, T.O.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Catalytic reforming process using noble metal alkaline zeolites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes improvement in a process wherein a gasoline boiling range hydrocarbonaceous feedstock is catalytically reformed in the presence of hydrogen in a reforming process unit comprised of serially connected reactors wherein each of the reactors contains a supported noble metal-containing catalyst. The improvement comprises the noble-metal catalyst of at least one reactor being selected from the group consisting of alkaline faujasite zeolite, L zeolite and zeolites isostructural thereto, which catalysts are prepared by a: contacting an alkaline faujasite zeolite, L zeolite, or zeolite isostructural thereto, with a noble metal composition selected from Pt(acetylacetonate){sub 2} or Pd(acetylacetonate){sub 2} for an effective amount of time to form a substantially homogeneous mixture and to incorporate the platinum and/or palladium into the near surface regions of the zeolite, but not to disperse the platinum and/or palladium throughout the entire zeolite; and calcining the so treated zeolite at a temperature from about 250 {degrees} C to about 600 {degrees} C for an effective amount of time.

Schweizer, A.E.

1991-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

133

2003 Conference on Unburned Carbon on Utility Fly Ash  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2003 Conference on Unburned Carbon on Utility Fly Ash 2003 Conference on Unburned Carbon on Utility Fly Ash October 28, 2003 Table of Contents Disclaimer Participants List [PDF-31KB] Papers and Presentations Control Measures Predictive Performance Tools (Including Instrumentation) Processing and Utilization of High-LOI Fly Ash Beneficiation of High-LOI Fly Ash Characterization of High-LOI Fly Ash Poster Presentations Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government or any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof.

134

Fly ash as a liming material for corn production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fly ash produced as a by-product of subbituminous coal combustion can potentially serve as an alternative liming material without negatively affecting corn (Zea mays L.) production in areas where use of conventional liming materials can be uneconomical due to transportation costs. A study was conducted to determine if fly ash produced from the Nebraska Public Power District Gerald Gentleman Power Station located in Sutherland, NE could be used as an alternative liming material. Combinations of dry fly ash (DFA), wet fly ash (WFA), beet lime (by-product of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) processing) (BL), and agricultural lime (AGL) were applied at rates ranging from 0.43 to 1.62 times the recommended lime rate to plots on four acidic soils (Anselmo fine sandy loam, Hord fine sandy loam, Holdrege sandy loam, and Valentine fine sand). Soil samples were collected to a depth of 0.2 m from plots and analyzed for pH before lime applications and twice periodically after lime application. The Hord and Valentine soils were analyzed for exchangeable Ca, Mg, K, Na,and Al for determination of percent Al saturation on selected treatments and sampling dates. Corn grain yields were determined annually. It is concluded that the fly ash utilized in this study and applied at rates in this study, increases soil pH comparable to agricultural lime and is an appropriate alternative liming material.

Tarkalson, D.D.; Hergert, G.W.; Stevens, W.B.; McCallister, D.L.; Kackman, S.D. [University of Nebraska, North Platte, NE (US)

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Alkaline Pressure Oxidation of Pyrite in the Presence of Silica – Characterization of the Passivating Film.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Alkaline pressure oxidation, particularly in the presence of trona as additive, can be used to oxidize high carbonate refractory gold ores as it prevents the… (more)

Dani, Anirudha

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

ACCESSIBILITY: Acquisition JOINT AIR FORCE-NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION (AF-NNSA) NUCLEAR WEAPONS LIFE CYCLE MANAGEMENT COMPLIANCE WITH THIS PUBLICATION IS MANDATORY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication is available for downloading or ordering on the e-publishing website at: www.e-publishing.af.mil. RELEASABILITY: There are no releasability restrictions on this publication. OPR: AF/A3/5N-R Certified by: AF/A3/5N

Dr Billy Mullins

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Fuel Economy on the Fly | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Economy on the Fly Fuel Economy on the Fly Fuel Economy on the Fly January 19, 2011 - 5:06pm Addthis Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? Fuel Economy information at your fingertips Cross Post from the Energy Savers Blog. Written by Shannon Brescher Shea. With the North American International Auto Show in Detroit kicking off the auto-show circuit last week, manufacturers are unveiling their future models. If you're inspired and in the market for a new car, FuelEconomy.gov can help you pick the most fuel-efficient vehicle for your needs. Although most people don't bring their computer with them to the dealership, you're in luck if you have a smartphone or other mobile internet device. FuelEconomy.gov has a mobile version of its popular Find and Compare Cars

138

Fuel Economy on the Fly | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Economy on the Fly Fuel Economy on the Fly Fuel Economy on the Fly January 18, 2011 - 1:45pm Addthis Shannon Brescher Shea Communications Manager, Clean Cities Program With the North American International Auto Show in Detroit kicking off the auto-show circuit last week, manufacturers are unveiling their future models. If you're inspired and in the market for a new car, FuelEconomy.gov can help you pick the most fuel-efficient vehicle for your needs. Although most people don't bring their computer with them to the dealership, you're in luck if you have a smartphone or other mobile internet device. FuelEconomy.gov has a mobile version of its popular Find and Compare Cars tool that allows you to search anytime, anywhere. The mobile tool works just like the one on the FuelEconomy.gov website. You

139

Glacier Girl flies again | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glacier Girl flies again Glacier Girl flies again Glacier Girl flies again Posted: February 11, 2013 - 3:42pm | Y-12 Report | Volume 9, Issue 2 | 2013 On July 15, 1942, foul weather forced six P-38 fighters and two B-17 bombers to crash-land on Greenland. The squadron's crew, en route from Maine to England to support Allied war efforts, was rescued, but the aircraft were left behind on the arctic ice cap. For 50 years, an ice and snow cocoon enveloped six P-38 fighters and two B-17 bombers that crash-landed on Greenland during World War II. Then, in 1992, after 12 failed attempts to recover the planes, a group of adventurers tunneled through 268 feet of packed ice and raised one of the P-38 fighters piece by piece. Once brought to the surface, the sections were flown to Middlesboro, Ky. - home of the project's financier, Roy

140

Cementitious binder from fly ash and other industrial wastes  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, investigations were undertaken to formulate cementitious binder by judicious blending of fly ash with Portland cement as well as by admixing fly ash with calcined phosphogypsum, fluorogypsum, lime sludge, and chemical activators of different finenesses. The effect of addition of calcined clay in these types of binders was studied. Data showed that cementitious binders of high compressive strength and water retentivity can be produced. The strength of masonry mortars increased with the addition of chemical activators. The strength development of binders takes place through formation of ettringite. C-S-H, and C{sub 4}AH{sub 13}. The binders are eminently suitable for partial replacement (up to 25%) of the cement in concrete without any detrimental affect on the strength. The results showed that fly ash can be used in the range from 45% to 70% in formulating these binders along with other industrial wastes to help in mitigating environmental pollution.

Singh, M.; Garg, M. [Central Building Research Inst., Roorkee (India)] [Central Building Research Inst., Roorkee (India)

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "af alkaline fly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Continuous air Agglomeration Method for high Carbon fly ash Beneficiation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The carbon and mineral components of fly ash are effectively separated by a continuous air agglomeration method, resulting in a substantially carbon-free mineral stream and a highly concentrated carbon product. The method involves mixing the fly ash comprised of carbon and inorganic mineral matter with a liquid hydrocarbon to form a slurry, contacting the slurry with an aqueous solution, dispersing the hydrocarbon slurry into small droplets within the aqueous solution by mechanical mixing and/or aeration, concentrating the inorganic mineral matter in the aqueous solution, agglomerating the carbon and hydrocarbon in the form of droplets, collecting the droplets, separating the hydrocarbon from the concentrated carbon product, and recycling the hydrocarbon.

Gray, McMahan L.; Champagne, Kenneth J.; Finseth, Dennis H.

1998-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

142

Continuous air agglomeration method for high carbon fly ash beneficiation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The carbon and mineral components of fly ash are effectively separated by a continuous air agglomeration method, resulting in a substantially carboree mineral stream and a highly concentrated carbon product. The method involves mixing the fly ash comprised of carbon and inorganic mineral matter with a liquid hydrocarbon to form a slurry, contacting the slurry with an aqueous solution, dispersing the hydrocarbon slurry into small droplets within the aqueous solution by mechanical mixing and/or aeration, concentrating the inorganic mineral matter in the aqueous solution, agglomerating the carbon and hydrocarbon in the form of droplets, collecting the droplets, separating the hydrocarbon from the concentrated carbon product, and recycling the hydrocarbon.

Gray, McMahon L. (Pittsburgh, PA); Champagne, Kenneth J. (Monongahela, PA); Finseth, Dennis H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID CONTROL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, Furnace Injection of Alkaline Sorbents for Sulfuric Acid Control, during the time period April 1, 2003 through September, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The coincident removal of hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid is also being determined, as is the removal of arsenic, a known poison for NO{sub x} selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts. EPRI, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), FirstEnergy Corporation, American Electric Power (AEP) and the Dravo Lime Company are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. This is the eighth reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During previous reporting periods, two long-term sorbent injection tests were conducted, one on Unit 3 at FirstEnergy's Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) and one on Unit 1 at AEP's Gavin Plant. Those tests determined the effectiveness of injecting alkaline slurries into the upper furnace of the boiler as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions from these units. The alkaline slurries tested included commercially available magnesium hydroxide slurry (Gavin Plant), and a byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry (both Gavin Plant and BMP). The tests showed that injecting either the commercial or the byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry could achieve up to 70-75% overall sulfuric acid removal. At BMP, the overall removal was limited by the need to maintain acceptable electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate control performance. At Gavin Plant, the overall sulfuric acid removal was limited because the furnace injected sorbent was less effective at removing SO{sub 3} formed across the SCR system installed on the unit for NO{sub x} control than at removing SO{sub 3} formed in the furnace. The SO{sub 3} removal results were presented in the semi-annual Technical Progress Report for the time period April 1, 2001 through September 30, 2001. Additional balance of plant impact information for the two tests was reported in the Technical Progress Report for the time period October 1, 2001 through March 30, 2002. Additional information became available about the effects of byproduct magnesium hydroxide injection on SCR catalyst coupons during the long-term test at BMP, and those results were reported in the report for the time period April 1, 2002 through September 30, 2002. During the current period, process economic estimates were developed, comparing the costs of the furnace magnesium hydroxide slurry injection process tested as part of this project to a number of other candidate SO{sub 3}/sulfuric acid control technologies for coal-fired power plants. The results of this economic evaluation are included in this progress report.

Gary M. Blythe

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Field test of cosurfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To demonstrate that cosurfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding is viable in recovering waterflood residual oil from sandstone reservoirs in the near-offshore Gulf of Mexico, a series of tests is being conducted in the White Caste field, Louisiana. The strategy adopted was to pilot the technology in three stages: (1) a flood without polymer to prove features of the process unrelated to achieving mobility control, (2) a test of process polymer injectivity in the same reservoir, and (3) a full process demonstration in a shallower sand. The first phase of the pilot is described in this paper; pilot design, slug formulation, and operations are summarized and key responses are documented and interpreted. Ref. 2 describes the polymer injectivity test. The final pilot stage has not been initiated yet.

Falls, A.H.; Thigpen, D.R.; Nelson, R.C.; Ciaston, J.W.; Lawson, J.B.; Good, P.A.; Ueber, R.C.; Shahin, G.T.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production  

SciTech Connect

Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate-xanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid flowing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential pressures across cores. None of the gels tested appeared to alter alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution oil recovery. Total waterflood plus chemical flood oil recovery sequence recoveries were all similar. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gel used to seal fractured core maintain fracture closure if followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate gels that were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 72 F were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 125 F and 175 F in linear corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained diversion capability after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution in stacked; radial coreflood with a common well bore. Xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels maintained gel integrity in linear corefloods after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution at 125 F. At 175 F, Xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels were not stable either with or without subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Numerical simulation demonstrated that reducing the permeability of a high permeability zone of a reservoir with gel improved both waterflood and alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery. A Minnelusa reservoir with both A and B sand production was simulated. A and B sands are separated by a shale layer. A sand and B sand waterflood oil recovery was improved by 196,000 bbls when a gel was placed in the B sand. A sand and B sand alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery was improved by 596,000 bbls when a gel was placed in the B sand. Alkaline-surfactant-pol

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; David Stewart; Bill Jones

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Extracting Alumina from Coal Fly Ash Using Acid Sintering-Leaching ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Extracting Alumina from Coal Fly Ash Using Acid ... Coal fly- ash from coal-fired power plants is rich in Al2O3 content with potential use as a ...

147

Phototactic personality in fruit flies and its suppression by serotonin and white  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

one choice tube leads to a lit light-emitting diode (LED) (Fig. 1A, Fig. S1 A and B, and Movie S1). Af

de Bivort, Benjamin

148

Activation Of Fly Ash-Lime Reactions By Curing At Elevated Temperature And By Addition Of Phosphogypsum.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Pozzolanic reactions play a key role in improving the compressive strengths of compacted fly ash-lime specimens. Based on studies performed with cement amended fly ash… (more)

Asha, K

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Geochemistry of Extremely Alkaline (pH[ 12) Ground Water in Slag-Fill Aquifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in an alkaline sodium metasilicate/sodium carbonate (Na2SiO3/Na2CO3) solution and deoxidized in a nitric acid in alkaline Li salt solution involves two simultaneous processes: dissolution of aluminum and deposition effect. When the oxidizing species were used in the hydrotalcite coating bath, the aluminum dissolution

Bethke, Craig

150

An update of the polymer-augmented alkaline flood at the Isenhour unit, Sublette County, Wyoming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An Almy sand polymer-augmented alkaline flood at the Isenhour Unit, Sublette County, WY, is reviewed. This paper updates process technology, including the use of clay stabilization, sweep improvement, soda ash alkaline agent (to reduce interfacial tension (IFT) and mobilize residual oil), and anionic-polymer-blend mobility buffer. Oil production has been increasing at 20%/yr since the process start.

Doll, T.E.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production  

SciTech Connect

Performance and produced polymer evaluation of four alkaline-surfactant-polymer projects concluded that only one of the projects could have benefited from combining the alkaline-surfactant-polymer and gelation technologies. Cambridge, the 1993 Daqing, Mellott Ranch, and the Wardlaw alkaline-surfacant-polymer floods were studied. An initial gel treatment followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood in the Wardlaw field would have been a benefit due to reduction of fracture flow. Numerical simulation demonstrated that reducing the permeability of a high permeability zone of a reservoir with gel improved both waterflood and alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery. A Minnelusa reservoir with both A and B sand production was simulated. A and B sands are separated by a shale layer. A sand and B sand waterflood oil recovery was improved by 196,000 bbls or 3.3% OOIP when a gel was placed in the B sand. Alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery improvement over a waterflood was 392,000 bbls or 6.5% OOIP. Placing a gel into the B sand prior to an alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood resulted in 989,000 bbl or 16.4% OOIP more oil than only water injection. A sand and B sand alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery was improved by 596,000 bbls or 9.9% OOIP when a gel was placed in the B sand.

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Adsorption of Trace Elements on Fresh and Weathered Coal Fly Ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A variety of trace elements are associated with fly ash produced by coal combustion. These trace elements are potentially of concern for human health if they are released to the environment, and thus it is important to understand their mobility in coal fly ash management settings. In the fly ash management environment, the ash may react with meteoric fluid to release trace elements into groundwater or surface water. However, fly ash particles also have a relatively high surface area and have the ability ...

2012-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

153

Using Zeolites Synthesized from Fly Ash to Reduce Ammonia Loss to the Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim report describes studies using zeolites synthesized from fly ash to reduce ammonia loss to the environment.

2002-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

154

Mercury Leachability From Concretes That Contain Fly Ashes and Activated Carbon Sorbents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents new laboratory data on the leaching of mercury from concrete that contains fly ash and powdered activated carbon (PAC) sorbents used to capture mercury. The concretes studied during this project were made with fly ashes from lignite and subbituminous coal, including fly ashes containing PAC. Only very low levels of mercuryless than 5 parts per trillionwere leached from the fly ash concretes in both 18-hour and 7-day laboratory leach tests.

2007-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

155

Hydration and strength development of binder based on high-calcium oil shale fly ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The properties of high-calcium oil shale fly ash and low-calcium coal fly ash, which are produced in Israeli power stations, were investigated. High-calcium oil shale fly ash was found to contain a great amount of CaO{sub free} and SO{sub 3} in the form of lime and anhydrite. Mixtures of high-calcium oil shale fly ash and low-calcium coal fly ash, termed fly ash binder, were shown to cure and have improved strength. The influence of the composition and curing conditions on the compressive strength of fly ash binders was examined. The microstructure and the composition of fly ash binder after curing and long-term exposure in moist air, water and open air conditions were studied. It was determined that ettringite is the main variable in the strength and durability of cured systems. The positive effect of calcium silicate hydrates, CSH, which are formed by interaction of high-calcium oil shale fly ash and low-calcium coal fly ash components, on the carbonation and dehydration resistance of fly ash binder in open air is pronounced. It was concluded that high-calcium oil shale fly ash with high CaO{sub free} and SO{sub 3} content can be used as a binder for building products.

Freidin, C. [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Sede-Boqer (Israel)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Swirling Melting Characteristics of Fly Ashes from Co-Firing of MSWI in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Melting treatment is an efficient for heavy metal stabilization in MSW fly ash. The fly ashes from co-firing of municipal solid waste and coal incinerator were melted in the swirling melting furnace system under various temperatures. The melting characteristics ... Keywords: fly ash, co-firing, melting, melting temperature, heavy metals, fixation rate

Wang Xue-tao; Jiao You-zhou; Xu Bin; Jin Bao-sheng

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Infiltration Processing of Metal Matrix-Fly Ash Particle Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metal Matrix composites can provide improved functional properties compared to solid metal castings while saving production energy and raw material costs. Ash-derived metal matrix composites, in particular, can provide high value-added use to coal fly ash. This report describes research on use of pressure infiltration techniques to produce composites for automotive component applications.

1997-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

158

Aluminum - Fly Ash Metal Matrix Composites as Advanced Automobile Material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metal matrix composites such as silicon carbide-aluminum, alumina-aluminum, and graphite-aluminum represent a class of emerging materials with significant potential for commercial use in the auto and aerospace industries. In industrial foundry trials, a joint industry and Department of Energy project demonstrated a promising new process for producing a low cost aluminum metal matrix composite containing fly ash particles.

2001-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

159

Flying Fast and Low Among Obstacles: Methodology and Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Safe autonomous flight is essential for widespread acceptance of aircraft that must fly close to the ground. We have developed a method of collision avoidance that can be used in three dimensions in much the same way as autonomous ground vehicles ... Keywords: Aerial robotics, learning

Sebastian Scherer; Sanjiv Singh; Lyle Chamberlain; Mike Elgersma

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Data:Af8669e3-923c-4d31-af5d-61eb4e38f8ad | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

e3-923c-4d31-af5d-61eb4e38f8ad e3-923c-4d31-af5d-61eb4e38f8ad No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: New London Electric&Water Util Effective date: 2009/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Cp-1 TOD Small Power Optional Time-of-Day Service Primary Metering & Transformer Ownership Discounts Sector: Industrial Description: Power Cost Adjustment Clause - All metered rates shall be subject to a positive or negative power cost adjustment charge equivalent to the amount by which the current cost of power (per kilowatt-hour of sales) is greater or lesser than the base cost of power purchased (per kilowatt-hour of sales). The base cost of power (U) is $0.0699 per kilowatt-hour.

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161

Data:821153d6-7906-4372-af02-5219546dcf65 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d6-7906-4372-af02-5219546dcf65 d6-7906-4372-af02-5219546dcf65 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Springfield, Oregon (Utility Company) Effective date: 2013/05/01 End date if known: Rate name: Private Lighting 200 W HPS L-3 Sector: Lighting Description: New Lighting systems shall be overhead construction consisting of wood poles, aerial circuits, and conventional street lighting luminaries with mast arms not longer than ten feet, or floodlighting luminaries with no mast arms. The installed luminaries shall use low-pressure sodium lamps. All equipment used to provide service under this schedule will be furnished, owned, operated and maintained by the Springfield Utility Board.

162

Data:32435ebe-89ec-4506-a9af-0575162b3925 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ebe-89ec-4506-a9af-0575162b3925 ebe-89ec-4506-a9af-0575162b3925 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Village of Pardeeville, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Effective date: 2007/10/10 End date if known: Rate name: Gs-1 General Service Single Phase Sector: Commercial Description: Power Cost Adjustment Clause - All metered rates shall be subject to a positive or negative power cost adjustment charge equivalent to the amount by which the current cost of power (per kilowatt-hour of sales) is greater or lesser than the base cost of power purchased (per kilowatt-hour of sales). The base cost of power (U) is $0.0680 per kilowatt-hour.

163

Data:88278181-5480-404d-8517-770fa69af339 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

78181-5480-404d-8517-770fa69af339 78181-5480-404d-8517-770fa69af339 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Northern States Power Co - Minnesota (South Dakota) Effective date: 2013/05/01 End date if known: Rate name: SGS (Small General Service) Sector: Commercial Description: *Available to any non-residential customer for single or three phase electric service supplied through one meter. Source or reference: https://www.xcelenergy.com/staticfiles/xe/Regulatory/Se_Section_5.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicable to 0kW-25kW Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months):

164

Data:36aedabb-8965-49ba-b6af-bec8810857ba | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Data Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Data:36aedabb-8965-49ba-b6af-bec8810857ba No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our...

165

Leaching of mixtures of biochar and fly ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases, especially CO2, and their effects on global temperature have led to interest in the possibility of carbon storage in terrestrial environments. Both the residual char from biomass pyrolysis (biochar) and fly ash from coal combustion have the potential to significantly expand terrestrial sequestration options. Both biochar and fly ash also have potentially beneficial effects on soil properties. Fly ash has been shown to increase porosity, water-holding capacity, pH, conductivity, and dissolved SO42-, CO32-, Cl- and basic cations. Adding biochar to soil generally raises pH, increases total nitrogen and total phosphorous, encourages greater root development, improves cation exchange capacity and decreases available aluminum. A combination of these benefits likely is responsible for observed increases in yields for crops such as corn and sugarcane. In addition, it has been found that soils with added biochar emit lower amounts of other greenhouse gases (methane and nitrous oxide) than do unamended soils. Biochar and fly ash amendments may be useful in promoting terrestrial carbon sequestration on currently underutilized and degraded lands. For example, about 1% of the US surface lands consist of previously mined lands or highway rights-of-way. Poorly managed lands could count for another 15% of US area. Biochar and fly ash amendments could increase productivity of these lands and increase carbon storage in the soil. Previous results showed minimal leaching of organic carbon and metals from a variety of fly ashes. In the present study, we examined the properties of mixtures of biochar, fly ash, and soil and evaluated the leaching of organic carbon and metals from these mixtures. The carbon sorption experiments showed release of carbon from biochar, rather than sorption, except at the highest concentrations in the Biochar HW sample. Similar results were obtained by others for oxidative leaching of bituminous coal, in which more C was released as dissolved C than was oxidized to CO2 by the oxygen in water. We confirmed that both fly ash and two types of biochar (oak char [OKEB], and hardwood [HW] char) exhibited minimal leaching of heavy metals including Cr, Ni, Zn, Ga, and Ag, and no detectable leaching of Pb or Cd (data not shown) under the conditions tested. The Biochar HW had a slightly higher C/N ratio (334) and pH (7.7) than did the Biochar OKEB (284 and 6.5). There was no toxicity exhibited by the fly ash (not shown) or biochar leachates as measured by the Microtox© assay under the conditions tested. In previous results no toxicity was reported in testing the fly ash samples except for one high-pH sample. The most notable leachate component from both types of biochar, but not the fly ash, was organic carbon with the HW biochar leaching less organic carbon than the OKEB biochar (5.71 ppm vs. 59.3 ppm). Alone (in batch sorption experiments), or in mixtures of 90% soil and 10% biochar (column studies), we noted significant loss of carbon from the biochar into soluble components. However, when we added fly ash to the column experiments (80% soil, 10% fly ash, and 10% biochar) we observed significant decreases in the amounts of C leached (20% for HW, and 47% for OKEB). The results indicate that applying a combination of fly ash and biochar may result in maximizing the amount of carbon sequestration in soil while also increasing beneficial soil properties and fertility. The lower amount of carbon leached from the HW biochar compared to the OKEB biochar is likely due to the more recalcitrant form of the carbon in the HW char, due to its preparation at a higher temperature (600 şC) than the OKEB biochar (450 şC). High heat treatment temperatures during biochar preparation increase both the total carbon content of the biochar and the proportion of the carbon that is present in fused aromatic rings resistant to chemical and physical degradation.

Palumbo, Anthony V.; Porat, Iris; Phillips, Jana R.; Amonette, James E.; Drake, Meghan M.; Brown, Steven D.; Schadt, Christopher W.

2009-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

166

Research on separators for alkaline zinc batteries. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project is concerned with the research and development of a hybrid separator as an improved battery separator in alkaline zinc secondary batteries. Particular emphasis has been directed toward mitigating the failure of zinc electrodes by controlling the permselectivity of the separator. Hybrid separators were synthesized and fabricated. These separators consist of a microporous film, radiation-grafted with a monomer containing ion-exchange groups. The new separator incorporates the favorable aspects of both ion-exchange membranes and microporous separators. Such a hybrid separator should ideally be highly specific for fast transport of electrolyte while inhibiting zincate diffusion. Hybrid separators with a wide range of percent graft (0 to 60%) were made by varying the monomer concentration and radiation time. The grafting of these ionic groups imparts the ion selectivity of the separators. The electrolyte uptake of hybrid separators is ca. 60 wt %. The higher the percent graft of the separator, the higher the water uptake and the lower the KOH uptake that are observed. The permeabilities of zincate ions were measured for a series of hybrid separators.

Yeo, R.S.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Method for increasing the rate of compressive strength gain in hardenable mixtures containing fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention provides a method for increasing the rate of strength gain of a hardenable mixture containing fly ash by exposing the fly ash to an aqueous slurry of calcium oxide (lime) prior to its incorporation into the hardenable mixture. The invention further relates to such hardenable mixtures, e.g., concrete and mortar, that contain fly ash pre-reacted with calcium oxide. In particular, the fly ash is added to a slurry of calcium oxide in water, prior to incorporating the fly ash in a hardenable mixture. The hardenable mixture may be concrete or mortar. In a specific embodiment, mortar containing fly ash treated by exposure to an aqueous lime slurry are prepared and tested for compressive strength at early time points. 2 figs.

Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

1997-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

168

Method for increasing the rate of compressive strength gain in hardenable mixtures containing fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention provides a method for increasing the rate of strength gain of a hardenable mixture containing fly ash by exposing the fly ash to an aqueous slurry of calcium oxide (lime) prior to its incorporation into the hardenable mixture. The invention further relates to such hardenable mixtures, e.g., concrete and mortar, that contain fly ash pre-reacted with calcium oxide. In particular, the fly ash is added to a slurry of calcium oxide in water, prior to incorporating the fly ash in a hardenable mixture. The hardenable mixture may be concrete or mortar. In a specific embodiment, mortar containing fly ash treated by exposure to an aqueous lime slurry are prepared and tested for compressive strength at early time points.

Liskowitz, John W. (Belle Mead, NJ); Wecharatana, Methi (Parsippany, NJ); Jaturapitakkul, Chai (Bangkok, TH); Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E. (late of Livingston, NJ)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

COUPLING THE ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER TECHNOLOGY AND THE GELATION TECHNOLOGY TO MAXIMIZE OIL PRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Neither aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide nor silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems produced significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels produced incremental oil with the rigid flowing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential pressures across cores. None of the gels tested appeared to alter alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution oil recovery. Total waterflood plus chemical flood oil recovery sequence recoveries were all similar.

