Sample records for aerosol optical properties

  1. VARIATION OF AEROSOL OPTICAL PROPERTIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    radiative forcing due to the aerosol, W m-2 FT is the solar constant, W m-2 Ac is the fractional cloud cover;APPROACH TO MODELING AEROSOL RADIATIVE EFFECTS Transport Chemistry Microphysics Removal ModelEmissions Size-distributed Composition Optical Properties Radiative Effects Optics Model Radiation Transfer Model #12;CLASSES OF AEROSOL

  2. Optical Properties of Secondary Organic Aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Hwajin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Paulson, S. E. ; Chung, A. Aerosol Sci. Technol. 2007 , 41,Y. G. ; Daum, P. H. J. Aerosol Sci 2008 , 39, 974-986. (32)Accurate Monitoring of Terrestrial Aerosols and Total Solar

  3. Cloud-Driven Changes in Aerosol Optical Properties - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogren, John A.; Sheridan, Patrick S.; Andrews, Elisabeth

    2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The optical properties of aerosol particles are the controlling factors in determining direct aerosol radiative forcing. These optical properties depend on the chemical composition and size distribution of the aerosol particles, which can change due to various processes during the particles’ lifetime in the atmosphere. Over the course of this project we have studied how cloud processing of atmospheric aerosol changes the aerosol optical properties. A counterflow virtual impactor was used to separate cloud drops from interstitial aerosol and parallel aerosol systems were used to measure the optical properties of the interstitial and cloud-scavenged aerosol. Specifically, aerosol light scattering, back-scattering and absorption were measured and used to derive radiatively significant parameters such as aerosol single scattering albedo and backscatter fraction for cloud-scavenged and interstitial aerosol. This data allows us to demonstrate that the radiative properties of cloud-processed aerosol can be quite different than pre-cloud aerosol. These differences can be used to improve the parameterization of aerosol forcing in climate models.

  4. Optical Properties of Mixed Black Carbon, Inorganic and Secondary Organic Aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paulson, S E

    2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Summarizes the achievements of the project, which are divided into four areas: 1) Optical properties of secondary organic aerosols; 2) Development and of a polar nephelometer to measure aerosol optical properties and theoretical approaches to several optical analysis problems, 3) Studies on the accuracy of measurements of absorbing carbon by several methods, and 4) Environmental impacts of biodiesel.

  5. Radiative Effects of Dust Aerosols, Natural Cirrus Clouds and Contrails: Broadband Optical Properties and Sensitivity Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi, Bingqi

    2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation aims to study the broadband optical properties and radiative effects of dust aerosols and ice clouds. It covers three main topics: the uncertainty of dust optical properties and radiative effects from the dust particle shape...

  6. Radiative Effects of Dust Aerosols, Natural Cirrus Clouds and Contrails: Broadband Optical Properties and Sensitivity Studies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi, Bingqi

    2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation aims to study the broadband optical properties and radiative effects of dust aerosols and ice clouds. It covers three main topics: the uncertainty of dust optical properties and radiative effects from the dust particle shape...

  7. Characterizing Aerosol Distributions and Optical Properties Using the NASA Langley High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hostetler, Chris; Ferrare, Richard

    2013-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to provide vertically and horizontally resolved data on aerosol optical properties to assess and ultimately improve how models represent these aerosol properties and their impacts on atmospheric radiation. The approach was to deploy the NASA Langley Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) and other synergistic remote sensors on DOE Atmospheric Science Research (ASR) sponsored airborne field campaigns and synergistic field campaigns sponsored by other agencies to remotely measure aerosol backscattering, extinction, and optical thickness profiles. Synergistic sensors included a nadir-viewing digital camera for context imagery, and, later in the project, the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP). The information from the remote sensing instruments was used to map the horizontal and vertical distribution of aerosol properties and type. The retrieved lidar parameters include profiles of aerosol extinction, backscatter, depolarization, and optical depth. Products produced in subsequent analyses included aerosol mixed layer height, aerosol type, and the partition of aerosol optical depth by type. The lidar products provided vertical context for in situ and remote sensing measurements from other airborne and ground-based platforms employed in the field campaigns and was used to assess the predictions of transport models. Also, the measurements provide a data base for future evaluation of techniques to combine active (lidar) and passive (polarimeter) measurements in advanced retrieval schemes to remotely characterize aerosol microphysical properties. The project was initiated as a 3-year project starting 1 January 2005. It was later awarded continuation funding for another 3 years (i.e., through 31 December 2010) followed by a 1-year no-cost extension (through 31 December 2011). This project supported logistical and flight costs of the NASA sensors on a dedicated aircraft, the subsequent analysis and archival of the data, and the presentation of results in conferences, workshops, and publications. DOE ASR field campaigns supported under this project included - MAX-Mex /MILAGRO (2006) - TexAQS 2006/GoMACCS (2006) - CHAPS (2007) - RACORO (2009) - CARE/CalNex (2010) In addition, data acquired on HSRL airborne field campaigns sponsored by other agencies were used extensively to fulfill the science objectives of this project and the data acquired have been made available to other DOE ASR investigators upon request.

  8. Measurements of aerosol vertical profiles and optical properties during INDOEX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markowicz,5 James R. Campbell,6 James D. Spinhirne,7 Howard R. Gordon,2 and James E. Johnson3 Received 5 field phase. Measurements were made from two platforms: the NOAA ship R/V Ronald H. Brown. Markowicz, J. R. Campbell, J. D. Spinhirne, H. R. Gordon, and J. E. Johnson, Measurements of aerosol

  9. Synthesis of information on aerosol optical properties Hongqing Liu,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chin, Mian

    revealed a significant decrease in sur- face solar heating due to the presence of absorbing aerosols, which spectral dependence derived from AERONET retrievals. The asymmetry parameter over the solar spectrum radiation balance [Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, 2001]. Their potential to increase reflected

  10. Lidar Measurements of the Vertical Distribution of Aerosol Optical and Physical Properties over Central Asia

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Boris B.; Sverdlik, Leonid G.; Imashev, Sanjar A.; Solomon, Paul A.; Lantz, Jeffrey; Schauer, James J.; Shafer, Martin M.; Artamonova, Maria S.; Carmichael, Gregory R.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The vertical structure of aerosol optical and physical properties was measured by Lidar in Eastern Kyrgyzstan, Central Asia, from June 2008 to May 2009. Lidar measurements were supplemented with surface-based measurements of PM2.5and PM10mass and chemical composition in both size fractions. Dust transported into the region is common, being detected 33% of the time. The maximum frequency occurred in the spring of 2009. Dust transported to Central Asia comes from regional sources, for example, Taklimakan desert and Aral Sea basin, and from long-range transport, for example, deserts of Arabia, Northeast Africa, Iran, and Pakistan. Regional sources are characterized by pollutionmore »transport with maximum values of coarse particles within the planetary boundary layer, aerosol optical thickness, extinction coefficient, integral coefficient of aerosol backscatter, and minimum values of the Ångström exponent. Pollution associated with air masses transported over long distances has different characteristics during autumn, winter, and spring. During winter, dust emissions were low resulting in high values of the Ångström exponent (about 0.51) and the fine particle mass fraction (64%). Dust storms were more frequent during spring with an increase in coarse dust particles in comparison to winter. The aerosol vertical profiles can be used to lower uncertainty in estimating radiative forcing.« less

  11. Optical, physical, and chemical properties of springtime aerosol over Barrow Alaska in 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shantz, Nicole C.; Gultepe, Ismail; Andrews, Elisabeth; Zelenyuk, Alla; Earle, Michael; MacDonald, A. M.; Liu, Peter S.; Leaitch, W. R.

    2014-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Airborne observations from four flights during the 2008 Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) are used to examine some cloud-free optical, physical, and chemical properties of aerosol particles in the springtime Arctic troposphere. The number concentrations of particles larger than 0.12 ?m (Na>120), important for light extinction and cloud droplet formation, ranged from 15 to 2260 cm?3, with the higher Na>120 cases dominated by measurements from two flights of long-range transported biomass burning (BB) aerosols. The two other flights examined here document a relatively clean aerosol and an Arctic Haze aerosol impacted by larger particles largely composed of dust. For observations from the cleaner case and the BB cases, the particle light scattering coefficients at low relative humidity (RH<20%) increased nonlinearly with increasing Na>120, driven mostly by an increase in mean sizes of particles with increasing Na>120 (BB cases). For those three cases, particle light absorption coefficients also increased nonlinearly with increasing Na>120 and linearly with increasing submicron particle volume concentration. In addition to black carbon, brown carbon was estimated to have increased light absorption coefficients by 27% (450 nm wavelength) and 14% (550 nm) in the BB cases. For the case with strong dust influence, the absorption relative to submicron particle volume was small compared with the other cases. There was a slight gradient of Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer Probe (PCASP) mean volume diameter (MVD) towards smaller sizes with increasing height, which suggests more scavenging of the more elevated particles, consistent with a typically longer lifetime of particles higher in the atmosphere. However, in approximately 10% of the cases, the MVD increased (>0.4 ?m) with increasing altitude, suggesting transport of larger fine particle mass (possibly coarse particle mass) at high levels over the Arctic. This may be because of transport of larger particles at higher elevations and relatively slow deposition to the surface.

  12. aerosol optical thickness: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of solar radiation by atmospheric aerosols is a key el- ement of the Earth's radiative energy balance and climate. The optical properties of aerosol particles are, however,...

  13. Atmospheric effects of nuclar war aerosols in general circulation model simulations: Influence of smoke optical properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, S.L.; Ramaswamy, V.; Covey, C.

    1987-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A global atmospheric general circulation model (GCM) is modified to include radiative transfer parameterizations for the absorption and scattering of solar radiation and the absorption of thermal infrared (IR) radiation by smoke aerosols. The solar scattering modifications include a parameterization for diagnosing smoke optical properties as a function of the time- and space-dependent smoke particle radii. The aerosol IR modifications allow for both the ''grey'' absorber approximation and a broadband approximation that resolves the aerosol absorption in four spectral intervals. We examine the sensitivity of some GCM-simulated atmospheric and climatic effects to the optical properties and radiative transfer parameterizations used in studies of massive injections of smoke. Specifically, we test the model response to solar scattering versus nonscattering smoke, variations in prescribed smoke single scattering albedo and IR specific absorption, and interactive versus fixed smoke optical properties. Hypothetical nuclear war created smoke scenarios assume the July injection of 60 or 180 Tg of smoke over portions of the mid-latitude land areas of the northern hemisphere. Atmospheric transport and scavenging of the smoke are included. Nonscattering smoke cases produce roughly 40 Wm/sup -2/ more Earth-atmosphere solar irradiance absorption over the northern hemisphere, when compared to scattering smoke cases having equivalent specific absorption efficiencies. Varying the elemental carbon content of smoke over a plausible range produces a 4/sup 0/--6 /sup 0/C change in average mid-latitude land surface temperature, and a variation of about 0.1 in zonally averaged planetary albedo in the northern hemisphere.

  14. Correlations Between Optical, Chemical and Physical Properties...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Correlations Between Optical, Chemical and Physical Properties of Biomass Burn Aerosols. Correlations Between Optical, Chemical and Physical Properties of Biomass Burn Aerosols....

  15. Correlations between Optical, Chemical and Physical Properties of Biomass Burn Aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    instruments and photoelectric aerosol sensors in source-sampling of black carbon aerosol and particle-bound PAHsAirborne minerals and related aerosol particles: Effects on

  16. Geometrical Optics of Dense Aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hay, Michael J.; Valeo, Ernest J.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Assembling a free-standing, sharp-edged slab of homogeneous material that is much denser than gas, but much more rare ed than a solid, is an outstanding technological challenge. The solution may lie in focusing a dense aerosol to assume this geometry. However, whereas the geometrical optics of dilute aerosols is a well-developed fi eld, the dense aerosol limit is mostly unexplored. Yet controlling the geometrical optics of dense aerosols is necessary in preparing such a material slab. Focusing dense aerosols is shown here to be possible, but the nite particle density reduces the eff ective Stokes number of the flow, a critical result for controlled focusing. __________________________________________________

  17. The seasonality of aerosol properties in Big Bend National Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Christopher Lee

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    ), to characterize the seasonal variability of the Big Bend regions aerosol optical properties. Mass extinction efficiencies and relative humidity scattering enhancement factors were calculated for both externally and internally mixed aerosol populations for all size...

  18. Production Mechanism, Number Concentration, Size Distribution, Chemical Composition, and Optical Properties of Sea Spray Aerosols Workshop, Summer 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meskhidze, Nicholas [NCSU] [NCSU

    2013-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this workshop was to address the most urgent open science questions for improved quantification of sea spray aerosol-radiation-climate interactions. Sea spray emission and its influence on global climate remains one of the most uncertain components of the aerosol-radiation-climate problem, but has received less attention than other aerosol processes (e.g. production of terrestrial secondary organic aerosols). Thus, the special emphasis was placed on the production flux of sea spray aerosol particles, their number concentration and chemical composition and properties.

  19. ARM: 1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

    1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

  20. ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Newsom, Rob; Goldsmith, John

    10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

  1. Using multi-angle, multispectral photo-polarimetry of the NASA Glory mission to constrain optical properties of aerosols and clouds: Results from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Using multi-angle, multispectral photo-polarimetry of the NASA Glory mission to constrain optical Sensor (APS) for the determination of aerosol and cloud properties and a Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM (IFOV)instrument. The APS sensor will provide high-precision measurements of the total and polarized

  2. Investigation of the optical and cloud forming properties of pollution, biomass burning, and mineral dust aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Yong Seob

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    collected data during the Asian Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia) to examine the composition and homogeneity of a complex aerosol generated in the deserts and urban regions of China and other Asian countries. An aircraft-based TDMA was used...

  3. Variations in organic aerosol optical and hygroscopic properties upon heterogeneous OH oxidation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappa, Christopher D.

    Measurements of the evolution of organic aerosol extinction cross sections (?[subscript ext]) and subsaturated hygroscopicity upon heterogeneous OH oxidation are reported for two model compounds, squalane (a C30 saturated ...

  4. ARM: 10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

    10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

  5. Using In-Situ Aerosol Optical Properties to Develop a Novel Air Quality Monitoring and Diagnostic Tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orcutt, John Michael

    2014-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    and the optical properties were examined. Also, soot was used to generate ice crystals in the Texas A&M University Continuous Flow Diffusion Chamber (CFDC) which was used in conjunction with the CASPOL to measure the optical properties of ice nucleated on soot...

  6. Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard A. Ferrare; David D. Turner

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Project goals: (1) Use the routine surface and airborne measurements at the ARM SGP site, and the routine surface measurements at the NSA site, to continue our evaluations of model aerosol simulations; (2) Determine the degree to which the Raman lidar measurements of water vapor and aerosol scattering and extinction can be used to remotely characterize the aerosol humidification factor; (3) Use the high temporal resolution CARL data to examine how aerosol properties vary near clouds; and (4) Use the high temporal resolution CARL and Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) data to quantify entrainment in optically thin continental cumulus clouds.

  7. Cloud Scavenging Effects on Aerosol Radiative and Cloud-nucleating Properties - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogren, John A.; Sheridan, Patrick S.; Andrews, Elisabeth

    2009-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The optical properties of aerosol particles are the controlling factors in determining direct aerosol radiative forcing. These optical properties depend on the chemical composition and size distribution of the aerosol particles, which can change due to various processes during the particles’ lifetime in the atmosphere. Over the course of this project we have studied how cloud processing of atmospheric aerosol changes the aerosol optical properties. A counterflow virtual impactor was used to separate cloud drops from interstitial aerosol and parallel aerosol systems were used to measure the optical properties of the interstitial and cloud-scavenged aerosol. Specifically, aerosol light scattering, back-scattering and absorption were measured and used to derive radiatively significant parameters such as aerosol single scattering albedo and backscatter fraction for cloud-scavenged and interstitial aerosol. This data allows us to demonstrate that the radiative properties of cloud-processed aerosol can be quite different than pre-cloud aerosol. These differences can be used to improve the parameterization of aerosol forcing in climate models.

  8. Photoacoustic optical properties at UV, VIS, and near IR wavelengths for laboratory generated and winter time ambient urban aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gyawali, Madhu S.; Arnott, W. Patrick; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Song, Chen; Moosmuller, H.; Liu, Li; Mishchenko, M.; Chen, L-W A.; Green, M.; Watson, J. G.; Chow, J. C.

    2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the laboratory and ambient photoacoustic (PA) measurement of aerosol light absorption coefficients at ultraviolet wavelength (i.e., 355 nm) and compare with measurements at 405, 532, 870, and 1047 nm. Simultaneous measurements of aerosol light scattering coefficients were achieved by the integrating reciprocal nephelometer within the PA's acoustic resonator. Absorption and scattering measurements were carried out for various laboratory generated aerosols, including salt, incense, and kerosene soot to evaluate the instrument calibration and gain insight on the spectral dependence of aerosol light absorption and scattering. Ambient measurements were obtained in Reno, Nevada, between 18 December 2009 and 18 January 2010. The measurement period included days with and without strong ground level temperature inversions, corresponding to highly polluted (freshly emitted aerosols) and relatively clean (aged aerosols) conditions. Particulate matter (PM) concentrations were measured and analyzed with other tracers of traffic emissions. The temperature inversion episodes caused very high concentration of PM{sub 2.5} and PM{sub 10} (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 {mu}m and 10 {mu}m, respectively) and gaseous pollutants: carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), and nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}). The diurnal change of absorption and scattering coefficients during the polluted (inversion) days increased approximately by a factor of two for all wavelengths compared to the clean days. The spectral variation in aerosol absorption coefficients indicated a significant amount of absorbing aerosol from traffic emissions and residential wood burning. The analysis of single scattering albedo (SSA), Angstrom exponent of absorption (AEA), and Angstrom exponent of scattering (AES) for clean and polluted days provides evidences that the aerosol aging and coating process is suppressed by strong temperature inversion under cloudy conditions. In general, measured UV absorption coefficients were found to be much larger for biomass burning aerosol than for typical ambient aerosols.