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

The Physical and Chemical Properties of Fly Ash from Coal Gasification and Study on Its Recycling Utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aiming at the difficulties in utilization of fly ash from coal gasification, the physical and chemical properties of fly ash were investigated. This research studied recycling utilization on using fly ash as one of cement raw materials for cement clinker. ... Keywords: fly ash, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), recycling utilization

Guohua Qiu; Weiqiang Zeng; Zhenglun Shi; Mengxiang Fang; Zhongyang Luo

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

COUPLING THE ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER TECHNOLOGY AND THE GELATION TECHNOLOGY TO MAXIMIZE OIL PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate-xanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid flowing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential pressures across cores. None of the gels tested appeared to alter alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution oil recovery. Total waterflood plus chemical flood oil recovery sequence recoveries were all similar.

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; David Stewart; Bill Jones

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Utilization of Biomineralization Processes with Fly Ash for Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utilization of Biomineralization Processes with Fly Ash Utilization of Biomineralization Processes with Fly Ash for Carbon Sequestration Y. Roh (rohy@ornl.gov; 865-576-9931) T. J. Phelps (phelpstj1@ornl.gov; 865-574-7290) Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory*, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6036 A. D. McMillan (mcmillanad@ornl.gov; 865-241-4554) R. J. Lauf (laufrj@ornl.gov; 865-574-5176) Metal and Ceramics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6085 *Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC05-00OR22725 Introduction The Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration estimates atmospheric greenhouse gas releases may exceed 8 billion metric tons by the year 2010 heightening its international environmental concern. Carbon dioxide will dominate the

173

Scale-Up and Demonstration of Fly Ash Ozonation Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The disposal of fly ash from the combustion of coal has become increasingly important. When the fly ash does not meet the required specification for the product or market intended, it is necessary to beneficiate it to achieve the desired quality. This project, conducted at PPL's Montour SES, is the first near full-scale ({approx}10 ton/day), demonstration of ash ozonation technology. Bituminous and sub bituminous ashes, including two ash samples that contained activated carbon, were treated during the project. Results from the tests were very promising. The ashes were successfully treated with ozone, yielding concrete-suitable ash quality. Preliminary process cost estimates indicate that capital and operating costs to treat unburned carbon are competitive with other commercial ash beneficiation technologies at a fraction of the cost of lost sales and/or ash disposal costs. This is the final technical report under DOE Cooperative Agreement No.: DE-FC26-03NT41730.

Rui Afonso; R. Hurt; I. Kulaots

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID REMOVAL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project has been to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, along with EPRI, the American Electric Power Company (AEP), FirstEnergy Corporation, the Tennessee Valley Authority, and Carmeuse North America. Sulfuric acid controls are becoming of increased interest for coal-fired power generating units for a number of reasons. In particular, sulfuric acid can cause plant operation problems such as air heater plugging and fouling, back-end corrosion, and plume opacity. These issues will likely be exacerbated with the retrofit of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) for NOX control, as SCR catalysts are known to further oxidize a portion of the flue gas SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3}. The project tested the effectiveness of furnace injection of four different magnesium-based or dolomitic alkaline sorbents on full-scale utility boilers. These reagents were tested during one- to two-week tests conducted on two FirstEnergy Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) units. One of the sorbents tested was a magnesium hydroxide slurry byproduct from a modified Thiosorbic{reg_sign} Lime wet flue gas desulfurization process. The other three sorbents are available commercially and include dolomite, pressure-hydrated dolomitic lime, and commercially available magnesium hydroxide. The dolomite reagent was injected as a dry powder through out-of-service burners. The other three reagents were injected as slurries through air-atomizing nozzles inserted through the front wall of the upper furnace. After completing the four one- to two-week tests, the most promising sorbents were selected for longer-term (approximately 25-day) full-scale tests on two different units. The longer-term tests were conducted to confirm sorbent effectiveness over extended operation on two different boilers, and to determine balance-of-plant impacts. The first long-term test was conducted on FirstEnergy's BMP Unit 3, and the second was conducted on AEP's Gavin Plant, Unit 1. The Gavin Plant test provided an opportunity to evaluate the effects of sorbent injected into the furnace on SO{sub 3} formed across an operating SCR reactor. A final task in the project was to compare projected costs for furnace injection of magnesium hydroxide slurries to estimated costs for other potential sulfuric acid control technologies. Estimates were developed for reagent and utility costs, and capital costs, for furnace injection of magnesium hydroxide slurries and seven other sulfuric acid control technologies. The estimates were based on retrofit application to a model coal-fired plant.

Gary M. Blythe

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Triboelectric Fly Ash Beneficiation: Summary Report, Phase IV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) at the University of Kentucky has devised new approaches for extracting marketable fly ash from high carbon combustion ashes. Dry beneficiation technology based on pneumatic transport, triboelectric principles has emerged with the potential for high efficiency removal of carbon at low cost and with no secondary waste products. (EPRI Interim Report TR-109016, November, 1997; EPRI Interim Report TR-111647, November 1998; EPRI Report TE-113673, September 1999; E...

2000-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

176

Fly Ranch Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fly Ranch Hot Springs Geothermal Area Fly Ranch Hot Springs Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Fly Ranch Hot Springs Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.86666667,"lon":-119.3483333,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

177

Fly Ash and Mercury Oxidation/Chlorination Reactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mercury is a known pollutant that has detrimental effect on human health and environment. The anthropogenic emissions of mercury account for 10 to 30% of worldwide mercury emissions. There is a need to control/reduce anthropogenic mercury emissions. Many mercury control technologies are available but their effectiveness is dependent on the chemical form of mercury, because different chemical forms of mercury have different physical and chemical properties. Mercury leaves the boiler in its elemental form but goes through various transformations in the post-combustion zone. There is a need to understand how fly ash and flue gas composition affect speciation, partitioning, and reactions of mercury under the full range of post-combustion zone conditions. This knowledge can then be used to predict the chemical transformation of mercury (elemental, oxidized or particulate) in the post combustion zone and thus help with the control of mercury emissions from coal-burning power plants. To accomplish this goal present study was conducted using five coal fly ashes. These ashes were characterized and their catalytic activity was compared under selected reaction conditions in a fixed bed reactor. Based on the results from these fly ash experiments, three key components (carbon, iron oxide and calcium oxide) were chosen. These three components were then used to prepare model fly ashes. Silica/alumina was used as a base for these model fly ashes. One, two or three component model fly ashes were then prepared to investigate mercury transformation reactions. The third set of experiments was performed with CuO and CuCl2 catalysts to further understand the mercury oxidation process. Based on the results of these three studies the key components were predicted for different fly ash compositions under variety of flue gas conditions. A fixed bed reactor system was used to conduct this study. In all the experiments, the inlet concentration of Hg0(g) was maintained at 35 {micro}g/m3 using a diffusion tube as the source of Hg0(g). All experiments were conducted using 4% O2 in nitrogen mix as a reaction gas, and other reactants (HCl, H2O and SO2, NO2, Br2) were added as required. The fixed bed reactor was operated over a temperature range of 200 to 400 C. In each experiment, the reactor effluent was analyzed using the modified Ontario-Hydro method. After each experiment, fly ash particles were also analyzed for mercury. The results show that the ability of fly ash to adsorb and/or oxidize mercury is primarily dependent on its carbon, iron and calcium content. There can be either one or more than one key component at a particular temperature and flue gas condition. Surface area played a secondary role in effecting the mercury transformations when compared to the concentration of the key component in the fly ash. Amount of carbon and surface area played a key important role in the adsorption of mercury. Increased concentration of gases in the flue gas other than oxygen and nitrogen caused decreased the amount of mercury adsorbed on carbon surface. Mercury adsorption by iron oxide primarily depended on the crystalline structure of iron oxide. {alpha}-Iron oxide had no effect on mercury adsorption or oxidation under most of the flue gas conditions, but ?-iron oxide adsorbed mercury under most of the flue gas conditions. Bromine is a very good oxidizing agent for mercury. But in the presence of calcium oxide containing fly ashes, all the oxidized mercury would be reduced to elemental form. Among the catalysts, it was observed that presence of free lattice chlorine in the catalyst was very important for the oxidation of mercury. But instead of using the catalyst alone, using it along with carbon may better serve the purpose by providing the adsorption surface for mercury and also some extra surface area for the reaction to occur (especially for fly ashes with low surface area).

Sukh Sidhu; Patanjali Varanasi

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

178

Method of determining pH by the alkaline absorption of carbon dioxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for measuring the concentration of hydroxides in alkaline solutions in a remote location using the tendency of hydroxides to absorb carbon dioxide. The method includes the passing of carbon dioxide over the surface of an alkaline solution in a remote tank before and after measurements of the carbon dioxide solution. A comparison of the measurements yields the absorption fraction from which the hydroxide concentration can be calculated using a correlation of hydroxide or pH to absorption fraction.

Hobbs, David T. (1867 Lodgepole Ave., N. Augusta, SC 29841)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Experimental data developed to support the selection of a treatment process for West Valley alkaline supernatant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the request of West Valley Nuclear Services Co., Inc., the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has studied alternative treatment processes for the alkaline PUREX waste presently being stored in Tank 8D2 at West Valley, New York. Five tasks were completed during FY 1983: (1) simulation and characterization of the alkaline supernatant and sludge from the tank. The radiochemical and chemical distributions between the aqueous and solid phase were determined, and the efficiency of washing sludge with water to remove ions such as Na/sup +/ and SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ was investigated; (2) evaluation of a sodium tetraphenylboron (Na-TPB) precipitation process to recover cesium (Cs) and a sodium titanate (Na-TiA) sorption process to recover strontium (Sr) and plutonium (Pu) from the West Valley Alkaline supernatant. These processes were previously developed and tested at the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Plant; (3) evaluation of an organic cation-exchange resin (Duolite CS-100) to recover Cs and Pu from the alkaline supernatant followed by an organic macroreticular cation exchange resin (Amberlite IRC-718) to recover Sr; (4) evaluation of an inorganic ion exchanger (Linde Ionsiv IE-95) to recover Cs, Sr, and Pu from the alkaline supernatant; and (5) evaluation of Dowex-1,X8 organic anion exchange resin to recover technetium (Tc) from alkaline supernatant. The findings of these tasks are reported. 21 references, 36 figures, 34 tables.

Bray, L.A.; Holton, L.K.; Myers, T.R.; Richardson, G.M.; Wise, B.M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Enhanced Oil Recovery Using the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer (ASP)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alkaline Surfactant Polymer (ASP) process is a tertiary method of oil recovery that has promising results for future development. It has already been implemented in different areas of the United States such as Wyoming, west Texas, also in Canada and China. The success of this process depends on the proper combination of alkali, surfactant, and polymer and their compatibility with a reservoir. Therefore, the main objective of the proposed research is to identify chemical interactions between ASP chemicals and reservoir fluids and rock. I hypothesize that testing different alkalis, polymers and surfactants will result not only in getting different profiles of rheological properties of ASP system, but also analyzing compatibility degrees of chemicals with formation fluids and rock properties such as rock wettability, oil mobility and sweep efficiency which will be affected by the designed ASP system. In this paper the results of chemical interactions between ASP chemicals and reservoir fluids are presented and the phenomena occurred are described. The experiments conducted are considered to be unique for a selected oil sample with certain values of API gravity, viscosity, and chemical composition. Lab experiments conducted show the effect of polymer, alkali and surfactant addition to an aqueous solution. Polymers were tested with alkali as a function of shear rate for the purposes of the buildup water viscosity in EOR. Different types of alkali at different concentrations are tested for alkali optimal concentration determination. The effect of adding surfactant at different concentrations has been tested, and acidic number of tested oil sample was identified. Polymers tested with alkali result in non-Newtonian behavior of the testing solution and display a shear thinning beneficial effect for the buildup water viscosity in EOR. The results show that acidic number of crude oil is a critical parameter that affects the optimal concentration for mixing chemicals and interfacial tension profile. The alkali and surfactant added to crude oil result in a significant reduction of interfacial tension and lead to increase of oil mobilization which is a desired output after ASP injection in EOR process.

Musharova, Darya

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

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181

Mercury Emissions from Curing Concretes that Contain Fly Ash and Activated Carbon Sorbents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents new laboratory data on the release of mercury from concrete containing fly ash and powdered activated carbon sorbents used to capture mercury. The concretes studied in this project were made with fly ashes from lignite and subbituminous coal, including fly ashes containing powdered activated carbon (PAC). Minute quantities of mercury were emitted from five concretes during the standard 28-day curing process and throughout an additional 28 days of curing for two of these concretes. Ge...

2006-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

182

Fly Ash Carbon Burn-Out at TVA's Colbert and Shawnee Stations: Site Specific Application Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fly ash beneficiation using Carbon Burn-Out (CBO) technology offers the opportunity to market fly ash that was previously landfilled. This site application study of beneficiating pulverized coal boiler fly ash at Tennessee Valley Authority's Colbert and Shawnee Stations indicates this process is a cost effective solution for decreasing solid waste disposal, increasing landfill life, improving boiler heat rate, and generating a positive revenue stream.

1996-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

183

Use of High Carbon Fly Ash as a Component of Raw Mix for Cement Manufacture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the production of concrete, fly ash often serves as a supplementary cementing material, but some fly ashes may not be suitable for this use due to excess unburned carbon. This report presents the results of a literature investigation, bench-scale laboratory study, and pilot-scale tests of the feasibility of using such high carbon fly ashes in the manufacture of portland cement.

1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

184

Thermal Barrier Coatings Resistant to Attack by Molten Fly Ash in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Thermal Barrier Coatings Resistant to Attack by Molten Fly Ash in Integrated Gas Combined Cycle Turbine Engines. Author(s), Andrew D.

185

Optimum Condition of Vanadium Recovery from Power Plant Fly-ash ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, In this study, recovery of vanadium from power plant fly-ash was developed using a hydro metallurgical process consisted of acidic leaching ...

186

A Limnological Approach to the Management of Fly Ash Disposal Ponds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fly ash disposal ponds are found at half of the U.S. coal burning power plants and receive a mixture of fly ash and water used to sluice the ash from the power plant to the pond. Leaching of metals, notably Cu, As, and Se, from fly ash can be decreased by control of inflow pH, but their release through the discharge to surface waters remains a problem, particularly for Se. Comanagement of low volume wastes of varying chemical composition and volume with fly ash make the management of water quality at the...

2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

187

Data:33621295-c71e-4723-b5af-0359f783cccc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1295-c71e-4723-b5af-0359f783cccc 1295-c71e-4723-b5af-0359f783cccc No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Stillwater Utilities Authority Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: ELECTRIC RATE RESIDENTIAL HEAT PUMP RATE Sector: Residential Description: The application of this rate schedule is limited to residential consumers which use a heat pump for all heating and cooling needs within the residence. Service under this rate requires that the customer must be using a functional heat pump as the primary source of heating and cooling (HVAC) for the residence. Production Cost Adjustment (PCA): a factor determined by SEU and applied to the cost of energy used by the consumer to account for variations in the cost of generating or purchasing power may apply.

188

Data:77783627-d5af-4901-aaf1-164d97736691 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-d5af-4901-aaf1-164d97736691 -d5af-4901-aaf1-164d97736691 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: PUD No 1 of Cowlitz County Effective date: 2011/11/01 End date if known: Rate name: PRIVATE STREET AND AREA LIGHTING SCHEDULE 10 Sodium Vapor 200 watts Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable to street, roadway, and area lighting for residential and commercial property. SPECIAL CONDITIONS All lighting equipment, including mast arms, brackets, control equipment, transformers, wiring and supports, shall be owned, operated and maintained by the District. For new installations which do not utilize an existing District-owned pole and require the setting of a new pole for the light, the customer shall pay in advance $300 as an Aid-to- Construction. The District will require a Special Contract for service hereunder for a term of not less than sixty (60) consecutive months reflecting monthly payments computed in accordance with this Rate Schedule as it may be amended or superseded.

189

Data:9813c71c-bcda-47de-8079-2532054440af | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

c71c-bcda-47de-8079-2532054440af c71c-bcda-47de-8079-2532054440af No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Northeast Nebraska P P D Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Rate Scheduel WPS-1 - Transmission Substation Sector: Commercial Description: A. This Rate Schedule WPS -1 is available only to municipalities who purchase from the District all of its power and energy requirements (with the exception of any direct Western allocation) for resale, including sales to end-use customers and load growth. B. This Rate Schedule WPS-1 is made available in conjunction with rate schedules that are a part of a Wholesale Power Agreement between the District and Nebraska Electric Generation and Transmission Cooperative, Inc. ("NEG&T"). In the event there is any inconsistency between the provisions of this Rate Schedule WPS -1 and those rate schedules which are a part of the District/NEG&T Wholesale Power Contract, then the provisions of the District/NEG&T Power Contract rate schedules shall govern

190

Arsenic and Selenium Speciation in Fly Ash and Wastewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the work is to predict As and Se behavior in pond wastewater based on coal and power plant characteristics so that utilities will have tools for selection of coals (and blends) that will allow them to meet applicable water quality regulations in the ash pond discharge. Arsenic and selenium were chosen as the focus of this work because the behavior of arsenic and selenium is not well correlated with pH in ash pond water, but with speciation of these oxyanions in the fly ash. Furthermore, ...

2005-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

191

Scale-up and Demonstration of Fly Ash Ozonation Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project is the first large pilot scale test of a new process to passivate the carbon in ash so that it can be used in concrete without physically removing the carbon from the ash. The tests were conducted at PPL's Montour SES, sponsored by DOE and supported by EPRI. Near full-scale industrial equipment was used to expose fly ash, carbon mixtures to ozone to see if ozone would passivate the surface of carbon so that it would not react with air entraining agents that are used by concrete manufacturers...

2005-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

192

Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and the Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production  

SciTech Connect

Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or reservoirs with different sand lenses with high permeability contrast. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more crude oil than waterflooding froin swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or reservoirs with high permeability contrast zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium-polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses with the exception of the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels. Aluminum-polyacrylamide flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9, either in linear corefloods or in dual separate radial core, common manifold corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid tonguing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Chromium acetate gels were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 72 F, 125 F and 175 F in linear corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained diversion capability after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution in stacked; radial coreflood with a common well bore. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gel used to seal fractured core maintain fracture closure if followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate-xanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection at 72, 125, and 175 F. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid tonguing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differentia

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production  

SciTech Connect

Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or reservoirs with different sand lenses with high permeability contrast. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more crude oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or reservoirs with high permeability contrast zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium-polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses with the exception of the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels. Aluminum-polyacrylamide flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9, either in linear corefloods or in dual separate radial core, common manifold corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid tonguing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Chromium acetate gels were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 72 F, 125 F and 175 F in linear corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained diversion capability after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution in stacked; radial coreflood with a common well bore. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gel used to seal fractured core maintain fracture closure if followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetatexanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection at 72, 125, and 175 F. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid tonguing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or reservoirs with different sand lenses with high permeability contrast. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more crude oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or reservoirs with high permeability contrast zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium-polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses with the exception of the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels. Aluminum-polyacrylamide flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9, either in linear corefloods or in dual separate radial core, common manifold corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid tonguing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Chromium acetate gels were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 72 F, 125 F and 175 F in linear corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained diversion capability after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution in stacked; radial coreflood with a common well bore. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gel used to seal fractured core maintain fracture closure if followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetatexanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection at 72, 125, and 175 F. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid tonguing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Phenolic acids as bioindicators of fly ash deposit revegetation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The floristic composition, the abundance, and the cover of pioneer plant species of spontaneously formed plant communities and the content of total phenolics and phenolic acids, as humus constituents, of an ash deposit after 7 years of recultivation were studied. The restoration of both the soil and the vegetation on the ash deposits of the 'Nikola Tesla-A' thermoelectric power plant in Obrenovac (Serbia) is an extremely slow process. Unfavorable physical and chemical characteristics, the toxicity of fly ash, and extreme microclimatic conditions prevented the development of compact plant cover. The abundance and cover of plants increased from the central part of the deposit towards its edges. Festuca rubra L., Crepis setosa Hall., Erigeron canadensis L., Cirsium arvense (L.) Scop., Calamagrostis epigeios (L.) Roth., and Tamarix gallica L. were the most abundant species, thus giving the highest cover. Humus generated during the decomposition process of plant remains represents a completely new product absent in the ash as the starting material. The amount of total phenolics and phenolic acids in fly ash increased from the center of the deposit towards its edges in correlation with the increase in plant abundance and cover. The presence of phenolic acids indicates the ongoing process of humus formation in the ash, in which the most abundant pioneer plants of spontaneously formed plant communities play the main role. Phenolic compounds can serve as reliable bioindicators in an assessment of the success of the recultivation process of thermoelectric power plants' ash deposits.

L. Djurdjevic; M. Mitrovic; P. Pavlovic; G. Gajic; O. Kostic [Institute for Biological Research 'Sinisa Stankovic,' Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro). Department of Ecology

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

196

Characterization of Slag, Fly Ash and Portland Cement for Saltstone  

SciTech Connect

Batch-to-batch variability in the chemical and physical properties of the fly ash, slag and portland cement (binders) will be an ongoing concern over the many years that salt waste from Tank 50 will be processed into grout at the Saltstone Processing Facility. This batch-to-batch variability in the properties of the binder materials translates to variability in the fresh and cured properties of Saltstone. Therefore, it is important to quantify the batch-to-batch variability of the binder materials and the resultant variation in grout properties. This report is the starting point for that process by providing the baseline (reference point) binder properties to which future batches of binder materials can be compared. For this characterization effort, properties of fly ash, slag and portland cement were obtained and documented in this report. These properties included particle size distribution by laser light scattering and dry sieving, particle size and morphology by scanning electron microscopy, true, aerated and tapped densities, chemical composition, rheological properties of the water based slurries made from individual binder material, and volatility through thermogravimetric analysis and differential thermal analysis. The properties presented in this report also provide a baseline data set to assist in problem solving efforts when or if unanticipated and/or unwanted processing events occur at the Saltstone Processing Facility.

Harbour, J

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

A new way to stabilize fly ash from municipal incinerators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heavy metals and toxic chlorinated organics, added to very low grain-size distributions, make fly ashes from municipal incinerators a very hazardous waste. For their disposal, the present general trend is, not only to stabilize chemically the ashes, i.e., to reduce the leachability of the toxic substances, but also to stabilize them mechanically, i.e., to convert them into massive, resistant, and unleachable solids. This paper describes various stabilization methods used on representative European fly ash samples, which led to the development of a new stabilization technique taking place in four stages: elimination of the alkali chlorides by dissolution; addition of a moderate quantity of phosphoric acid; calcination; and solidification with Portland clinker or cement. The principal advantages of the process are as follows: the polychlorodibenzodioxins-polychlorodibenzofurans are destroyed, the reactivity of the heavy metals is reduced drastically, the final solids have satisfactory mechanical properties, and the increase in weight of the waste to be disposed of does not exceed one fourth. Comparative results of TCLP extraction tests are presented.

Derie, R. [Free Univ. of Brussels (Belgium). Dept. of Ore Dressing

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

198

Beam profile measurement with flying wires at the Fermilab Recycler Ring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flying wires were installed at the Fermilab Recycler Ring for transverse beam profile measurement for both proton and antiproton beams. The following note describes the system configuration, calibration and resolution of the flying wire system, interactions between the wires and the beam, as well as analysis of the transverse beam profile in the presence of a stochastic cooling system.

Carcagno, R.; Pishchalnikov, Yu.; Krider, J.; Hu, M.; Lorman, E.; Marchionni, A.; Pordes, S.; Wilson, P.; Zagel, J.; /Fermilab

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Release of Mercury During Curing of Concrete Containing Fly Ash and Mercury Sorbent Material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides laboratory data on mercury release during the initial curing stage of concrete made with fly ash or mixtures of fly ash and activated carbon containing mercury. These experiments suggest that mercury is not released from these concretes during initial curing.

2002-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

200

Quantifying the availability and the stability of trace cationic elements in fly ash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Products Associated with Coal Mining Interactive Forum: Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, Carbondale, IL in this paper to deter- mine these parameters for model elements Cu(II), Cd(II), and Ni(II) in fly ash 50 mM EDTA extraction. Ă? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Coal fly ash has

Ragsdell, Kenneth M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "af alkaline fly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Recognition of two-dimensional representation of urban environment for autonomous flying agents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the problem of a vision system implementation for autonomous flying agents is considered in the context of industrial inspection tasks performed by unmanned aerial vehicles. A syntactic algorithm of a two-dimensional object vectorization ... Keywords: Autonomous flying agents, Object recognition, Syntactic languages, Vectorization

Andrzej Bielecki; Tomasz Buratowski; Piotr Migielski

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Fly Ash Construction Manual for Road and Site Applications, Volumes 1 and 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This two-volume construction manual details the use of fly ash in high-volume road construction and site development, covering all project elements from ash procurement to finishing. It addresses the use of fly ash in fills, embankments, backfills, subgrade stabilization, pavement base course, and slurried backfills, as well as its application as a soil amendment.

1988-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

203

Effect of particle size and volume fraction on tensile properties of fly ash/polyurea composites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

particles. In addition, the composites filled with 20% fly ash became softer. These samples showed lower, composites, tensile properties 1. INTRODUCTION Fly ash, a waste by-product generated abundantly in electric processibility of the filled materials5 . Furthermore, as a waste by-product, its usage decreases the overall

Nemat-Nasser, Sia

204

High-Volume Fly Ash Utilization Projects in the United States and Canada: Second Edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fly ash--an increasing disposal problem for utilities operating coal-fired power plants--has considerable unrealized potential as a construction material. In a wide-ranging survey, this study documented more than 250 U.S. and Canadian construction projects employing fly ash in high volume for backfill, landfill, hydraulic fill, embankments, pavement base courses, soil amendment, subgrade stabilization, and grout.

1986-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

205

Method of determining pH by the alkaline absorption of carbon dioxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for measuring the concentration of hydroxides in alkaline solutions in a remote location using the tendency of hydroxides to absorb carbon dioxide. The method includes the passing of carbon dioxide over the surface of an alkaline solution in a remote tank before and after measurements of the carbon dioxide solution. A comparison of the measurements yields the absorption fraction from which the hydroxide concentration can be calculated using a correlation of hydroxide or pH to absorption fraction. 2 figs.

Hobbs, D.T.

1992-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

206

Outage Performance of Dual-Hop AF Relay Channels with Co-Channel Interferences over Rayleigh Fading  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper studies the outage performance of a dual-hop amplify-and-forward (AF) relay fading channel in an interference-limited environment. The relay and destination nodes are corrupted by multiple co-channel Rayleigh interferences. New exact closed-form ... Keywords: Amplify and-forward relay, Co-channel interference, Nonregenerative relay, Outage probability, Rayleigh fading

Aleksandra M. Cvetkovi?; Dejan N. Mili?; Aleksandar S. Cvetkovi?; Mihajlo Stefanovi?

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Outage probability and channel capacity for the Nth best relay selection AF relaying over INID Rayleigh fading channels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cooperative diversity systems have recently been proposed as a way to form virtual antenna schemes without utilizing collocated multiple antennas. In this paper, we consider the Nth best opportunistic amplify-and-forward (AF) cooperative diversity ... Keywords: Nth best OAF, INID Rayleigh fading channels, channel capacity, cooperative diversity, outage probability

K. Ko; C. Woo

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Ann. For. Sci. 66 (2009) 208 Available online at: c INRA, EDP Sciences, 2009 www.afs-journal.org  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.afs-journal.org DOI: 10.1051/forest/2009001 Original article Biomass component equations for Latin American species procedures Abstract · Studies dealing with the estimation of biomass, site productivity and the contribution number of equations developed to estimate biomass components of trees and shrubs in various ecosystems

Recanati, Catherine

209

d. 11. dec. 2003 Moderne bioenergi -et nyt dansk vkstomrde 1 Har forbrnding og forgasning af biomasse en  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biomasse en fremtid ? Charles Nielsen Elsam A/S #12;d. 11. dec. 2003 Moderne bioenergi - et nyt dansk · Afgrænsning og perspektiv · Den energipolitiske vision · Road-map på biomasse · Drivkræftene på kort sigt · Biomasse - organisk fraktion af affald samt overskud fra land- og skovbrug · Nationalt og internationalt

210

Solar-wind protons and heavy ions sputtering of lunar surface materials A.F. Barghouty a,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar-wind protons and heavy ions sputtering of lunar surface materials A.F. Barghouty a, , F Available online 21 December 2010 Keywords: Solar wind sputtering Lunar regolith KREEP soil Potential a c t Lunar surface materials are exposed to $1 keV/amu solar-wind protons and heavy ions on almost

211

Argonne CNM HighlightL Hard X-ray characterization of fly ash geopolymers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hard X-ray characterization of fly ash geopolymers Hard X-ray characterization of fly ash geopolymers Calcium Map Calcium map of an activated fly ash geopolymer displays regions of high calcium concentration (circled). Their distribution suggests localization as a discrete calcium-rich phase within the lower-calcium aluminosilicate geopolymer gel. Use of the Hard X-Ray Nanoprobe (HXN) has provided the first access to the nature of heterogeneity in real fly ash-derived geopolymers at the nanoscale. Direct evidence of the formation of discrete high-calcium nanometer-sized particles within a hydroxide-activated geopolymer synthesized from a low-calcium fly ash has been obtained using HXN fluorescence characterization. Additionally, the team of CNM users from the University of Melbourne, the Universidad del Valle of Colombia, and the

212

Mercury retention by fly ashes from coal combustion: Influence of the unburned carbon content  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of unburned carbon particles present in fly ashes produced by coal combustion on mercury retention. To achieve this objective, the work was divided into two parts. The aim of the first part of the study was to estimate the amount of mercury captured by the fly ashes during combustion in power stations and the relationship of this retention to the unburned carbon content. The second part was a laboratory-scale study aimed at evaluating the retention of mercury concentrations greater than those produced in power stations by fly ashes of different characteristics and by unburned carbon particles. From the results obtained it can be inferred that the unburned carbon content is not the only variable that controls mercury capture in fly ashes. The textural characteristics of these unburned particles and of other components of fly ashes also influence retention.

Lopez-Anton, M.A.; Diaz-Somoano, M.; Martinez-Tarazona, M.R. [CSIC, Oviedo (Spain)

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

213

Gypsum treated fly ash as a liner for waste disposal facilities  

SciTech Connect

Fly ash has potential application in the construction of base liners for waste containment facilities. While most of the fly ashes improve in the strength with curing, the ranges of permeabilities they attain may often not meet the basic requirement of a liner material. An attempt has been made in the present context to reduce the hydraulic conductivity by adding lime content up to 10% to two selected samples of class F fly ashes. The use of gypsum, which is known to accelerate the unconfined compressive strength by increasing the lime reactivity, has been investigated in further improving the hydraulic conductivity. Hydraulic conductivities of the compacted specimens have been determined in the laboratory using the falling head method. It has been observed that the addition of gypsum reduces the hydraulic conductivity of the lime treated fly ashes. The reduction in the hydraulic conductivity of the samples containing gypsum is significantly more for samples with high amounts of lime contents (as high as 1000 times) than those fly ashes with lower amounts of lime. However there is a relatively more increase in the strengths of the samples with the inclusion of gypsum to the fly ashes at lower lime contents. This is due to the fact that excess lime added to fly ash is not effectively converted into pozzolanic compounds. Even the presence of gypsum is observed not to activate these reactions with excess lime. On the other hand the higher amount of lime in the presence of sulphate is observed to produce more cementitious compounds which block the pores in the fly ash. The consequent reduction in the hydraulic conductivity of fly ash would be beneficial in reducing the leachability of trace elements present in the fly ash when used as a base liner.

Sivapullaiah, Puvvadi V., E-mail: siva@civil.iisc.ernet.in [Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Baig, M. Arif Ali, E-mail: reach2arif@gmail.com [Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

Investigation on the utilization of coal fly ash as amendment to compost for vegetation in acid soil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of fly ash as amendment to compost is presented. Plant growth/yields of corn collard greens, mustard greens, and sorgum is described. The treatment parameters such as fly ash to compost ratio, fly ash-amended compost to soil ratio, type of compost used for treatment etc. are discussed. 2 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs. (CBS)

Menon, M.P.

1990-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

215

Results from the High Resolution Fly's Eye Experiment  

SciTech Connect

The High Resolution Fly's Eye (HiRes) Experiment operated two fluorescence detector sites in the western Utah desert between 1997 and 2006. The HiRes results on the cosmic ray spectrum are consistent with the GZK Suppression predicted at 10{sup 19.8} eV and observe an ankle structure at 10{sup 18.5} eV. These spectral features are consistent with a proton-dominated composition for cosmic rays at the highest energies. The HiRes composition studies of both the mean and the variance of the shower maximum depth (X{sub max}) also give results that are completely consistent with a predominately protonic composition, and inconsistent with heavy nuclei such as iron. We also report on the result of anisotropy studies.

Jui, C. C. H. [Department of Physics, University of Utah, 115 S. 1400 E. Rm. 201 Salt Lake City, Utah, 84112-0830 (United States)

2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

216

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - The Flying Ring!  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquid Nitrogen and the Tea Kettle Mystery! Liquid Nitrogen and the Tea Kettle Mystery! Previous Video (Liquid Nitrogen and the Tea Kettle Mystery!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Pewter Bells) Pewter Bells The Flying Ring! A copper ring leaps off an electromagnet when it's turned on. What happens when the ring's resistance is lowered using liquid nitrogen? [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: And this is an AC powered electromagnet. And this is a copper ring. When I place the copper ring on the electromagnet and turn it on, the magnet's changing magnetic field will induce an electric current in the copper ring. The current in the ring will then create it's own magnetic

217

Formation flying for a Fresnel lens observatory mission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The employment of a large area Phase Fresnel Lens (PFL) in a gamma-ray telescope offers the potential to image astrophysical phenomena with micro-arcsecond angular resolution. In order to assess the feasibility of this concept, two detailed studies have been conducted of formation flying missions in which a Fresnel lens capable of focussing gamma-rays and the associated detector are carried on two spacecraft separated by up to 10$^6$ km. These studies were performed at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Integrated Mission Design Center (IMDC) which developed spacecraft, orbital dynamics, and mission profiles. The results of the studies indicated that the missions are challenging but could be accomplished with technologies available currently or in the near term. The findings of the original studies have been updated taking account of recent advances in ion thruster propulsion technology.

Krizmanic, J; Gehrels, N; Krizmanic, John; Skinner, Gerry; Gehrels, Neil

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Formation flying for a Fresnel lens observatory mission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The employment of a large area Phase Fresnel Lens (PFL) in a gamma-ray telescope offers the potential to image astrophysical phenomena with micro-arcsecond angular resolution. In order to assess the feasibility of this concept, two detailed studies have been conducted of formation flying missions in which a Fresnel lens capable of focussing gamma-rays and the associated detector are carried on two spacecraft separated by up to 10$^6$ km. These studies were performed at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Integrated Mission Design Center (IMDC) which developed spacecraft, orbital dynamics, and mission profiles. The results of the studies indicated that the missions are challenging but could be accomplished with technologies available currently or in the near term. The findings of the original studies have been updated taking account of recent advances in ion thruster propulsion technology.

John Krizmanic; Gerry Skinner; Neil Gehrels

2006-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

219

Surface structural changes of perovskite oxides during oxygen evolution in alkaline electrolyte  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Perovskite oxides such Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.8O3-6 (BSCF82) are among the most active catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in alkaline solution reported to date. In this work it is shown via high resolution ...

May, Kevin J. (Kevin Joseph)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Alkaline resistant phosphate glasses and method of preparation and use thereof  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A substantially alkaline resistant calcium-iron-phosphate (CFP) glass and methods of making and using thereof. In one application, the CFP glass is drawn into a fiber and dispersed in cement to produce glass fiber reinforced concrete (GFRC) articles having the high compressive strength of concrete with the high impact, flexural and tensile strength associated with glass fibers.

Brow, Richard K. (Rolla, MO); Reis, Signo T. (Rolla, MO); Velez, Mariano (Rolla, MO); Day, Delbert E. (Rolla, MO)

2010-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "af alkaline fly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Natural Arsenic in Groundwater and Alkaline Lakes at the upper Paraguay basin, Pantanal, Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Arsenic in Groundwater and Alkaline Lakes at the upper Paraguay basin, Pantanal, Brazil L, Brazil d Université de Provence, Aix Marseille 1, France e Departamento de Geografia, Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso do Sul, Três Lagoas, Brazil f Laboratoire de Géomophologie Appliquée, Université de

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

222

MINERALOGY AND GENESIS OF SMECTITES IN AN ALKALINE-SALINE ENVIRONMENT OF PANTANAL WETLAND, BRAZIL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MINERALOGY AND GENESIS OF SMECTITES IN AN ALKALINE-SALINE ENVIRONMENT OF PANTANAL WETLAND, BRAZIL, Universidade de Sa~o Paulo (USP), Av. Prof. Dr. Lineu Prestes, 338, 05508-900, Sa~o Paulo, Brazil 2 Soil-saline lake of Nhecola^ndia, a sub-region of the Pantanal wetland, Brazil, and then to identify the mechanisms

Ahmad, Sajjad

223

On-the-Fly Decompression and Rendering of Multiresolution Terrain  

SciTech Connect

We present a streaming geometry compression codec for multiresolution, uniformly-gridded, triangular terrain patches that supports very fast decompression. Our method is based on linear prediction and residual coding for lossless compression of the full-resolution data. As simplified patches on coarser levels in the hierarchy already incur some data loss, we optionally allow further quantization for more lossy compression. The quantization levels are adaptive on a per-patch basis, while still permitting seamless, adaptive tessellations of the terrain. Our geometry compression on such a hierarchy achieves compression ratios of 3:1 to 12:1. Our scheme is not only suitable for fast decompression on the CPU, but also for parallel decoding on the GPU with peak throughput over 2 billion triangles per second. Each terrain patch is independently decompressed on the fly from a variable-rate bitstream by a GPU geometry program with no branches or conditionals. Thus we can store the geometry compressed on the GPU, reducing storage and bandwidth requirements throughout the system. In our rendering approach, only compressed bitstreams and the decoded height values in the view-dependent 'cut' are explicitly stored on the GPU. Normal vectors are computed in a streaming fashion, and remaining geometry and texture coordinates, as well as mesh connectivity, are shared and re-used for all patches. We demonstrate and evaluate our algorithms on a small prototype system in which all compressed geometry fits in the GPU memory and decompression occurs on the fly every rendering frame without any cache maintenance.

Lindstrom, P; Cohen, J D

2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

224

Development of New Industrial Ashalloy Material Using Fly Ash Cenospheres "Lead-Lite" Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One potential high-value utilization method for power plant fly ash is to mix it with an alloy to make a metal matrix composite. In the case of this project, the fly ash is mixed with lead to make a composite with low density and improved hardness. This new material can be used in the auto industry to make lighter battery components. This report describes the results of corrosion tests of several lead samples and lead-fly ash composite samples at room temperature for more than 1500 days. This long-term d...

1999-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

225

Salt-soda sinter process for recovering aluminum from fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for recovering aluminum values from fly ash comprises sintering the fly ash with a mixture of NaCl and Na.sub.2 CO.sub.3 to a temperature in the range 700.degree.-900.degree. C. for a period of time sufficient to convert greater than 90% of the aluminum content of the fly ash into an acid-soluble fraction and then contacting the thus-treated fraction with an aqueous solution of nitric or sulfuric acid to effect dissolution of aluminum and other metal values in said solution.

McDowell, William J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Seeley, Forest G. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Data:33af69f1-4f2b-493c-af6f-b6ae98c699a7 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

f2b-493c-af6f-b6ae98c699a7 f2b-493c-af6f-b6ae98c699a7 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Entergy New Orleans Inc Effective date: 2010/10/29 End date if known: Rate name: Municipal building light & power service MB-4 Sector: Lighting Description: This schedule is applicable to the electrical energy requirements of certain municipal buildings situated in the City of the New Orleans, which are the property of and are operated and administrated by the city of New Orleans or any agency thereof, or by the Orleans Parish School Board. Source or reference: www.entergy-neworleans.com/content/price/tariffs/enoi_mb.pdf

227

Data:930ed6de-5819-4665-9ffe-db746af9bf10 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ed6de-5819-4665-9ffe-db746af9bf10 ed6de-5819-4665-9ffe-db746af9bf10 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Lower Yellowstone R E A, Inc Effective date: 2010/09/14 End date if known: Rate name: Schedule YL - Metered Lights (Owned by Consumer) Sector: Lighting Description: These will be charged for energy usage as per the consumer's "A" or "GS-3" rate schedule. Source or reference: Illinois State University Archive Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage

228

Data:330170f8-bfe2-4835-af2a-c8832115cfdd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

70f8-bfe2-4835-af2a-c8832115cfdd 70f8-bfe2-4835-af2a-c8832115cfdd No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Omaha Public Power District Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: 236 DUSK TO DAWN LIGHTING 100 Watt Sector: Lighting Description: 100 watt, 7,200 lumen high pressure sodium To all Consumers, for private outdoor lighting service, when such lighting facilities are operated as an extension of the District's distribution system, except for (1) installations on public or semi-public thoroughfares including public parks, where such installations would conflict with a legally constituted public authority having jurisdiction, and (2) athletic fields covered by other rate schedules.

229

Data:603f3abb-4342-429c-978c-0670c88794af | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3f3abb-4342-429c-978c-0670c88794af 3f3abb-4342-429c-978c-0670c88794af No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Bangor, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Effective date: 2010/05/19 End date if known: Rate name: Gs-1 General Service Three Phase with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Sector: Commercial Description: Application: This rate will be applied to single and three-phase customers. This includes commercial, institutional, government, farm, and other customers. The monthly Maximum Measured Demand of customers served on this rate shall not exceed 50 kilowatts for three or more months in a consecutive 12-month period.

230

Data:074fdb62-6bca-4596-a287-08000af535fe | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2-6bca-4596-a287-08000af535fe 2-6bca-4596-a287-08000af535fe No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Farmers Electric Company, Ltd Effective date: 2010/11/16 End date if known: Rate name: Secure Energy Rate Plan (SERP) Sector: Residential Description: Residential only 12-month contract. Sign up available until May 31, 2007, initiated June 2006 Source or reference: Rates Binder A Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

231

Data:9938a3ae-39dd-4803-b189-4195441af5a9 | Open Energy Information  

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ae-39dd-4803-b189-4195441af5a9 ae-39dd-4803-b189-4195441af5a9 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Wells Rural Electric Co Effective date: 2011/10/01 End date if known: Rate name: Security Light- 175 W Sector: Lighting Description: The Seller shall determine the Power Cost Adjustment subject to power supplier charges and credits. Source or reference: http://wrec.coop/info/rates_dyn.php Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

232

Data:238c150c-4117-4ae5-af40-54579540b808 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

c-4117-4ae5-af40-54579540b808 c-4117-4ae5-af40-54579540b808 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Kingfisher, Oklahoma (Utility Company) Effective date: 2003/07/25 End date if known: Rate name: Security Light- With Existing Pole Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous

233

Data:791fc044-6654-4af7-8bce-745c676fd797 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

44-6654-4af7-8bce-745c676fd797 44-6654-4af7-8bce-745c676fd797 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Pella, Iowa (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Commercial Rate Sector: Commercial Description: Source or reference: www.cityofpella.com Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Seasonal/Monthly Demand Charge Structures

234

Data:12819b61-8fb8-4289-afae-af2425c7504d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-8fb8-4289-afae-af2425c7504d -8fb8-4289-afae-af2425c7504d No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Heartland Rural Elec Coop, Inc Effective date: 2009/08/01 End date if known: Rate name: METERED SECURITY LIGHTING: 175 Watt Mercury Vapor Light Sector: Lighting Description: AVAILABILITY This schedule is available for metered outdoor lighting service to any Customer. New or replacement light installations shall be limited to high pressure sodium and metal-halide lights. Source or reference: http://www.heartland-rec.com/documents/HRECTarriffsAug09web.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability

235

Data:C046039e-22be-4017-8930-af61addfd05f | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

039e-22be-4017-8930-af61addfd05f 039e-22be-4017-8930-af61addfd05f No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Tri-County Elec Member Corp (Tennessee) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: 400 Watt HPS Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.tcemc.org/index.php/residential-information/ Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous

236

Data:91be1bda-607a-4ff5-9ee9-be98291906af | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

be1bda-607a-4ff5-9ee9-be98291906af be1bda-607a-4ff5-9ee9-be98291906af No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Walton Electric Member Corp Effective date: 2006/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: Coop Provides Relamping (Traffic Signal) Sector: Lighting Description: Each Additional 60 Watts of demand = $1.79 Source or reference: http://www.waltonemc.com/commercial/ Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category:

237

Data:95dad923-e15f-42f4-af2a-847210c9993c | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

dad923-e15f-42f4-af2a-847210c9993c dad923-e15f-42f4-af2a-847210c9993c No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Kings Mountain, North Carolina (Utility Company) Effective date: 2011/07/31 End date if known: Rate name: Outdoor Lighting Service- 175W Mercury Vapor- Suburban, New Pole Sector: Lighting Description: Available to individual customer at locations on the City's distribution system. Source or reference: http://www.cityofkm.com/Downloads/billing/Electric_Rates.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh):

238

Data:7afd7791-aaca-4921-a5af-f9992204eb8d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

afd7791-aaca-4921-a5af-f9992204eb8d afd7791-aaca-4921-a5af-f9992204eb8d No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Tipton Municipal Electric Util Effective date: 2004/08/13 End date if known: Rate name: Rate F- Street and Highway Lighting: Overhead, 250 Watt Sodium Vapor Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: Rates Binder 1, Illinois State University Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring:

239

Data:Fa35e236-5399-47eb-af14-d9530988f193 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

36-5399-47eb-af14-d9530988f193 36-5399-47eb-af14-d9530988f193 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Rockwood, Tennessee (Utility Company) Effective date: 2012/12/01 End date if known: Rate name: General (GSA Part 2) Industrial Sector: Industrial Description: * 50 - 1,000 kW Demand; > 15,000 kwh General Power Rate - "applies to the firm power requirements for electric service to commercial, industrial, and governmental customers; institutional customers including but not limited to, churches, clubs, and like customers, except to whom service is available under other resale rate schedules."

240

Data:638af629-a173-45fe-a31c-2ecaca262316 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

af629-a173-45fe-a31c-2ecaca262316 af629-a173-45fe-a31c-2ecaca262316 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Empire District Electric Co (Missouri) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: COGENERATION PURCHASE RATE Sector: Description: Source or reference: Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Seasonal/Monthly Demand Charge Structures

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "af alkaline fly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Data:6133353e-33af-4276-a282-3daf0dd8a3ba | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

53e-33af-4276-a282-3daf0dd8a3ba 53e-33af-4276-a282-3daf0dd8a3ba No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Bangor Hydro-Electric Co Effective date: 2012/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Periodic Mercury Vapor-100 watts Sector: Lighting Description: Service under this rate is available for street and area lighting service installations, maintenance and use of energy, and traffic control lighting service provided the customer furnishes the equipment. Customers taking service under this rate schedule are responsible for paying both Distribution Service and Stranded Cost. Source or reference: http://www.bangorhydro.com/business/rates/rates-schedules.aspx

242

Data:4451b404-24fd-4ceb-aab6-934994ce11af | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b404-24fd-4ceb-aab6-934994ce11af b404-24fd-4ceb-aab6-934994ce11af No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Avista Corp Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Area Lighting - MV-L&S (30ftpole) 20000L Sector: Lighting Description: Public Purposes Rider = base rate x %2.85. Source or reference: http://www.avistautilities.com/services/energypricing/wa/elect/Pages/default.aspx Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

243

Data:Db239874-2117-4094-9105-d17332e53af8 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Db239874-2117-4094-9105-d17332e53af8 Db239874-2117-4094-9105-d17332e53af8 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Jackson Electric Member Corp Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Outdoor Lighting Decashield MH 250 W Wood Pole Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.jacksonemc.com/business-manage-my-account-commercial-rates-options/schedules/outdoor-lighting-service Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

244

Data:C96c1989-d68c-4373-b9b4-af5833727dbb | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

989-d68c-4373-b9b4-af5833727dbb 989-d68c-4373-b9b4-af5833727dbb No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Memphis Light, Gas & Water Effective date: 2012/10/01 End date if known: Rate name: GENERAL POWER RATE - PART C Sector: Industrial Description: * This rate shall apply to the firm electric power requirements where a customer's currently effective onpeak or offpeak contract demand, whichever is higher, is greater than 15,000 kW but not more than 25,000 kW; provided that the other conditions of this section are met. Fixed monthly charge = Customer Charge ($1,500) + TVA Administrative Charge ($350)

245

Data:149f102f-73af-4d9a-88dc-58ccb5453652 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

73af-4d9a-88dc-58ccb5453652 73af-4d9a-88dc-58ccb5453652 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of New Bern, North Carolina (Utility Company) Effective date: 2008/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Street Lighting Service - Post-Mounted 9500 Lumen Sodium Vapor (1 light per 10 customers) - Metal Pole Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: www.newbern-nc.org/Elec/documents/SLS32B2009.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V):

246

Data:7c6c5233-1524-4532-baea-3b1af3dd7127 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

33-1524-4532-baea-3b1af3dd7127 33-1524-4532-baea-3b1af3dd7127 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Lansing, Michigan (Utility Company) Effective date: 2011/03/01 End date if known: Rate name: LARGE GENERAL ELECTRIC SERVICE Sector: Industrial Description: This rate is available to any customer desiring secondary voltage for any purpose when the electrical requirements are supplied at one point of delivery through one metering installation and the billing demand is 15 kW or more. The limitation to secondary-voltage service may be waived in instances where the character of the electric load at the premises served has changed substantially. This rate is not available for standby or emergency services.

247

Data:361580db-2792-4d51-b4af-1029be488077 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

80db-2792-4d51-b4af-1029be488077 80db-2792-4d51-b4af-1029be488077 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Butler Public Power District Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Stand By Rate 10 Three Phase Sector: Commercial Description: Source or reference: http://www.butlerppd.com/common/New%20Customer%20Packet%20_1.2013.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous

248

Data:F8667979-6811-4745-af14-b79a47bf3977 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

79-6811-4745-af14-b79a47bf3977 79-6811-4745-af14-b79a47bf3977 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Omaha Public Power District Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: CONSUMER OWNED STREET LIGHTING Metal Halide 70 Sector: Lighting Description: CONSUMER OWNED SYSTEM OPERATED BY DISTRICT Source or reference: http://ww3.oppd.com/rates/OppdRateManual.pdf#nameddest=110 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

249

Data:09630002-11af-4337-82dc-80f822e0575f | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

02-11af-4337-82dc-80f822e0575f 02-11af-4337-82dc-80f822e0575f No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Lubbock, Texas (Utility Company) Effective date: 2010/10/29 End date if known: Rate name: GUARD LIGHT SERVICE,150w mv, wood pole Sector: Lighting Description: Each 150 Watt 7,000 lumen (nominal - actual rating may vary) mercury vapor fixture installed on an overhead bracket on a wood pole Source or reference: http://www.lpandl.com/Rates.htm Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months):

250

Data:52114253-f79c-4e56-af04-23a58ff8fdfc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

253-f79c-4e56-af04-23a58ff8fdfc 253-f79c-4e56-af04-23a58ff8fdfc No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Eastern Illinois Elec Coop Effective date: 2013/04/15 End date if known: Rate name: INTERRUPTIBLE AIR CONDITIONING Sector: Commercial Description: This rider is available upon application to any member/owner served under Rates 1, 5, 8, or 20 with a 240 volt central air conditioning system that is capable of being cycled off and on by the installation of a cooperative provided control device. Such systems must be of sufficient size to provide air conditioning to the entire facility where it is located.

251

Data:97199320-92ca-4056-8235-02af2b33d56c | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0-92ca-4056-8235-02af2b33d56c 0-92ca-4056-8235-02af2b33d56c No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Baltimore Gas & Electric Co Effective date: 2013/02/23 End date if known: Rate name: 14ft foot black fluted poles Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.bge.com/myaccount/billsrates/ratestariffs/electricservice/pages/electric-services-rates-and-tariffs.aspx Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

252

Data:123b8377-6566-4149-af6e-47a669adf9ab | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b8377-6566-4149-af6e-47a669adf9ab b8377-6566-4149-af6e-47a669adf9ab No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Tecumseh, Nebraska (Utility Company) Effective date: 2013/10/01 End date if known: Rate name: Seasonal Unmetered Service (October 2013) Sector: Commercial Description: Applicable to where customers desire an electric service connection for a very limited time requirement, such as, but not limited to carnivals, the circus, shows, etc, and metering is not feasible. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW):

253

Data:2657af18-6250-47ef-8647-f8d09f894495 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

af18-6250-47ef-8647-f8d09f894495 af18-6250-47ef-8647-f8d09f894495 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Electrical Dist No4 Pinal Cnty Effective date: 2009/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Residential Rate Sector: Residential Description: Available to residential use only in single private residences or apartments for lighting, appliances domestic single-phase power with no motor over 5 HP, heating and cooking served through one meter. Three-phase service is subject to application. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments The bill is subject to a power supply adjuster as set forth in the District's power cost adjuster rate tariff.

254

Data:9576c0dd-6d4a-40af-8560-125902234c79 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

dd-6d4a-40af-8560-125902234c79 dd-6d4a-40af-8560-125902234c79 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Douglas, Georgia (Utility Company) Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Security Lights - 400 Watt HPS Vapor - Metered Sector: Lighting Description: Wood Pole Charge - $2.00 Fiberglass Pole - $10.00/fixture for 60 months Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

255

Data:D07856af-8162-4183-be2b-04015925df16 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

af-8162-4183-be2b-04015925df16 af-8162-4183-be2b-04015925df16 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: United Illuminating Co Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Rate MH - Cobra Head 400 Watt Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: www.uinet.com Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Seasonal/Monthly Demand Charge Structures

256

Data:2027ba7a-f5bf-4540-b733-b3fe771817ae | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a-f5bf-4540-b733-b3fe771817ae a-f5bf-4540-b733-b3fe771817ae No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Tri-County Elec Member Corp (Tennessee) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: 200 Watt HPS Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.tcemc.org/index.php/residential-information/ Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous

257

Data:26cacead-02ed-41be-af8e-334e2755b38f | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cacead-02ed-41be-af8e-334e2755b38f cacead-02ed-41be-af8e-334e2755b38f No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: M J M Electric Cooperative Inc Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Large Power (100 KVA & Up 1 Phase) Sector: Commercial Description: Large Power (100 KVA & Up 1 Phase) Source or reference: Rate Binder #7 (Illinois State University) Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring:

258

Data:Db084458-5f75-4238-9823-effbb3af25bb | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

84458-5f75-4238-9823-effbb3af25bb 84458-5f75-4238-9823-effbb3af25bb No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Delaware Electric Cooperative Effective date: 2011/02/01 End date if known: Rate name: Lighting Service--Schedule L-1 HP Sodium Vapor Lamp-Post Top Luminaire (100w) Arlington DBL 12" Sector: Lighting Description: Available to Members, governments, agencies, public and private organizations desiring Electric Delivery or Electric Supply and Delivery Services through unmetered services for roadway and area lighting. Source or reference: http://www.delaware.coop/my-services/residential/billing/rates

259

Data:5213674a-f171-4383-980b-7a41ba0cb264 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a-f171-4383-980b-7a41ba0cb264 a-f171-4383-980b-7a41ba0cb264 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Stanton County Public Pwr Dist Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Commercial Pumping Single Phase Sector: Commercial Description: Source or reference: ISU Archives Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

260

Data:0786987d-7134-4f85-be71-af83f26ddf57 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7d-7134-4f85-be71-af83f26ddf57 7d-7134-4f85-be71-af83f26ddf57 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Snohomish County PUD No 1 Effective date: 2002/04/01 End date if known: Rate name: 250 WATT MUNICIPAL OWNED STREET LIGHTING SERVICE Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www2.snopud.com/site/content/documents/rates/streetlighting_rates010105.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "af alkaline fly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Data:0723832b-93c2-44b4-af87-ef74561b618e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

32b-93c2-44b4-af87-ef74561b618e 32b-93c2-44b4-af87-ef74561b618e No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Story City, Iowa (Utility Company) Effective date: 2004/11/01 End date if known: Rate name: Commercial Rate Sector: Commercial Description: monthly CHARGE Is subject to fuel cost and purchase power adjustment Source or reference: Rate Binder# 1B (Illinois State University) Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

262

Data:16852873-60df-4517-b1fb-0c4dc84af95c | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

60df-4517-b1fb-0c4dc84af95c 60df-4517-b1fb-0c4dc84af95c No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Altamaha Electric Member Corp Effective date: 2011/05/01 End date if known: Rate name: Small Power Service- Three Phase SP-8 Sector: Commercial Description: Applicable for commercial and farm use for use incidental thereto supplied through one meter at one standard secondary voltage for service up to 50 kVA required transformer capacity. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh):

263

Data:535499f5-1781-43ad-af7e-714654983b7e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

f5-1781-43ad-af7e-714654983b7e f5-1781-43ad-af7e-714654983b7e No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Nolin Rural Electric Coop Corp Effective date: 2011/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: Security Lights: Mercury Vapor 175 Watt Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: www.nolinrecc.com Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous

264

Data:A3467e96-a8af-4012-9300-52134723b839 | Open Energy Information  

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67e96-a8af-4012-9300-52134723b839 67e96-a8af-4012-9300-52134723b839 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Eugene, Oregon (Utility Company) Effective date: 2013/05/01 End date if known: Rate name: Schedule L-4 (Private Property Lighting Service) - 150 Watt High Efficiency High Pressure Sodium Sector: Lighting Description: To overhead outdoor lighting from dusk-to-dawn each day throughout the year for lighting private property with facilities supplied by EWEB. For the purposes of administering this service, the primary references are Eugene Code 9.6725 and all EWEB policies and procedures pertaining to light pollution, light trespass and glare.