  9. 8, 68456901, 2008 Aerosol optical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of solar radiation by atmospheric aerosols is a key el- ement of the Earth's radiative energy balance, Germany 2 Helmholtz Center Munich, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute

  10. An optimal fitting approach to improve the GISS ModelE aerosol optical property parameterization using AERONET data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and absorbing solar radiation and the indirect effect by interacting with water vapor to affect cloud formation and lifetime. Absorbing aerosols also have the semidirect effect by heating the atmosphere layer, reducing; Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, 2001]. [3] Globalscale models, which simulate the emission, transport

  11. Aerosol Properties and Radiative Forcing over Kanpur during Severe Aerosol Loading Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaskaoutis, D. G.; Sinha, P. R.; Vinoj, V.; Kosmopoulos, P. G.; Tripathi, S. N.; Misra, Amit; Sharma, M.; Singh, R. P.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric aerosols over India exhibit large spatio-temporal fluctuation driven by the local monsoon system, emission rates and seasonally-changed air masses. The northern part of India is well-known for its high aerosol loading throughout the year due to anthropogenic emissions, dust influence and biomass burning. On certain circumstances and, under favorable weather conditions, the aerosol load can be severe, causing significant health concerns and climate implications. The present work analyzes the aerosol episode (AE) days and examines the modification in aerosol properties and radiative forcing during the period 2001-2010 based on Kanpur-AERONET sun photometer data. As AEs are considered the days having daily-mean aerosol optical depth (AOD) above the decadal mean + 1 STD (standard deviation); the threshold value is defined at 0.928. The results identify 277 out of 2095 days (13.2%) of AEs over Kanpur, which are most frequently observed during post-monsoon (78 cases, 18.6%) and monsoon (76, 14.7%) seasons due to biomass-burning episodes and dust influence, respectively. On the other hand, the AEs in winter and pre-monsoon are lower in both absolute and percentage values (65, 12.5% and 58, 9.1%, respectively). The modification in aerosol properties on the AE days is strongly related to season. Thus, in post-monsoon and winter the AEs are associated with enhanced presence of fine-mode aerosols and Black Carbon from anthropogenic pollution and any kind of burning, while in pre-monsoon and monsoon seasons they are mostly associated with transported dust. Aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) calculated using SBDART shows much more surface (~-69 to -97 Wm-2) and Top of Atmosphere cooling (-20 to -30 Wm-2) as well as atmospheric heating (~43 to 71 Wm-2) during the AE days compared to seasonal means. These forcing values are mainly controlled by the higher AODs and the modified aerosol characteristics (Angstrom ?, SSA) during the AE days in each season and may cause severe climate implications over Ganges Basin with further consequences on atmospheric heating, cloud microphysics, monsoon rainfall and melting of Himalayan glaciers.

  12. Smoke over haze: Comparative analysis of satellite, surface radiometer, and airborne in situ measurements of aerosol optical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zhanqing

    measurements of aerosol optical properties and radiative forcing over the eastern United States Brian Vant their consistency for application to satellite retrievals of optical depth and radiative forcing. These optical properties were combined with MODIS reflectance observations to calculate optical depth. The use of AERONET

  13. Parameter exploration of optically trapped liquid aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. R. Burnham; P. J. Reece; D. McGloin

    2010-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    When studying the motion of optically trapped particles on the $\\mu s$ time scale, in low viscous media such as air, inertia cannot be neglected. Resolution of unusual and interesting behaviour not seen in colloidal trapping experiments is possible. In attempt to explain the phenomena we use power spectral methods to perform a parameter study of the Brownian motion of optically trapped liquid aerosol droplets concentrated around the critically damped regime. We present evidence that the system is suitably described by a simple harmonic oscillator model which must include a description of Fax\\'{e}n's correction, but not necessarily frequency dependent hydrodynamic corrections to Stokes' law. We also provide results describing how the system behaves under several variables and discuss the difficulty in decoupling the parameters responsible for the observed behaviour. We show that due to the relatively low dynamic viscosity and high trap stiffness it is easy to transfer between over- and under-damped motion by experimentally altering either trap stiffness or damping. Our results suggest stable aerosol trapping may be achieved in under-damped conditions, but the onset of deleterious optical forces at high trapping powers prevents the probing of the upper stability limits due to Brownian motion.

  14. Group Report: Connections between Aerosol Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    14 Group Report: Connections between Aerosol Properties and Forcing of Climate S.E. XMWRZ, Rapporteur F.ARNOLD,J.-p.BLANCHET,PA. DURKEE, D.J.HOFMANN,W.A. HOPPEL, M.D. KING, A.A. LACE, T. NAKAJIMA

  15. ARM - AOS Aerosol Properties Plots

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearchSOLICITATIONIMODI FICATION OF CONTRACTOperations AMF2ViewersAOS Aerosol

  16. Hyperspectral Aerosol Optical Depths from TCAP Flights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinozuka, Yohei; Johnson, Roy R.; Flynn, Connor J.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Redemann, Jens; Dunagan, Stephen; Kluzek, Celine D.; Hubbe, John M.; Segal-Rosenheimer, Michal; Livingston, J. M.; Eck, T.; Wagener, Richard; Gregory, L.; Chand, Duli; Berg, Larry K.; Rogers, Ray; Ferrare, R. A.; Hair, John; Hostetler, Chris A.; Burton, S. P.

    2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research), the world’s first hyperspectral airborne tracking sunphotometer, acquired aerosol optical depths (AOD) at 1 Hz during all July 2012 flights of the Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP). Root-mean square differences from AERONET ground-based observations were 0.01 at wavelengths between 500-1020 nm, 0.02 at 380 and 1640 nm and 0.03 at 440 nm in four clear-sky fly-over events, and similar in ground side-by-side comparisons. Changes in the above-aircraft AOD across 3-km-deep spirals were typically consistent with integrals of coincident in situ (on DOE Gulfstream 1 with 4STAR) and lidar (on NASA B200) extinction measurements within 0.01, 0.03, 0.01, 0.02, 0.02, 0.02 at 355, 450, 532, 550, 700, 1064 nm, respectively, despite atmospheric variations and combined measurement uncertainties. Finer vertical differentials of the 4STAR measurements matched the in situ ambient extinction profile within 14% for one homogeneous column. For the AOD observed between 350-1660 nm, excluding strong water vapor and oxygen absorption bands, estimated uncertainties were ~0.01 and dominated by (then) unpredictable throughput changes, up to +/-0.8%, of the fiber optic rotary joint. The favorable intercomparisons herald 4STAR’s spatially-resolved high-frequency hyperspectral products as a reliable tool for climate studies and satellite validation.

  17. ARM - Measurement - Aerosol optical properties

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDC documentationBarrow, AlaskaWhenimage ARM Data Discoveryproperties

  18. Sunlight Changes Aerosols in Clouds | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sunlight Changes Aerosols in Clouds Sunlight Changes Aerosols in Clouds Released: October 20, 2011 Scientists show how sunlight alters optical, chemical properties of atmospheric...

  19. aerosol optical depths: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AERONET, AVHRR and 3 MODIS 4 A. Hauser, D. Oesch have been used to 9 retrieve the spatial distribution of aerosol optical depth for 10 central Europe. At eight AERONET sites,...

  20. aerosol optical depth: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AERONET, AVHRR and 3 MODIS 4 A. Hauser, D. Oesch have been used to 9 retrieve the spatial distribution of aerosol optical depth for 10 central Europe. At eight AERONET sites,...

  1. Temporal Variability of Aerosol Properties during TCAP: Impact on Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Berg, Larry K.; Fast, Jerome D.; Michalsky, Joseph J.; Lantz, K.; Hodges, G. B.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground-based remote sensing and in situ observations of aerosol microphysical and optical properties have been collected during summertime (June-August, 2012) as part of the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP; http://campaign.arm.gov/tcap/), which was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program (http://www.arm.gov/). The overall goal of the TCAP field campaign is to study the evolution of optical and microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosol transported from North America to the Atlantic and their impact on the radiation energy budget. During TCAP, the ground-based ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) was deployed on Cape Cod, an arm-shaped peninsula situated on the easternmost portion of Massachusetts (along the east coast of the United States) and that is generally downwind of large metropolitan areas. The AMF site was equipped with numerous instruments for sampling aerosol, cloud and radiative properties, including a Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR), a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS), an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS), and a three-wavelength nephelometer. In this study we present an analysis of diurnal and day-to-day variability of the column and near-surface aerosol properties obtained from remote sensing (MFRSR data) and ground-based in situ measurements (SMPS, APS, and nephelometer data). In particular, we show that the observed diurnal variability of the MFRSR aerosol optical depth is strong and comparable with that obtained previously from the AERONET climatology in Mexico City, which has a larger aerosol loading. Moreover, we illustrate how the variability of aerosol properties impacts the direct aerosol radiative forcing at different time scales.

  2. aerosol black carbon: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of solar radiation by atmospheric aerosols is a key el- ement of the Earth's radiative energy balance and climate. The optical properties of aerosol particles are, however,...

  3. Developing models of aerosol representation to investigate composition, evolution, optical properties, and CCN spectra using measurements of size-resolved hygroscopicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gasparini, Roberto

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A Differential Mobility Analyzer/Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (DMA/TDMA) was used to measure size distributions, hygroscopicity, and volatility during the May 2003 Aerosol Intensive Operational Period at the Central Facility...

  4. Developing models of aerosol representation to investigate composition, evolution, optical properties, and CCN spectra using measurements of size-resolved hygroscopicity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gasparini, Roberto

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A Differential Mobility Analyzer/Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (DMA/TDMA) was used to measure size distributions, hygroscopicity, and volatility during the May 2003 Aerosol Intensive Operational Period at the Central ...

  5. CLOUD DROPLET NUCLEATION AND ITS CONNECTION TO AEROSOL PROPERTIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the uncertainty of the indirect effect arises from incomplete ability to describe changes in cloud properties. Keywords - Climate. aerosols. clouds, radiation INTRODUcnON In recent years awareness has increased of enhancement of scanering of radiation by aerosols in clear (cloud-free) air; a portion of the scattered

  6. Correction to “Hyperspectral Aerosol Optical Depths from TCAP Flights”

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinozuka, Yohei; Johnson, Roy R.; Flynn, Connor J.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Redemann, Jens; Dunagan, Stephen; Kluzek, Celine D.; Hubbe, John M.; Segal-Rosenheimer, Michal; Livingston, J. M.; Eck, T.; Wagener, Richard; Gregory, L.; Chand, Duli; Berg, Larry K.; Rogers, Ray; Ferrare, R. A.; Hair, John; Hostetler, Chris A.; Burton, S. P.

    2014-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In the paper “Hyperspectral aerosol optical depths from TCAP flights” by Y. Shinozuka et al. (Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, 118, doi:10.1002/2013JD020596, 2013), Tables 1 and 2 were published with the column heads out of order. Tables 1 and 2 are published correctly here. The publisher regrets the error.

  7. Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, David, D.; Ferrare, Richard, A.

    2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The 'Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds' project focused extensively on the analysis and utilization of water vapor and aerosol profiles derived from the ARM Raman lidar at the Southern Great Plains ARM site. A wide range of different tasks were performed during this project, all of which improved quality of the data products derived from the lidar or advanced the understanding of atmospheric processes over the site. These activities included: upgrading the Raman lidar to improve its sensitivity; participating in field experiments to validate the lidar aerosol and water vapor retrievals; using the lidar aerosol profiles to evaluate the accuracy of the vertical distribution of aerosols in global aerosol model simulations; examining the correlation between relative humidity and aerosol extinction, and how these change, due to horizontal distance away from cumulus clouds; inferring boundary layer turbulence structure in convective boundary layers from the high-time-resolution lidar water vapor measurements; retrieving cumulus entrainment rates in boundary layer cumulus clouds; and participating in a field experiment that provided data to help validate both the entrainment rate retrievals and the turbulent profiles derived from lidar observations.

  8. The effects of emission of anthropogenic chemical species on chemical and physical properties of aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, In Young

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical studies have been carried out to examine the effects of chemically reactive trace gases emitted into the atmosphere on the evolution of chemical species concentrations, on the chemical composition and size distribution of airborne particles, and on optical properties of aerosols. Argonne`s chemistry module has been modified by refining the treatment of gas-to-particle conversion. The changes in size distribution and chemical composition of aerosols are calculated with consideration of heteramolecular diffusion and coagulation. Results of the 24 h real-time simulation indicate that the maximum oxidation rate of sulfur dioxide is about 0.4% h{sup {minus}1}; that the total aerosol volume increases with the increase in relative humidity by as much as 36% (due mainly to the collection of sulfuric acid embryos by preexisting particles); and that the surface area, a measure of optical depth, increases with the increase in relative humidity by as much as 27%.

  9. Geometrical Optics of Dense Aerosols: Forming Dense Plasma Slabs Michael J. Hay,1,* Ernest J. Valeo,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geometrical Optics of Dense Aerosols: Forming Dense Plasma Slabs Michael J. Hay,1,* Ernest J. Valeo aerosol to assume this geometry. However, whereas the geometrical optics of dilute aerosols is a well-developed field, the dense aerosol limit is mostly unexplored. Yet controlling the geometrical optics of dense

  10. Africa Aerosol Optical Depth Obtained From MISR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank, Thomas D.

    OpticalDepth Central African Republic Chad Djibouti Egypt Ethiopia Libya Kenya Somalia Sudan Uganda #12;Southern Africa Ethiopia Libya Kenya Somalia Sudan Uganda #12;Southern Africa 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 Mean Seasonal

  11. Group Report: Connections between Aerosol Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    increases absorption of solar radiation in clouds. The net effect is expected to be enhancement of shortwave effect and causes surface warming. Absorption of solar or thermal radiation within the atmospheric column after cloud evaporation. 3. Indirect effects ofaerosols on heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry. Aerosol

  12. Parametric Resonance of Optically Trapped Aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Di Leonardo; G. Ruocco; J. Leach; M. J. Padgett; A. J. Wright; J. M. Girkin; D. R. Burnham; D. McGloin

    2007-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Brownian dynamics of an optically trapped water droplet are investigated across the transition from over to under-damped oscillations. The spectrum of position fluctuations evolves from a Lorentzian shape typical of over-damped systems (beads in liquid solvents), to a damped harmonic oscillator spectrum showing a resonance peak. In this later under-damped regime, we excite parametric resonance by periodically modulating the trapping power at twice the resonant frequency. The power spectra of position fluctuations are in excellent agreement with the obtained analytical solutions of a parametrically modulated Langevin equation.

  13. Cloud and Aerosol Properties, Precipitable Water, and Profiles of Temperature and Water Vapor from MODIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Cloud and Aerosol Properties, Precipitable Water, and Profiles of Temperature and Water Vapor from such as cloud mask, atmos- pheric profiles, aerosol properties, total precipitable water, and cloud properties vapor amount, aerosol particles, and the subsequently formed clouds [9]. Barnes et al. [2] provide

  14. ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Newsom, Rob; Goldsmith, John

    10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm

  15. Optical Properties of Secondary Organic Aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Hwajin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    oxygen (0.5 L/min) through a mercury lamp O 3 generator (oxygen (0.5 L/min) through a mercury lamp O 3 generator (

  16. ARM - Field Campaign - MASRAD - Aerosol Optical Properties

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa- Polarization Diversity Lidar (PDL) Campaign Links M-PACE Website ARM Data

  17. Chemical and physicochemial properties of submicron aerosol agglomerates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scripsick, R.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Ehrman, S.; Friedlander, S.K. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The formation of nanometer-sized aerosol particles in a premixed methane flame from both solid-phase aerosol precursors and gas-phase precursors was investigated. Techniques were developed to determine the distribution of the individual chemical species as a function of agglomerate size by using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). To determine the distribution of chemical species both from particle to particle and within the particles on a nanometer scale, we used the analytical electron microscopy techniques of energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry (EDS) and electron energy loss spectrometry (EELS) coupled with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The observed distribution of individual chemical species as a function of agglomerate size was linked to the material properties of the solid-phase precursors. For aerosol formed from gas-phase precursors by gas-to-particle conversion, the distribution of species on a manometer scale was found to correspond to the equilibrium phase distribution expected from equilibrium for the system at the flame temperatures.

  18. Satellite characterization of urban aerosols: Importance of including hygroscopicity and mixing state in the retrieval algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satellite characterization of urban aerosols: Importance of including hygroscopicity and mixing the sensitivity of the calculated optical properties of urban aerosols to (1) hygroscopicity and (2) internal of satellite retrievals of aerosol optical thickness (t) and aerosol effective radius (reff). State

  19. Direct Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mccomiskey, Allison

    Understanding sources of uncertainty in aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF), the difference in a given radiative flux component with and without aerosol, is essential to quantifying changes in Earth's radiation budget. We examine the uncertainty in DRF due to measurement uncertainty in the quantities on which it depends: aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, solar geometry, and surface albedo. Direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface as well as sensitivities, the changes in DRF in response to unit changes in individual aerosol or surface properties, are calculated at three locations representing distinct aerosol types and radiative environments. The uncertainty in DRF associated with a given property is computed as the product of the sensitivity and typical measurement uncertainty in the respective aerosol or surface property. Sensitivity and uncertainty values permit estimation of total uncertainty in calculated DRF and identification of properties that most limit accuracy in estimating forcing. Total uncertainties in modeled local diurnally averaged forcing range from 0.2 to 1.3 W m-2 (42 to 20%) depending on location (from tropical to polar sites), solar zenith angle, surface reflectance, aerosol type, and aerosol optical depth. The largest contributor to total uncertainty in DRF is usually single scattering albedo; however decreasing measurement uncertainties for any property would increase accuracy in DRF. Comparison of two radiative transfer models suggests the contribution of modeling error is small compared to the total uncertainty although comparable to uncertainty arising from some individual properties.

  20. Aerosol Observing System (AOS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jefferson, A

    2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Aerosol Observing System (AOS) is a suite of in situ surface measurements of aerosol optical and cloud-forming properties. The instruments measure aerosol properties that influence the earth’s radiative balance. The primary optical measurements are those of the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients as a function of particle size and radiation wavelength and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements as a function of percent supersaturation. Additional measurements include those of the particle number concentration and scattering hygroscopic growth. Aerosol optical measurements are useful for calculating parameters used in radiative forcing calculations such as the aerosol single-scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, mass scattering efficiency, and hygroscopic growth. CCN measurements are important in cloud microphysical models to predict droplet formation.