265

Data:F36814f9-a2fe-4161-b11c-5635461de1af | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

f9-a2fe-4161-b11c-5635461de1af f9-a2fe-4161-b11c-5635461de1af No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Potomac Electric Power Co Effective date: 2012/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: Residential Time Metered - Schedule RTM Sector: Residential Description: Source or reference: http://www.pepco.com/_res/documents/DCRates_RTM.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous

266

Kinetics of fly ash beneficiation by carbon burnout. Quarterly report, October 1996--December 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The presence of carbon in fly ash requires an increase in the dosage of the air-entraining admixture for concrete mix, and may cause the admixture to lose efficiency. Specifying authorities for the concrete producers have set maximum allowable levels of residual carbon. These levels are the so called {open_quotes}Loss On Ignition{close_quotes} (LOI). The concrete producer`s day-to-day purchasing decisions sets the LOI at 4%. The objective of the project is to investigate the kinetics of oxidation of residual carbon present in coal fly ash as a possible first step toward producing low-carbon fly ash from high-carbon, low quality fly ash.

Dodoo, J.N.; Okoh, J.M.; Diaz, A. [and others

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

STATE-OF-THE-ART: FLY ASH, SILICA FUME AND SLAG UTILIZATION IN USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Backfill. 1.0 Introduction At the present time, coal fired electric power plants in the USA produce, ease of handling, and moisture insensitivity, etc. [2,11]. 2.1.2 Backfills Fly ash is used

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

268

Removal of Heavy Metals from Water by Fly Ash from Coal and Steel ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, iron dust from steelmaking process and coal fly ahs are used as an alternative adsorbent ... iNEMI Environmental Thrust; History, Challenges, & Opportunities ... Phosphorus Flow Analysis for Food Production and Consumption.

269

M-2: Extracting Alumina from Coal Fly Ash with Ammonium Sulfate ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, The whole process of extracting alumina from coal fly ash ... Decrease of Heat Consumption at Nepheline Processing to Alumina and By- Products ... Flash -and CFB Calciners, History and Difficulties of Development of Two ...

270

Recovery of Metal Oxides From Fly Ash, Volumes 1-3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By processing fly ash to obtain metal oxides and other commercial products, utilities can realize both sales revenues and reduced disposal costs. A commercial-scale processing plant could be ready for demonstration by 1992.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Fly and Be Damned: What Now for Aviation and Climate Change?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fly and Be Damned gets underneath the well-known facts about the unsustainable nature of the aviation industry and argues for fundamental change to our traveling habits. The first book to transcend the emotional debate between the entrenched positions ...

Peter McManners

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Utilizing fly ash particles to produce low-cost metal matrix composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metal matrix composites (MMCs) are a blend of fine ceramic particles mixed with metals such as aluminium or magnesium. Fly ash is considerably cheaper than ceramics; aluminium-fly ash composites cost less than 60% of conventional aluminium-SiC composites making them attractive to automakers striving for lower weight and cheaper materials for brake rotors or brake drums. Ultalite.com has consulted with US researchers to to find the optimum requirements of the fly ash needed to make MMCs. Particle size 20-40 microns, low calcium oxide content and spherical particles were identified. The desired particles once extracted are stirred into molten aluminum and the resulting composite is into ingots for shipment to a casting facility. Dynamometer testing has shown that aluminium-fly ash composite brake drums have better performance and wear than cast iron drums. 6 figs., 1 tab.

Withers, G. [Ultalite.com, Melbourne, Vic. (Australia)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Alkali or alkaline earth metal promoted catalyst and a process for methanol synthesis using alkali or alkaline earth metals as promoters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a heterogeneous catalyst comprising reduced copper chromite impregnated with an alkali or alkaline earth metal. There is thus no need to add a separate alkali or alkaline earth compound. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100--160 C and the pressure range of 40--65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H[sub 2]/CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.; Palekar, V.M.

1995-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

274

Alkali or alkaline earth metal promoted catalyst and a process for methanol synthesis using alkali or alkaline earth metals as promoters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a heterogeneous catalyst comprising reduced copper chromite impregnated with an alkali or alkaline earth metal. There is thus no need to add a separate alkali or alkaline earth compound. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100.degree.-160.degree. C. and the pressure range of 40-65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H.sub.2 /CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

Tierney, John W. (Pittsburgh, PA); Wender, Irving (Pittsburgh, PA); Palekar, Vishwesh M. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Pages that link to "Data:99623403-8ce8-483f-82af-ef5cae66b9e8...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3f-82af-ef5cae66b9e8: View (previous 50 | next 50) (20 | 50 | 100 | 250 | 500) City of Seattle, Washington (Utility Company) ( links) View (previous 50 | next 50) (20 | 50 |...

276

Pages that link to "Data:9fa317b0-1d22-44bc-9318-f01ea4a6f5af...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

bc-9318-f01ea4a6f5af: View (previous 50 | next 50) (20 | 50 | 100 | 250 | 500) City of Seattle, Washington (Utility Company) ( links) View (previous 50 | next 50) (20 | 50 |...

277

Mitigation of SCR-Ammonia Related Aqueous Effects in a Fly Ash Pond  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contaminated fly ash resulting from secondary injection of ammonia to mitigate SO3 produced by a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system altered the water quality of a fly ash pond at a coal-fired power generation station. This project attempted to improve water quality by encouraging the growth of algae in the pond to remove ammonia, while keeping other important parameters (pH, total suspended solids, Biological Oxygen Demand, and metals) within allowable limits.

2006-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

278

Field Test of a Semi-Continuous Fly Ash Unburned Carbon Monitor: Cyclone Boiler Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unburned carbon (UBC) is the measure of the carbon level in the fly ash of a coal-fired boiler—with increased carbon indicating less-complete and less-efficient combustion. Boiler design is one important factor that affects UBC levels. Cyclone boilers burn coal at high combustion temperatures (ca. 1650°C) and exhibit relatively high, but quite variable, fly ash UBC levels. Recently, because of competitive fuel pricing and reduced SO2 and NOX emissions, cyclone boilers ...

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

279

Investigation of Ammonia Adsorption on Fly Ash and Potential Impacts of Ammoniated Ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Problems associated with ammoniated fly ash have become a major concern for coal-fired facilities in recent years due to the increased use of ammonia-based environmental control technologies. Of particular note is more frequent use of ammonia-based NOx control systems and electrostatic precipitator (ESP) conditioning with ammonia. To help power producers evaluate and mitigate the impacts of ammoniated ash, this project provides crucial information in the areas of fly ash characterization, adsorption test...

1999-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

280

IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. 95. Alkaline Earth Carbonates in Aqueous Systems. Part 2. Ca  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The alkaline earth carbonates are an important class of minerals. This article is part of a volume in the IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series that compiles and critically evaluates solubility data of the alkaline earth carbonates in water and in simple aqueous electrolyte solutions. Part 1 outlined the procedure adopted in this volume, and presented the beryllium and magnesium carbonates. Part 2, the current paper, compiles and critically evaluates the solubility data of calcium carbonate. The chemical forms included are the anhydrous CaCO{sub 3} types calcite, aragonite, and vaterite, the monohydrate monohydrocalcite (CaCO{sub 3}{center_dot} H{sub 2}O), the hexahydrate ikaite (CaCO{sub 3}{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O), and an amorphous form. The data were analyzed with two model variants, and thermodynamic data of each form consistent with each of the models and with the CODATA key values for thermodynamics are presented.

De Visscher, Alex; Vanderdeelen, Jan [Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, and Centre for Environmental Engineering Research and Education (CEERE), Schulich School of Engineering, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 1N4 (Canada); Department of Applied Analytical and Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "af alkaline fly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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281

Surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding for light oil recovery. Annual report, 1992--1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this report, the authors present the results of experimental and theoretical studies in surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding for light oil recovery. The overall objective of this work is to develop a very cost-effective method for formulating a successful surfactant-enhanced alkaline flood by appropriately choosing mixed alkalis which form inexpensive buffers to obtain the desired pH (between 8.5 and 12.0) for ultimate spontaneous emulsification and ultralow interfacial tension. In addition, the authors have (1) developed a theoretical interfacial activity model for determining equilibrium interfacial tension, (2) investigated the mechanisms for spontaneous emulsification, (3) developed a technique to monitor low water content in oil, and (4) developed a technique to study water-in-oil emulsion film properties.

Wasan, D.T.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Flying Triangulation - towards the 3D movie camera  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flying Triangulation sensors enable a free-hand and motion-robust 3D data acquisition of complex shaped objects. The measurement principle is based on a multi-line light-sectioning approach and uses sophisticated algorithms for real-time registration (S. Ettl et al., Appl. Opt. 51 (2012) 281-289). As "single-shot principle", light sectioning enables the option to get surface data from one single camera exposure. But there is a drawback: A pixel-dense measurement is not possible because of fundamental information-theoretical reasons. By "pixel-dense" we understand that each pixel displays individually measured distance information, neither interpolated from its neighbour pixels nor using lateral context information. Hence, for monomodal single-shot principles, the 3D data generated from one 2D raw image display a significantly lower space-bandwidth than the camera permits. This is the price one must pay for motion robustness. Currently, our sensors project about 10 lines (each with 1000 pixels), reaching an co...

Willomitzer, Florian; Faber, Christian; Häusler, Gerd

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Electrocatalytic oxidation of glycerol; 1: Behavior of palladium electrode in alkaline medium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The direct oxidation of organic compounds derived from biomass, such as alcohols, in a fuel cell is a very attractive way for converting chemical energy into electrical energy. The electrocatalytic oxidation of glycerol has been investigated at palladium electrodes in alkaline medium by electro-chemical and spectroscopic techniques. The kinetic parameters measured, together with other experimental data, allow one to suggest a mechanism. Diffusion is involved in the rate-determining step.

Yildiz, G.; Kadirgan, F. (Istanbul Teknik Univ. (Turkey))

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Characterization of Actinides in Simulated Alkaline Tank Waste Sludges and Leachates  

SciTech Connect

Removal of waste-limiting components of sludge (Al, Cr, S, P) in underground tanks at Hanford by treatment with concentrated alkali has proven less efficacious for Al and Cr removal than had been hoped. More aggressive treatments of sludges, for example, contact with oxidants targeting Cr(III), have been tested in a limited number of samples and found to improve leaching efficiency for Cr. Oxidative alkaline leaching can be expected to have at best a secondary influence on the mobilization of Al. Our earlier explorations of Al leaching from sludge simulants indicated acidic and complexometric leaching can improve Al dissolution. Unfortunately, treatments of sludge samples with oxidative alkaline, acidic or complexing leachates produce conditions under which normally insoluble actinide ions (e.g., Am3+, Pu4+, Np4+) can be mobilized to the solution phase. Few experimental or meaningful theoretical studies of actinide chemistry in strongly alkaline, strongly oxidizing solutions have been completed. Unfortunately, extrapolation of the more abundant acid phase thermodynamic data to these radically different conditions provides limited reliable guidance for predicting actinide speciation in highly salted alkaline solutions. In this project, we are investigating the fundamental chemistry of actinides and important sludge components in sludge simulants and supernatants under representative oxidative leaching conditions. We are examining the potential impact of acidic or complexometric leaching with concurrent secondary separations on Al removal from sludges. Finally, a portion of our research is directed at the control of polyvalent anions (SO4=, CrO4=, PO43-) in waste streams destined for vitrification. Our primary objective is to provide adequate insight into actinide behavior under these conditions to enable prudent decision making as tank waste treatment protocols develop. We expect to identify those components of sludges that are likely to be problematic in the application of oxidative, acidic, and complexometric leaching protocols.

Nash, Kenneth L.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Probing the Kondo lattice model with alkaline-earth-metal atoms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study transport properties of alkaline-earth-metal atoms governed by the Kondo lattice Hamiltonian plus a harmonic confining potential, and suggest simple dynamical probes of several different regimes of the phase diagram that can be implemented with current experimental techniques. In particular, we show how Kondo physics at strong coupling, at low density, and in the heavy fermion phase is manifest in the dipole oscillations of the conduction band upon displacement of the trap center.

Foss-Feig, Michael [Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); JILA, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Hermele, Michael [Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Rey, Ana Maria [Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); JILA, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); NIST, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

286

Laboratory development of sludge washing and alkaline leaching processes: Test plan for FY 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy plans to vitrify (as borosilicate glass) the large volumes of high-level radioactive wastes at the Hanford site. To reduce costs, pretreatment processes will be used to reduce the volume of borosilicate glass required for disposal. Several options are being considered for the pretreatment processes: (1) sludge washing with water or dilute hydroxide: designed to remove most of the Na from the sludge, thus significantly reducing the volume of waste to be vitrified; (2) sludge washing plus caustic leaching and/or metathesis (alkaline sludge leaching): designed to dissolve large quantities of certain nonradioactive elements, such as Al, Cr and P, thus reducing the volume of waste even more; (3) sludge washing, sludge dissolution, and separation of radionuclides from the dissolved sludge solutions (advanced processing): designed to remove all radionuclides for concentration into a minimum waste volume. This report describes a test plan for work that will be performed in FY 1994 under the Sludge Washing and Caustic Leaching Studies Task (WBS 0402) of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Pretreatment Project. The objectives of the work described here are to determine the effects of sludge washing and alkaline leaching on sludge composition and the physical properties of the washed sludge and to evaluate alkaline leaching methods for their impact on the volume of borosilicate glass required to dispose of certain Hanford tank sludges.

Rapko, B.M.; Lumetta, G.J.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

High-Strength / High Alkaline Resistant Fe-Phosphate Glass Fibers as Concrete Reinforcement  

SciTech Connect

Calcium-iron-phosphate glasses were developed whose chemical durabilities in alkaline solutions (pH 13) were comparable or superior to those of commercial alkaline-resistant (AR) silica-based glasses. However, the tensile strength of Ca-Fe-phosphate fibers, after being exposed to alkaline environments, including wet Portland cement pastes, is lower than that of current AR silicate fibers. Another series of Ca-Fe-phosphate glasses were developed with excellent chemical durability in strong acidic solutions (H2SO4, HF), indicating potential applications where silica-based fibers degrade very quickly, including E-glass. The new Ca-Fe-phosphate glasses can be melted and processed 300 to 500°C lower than silica-based glasses. This offers the possibility of manufacturing glass fibers with lower energy costs by 40-60% and the potential to reduce manufacturing waste and lower gas emissions. It was found that Ca-Fe-phosphate melts can be continuously pulled into fibers depending on the slope of the viscosity-temperature curve and with viscosity ~100 poise, using multi-hole Pt/Rh bushings.

Mariano Velez

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

288

CHARACTERIZATION OF ACTINIDES IN SIMULATED ALKALINE TANK WASTE SLUDGES AND LEACHATES  

SciTech Connect

In this project, both the fundamental chemistry of actinides in alkaline solutions (relevant to those present in Hanford-style waste storage tanks), and their dissolution from sludge simulants (and interactions with supernatants) have been investigated under representative sludge leaching procedures. The leaching protocols were designed to go beyond conventional alkaline sludge leaching limits, including the application of acidic leachants, oxidants and complexing agents. The simulant leaching studies confirm in most cases the basic premise that actinides will remain in the sludge during leaching with 2-3 M NaOH caustic leach solutions. However, they also confirm significant chances for increased mobility of actinides under oxidative leaching conditions. Thermodynamic data generated improves the general level of experiemental information available to predict actinide speciation in leach solutions. Additional information indicates that improved Al removal can be achieved with even dilute acid leaching and that acidic Al(NO3)3 solutions can be decontaminated of co-mobilized actinides using conventional separations methods. Both complexing agents and acidic leaching solutions have significant potential to improve the effectiveness of conventional alkaline leaching protocols. The prime objective of this program was to provide adequate insight into actinide behavior under these conditions to enable prudent decision making as tank waste treatment protocols develop.

Nash, Kenneth L.

2008-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

289

Calixarene crown ether solvent composition and use thereof for extraction of cesium from alkaline waste solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solvent composition and corresponding method for extracting cesium (Cs) from aqueous neutral and alkaline solutions containing Cs and perhaps other competing metal ions is described. The method entails contacting an aqueous Cs-containing solution with a solvent consisting of a specific class of lipophilic calix[4]arene-crown ether extractants dissolved in a hydrocarbon-based diluent containing a specific class of alkyl-aromatic ether alcohols as modifiers. The cesium values are subsequently recovered from the extractant, and the solvent subsequently recycled, by contacting the Cs-containing organic solution with an aqueous stripping solution. This combined extraction and stripping method is especially useful as a process for removal of the radionuclide cesium-137 from highly alkaline waste solutions which are also very concentrated in sodium and potassium. No pre-treatment of the waste solution is necessary, and the cesium can be recovered using a safe and inexpensive stripping process using water, dilute (millimolar) acid solutions, or dilute (millimolar) salt solutions. An important application for this invention would be treatment of alkaline nuclear tank wastes. Alternatively, the invention could be applied to decontamination of acidic reprocessing wastes containing cesium-137.

Moyer, Bruce A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sachleben, Richard A. (Knoxville, TN); Bonnesen, Peter V. (Knoxville, TN); Presley, Derek J. (Ooltewah, TN)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Utilization of by-products from alkaline hydroxide preservation of whole broiler carcasses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alkaline hydroxides can be used as a preservation method for on-farm storage of broiler mortalities. This method creates two by-products: alkaline preserved whole broiler carcasses, which can be rendered into an Alkaline Poultry By-Product Meal (APBPM) and residual alkaline effluent, which can be used as a soil amendment. In experiment 1 APBPM was added to a broiler diet and evaluated for apparent metabolizable energy (AME). In experiment 2 AME was used to formulate balanced diets with 0 to 5% APBPM. Effects on broiler performance, organ morphology, tibia sheer strength and moisture content were evaluated in both experiments. Experiment 1 determined that the optimum additive concentration for the APBPM was 5%. The AME trials showed no significant difference between the control group and treatment group (5% APBPM) when comparing body weight and feed consumption, however a significant difference was observed when comparing excreta moisture. Experiment 2 evaluated the parameters of feed consumption, feed conversion, and body weight when fed an APBPM. The feed conversion for the 5% treatment in trial 1 was significantly lower compared to control, 1%, and 3% treatment groups. Feed consumption per bird for trial 1 was significantly higher in the control, 1%, and 3% treatment groups compared to the 5% treatment group. The percentage of organ weight was larger in treatment groups compared to control groups indicating an enlargement of organ weight as a percentage of body weight. The residual alkaline effluent was applied to coastal bermudagrass plots in amounts of 0 to 9354 L/ha with four replications per treatment each year for 1999 and 2000. Dry matter yield, nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) uptakes were evaluated. In 1999 maximum yields were at the 5612 L/ha rate but there was no yield response to effluent rate in 2000. Effluent rate had only small effects on N and P uptake since all treatments were balanced for these nutrients. The potassium uptakes showed a significant increase as the effluent rate increased. The residual KOH effluent can be applied to Coastal bermudagrasses as a source of K as well as N and P.

Niemeyer, Truitt Preston

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Role of fly ash in the removal of organic pollutants from wastewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fly ash, a relatively abundant and inexpensive material, is currently being investigated as an adsorbent for the removal of various organic pollutants from wastewater. The wastewater contains various types of phenolic compounds, such as chloro, nitro, amino, and other substituted compounds. Various types of pesticides, such as lindane, malathion, carbofuran, etc., and dyes, such as, methylene blue, crystal violet, malachite green, etc., are also present in the wastewater. These contaminants pollute the water stream. These organic pollutants, such as phenolic compounds, pesticides, and dyes, etc., can be removed very effectively using fly ash as adsorbent. This article presents a detailed review on the role of fly ash in the removal of organic pollutants from wastewater. Adsorption of various pollutants using fly ash has been reviewed. The adsorption mechanism and other influencing factors, favorable conditions, and competitive ions, etc., on the adsorption process have also been discussed in this paper. It is evident from the review that fly ash has demonstrated good removal capabilities for various organic compounds. 171 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

M. Ahmaruzzaman [National Institute of Technology, Silchar (India). Department of Chemistry

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

292

Summary technical report on the electrochemical treatment of alkaline nuclear wastes  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the laboratory studies investigating the electrolytic treatment of alkaline solutions carried out under the direction of the Savannah River Technology Center from 1985-1992. Electrolytic treatment has been demonstrated at the laboratory scale to be feasible for the destruction of nitrate and nitrite and the removal of radioactive species such as {sup 99}Tc and {sup 106}Ru from Savannah River Site (SRS) decontaminated salt solution and other alkaline wastes. The reaction rate and current efficiency for the removal of these species are dependent on cell configuration, electrode material, nature of electrode surface, waste composition, current density, and temperature. Nitrogen, ammonia, and nitrous oxide have been identified as the nitrogen-containing reaction products from the electrochemical reduction of nitrate and nitrite under alkaline conditions. The reaction mechanism for the reduction is very complex. Voltammetric studies indicated that the electrode reactions involve surface phenomena and are not necessarily mass transfer controlled. In an undivided cell, results suggest an electrocatalytic role for oxygen via the generation of the superoxide anion. In general, more efficient reduction of nitrite and nitrate occurs at cathode materials with higher overpotentials for hydrogen evolution. Nitrate and nitrite destruction has also been demonstrated in engineering-scale flow reactors. In flow reactors, the nitrate/nitrite destruction efficiency is improved with an increase in the current density, temperature, and when the cell is operated in a divided cell configuration. Nafion{reg_sign} cation exchange membranes have exhibited good stability and consistent performance as separators in the divided-cell tests. The membranes were also shown to be unaffected by radiation at doses approximating four years of cell operation in treating decontaminated salt solution.

Hobbs, D.T.

1994-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

293

An alkaline spring system within the Del Puerto ophiolite (California USA): A Mars analog site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Mars appears to have experienced little compositional differentiation of primitive lithosphere, and thus much of the surface of Mars is covered by mafic lavas. On Earth, mafic and ultramafic rocks present in ophiolites, oceanic crust and upper mantle that have been obducted onto land, are therefore good analogs for Mars. The characteristic mineralogy, aqueous geochemistry, and microbial communities of cold-water alkaline springs associated with these mafic and ultramafic rocks represent a particularly compelling analog for potential life-bearing systems. Serpentinization, the reaction of water with mafic minerals such as olivine and pyroxene, yields fluids with unusual chemistry (Mg-OH and Ca-OH waters with pH values up to {approx}12), as well as heat and hydrogen gas that can sustain subsurface, chemosynthetic ecosystems. The recent observation of seeps from pole-facing crater and canyon walls in the higher Martian latitudes supports the hypothesis that even present conditions might allow for a rockhosted chemosynthetic biosphere in near-surface regions of the Martian crust. The generation of methane within a zone of active serpentinization, through either abiogenic or biogenic processes, could account for the presence of methane detected in the Martian atmosphere. For all of these reasons, studies of terrestrial alkaline springs associated with mafic and ultramafic rocks are particularly timely. This study focuses on the alkaline Adobe Springs, emanating from mafic and ultramafic rocks of the California Coast Range, where a community of novel bacteria is associated with the precipitation of Mg-Ca carbonate cements. The carbonates may serve as a biosignature that could be used in the search for evidence of life on Mars.

Blank, J.G.; Green, S.; Blake, D.; Valley, J.; Kita, N.; Treiman, A.; Dobson, P.F.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Investigation on application of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis for alkaline waste treatment  

SciTech Connect

The stabilization of neptunium(IV) in alkaline solution by chemical reductants under various conditions was studied. Testing showed that neptunium(V) is slowly reduced to Np(IV) by V(IV) at room temperature in alkaline solutions. Increasing temperature accelerates reduction. Complete reduction of 2 x 10{sup -4} M Np(V) occurs in three hours at 80{degrees}C in 1 M NaOH with 0.02 M VOSO{sub 4-}. Under similar conditions, but in 5 M NaOH, only 15 to 20% of the Np(V) was reduced in 5 hours. In all cases, about 98 % of the initial neptunium was found in the precipitate. Thus V(IV) acts both as a reductant and as a precipitation carrier. Tests showed Np(V) reduction by hydrazine hydrate could be catalyzed by Pd(II). Reduction increased with temperature and catalyst concentration and decreased with hydroxide concentration. Reduction of Np(V) also takes place in 1 M NaOH solutions containing 1 M sodium formate and palladium. Increasing temperature accelerates reduction; with three hours` treatment in 5 M NaOH solution at 90{degrees}C, about 95 % of the initial 2 x 10{sup -4} M neptunium(V) is transformed to Np(IV). Organic complexants and organic acid anions hinder the decontamination of alkaline solutions from neptunium and plutonium by coprecipitation with d-element hydroxides (the Method of Appearing Reagents). It was found that ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) and N-(2-hydroxyethyl) ethylenediaminetriacetate (HEDTA) are decomposed by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in alkaline solution in the presence of cobalt compounds with heating and by Na2S208 at moderate temperatures. Citrate, glycolate, and oxalate are decomposed by Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 8} with heating. Oxidant amounts must be increased when NaNO{sub 2} also is present in solution. 8 refs., 25 figs., 16 tabs.

Shilov, V.P.; Bessonov, A.A.; Garnov, A.Y.; Gelis, A.V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Institute of Physical Chemistry] [and others

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Progress in alkaline peroxide dissolution of low-enriched uranium metal and silicide targets  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports recent progress on two alkaline peroxide dissolution processes: the dissolution of low-enriched uranium metal and silicide (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) targets. These processes are being developed to substitute low-enriched for high-enriched uranium in targets used for production of fission-product {sup 99}Mo. Issues that are addressed include (1) dissolution kinetics of silicide targets, (2) {sup 99}Mo lost during aluminum dissolution, (3) modeling of hydrogen peroxide consumption, (4) optimization of the uranium foil dissolution process, and (5) selection of uranium foil barrier materials. Future work associated with these two processes is also briefly discussed.