  1. Aerosol optical hygroscopicity measurements during the 2010 CARES Campaign

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkinson, D. B.; Radney, J. G.; Lum, J.; Kolesar, K. R.; Cziczo, Daniel J.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Zhang, Qi; Setyan, Ari; Zelenyuk, Alla; Cappa, Christopher

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of the effect of water uptake on particulate light extinction or scattering made at two locations during the 2010 CARES study around Sacramento, CA are reported. The observed influence of water uptake, characterized through the dimensionless optical hygroscopicity parameter ?, is compared with calculations constrained by observed particle size distributions and size-dependent particle composition. A closure assessment has been carried out that allowed for determination of the average hygroscopic growth factors (GF) at 85% relative humidity and the dimensionless hygroscopicity parameter ? for oxygenated organic aerosol (OA) and for supermicron particles, yielding ? = 0.1–0.15 and 0.9–1.0, respectively. The derived range of oxygenated OA ? values are in line with previous observations. The relatively large values for supermicron particles is consistent with substantial contributions of sea salt-containing particles in this size range. Analysis of time-dependent variations in the supermicron particle hygroscopicity suggest that atmospheric processing, specifically chloride displacement by nitrate and the accumulation of secondary organics on supermicron particles, can lead to substantial depression of the observed GF.

  2. 8, 7194, 2008 Sea salt aerosol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 8, 71­94, 2008 Sea salt aerosol refractive indices R. Irshad et al. Title Page Abstract Discussions Laboratory measurements of the optical properties of sea salt aerosol R. Irshad 1 , R. G. Grainger salt aerosol refractive indices R. Irshad et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions

  3. Evolution of biomass burning aerosol properties from an agricultural fire in southern Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Highwood, Ellie

    Evolution of biomass burning aerosol properties from an agricultural fire in southern Africa Steven Met Office C-130 within a distinct biomass burning plume during the Southern AFricAn Regional science, and P. R. Buseck, Evolution of biomass burning aerosol properties from an agricultural fire in southern

  4. CARES: Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study Science Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaveri, RA; Shaw, WJ; Cziczo, DJ

    2010-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbonaceous aerosol components, which include black carbon (BC), urban primary organic aerosols (POA), biomass burning aerosols, and secondary organic aerosols (SOA) from both urban and biogenic precursors, have been previously shown to play a major role in the direct and indirect radiative forcing of climate. The primary objective of the CARES 2010 intensive field study is to investigate the evolution of carbonaceous aerosols of different types and their effects on optical and cloud formation properties.

  5. Effects of spatial and temporal variations in aerosol properties on mean cloud albedo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in quantifying the effects of cloud on radiation budget and aerosol indirect effects on global scaleEffects of spatial and temporal variations in aerosol properties on mean cloud albedo Jian Wang1 effect on mean cloud albedo, was investigated using data collected at Pt. Reyes, California, during

  6. REPRESENTING AEROSOL DYNAMICS AND PROPERTIES IN CHEMICAL TRANSPORT MODELS BY THE METHOD OF MOMENTS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SCHWARTZ,S.E.; MCGRAW,R.; BENKOVITZ,C.M.; WRIGHT,D.L.

    2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric aerosols, suspensions of solid or liquid particles, are an important multi-phase system. Aerosols scatter and absorb shortwave (solar) radiation, affecting climate (Charlson et al., 1992; Schwartz, 1996) and visibility; nucleate cloud droplet formation, modifying the reflectivity of clouds (Twomey et al., 1984; Schwartz and Slingo, 1996) as well as contributing to composition of cloudwater and to wet deposition (Seinfeld and Pandis, 1998); and affect human health through inhalation (NRC, 1998). Existing and prospective air quality regulations impose standards on concentrations of atmospheric aerosols to protect human health and welfare (EPA, 1998). Chemical transport and transformation models representing the loading and geographical distribution of aerosols and precursor gases are needed to permit development of effective and efficient strategies for meeting air quality standards, and for examining aerosol effects on climate retrospectively and prospectively for different emissions scenarios. Important aerosol properties and processes depend on their size distribution: light scattering, cloud nucleating properties, dry deposition, and penetration into airways of lungs. The evolution of the mass loading itself depends on particle size because of the size dependence of growth and removal processes. For these reasons it is increasingly recognized that chemical transport and transformation models must represent not just the mass loading of atmospheric particulate matter but also the aerosol microphysical properties and the evolution of these properties if aerosols are to be accurately represented in these models. If the size distribution of the aerosol is known, a given property can be evaluated as the integral of the appropriate kernel function over the size distribution. This has motivated the approach of determining aerosol size distribution, and of explicitly representing this distribution and its evolution in chemical transport models.

  7. Aerosol radiative forcing and the accuracy of satellite aerosol optical depth retrieval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) of the AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) is typically between 0.06 and 0.15, while the RMSE between t = 0.1 and t = 0.8. The Department of Energy research satellite instrument, the Multispectral aerosol radiative forcing are known, the predictions of future global warming may remain unacceptably high

  8. Intercomparison and Evaluation of Global Aerosol Microphysical Properties among AeroCom Models of a Range of Complexity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, G. W.; Carslaw, K. S.; Reddington, C. L.; Pringle, K. J.; Schulz, M.; Asmi, A.; Spracklen, D. V.; Ridley, D. A.; Woodhouse, M. T.; Lee, L. A.; Zhang, Kai; Ghan, Steven J.; Easter, Richard C.; Liu, Xiaohong; Stier, P.; Lee, Y. H.; Adams, P. J.; Tost, H.; Lelieveld, J.; Bauer, S.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; van Noije, T.; Strunk, A.; Vignati, E.; Bellouin, N.; Dalvi, M.; Johnson, C. E.; Bergman, T.; Kokkola, H.; Von Salzen, Knut; Yu, Fangqun; Luo, Gan; Petzold, A.; Heintzenberg, J.; Clarke, A. D.; Ogren, J. A.; Gras, J.; Baltensperger, Urs; Kaminski, U.; Jennings, S. G.; O'Dowd, C. D.; Harrison, R. M.; Beddows, D. C.; Kulmala, M.; Viisanen, Y.; Ulevicius, V.; Mihalopoulos, Nikos; Zdimal, V.; Fiebig, M.; Hansson, H. C.; Swietlicki, E.; Henzing, J. S.

    2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Many of the next generation of global climate models will include aerosol schemes which explicitly simulate the microphysical processes that determine the particle size distribution. These models enable aerosol optical properties and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations to be determined by fundamental aerosol processes, which should lead to a more physically based simulation of aerosol direct and indirect radiative forcings. This study examines the global variation in particle size distribution simulated by twelve global aerosol microphysics models to quantify model diversity and to identify any common biases against observations. Evaluation against size distribution measurements from a new European network of aerosol supersites shows that the mean model agrees quite well with the observations at many sites on the annual mean, but there are some seasonal biases common to many sites. In particular, at many of these European sites, the accumulation mode number concentration is biased low during winter and Aitken mode concentrations tend to be overestimated in winter and underestimated in summer. At high northern latitudes, the models strongly underpredict Aitken and accumulation particle concentrations compared to the measurements, consistent with previous studies that have highlighted the poor performance of global aerosol models in the Arctic. In the marine boundary layer, the models capture the observed meridional variation in the size distribution, which is dominated by the Aitken mode at high latitudes, with an increasing concentration of accumulation particles with decreasing latitude. Considering vertical profiles, the models reproduce the observed peak in total particle concentrations in the upper troposphere due to new particle formation, although modelled peak concentrations tend to be biased high over Europe. Overall, the results suggest that most global aerosol microphysics models simulate the global variation of the particle size distribution with a good degree of skill, but some models are in poor agreement with the observations. Further work is required to better constrain size-resolved primary and secondary particle number sources, and an improved understanding of nucleation and growth (e.g. the role of nitrate and secondary organics) will improve the fidelity of simulated particle size distributions.

  9. An investigation of aerosol physical properties in Houston, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gasparini, Roberto

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From June through October 2001, three Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (TDMA) systems were operated around Houston, Texas, to obtain a large, high-quality dataset in order to explore characteristics of aerosol size distributions...

  10. A geostatistical data fusion technique for merging remote sensing and groundbased observations of aerosol optical thickness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalak, Anna M.

    A geostatistical data fusion technique for merging remote sensing and groundbased observations. Braverman, and C. E. Miller (2010), A geostatistical data fusion technique for merging remote sensing cloud properties (the aerosol indirect effect), producing a net cooling of the Earth surface, and can

  11. Aerosol Optical Depth Prediction from Satellite Observations by Multiple Instance Regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vucetic, Slobodan

    airborne particles that both reflect and absorb incoming solar radiation and whose effect on the Earth's radiation budget is one of the biggest challenges of current climate research. To help address profiles, cloud/aerosol properties, or vegetation cover. Achieving accurate estimations is a critical

  12. Climatology of aerosol optical depth in north?central Oklahoma: 1992–2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michalsky, Joseph J.; Denn, Frederick; Flynn, Connor J.; Hodges, G. B.; Kiedron, Piotr; Koontz, Annette S.; Schlemmer, James; Schwartz, Stephen E.

    2010-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD) has been measured at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program central facility near Lamont, Oklahoma, since the fall of 1992. Most of the data presented are from the multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer, a narrow?band, interference?filter Sun radiometer with five aerosol bands in the visible and near infrared; however, AOD measurements have been made simultaneously and routinely at the site by as many as three different types of instruments, including two pointing Sun radiometers. Scatterplots indicate high correlations and small biases consistent with earlier comparisons. The early part of this 16 year record had a disturbed stratosphere with residual Mt. Pinatubo aerosols, followed by the cleanest stratosphere in decades. As such, the last 13 years of the record reflect changes that have occurred predominantly in the troposphere. The field calibration technique is briefly described and compared to Langley calibrations from Mauna Loa Observatory. A modified cloudscreening technique is introduced that increases the number of daily averaged AODs retrieved annually to about 250 days compared with 175 days when a more conservative method was employed in earlier studies. AODs are calculated when the air mass is less than six; that is, when the Sun’s elevation is greater than 9.25°. The more inclusive cloud screen and the use of most of the daylight hours yield a data set that can be used to more faithfully represent the true aerosol climate for this site. The diurnal aerosol cycle is examined month?by?month to assess the effects of an aerosol climatology on the basis of infrequent sampling such as that from satellites.

  13. Effect of Solar Radiation on the Optical Properties and Molecular...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Radiation on the Optical Properties and Molecular Composition of Laboratory Proxies of Atmospheric Brown Carbon Effect of Solar Radiation on the Optical Properties and...

  14. The Optical Properties of Some Petroleum Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humphrey, Irvin W.

    1913-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    KU ScholarWorks | The University of Kansas Pre-1923 Dissertations and Theses Collection The Optical Properties of Some Petroleum Products 1913 by Irvin Wesley Humphrey This work was digitized by the Scholarly Communications program staff in the KU... PETROLEUM PRODUCTS 1913 THE OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF SOME PETROLEUM PRODUCTS. By I. W. Humphrey. Presented to the Faculty of the Graduate School partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science May 15, 1913. I...

  15. Laboratory investigation of chemical and physical properties of soot-containing aerosols 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Dan

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    SO4-coated soot aerosols; (3) effect of H2SO4 coating on scattering and extinction properties of soot particles. A low-pressure laminar-flow reactor, coupled to ion driftchemical ionization mass spectrometry (ID-CIMS) detection, is used to study...

  16. A06: Analysis of GRAPE data The effects of anthropogenic aerosols on cloud microphysical properties.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    the radiative balance of the atmosphere. This effect is known as the `first direct radiative forcing'[4 of this warming is to reduce the upward movement of moisture and in turn reduce the cloud cover[5]. This `semiA06: Analysis of GRAPE data The effects of anthropogenic aerosols on cloud microphysical properties

  17. Atmospheric Aerosols Aging Involving Organic Compounds and Impacts on Particle Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Chong

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    through sandstorm.2 Examples of anthropogenic sources are vehicle exhaust, plant emission, and construction sites. Some aerosols may have both biogenic and anthropogenic sources. For example, soot aerosols, also known as black carbon, can be produced... with an initial size of 150 nm increases slightly faster than those of soot with the initial size of 80 or 100 nm. Table 1. Properties of Fresh Soot Particles. Dp, nm mp, 10 ?16 g Dve, nm Npp a 82.4 1.47 54.1 20 101 2.34 63.2 32 155 7.77 94.3 105 a...

  18. Reduction of Ground-Based Sensor Sites for Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vucetic, Slobodan

    Reduction of Ground-Based Sensor Sites for Spatio- Temporal Analysis of Aerosols Vladan in this study is estimation of an important property of atmosphere, called Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD). Remote of spatio- temporal aerosol patterns on a global scale. Ground-based AOD estimation is more accurate

  19. Optical properties of inhomogeneous metallic hydrogen plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Broeck, N Van den; Tempere, J; Silvera, I F

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the optical properties of hydrogen as it undergoes a transition from the insulating molecular to the metallic atomic phase, when heated by a pulsed laser at megabar pressures in a diamond anvil cell. Most current experiments attempt to observe this transition by detecting a change in the optical reflectance and/or transmittance. Theoretical models for this change are based on the dielectric function calculated for bulk, homogeneous slabs of material. Experimentally, one expects a hydrogen plasma density that varies on a length scale not substantially smaller than the wave length of the probing light. We show that taking this inhomogeneity into account can lead to significant corrections in the reflectance and transmittance. We present a technique to calculate the optical properties of systems with a smoothly varying density of charge carriers, determine the optical response for metallic hydrogen in the diamond anvil cell experiment and contrast this with the standard results. Analyzing recent e...

  20. aerosol properties in-canopy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aerosol, cloud condensation nuclei, water accommodation coefficient, organic of aerosol size distribution, chemical composition and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration...

  1. The application of size- resolved hygroscopicity measurements to understand the physical and chemical properties of ambient aerosol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santarpia, Joshua Lee

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    THE APPLICATION OF SIZE-RESOLVED HYGROSCOPICITY MEASUREMENTS TO UNDERSTANDING THE PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF AMBIENT AEROSOL A Dissertation by JOSHUA L. SANTARPIA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A... AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF AMBIENT AEROSOL A Dissertation by JOSHUA L. SANTARPIA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved...

  2. Global Distribution and Climate Forcing of Marine Organic Aerosol - Part 2: Effects on Cloud Properties and Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gantt, Brett; Xu, Jun; Meskhidze, N.; Zhang, Yang; Nenes, Athanasios; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of simulations with the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) with a 7-mode Modal Aerosol Model were conducted to assess the changes in cloud microphysical properties and radiative forcing resulting from marine organic aerosols. Model simulations show that the anthropogenic aerosol indirect forcing (AIF) predicted by CAM5 is decreased in absolute magnitude by up to 0.09 Wm{sup -2} (7 %) when marine organic aerosols are included. Changes in the AIF from marine organic aerosols are associated with small global increases in low-level incloud droplet number concentration and liquid water path of 1.3 cm{sup -3} (1.5 %) and 0.22 gm{sup -2} (0.5 %), respectively. Areas especially sensitive to changes in cloud properties due to marine organic aerosol include the Southern Ocean, North Pacific Ocean, and North Atlantic Ocean, all of which are characterized by high marine organic emission rates. As climate models are particularly sensitive to the background aerosol concentration, this small but non-negligible change in the AIF due to marine organic aerosols provides a notable link for ocean-ecosystem marine low-level cloud interactions and may be a candidate for consideration in future earth system models.

  3. FY 2010 Fourth Quarter Report: Evaluation of the Dependency of Drizzle Formation on Aerosol Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, W; McGraw, R; Liu, Y; Wang, J; Vogelmann, A; Daum, PH

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Metric for Quarter 4: Report results of implementation of composite parameterization in single-column model (SCM) to explore the dependency of drizzle formation on aerosol properties. To better represent VOCALS conditions during a test flight, the Liu-Duam-McGraw (LDM) drizzle parameterization is implemented in the high-resolution Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, as well as in the single-column Community Atmosphere Model (CAM), to explore this dependency.

  4. Optical Properties of a ?-Vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luis Huerta; Jorge Zanelli

    2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Chern-Simons (CS) forms generalize the minimal coupling between gauge potentials and point charges, to sources represented by charged extended objects (branes). The simplest example of such a CS-brane coupling is a domain wall coupled to the electromagnetic CS three-form. This describes a topologically charged interface where the CS form AdA is supported, separating two three-dimensional spatial regions in 3+1 spacetime. Electrodynamics at either side of the brane is described by the same Maxwell's equations, but those two regions have different vacua, characterized by a different value of the \\theta-parameter multiplying the Pontryagin form F ^ F. The \\theta-term is the abelian version of the concept introduced by 't Hooft for the resolution of the U(1) problem in QCD. We point out that CS-generalized classical electrodynamics shows new phenomena when two neighboring regions with different \\theta-vacua are present. These topological effects result from surface effects induced by the boundary and we explore the consequences of such boundary effects for the propagation of the electromagnetic field in Maxwell theory. Several features, including optical and electrostatic/magnetostatic responses, which may be observable in condensed matter systems, like topological insulators, are discussed.

  5. BNL -65518-AB UNCERTAINTIES IN CLIMATE FORCING BY ANTHROPOGENIC AEROSOLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the earth radiation budget and climate by scattering and absorbing shortwave radiation (direct effect), by modifying cloud shortwave and longwave optical properties (indirect effect), and by modifying cloud of these aerosols, as well as determination of the radiative influence of a specified well characterized aerosol

  6. Observational Studies of Atmospheric Aerosols over Bozeman, Montana, Using a Two-Color Lidar, a Water Vapor DIAL, a Solar Radiometer,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Joseph A.

    Observational Studies of Atmospheric Aerosols over Bozeman, Montana, Using a Two-Color Lidar form 24 June 2010) ABSTRACT Coordinated observational data of atmospheric aerosols were collected over-based nephelometer. The optical properties and spatial distribution of the atmospheric aerosols were inferred from

  7. Ultrafast nonlinear optical properties of passive and active semiconductor devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motamedi, Ali Reza

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonlinear optical properties and ultrafast carrier dynamics of slab-coupled optical waveguide amplifiers, silicon nanowaveguides, and III-V semiconductor saturable Bragg reflectors are studied. The limits imposed by two ...

  8. Temporal variation of aerosol properties at a rural continental site and study of aerosol evolution through growth law analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (direct effect) and by changing the microphysical structure, lifetime, and coverage of clouds (indirect effect). While it is widely accepted that aerosols could have significant impact on global climate, at present the magnitudes of these effects are poorly under- stood. Unlike greenhouse gases, whose radiative

  9. Retrieval of Non-Spherical Dust Aerosol Properties from Satellite Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Xin

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An accurate and generalized global retrieval algorithm from satellite observations is a prerequisite to understand the radiative effect of atmospheric aerosols on the climate system. Current operational aerosol retrieval algorithms are limited...

  10. AEROSOL, CLOUDS, AND CLIMATE CHANGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SCHWARTZ, S.E.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Earth's climate is thought to be quite sensitive to changes in radiative fluxes that are quite small in absolute magnitude, a few watts per square meter, and in relation to these fluxes in the natural climate. Atmospheric aerosol particles exert influence on climate directly, by scattering and absorbing radiation, and indirectly by modifying the microphysical properties of clouds and in turn their radiative effects and hydrology. The forcing of climate change by these indirect effects is thought to be quite substantial relative to forcing by incremental concentrations of greenhouse gases, but highly uncertain. Quantification of aerosol indirect forcing by satellite- or ground-based remote sensing has proved quite difficult in view of inherent large variation in the pertinent observables such as cloud optical depth, which is controlled mainly by liquid water path and only secondarily by aerosols. Limited work has shown instances of large magnitude of aerosol indirect forcing, with local instantaneous forcing upwards of 50 W m{sup 66}-2. Ultimately it will be necessary to represent aerosol indirect effects in climate models to accurately identify the anthropogenic forcing at present and over secular time and to assess the influence of this forcing in the context of other forcings of climate change. While the elements of aerosol processes that must be represented in models describing the evolution and properties of aerosol particles that serve as cloud condensation particles are known, many important components of these processes remain to be understood and to be represented in models, and the models evaluated against observation, before such model-based representations can confidently be used to represent aerosol indirect effects in climate models.

  11. Electronic and optical properties of Praseodymium trifluoride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saini, Sapan Mohan, E-mail: smsaini.phy@nitrr.ac.in [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Raipur-492010, (CG) (India)

    2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the role of f- states on electronic and optical properties of Praseodymium trifluoride (PrF{sub 3}) compound. Full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FPLAPW) method with the inclusion of spin orbit coupling has been used. We employed the local spin density approximation (LSDA) and Coulomb-corrected local spin density approximation (LSDA+U). LSDA+U is known for treating the highly correlated 4f electrons properly. Our theoretical investigation shows that LSDA+U approximation reproduce the correct insulating ground state of PrF{sub 3}. On the other hand there is no significant difference of reflectivity calculated by LSDA and LSDA+U. We find that the reflectivity for PrF{sub 3} compound stays low till around 7 eV which is consistent with their large energy gaps. Our calculated reflectivity compares well with the experimental data. The results are analyzed in the light of transitions involved.

  12. Measurements of Carbonaceous Aerosols using Semi-Continuous Thermal-Optical Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Xiao-Ying

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbonaceous aerosols are major components in air pollution as a result of energy consumption, thus measurement of them is important to waste management. Increasing interest has been drawn to the identification, measurement, analysis, and modeling of carbon aerosols in the past decade. This book chapter will provide a review of current state-of-art techniques to determine carbonaceous aerosols in relation to air pollution and waste management. The chapter will be composed of four parts. The introduction will discuss why carbon aerosols including elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), and total carbon (TC=EC+OC) are important to energy consumption, air pollution, waste management, and global climate change. Key definitions will be introduced. Relevant terminologies will be provided. The second part will be a review of the current state-of the art measurement techniques that are used to determine carbon aerosols. Both on-line and off-line methods will be described. Comparisons of different techniques that provide the same physical quantity will be provided based on recent literature findings. Differences among the physical parameters determined by various techniques will be discussed. The third part will focus on data analysis and products obtained from carbon aerosol measurements. In addition to EC, OC, and TC, primary organic carbon (POC) and secondary organic carbon (SOC) are of interest to researchers to understand the source and sink of carbonaceous aerosols. Techniques used to determine POC and SOC, such as the EC tracer method and positive matrix factorization, will be described and their differences discussed. Examples will be provided showing field data comparison between the Sunset organic carbon and elemental carbon field analyzer and the Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer, both of which are widely used for on-line aerosol measurements. The last part will report new trends and summarize future research needs in carbon aerosol measurement. Emerging problems will be identified and research priorities will be recommended.

  13. 4, 30133043, 2004 Optical properties in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , tartronic, succinic and glutaric acid. In addition we report data for pyruvic, pinonic, benzoic and phthalic spectral region of organic acids relevant to tropospheric aerosols C. E. Lund Myhre and C. J. Nielsen and absorption indices in the UV and visible region of selected aqueous organic acids relevant to tropospheric

  14. Aerosol mobility size spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Jian (Port Jefferson, NY); Kulkarni, Pramod (Port Jefferson Station, NY)

    2007-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for measuring aerosol size distribution within a sample containing aerosol particles. The device generally includes a spectrometer housing defining an interior chamber and a camera for recording aerosol size streams exiting the chamber. The housing includes an inlet for introducing a flow medium into the chamber in a flow direction, an aerosol injection port adjacent the inlet for introducing a charged aerosol sample into the chamber, a separation section for applying an electric field to the aerosol sample across the flow direction and an outlet opposite the inlet. In the separation section, the aerosol sample becomes entrained in the flow medium and the aerosol particles within the aerosol sample are separated by size into a plurality of aerosol flow streams under the influence of the electric field. The camera is disposed adjacent the housing outlet for optically detecting a relative position of at least one aerosol flow stream exiting the outlet and for optically detecting the number of aerosol particles within the at least one aerosol flow stream.

  15. Quantifying aerosol direct radiative effect with Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer observations: Top-of-atmosphere albedo change by aerosols based on land surface types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yang; Li, Qinbin; Kahn, Ralph A; Randerson, James T; Diner, David J

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    coincident MISR and MODIS aerosol optical depths over land2003), Estimates of the spectral aerosol single scatteringalbedo and aerosol radiative effects during SAFARI 2000, J.

  16. STABILITY PROPERTIES OF LIGHT PROPAGATING IN FIBER OPTICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasman, Alex

    STABILITY PROPERTIES OF LIGHT PROPAGATING IN FIBER OPTICS ST´EPHANE LAFORTUNE Summary The study is crucial in applications such as lasers and optical fibers. In this proposal I will focus on a model of fiber optics: the Manakov system. This system consists of two differential equations, that is two

  17. APPARENT WATER OPTICAL PROPERTIES AT THE CARIBBEAN TIME SERIES STATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    APPARENT WATER OPTICAL PROPERTIES AT THE CARIBBEAN TIME SERIES STATION Roy A. Armstrong, Jose M of Puerto Rico Mayagüez, Puerto Rico 00681 ABSTRACT The Caribbean Time Series, located 28 nautical miles in near- surface waters of the northeastern Caribbean Basin. Apparent optical properties such as, remote

  18. The Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) Science Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berkowitz, CM; Berg, LK; Cziczo, DJ; Flynn, CJ; Kassianov, EI; Fast, JD; Rasch, PJ; Shilling, JE; Zaveri, RA; Zelenyuk, A; Ferrare, RA; Hostetler, CA; Cairns, B; Russell, PB; Ervens, B

    2011-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) field campaign will provide a detailed set of observations with which to (1) perform radiative and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) closure studies, (2) evaluate a new retrieval algorithm for aerosol optical depth (AOD) in the presence of clouds using passive remote sensing, (3) extend a previously developed technique to investigate aerosol indirect effects, and (4) evaluate the performance of a detailed regional-scale model and a more parameterized global-scale model in simulating particle activation and AOD associated with the aging of anthropogenic aerosols. To meet these science objectives, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility will deploy the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) and the Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, for a 12-month period starting in the summer of 2012 in order to quantify aerosol properties, radiation, and cloud characteristics at a location subject to both clear and cloudy conditions, and clean and polluted conditions. These observations will be supplemented by two aircraft intensive observation periods (IOPs), one in the summer and a second in the winter. Each IOP will deploy one, and possibly two, aircraft depending on available resources. The first aircraft will be equipped with a suite of in situ instrumentation to provide measurements of aerosol optical properties, particle composition and direct-beam irradiance. The second aircraft will fly directly over the first and use a multi-wavelength high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) and scanning polarimeter to provide continuous optical and cloud properties in the column below.

  19. Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES), g1-aircraft, sedlacek sp2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sedlacek, Art

    2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of the Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) in 2010 was to investigate the evolution of carbonaceous aerosols of different types and their optical and hygroscopic properties in central California, with a focus on the Sacramento urban plume.

  20. Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES), g1-aircraft, sedlacek sp2

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sedlacek, Art

    The primary objective of the Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) in 2010 was to investigate the evolution of carbonaceous aerosols of different types and their optical and hygroscopic properties in central California, with a focus on the Sacramento urban plume.

  1. Relationships between inherent optical properties and the depth of penetration of solar radiation in optically complex coastal waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strathclyde, University of

    Relationships between inherent optical properties and the depth of penetration of solar radiation optical properties and the depth of penetration of solar radiation in optically complex coastal waters, J

  2. Maritime aerosol optical thickness measured by handheld sun photometers Kirk D. Knobelspiessea,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    thickness (AOT) and 2ngstrfm exponent reveal varied aerosol populations. A K-means unsupervised Sensor Inter-comparison and Merger for Biological and Interdisciplinary Oceanic Studies (SIMBIOS) Project

  3. A 4-D Climatology (1979-2009) of the Monthly Tropospheric Aerosol Optical Depth Distribution over the Mediterranean Region from a Comparative Evaluation and Blending of Remote Sensing and Model Products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nabat, P.; Somot, S.; Mallet, M.; Chiapello, I.; Morcrette, J. -J.; Solmon, F.; Szopa, S.; Dulac, F.; Collins, W.; Ghan, Steven J.; Horowitz, L.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Lee, Y. H.; Naik, Vaishali; Nagashima, T.; Shindell, Drew; Skeie, R. B.

    2013-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the 1980s several spaceborne sensors have been used to retrieve the aerosol optical depth (AOD) over the Mediterranean region. In parallel, AOD climatologies coming from different numerical model simulations are now also available, permitting to distinguish the contribution of several aerosol types to the total AOD. In this work, we perform a comparative analysis of this unique multiyear database in terms of total AOD and of its apportionment by the five main aerosol types (soil dust, seasalt, sulfate, black and organic carbon). We use 9 different satellite-derived monthly AOD products: NOAA/AVHRR, SeaWiFS (2 products), TERRA/MISR, TERRA/MODIS, AQUA/MODIS, ENVISAT/MERIS, PARASOL/POLDER and MSG/SEVIRI, as well as 3 more historical datasets: NIMBUS7/CZCS, TOMS (onboard NIMBUS7 and Earth- Probe) and METEOSAT/MVIRI. Monthly model datasets include the aerosol climatology from Tegen et al. (1997), the climate-chemistry models LMDz-OR-INCA and RegCM-4, the multi-model mean coming from the ACCMIP exercise, and the reanalyses GEMS and MACC. Ground-based Level- 2 AERONET AOD observations from 47 stations around the basin are used here to evaluate the model and satellite data. The sensor MODIS (on AQUA and TERRA) has the best average AOD scores over this region, showing a relevant spatiotemporal variability and highlighting high dust loads over Northern Africa and the sea (spring and summer), and sulfate aerosols over continental Europe (summer). The comparison also shows limitations of certain datasets (especially MERIS and SeaWiFS standard products). Models reproduce the main patterns of the AOD variability over the basin. The MACC reanalysis is the closest to AERONET data, but appears to underestimate dust over Northern Africa, where RegCM-4 is found closer to MODIS thanks to its interactive scheme for dust emissions. The vertical dimension is also investigated using the CALIOP instrument. This study confirms differences of vertical distribution between dust aerosols showing a large vertical spread, and other continental and marine aerosols which are confined in the boundary layer. From this compilation, we propose a 4-D blended product from model and satellite data, consisting in monthly time series of 3-D aerosol distribution at a 50 km horizontal resolution over the Euro-Mediterranean marine and continental region for the 2003–2009 period. The product is based on the total AOD from AQUA/MODIS, apportioned into sulfates, black and organic carbon from the MACC reanalysis, and into dust and sea-salt aerosols from RegCM-4 simulations, which are distributed vertically based on CALIOP climatology.We extend the 2003–2009 reconstruction to the past up to 1979 using the 2003–2009 average and applying the decreasing trend in sulfate aerosols from LMDz-OR-INCA, whose AOD trends over Europe and the Mediterranean are median among the ACCMIP models. Finally optical properties of the different aerosol types in this region are proposed from Mie calculations so that this reconstruction can be included in regional climate models for aerosol radiative forcing and aerosolclimate studies.

  4. Aerosol Best Estimate Value-Added Product

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, C; Turner, D; Koontz, A; Chand, D; Sivaraman, C

    2012-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Aerosol Best Estimate (AEROSOLBE) value-added product (VAP) is to provide vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, single scatter albedo, asymmetry parameter, and Angstroem exponents for the atmospheric column above the Central Facility at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. We expect that AEROSOLBE will provide nearly continuous estimates of aerosol optical properties under a range of conditions (clear, broken clouds, overcast clouds, etc.). The primary requirement of this VAP was to provide an aerosol data set as continuous as possible in both time and height for the Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) VAP in order to provide a structure for the comprehensive assessment of our ability to model atmospheric radiative transfer for all conditions. Even though BBHRP has been completed, AEROSOLBE results are very valuable for environmental, atmospheric, and climate research.

  5. Droplet activation properties of organic aerosols observed at an urban site during CalNex-LA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    directly influence the global energy budget, by scattering and absorbing incoming solar radiation [Jacobson. This effect is known as the first indirect aerosol effect or Twomey effect [Twomey, 1977]. The smaller cloud to an increase in cloud lifetime and coverage (the second indirect aerosol effect) [Albrecht, 1989]. Although

  6. Aerosols in Central California: Unexpectedly Large Contribution of Coarse Mode to Aerosol Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Barnard, James C.

    2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The majority of previous studies dealing with effect of coarse-mode aerosols on the radiation budget have focused primary on polluted regions with substantial aerosol loadings. We reexamine this effect for a relatively "pristine" area using a unique 1-month dataset collected during recent Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES). We demonstrate that the coarse-mode (supermicron) particles can contribute substantially (more than 50%) and frequently (up to 85% of time) to the total volume. In contrast to the conventional expectations that the radiative impact of coarse-mode aerosols should be small for "pristine" regions, we find that the neglecting of the large particles may lead to significant overestimation (up to 45%) of direct aerosol radiative forcing at the top-of atmosphere despite of very small aerosol optical depth (about 0.05 at 0.5 ). Our findings highlight the potential for widespread impacts of the coarse-mode aerosols on the pristine radiative properties over land and the need for more explicit inclusion of the coarse-mode aerosols in climate-related observational and model studies.

  7. OPTICAL AND DYNAMIC PROPERTIES OF UNDOPED AND DOPED SEMICONDUCTOR NANOSTRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant, C D; Zhang, J Z

    2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter provides an overview of some recent research activities on the study of optical and dynamic properties of semiconductor nanomaterials. The emphasis is on unique aspects of these properties in nanostructures as compared to bulk materials. Linear, including absorption and luminescence, and nonlinear optical as well as dynamic properties of semiconductor nanoparticles are discussed with focus on their dependence on particle size, shape, and surface characteristics. Both doped and undoped semiconductor nanomaterials are highlighted and contrasted to illustrate the use of doping to effectively alter and probe nanomaterial properties. Some emerging applications of optical nanomaterials are discussed towards the end of the chapter, including solar energy conversion, optical sensing of chemicals and biochemicals, solid state lighting, photocatalysis, and photoelectrochemistry.

  8. Optical properties of nanostructured silicon-rich silicon dioxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stolfi, Michael Anthony

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have conducted a study of the optical properties of sputtered silicon-rich silicon dioxide (SRO) thin films with specific application for the fabrication of erbium-doped waveguide amplifiers and lasers, polarization ...

  9. Optical properties of polymeric materials for concentrator photovoltaic systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    photovoltaics (CPV), we are evaluating the optical properties and solar radiation durability of a number sheet (e.g., DuPontTM PV5300) have applications as encapsulants in crystalline silicon (c-Si) and other

  10. EAS/CEE 6795 Atmospheric Aerosols Fall 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Rodney

    EAS/CEE 6795 Atmospheric Aerosols Fall 2011 Mon Wed Fri ­ 11 concepts of aerosol physics with applications to atmospheric aerosols. Text Book: Hinds, Aerosol Technology: Properties, behavior and measurement of airborne particles

  11. Influence of anthropogenic aerosol on cloud optical depth and albedo shown by satellite measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - flux of sulfate aerosol from industrial regions of Europe or North America to remote areas of the North- atmosphere system over the industrial period and a cooling influence on climate. Estimates of the global), the negative sign indicating a cooling influence. Such a global mean forcing would more than offset the warming

  12. Modeling aerosols and their interactions with shallow cumuli during the 2007 CHAPS field study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Berg, Larry K.; Fast, Jerome D.; Easter, Richard C.; Laskin, Alexander; Chapman, Elaine G.; Gustafson, William I.; Liu, Ying; Berkowitz, Carl M.

    2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with chemistry (WRF-Chem) is used to simulate relationships between aerosols and clouds in the vicinity of Oklahoma City during the June 2007 Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS). The regional scale simulation completed using 2 km horizontal grid spacing evaluates four important relationships between aerosols and shallow cumulus clouds observed during CHAPS. First, the model reproduces the trends of higher nitrate volume fractions in cloud droplet residuals compared to interstitial non-activated aerosols, as measured using the Aerosol Mass Spectrometer. Comparing simulations with cloud chemistry turned on and off, we show that nitric acid vapor uptake by cloud droplets explains the higher nitrate content of cloud droplet residuals. Second, as documented using an offline code, both aerosol water and other inorganics (OIN), which are related to dust and crustal emissions, significantly affect predicted aerosol optical properties. Reducing the OIN content of wet aerosols by 50% significantly improves agreement of model predictions with measurements of aerosol optical properties. Third, the simulated hygroscopicity of aerosols is too high as compared to their hygroscopicity derived from cloud condensation nuclei and particle size distribution measurements, indicating uncertainties associated with simulating size-dependent chemical composition and treatment of aerosol mixing state within the model. Fourth, the model reasonably represents the observations of the first aerosol indirect effect where pollutants in the vicinity of Oklahoma City increase cloud droplet number concentrations and decrease the droplet effective radius. While previous studies have often focused on cloud-aerosol interactions in stratiform and deep convective clouds, this study highlights the ability of regional-scale models to represent some of the important aspects of cloud-aerosol interactions associated with fields of short-lived shallow cumuli.