Chen, L.; Dong, D.; Buchholz, B.A.; Vandegrift, G.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.; Wu, D. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

296

Liquefaction process for solid carbonaceous materials containing alkaline earth metal humates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved liquefaction process wherein wall scale and particulate agglomeration during the liquefaction of solid carbonaceous materials containing alkaline earth metal humates is reduced and/or eliminated by subjecting the solid carbonaceous materials to controlled cyclic cavitation during liquefaction. It is important that the solid carbonaceous material be slurried in a suitable solvent or diluent during liquefaction. The cyclic cavitation may be imparted via pressure cycling, cyclic agitation and the like. When pressure cycling or the like is employed an amplitude equivalent to at least 25 psia is required to effectively remove scale from the liquefaction vessel walls.

Epperly, William R. (Summit, NJ); Deane, Barry C. (East Brunswick, NJ); Brunson, Roy J. (Buffalo Grove, IL)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Laboratory study on the behaviour of spent AA household alkaline batteries in incineration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quantitative evaluation of emissions from incineration is essential when Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) studies consider this process as an end-of-life solution for some wastes. Thus, the objective of this work is to quantify the main gaseous emissions produced when spent AA alkaline batteries are incinerated. With this aim, batteries were kept for 1 h at 1273 K in a refractory steel tube hold in a horizontal electric furnace with temperature control. At one end of the refractory steel tube, a constant air flow input assures the presence of oxygen in the atmosphere and guides the gaseous emissions to a filter system followed by a set of two bubbler flasks having an aqueous solution of 10% (v/v) nitric acid. After each set of experiments, sulphur, chlorides and metals (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, Tl and Zn) were analyzed in both the solutions obtained from the steel tube washing and from the bubblers. Sulphur, chlorides and metals were quantified, respectively, using barium sulfate gravimetry, the Volhard method and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). The emissions of zinc, the most emitted metal, represent about 6.5% of the zinc content in the batteries. Emissions of manganese (whose oxide is the main component of the cathode) and iron (from the cathode collector) are negligible when compared with their amount in AA alkaline batteries. Mercury is the metal with higher volatility in the composition of the batteries and was collected even in the second bubbler flask. The amount of chlorides collected corresponds to about 36% of the chlorine in the battery sleeve that is made from PVC. A considerable part of the HCl formed in PVC plastic sleeve incineration is neutralized with KOH, zinc and manganese oxides and, thus, it is not totally released in the gas. Some of the emissions are predictable through a thermodynamic data analysis at temperatures in the range of 1200-1300 K taking into account the composition of the batteries. This analysis was done for most of potential reactions between components in the batteries as well as between them and the surrounding atmosphere and it reasonably agrees the experimental results. The results obtained show the role of alkaline batteries at the acid gases cleaning process, through the neutralization reactions of some of their components. Therefore, LCA of spent AA alkaline batteries at the municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration process must consider this contribution.

Almeida, Manuel F. [LEPAE, Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)], E-mail: mfa@fe.up.pt; Xara, Susana M.; Delgado, Julanda; Costa, Carlos A. [LEPAE, Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

298

The FlyBase database of the Drosophila genome projects andcommunity literature  

SciTech Connect

FlyBase (http://flybase.bio.indiana.edu/) provides an integrated view of the fundamental genomic and genetic data on the major genetic model Drosophila melanogaster and related species. FlyBase has primary responsibility for the continual reannotation of the D.melanogaster genome. The ultimate goal of the reannotation effort is to decorate the euchromatic sequence of the genome with as much biological information as is available from the community and from the major genome project centers. A complete revision of the annotations of the now-finished euchromatic genomic sequence has been completed. There are many points of entry to the genome within FlyBase, most notably through maps, gene products and ontologies, structured phenotypic and gene expression data, and anatomy.

Gelbart, William; Bayraktaroglu, Leyla; Bettencourt, Brian; Campbell, Kathy; Crosby, Madeline; Emmert, David; Hradecky, Pavel; Huang,Yanmei; Letovsky, Stan; Matthews, Beverly; Russo, Susan; Schroeder,Andrew; Smutniak, Frank; Zhou, Pinglei; Zytkovicz, Mark; Ashburner,Michael; Drysdale, Rachel; de Grey, Aubrey; Foulger, Rebecca; Millburn,Gillian; Yamada, Chihiro; Kaufman, Thomas; Matthews, Kathy; Gilbert, Don; Grumbling, Gary; Strelets, Victor; Shemen, C.; Rubin, Gerald; Berman,Brian; Frise, Erwin; Gibson, Mark; Harris, Nomi; Kaminker, Josh; Lewis,Suzanna; Marshall, Brad; Misra, Sima; Mungall, Christopher; Prochnik,Simon; Richter, John; Smith, Christopher; Shu, ShengQiang; Tupy,Jonathan; Wiel, Colin

2002-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

299

Evaluating the Effects of the Kingston Fly Ash Release on Fish Reproduction: Spring 2009 - 2010 Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On December 22, 2008, a dike containing fly ash and bottom ash at the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant in East Tennessee failed and released a large quantity of ash into the adjacent Emory River. Ash deposits from the spill extended 4 miles upstream of the facility to Emory River mile 6 and downstream to Tennessee River mile 564 ({approx}8.5 miles downstream of the confluence of the Emory River with the Clinch River, and {approx}4 miles downstream of the confluence of the Clinch River with the Tennessee River). A byproduct of coal combustion, fly ash contains a variety of metals and other elements which, at sufficient concentrations and in specific forms, can be harmful to biological systems. The ecological effects of fly ash contamination on exposed fish populations depend on the magnitude and duration of exposure, with the most significant risk considered to come from elevated levels of certain metals in the ash, particularly selenium, on fish reproduction and fish early life stages (Lemly 1993; Besser and others 1996). The ovaries of adult female fish in a lake contaminated by coal ash were reported to have an increased frequency of atretic oocytes (dead or damaged immature eggs) and reductions in the overall numbers of developing oocytes (Sorensen 1988) associated with elevated body burdens of selenium. Larval fish exposed to selenium through maternal transfer of contaminants to developing eggs in either contaminated bodies of water (Lemly 1999) or in experimental laboratory exposures (Woock and others 1987, Jezierska and others 2009) have significantly increased incidences of developmental abnormalities. Contact of fertilized eggs and developing embryos to ash in water and sediments may also pose an additional risk to the early life stages of exposed fish populations through direct uptake of metals and other ash constituents (Jezierska and others 2009). The establishment and maintenance of fish populations is intimately associated with the ability of individuals within a population to reproduce. Reproduction is thus generally considered to be the most critical life function affected by environmental contamination. From a regulatory perspective, the issue of potential contaminant-related effects on fish reproduction from the Kingston fly ash spill has particular significance because the growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life is a specific classified use of the affected river systems. To address the potential effects of fly ash from the Kingston spill on the reproductive health of exposed fish populations, ORNL has undertaken a series of studies in collaboration with TVA that include: (1) a combined field study of metal bioaccumulation in ovaries and other fish tissues (Adams and others 2012) and the reproductive condition of sentinel fish species in reaches of the Emory and Clinch Rivers affected by the fly ash spill (the current report); (2) laboratory tests of the potential toxicity of fly ash from the spill area on fish embryonic and larval development (Greeley and others 2012); (3) additional laboratory experimentation focused on the potential effects of long-term exposures to fly ash on fish survival and reproductive competence (unpublished); and (4) a combined field and laboratory study examining the in vitro developmental success of embryos and larvae obtained from fish exposed in vivo for over two years to fly ash in the Emory and Clinch Rivers (unpublished). The current report focuses on the reproductive condition of adult female fish in reaches of the Emory and Clinch Rivers influenced by the fly ash spill at the beginning of the spring 2009 breeding season - the first breeding season immediately following the fly ash release - and during the subsequent spring 2010 breeding season. Data generated from this and related reproductive/early life stage studies provide direct input to ecological risk assessment efforts and complement and support other phases of the overall biomonitoring program associated with the fly ash spill.

Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen [ORNL; Adams, Marshall [ORNL; McCracken, Kitty [ORNL

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

The Effects of Trona Use in Flue Gas on Fly Ash Pond Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, researchers analyzed the effect of the use of trona on the dynamics of a fly ash pond (FAP) at a plant in Ohio, using both field and laboratory measurements. They compared the chemical concentrations and biological dynamics in the FAP from four years before the onset of trona use with those from two years after trona use was implemented. They compared the chemical composition of fly ash from two generating units with trona injection systems with that from a generating unit without trona. T...

2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "af alkaline fly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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301

Leaching Assessment of Fly Ash, Flue Gas Desulfurization Filter Cake, and Fixated Scrubber Solids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The by-products of coal combustion (for example, fly ash and flue gas desulfurization filter cake) are an important environmental concern due to potential leaching of trace constituents and the large volume of residues produced. About 40% of these by-products may be utilized as raw materials outside of the energy sector; the remaining 60% of the coal combustion products (CCPs) are disposed of as waste. At Plant 14090, the subject of this report, fly ash and scrubber sludge are blended with quicklime ...

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

302

Data:950109f7-27af-4032-b7c1-c80a1592baff | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9f7-27af-4032-b7c1-c80a1592baff 9f7-27af-4032-b7c1-c80a1592baff No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Northeast Nebraska P P D Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Rate Scheduel WPS-1 - Transmission Lines Sector: Commercial Description: A. This Rate Schedule WPS -1 is available only to municipalities who purchase from the District all of its power and energy requirements (with the exception of any direct Western allocation) for resale, including sales to end-use customers and load growth. B. This Rate Schedule WPS-1 is made available in conjunction with rate schedules that are a part of a Wholesale Power Agreement between the District and Nebraska Electric Generation and Transmission Cooperative, Inc. ("NEG&T"). In the event there is any inconsistency between the provisions of this Rate Schedule WPS -1 and those rate schedules which are a part of the District/NEG&T Wholesale Power Contract, then the provisions of the District/NEG&T Power Contract rate schedules shall govern

303

Data:143cc353-3145-4d89-af1c-f5761280cfad | Open Energy Information  

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53-3145-4d89-af1c-f5761280cfad 53-3145-4d89-af1c-f5761280cfad No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Kiel, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Effective date: 2011/05/06 End date if known: Rate name: Rg-1 Residential Service Three Phase with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Sector: Residential Description: Power Cost Adjustment Clause - All metered rates shall be subject to a positive or negative power cost adjustment charge equivalent to the amount by which the current cost of power (per kilowatt-hour of sales) is greater or lesser than the base cost of power purchased (per kilowatt-hour of sales). The base cost of power (U) is $0.0754 per kilowatt-hour.

304

Data:22824429-7771-47b5-8e7f-4773db5810af | Open Energy Information  

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29-7771-47b5-8e7f-4773db5810af 29-7771-47b5-8e7f-4773db5810af No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Santee Electric Coop, Inc Effective date: 2010/11/01 End date if known: Rate name: Area Lighting Service 320w Metal Halide Flood Sector: Lighting Description: This Schedule is available for the leasing of mercury vapor; metal halide and sodium vapor outdoor lighting units to any member/owner served by the Cooperative and subject to established Service Rules and Regulations. Extra charges - Dedicated Poles 30' Wood $2.00 35' Wood $4.00 40' Wood $5.00 45' Wood $6.00 30' to 45' Fiberglass or Metal Pole $16.17

305

Data:80647cc6-75af-4431-aafb-6c457d716ba0 | Open Energy Information  

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cc6-75af-4431-aafb-6c457d716ba0 cc6-75af-4431-aafb-6c457d716ba0 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Oconto Falls Water & Light Comm Effective date: 2010/10/13 End date if known: Rate name: Gs-2 General Service Single Phase Optional Time-of-Day 8am-8pm Sector: Commercial Description: Power Cost Adjustment Clause - All metered rates shall be subject to a positive or negative power cost adjustment charge equivalent to the amount by which the current cost of power (per kilowatt-hour of sales) is greater or lesser than the base cost of power purchased (per kilowatt-hour of sales). The base cost of power (U) is $0.0847 per kilowatt-hour.

306

Data:54dd4786-e976-4995-af31-a16f637583a6 | Open Energy Information  

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e976-4995-af31-a16f637583a6 e976-4995-af31-a16f637583a6 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Cornell, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Effective date: 2008/05/12 End date if known: Rate name: Cp-1 Large Power Service with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Sector: Industrial Description: Power Cost Adjustment Clause - All metered rates shall be subject to a positive or negative power cost adjustment charge equivalent to the amount by which the current cost of power (per kilowatt-hour of sales) is greater or lesser than the base cost of power purchased (per kilowatt-hour of sales). The base cost of power (U) is $0.0644 per kilowatt-hour.

307

Data:07644ec7-611f-49fd-af65-e37c44010272 | Open Energy Information  

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ec7-611f-49fd-af65-e37c44010272 ec7-611f-49fd-af65-e37c44010272 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: CenterPoint Energy Effective date: 2013/01/25 End date if known: Rate name: Primary Service - Non-IDR Metered, less than 400 kVa (TC-MGS) - Muni Discount Rate Sector: Commercial Description: Delivery Service will be single or three-phase, 60 hertz, at a standard primary voltage. Delivery Service will be metered using Company's standard Meter provided for this type of Delivery Service. Any Meter other than the standard Meter will be provided at an additional charge and/or will be provided by a Meter Owner other than the Company pursuant to Applicable Legal Authorities. Where Delivery Service of the type desired is not available at the Point of Delivery, additional charges and special contract arrangements may be required prior to Delivery Service being furnished, pursuant to Section 6.1.2.2, Construction Services, of this Tariff.

308

Data:0bbeccfa-2a6a-4f78-af08-e600520765b2 | Open Energy Information  

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bbeccfa-2a6a-4f78-af08-e600520765b2 bbeccfa-2a6a-4f78-af08-e600520765b2 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Oregon Trail El Cons Coop, Inc Effective date: 2011/10/01 End date if known: Rate name: Irrigation exceeding 17kW, Schedule IR Sector: Industrial Description: This rate is applicable when the monthly demand charge exceeds 17kW. Available in OTEC service territory for agricultural crops, drainage pumping, and stock watering purposes, subject to policies as established by the Board of Directors. Power cost adjustment: The power cost adjustment will follow Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) temporary charges to OTEC as they adjust their wholesale rates up or down through BPA's Cost Recovery Adjustment Clauses (CRAC). The power cost adjustment will also include future price increases in the cogeneration power purchase contracts.

309

Data:35ba748d-2a52-4aea-8f27-af02790671fb | Open Energy Information  

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2a52-4aea-8f27-af02790671fb 2a52-4aea-8f27-af02790671fb No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Kenergy Corp Effective date: 2011/09/01 End date if known: Rate name: Light - 400 watt HPS - Contemporary Sector: Lighting Description: APPLICABLE In all territory served. AVAILABILITY OF SERVICE Service under this schedule is offered, under the conditions set out hereinafter, for lighting applications on private property such as, but not Limited to, residential, commercial and industrial plant site or parking lot, other commercial area lighting, etc. to customers now receiving electric service from Kenergy at the same location. Service will be provided under written contract signed by customer prior to service commencing, when facilities are required other than fixture(s).

310

Data:85505044-4615-4682-86f3-1a6b1af6991b | Open Energy Information  

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-4615-4682-86f3-1a6b1af6991b -4615-4682-86f3-1a6b1af6991b No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of New Richmond, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Effective date: 2010/02/01 End date if known: Rate name: Cp-1 Small Power Service Transformer Ownership Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Sector: Industrial Description: Power Cost Adjustment Clause - All metered rates shall be subject to a positive or negative power cost adjustment charge equivalent to the amount by which the current cost of power (per kilowatt-hour of sales) is greater or lesser than the base cost of power purchased (per kilowatt-hour of sales). The base cost of power (U) is $0.0710 per kilowatt-hour.

311

Data:F5a595fd-b085-4930-8322-af642236eee5 | Open Energy Information  

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5fd-b085-4930-8322-af642236eee5 5fd-b085-4930-8322-af642236eee5 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Medford, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Effective date: 1997/06/27 End date if known: Rate name: Ms-1 Street Lighting Service 250 W HPS Sector: Lighting Description: The schedule will be applied to municipal street lighting. The utility will furnish, install and maintain street lighting units. Power Cost Adjustment Clause - All metered rates shall be subject to a positive or negative power cost adjustment charge equivalent to the amount by which the current cost of power (per kilowatt-hour of sales) is greater or lesser than the base cost of power purchased (per kilowatt-hour of sales). The base cost of power (U) is $0.0351 per kilowatt-hour. Fixed Monthly Charge includes Commitment to Community Rider:$12.50 per customer per month.

312

Data:71152dce-4bbe-4ac9-89ef-d46218af42ed | Open Energy Information  

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152dce-4bbe-4ac9-89ef-d46218af42ed 152dce-4bbe-4ac9-89ef-d46218af42ed No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Sharyland Utilities LP Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Large Power Primary (Rate Codes 660 and 668) Sector: Commercial Description: This Rate Schedule is applicable to Electric Service for non-residential purposes at primary voltage when such Electric Service is to one Point of Delivery and measured through one Meter. Electric Service will be single or three-phase, 60 hertz, at standard primary voltage. Electric Service will be metered using Company's standard Meter provided for this type of Electric Service. Any Meter other than the standard Meter will be provided at an additional charge. Where Electric Service of the type desired is not available at the Point of Delivery, additional charges and special contract arrangements may be required prior to Electric Service being furnished, pursuant to the Company's Facilities extension policy.

313

Data:6211d159-b8bf-4072-af2e-ead5977c59bc | Open Energy Information  

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1d159-b8bf-4072-af2e-ead5977c59bc 1d159-b8bf-4072-af2e-ead5977c59bc No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Town of Wheatland, Wyoming (Utility Company) Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Irrigation Time-Of-Day Sector: Commercial Description: To irrigators pumping irrigation water. Facilities Charge: $3.39 per Installed HP/Year which is to be billed in July. Source or reference: http://psc.state.wy.us/htdocs/tariffs/wy_whe1/0001a.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh):

314

Data:152e238b-6601-4370-8af1-8585ebed0cd3 | Open Energy Information  

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e238b-6601-4370-8af1-8585ebed0cd3 e238b-6601-4370-8af1-8585ebed0cd3 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Clintonville, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Effective date: 2006/05/05 End date if known: Rate name: Gs-1 General Service Three Phase with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Sector: Commercial Description: Power Cost Adjustment Clause - All metered rates shall be subject to a positive or negative power cost adjustment charge equivalent to the amount by which the current cost of power (per kWh of sales) is greater or lesser than the base cost of power purchased (per kWh of sales). The base cost of power is $0.0680 per kWh. See schedule PCAC.

315

Data:1aaf7784-3647-411c-af31-67f6a2567099 | Open Energy Information  

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aaf7784-3647-411c-af31-67f6a2567099 aaf7784-3647-411c-af31-67f6a2567099 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Algoma Utility Comm Effective date: 2008/05/28 End date if known: Rate name: Residential Service - Optional Time-of-Day Three-Phase 7am-7pm Sector: Residential Description: This rate schedule is optional to all Rg-1, Residential Service customers. Customers that wish to be served on this rate schedule must apply to the utility for service. Once an optional customer begins service on this rate schedule, the customer shall remain on the rate for a minimum of one year. Any customer choosing to be served on this rate schedule waives all rights to billing adjustments arising from a claim that the bill for service would be less on another rate schedule than under this rate schedule. Rg-2 Residential Service Optional TOD $1.00 per customer per month

316

Data:79b3af62-5573-496e-915c-4aaa88cbec22 | Open Energy Information  

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af62-5573-496e-915c-4aaa88cbec22 af62-5573-496e-915c-4aaa88cbec22 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Northern Indiana Pub Serv Co Effective date: 2011/12/27 End date if known: Rate name: Dusk to Dawn Light - 150 watt HPS - Floodlight Sector: Lighting Description: TO WHOM AVAILABLE Available for dusk to dawn area lighting service to Customers for Company-owned lighting systems located on electric supply lines of the Company which are suitable and adequate for supplying the service requested, subject to the conditions set forth in this Rate Schedule and the Company Rules. MAINTENANCE Company will repair and/or replace and maintain all equipment owned by Company which may be necessary to provide a continuous supply of electrical Energy to the point of connection of Company's property

317

Data:23546671-1406-48c9-8470-b7af98806f18 | Open Energy Information  

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1-1406-48c9-8470-b7af98806f18 1-1406-48c9-8470-b7af98806f18 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: UNS Electric, Inc Effective date: 2011/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: RES-01 TOU-A - Residential Time-of-Use, Weekends Off-Peak Sector: Residential Description: Applicable with Rider REST-TS1 and Rider R-2 charges. Available as an optional rate to Customers served under the Company's Pricing Plan RS, Residential Service. This service is normally provided at one point of delivery measured through one meter. More than one service and meter may be provided in instances where such is permitted under 230.2 (A) through (D) of the National Electric Code with prior approval of the Unisource Electric Engineering Department. Service is restricted to private single family dwellings or individually metered apartments.

318

Data:77917991-0154-4342-9d9a-f8afbdc83bc3 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

91-0154-4342-9d9a-f8afbdc83bc3 91-0154-4342-9d9a-f8afbdc83bc3 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Potomac Electric Power Co Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: General Service Low Voltage Service - Schedule GSLV Sector: Description: Available for either Standard Offer Service when modified by Rider "SOS" or Distribution Service in the District of Columbia portion of the Company's service area, except if the customer's maximum demand is equal to or in excess of one hundred (100) kilowatts during two (2) or more billing months within twelve (12) consecutive billing months, the customer will be transferred to Schedule "GT LV", "GT 3A", or "GT 3B" in accordance with the availability provisions therein. Rate schedule transfers will be made annually and become effective with the billing month of June. Customers with monthly maximum demands less than 25 kW are served on Schedule "GS ND" subject to the provisions stated therein.

319

Data:6547b862-fa2a-45e9-af24-58380cff0407 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b862-fa2a-45e9-af24-58380cff0407 b862-fa2a-45e9-af24-58380cff0407 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Russell, Massachusetts (Utility Company) Effective date: 2009/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: LARGE GENERAL SERVICE SCHEDULE LG- FARM DISCOUNT Sector: Industrial Description: Additional Info: Availability: To any non-residential customer having a three phase service. With a consistent demand less than (a) 80kw of demand/per 30 minutes and/or (b) 30,000 kWhr's per month. Includes 10% discount on monthly bill. Minimum Bill: $36.00 Plus $3.60 per kVA for transformer capacity installed if customer exceeds 80kw and/or 30,000kWhr's per month.

320

The role of ammonia on mercury leaching from coal fly ash Jianmin Wang a,*, Tian Wang a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analysis of fly ash disposal in mined areas. In: Proceedings of the 12th International Symposium on CoalThe role of ammonia on mercury leaching from coal fly ash Jianmin Wang a,*, Tian Wang a , Harmanjit, 2005). CAIR permanently caps emissions of NOx and SOx from large stationary sources including coal

Ragsdell, Kenneth M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "af alkaline fly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Mechanical Properties and Durability of Concrete Made with High-Volume Fly Ash Blended Cement Produced in a Cement Plant: Commercial -Scale Trial Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim report documents the preliminary results of the commercial-scale production of a high-volume fly ash (HVFA) blended cement, using up to 55 percent fly ash to replace the portland cement.

2000-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

322

Bioaccumulation Studies Associated with the Kingston Fly Ash Spill, Spring 2009 - Fall 2010  

SciTech Connect

In December 2008, an ash dike at the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant ruptured, releasing over one billion gallons of coal fly ash into the Emory and Clinch Rivers. Coal fly ash may contain several contaminants of concern, but of these selenium (Se) and arsenic (As) have been highlighted because of their toxicity and tendency to bioaccumulate in aquatic food chains. To assess the potential impact of the spilled fly ash on humans and the environment, a comprehensive biological and environmental monitoring program was established, for which resident aquatic organisms (among other sample media) are collected to determine contaminant exposure and evaluate the risk to humans and wildlife. Studies on bioaccumulation and fish health are major components of the TVA Biological Monitoring Program for the Kingston fly ash project. These studies were initiated in early Spring 2009 for the purposes of: (1) documenting the levels of fly ash-associated metals in various tissues of representative sentinel fish species in the area of the fly ash spill, (2) determining if exposure to fly ash-associated metals causes short, intermediate, or long-term health effects on these sentinel fish species, (3) assessing if there are causal relationships between exposure (to metals) and effects on fish, (4) evaluating, along with information regarding other ecological and physicochemical studies, the nature and route of contaminant transfer though food chains into higher level consumers, (5) providing important information for the Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA) for the Kingston fly ash project, and (6) serving as an important technology transfer or model study focused on how to best evaluate the environmental effects of fly ash, not only at the Kingston site, but also at sites on other aquatic systems where coal-fired generating stations are located. This report summarizes the bioaccumulation results from the first two years of study after the fly ash spill, including four seasonal collections: Spring 2009, Fall 2009, Spring 2010, and Fall 2010. Both the Spring and Fall studies have focused on 3-4 sentinel fish species that represent different feeding habits, behaviors, and home ranges. In addition to bioaccumulation studies, the Spring investigations also included evaluation of fish health and reproductive integrity on the same fish used for bioaccumulation. Two associated reports present the fish health (Adams et al 2012) and reproductive studies (Greeley et al 2012) conducted in 2009 and 2010. The fish health study conducted in conjunction with the bioaccumulation and reproductive study is critical for assessing and evaluating possible causal relationships between contaminant exposure (bioaccumulation) and the response of fish to exposure as reflected by the various measurements of fish health. This report emphasizes evaluation of arsenic and selenium bioaccumulation in fish and consists of four related studies (Sections 2-5) including, (1) bioaccumulation in liver and ovaries, (2) bioaccumulation in whole body gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepedianum), (3) bioaccumulation in muscle tissue or fillets, and (4) a reconstruction analysis which establishes the relationship between selenium in muscle tissue and that of the whole body of bluegill (Lepomis machrochirus). Metals other than arsenic and selenium are evaluated separately in Section 6. This report focuses on selenium and arsenic for the following reasons: (1) based on baseline studies conducted in early 2009 in the Emory and Clinch River, only two potentially fly-ash related metals, selenium and arsenic, appeared to be elevated above background or reference levels, (2) selenium and arsenic are two of the metals in coal ash that are known to bioaccumulate and cause toxicity in wildlife, and (3) based on bioaccumulation studies of bluegill and carp (Cyprinus carpio) in the Stilling Pond during Spring 2009, which would represent a worst case situation for metal bioaccumulation, selenium and arsenic were the only two metals consistently elevated above background levels in fish. E

Adams, Marshall [ORNL; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Development of Fly Ash Derived Sorbents to Capture CO2 from Flue Gas of Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This research program focused on the development of fly ash derived sorbents to capture CO{sub 2} from power plant flue gas emissions. The fly ash derived sorbents developed represent an affordable alternative to existing methods using specialized activated carbons and molecular sieves, that tend to be very expensive and hinder the viability of the CO{sub 2} sorption process due to economic constraints. Under Task 1 'Procurement and characterization of a suite of fly ashes', 10 fly ash samples, named FAS-1 to -10, were collected from different combustors with different feedstocks, including bituminous coal, PRB coal and biomass. These samples presented a wide range of LOI value from 0.66-84.0%, and different burn-off profiles. The samples also spanned a wide range of total specific surface area and pore volume. These variations reflect the difference in the feedstock, types of combustors, collection hopper, and the beneficiation technologies the different fly ashes underwent. Under Task 2 'Preparation of fly ash derived sorbents', the fly ash samples were activated by steam. Nitrogen adsorption isotherms were used to characterize the resultant activated samples. The cost-saving one-step activation process applied was successfully used to increase the surface area and pore volume of all the fly ash samples. The activated samples present very different surface areas and pore volumes due to the range in physical and chemical properties of their precursors. Furthermore, one activated fly ash sample, FAS-4, was loaded with amine-containing chemicals (MEA, DEA, AMP, and MDEA). The impregnation significantly decreased the surface area and pore volume of the parent activated fly ash sample. Under Task 3 'Capture of CO{sub 2} by fly ash derived sorbents', sample FAS-10 and its deashed counterpart before and after impregnation of chemical PEI were used for the CO{sub 2} adsorption at different temperatures. The sample FAS-10 exhibited a CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of 17.5mg/g at 30 C, and decreases to 10.25mg/g at 75 C, while those for de-ashed counterpart are 43.5mg/g and 22.0 mg/g at 30 C and 75 C, respectively. After loading PEI, the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increased to 93.6 mg/g at 75 C for de-ashed sample and 62.1 mg/g at 75 C for raw fly ash sample. The activated fly ash, FAS-4, and its chemical loaded counterparts were tested for CO{sub 2} capture capacity. The activated carbon exhibited a CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of 40.3mg/g at 30 C that decreased to 18.5mg/g at 70 C and 7.7mg/g at 120 C. The CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity profiles changed significantly after impregnation. For the MEA loaded sample the capacity increased to 68.6mg/g at 30 C. The loading of MDEA and DEA initially decreased the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity at 30 C compared to the parent sample but increased to 40.6 and 37.1mg/g, respectively, when the temperature increased to 70 C. The loading of AMP decrease the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity compared to the parent sample under all the studied temperatures. Under Task 4 'Comparison of the CO{sub 2} capture by fly ash derived sorbents with commercial sorbents', the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities of selected activated fly ash carbons were compared to commercial activated carbons. The CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of fly ash derived activated carbon, FAS-4, and its chemical loaded counterpart presented CO{sub 2} capture capacities close to 7 wt%, which are comparable to, and even better than, the published values of 3-4%.