  13. Aerosol Single-Scattering Albedo and Asymmetry Parameter from MFRSR Observations during the ARM Aerosol IOP 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Flynn, Connor J.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Barnard, James C.

    2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometers (MFRSRs) provide routine measurements of the aerosol optical depth ( << OLE Object: Microsoft Equation 3.0 >> ) at six wavelengths (0.415, 0.5, 0.615, 0.673, 0.870 and 0.94  << OLE Object: Picture (Metafile) >> ). The single-scattering albedo ( << OLE Object: Microsoft Equation 3.0 >> ) is typically estimated from the MFRSR measurements by assuming the asymmetry parameter ( << OLE Object: Microsoft Equation 3.0 >> ). In most instances, however, it is not easy to set an appropriate value of << OLE Object: Microsoft Equation 3.0 >> due to its strong temporal and spatial variability. Here, we introduce and validate an updated version of our retrieval technique that allows one to estimate simultaneously << OLE Object: Microsoft Equation 3.0 >> and << OLE Object: Microsoft Equation 3.0 >> for different types of aerosol. We use the aerosol and radiative properties obtained during the Atmospheric Science Program (ARM) Aerosol Intensive Operational Period (IOP) to validate our retrieval in two ways. First, the MFRSR-retrieved optical properties are compared with those obtained from independent surface, Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and aircraft measurements. The MFRSR-retrieved optical properties are in reasonable agreement with these independent measurements. Second, we perform radiative closure experiments using the MFRSR-retrieved optical properties. The calculated broadband values of the direct and diffuse fluxes are comparable (~ 5 << OLE Object: Microsoft Equation 3.0 >> ) to those obtained from measurements.

  14. Development and Characterization of a Thermodenuder for Aerosol Volatility Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Timothy Onasch

    2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This SBIR Phase I project addressed the critical need for improved characterization of carbonaceous aerosol species in the atmosphere. The proposed work focused on the development of a thermodenuder (TD) system capable of systematically measuring volatility profiles of primary and secondary organic aerosol species and providing insight into the effects of absorbing and nonabsorbing organic coatings on particle absorption properties. This work provided the fundamental framework for the generation of essential information needed for improved predictions of ambient aerosol loadings and radiative properties by atmospheric chemistry models. As part of this work, Aerodyne Research, Inc. (ARI) continued to develop and test, with the final objective of commercialization, an improved thermodenuder system that can be used in series with any aerosol instrument or suite of instruments (e.g., aerosol mass spectrometers-AMS, scanning mobility particle sizers-SMPS, photoacoustic absorption spectrometers-PAS, etc.) to obtain aerosol chemical, physical, and optical properties as a function of particle volatility. In particular, we provided the proof of concept for the direct coupling of our improved TD design with a full microphysical model to obtain volatility profiles for different organic aerosol components and to allow for meaningful comparisons between different TD-derived aerosol measurements. In a TD, particles are passed through a heated zone and a denuding (activated charcoal) zone to remove semi-volatile material. Changes in particle size, number concentration, optical absorption, and chemical composition are subsequently detected with aerosol instrumentation. The aerosol volatility profiles provided by the TD will strengthen organic aerosol emission inventories, provide further insight into secondary aerosol formation mechanisms, and provide an important measure of particle absorption (including brown carbon contributions and identification, and absorption enhancements due to coatings on soot particles). The successfully completed Phase I project included construction of a prototype design for the TD with detailed physical modeling, testing with laboratory and ambient aerosol particles, and the initiation of a detailed microphysical model of the aerosol particles passing through the TD to extract vapor pressure distributions. The objective of the microphysical model is to derive vapor pressure distributions (i.e. vapor pressure ranges, including single chemical compounds, mixtures of known compounds, and complex ‘real-world’ aerosols, such as SOA, and soot particles with absorbing and nonabsorbing coatings) from TD measurements of changes in particle size, mass, and chemical composition for known TD temperatures and flow rates (i.e. residence times). The proposed Phase II project was designed to optimize several TD systems for different instrument applications and to combine the hardware and modeling into a robust package for commercial sales.

  15. The Effects of Black Carbon and Sulfate Aerosols in ChinaRegions on East Asia Monsoons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Bai [ORNL; Liu, Yu [Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences, Beijing, China; Sun, Jiaren [South China Institute of Environmental Sciences, Guangzhou, China

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we examine the direct effects of sulfate and black carbon aerosols in China on East Asia monsoons and its precipitation processes by using the CAM3.0 model. It is demonstrated that sulfate and black carbon aerosols in China both have the effects to weaken East Asia monsoons in both summer and winter seasons. However, they certainly differ from each other in affecting vertical structures of temperature and atmospheric circulations. Their differences are expected because of their distinct optical properties, i.e., scattering vs. absorbing. Even for a single type of aerosol, its effects on temperature structures and atmospheric circulations are largely season-dependent. Applications of T-test on our results indicate that forcing from black carbon aerosols over China is relatively weak and limited. It is also evident from our results that the effects of synthetic aerosols (sulfate and black carbon together) on monsoons are not simply a linear summation between these two types of aerosols. Instead, they are determined by their integrated optical properties. Synthetic aerosols to a large degree resemble effects of sulfate aerosols. This implies a likely scattering property for the integration of black carbon and sulfate aerosols in China.

  16. Sensitivity of aerosol properties to new particle formation mechanism and to primary emissions in a continental-scale chemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of aerosol particles and in turn their number concentration and size distribution. Aerosol particles can grow contribution from coagulation. The aerosol mass concentration, which is primarily in the accumulation mode of aerosol number concentration and size distri- bution is important for considerations of the aerosol

  17. New gel phantoms simulating optical properties of biological tissue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Mija

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . TABLE OF CONTENTS vt LIST OF FIGURES . CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION. Tissue Optical Properties . . Beer's Law. Snell's Law Optical Fiber. Optical Parameters 1. 5. 1 N(r, s), 1. 5. 2 Radiance L(r, s). 1. 5. 3 Fluence Rate $( r) 1. 5. 4 Net Flux... reflection . . 3 Cross section of an optical fiber 4 Geometry used to depict the definition of radiance . . . . 5 Scattering of radiance 6 The preparation of the new phantom. 7 Schematic of experimental setup . 8 Phantom setup 9 Schematic of reiractive...

  18. Optical properties and structure of beryllium lead silicate glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhidkov, I. S., E-mail: i.s.zhidkov@urfu.ru [Ural Federal University, Mira Str. 19, Yekaterinburg, 620002, Russia and Institute of Metal Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences-Ural Division, S. Kovalevskoi Str. 18, 620990 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Zatsepin, A. F.; Cholakh, S. O.; Kuznetsova, Yu. A. [Ural Federal University, Mira Str. 19, Yekaterinburg, 620002 (Russian Federation)

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Luminescence and optical properties and structural features of (BeO){sub x}(PbO?SiO{sub 2}){sub 1?x} glasses (x = 0 ÷ 0.3) are investigated by means of optical absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The regularities of the formation of the optical absorption edge and static disorder are studied. It is shown that the optical absorption and luminescence are determined by transitions between localized states of lead ions. The impact of beryllium oxide on optical and luminescence properties and electronic structure of bands tails is discussed. The presence of two different concentration ranges with various short-range order structure and band tails nature has been established.

  19. Chiral imides as potential chiroptical switches: synthesis and optical properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wan, Xin-hua

    Chiral imides as potential chiroptical switches: synthesis and optical properties Erin K. Todd and their electrochemical, absorption, fluorescent, and chiroptical properties were examined for their potential application 613 520 2316; e-mail: wangw@ccs.carleton.ca Tetrahedron Letters 46 (2005) 587­590 Tetrahedron Letters

  20. The Evolution of the Physicochemical Properties of Aerosols in the Atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomlinson, Jason

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A Differential Mobility Analyzer/Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (DMA/TDMA) system was used to measure simultaneously the size distribution and hygroscopicity of the ambient aerosol population. The system was operated aboard the National...

  1. Optical and electronic properties of two dimensional graphitic silicon carbide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Xiao; Lin, Shisheng; Hakro, Ayaz Ali; Cao, Te; Chen, Hongsheng; Zhang, Baile

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical and electronic properties of two dimensional few layers graphitic silicon carbide (GSiC), in particular monolayer and bilayer, are investigated by density functional theory and found different from that of graphene and silicene. Monolayer GSiC has direct bandgap while few layers exhibit indirect bandgap. The bandgap of monolayer GSiC can be tuned by an in-plane strain. Properties of bilayer GSiC are extremely sensitive to the interlayer distance. These predictions promise that monolayer GSiC could be a remarkable candidate for novel type of light-emitting diodes utilizing its unique optical properties distinct from graphene, silicene and few layers GSiC.

  2. Optical Properties of Moderately-Absorbing Organic and Mixed Organic/Inorganic Particles at Very High Humidities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond, Tami C; Rood, Mark J; Brem, Benjamin T; Mena-Gonzalez, Francisco C; Chen, Yanju

    2012-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Relative humidity (RH) affects the water content of an aerosol, altering its ability to scatter and absorb light, which is important for aerosol effects on climate and visibility. This project involves in situ measurement and modeling of aerosol optical properties including absorption, scattering and extinction at three visible wavelengths (467, 530, 660 nm), for organic carbon (OC) generated by pyrolysis of biomass, ammonium sulfate and sodium chloride, and their mixtures at controlled RH conditions. Novel components of this project include investigation of: (1) Changes in all three of these optical properties at scanned RH conditions; (2) Optical properties at RH values up to 95%, which are usually extrapolated instead of measured; and (3) Examination of aerosols generated by the pyrolysis of wood, which is representative of primary atmospheric organic carbon, and its mixture with inorganic aerosol. Scattering and extinction values were used to determine light absorption by difference and single scattering albedo values. Extensive instrumentation development and benchmarking with independently measured and modeled values were used to obtain and evaluate these new results. The single scattering albedo value for a dry absorbing polystyrene microsphere benchmark agreed within 0.02 (absolute value) with independently published results at 530 nm. Light absorption by a nigrosin (sample light-absorbing) benchmark increased by a factor of 1.24 +/-0.06 at all wavelengths as RH increased from 38 to 95%. Closure modeling with Mie theory was able to reproduce this increase with the linear volume average (LVA) refractive index mixing rule for this water soluble compound. Absorption by biomass OC aerosol increased by a factor of 2.1 +/- 0.7 and 2.3 +/- 1.2 between 32 and 95% RH at 467 nm and 530 nm, but there was no detectable absorption at 660 nm. Additionally, the spectral dependence of absorption by OC that was observed with filter measurements was confirmed qualitatively in situ at 467 and 530 nm. Closure modeling with the dynamic effective medium approximation (DEMA) refractive index model was able to capture the increasing absorption trend with RH indicating that the droplets were heterogeneously mixed while containing dispersed insoluble absorbing material within those droplets. Seven other refractive index mixing models including LVA did not adequately describe the measurements for OC. Mixing the biomass OC aerosol with select mass fractions of ammonium sulfate ranging from 25 to 36% and sodium chloride ranging from 21 to 30% resulted in an increase in light scattering and extinction with RH and inorganic mass fraction. However, no detectable difference in light absorption behavior in comparison to pure biomass OC was observed. The main finding of this research is a measured increase in absorption with increasing RH, which is currently not represented in radiative transfer models even though biomass burning produces most of the primary OC aerosol in the atmosphere.

  3. Biomineralized structural materials with functional optical properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Ling, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many biological structural materials exhibit "mechanical property amplification" through their intricate hierarchical composite designs. In the past several decades, significant progress has been achieved in elucidating ...

  4. Thermodynamics, Optical Properties and Coordination Modes of Np(V) with Dipicolinic Acid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Guoxin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermodynamics, Optical Properties and Coordination Modes ofacid, complexation, thermodynamics, coordination mode 1.

  5. aerosol flow reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    APPROACH TO SPACEBORN HYPERSPECTRAL OPTICAL FLOW ESTIMATION ON DUST AEROSOLS Fabian E, Canada ABSTRACT The significant role dust aerosols play in the earth's climate sys- tem and...

  6. aerosol formation durint: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    XI, Universit de 86 8, 68456901, 2008 Aerosol optical Physics Websites Summary: of solar radiation by atmospheric aerosols is a key el- ement of the Earth's radiative energy...

  7. Soot aerosol properties in laminar soot-emitting microgravity nonpremixed flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konsur, B.; Megaridis, C.M.; Griffin, D.W.

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The spatial distributions and morphological properties of the soot aerosol are examined experimentally in a series of 0-g laminar gas-jet nonpremixed flames. The methodology deploys round jet diffusion flames of nitrogen-diluted acetylene fuel burning in quiescent air at atmospheric pressure. Full-field laser-light extinction is utilized to determine transient soot spatial distributions within the flames. Thermophoretic sampling is employed in conjunction with transmission electron microscopy to define soot microstructure within the soot-emitting 0-g flames. The microgravity tests indicate that the 0-g flames attain a quasi-steady state roughly 0.7 s after ignition, and sustain their annular structure even beyond their luminous flame tip. The measured peak soot volume fractions show a complex dependence on burner exit conditions, and decrease in a nonlinear fashion with decreasing characteristic flow residence times. Fuel preheat by {approximately}140K appears to accelerate the formation of soot near the flame axis via enhanced field pyrolysis rates. The increased soot presence caused by the elevated fuel injection temperatures triggers higher flame radiative losses, which may account for the premature suppression of soot growth observed along the annular region of preheated-fuel flames. Electron micrographs of soot aggregates collected in 0-g reveal the presence of soot precursor particles near the symmetry axis at midflame height. The observations also verify that soot primary particle sizes are nearly uniform among aggregates present at the same flame location, but vary considerably with radius at a fixed distance from the burner. The maximum primary size in 0-g is found to be by 40% larger than in 1-g, under the same burner exit conditions. Estimates of the number concentration of primary particles and surface area of soot particulate phase per unit volume of the combustion gases are also made for selected in-flame locations.

  8. Magneto-optical properties of paramagnetic superrotors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Milner; A. Korobenko; J. Floß; I. Sh. Averbukh; V. Milner

    2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the dynamics of paramagnetic molecular superrotors in an external magnetic field. Optical centrifuge is used to create dense ensembles of oxygen molecules in ultra-high rotational states. It is shown for the first time, that the gas of rotating molecules becomes optically birefringent in the presence of magnetic field. The discovered effect of "magneto-rotational" birefringence indicates preferential alignment of molecular axes along the field direction. Our experimental observations are supported by numerical calculations and explained by means of an intuitive qualitative model, in which the influence of the applied magnetic field on the distribution of molecular axes is mediated by the spin-rotation coupling. We show the magnetic reversal of the rotational Raman signal, as well as investigate the robustness of the induced magneto-rotational birefringence with respect to collisions.

  9. Mixed metal films with switchable optical properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richardson, Thomas J.; Slack, Jonathan L.; Farangis, Baker; Rubin, Michael D.

    2001-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Thin, Pd-capped metallic films containing magnesium and first row transition metals (Mn, Fe, Co) switch reversibly from their initial reflecting state to visually transparent states when exposed to gaseous hydrogen or following cathodic polarization in an alkaline electrolyte. Reversion to the reflecting state is achieved by exposure to air or by anodic polarization. The films were prepared by co-sputtering from one magnesium target and one manganese, iron, or cobalt target. Both the dynamic optical switching range and the speed of the transition depend on the magnesium-transition metal ratio. Infrared spectra of films in the transparent, hydrided (deuterided) states support the presence of the intermetallic hydride phases Mg3MnH7, Mg2FeH6, and Mg2CoH5.

  10. Laboratory investigation of chemical and physical properties of soot-containing aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Dan

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    is affected by the mixing of soot with other aerosol constituents, such as sulfuric acid. In this work, experimental studies have been carried out focusing on three integral parts: (1) heterogeneous uptake of sulfuric acid on soot; (2) hygroscopic growth of H2...

  11. Aircraft Observations of Sub-cloud Aerosol and Convective Cloud Physical Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Axisa, Duncan

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This research focuses on aircraft observational studies of aerosol-cloud interactions in cumulus clouds. The data were collected in the summer of 2004, the spring of 2007 and the mid-winter and spring of 2008 in Texas, central Saudi Arabia...

  12. Assessment of the size, position, and optical properties of breast tumors in vivo by noninvasive optical methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assessment of the size, position, and optical properties of breast tumors in vivo by noninvasive optical methods Sergio Fantini, Scott A. Walker, Maria Angela Franceschini, Michael Kaschke, Peter M, and optical properties absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of tumors in the human breast. The tumor

  13. Optical Fiber Technique for In-Reactor Mechanical Properties Measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert S. Schley; Zilong Hua; David H. Hurley; Heng Ban

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In-reactor measurement of material properties is required for a better understanding of radiation effects on materials. We present an optical fiber based technique for measuring changes in elastic properties which involves exciting and measuring flexural vibrations in a thin cantilever beam. By exciting the beam and measuring the natural frequency, changes in the modulus of elasticity can be monitored. The technique is demonstrated by monitoring the elastic property changes of a beam fabricated from copper, as the copper undergoes recrystallization at elevated temperature.

  14. Optical properties of fly ash. Volume 2, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Self, S.A.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research performed under this contract was divided into four tasks under the following headings: Task 1, Characterization of fly ash; Task 2, Measurements of the optical constants of slags; Task 3, Calculations of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions; and Task 4, Measurements of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions. Tasks 1 and 4 constituted the Ph.D. research topic of Sarbajit Ghosal, while Tasks 2 and 3 constituted the Ph.D. research topic of Jon Ebert. Together their doctoral dissertations give a complete account of the work performed. This final report, issued in two volumes consists of an executive summary of the whole program followed by the dissertation of Ghosal and Ebert. Volume 2 contains the dissertation of Ebert which covers the measurements of the optical constants of slags, and calculations of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions. A list of publications and conference presentations resulting from the work is also included.