M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; John M. Andresen; Yinzhi Zhang; Zhe Lu

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

324

New Air-Entraining Admixtures for Concrete Using High-Carbon Fly Ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A promising new air-entraining admixture has been developed by the leading North American admixture producer. Independent, EPRI-sponsored testing indicated the admixture was suitable for use with concretes that contain fly ashes with levels of unburned carbon higher than the typical 3-4 percent allowed in the concrete industry.

2002-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

325

Use of High-Calcium Fly Ash in Cement-Based Construction Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in blended cements with minimum (less than 10%) portland cement in the blend. Keywords: Fly ash; concrete impact assessments. INTRODUCTION #12;3 Coal is the most widely used source of energy for power production, total coal ash production in the world was estimated to be 600 million tons, of which 100 million tons

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

326

Fly ash-amended compost as a manure for agricultural crops  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Homemade organic compost prepared from lawn grass clippings was amended with fine fly ash collected from a coal-fired power plant (SRS 484.D. Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC) to investigate its usefulness as a manure in enhancing nutrient uptake and increasing dry matter yield in selected agricultural crops. Three treatments were compared: five crops (mustard, collard, string beans, bell pepper, and eggplant) were each grown on three kinds of soil: soil alone, soil amended with composted grass clippings, and soil amended with the mixed compost of grass clippings and 20% fly ash. The fly ash-amended compost was found to be effective in enhancing the dry matter yield of collard greens and mustard greens by 378% and 348%, respectively, but string beans, bell pepper, and eggplant did not show any significant increase in dry matter yield. Analysis of the above-ground biomass of these last three plants showed they assimilated high levels of boron, which is phytotoxic; and this may be the reason for their poor growth. Soils treated with fly ash-amended compost often gave higher concentrations than the control for K, Ca, Mg, S, Zn, and B in the Brassica crops. 18 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

Menon, M.P.; Sajwan, K.S.; Ghuman, G.S.; James, J.; Chandra, K. (Savannah State College, GA (United States))

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Effect of coal fly ash-amended organic compost as a manure for agricultural crops  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal-fired electric power plants generate large quantities of fly ash as a byproduct. In continuation of previous studies on the utilization of fly ash as an amendment to organic compost for use as a manure for agricultural crops, the authors have now determined the effects of this manure on the yield and uptake of selected elements by several plants including collard green, corn, mustard green, bell pepper, egg plant, and climbing beans. An amended compost containing 30-40% fly ash with a compost:soil ratio of 1:3 was found to be most effective to enhance the yield and nutrient uptake of most of the plants. At 20% fly ash level, no increase in yield of any of the above crops was observed. The uptake of K, Mg, Mn, and P was increased in most plants. Boron which is known to be detrimental to the growth of plants above certain level was also found to be increased in plants nourished with the manure.

Ghuman, G.S.; Menon, M.P.; James, J.; Chandra, K.; Sajwan, K. (Savannah State College, GA (United States))

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Mercury Control Research: Effects of Fly Ash and Flue Gas Parameters on Mercury Speciation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and fly ash parameters on the oxidation of HgOin simulated flue gases containing hydrogen chloride (Hel-combustion region are unknown, and the major reaction pathways for Hg oxidation in combustion flue gases remain in the oxidation ofHgo in flue gases containingHC!. Thus, an important parameter that influences the oxidation of

Columbia University

329

Development of Fly Ash Derived Sorbents to Capture CO2 from Flue Gas of Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

This research program focused on the development of fly ash derived sorbents to capture CO{sub 2} from power plant flue gas emissions. The fly ash derived sorbents developed represent an affordable alternative to existing methods using specialized activated carbons and molecular sieves, that tend to be very expensive and hinder the viability of the CO{sub 2} sorption process due to economic constraints. Under Task 1 'Procurement and characterization of a suite of fly ashes', 10 fly ash samples, named FAS-1 to -10, were collected from different combustors with different feedstocks, including bituminous coal, PRB coal and biomass. These samples presented a wide range of LOI value from 0.66-84.0%, and different burn-off profiles. The samples also spanned a wide range of total specific surface area and pore volume. These variations reflect the difference in the feedstock, types of combustors, collection hopper, and the beneficiation technologies the different fly ashes underwent. Under Task 2 'Preparation of fly ash derived sorbents', the fly ash samples were activated by steam. Nitrogen adsorption isotherms were used to characterize the resultant activated samples. The cost-saving one-step activation process applied was successfully used to increase the surface area and pore volume of all the fly ash samples. The activated samples present very different surface areas and pore volumes due to the range in physical and chemical properties of their precursors. Furthermore, one activated fly ash sample, FAS-4, was loaded with amine-containing chemicals (MEA, DEA, AMP, and MDEA). The impregnation significantly decreased the surface area and pore volume of the parent activated fly ash sample. Under Task 3 'Capture of CO{sub 2} by fly ash derived sorbents', sample FAS-10 and its deashed counterpart before and after impregnation of chemical PEI were used for the CO{sub 2} adsorption at different temperatures. The sample FAS-10 exhibited a CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of 17.5mg/g at 30 C, and decreases to 10.25mg/g at 75 C, while those for de-ashed counterpart are 43.5mg/g and 22.0 mg/g at 30 C and 75 C, respectively. After loading PEI, the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increased to 93.6 mg/g at 75 C for de-ashed sample and 62.1 mg/g at 75 C for raw fly ash sample. The activated fly ash, FAS-4, and its chemical loaded counterparts were tested for CO{sub 2} capture capacity. The activated carbon exhibited a CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of 40.3mg/g at 30 C that decreased to 18.5mg/g at 70 C and 7.7mg/g at 120 C. The CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity profiles changed significantly after impregnation. For the MEA loaded sample the capacity increased to 68.6mg/g at 30 C. The loading of MDEA and DEA initially decreased the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity at 30 C compared to the parent sample but increased to 40.6 and 37.1mg/g, respectively, when the temperature increased to 70 C. The loading of AMP decrease the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity compared to the parent sample under all the studied temperatures. Under Task 4 'Comparison of the CO{sub 2} capture by fly ash derived sorbents with commercial sorbents', the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities of selected activated fly ash carbons were compared to commercial activated carbons. The CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of fly ash derived activated carbon, FAS-4, and its chemical loaded counterpart presented CO{sub 2} capture capacities close to 7 wt%, which are comparable to, and even better than, the published values of 3-4%.

M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; John M. Andresen; Yinzhi Zhang; Zhe Lu

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

330

How carbon-based sorbents will impact fly ash utilization and disposal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The injection of activated carbon flue gas to control mercury emissions will result in a fly ash and activated carbon mixture. The potential impact of this on coal combustion product disposal and utilization is discussed. The full paper (and references) are available at www.acaa-usa.org. 1 tab., 2 photos.

Pflughoeft-Hassett, D.F.; Hassett, D.J.; Buckley, T.D.; Heebink, L.V.; Pavlish, J.H. [Energy and Environmental Research Center (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Fly Ash Design Manual for Road and Site Applications: Volumes 1 and 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This two-volume design manual describes the use of fly ash as a construction material in high-volume applications like structural fills, highway embankments, grouting, roller-compacted concrete, and land reclamation. The engineering data and construction procedures presented should help coal ash managers and power plant managers incorporate such applications in by-product management plans.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Fly Ash Design Manual for Road and Site Applications: Volumes 1 and 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This two-volume design manual describes the use of fly ash as a construction material in high-volume applications like structural fills, highway embankments, grouting, roller-compacted concrete, and land reclamation. The engineering data and construction procedures presented should help coal ash managers and power plant managers incorporate such applications in by-product management plans.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

FlySPEC: a multi-user video camera system with hybrid human and automatic control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FlySPEC is a video camera system designed for real-time remote operation. A hybrid design combines the high resolution of an optomechanical video camera with the wide field of view always available from a panoramic camera. The control system integrates ... Keywords: collaborative and automatic camera control, distance learning, gesture based camera control, panoramic video, video communication, video conferencing, video production, webcams

Qiong Liu; Don Kimber; Jonathan Foote; Lynn Wilcox; John Boreczky

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Flying on Hydrogen GeorgiaTech researchers use fuel cells to power unmanned aerial vehicle.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the GeorgiaTech Research Institute (GTRI), the project was attractive as energy sources because of their high energy density. Higher energy density translates into longer endurance. Though fuel cells don't produce: Researchers have developed a hydro- gen-powered unmanned aircraft believed to be the largest to fly

Sherrill, David

335

Evaluation of leaching and ecotoxicological properties of sewage sludge-fly ash mixtures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this work were the evaluation of sewage sludge stabilization by mixing with fly ash, the examination of the physicochemical properties of the produced materials and their leachates and the assessment of their environmental impact by the evaluation of the ecotoxic characteristics. Different ratios of fly ash and sewage sludge (1:1, 1:2, 1:3, 1:6, and 1:9) were mixed for 48 and 72 h. After mixing, the liquid phase of the produced materials was analyzed for total coliforms and Escherichia coli, while the solid residue was dried and tested for the leaching characteristics by the application of TCLP and EN 12457-2 standard leaching methods. Furthermore, the produced leachates were analyzed for their content of specific metals, while their ecotoxicological characteristics were determined by the use of toxicity bioassays, using the marine photobacterium Vibrio fischeri and the crustacean Daphnia magna. The phytotoxicity of sewage sludge-fly ash mixtures was also determined by utilizing seeds of three higher plants (one monocotyl and two dicotyls). The mixtures exhibited low metal leaching in all cases, while the ecotoxic properties increased with the increase of fly ash/sewage sludge ratio. The phytotoxicity testing showed increased root length growth inhibition.

C.A. Papadimitriou; I. Haritou; P. Samaras; A.I. Zouboulis [Technological Educational Institute of West Macedonia, Kozani (Greece)

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

336

Extraction of cesium from an alkaline leaching solution of spent catalysts using an ion-exchange column  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The selective extraction of cesium from an alkaline leaching solution of spent catalysts using phenolic resins was studied. The resins were synthesized by alkaline polycondensation of formaldehyde by phenol, resorcinol, catechol, and phloroglucinol. Their ionoselectivities for five alkali metals were evaluated with a solid-liquid extraction, and their ion-exchange capacities were compared. The resin with the best selectivity for cesium was tested with a real solution at different pH values. An on-column extraction is proposed to obtain cesium with high purity.

Dumont, N.; Favre-Reguillon, A.; Dunjic, B.; Lemaire, M. [Institut De Recherches sur la Catalyse et Laboratoire de Catalyse et Synthese Organique, Villeubanne (France)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Experimental investigation of sand consolidation using high-temperature alkaline solution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental study was conducted to better understand the sand consolidation process under high-temperature alkaline solution. Wilmington Tar sand samples were successfully consolidated in the laboratory using high-temperature (250-260?C) solution of sodium carbonate (pH 11-12). The sample was placed in a vertical 18 in. long aluminum cylindrical cell with an ID of 1.5 in.. The top half of the cell was thermally insulated while the bottom half was cooled. Hot alkaline solution was injected at 20 ml/min for 3-4 hours at the top of the cell and liquid produced at the bottom of the cell. After each experiment, the cell contents were removed and analyzed to determine if sand consolidation occurred. Both aggregates of sand grains and sectioned and polished epoxy-mounted sand grains were examined and analyzed using an electron microprobe to determine any change in shape, size, or composition of the sand pack and precipitation and growth of secondary phases. To better understand the process, experiments were subsequently conducted using samples of pure quartz, pure feldspar, and a 50:50 (by weight) mixture of quartz and feldspar. In each case, both varied 20-40 mesh and 50-250 mesh grain size samples were used. For the 20-40 mesh cases, zeolites and a mixture of amorphous silica and sodium carbonate were deposited on grain surfaces but were insufficient to cause overall sand consolidation. However, when a finer, poorly sorted (50-250 mesh) 50:50 mixture of feldspar and quartz was used, sand consolidation was obtained in 2.5 hours. At the top, hotter part of the cell, equant and acicular zeolite crystals (sodium aluminum silicates) weakly bound the sand grains. At the bottom and cooler part of the cell, the sand grains were strongly bound by a mixture of amorphous silica and sodium carbonate. Results to-date indicate that both zeolite and silica may be cementing agents, the grain-bonding strength depending on the grain surface area. This investigation is part of an ongoing research. The temperature, injection rate, and pH of the alkaline solution, treating time and "soaking period" are considered important process parameters that need to be further investigated.

Moreno Romero, Fidel Enrique

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Risk ranking of bioaccessible metals from fly ash dissolved in simulated lung and gut fluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power plant fly ash from two fuels, coal and a mixture of coal and shredded tires were evaluated for trace metal solubility in simulated human lung and gut fluids (SLF and SGF, respectively) to estimate bioaccessibility. The proportion of bioaccessible to total metal ranged from zero (V) to 80% (Zn) for coal-derived ash in SLF and from 2 (Th) to 100% (Cu) for tire-derived fly ash in SGF. The tire-derived ash contained much more Zn. However, Zn ranked only 5th of the various toxic metals in SGF compared with international regulations for ingestion. On the basis of total concentrations, the metals closest to exceeding limits based on international regulations for inhalation were Cr, Pb, and Al. On dissolution in SLF, the most limiting metals were Pb, Cu, and Zn. For metals exposed to SGF there was no relative change in the top metal, Al, before and after dissolution but the second-ranked metal shifted from Pb to Ni. In most cases only a proportion of the total metal concentrations in either fly ash was soluble, and hence bioaccessible, in either biofluid. When considering the regulatory limits for inhalation of particulates, none of the metal concentrations measured were as hazardous as the fly ash particulates themselves. However, on the basis of the international ingestion regulations for Al, the maximum mass of fly ash that could be ingested is only 1 mg per day (10 mg based on bioaccessibility). It is possible that such a small mass could be consumed by exposed individuals or groups. 39 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

John Twining; Peter McGlinn; Elaine Loi; Kath Smith; Reto Giere [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Menai, NSW (Australia)

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research involving collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is to explore new approaches to the separation of sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrate, and other sodium salts from high-level alkaline tank waste. The principal potential benefit is a major reduction in disposed waste volume, obviating the building of expensive new waste tanks and reducing the costs of low-activity waste immobilization. Principles of ion recognition are being researched toward discovery of liquid extraction systems that selectively separate sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate from other waste components. The successful concept of pseudohydroxide extraction using fluorinated alcohols and phenols is being developed at ORNL and PNNL toward a greater understanding of the controlling equilibria, role of solvation, and of synergistic effects involving crown ethers. Studies at PNNL are directed toward new solvent formulation for the practical sodium pseudohydroxide extraction systems.

Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Moyer, Bruce A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Pilot-scale HCl control by dry alkaline injection for emissions from refuse incinerators. Technical report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One method of removing the HCl in an exhaust-gas stream is to directly inject finely divided sorbent particles into the gas stream upstream from particulate collection equipment, allowing enough time for the HCl to react with the sorbent in the duct. The study proposed to provide data on HCl removal from a simulated incinerator exhaust stream as a function of the in-duct reaction/residence time, the reaction temperature, and the sorbent-to-gas ratio. A 500-acfm pilot-scale HCl control system utilizing dry powdered sorbent was tested at the University of Washington. Powdered alkaline reagents including sodium bicarbonate and calcium hydroxide were injected into boiler flue gas spiked with hydrogen chloride gas. The acid gas reacts with the injected sorbent in a 20-inch diameter by 26-foot high vertical, down-flow vessel. HCl removal efficiency was measured as a function of sorbent stoichiometry, gas residence time in reactor, and reaction temperature.

Moore, D.; Pilat, M.

1988-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "af alkaline fly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Review and assessment of technologies for the separation of strontium from alkaline and acidic media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A literature survey has been conducted to identify and evaluate methods for the separation of strontium from acidic and alkaline media as applied to Hanford tank waste. The most promising methods of solvent extraction, precipitation, and ion exchange are described. The following criteria were used for evaluating the separation methods: Appreciable strontium removal must be demonstrated; Strontium selectivity over bulk components must be demonstrated; The method must show promise for evolving into a practical and fairly simple process; The process should be safe to operate; The method must be robust (i.e., capable of separating strontium from various waste types); Secondary waste generation must be minimized; and The method must show resistance to radiation damage. The methods discussed did not necessarily satisfy all of the above criteria; thus, key areas requiring further development are also given for each method. Less promising solvent extraction, precipitation, and ion exchange methods were also identified; areas for potential development are included in this report.

Orth, R.J.; Kurath, D.E.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Methanol synthesis using a catalyst combination of alkali or alkaline earth salts and reduced copper chromite  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a catalyst combination comprising reduced copper chromite and basic alkali salts or alkaline earth salts. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100--160 C and the pressure range of 40--65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H[sub 2]/CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.; Palekar, V.M.

1995-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

343

Methanol synthesis using a catalyst combination of alkali or alkaline earth salts and reduced copper chromite  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a catalyst combination comprising reduced copper chromite and basic alkali salts or alkaline earth salts. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100.degree.-160.degree. C. and the pressure range of 40-65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H.sub.2 /CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

Tierney, John W. (Pittsburgh, PA); Wender, Irving (Pittsburgh, PA); Palekar, Vishwesh M. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Design and Test of a Carbon-Tolerant Alkaline Fuel Cell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents new results which may constitute a breakthrough in the effort to develop fuel cells truly suitable for use in cars and trucks. For decades, researchers have known that the alkaline fuel cell (AFC) is much cheaper to make, more efficient and more durable than the more popular PEM fuel cell; however, "carbon poisoning" (either from CO2 in air or from contaminants in reformed methanol) causes big problems in the kind of oxygen-hydrogen AFC commonly used in space. This paper reports successful tests of a technique for coating the electrodes with polystyrene which, in conjunction with older common-sense techniques, appears to solve the problem. This kind of design is applicable to cars run on hydrogen fuel, on reformed methanol or even direct methanol. Developing a test methodology was a major part of the work. A foreword by one of the sponsors at NSF discusses the larger importance of this work for energy security and the environment.

Urquidi-Macdonald, M; Grimes, P; Tewari, A; Sambhy, V; Urquidi-Macdonald, Mirna; Sen, Ayusman; Grimes, Patrick; Tewari, Ashutosh; Sambhy, Varun

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Data:774c1c10-6af4-4ab3-b4e3-8cb58ee3628d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

kWh << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleData:774c1c10-6af4-4ab3-b4e3-8cb58ee3628d&oldid633995" Category: Utility Rates What links...

346

Data:6640743e-3b4e-4af1-a21f-4c3abbb26646 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

kWh << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleData:6640743e-3b4e-4af1-a21f-4c3abbb26646&oldid661618" Category: Utility Rates What links...

347

Data:4fea4549-9118-423a-af1d-f64ddcee4065 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

fea4549-9118-423a-af1d-f64ddcee4065 fea4549-9118-423a-af1d-f64ddcee4065 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Black River Falls, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Effective date: 2010/04/15 End date if known: Rate name: General Service - Gs-1 Three Phase Sector: Commercial Description: Power Cost Adjustment Clause All metered rates shall be subject to a positive or negative power cost adjustment charge equivalent to the amount by which the current cost of power (per kilowatt-hour of sales) is greater or lesser than the base cost of power purchased (per kilowatt-hour of sales). The current cost per kilowatt-hour of energy billed is equal to the cost of power purchased for the most recent month, divided by the kilowatt-hours of energy sold. The monthly adjustment (rounded to the nearest one one-hundredth of a cent) is equal to the current cost less the base cost. The base cost of power (U) is $0.0790 per kilowatt-hour. Application: This rate will be applied to single and three-phase customers. This includes commercial, institutional, government, farm, and other customers. The monthly Maximum Measured Demand of customers served on this rate shall not exceed 50 kilowatts for three or more months in a consecutive 12-month period. Commitment to Community rider:Gs-1 General Service 3.0% of the total electric bill not to exceed $1.66

348

Fish Health Studies Associated with the Kingston Fly Ash Spill, Spring 2009 - Fall 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On December 22, 2008, over 4 million cubic meters of fly ash slurry was released into the Emory River when a dike surrounding a solid waste containment area at the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant ruptured. One component of TVA's response to the spill is a biological monitoring program to assess short- and long-term ecological responses to the ash and associated chemicals, including studies on fish health and contaminant bioaccumulation. These studies were initiated in early Spring 2009 for the purposes of: (1) documenting the levels of fly ash-associated metals in various tissues of representative sentinel fish species in the area of the fly ash spill, (2) determining if exposure to fly ash-associated metals causes short, intermediate, or long-term health effects on these sentinel fish species, (3) assessing if there are causal relationships between exposure to metals and health effects on fish, (4) evaluating, along with information from other ecological and physicochemical studies, the nature and route of contaminant transfer though food chains into higher level consumers, (5) providing important information for the Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA) for the Kingston fly ash project, and (6) serving as an important technology information transfer or model study focused on how to best evaluate the environmental effects of fly ash (and related environmental stressors), not only at the Kingston site, but also at sites on other aquatic systems where coal-fired generating stations are located. This report presents the results of the first two years of the fish health study. To date, fish health and bioaccumulation studies have been conducted from Spring 2009 though Fall 2011 and includes 6 seasonal studies: Spring 2009, Fall 2009, Spring 2010, Fall 2010, Spring 2011, and Fall 2011. Both the Spring and Fall studies have focused on 3-4 sentinel fish species that represent different feeding habits, behaviors, and home ranges. In addition to fish health and bioaccumulation, the Spring investigations also included reproductive integrity studies on the same fish used for bioaccumulation and fish health. In this report, results of the fish health studies from Spring 2009 through Fall 2010 are presented while an associated report will present the fish reproductive studies conducted during Spring 2009 and Spring 2010. A report on fish bioaccumulation was submitted to TVA in June 2011. The fish health study conducted in conjunction with the bioaccumulation and reproductive study is critical for assessing and evaluating possible causal relationships between contaminant exposure (bioaccumulation) and the response of fish to exposure as reflected by the various measurements of fish health.

Adams, Marshall [ORNL; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Afprvning af leverance af reguleringsydelser fra et  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

anlæg baseret på · 80 kW mikrogasturbine · UPS/inverter system · Absorption Chiller system Mikrogasturbinesystemet er et standard system men modificeret på følgende punkter: · Generator for optimal tilpasning til

350

File:KITE FLYING POSTER RUBRIC.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search File Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » File:KITE FLYING POSTER RUBRIC.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:KITE FLYING POSTER RUBRIC.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 45 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 18:11, 2 January 2014 Thumbnail for version as of 18:11, 2 January 2014 1,275 × 1,650 (45 KB) Foteri (Talk | contribs) Category:Wind for Schools Portal CurriculaCategory:Wind for Schools Elementary School Curricula

351

File:Kite flying wind facts.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

File File Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » File:Kite flying wind facts.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:Kite flying wind facts.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 29 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 18:11, 2 January 2014 Thumbnail for version as of 18:11, 2 January 2014 1,275 × 1,650 (29 KB) Foteri (Talk | contribs) Category:Wind for Schools Portal CurriculaCategory:Wind for Schools Elementary School Curricula You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup

352

Formation processes and main properties of hollow aluminosilicate microspheres in fly ash from thermal power stations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main parameters of aluminosilicate microspheres formed at thermal power stations in Russia were studied. These parameters are responsible for the prospective industrial application of these microspheres. A comparative analysis of the properties of mineral coal components, the conditions of coal combustion, and the effects of chemical and phase-mineralogical compositions of mineral impurities in coals from almost all of the main coal deposits on the formation of microspheres was performed. The effects of thermal treatment conditions on gas evolution processes in mineral particles and on the fraction of aluminosilicate microspheres in fly ash were considered. It was found that the yield of microspheres was higher in pulverized coal combustion in furnaces with liquid slag removal, all other factors being equal. The regularities of microsphere formation were analyzed, and the mechanism of microsphere formation in fly ash during the combustion of solid fuels was considered.

V.S. Drozhzhin; M.Ya. Shpirt; L.D. Danilin; M.D. Kuvaev; I.V. Pikulin; G.A. Potemkin; S.A. Redyushev [Russian Federal Nuclear Center VNIIEF, Nizhegorodskaya oblast (Russia)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

353

Removal of radium from acidic solutions containing same by adsorption on coal fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for the removal of radium from acidic aqueous solutions. In one aspect, the invention is a process for removing radium from an inorganic-acid solution. The process comprises contacting the solution with coal fly ash to effect adsorption of the radium on the ash. The radium-containing ash then is separated from the solution. The process is simple, comparatively inexpensive, and efficient. High radium-distribution coefficients are obtained even at room temperature. Coal fly ash is an inexpensive, acid-resistant, high-surface-area material which is available in large quantities throughout the United States. The invention is applicable, for example, to the recovery of .sup.226 Ra from nitric acid solutions which have been used to leach radium from uranium-mill tailings.

Scheitlin, Frank M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Investigation on the utilization of coal fly ash as amendment to compost for vegetation in acid soil. Technical terminal report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Application of fly ash-amended composts as manure enhances the crop yield of certain plants like corn, sorghum, collard and mustard greens. Organic compost made out of grass and leaves (home-made) is better than the commercial composts for amendment with fly ash. A 20--40% fly ash in the amended compost and a soil to ash-amended compost ratio of 3:1 are recommended for making bed for plantation. Organic compost mixed with fly ash, due to reduced porosity, will help the bed to retain water and conserve water supply to plants. Organic compost will release to the manure additional quantities of N, P, and S that are not substantially available in fly ash. It appears that chemical reaction and/or mineralization occurs during composting of fly ash with organic manure to release more N, P, K and S to the system. Potassium is more elevated in all plants grown in potted soil treated with fly ash-amended compost than in those grown in soil or soil treated with organic manure. Contrary to expectation Ca in fly ash is not effectively used by plants as the latter treated with ash- amended compost is not rich in Ca. This suggests that Ca may be tied up as insoluble CaSO{sub 4} in the manure so that it may not be bioavailable to the plant. Uptake of boron by bean, bell pepper and egg plant is considerably higher than that absorbed by corn, sorghum and greens resulting in poor yield for the former.

Menon, M.P.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Investigation on the utilization of coal fly ash as amendment to compost for vegetation in acid soil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Application of fly ash-amended composts as manure enhances the crop yield of certain plants like corn, sorghum, collard and mustard greens. Organic compost made out of grass and leaves (home-made) is better than the commercial composts for amendment with fly ash. A 20--40% fly ash in the amended compost and a soil to ash-amended compost ratio of 3:1 are recommended for making bed for plantation. Organic compost mixed with fly ash, due to reduced porosity, will help the bed to retain water and conserve water supply to plants. Organic compost will release to the manure additional quantities of N, P, and S that are not substantially available in fly ash. It appears that chemical reaction and/or mineralization occurs during composting of fly ash with organic manure to release more N, P, K and S to the system. Potassium is more elevated in all plants grown in potted soil treated with fly ash-amended compost than in those grown in soil or soil treated with organic manure. Contrary to expectation Ca in fly ash is not effectively used by plants as the latter treated with ash- amended compost is not rich in Ca. This suggests that Ca may be tied up as insoluble CaSO{sub 4} in the manure so that it may not be bioavailable to the plant. Uptake of boron by bean, bell pepper and egg plant is considerably higher than that absorbed by corn, sorghum and greens resulting in poor yield for the former.