  15. Relating Aerosol Absorption due to Soot, Organic Carbon, and Dust to Emission Sources Determined from In-situ Chemical Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cazorla, Alberto; Bahadur, R.; Suski, Kaitlyn; Cahill, John F.; Chand, Duli; Schmid, Beat; Ramanathan, V.; Prather, Kimberly

    2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimating the aerosol contribution to the global or regional radiative forcing can take advantage of the relationship between the spectral aerosol optical properties and the size and chemical composition of aerosol. Long term global optical measurements from observational networks or satellites can be used in such studies, and using in-situ chemical mixing state measurements can help us to constrain the limitations of such an estimation. In this study, the Absorption Ångström Exponent (AAE) and the Scattering Ångström Exponent (SAE) are used to develop a new methodology for deducing chemical speciation based on wavelength dependence of the optical properties. In addition, in-situ optical properties and single particle chemical composition measured during three aircraft field campaigns are combined in order to validate the methodology for the estimation of aerosol composition using spectral optical properties. Results indicate a dominance of mixed types in the classification leading to an underestimation of the primary sources, however secondary sources are better classified. The distinction between carbonaceous aerosols from fossil fuel and biomass burning origins is not clear. On the other hand, the knowledge of the aerosol sources in California from chemical studies help to identify other misclassification such as the dust contribution.

  16. Droplet Activation Properties of Organic Aerosols Observed at an Urban Site during CalNex-LA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mei, Fan; Hayes, Patrick L.; Ortega, Amber; Taylor, Jonathan W.; Allan, James D.; Gilman, Jessica; Kuster, W. C.; de Gouw, Joost A.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Wang, Jian

    2013-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Size-resolved cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra and aerosol chemical composition were characterized at an urban supersite in Pasadena, California from 15 May to 4 June, 2010, during the CalNex campaign. The derived hygroscopicity (?CCN) of CCN-active particles with diameter between 97 and 165 nm ranged from 0.05 to 0.4. Diurnal variation showed a slight decrease of ?CCN from 8:00 to 16:00 (from 0.24 to 0.20), which is attributed to increasing organics volume fraction resulted from secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. The derived hygroscopicity distribution and maximum activated fraction of the size selected particles were examined as functions of photochemical age. The result indicates that condensation of secondary species (e.g., SOA and sulfate) quickly converted hydrophobic particles to hydrophilic ones, and during daytime, nearly every particle became a CCN at ~0.4% in just a few hours. Based on ?CCN and aerosol chemical composition, the organic hygroscopicity (?org) was derived, and ranged from 0.05 to 0.23 with an average value of 0.13, consistent with the results from earlier studies. The derived ?org generally increased with the organic oxidation level, and most of the variation in ?org could be explained by the variation of the organic O:C atomic ratio alone. The least squares fit of the data yielded ?org =(0.83±0.06) ? (O:C) +(-0.19±0.02). Compared to previous results based on CCN measurements of laboratory generated aerosols, ?org derived from measurements during the CalNex campaign exhibited stronger increase with O:C atomic ratio, and therefore substantially higher values for organics with average O:C greater than 0.5.

  17. Method for quantifying optical properties of the human lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Loree, deceased, Thomas R. (late of Albuquerque, NM); Bigio, Irving J. (Los Alamos, NM); Zuclich, Joseph A. (San Antonio, TX); Shimada, Tsutomu (Los Alamos, NM); Strobl, Karlheinz (Fiskdale, MA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method for quantifying optical properties of the human lens. The present invention includes the application of fiberoptic, OMA-based instrumentation as an in vivo diagnostic tool for the human ocular lens. Rapid, noninvasive and comprehensive assessment of the optical characteristics of a lens using very modest levels of exciting light are described. Typically, the backscatter and fluorescence spectra (from about 300- to 900-nm) elicited by each of several exciting wavelengths (from about 300- to 600-nm) are collected within a few seconds. The resulting optical signature of individual lenses is then used to assess the overall optical quality of the lens by comparing the results with a database of similar measurements obtained from a reference set of normal human lenses having various ages. Several metrics have been identified which gauge the optical quality of a given lens relative to the norm for the subject's chronological age. These metrics may also serve to document accelerated optical aging and/or as early indicators of cataract or other disease processes.

  18. Method for quantifying optical properties of the human lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Loree, T.R.; Bigio, I.J.; Zuclich, J.A.; Shimada, Tsutomu; Strobl, K.

    1999-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for quantifying optical properties of the human lens. The present invention includes the application of fiberoptic, OMA-based instrumentation as an in vivo diagnostic tool for the human ocular lens. Rapid, noninvasive and comprehensive assessment of the optical characteristics of a lens using very modest levels of exciting light are described. Typically, the backscatter and fluorescence spectra (from about 300- to 900-nm) elicited by each of several exciting wavelengths (from about 300- to 600-nm) are collected within a few seconds. The resulting optical signature of individual lenses is then used to assess the overall optical quality of the lens by comparing the results with a database of similar measurements obtained from a reference set of normal human lenses having various ages. Several metrics have been identified which gauge the optical quality of a given lens relative to the norm for the subject`s chronological age. These metrics may also serve to document accelerated optical aging and/or as early indicators of cataract or other disease processes. 8 figs.

  19. Evaluation of the carbon content of aerosols from the burn- ing of biomass in the Brazilian Amazon using thermal, op- tical and thermal-optical analysis methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soto-Garcia, Lydia L.; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Andreae, Tracey W.; taxo, Paulo Ar-; Maenhaut, Willy; Kirchstetter, Thomas; Novakov, T.; Chow, Judith C.; Mayol-Bracero, Olga L.

    2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Aerosol samples were collected at a pasture site in the Amazon Basin as part of the project LBA-SMOCC-2002 (Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia - Smoke Aerosols, Clouds, Rainfall and Climate: Aerosols from Biomass Burning Perturb Global and Regional Climate). Sampling was conducted during the late dry season, when the aerosol composition was dominated by biomass burning emissions, especially in the submicron fraction. A 13-stage Dekati low-pressure impactor (DLPI) was used to collect particles with nominal aerodynamic diameters (D{sub p}) ranging from 0.03 to 0.10 m. Gravimetric analyses of the DLPI substrates and filters were performed to obtain aerosol mass concentrations. The concentrations of total, apparent elemental, and organic carbon (TC, EC{sub a}, and OC) were determined using thermal and thermal-optical analysis (TOA) methods. A light transmission method (LTM) was used to determine the concentration of equivalent black carbon (BC{sub e}) or the absorbing fraction at 880 nm for the size-resolved samples. During the dry period, due to the pervasive presence of fires in the region upwind of the sampling site, concentrations of fine aerosols (D{sub p} < 2.5 {mu}m: average 59.8 {mu}g m{sup -3}) were higher than coarse aerosols (D{sub p} > 2.5 {mu}m: 4.1 {mu}g m{sup -3}). Carbonaceous matter, estimated as the sum of the particulate organic matter (i.e., OC x 1.8) plus BC{sub e}, comprised more than 90% to the total aerosol mass. Concentrations of EC{sub a} (estimated by thermal analysis with a correction for charring) and BCe (estimated by LTM) averaged 5.2 {+-} 1.3 and 3.1 {+-} 0.8 {mu}g m{sup -3}, respectively. The determination of EC was improved by extracting water-soluble organic material from the samples, which reduced the average light absorption {angstrom} exponent of particles in the size range of 0.1 to 1.0 {mu}m from > 2.0 to approximately 1.2. The size-resolved BC{sub e} measured by the LTM showed a clear maximum between 0.4 and 0.6 m in diameter. The concentrations of OC and BC{sub e} varied diurnally during the dry period, and this variation is related to diurnal changes in boundary layer thickness and in fire frequency.

  20. Atmospheric optical calibration system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hulstrom, Roland L. (Bloomfield, CO); Cannon, Theodore W. (Golden, CO)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions.

  1. Atmospheric optical calibration system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hulstrom, R.L.; Cannon, T.W.

    1988-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions. 7 figs.

  2. INHERENT WATER OPTICAL PROPERTIES AT THE CARIBBEAN TIME SERIES STATION (CaTS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    INHERENT WATER OPTICAL PROPERTIES AT THE CARIBBEAN TIME SERIES STATION (CaTS) Fernando Gilbes Rico 00681 ABSTRACT The temporal variability of the inherent water optical properties at the Caribbean wavelengths, but in all cases, the values were less than one. The correlation between bio-optical properties

  3. Aerosol optical and hygroscopic properties during TexAQS-GoMACCS 2006 and their impact on aerosol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by diesel-fueled mobile sources and from the numerous coal- fired industries and power generation stations

  4. Science Overview Document Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) April 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SJ Ghan; B Schmid; JM Hubbe; CJ Flynn; A Laskin; AA Zelenyuk; DJ Czizco; CN Long; G McFarquhar; J Verlinde; J Harrington; JW Strapp; P Liu; A Korolev; A McDonald; M Wolde; A Fridlind; T Garrett; G Mace; G Kok; S Brooks; D Collins; D Lubin; P Lawson; M Dubey; C Mazzoleni; M Shupe; S Xie; DD Turner; Q Min; EJ Mlawer; D Mitchell

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ARM Climate Research Facility’s (ACRF) Aerial Vehicle Program (AVP) will deploy an intensive cloud and aerosol observing system to the ARM North Slope of Alaska (NSA) locale for a five week Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) during period 29 March through 30 April 2008. The deployment period is within the International Polar Year, thus contributing to and benefiting from the many ancillary observing systems collecting data synergistically. We will deploy the Canadian National Research Council Convair 580 aircraft to measure temperature, humidity, total particle number, aerosol size distribution, single particle composition, concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei and ice nuclei, optical scattering and absorption, updraft velocity, cloud liquid water and ice contents, cloud droplet and crystal size distributions, cloud particle shape, and cloud extinction. In addition to these aircraft measurements, ISDAC will deploy two instruments at the ARM site in Barrow: a spectroradiometer to retrieve cloud optical depth and effective radius, and a tandem differential mobility analyzer to measure the aerosol size distribution and hygroscopicity. By using many of the same instruments used during Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), conducted in October 2004, we will be able to contrast the arctic aerosol and cloud properties during the fall and spring transitions. The aerosol measurements can be used in cloud models driven by objectively analyzed boundary conditions to test whether the cloud models can simulate the aerosol influence on the clouds. The influence of aerosol and boundary conditions on the simulated clouds can be separated by running the cloud models with all four combinations of M-PACE and ISDAC aerosol and boundary conditions: M-PACE aerosol and boundary conditions, M-PACE aerosol and ISDAC boundary conditions, ISDAC aerosol and M-PACE boundary conditions, and ISDAC aerosol and boundary conditions. ISDAC and M-PACE boundary conditions are likely to be very different because of the much more extensive ocean water during M-PACE. The uniformity of the surface conditions during ISDAC greatly simplifies the objective analysis (surface fluxes and precipitation are very weak), so that it can largely rely on the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts analysis. The aerosol measurements can also be used as input to the cloud models and to evaluate the aerosol retrievals. By running the cloud models with and without solar absorption by the aerosols, we can determine the semidirect effect of the aerosol on the clouds.

  5. Effect of Solar Radiation on the Optical Properties and Molecular Composition of Laboratory Proxies of Atmospheric Brown Carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Hyun Ji; Aiona, Paige K.; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey

    2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Sources, optical properties, and chemical composition of atmospheric brown carbon (BrC) aerosol are uncertain, making it challenging to estimate its contribution to radiative forcing. Furthermore, optical properties of BrC may change significantly during its atmospheric aging. We examined the effect of solar photolysis on the molecular composition, mass absorption coefficient, and fluorescence of secondary organic aerosol prepared by high-NOx photooxidation of naphthalene (NAP SOA). The aqueous solutions of NAP SOA was observed to photobleach with an effective half-time of ?15 hours (with sun in its zenith) for the loss of the near-UV (300 -400 nm) absorbance. The molecular composition of NAP SOA was significantly modified by photolysis, with the average SOA formula changing from C14.1H14.5O5.1N0.08 to C11.8H14.9O4.5N0.02 after 4 hours of irradiation. The average O/C ratio did not change significantly, however, suggesting that it is not a good metric for assessing the extent of photolysis-driven aging in NAP SOA (and in BrC in general). In contrast to NAP SOA, the photolysis of BrC material produced by aqueous reaction of limonene+O3 SOA (LIM/O3 SOA) with ammonium sulfate was much faster, but it did not result in a significant change in the molecular level composition. The characteristic absorbance of the aged LIM/O3 SOA in the 450-600 nm range decayed with an effective half-time of <0.5 hour. This result emphasizes the highly variable and dynamic nature of different types of atmospheric BrC.

  6. Syntheses, Structure, Magnetism, and Optical Properties of the Interlanthanide Sulfides delta-Ln2-xLuxS3 (Ln = Ce, Pr, Nd)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Geng Bang

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Syntheses, Structure, Magnetism, and Optical Properties ofstructure determination, magnetism, and optical propertiesSusceptibility Measurements. Magnetism data were measured on

  7. Nonclassical properties of a contradirectional nonlinear optical coupler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kishore Thapliyal; Anirban Pathak; Biswajit Sen; Jan Perina

    2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the nonclassical properties of output fields propagated through a contradirectional asymmetric nonlinear optical coupler consisting of a linear waveguide and a nonlinear (quadratic) waveguide operated by second harmonic generation. In contrast to the earlier results, all the initial fields are considered weak and a completely quantum mechanical model is used here to describe the system. Perturbative solutions of Heisenberg's equations of motion for various field modes are obtained using Sen-Mandal technique. Obtained solutions are subsequently used to show the existence of single-mode and intermodal squeezing, single-mode and intermodal antibunching, two-mode and multi-mode entanglement in the output of contradirectional asymmetric nonlinear optical coupler. Further, existence of higher order nonclassicality is also established by showing the existence of higher order antibunching, higher order squeezing and higher order entanglement. Variation of observed nonclassical characters with different coupling constants and phase mismatch is discussed.

  8. Assessing regional scale predictions of aerosols, marine stratocumulus, and their interactions during VOCALS-REx using WRF-Chem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang Q.; Lee Y.; Gustafson Jr., W. I.; Fast, J. D.; Wang, H.; Easter, R. C.; Morrison, H.; Chapman, E. G.; Spak, S. N.; Mena-Carrasco, M. A.

    2011-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This study assesses the ability of the recent chemistry version (v3.3) of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-Chem) model to simulate boundary layer structure, aerosols, stratocumulus clouds, and energy fluxes over the Southeast Pacific Ocean. Measurements from the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) and satellite retrievals (i.e., products from the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES), and GOES-10) are used for this assessment. The Morrison double-moment microphysics scheme is newly coupled with interactive aerosols in the model. The 31-day (15 October-16 November 2008) WRF-Chem simulation with aerosol-cloud interactions (AERO hereafter) is also compared to a simulation (MET hereafter) with fixed cloud droplet number concentrations in the microphysics scheme and simplified cloud and aerosol treatments in the radiation scheme. The well-simulated aerosol quantities (aerosol number, mass composition and optical properties), and the inclusion of full aerosol-cloud couplings lead to significant improvements in many features of the simulated stratocumulus clouds: cloud optical properties and microphysical properties such as cloud top effective radius, cloud water path, and cloud optical thickness. In addition to accounting for the aerosol direct and semi-direct effects, these improvements feed back to the simulation of boundary-layer characteristics and energy budgets. Particularly, inclusion of interactive aerosols in AERO strengthens the temperature and humidity gradients within the capping inversion layer and lowers the marine boundary layer (MBL) depth by 130 m from that of the MET simulation. These differences are associated with weaker entrainment and stronger mean subsidence at the top of the MBL in AERO. Mean top-of-atmosphere outgoing shortwave fluxes, surface latent heat, and surface downwelling longwave fluxes are in better agreement with observations in AERO, compared to the MET simulation. Nevertheless, biases in some of the simulated meteorological quantities (e.g., MBL temperature and humidity) and aerosol quantities (e.g., underestimations of accumulation mode aerosol number) might affect simulated stratocumulus and energy fluxes over the Southeastern Pacific, and require further investigation. The well-simulated timing and outflow patterns of polluted and clean episodes demonstrate the model's ability to capture daily/synoptic scale variations of aerosol and cloud properties, and suggest that the model is suitable for studying atmospheric processes associated with pollution outflow over the ocean. The overall performance of the regional model in simulating mesoscale clouds and boundary layer properties is encouraging and suggests that reproducing gradients of aerosol and cloud droplet concentrations and coupling cloud-aerosol-radiation processes are important when simulating marine stratocumulus over the Southeast Pacific.

  9. Optical method for determining the mechanical properties of a material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maris, Humphrey J. (Barrington, RI); Stoner, Robert J. (Duxbury, MA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a method for characterizing a sample, comprising the steps of: (a) acquiring data from the sample using at least one probe beam wavelength to measure, for times less than a few nanoseconds, a change in the reflectivity of the sample induced by a pump beam; (b) analyzing the data to determine at least one material property by comparing a background signal component of the data with data obtained for a similar delay time range from one or more samples prepared under conditions known to give rise to certain physical and chemical material properties; and (c) analyzing a component of the measured time dependent reflectivity caused by ultrasonic waves generated by the pump beam using the at least one determined material property. The first step of analyzing may include a step of interpolating between reference samples to obtain an intermediate set of material properties. The material properties may include sound velocity, density, and optical constants. In one embodiment, only a correlation is made with the background signal, and at least one of the structural phase, grain orientation, and stoichiometry is determined.

  10. Optical method for determining the mechanical properties of a material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maris, H.J.; Stoner, R.J.

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a method for characterizing a sample, comprising the steps of: (a) acquiring data from the sample using at least one probe beam wavelength to measure, for times less than a few nanoseconds, a change in the reflectivity of the sample induced by a pump beam; (b) analyzing the data to determine at least one material property by comparing a background signal component of the data with data obtained for a similar delay time range from one or more samples prepared under conditions known to give rise to certain physical and chemical material properties; and (c) analyzing a component of the measured time dependent reflectivity caused by ultrasonic waves generated by the pump beam using the at least one determined material property. The first step of analyzing may include a step of interpolating between reference samples to obtain an intermediate set of material properties. The material properties may include sound velocity, density, and optical constants. In one embodiment, only a correlation is made with the background signal, and at least one of the structural phase, grain orientation, and stoichiometry is determined. 14 figs.