Menon, M.P.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Thermal treatment for recovery of manganese and zinc from zinc-carbon and alkaline spent batteries  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We separated Zn from Mn in zinc-carbon and alkaline batteries after removal of Hg. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Almost total removal of Hg is achieved at low temperature in air. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nitrogen atmosphere is needed to reduce zinc and to permit its volatilization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A high grade Zn concentrate was obtained with a high recovery at 1000-1200 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The grade of Mn in the residue was enhanced with complete recovery. - Abstract: The aim of this paper is the recovery of manganese and zinc from a mixture of zinc-carbon and alkaline spent batteries, containing 40.9% of Mn and 30.1% of Zn, after preliminary physical treatment followed by removal of mercury. Separation of the metals has been carried out on the basis of their different boiling points, being 357 Degree-Sign C and 906 Degree-Sign C the boiling point of mercury and zinc and 1564 Degree-Sign C the melting point of Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Characterization by chemical analysis, TGA/DTA and X-ray powder diffraction of the mixture has been carried out after comminution sieving and shaking table treatment to remove the anodic collectors and most of chlorides contained in the mixture. The mixture has been roasted at various temperatures and resident times in a flow of air to set the best conditions to remove mercury that were 400 Degree-Sign C and 10 min. After that, the flow of air has been turned into a nitrogen one (inert atmosphere) and the temperatures raised, thus permitting the zinc oxide to be reduced to metallic zinc by the carbon present in the original mixture and recovered after volatilization as a high grade concentrate, while manganese was left in the residue. The recovery and the grade of the two metals, at 1000 Degree-Sign C and 30 min residence time, were 84% and 100% for zinc and 85% and 63% for manganese, respectively. The recovery of zinc increased to 99% with a grade of 97% at 1200 Degree-Sign C and 30 min residence time, while the recovery and grade of manganese were 86% and 87%, respectively, at that temperature. Moreover, the chlorinated compounds that could form by the combustion of the plastics contained in the spent batteries, are destroyed at the temperature required by the process.

Belardi, G. [Institute for Environmental Engineering and Geosciences (CNR) Area della Ricerca CNR, via Salaria km 29,300, Monterotondo, 00016 Rome (Italy); Lavecchia, R.; Medici, F. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Materials and Environment, Sapienza University of Rome, via Eudossiana 84, 00184 Rome (Italy); Piga, L., E-mail: luigi.piga@uniroma1.it [Department of Chemical Engineering, Materials and Environment, Sapienza University of Rome, via Eudossiana 84, 00184 Rome (Italy)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

357

Development of New Industrial Ashalloy Material Using Fly-Ash Cenospheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metal matrix composites can provide improved functional properties compared to solid metal castings, while saving production energy and raw material costs in the process. In particular, ash-derived metal matrix composites can provide utilities a high value-added market for their coal fly ash. This report describes research on a promising manufacturing process for one such application -- pressure infiltration techniques to produce lead-ash composites for automotive battery applications.

1997-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

358

The Role of High Calcium Fly Ashes in Controlling Alkali-Silica Reactions in Concrete  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The alkali-silica reaction (ASR) is a deleterious chemical reaction that can result in the deterioration of concrete structures. This report builds upon the results of a research and development study, funded by a broadly-based multi-national industry consortium, that is developing an engineering database on the long-term effectiveness of Class F fly ash and other supplementary cementing materials (SCMs) in counteracting ASR in concrete.

2002-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

359

Potential Health Effects of Crystalline Silica Exposures from Coal Fly Ash: A Literature Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The amount of crystalline silica in coal fly ash (CFA) depends on a variety of factors, including the amount of silica in the pre-combustion coal, the combustion process, and emission control technologies among others. Occupational exposures to crystalline silica in CFA are related to these factors as well as activities associated with exposures and durations of exposure. This review summarizes the occupational and environmental health literature relevant to the presence of crystalline silica in CFA from...

2006-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

360

Fly ash properties and mercury sorbent affect mercury release from curing concrete  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The release of mercury from concrete containing fly ashes from various generator boilers and powdered activated carbon sorbent used to capture mercury was measured in laboratory experiments. Release of gaseous mercury from these concretes was less than 0.31% of the total quantity of mercury present. The observed gaseous emissions of mercury during the curing process demonstrated a dependency on the organic carbon content of the fly ash, with mercury release decreasing with increasing carbon content. Further, lower gaseous emissions of mercury were observed for concretes incorporating ash containing activated carbon sorbent than would be expected based on the observed association with organic carbon, suggesting that the powdered activated carbon more tightly binds the mercury as compared to unburned carbon in the ash. Following the initial 28-day curing interval, mercury release diminished with time. In separate leaching experiments, average mercury concentrations leached from fly ash concretes were less than 4.1 ng/L after 18 h and 7 days, demonstrating that less than 0.02% of the mercury was released during leaching. 25 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

Danold W. Golightly; Chin-Min Cheng; Linda K. Weavers; Harold W. Walker; William E. Wolfe [State University, Columbus, OH (United States). Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Geodetic Science

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "af alkaline fly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

File:Kite Flying Lesson Plan.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kite Flying Lesson Plan.pdf Kite Flying Lesson Plan.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:Kite Flying Lesson Plan.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 3 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 223 KB, MIME type: application/pdf, 3 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 18:10, 2 January 2014 Thumbnail for version as of 18:10, 2 January 2014 1,275 × 1,650, 3 pages (223 KB) Foteri (Talk | contribs) Category:Wind for Schools Portal CurriculaCategory:Wind for Schools Elementary School Curricula You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup

362

Fly ash utilization in McLean County, North Dakota. Topical report, Task 7.25  

SciTech Connect

In 1989, the McLean County Commissioners requested assistance from personnel at the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) with the construction of a section of road and a boat ramp in their county. Assistance was sought from the EERC because the county`s construction plans called for partial replacement of the lime and portland cement normally used for soil stabilization with fly ash. Since the EERC had recently conducted several research projects dealing with the use of coal combustion by-products for road construction, the commissioners requested that EERC personnel help to determine appropriate formulas for the stabilized soil mixtures to be used for both the road and boat ramp applications. An additional incentive was provided when the management of the Coal Creek Power Plant offered to donate the necessary fly ash at no cost. This project was performed as a joint venture between McLean County and the EERC. The EERC was primarily responsible for conducting a laboratory testing program to develop soil stabilization mixtures for the two construction activities. These mixtures were to contain a relatively high percentage of fly ash and to exhibit sufficient strength and durability so that the road and boat ramp would both have a service life of 20 years or more. McLean County would be primarily responsible for the road and boat ramp construction activities. The funding for the EERC portion of the project was provided by the US Department of Energy through a joint venture support program.

Moretti, C.J.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Properties of concrete incorporating high volumes of ASTM Class F fly ash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents the results of research performed in developing high-volume fly ash (HVFA) concrete incorporating ASTM Type I cement and ASTM Class F fly ash from Big Brown Power Plant of TU Electric, Texas. In HVFA concrete, the proportion of fly ash was 58 percent by weight of the total cementitious materials, the water and cement content were kept low at 115 and 155 k g/M3 , respectively. A broad range of engineering properties was investigated including compressive strength, flexural strength, splitting-tensile strength, Young's modulus of elasticity, drying shrinkage, resistance to freeze-thaw cycling, pore structure and activation energy. A preliminary economic analysis was also performed on HVFA concrete. The HVFA concrete evaluated in this study had satisfactory workability and setting characteristics. It also exhibited excellent mechanical properties with satisfactory early age strength and good long-term strength development. The HVFA concrete had relatively low drying shrinkage and a very fine pore system. Excellent durability under freeze-thaw cycling was also found for the air-entrained HVFA concrete. Results from activation energy test show that strength gain of the HVFA concrete under isothermal curing conditions could be modeled appropriately using Plowman's logarithmic strength-age model. The relative strength-maturity relationship was established for the HVFA concrete containing various percentages of additional gypsum. The HVFA concrete investigated was determined to be cost effective. It was shown that about two and half dollars per cubic meter could be saved through savings on portland cement.

Li, Wei Tung

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Reactive transport modelling of the interaction of fission product ground contamination with alkaline and cementitious leachates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fission products Cs-137 and Sr-90 are amongst the most common radionuclides occurring in ground contamination at the UK civil nuclear sites. Such contamination is often associated with alkaline liquids and the mobility of these fission products may be affected by these chemical conditions. Similar geochemical effects may also result from cementitious leachate associated with building foundations and the use of grouts to remediate ground contamination. The behaviour of fission products in these scenarios is a complex interaction of hydrogeological and geochemical processes. A suite of modelling tools have been developed to investigate the behaviour of a radioactive plume containing Cs and Sr. Firstly the effects of sorption due to cementitious groundwater is modelled using PHREEQC. This chemical model is then incorporated into PHAST for the 3-D reactive solute transport modeling. Results are presented for a generic scenario including features and processes that are likely to be relevant to a number of civil UK nuclear sites. Initial results show that modelling can be a very cost-effective means to study the complex hydrogeological and geochemical processes involved. Modelling can help predict the mobility of contaminants in a range of site end point scenarios, and in assessing the consequences of decommissioning activities. (authors)

Kwong, S.; Small, J. [Nexia Solutions Ltd, The British Technology Centre, Sellafield, Seascale, CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research involving collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is to explore new approaches to the separation of sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrate, and other sodium salts from high-level alkaline tank waste. The principal potential benefit is a major reduction in disposed waste volume, obviating the building of expensive new waste tanks and reducing the costs of vitrification. Principles of ion recognition are being researched toward discovery of liquid-liquid extraction systems that selectively separate sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate from other waste components. The successful concept of pseudo hydroxide extraction using fluorinated alcohols and phenols is being developed at ORNL and PNNL toward a greater understanding of the controlling equilibria, role of solvation, and of synergistic effects involving crown ethers. Synthesis efforts are being directed toward enhanced sodium binding by crown ethers, both neutral and proton-ionizable. Studies with real tank waste at PNNL will provide feedback toward solvent compositions that have promising properties.

Moyer, Bruce A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Custelcean, Radu; Delmau, Laetitia H.; Engle, Nancy L.; Kang, Hyun-Ah; Keever, Tamara J.; Marchand, Alan P.; Gadthula, Srinivas; Gore, Vinayak K.; Huang, Zilin; Sivappa, Rasapalli; Tirunahari, Pavan K.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lumetta, Gregg J.

2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

366

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research involving collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is to explore new approaches to the separation of sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrate, and other sodium salts from high-level alkaline tank waste. The principal potential benefit is a major reduction in disposed waste volume, obviating the building of expensive new waste tanks and reducing the costs of low-activity waste immobilization. Principles of ion recognition are being researched toward discovery of liquid-liquid extraction systems that selectively separate sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate from other waste components. The successful concept of pseudohydroxide extraction using fluorinated alcohols and phenols is being developed at ORNL and PNNL toward a greater understanding of the controlling equilibria, role of solvation, and of synergistic effects involving crown ethers. Synthesis efforts are being directed toward enhanced sodium binding by crown ethers, both neutral and proton-ionizable. Studies with real tank waste at PNNL will provide feedback toward solvent compositions that have promising properties.

Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Moyer, Bruce A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Process for depositing epitaxial alkaline earth oxide onto a substrate and structures prepared with the process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process and structure involving a silicon substrate utilize molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and/or electron beam evaporation methods and an ultra-high vacuum facility to grow a layup of epitaxial alkaline earth oxide films upon the substrate surface. By selecting metal constituents for the oxides and in the appropriate proportions so that the lattice parameter of each oxide grown closely approximates that of the substrate or base layer upon which oxide is grown, lattice strain at the film/film or film/substrate interface of adjacent films is appreciably reduced or relieved. Moreover, by selecting constituents for the oxides so that the lattice parameters of the materials of adjacent oxide films either increase or decrease in size from one parameter to another parameter, a graded layup of films can be grown (with reduced strain levels therebetween) so that the outer film has a lattice parameter which closely approximates that of, and thus accomodates the epitaxial growth of, a pervoskite chosen to be grown upon the outer film.

McKee, Rodney A. (Kingston, TN); Walker, Frederick J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Modeling experimental results of diffusion of alkaline solutions through a compacted bentonite barrier  

SciTech Connect

The interaction between concrete/cement and swelling clay (bentonite) has been modeled in the context of engineered barrier systems for deep geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The geochemical transformations observed in laboratory diffusion experiments at 60 and 90 {sup o}C between bentonite and different high-pH solutions (K-Na-OH and Ca(OH){sub 2}-saturated) were reconciled with the reactive transport code CrunchFlow. For K-Na-OH solutions (pH = 13.5 at 25 {sup o}C) partial dissolution of montmorillonite and precipitation of Mg-silicates (talc-like), hydrotalcite and brucite at the interface are predicted at 60 {sup o}C, while at 90 {sup o}C the alteration is wider. Alkaline cations diffused beyond the mineralogical alteration zone by means of exchange with Mg{sup 2+} in the interlayer region of montmorillonite. Very slow reactivity and minor alteration of the clay are predicted in the Ca(OH){sub 2}-bentonite system. The model is a reasonable description of the experiments but also demonstrates the difficulties in modeling processes operating at a small scale under a diffusive regime.

Fernandez, Raul, E-mail: raul.fernandez@ietcc.csic.e [Instituto Eduardo Torroja de Ciencias de la Construccion (CSIC), C/Serrano Galvache, 4, 28033 Madrid (Spain); Institut fuer Geologie, Universitaet Bern, Baltzerstrasse 3, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); Cuevas, Jaime [Dpto. Geologia y Geoquimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Campus Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Maeder, Urs K. [Institut fuer Geologie, Universitaet Bern, Baltzerstrasse 3, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

369

Palladium and Tin Alloyed Catalysts for the Ethanol Oxidation Reaction in an Alkaline Medium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we present a study of a series of carbon-supported Pd-Sn binary alloyed catalysts prepared through a modified Polyol method as anode electrocatalysts for direct ethanol fuel cell reactions in an alkaline medium. Transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy equipped with electron energy loss spectroscopy were used to characterize the Pd-Sn/C catalysts, where homogeneous Pd-Sn alloys were determined to be present with the surface Sn being partially oxidized. Among various Pd-Sn catalysts, Pd{sub 86}Sn{sub 14}/C catalysts showed much enhanced current densities in cyclic voltammetric and chronoamperometric measurements, compared to commercial Pd/C (Johnson Matthey). The overall rate law of ethanol oxidation reaction for both Pd{sub 86}Sn{sub 14}/C and commercial Pd/C were also determined, which clearly showed that Pd{sub 86}Sn{sub 14}/C was more favorable in high ethanol concentration and/or high pH environment. Density functional theory calculations also confirmed Pd-Sn alloy structures would result in lower reaction energies for the dehydrogenation of ethanol, compared to the pure Pd crystal.

Su D.; Du W.; Mackenzie K.E.; Milano D.F.; Deskins N.A.; Teng X.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Data:F936b9f4-0442-4860-b4e6-4af17ad2e1b6 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6b9f4-0442-4860-b4e6-4af17ad2e1b6 6b9f4-0442-4860-b4e6-4af17ad2e1b6 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Singing River Elec Pwr Assn (Mississippi) Effective date: 2009/12/04 End date if known: Rate name: Security Lighting MV 175 W Sector: Lighting Description: *Subject to power cost adjustment, tax expense adjustment, and an environmental compliance charge. Source or reference: http://www.singingriver.com/Files/R-18.pdf Source Parent: Comments Energy Adjustment is Power Cost Adjustment plus Environmental Clause plus Regulatory Adjustment Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW):

371

Data:2bb5564e-25f4-49a0-af9d-6175cb16f68e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

564e-25f4-49a0-af9d-6175cb16f68e 564e-25f4-49a0-af9d-6175cb16f68e No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Steuben County Rural E M C Effective date: 2012/02/01 End date if known: Rate name: Security and Street Light Services: High Pressure Sodium 100W Sector: Lighting Description: Security and Street Light Services: High Pressure Sodium 100W. Lamps Owned and maintained by the Corporation. Source or reference: http://www.remcsteuben.com/sites/remcsteuben.coopwebbuilder.com/files/current_rate_schedule-_03-2012.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW):

372

Data:0b69f86b-5c36-4af2-b736-ccd9d8074c6a | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5c36-4af2-b736-ccd9d8074c6a 5c36-4af2-b736-ccd9d8074c6a No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Little Ocmulgee El Member Corp Effective date: 2009/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: 400 watt HPS, MV, MH - Directional, Non-Metered Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Additional fees may be charged Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous

373

Data:89aced84-c9f9-43de-a576-f048ace977af | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

aced84-c9f9-43de-a576-f048ace977af aced84-c9f9-43de-a576-f048ace977af No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Howard Greeley Rural P P D Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Schedule V town residential and commercial Sector: Commercial Description: Source or reference: Ilinois State University Rate binder # 10 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

374

Data:B7c7d80c-bf58-466f-82bb-566ac3c36af0 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d80c-bf58-466f-82bb-566ac3c36af0 d80c-bf58-466f-82bb-566ac3c36af0 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Trico Electric Cooperative Inc Effective date: 2009/08/01 End date if known: Rate name: Street Lighting-180 Watt LPS Sector: Commercial Description: *Applicable for lighting public streets,alleys and public parks. Subject to tax and wholesale power cost. Source or reference: http://www.trico.coop/images/TRICO_SL1.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage

375

Data:2c4af026-56fa-44bf-93f0-007bc0646751 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

af026-56fa-44bf-93f0-007bc0646751 af026-56fa-44bf-93f0-007bc0646751 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Village of Davenport, Nebraska (Utility Company) Effective date: 2012/11/11 End date if known: Rate name: Area Lighting MV 175 Watt Metered Sector: Lighting Description: Area/directional lighting of farmyards, backyards, patios, parking lots, storage yards, trailer courts, industrial sites, schools churches, apartments, businesses and many other applications where lighting is needed for identification, merchandising, environment, aesthetics, safety, security, protection or convenience.

376

Data:C98d8551-b87e-475f-a90b-127018426af9 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d8551-b87e-475f-a90b-127018426af9 d8551-b87e-475f-a90b-127018426af9 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Leavenworth-Jefferson E C, Inc Effective date: 2010/05/01 End date if known: Rate name: Single Phase General Service Sector: Commercial Description: This rate is available for single phase service of single character. Single Phase, alternating current, 60 cycle, available voltage. Source or reference: Rate Binder #7 (Illinois State University) Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months):

377

Data:5d66b6af-3977-449d-a71d-e628a0bfde49 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6b6af-3977-449d-a71d-e628a0bfde49 6b6af-3977-449d-a71d-e628a0bfde49 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Somerset Rural Elec Coop, Inc Effective date: 2000/04/15 End date if known: Rate name: Interruptible Service Rider, Industrial Sector: Industrial Description: * Available to consumers upon request taking service under schedule LP and contracting for a generation and transmission load of 100kW or more. Monthly Interruptibilite Capacity Credit shall not apply unless the consumer's interruptible demand is at least 50 kW. Source or reference: Rate binder # 4(Illinios State University)

378

Data:963d8ace-d08d-487d-8f71-45bf39af9c00 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ace-d08d-487d-8f71-45bf39af9c00 ace-d08d-487d-8f71-45bf39af9c00 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Alabama Power Co Effective date: 2009/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: 100 W HIGH PRESSURE OFF ROAD LUMINIARIES Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.alabamapower.com/pricing/pdf/FPL.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

379

Data:6c0893bc-c5c0-41af-8b16-3a14657cc090 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

bc-c5c0-41af-8b16-3a14657cc090 bc-c5c0-41af-8b16-3a14657cc090 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Coos-Curry Electric Coop, Inc Effective date: 2011/12/22 End date if known: Rate name: Security Lighting, 200 Watt HPSF Sector: Lighting Description: * For yard or security lighting. Source or reference: Rate binder #4 (Illinois State University) Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring:

380

Data:Fdaeb9af-0027-4d11-a9b9-5acec97f58ab | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fdaeb9af-0027-4d11-a9b9-5acec97f58ab Fdaeb9af-0027-4d11-a9b9-5acec97f58ab No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Adams Electric Coop Effective date: 2009/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Rate Schedule SL (Security Lighting) (Standard Fixtures 400 Watt HPS) Sector: Lighting Description: Available to all cooperative members. Standard fixtures 400 watt HPS. Source or reference: Rate Binder #7 (Illinois State University) Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V):

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381

Data:35304023-af4d-4256-97e9-4d5bb83aab01 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-af4d-4256-97e9-4d5bb83aab01 -af4d-4256-97e9-4d5bb83aab01 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Rolling Hills Electric Coop Effective date: 2010/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Private Street and Area Lighting (PSL-10) metered MV 250W Sector: Lighting Description: http://rollinghills.coopwebbuilder.com/sites/rollinghills.coopwebbuilder.com/files/rate_tariffs.pdf Source or reference: http://rollinghills.coopwebbuilder.com/sites/rollinghills.coopwebbuilder.com/files/rate_tariffs.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months):

382

Data:069c5c98-552e-46af-8588-d1a6d19b6e90 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

069c5c98-552e-46af-8588-d1a6d19b6e90 069c5c98-552e-46af-8588-d1a6d19b6e90 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Sand Mountain Electric Coop Effective date: 2013/05/01 End date if known: Rate name: Schedule SMSD - Manufacturing Service Sector: Industrial Description: Source or reference: Illinois State University Archive Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

383

Data:2a460ec1-da39-4574-b9c5-103f1af603b7 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0ec1-da39-4574-b9c5-103f1af603b7 0ec1-da39-4574-b9c5-103f1af603b7 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: East Central Oklahoma Elec Coop Inc Effective date: 1996/05/02 End date if known: Rate name: Commercial Time of Use (Single-Phase), Schedule TOU-C Sector: Commercial Description: Business, industrial and non-residential service. Minimum Charge shall be the highest of: (a) Customer Charge of 10.00; or (b) As prescribed by the line extension policy of the rules and regulations of the Cooperative Subject to Power Cost Adjustment and Tax Adjustment Source or reference: Rates Binder B #4

384

Data:3310e7de-f4c4-4efe-8e5a-f0cb1ab95150 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

de-f4c4-4efe-8e5a-f0cb1ab95150 de-f4c4-4efe-8e5a-f0cb1ab95150 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Russellville, Kentucky (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Commercial Class 40 Sector: Commercial Description: Source or reference: http://www.russepb.com/rates.htm Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous

385

Data:C93b7585-23dd-4007-af1b-f101d2624bb1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

85-23dd-4007-af1b-f101d2624bb1 85-23dd-4007-af1b-f101d2624bb1 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Duncan, Oklahoma (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Security Lighting- (250W SV on existing 35 ft. wood Pole- Overheard Wiring) Sector: Lighting Description: This rate schedule is available on an annual basis to any customer for illumination of outdoor areas. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Rate Binder Ted #9 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh):

386

Data:Bcf25f00-7fce-4bb7-b23a-f9576993f97d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0-7fce-4bb7-b23a-f9576993f97d 0-7fce-4bb7-b23a-f9576993f97d No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Altamaha Electric Member Corp Effective date: 2011/05/01 End date if known: Rate name: Street Lighting Service STL-8 (400W HPS) Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable to municipal or local governmental street lighting service by means of mercury vapor or high pressure sodium lamps. Service will be rendered only at locations that, in the opinion of the Cooperative, are readily accessible for maintenance. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Applicability

387

Data:42f77724-394f-4af3-873a-ae25dd294a91 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7724-394f-4af3-873a-ae25dd294a91 7724-394f-4af3-873a-ae25dd294a91 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Mt Wheeler Power, Inc Effective date: 2012/01/10 End date if known: Rate name: Irrigation Rate (Off-Peak Rate) Sector: Commercial Description: With Off-Peak Rate, irrigators can waive the monthly demand charge if they can schedule their irrigation times with the cooperative's designated off-peak time periods. This includes some afternoon hours part of the year, and nighttime hours all year. If any usage is recorded during on-peak time periods, the demand charge is also billed.

388

Data:59030ce0-1bb0-4287-bbc3-8540d2af911e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-1bb0-4287-bbc3-8540d2af911e -1bb0-4287-bbc3-8540d2af911e No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: GreyStone Power Corporation Effective date: 2008/11/01 End date if known: Rate name: Ball Park Metered Outdoor Lighting Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.greystonepower.com/UploadedFiles/pdf/rate%2017.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous

389

Data:E0a904e4-035e-472e-af3f-7ee0cd1d5ebd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4e4-035e-472e-af3f-7ee0cd1d5ebd 4e4-035e-472e-af3f-7ee0cd1d5ebd No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Borough of Quakertown, Pennsylvania (Utility Company) Effective date: 2012/09/26 End date if known: Rate name: Industrial service rate (2) V2 Sector: Industrial Description: Source or reference: Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous

390

Data:Db758f51-b7a3-4bd4-adfb-4af27ab0ec42 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Db758f51-b7a3-4bd4-adfb-4af27ab0ec42 Db758f51-b7a3-4bd4-adfb-4af27ab0ec42 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Pataula Electric Member Corp Effective date: 1997/12/01 End date if known: Rate name: Schedule MPS - Municipal Pumping Service Sector: Description: Applicable to all electric service for pumping and other uses incidental to the operation of a municipal water works or sewage disposal plant. Source or reference: http://facts.psc.state.ga.us/Public/GetDocument.aspx?ID=128532 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh)

391

Data:7b0e1af4-d59b-4700-9d74-39fc803f9b4d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

e1af4-d59b-4700-9d74-39fc803f9b4d e1af4-d59b-4700-9d74-39fc803f9b4d No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Bangor Hydro-Electric Co Effective date: 2012/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Municipal Incandescent-295 watts Sector: Lighting Description: Energy service only to municipalities owning, operating, and maintaining a street lighting system and limited to locations where secondary service is available. Traffic control lighting service may be rendered under this rate providing the customer furnishes the equipment. Customers taking service under this rate schedule are responsible for paying both Distribution Service and Stranded Cost.

392

Data:0133591f-42a3-40a2-bf96-af17cc68fd03 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

91f-42a3-40a2-bf96-af17cc68fd03 91f-42a3-40a2-bf96-af17cc68fd03 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Village of Lyndonville, Vermont (Utility Company) Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Street Lighting (250 W HP Sodium without Pole) Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

393

Data:26766b49-a23f-4662-bb0f-af496e6ab65f | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

66b49-a23f-4662-bb0f-af496e6ab65f 66b49-a23f-4662-bb0f-af496e6ab65f No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Oregon Trail El Cons Coop, Inc Effective date: 2011/10/01 End date if known: Rate name: Municipal-Owned Lighting - Sodium Vapor 70W, Schedule ML Sector: Lighting Description: Available in OTEC service territory for OTEC-owned municipal and highway lighting installed on existing facilities, subject to policies as established by the Board of Directors. Source or reference: http://www.otecc.com/rates.aspx Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW):

394

Data:4c206ceb-b4af-4f22-bf8b-df0caebefaae | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ceb-b4af-4f22-bf8b-df0caebefaae ceb-b4af-4f22-bf8b-df0caebefaae No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Paris, Tennessee (Utility Company) Effective date: 2012/10/01 End date if known: Rate name: Outdoor Lighting- LS- Part B (400MV or Incandescent) Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable for outdoor lighting for individual customers. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Rate Binder Ted #11 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V):

395

Data:99df3a59-78af-4da7-8083-753a727ac125 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

78af-4da7-8083-753a727ac125 78af-4da7-8083-753a727ac125 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Cleco Power LLC Effective date: 2011/02/01 End date if known: Rate name: Company-Owned Fixture - Floodlights 750 Watt HPS Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: www.cleco.com Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

396

Data:B5a349af-ccd1-4308-b8b3-613c9717c1d6 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9af-ccd1-4308-b8b3-613c9717c1d6 9af-ccd1-4308-b8b3-613c9717c1d6 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Mohave Electric Cooperative, Inc Effective date: 2012/09/01 End date if known: Rate name: Rate L Substation Rate Sector: Industrial Description: Available to commercial or industrial customers with demands exceeding 100 kW. A discount of 5% is applied to demand and energy charges for substation customers as defined as service taken directly from the low side bus of the distribution substation or where the customer requests multiple points of delivery. Source or reference: http://mohaveelectric.coopwebbuilder.com/content/rates

397

Data:56a0b8b5-d3f1-4281-8b9c-150b169af7d7 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b8b5-d3f1-4281-8b9c-150b169af7d7 b8b5-d3f1-4281-8b9c-150b169af7d7 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Electrical Dist No3 Pinal Cnty Effective date: 2012/12/19 End date if known: Rate name: RATE NO. 09 DUSK TO DAWN LIGHTING-High Pressure Sodium 250W Sector: Lighting Description: Applicability: To all customers for the purposes of outdoor lighting other than street and highway lighting service of privately owned property. Electric service is provided from dusk to dawn. ED3 will install, own, operate and maintain the complete lighting installation, including lamp replacements.

398

Data:Ea38227f-e85d-4631-9e5d-f40b1e4301af | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

227f-e85d-4631-9e5d-f40b1e4301af 227f-e85d-4631-9e5d-f40b1e4301af No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Georgetown, Texas (Utility Company) Effective date: 2011/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Municipal Water & Wastewater Pumping Sector: Commercial Description: *The Power Cost Adjustment is shown in the Flat rate adjustment field. Source or reference: http://billing.georgetown.org/rates/ Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V):

399

Data:C658e468-a7af-40c6-ae00-429e13ef346c | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8e468-a7af-40c6-ae00-429e13ef346c 8e468-a7af-40c6-ae00-429e13ef346c No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Bonneville Power Admin Effective date: 2011/10/01 End date if known: 2013/09/30 Rate name: PF - 12 Exchange Sector: Residential Description: This schedule is available for the contract purchase of Firm Requirements Power pursuant to section 5(b) of the Northwest Power Act. Firm Requirements Power may be purchased for use within the Pacific Northwest by public bodies, cooperatives, and Federal agencies for resale to ultimate consumers, for direct consumption, and for Construction, Test and Start- Up, and Station Service.

400

Data:85b5084d-c5d9-4347-aa5e-2af17122e91d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

84d-c5d9-4347-aa5e-2af17122e91d 84d-c5d9-4347-aa5e-2af17122e91d No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Glasgow, Kentucky (Utility Company) Effective date: 2012/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Outdoor Light- 250W High Pressure Sodium Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.glasgowepb.net/EPBrates.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "af alkaline fly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Data:3cfa9a60-9648-4189-ab29-c401a52c9af4 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a60-9648-4189-ab29-c401a52c9af4 a60-9648-4189-ab29-c401a52c9af4 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Village of Belmont, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Effective date: 2005/01/21 End date if known: Rate name: Rg-1 Residential Service Three Phase Sector: Residential Description: This rate will be applied to residential single phase customers for ordinary household purposes. Single-Phase motors may not exceed 5 horsepower individual-rated capacity without utility permission. Fixed Monthly Charge includes Commitment to Community Rider: $1.00 per customer per month Source or reference: http://psc.wi.gov/apps40/tariffs/viewfile.aspx?type=electric&id=440

402

Data:D2a0af69-9f80-45bc-943c-2011ecbce8cb | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

af69-9f80-45bc-943c-2011ecbce8cb af69-9f80-45bc-943c-2011ecbce8cb No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Auburn Board of Public Works Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Urban Electric Space Heating(Single Phase-Winter) Sector: Description: To customers within the corporate limits of the city of Auburn, NE as a rider to the General Service or Demand Service where only electric heating, cooling, and electric water heating, and associated equipment are connected as a separate service. Source or reference: http://auburnbpw.com/wp-content/files/2012_Electric_Rates.pdf

403

Data:304c7bdb-9ac5-4bea-ab51-af99e3f22ac3 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

bdb-9ac5-4bea-ab51-af99e3f22ac3 bdb-9ac5-4bea-ab51-af99e3f22ac3 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Cuming County Public Pwr Dist Effective date: 2011/12/14 End date if known: Rate name: Security Lighting Unmetered Lights 400W MV Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: Ilinois State University Rate binder # 10 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

404

Data:6af307a9-ffe0-4158-8b87-8be392c2fe7d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

af307a9-ffe0-4158-8b87-8be392c2fe7d af307a9-ffe0-4158-8b87-8be392c2fe7d No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: MidAmerican Energy Co Effective date: 2012/03/02 End date if known: Rate name: Large General Service, Base Use at Primary Voltage Price Schedules LPN and APN Sector: Industrial Description: APPLICABLE: At the option of the customer, to all electric service required on premises by customer, subject to applicable terms and conditions of the Company's Electric Service Policies and Electric Rate Application. Applicable to standby or supplementary service (under written agreement only) in conjunction with applicable Company riders for such service.

405

Data:92b84ab0-66ab-46f2-a8af-fe33421c676e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4ab0-66ab-46f2-a8af-fe33421c676e 4ab0-66ab-46f2-a8af-fe33421c676e No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Bangor Hydro-Electric Co Effective date: 2012/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Incandescent Lighting-405 watts Sector: Lighting Description: Service under this rate is available for street and area lighting service installations, maintenance and use of energy, and traffic control lighting service provided the customer furnishes the equipment. Customers taking service under this rate schedule are responsible for paying both Distribution Service and Stranded Cost. bundled TD&S monthly rate included

406

Data:Ccedef36-f73d-46af-87df-c8acc18c8a3b | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ccedef36-f73d-46af-87df-c8acc18c8a3b Ccedef36-f73d-46af-87df-c8acc18c8a3b No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Sand Mountain Electric Coop Effective date: 2013/05/01 End date if known: Rate name: Schedule GSB Sector: Commercial Description: Source or reference: Illinois State University Archive Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

407

Data:00ce79c7-0cf6-4814-af4b-c890e5586c1b | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0cf6-4814-af4b-c890e5586c1b 0cf6-4814-af4b-c890e5586c1b No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Moorhead, Minnesota (Utility Company) Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Interruptible Curtailable Load Sector: Description: Available to General Service customers with a minimum of 100 kW of interruptible electrical load. Service under these rates requires conformance with MPS' Electric Service Rules and Regulations. Customers agree to manually curtail demand to a specified maximum demand level during the utility's curtailment period. General Service rate applies with credit for interruption as follows:

408

Data:Df8e1df8-1796-4d76-b03a-f654e0fcfae9 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

e1df8-1796-4d76-b03a-f654e0fcfae9 e1df8-1796-4d76-b03a-f654e0fcfae9 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Public Service Elec & Gas Co Effective date: 2010/06/07 End date if known: Rate name: 10000 lumens NEMA Head Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.pseg.com/family/pseandg/tariffs/electric/pdf/electric_tariff.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous

409

Data:Df2a155a-c13e-40af-894c-3badb82a245f | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a155a-c13e-40af-894c-3badb82a245f a155a-c13e-40af-894c-3badb82a245f No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Lower Yellowstone R E A, Inc Effective date: 2008/11/01 End date if known: Rate name: Net Metering Rate Schedule - Base #3 Sector: Commercial Description: Includes 320A or greater services with over 5 kW of generating capacity. Source or reference: Illinois State University Archives Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

410

Data:B3277137-3d4e-4db0-8348-6d2c1af48efb | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7-3d4e-4db0-8348-6d2c1af48efb 7-3d4e-4db0-8348-6d2c1af48efb No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Tillamook Peoples Utility Dist Effective date: 2000/11/01 End date if known: Rate name: AREA LIGHTING 100 watt high pressure sodium Sector: Lighting Description: Available to all customers for dusk to dawn outdoor area lighting not served under street lighting contract. Service under this schedule is also available for television amplifiers for cable systems, and other flat rate services. Special light poles $1.00 per month Source or reference: http://www.tpud.org/servicesAndBilling/rateSchedules.aspx

411

Data:E6ef5af2-eba1-4f6a-9ba2-3492960faa16 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ef5af2-eba1-4f6a-9ba2-3492960faa16 ef5af2-eba1-4f6a-9ba2-3492960faa16 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Gastonia, North Carolina (Utility Company) Effective date: 2012/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: SCHEDULE CS - Small Commercial Service Sector: Commercial Description: Source or reference: Rates Binder A Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

412

Data:37f3d550-fae7-47f6-8e01-1580af1228f3 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d550-fae7-47f6-8e01-1580af1228f3 d550-fae7-47f6-8e01-1580af1228f3 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Southwestern Electric Power Co (Louisiana) Effective date: 2013/03/01 End date if known: Rate name: Municipal Street and Parkway Lighting - Closed offering - 400 Watt MV Energy Only Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.swepco.com/global/utilities/lib/docs/ratesandtariffs/Louisiana/LouisianaA_06_06_2013.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months):

413

Data:C10c0c69-1af0-4fd0-b3cf-45093932f0a0 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

c0c69-1af0-4fd0-b3cf-45093932f0a0 c0c69-1af0-4fd0-b3cf-45093932f0a0 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Adams Electric Coop Effective date: 2009/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Rate Schedule LM-C (Load Management Credits)(Controlled water heater) Sector: Commercial Description: Available to cooperative members with one or more electric water heaters and/or central air conditioners except for limitations listed in the Billing Provisions below. $8.00 credit per month per controlled water heater (12 months per year) (LMCWH)- Minimum monthly usage of 400 kilowatt-hours (kwh) is required.

414

Data:6cdf94d5-d609-4140-af6a-fd3cb32bce38 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cdf94d5-d609-4140-af6a-fd3cb32bce38 cdf94d5-d609-4140-af6a-fd3cb32bce38 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Harmon Electric Assn Inc Effective date: 2008/10/01 End date if known: Rate name: 100 Watt HPS Sector: Lighting Description: * Available to all customers for illumination of outdoor areas at any point on or near the Association's distribution lines. The cost of purchased power adjustment will be computed using 70kWh per light per month. Source or reference: Rate binder # 4 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh)

415

Data:3dc51ed5-91c8-464f-b50e-8af7ff5ccb32 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ed5-91c8-464f-b50e-8af7ff5ccb32 ed5-91c8-464f-b50e-8af7ff5ccb32 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Thomaston, Georgia (Utility Company) Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Industrial Service Sector: Industrial Description: Applicable to all electric service of one standard voltage required on the customer's premises,delivered at one point and metered at or compensated to that voltage for any customer who meets the following criteria: 1.An existing customer must have been served under schedule I-1 or schedule LMSS-1, prior to taking service under this schedule I-2.

416

Data:998a6b93-6a40-4406-b626-f3af149dc8fb | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b93-6a40-4406-b626-f3af149dc8fb b93-6a40-4406-b626-f3af149dc8fb No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Monroe County Elec Coop, Inc Effective date: 2013/04/01 End date if known: Rate name: Schedule B- Rate 0003 (Single-Phase) Sector: Commercial Description: This rate is available to members for commercial, industrial and three-phase farm service for all uses, including lighting, heating etc.., subject to established rules of the cooperative. Source or reference: http://www.mcec.org/Documents/2013%20Rates.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW):

417

Data:E1893b3c-247a-4e20-b22b-af34a3146b3f | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b3c-247a-4e20-b22b-af34a3146b3f b3c-247a-4e20-b22b-af34a3146b3f No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Black Warrior Elec Member Corp Effective date: 2013/09/01 End date if known: Rate name: City Limits- Residential Sector: Residential Description: Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

418

Data:A916e60f-11af-4286-b55b-996c6b56a39b | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6e60f-11af-4286-b55b-996c6b56a39b 6e60f-11af-4286-b55b-996c6b56a39b No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Ottawa, Kansas (Utility Company) Effective date: 2010/05/01 End date if known: Rate name: RU Sector: Residential Description: To all residential consumer, including rooming houses, with two or fewer units available for rent, apartment building and trailer courts, for customary domestic uses. To any combination residential and business consumer otherwise complying with residential zoning restrictins, where rendering of services and production or handing of goods is incidental to domestic uses, and none other than the resident is employed thereat.

419

Data:B186150c-7120-4086-af95-2a1f95d75ada | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0c-7120-4086-af95-2a1f95d75ada 0c-7120-4086-af95-2a1f95d75ada No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Omaha Public Power District Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: CONSUMER OWNED STREET LIGHTING Mercury Vapor 1000 Sector: Lighting Description: CONSUMER OWNED SYSTEM OPERATED BY DISTRICT Source or reference: http://ww3.oppd.com/rates/OppdRateManual.pdf#nameddest=110 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

420

Data:7a3bfb7d-7c13-4271-bcb6-af5197c36f02 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d-7c13-4271-bcb6-af5197c36f02 d-7c13-4271-bcb6-af5197c36f02 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Stanton County Public Pwr Dist Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Municipal Large Commercial Three Phase Sector: Commercial Description: Source or reference: ISU Archives Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "af alkaline fly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Data:6580e423-aca4-41ca-af7f-d50664e0d12d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

e423-aca4-41ca-af7f-d50664e0d12d e423-aca4-41ca-af7f-d50664e0d12d No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Sacramento Municipal Utility District Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: TC ILS - Intersection lighting service Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: https://www.smud.org/en/business/customer-service/rates-requirements-interconnection/documents/1-TC%20ILS.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V):

422

Data:3749a7af-207e-4d6b-a576-91e778643d03 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

af-207e-4d6b-a576-91e778643d03 af-207e-4d6b-a576-91e778643d03 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Howard Greeley Rural P P D Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Municipal Pumping Service Sector: Commercial Description: Source or reference: Illinois State University Binder #10 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

423

Data:6163a421-af48-4b99-a054-fd48e23f3831 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-af48-4b99-a054-fd48e23f3831 -af48-4b99-a054-fd48e23f3831 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Nolin Rural Electric Coop Corp Effective date: 2011/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: Schedule 1 - Residential, Farm, non-farm, trailers and mobile homes Sector: Residential Description: Source or reference: www.nolinrecc.com Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3

424

Data:18e26cbf-e04a-470e-8e47-bf0af1293710 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cbf-e04a-470e-8e47-bf0af1293710 cbf-e04a-470e-8e47-bf0af1293710 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Atlantic City Electric Co Effective date: 2012/11/01 End date if known: Rate name: RS-TOU FP (Bundled) Sector: Residential Description: Available for full domestic service to individually metered residential customers, including rural domestic customers, engaged principally in agricultural pursuits. This is the bundled service. Source or reference: http://www.atlanticcityelectric.com/_res/documents/NJTariffSectionIV.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW):

425

Data:0d999486-b06b-4af0-8fa9-5e7829e1fbef | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9486-b06b-4af0-8fa9-5e7829e1fbef 9486-b06b-4af0-8fa9-5e7829e1fbef No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Bandon, Oregon (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Public Authority Small Commercial Three Phase- Outside City Sector: Commercial Description: Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

426

Data:0bd2bb4a-f55f-4d57-a5e2-8cdebd2a138f | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a-f55f-4d57-a5e2-8cdebd2a138f a-f55f-4d57-a5e2-8cdebd2a138f No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Baudette, Minnesota (Utility Company) Effective date: 2011/04/20 End date if known: Rate name: Rate 9 Generation Sector: Description: Source or reference: Rate Binder Kelly 3 ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Fixed monthly charge is per month, per transformer. Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring:

427

Data:209d7efd-f9f6-4c93-a261-7922668af118 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

efd-f9f6-4c93-a261-7922668af118 efd-f9f6-4c93-a261-7922668af118 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Lebanon, Indiana (Utility Company) Effective date: 2013/04/01 End date if known: Rate name: SL - Public Street Lighting 100 watt sodium vapor Sector: Lighting Description: Availability Available for any standard overhead Public Street Lighting Service. Character of Service Public Street Lighting Service using lamps available under this schedule. Source or reference: http://www.lebanon-utilities.com/e_rates.html Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW):

428

Data:6aaf3bd3-a593-4012-9a64-d50af6aae37b | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

aaf3bd3-a593-4012-9a64-d50af6aae37b aaf3bd3-a593-4012-9a64-d50af6aae37b No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Pearl River Valley El Pwr Assn Effective date: 2008/04/15 End date if known: Rate name: 41 BP-AE-4 Bulk Power All Electric Sector: Description: Available to Consumers requiring a transformer capacity of 5000 kVA or more, subject to Association's established rules and regulations. This Bulk Power Service Rate applies to electric service measured by one meter used exclusively by one Consumer in a single establishment on one premise utilizing a single delivery point, and not resold or shared with others.

429

Data:B9f7af72-b0e4-4f57-8bbe-37bb03955fd6 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

af72-b0e4-4f57-8bbe-37bb03955fd6 af72-b0e4-4f57-8bbe-37bb03955fd6 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Coast Electric Power Assn Effective date: 2011/04/01 End date if known: Rate name: Light Service HPS 150 W - Town/Country Sector: Lighting Description: *Fixed monthly charge is the sum of fixture charge, energy charge, and pole charge. Adjustment includes power cost adjustment rider and tax expense adjustment rider Source or reference: http://www.coastepa.com/documents/Rate7H.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh)

430

Data:C3fdc9fa-9f0c-4a40-af1e-ac992cd70561 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

fdc9fa-9f0c-4a40-af1e-ac992cd70561 fdc9fa-9f0c-4a40-af1e-ac992cd70561 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Clinton County Elec Coop, Inc Effective date: 2013/02/01 End date if known: Rate name: Schedule 20 - ELECTRIC SPACE HEATING Sector: Residential Description: Available to all members of the Cooperative for residential and commercial space conditioning service, during the twelve calendar months of the year. Source or reference: www.cceci.com Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months):

431

Data:C47a3e76-0ad6-483b-b989-4550013285af | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6-0ad6-483b-b989-4550013285af 6-0ad6-483b-b989-4550013285af No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Caddo Electric Coop, Inc Effective date: 2007/05/01 End date if known: Rate name: One light 175 Watt MVL Sector: Lighting Description: - Available to all consumers located on or adjacent to cooperative's single-phase or three-phase lines. - Subject to power cost adjustment,tax adjustment and rate revisions. - Monthly rate depend on light within 150ft. proximity. Source or reference: Rate binder # 4 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months):

432

Data:20842e60-5a52-4e43-af71-081dd80c1e6d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

e60-5a52-4e43-af71-081dd80c1e6d e60-5a52-4e43-af71-081dd80c1e6d No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Fairfield Electric Coop, Inc Effective date: 2008/12/01 End date if known: Rate name: Construction Service Sector: Commercial Description: * Applicable to temporary service for builders for lighting and power for a construction site using a single point of delivery. Subject to power cost adjustment and tax adjustment. Source or reference: Rate binder # 4(Illinios State University) Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh)

433

Data:2ef4eff0-96bb-43af-b5c3-a303617272ab | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

eff0-96bb-43af-b5c3-a303617272ab eff0-96bb-43af-b5c3-a303617272ab No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Lighthouse Electric Coop, Inc Effective date: 2010/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: Large Power Service Sector: Industrial Description: Applicable to all customers having 51 KVa or more of installed transformer capacity taking the type of service described in this rate schedule for all of the electric service supplied at on point of delivery and measured through one meter used for all purposes subject to the established rules and regulations of the Cooperative. Source or reference: Rate Binder 5, Illinois State University

434

Data:D19c53df-3351-4b2d-a96b-cbe3ce02af56 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

df-3351-4b2d-a96b-cbe3ce02af56 df-3351-4b2d-a96b-cbe3ce02af56 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: New Hampshire Elec Coop Inc Effective date: 2013/05/01 End date if known: Rate name: Ski Area Contract (1000 KVA)SKI Sector: Commercial Description: The Coop Power rate will be NHEC's cost for procuring energy service and other NEPOOL Products applicable for the member's hourly load, adjusted to retail for losses and for NHEC administrative costs. Source or reference: http://www.nhec.com/filerepository/rate_change_sheets_for_2013_may01_final.pdf Source Parent:

435

Data:7abb6335-af9f-4c46-b6f4-0d5b1f807dc9 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

abb6335-af9f-4c46-b6f4-0d5b1f807dc9 abb6335-af9f-4c46-b6f4-0d5b1f807dc9 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Tacoma, Washington (Utility Company) Effective date: 2013/04/01 End date if known: Rate name: RS - Schedule A-1 - City of Lakewood - collectively metered apartments Sector: Residential Description: Available for domestic purposes in residences, apartments, duplex houses and multiple family dwellings. Source or reference: www.mytpu.org/customer-service/rates/power-rates/power-rates-schedules.htm Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW):

436

Data:280ad7fd-8af8-47ec-a275-34fdc7f7217a | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ad7fd-8af8-47ec-a275-34fdc7f7217a ad7fd-8af8-47ec-a275-34fdc7f7217a No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Florida Power & Light Co. Effective date: 2013/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: OL-1 - Outdoor Lighting - Sodium Vapor 150/12000Lumens Watt Relamping - Customer Owned Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: www.fpl.com/rates Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring:

437

Data:08fb31c8-8850-49b0-9174-3b194f1083af | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

fb31c8-8850-49b0-9174-3b194f1083af fb31c8-8850-49b0-9174-3b194f1083af No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Flathead Electric Coop Inc Effective date: 2010/05/01 End date if known: Rate name: Recreation Field Lighting Service Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.flatheadelectric.com/rates/FLS01.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

438

Data:72f3a5f6-f7af-4b34-8539-aebcd13d3e67 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

f6-f7af-4b34-8539-aebcd13d3e67 f6-f7af-4b34-8539-aebcd13d3e67 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Electrical Dist No3 Pinal Cnty Effective date: 2011/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: RATE NO. 11 STREET LIGHTING-Single Fixture Light 50000 HPS Sector: Lighting Description: Applicability: To all customers for the purpose of outdoor lighting of streets alleys, thoroughfares, public parks and playgrounds. Service is dusk to dawn and District will own, operate and maintain the street lighting system including lamps and glass replacement. Monthly Usage: 400kWh Source or reference: http://www.ed3online.org/view/70

439

Data:106c6ec3-d129-4dfd-877a-f0d97c6f1bd4 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

c6ec3-d129-4dfd-877a-f0d97c6f1bd4 c6ec3-d129-4dfd-877a-f0d97c6f1bd4 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Sun River Electric Coop, Inc Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Security Lighting - 100 watt HPS - Existing Pole Sector: Lighting Description: * Single phase at available voltage. Available for automatic dusk-to-dawn lighting when cooperative furnishes all material, maintenance and electric energy. Source or reference: http://www.sunriverelectric.coop/Membership/Billing_Rates_and_Fees/Security_Lighting/index.html Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW)

440

Data:08da069a-c1af-4e4f-9970-ea8510f75c48 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

c1af-4e4f-9970-ea8510f75c48 c1af-4e4f-9970-ea8510f75c48 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Pearl River Valley El Pwr Assn Effective date: 2012/08/01 End date if known: Rate name: 70 OL-8 400 HPS Sector: Lighting Description: Available to all Consumer's subject to Association's established rules and regulations. Association's standard outdoor lighting facilities. Service includes Association furnishing, operating, and maintaining lighting fixture, control equipment and lamp. When Association is required to alter its normal facilities to furnish a special outdoor lighting service, there will be an additional monthly charge.

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441

Data:F0b86ab4-f269-4ff9-b7af-380214768e35 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b86ab4-f269-4ff9-b7af-380214768e35 b86ab4-f269-4ff9-b7af-380214768e35 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Borough of Kutztown, Pennsylvania (Utility Company) Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: RESIDENTIAL SERVICE WITH ALL ELECTRIC HOUSE HEATING Sector: Residential Description: Source or reference: http://www.kutztownboro.org/kutztown/uploads/ElectricRatesJanuary2012.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

442

Data:1ed235b7-663f-4c2a-af80-95bfe26b2091 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ed235b7-663f-4c2a-af80-95bfe26b2091 ed235b7-663f-4c2a-af80-95bfe26b2091 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Woodruff Electric Coop Corp Effective date: 2012/10/24 End date if known: Rate name: Optional Residential Controlled Air Conditioning Service Sector: Description: Applicable to any customer who has a central air conditioning system with a connected compressor load of 3 kVA or more and agreeing to permit the Cooperative to install a control device is that the Cooperative can control the operation of the air conditioning compressor during periods of the Cooperative's peak load conditions and during emergency conditions.

443

Data:013319c0-4652-4e81-af0b-98dc9628c4aa | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-4652-4e81-af0b-98dc9628c4aa -4652-4e81-af0b-98dc9628c4aa No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Tecumseh, Nebraska (Utility Company) Effective date: 2013/05/01 End date if known: 2013/09/30 Rate name: Municipal General Service- Single Phase Sector: Commercial Description: Applicable to any customer that is City property tax supported, and such billings are paid from the City of Tecumseh's general fund for lighting, heating and power. Demand can not exceed 60 kW for 2 consecutive months. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW)

444

Data:7be77054-a962-44b5-be23-59be27af310d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7054-a962-44b5-be23-59be27af310d 7054-a962-44b5-be23-59be27af310d No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City Utilities of Springfield Effective date: 2011/10/01 End date if known: Rate name: Private Outdoor Lighting 150 watt Security Light Sector: Lighting Description: Service under this rate shall be available within the corporate limits of the City of Springfield, Missouri, and the adjacent territory served by City Utilities for residential, commercial, and industrial private outdoor lighting. Availability is subject to the General Terms and Conditions Governing Electric Service and the Utility Service Rules and Regulations.

445

Data:15d2b593-c15f-4329-be00-0b0664107af6 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b593-c15f-4329-be00-0b0664107af6 b593-c15f-4329-be00-0b0664107af6 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Broad River Electric Coop, Inc Effective date: 2012/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Pre-Paid Residential Service Three-Phase Sector: Residential Description: * Available to members who complete an agreement pursuant to the Cooperative's Pre-Paid Meter Program. It is 120/240 volts. Subject to wholesale power cost adjustment and sales tax. Source or reference: Rate binder # 4(Illinios State University) Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW):

446

Data:B537085d-40a6-464a-af0c-154db1a55be7 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d-40a6-464a-af0c-154db1a55be7 d-40a6-464a-af0c-154db1a55be7 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Stanhope, Iowa (Utility Company) Effective date: 2011/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Commercial Rate #5 (Single Phase) Tiered Rate Sector: Commercial Description: there are two rates, composite and Tiered. Source or reference: See IRPS Binder "A" Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category:

447

Data:09a33892-2e84-4931-aa2a-f67b405d5aef | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

892-2e84-4931-aa2a-f67b405d5aef 892-2e84-4931-aa2a-f67b405d5aef No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Mt Wheeler Power, Inc Effective date: 2012/01/10 End date if known: Rate name: Irrigation Rate (Demand Charge) Sector: Commercial Description: Demand Rate is the standard rate for most irrigation consumers. It is billed based on an energy charge for the total number of kilowatt hours during the month, a demand charge based on the highest recorded kilowatt demand, and an annual horsepower charge rather than a monthly customer charge. Source or reference: http://www.mwpower.net/content/member-services-rates

448

Data:Ab279419-79a1-4410-af5b-0c56114c33ea | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9419-79a1-4410-af5b-0c56114c33ea 9419-79a1-4410-af5b-0c56114c33ea No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Sumter Electric Member Corp Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Outdoor Lighting Underground MH Acorn 175 W w/ Aid Sector: Lighting Description: * Fixed Monthly Charge does not include monthly pole rate charges Source or reference: http://www.sumteremc.com/pdfs/OL-9.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

449

Data:7b64a4da-0bf0-42cc-a127-e98af1315dbc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

da-0bf0-42cc-a127-e98af1315dbc da-0bf0-42cc-a127-e98af1315dbc No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Three Notch Elec Member Corp Effective date: 2012/03/01 End date if known: Rate name: 100W Overhead Wiring (Non Mercury vapor fixtures) - (Type - 'HPS-Open',Wood Pole (1)) Sector: Lighting Description: Applicabl