  11. Optical properties of single-crystal sapphire fibers Rick K. Nubling and James A. Harrington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optical properties of single-crystal sapphire fibers Rick K. Nubling and James A. Harrington Single.4­0.3 dB m at 2.94 m. These fibers delivered 4.7 W at 10 Hz of Er:YAG laser power. © 1997 Optical Society of America Key words: Infrared fibers, sapphire fibers, Er:YAG lasers, optical properties. 1. Introduction

  12. Comparisons of optical properties of the coastal ocean derived from satellite ocean color and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Grace C.

    Comparisons of optical properties of the coastal ocean derived from satellite ocean color Laboratory, Ocean Optics Section, Code 7333, Stennis Space Center, MS 39529 gould@nrlssc.navy.mil Abstract: Satellite-derived optical properties are compared to in situ mooring and ship-based measurements

  13. Bio-optical properties of oceanic waters: A reappraisal Andre Morel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    Bio-optical properties of oceanic waters: A reappraisal Andre´ Morel Laboratoire de Physique et, California Abstract. The apparent optical properties (AOPs) of oceanic case 1 waters were previously analyzed describing the trophic conditions of water bodies. From these empirical relationships a bio-optical model

  14. Cloud optical and microphysical properties derived from ground-based and satellite sensors over

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zhanqing

    Cloud optical and microphysical properties derived from ground-based and satellite sensors over of cloud optical and microphysical properties were made at Taihu, a highly polluted site in the central Yangtze Delta region, during a research campaign from May 2008 to December 2009. Cloud optical depth (COD

  15. Aerosol engineering: design and stability of aerosol reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratsinis, S.E.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A theoretical study of the performance of aerosol reactors is presented. The goals of this study are (1) to identify the appropriate reactor types (batch, CSTR, and tubular) for production of aerosol with specific properties (for example, uniform size particles, high aerosol surface area, etc.) and (2) to investigate the effect of various process parameters on product aerosol characteristics and on the stability of operation of aerosol reactors. In all the reactors considered, the aerosol dynamics were detemined by chemical reaction, nucleation, and aerosol growth in the free molecule regime in the absence of coagulation at isothermal conditions. Formulation of the aerosol dynamics in terms of moments of the aerosol size distribution facilitated the numerical solution of the resulting systems of ordinary or partial differential equations. The stability characteristics of a continuous stirred tank aerosol reactor (CSTAR) were investigated since experimental data in the literature indicate that under certain conditions this reactor exhibits oscillatory behavior with respect to product aerosol concentration and size distribution.

  16. Does variation in mineral composition alter the short-wave light scattering properties of desert dust aerosol?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    retrievals of mineral dust aerosol from space by visible and near-infrared radiometers. Errors in aerosol depth in deserts and the surrounding regions during periods of high wind. Long range transport of desert particles into the air [6] (wind alone does not have sufficient energy to remove particles from the surface

  17. PROSPECT-4 and 5: Advances in the leaf optical properties model separating photosynthetic pigments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gitelson, Anatoly

    Ecology, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 260 Panama Street, Stanford, CA 94305, USA d Center reserved. Keywords: Leaf optical properties Radiative transfer model PROSPECT Hyperspectral data Pigments 1

  18. Syntheses, Structure, Magnetism, and Optical Properties of Lutetium-based Interlanthanide Selenides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Geng Bang

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Syntheses, Structure, Magnetism, and Optical Properties ofin some cases atypical magnetism. 1-21 New developments insimpler systems in term of magnetism and less investigated,

  19. Laboratory Studies of the Reactive Chemistry and Changing CCN Properties of Secondary Organic Aerosol, Including Model Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scot Martin

    2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The chemical evolution of secondary-organic-aerosol (SOA) particles and how this evolution alters their cloud-nucleating properties were studied. Simplified forms of full Koehler theory were targeted, specifically forms that contain only those aspects essential to describing the laboratory observations, because of the requirement to minimize computational burden for use in integrated climate and chemistry models. The associated data analysis and interpretation have therefore focused on model development in the framework of modified kappa-Koehler theory. Kappa is a single parameter describing effective hygroscopicity, grouping together several separate physicochemical parameters (e.g., molar volume, surface tension, and van't Hoff factor) that otherwise must be tracked and evaluated in an iterative full-Koehler equation in a large-scale model. A major finding of the project was that secondary organic materials produced by the oxidation of a range of biogenic volatile organic compounds for diverse conditions have kappa values bracketed in the range of 0.10 +/- 0.05. In these same experiments, somewhat incongruently there was significant chemical variation in the secondary organic material, especially oxidation state, as was indicated by changes in the particle mass spectra. Taken together, these findings then support the use of kappa as a simplified yet accurate general parameter to represent the CCN activation of secondary organic material in large-scale atmospheric and climate models, thereby greatly reducing the computational burden while simultaneously including the most recent mechanistic findings of laboratory studies.

  20. AERONET: The Aerosol Robotic Network

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    AERONET collaboration provides globally distributed observations of spectral aerosol optical Depth (AOD), inversion products, and precipitable water in diverse aerosol regimes. Aerosol optical depth data are computed for three data quality levels: Level 1.0 (unscreened), Level 1.5 (cloud-screened), and Level 2.0 (cloud screened and quality-assured). Inversions, precipitable water, and other AOD-dependent products are derived from these levels and may implement additional quality checks.[Copied from http://aeronet.gsfc.nasa.gov/new_web/system_descriptions.html

  1. Separating real and apparent effects of cloud, humidity, and dynamics on aerosol optical thickness near cloud edges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zhanqing

    have reported correlations between AOT and cloud cover, pointing to potential cloud contamination of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program. It was found that aerosol humidification effects can explain about one fourth of the correlation between the cloud cover and AOT. New particle genesis

  2. Fabrication and optical properties of single-crystal YAG fiber optics Brian.T. Laustsen and James A. Harrington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . In this method a CO2 laser is used to melt the tip of a crystalline source rod and a fiber is pulled upward from reservoir. In one method a high temperature crucible usually made of tungsten is used to contain the meltFabrication and optical properties of single-crystal YAG fiber optics Brian.T. Laustsen and James A

  3. Observations of the first aerosol indirect effect in shallow cumuli

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, Larry K.; Berkowitz, Carl M.; Barnard, James C.; Senum, Gunar; Springston, Stephen R.

    2011-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Data from the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS) are used to estimate the impact of both aerosol indirect effects and cloud dynamics on the microphysical and optical properties of shallow cumuli observed in the vicinity of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Not surprisingly, we find that the amount of light scattered by the clouds is dominated by their liquid water content (LWC), which in turn is driven by cloud dynamics. However, removing the effect of cloud dynamics by examining the scattering normalized by LWC shows a strong sensitivity of scattering to pollutant loading. These results suggest that even moderately sized cities, like Oklahoma City, can have a measureable impact on the optical properties of shallow cumuli.

  4. Niamey Aerosol Optical Depths

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Flynn, Connor

    MFRSR irradiance data collected during the ACRF AMF deployment in Niamey, Niger have been used to derive AOD for five wavelength channels of the MFRSR. These data have been corrected to adjust for filter drift over the course of the campaign and contamination due to forward scattering as a result of large dust particles in the atmosphere around Niamey.

  5. The impact of detailed urbanscale processing on the composition, distribution, and radiative forcing of anthropogenic aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    forcing of anthropogenic aerosols Jason Blake Cohen,1,2 Ronald G. Prinn,1 and Chien Wang1 Received 11 model to simulate the effects of cities around the world on aerosol chemistry, physics, and radiative values of total aerosol surface concentration, the total aerosol column abundance, the aerosol optical

  6. CARES: Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study Operations Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaveri, RA; Shaw, WJ; Cziczo, DJ

    2010-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The CARES field campaign is motivated by the scientific issues described in the CARES Science Plan. The primary objectives of this field campaign are to investigate the evolution and aging of carbonaceous aerosols and their climate-affecting properties in the urban plume of Sacramento, California, a mid-size, mid-latitude city that is located upwind of a biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emission region. Our basic observational strategy is to make comprehensive gas, aerosol, and meteorological measurements upwind, within, and downwind of the urban area with the DOE G-1 aircraft and at strategically located ground sites so as to study the evolution of urban aerosols as they age and mix with biogenic SOA precursors. The NASA B-200 aircraft, equipped with the High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL), digital camera, and the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP), will be flown in coordination with the G-1 to characterize the vertical and horizontal distribution of aerosols and aerosol optical properties, and to provide the vertical context for the G-1 and ground in situ measurements.

  7. A new aerosol collector for quasi on-line analysis of particulate organic matter: the Aerosol Collection Module (ACM) and first applications with a GC/MS-FID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hohaus, T.

    In many environments organic matter significantly contributes to the composition of atmospheric aerosol particles influencing its properties. Detailed chemical characterization of ambient aerosols is critical in order to ...

  8. Laboratory and field studies of combustion aerosol from the viewpoint of the nuclear winter scenario. Annual summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hallett, J.

    1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear winter scenario postulates that aerosol produced by widespread fires following a nuclear exchange is lofted to mid and upper tropospheric levels where it absorbs solar radiation (0.3 to 4 ..mu..m), but permits loss of thermal radiation (4 to 20 ..mu..m). This paper discusses possible removal and modification of the aerosol by cloud and precipitation processes which might take place during this period. Aerosol was produced from a selection of likely materials, its physical characteristics - (particle size, particle shape, coagulation rate) examined and its ability to form cloud droplets or ice crystals tested under conditions typical of a cloud system, both natural and perturbed by large scale fires. A numerical model of condensation growth has been used to illustrate the role of competition in growth of cloud droplets. During the first year we have looked at low aerosol concentration; during the coming year we will look at high aerosol concentrations and its influence on optical properties.

  9. Measurements of the chemical, physical, and optical properties of single aerosol particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moffet, Ryan Christopher

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Diner, B.J. Gaitley, W. Abdou, O. Dubovik, B. Holben, A.Kahn et al. , 2005b] 9 [Abdou et al. , 2005] 10 [Stephens etstudies. 1.7 References Abdou, W.A. , D.J. Diner, J.V.

  10. Measurements of the chemical, physical, and optical properties of single aerosol particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moffet, Ryan Christopher

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    particulate matter (PM) pollution in Mexico City, one needsuse Mexico City as a case study of air pollution mitigationMexico City Metropolitan area (MCMA) have employed a variety of instrumentation to address particulate pollution

  11. Measurements of the chemical, physical, and optical properties of single aerosol particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moffet, Ryan Christopher

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    located at the Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo (IMP) in thelocated at the Instituto Mexicano Del Petroleo (IMP). RAMACity, at the “Instituto Mexicano Del Petroleo” (IMP), at 19º

  12. Measurements of the chemical, physical, and optical properties of single aerosol particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moffet, Ryan Christopher

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the 3-km zone of lead/zinc smelters, Environmental Science &in air quality near a copper smelter, Science of the TotalParticles from a Copper Smelter, Environmental Science &

  13. Measurements of the chemical, physical, and optical properties of single aerosol particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moffet, Ryan Christopher

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    municipal solid waste incineration, Journal of HazardousBehavior in Municipal Solid-Waste Incineration ElectrostaticMetal Emissions from Incineration - Mechanisms and Control,

  14. Analysis of nonlinear optical properties in donor–acceptor materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Day, Paul N. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States) [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States); General Dynamics Information Technology, Inc., Dayton, Ohio 45431 (United States); Pachter, Ruth [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States)] [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States); Nguyen, Kiet A. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States) [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States); UES, Inc., Dayton, Ohio 45432 (United States)

    2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-dependent density functional theory has been used to calculate nonlinear optical (NLO) properties, including the first and second hyperpolarizabilities as well as the two-photon absorption cross-section, for the donor-acceptor molecules p-nitroaniline and dimethylamino nitrostilbene, and for respective materials attached to a gold dimer. The CAMB3LYP, B3LYP, PBE0, and PBE exchange-correlation functionals all had fair but variable performance when compared to higher-level theory and to experiment. The CAMB3LYP functional had the best performance on these compounds of the functionals tested. However, our comprehensive analysis has shown that quantitative prediction of hyperpolarizabilities is still a challenge, hampered by inadequate functionals, basis sets, and solvation models, requiring further experimental characterization. Attachment of the Au{sub 2}S group to molecules already known for their relatively large NLO properties was found to further enhance the response. While our calculations show a modest enhancement for the first hyperpolarizability, the enhancement of the second hyperpolarizability is predicted to be more than an order of magnitude.

  15. Optical Properties Chern-Simons (3+1)D $?$-systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luis Huerta

    2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Chern-Simons (CS) $\\theta$-systems are described by a $\\theta \\int F\\wedge F$ term in the action ($\\theta$ is an adimensional parameter), which does not change field equations in the bulk, but affects the system behaviour when it is bounded. When two of those $\\theta$-systems, each one characterized by a different value of $\\theta$ (even zero), share a common boundary, surface effects are then induced by a CS $\\theta$ term. Here, we study the consequences of the above in the propagation of electromagnetic radiation in $\\theta$-systems. In a previous paper, electromagnetic radiation properties traversing a $\\theta$-vacuum were analyzed where a number of interesting features arise related to polarization and energy distribution. Now, we investigate how electric and magnetic properties of the $\\theta$-system affect the optical response. Apart from the well-known Kerr polarization rotation found for the particular case of topological insulators, we examine in detail the issue and the results could be applied in other contexts where $\\theta$-term accounts for the system dynamics. In particular, we find two different Brewster angles, for $s$ and $p$ polarization of reflected radiation, respectively, with peculiar features derived from the $\\theta$ term influence. Possible applications of these results are discussed.

  16. 4, 75617614, 2004 Indirect aerosol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . While the cloud albedo enhance- ment (Twomey effect) of warm clouds received most attention so far, they can15 scatter, absorb and emit thermal radiation. Thirdly aerosol particles act as cloud con properties influenced by20 aerosols (e.g. semi-direct effect, suppression of convection). Clouds themselves

  17. Optical properties of the mouse eye Ying Geng,1,2,*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optical properties of the mouse eye Ying Geng,1,2,* Lee Anne Schery,1 Robin Sharma,1,2 Alfredo, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, 14627, USA 2 The Institute of Optics, University of Rochester indicate that the optical quality of the mouse eye assessed by measurement of its aberrations is remarkably

  18. header for SPIE use Fluoropolymers for 157nm Lithography: Optical Properties from VUV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    new radiation damage mechanisms in previously accepted optical materials. For 157 nm pellicles, newheader for SPIE use Fluoropolymers for 157nm Lithography: Optical Properties from VUV Absorbance With the introduction of 157 nm as the next optical lithography wavelength, the need for new pellicle and photoresist

  19. Effects of Ocean Ecosystem on Marine Aerosol-Cloud Interaction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Meskhidze, Nicholas; Nenes, Athanasios

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using satellite data for the surface ocean, aerosol optical depth (AOD), and cloud microphysical parameters, we show that statistically significant positive correlations exist between ocean ecosystem productivity, the abundance of submicron aerosols, and cloud microphysical properties over different parts of the remote oceans. The correlation coefficient for remotely sensed surface chlorophyllaconcentration ([Chl-a]) and liquid cloud effective radii over productive areas of the oceans varies between?0.2and?0.6. Special attention is given to identifying (and addressing) problems from correlation analysis used in the previous studies that can lead to erroneous conclusions. A new approach (using the difference between retrieved AOD and predicted seamore »salt aerosol optical depth,AODdiff) is developed to explore causal links between ocean physical and biological systems and the abundance of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the remote marine atmosphere. We have found that over multiple time periods, 550?nmAODdiff(sensitive to accumulation mode aerosol, which is the prime contributor to CCN) correlates well with [Chl-a] over the productive waters of the Southern Ocean. Since [Chl-a] can be used as a proxy of ocean biological productivity, our analysis demonstrates the role of ocean ecology in contributing CCN, thus shaping the microphysical properties of low-level marine clouds.« less

  20. Optical properties of doped polycarbonate layers A.B. Djurisic a,*, W.L. Guo a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optical properties of doped polycarbonate layers A.B. Djurisic a,*, W.L. Guo a , E.H. Li a , L Abstract Optical properties of polycarbonate layers doped with triphenylamine and chlorotricarbonyl diimine or to enhance photogeneration. Doping polycarbonate (PC) with triphenylamine is known to enhance hole transport

  1. Author's personal copy Inherent and apparent optical properties of the complex estuarine waters of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    Author's personal copy Inherent and apparent optical properties of the complex estuarine waters management strategy used by the Tampa Bay Estuary Program since the 1990s led to improved water clarity 30 September 2012 Available online 22 October 2012 Keywords: inherent optical properties apparent

  2. Optical properties of silicon carbide for astrophysical applications I. New laboratory infrared reflectance spectra and optical constants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitman, K M; Corman, A B; Speck, A K

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicon Carbide (SiC) optical constants are fundamental inputs for radiative transfer models of astrophysical dust environments. However, previously published values contain errors and do not adequately represent the bulk physical properties of the cubic (beta) SiC polytype usually found around carbon stars. We provide new, uncompromised optical constants for beta- and alpha-SiC derived from single-crystal reflectance spectra and investigate quantitatively whether there is any difference between alpha- and beta-SiC that can be seen in infrared spectra and optical functions. Previous optical constants for SiC do not reflect the true bulk properties, and they are only valid for a narrow grain size range. The new optical constants presented here will allow narrow constraints to be placed on the grain size and shape distribution that dominate in astrophysical environments. In addition, our calculated absorption coefficients are much higher than laboratory measurements, which has an impact on the use of previous d...

  3. How do A-train Sensors Intercompare in the Retrieval of Above-Cloud Aerosol Optical Depth? A Case Study-based Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jethva, H. T.; Torres, O.; Waquet, F.; Chand, Duli; Hu, Yong X.

    2014-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We inter-compare the above-cloud aerosol optical depth (ACAOD) of biomass burning plumes retrieved from different A-train sensors, i.e., MODIS, CALIOP, POLDER, and OMI. These sensors have shown independent capabilities to detect and retrieve aerosol loading above marine boundary layer clouds--a kind of situation often found over the Southeast Atlantic Ocean during dry burning season. A systematic one-to-one comparison reveals that, in general, all passive sensors and CALIOP-based research methods derive comparable ACAOD with differences mostly within 0.2 over homogeneous cloud fields. The 532-nm ACAOD retrieved by CALIOP operational algorithm is largely underestimated; however, it’s 1064-nm AOD when converted to 500 nm shows closer agreement to the passive sensors. Given the different types of sensor measurements processed with different algorithms, the close agreement between them is encouraging. Due to lack of adequate direct measurements above cloud, the validation of satellite-based ACAOD retrievals remains an open challenge. The inter-satellite comparison, however, can be useful for the relative evaluation and consistency check.

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol robotic network Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ), AERONET--A federated instrument network and data archive for aerosol characterization, Remote Sens... Period examining aerosol properties and radiative ... Source: Brookhaven...

  5. A new Cu–cysteamine complex: structure and optical properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Lun; Chen, Wei; Schatte, Gabriele; Wang, Wei; Joly, Alan G.; Huang, Yining; Sammynaiken, Ramaswami; Hossu, Marius

    2014-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we report the structure and optical properties of a new Cu–cysteamine complex (Cu–Cy) with a formula of Cu3Cl(SR)2 (R ¼ CH2CH2NH2). This Cu–Cy has a different structure from a previous Cu–Cy complex, in which both thio and amine groups from cysteamine bond with copper ions. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance results show that the oxidation state of copper in Cu3Cl(SR)2 is +1 rather than +2. Further, Cu3Cl(SR)2 has been observed to show intense photoluminescence and X-ray excited luminescence. More interesting is that Cu3Cl(SR)2 particles can produce singlet oxygen under irradiation by light or X-ray. This indicates that Cu3Cl(SR)2 is a new photosensitizer that can be used for deep cancer treatment as X-ray can penetrate soft tissues. All these findings mean that Cu3Cl(SR)2 is a new material with potential applications for lighting, radiation detection and cancer treatment.

  6. Optical properties of grooved silicon microstructures: Theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dyakov, S. A., E-mail: dyakovs@tcd.ie [Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Astrova, E. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute (Russian Federation); Perova, T. S. [Trinity College Dublin (Ireland); Tikhodeev, S. G.; Gippius, N. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Timoshenko, V. Yu. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The reflection spectra of grooved silicon structures consisting of alternating silicon walls and grooves (air channels) with a period of a = 4-6 {mu}m are studied experimentally and theoretically in the mid-IR spectral range (2-25 {mu}m) upon irradiation of samples by normally incident light polarized along and perpendicular to silicon layers. The calculation is performed by the scattering matrix method taking into account Rayleigh scattering losses in a grooved layer by adding imaginary parts to the refractive indices of silicon and air in grooved regions. The experimental and calculated reflection spectra are in good agreement in the entire spectral range studied. The analysis of experimental and calculated spectra gave close values of the effective refractive indices and birefringence of the studied structures in the long-wavelength spectral region. The values calculated in the effective medium model in the long-wavelength approximation ({lambda} Much-Greater-Than a) gave considerably understated values. The obtained results confirm the efficiency of the scattering matrix method for describing the optical properties of silicon microstructures.

  7. Thickness-dependent changes in the optical properties of PPV-and PF-based polymer light emitting diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Sue

    the thickness-dependent optical properties of single layer polymer light emitting diodes for two materials, poly the electronic and optical properties of these materials in light emitting diode LED structures.2 OurThickness-dependent changes in the optical properties of PPV- and PF-based polymer light emitting

  8. Optical properties of wurtzite and zinc-blende GaNAlN quantum dots Vladimir A. Fonoberova)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fonoberov, Vladimir

    Optical properties of wurtzite and zinc-blende GaNÕAlN quantum dots Vladimir A. Fonoberova; published 20 August 2004 We investigate theoretically and compare optical properties of wurtzite and zincN/AlN interface governs optical properties of wurtzite quantum dots while having a small effect on zinc

  9. Aerosolcloudprecipitation interactions. Part 1. The nature and sources of cloud-active aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutledge, Steven

    Aerosol­cloud­precipitation interactions. Part 1. The nature and sources of cloud-active aerosols M Available online 13 March 2008 Keywords: aerosol precipitation CCN emissions clouds Atmospheric aerosol the chemical composition of aerosols, their microphysical properties, and the factors that enable them to act

  10. Spectral optical properties of selected photosynthetic microalgae producing biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Euntaek; Heng, Ri-Liang; Pilon, Laurent

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Euntaek Lee, Ri-Liang Heng, and Laurent Pilon Mechanical andE. Lee, R. -L. Heng, and L. Pilon, 2013. “Spectral Optical

  11. Tuning linear and nonlinear optical properties of wurtzite GaN by c-axial stress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Duanjun; 10.1088/0022-3727/42/18/185107

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the linear and nonlinear optical properties of wurtzite GaN under c-axial stress field, using density functional theory calculations. The fully structural optimization at each c-axial strain was performed. The calculated dielectric functions show that tensile c-axial strain effectively improves the linear optical efficiency, especially for the band-edge transitions, and significantly increase the mobility of electrons in the conduction band. Second-order nonlinear optical susceptibilities show that the tensile c-axial strain will enhance the zero- and low-frequency nonlinear responses of GaN. The enhancement of the nonlinear optical property is explained by the reduction of the polarization of wurtzite GaN under tensile c-axial strains. Based on these findings, we propose a method for improving the electrical and optical properties of the crystal through imposing appropriate stress on the high symmetry crystalline directions.

  12. Atmospheric Aerosols Workshop | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atmospheric Aerosols Workshop Atmospheric Aerosols Workshop EMSL Science Theme Advisory Panel Workshop - Atmospheric Aerosol Chemistry, Climate Change, and Air Quality. Baer DR, BJ...

  13. Supporting Information (SI) Section Effect of Solar Radiation on the Optical Properties and Molecular

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    S1 Supporting Information (SI) Section Effect of Solar Radiation on the Optical Properties..................................................................................................7 Figure S3. A typical solar and spectral flux density of radiation, D0(), from the irradiation

  14. Optical Properties of Saharan Dust and Asian Dust: Application to Radiative Transfer Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Guangyang

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Because the bulk optical properties of dust are largely dependent on their chemical composition, published reports from numerous dust field studies enabled us to compile observation data sets to derive the effective complex refractive indices...

  15. OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF MATERIALS FOR CONCENTRATOR PHOTOVOLTAIC SYSTEMS R. H. French

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    are evaluating the optical properties and solar radiation durability of a number of polymeric materials such as DuPont TM PV5300 have applications as encapsulant in c-Si and other flat plate PV applications

  16. Optical Properties and London Dispersion Forces of Amorphous Silica Determined by Vacuum Ultraviolet Spectroscopy and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    for semiconductor fabrication, re- cently as a potential 157 nm mask substrate. The optical properties in the vacuum, optical fibers, and microelectronics such as metal oxide semiconductor transistors, etc.1 It also forms is tetrahedrally coordinated with four oxygen atoms and each oxygen atom serves as a bridge connecting two

  17. Optical anisotropy and liquid-crystal alignment properties of rubbed polyimide layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exeter, University of

    Optical anisotropy and liquid-crystal alignment properties of rubbed polyimide layers FUZI YANG polyimide layers and the rubbing process is investigated using the recently developed polarization-conversion guided mode technique. Results indicate that the effective optical anisotropy of the polyimide layers may

  18. aerosol monitors including: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    schemes which explicitly simulate the microphysical processes that determine the particle size distribution. These models enable aerosol optical ... Ridley, David Andrew 33...

  19. Assessing regional scale predictions of aerosols, marine stratocumulus, and their interactions during VOCALS-REx using WRF-Chem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Qing; Gustafson, William I.; Fast, Jerome D.; Wang, Hailong; Easter, Richard C.; Morrison, H.; Lee, Y.- N.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Spak, S. N.; Mena-Carrasco, M. A.

    2011-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In the recent chemistry version (v3.3) of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-Chem) model, we have coupled the Morrison double-moment microphysics scheme with interactive aerosols so that full two-way aerosol-cloud interactions are included in simulations. We have used this new WRF-Chem functionality in a study focused on assessing predictions of aerosols, marine stratocumulus clouds, and their interactions over the Southeast Pacific using measurements from the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) and satellite retrievals. This study also serves as a detailed analysis of our WRF-Chem simulations contributed to the VOCALS model Assessment (VOCA) project. The WRF-Chem 31-day (October 15-November 16, 2008) simulation with aerosol-cloud interactions (AERO hereafter) is also compared to a simulation (MET hereafter) with fixed cloud droplet number concentrations assumed by the default in Morrison microphysics scheme with no interactive aerosols. The well-predicted aerosol properties such as number, mass composition, and optical depth lead to significant improvements in many features of the predicted stratocumulus clouds: cloud optical properties and microphysical properties such as cloud top effective radius, cloud water path, and cloud optical thickness, and cloud macrostructure such as cloud depth and cloud base height. These improvements in addition to the aerosol direct and semi-direct effects, in turn, feed back to the prediction of boundary-layer characteristics and energy budgets. Particularly, inclusion of interactive aerosols in AERO strengths temperature and humidity gradients within capping inversion layer and lowers the MBL depth by 150 m from that of the MET simulation. Mean top-of-the-atmosphere outgoing shortwave fluxes, surface latent heat, and surface downwelling longwave fluxes are in better agreement with observations in AERO, compared to the MET simulation. Nevertheless, biases in some of the simulated meteorological quantities (e.g., MBL temperature and humidity over the remote ocean) and aerosol quantities (e.g., overestimations of supermicron sea salt mass) might affect simulated stratocumulus and energy fluxes over the SEP, and require further investigations. Although not perfect, the overall performance of the regional model in simulating mesoscale aerosol-cloud interactions is encouraging and suggests that the inclusion of spatially varying aerosol characteristics is important when simulating marine stratocumulus over the southeastern Pacific.

  20. Influence of sputtering power on the optical properties of ITO thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K, Aijo John; M, Deepak, E-mail: manju.thankamoni@gmail.com; T, Manju, E-mail: manju.thankamoni@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Sree Sankara College, Kalady P. O., Ernakulam Dist., Kerala (India); Kumar, Vineetha V. [Dept. of Physics, K. E. College, Mannanam, Kottayam Dist., Kerala (India)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Tin doped indium oxide films are widely used in transparent conducting coatings such as flat panel displays, crystal displays and in optical devices such as solar cells and organic light emitting diodes due to the high electrical resistivity and optical transparency in the visible region of solar spectrum. The deposition parameters have a commendable influence on the optical and electrical properties of the thin films. In this study, ITO thin films were prepared by RF magnetron sputtering. The properties of the films prepared under varying sputtering power were compared using UV- visible spectrophotometry. Effect of sputtering power on the energy band gap, absorption coefficient and refractive index are investigated.

  1. Fiber optic spectroscopic digital imaging sensor and method for flame properties monitoring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zelepouga, Serguei A. (Hoffman Estates, IL); Rue, David M. (Chicago, IL); Saveliev, Alexei V. (Chicago, IL)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for real-time monitoring of flame properties in combustors and gasifiers which includes an imaging fiber optic bundle having a light receiving end and a light output end and a spectroscopic imaging system operably connected with the light output end of the imaging fiber optic bundle. Focusing of the light received by the light receiving end of the imaging fiber optic bundle by a wall disposed between the light receiving end of the fiber optic bundle and a light source, which wall forms a pinhole opening aligned with the light receiving end.

  2. Atmospheric Aerosol Systems | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Themes Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Overview Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Biosystem Dynamics & Design Energy Materials & Processes Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems...

  3. Calculations of optical properties of the tetraphenyl-X family of isomorphous crystals (X ~ C, Si, Ge, Sn, Pb){

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaminsky, Werner

    Paper Calculations of optical properties of the tetraphenyl-X family of isomorphous crystals (X ~ C to determine how small structural changes become manifest in the optical properties of crystals we used classical dipole­dipole interaction calculations to estimate the linear birefringence and optical rotatory

  4. Optical properties of silicon carbide for astrophysical applications I. New laboratory infrared reflectance spectra and optical constants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. M. Pitman; A. M. Hofmeister; A. B. Corman; A. K. Speck

    2008-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicon Carbide (SiC) optical constants are fundamental inputs for radiative transfer models of astrophysical dust environments. However, previously published values contain errors and do not adequately represent the bulk physical properties of the cubic (beta) SiC polytype usually found around carbon stars. We provide new, uncompromised optical constants for beta- and alpha-SiC derived from single-crystal reflectance spectra and investigate quantitatively whether there is any difference between alpha- and beta-SiC that can be seen in infrared spectra and optical functions. Previous optical constants for SiC do not reflect the true bulk properties, and they are only valid for a narrow grain size range. The new optical constants presented here will allow narrow constraints to be placed on the grain size and shape distribution that dominate in astrophysical environments. In addition, our calculated absorption coefficients are much higher than laboratory measurements, which has an impact on the use of previous data to constrain abundances of these dust grains.

  5. Title of Dissertation: STUDY OF OPTICAL PROPERTIES AND CURRENT EMISSION PROCESSES OF GAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    ABSTRACT Title of Dissertation: STUDY OF OPTICAL PROPERTIES AND CURRENT EMISSION PROCESSES OF GAS PHASE FIELD IONIZATION SOURCES Xuefeng Liu, Doctor of Philosophy, 2004 Dissertation Directed By). This dissertation explores the properties of the gas field ionization source with the goal of providing a resource

  6. THE ELECTRICAL AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF THIN FILM DIAMOND IMPLANTED WITH SILICON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolodzey, James

    devices. The C:Si alloys were formed by the implantation of Si into polycrystalline diamond films grownTHE ELECTRICAL AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF THIN FILM DIAMOND IMPLANTED WITH SILICON K. J. Roe and J and electrical properties of diamond make it an attractive material for use in extreme conditions. Diamond

  7. Structural, Optical, and Transport Properties of -and Ag3VO4 K. R. Poeppelmeier,*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poeppelmeier, Kenneth R.

    and impedance spectroscopy. In order to assess the optical and electrical properties of -Ag3VO4, in situ at room temperature. Instead, we measured these properties in situ on sintered polycrystalline samples measurements were performed above the phase-transition temperature. Thin films of -Ag3VO4 were prepared

  8. Optical, electrical, and solar energy-conversion properties of gallium arsenide nanowire-array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Chongwu

    Optical, electrical, and solar energy-conversion properties of gallium arsenide nanowire, and will aid in the design and optimization of nanowire-based systems for solar energy-conversion applications, and the photoelectrochemical energy-conversion properties of GaAs nanowire arrays were evaluated in contact with one

  9. Structural and electronic properties of Fe3+ in GaN from optical and EPR experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    into GaN to compensate inherent n-type conductivity and to produce semi-insulating substrate materialStructural and electronic properties of Fe3+ and Fe2+ centers in GaN from optical and EPR, and electronic properties of Fe-doped GaN. A set of high-quality GaN crystals doped with Fe at concentrations

  10. Final Technical Report for "Ice nuclei relation to aerosol properties: Data analysis and model parameterization for IN in mixed-phase clouds"� (DOE/SC00002354)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul J. DeMott, Anthony J. Prenni; Sonia M. Kreidenweis

    2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Clouds play an important role in weather and climate. In addition to their key role in the hydrologic cycle, clouds scatter incoming solar radiation and trap infrared radiation from the surface and lower atmosphere. Despite their importance, feedbacks involving clouds remain as one of the largest sources of uncertainty in climate models. To better simulate cloud processes requires better characterization of cloud microphysical processes, which can affect the spatial extent, optical depth and lifetime of clouds. To this end, we developed a new parameterization to be used in numerical models that describes the variation of ice nuclei (IN) number concentrations active to form ice crystals in mixed-phase (water droplets and ice crystals co-existing) cloud conditions as these depend on existing aerosol properties and temperature. The parameterization is based on data collected using the Colorado State University continuous flow diffusion chamber in aircraft and ground-based campaigns over a 14-year period, including data from the DOE-supported Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. The resulting relationship is shown to more accurately represent the variability of ice nuclei distributions in the atmosphere compared to currently used parameterizations based on temperature alone. When implemented in one global climate model, the new parameterization predicted more realistic annually averaged cloud water and ice distributions, and cloud radiative properties, especially for sensitive higher latitude mixed-phase cloud regions. As a test of the new global IN scheme, it was compared to independent data collected during the 2008 DOE-sponsored Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC). Good agreement with this new data set suggests the broad applicability of the new scheme for describing general (non-chemically specific) aerosol influences on IN number concentrations feeding mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds. Finally, the parameterization was implemented into a regional cloud-resolving model to compare predictions of ice crystal concentrations and other cloud properties to those observed in two intensive case studies of Arctic stratus during ISDAC. Our implementation included development of a prognostic scheme of ice activation using the IN parameterization so that the most realistic treatment of ice nuclei, including their budget (gains and losses), was achieved. Many cloud microphysical properties and cloud persistence were faithfully reproduced, despite a tendency to under-predict (by a few to several times) ice crystal number concentrations and cloud ice mass, in agreement with some other studies. This work serves generally as the basis for improving predictive schemes for cloud ice crystal activation in cloud and climate models, and more specifically as the basis for such a scheme to be used in a Multi-scale Modeling Format (MMF) that utilizes a connected system of cloud-resolving models on a global grid in an effort to better resolve cloud processes and their influence on climate.

  11. Syntheses, Structure, Magnetism, and Optical Properties of the Partial Ordered Quaternary Interlanthanide Sulfides PrLnYb2S6 (Ln = Tb, Dy)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Geng Bang

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Syntheses, Structure, Magnetism, and Optical Properties ofSusceptibility Measurements. Magnetism data were measured on

  12. Climate Impacts of Atmospheric Sulfate and Black Carbon Aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qian, Yun; Song, Qingyuan; Menon, Surabi; Yu, Shaocai; Liu, Shaw C.; Shi, Guangyu; Leung, Lai R.; Luo, Yunfeng

    2008-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Although the global average surface temperature has increased by about 0.6°C during the last century (IPCC, 2001), some regions such as East Asia, Eastern North America, and Western Europe have cooled rather than warmed during the past decades (Jones, 1988; Qian and Giorgi, 2000). Coherent changes at the regional scale may reflect responses to different climate forcings that need to be understood in order to predict the future net climate response at the global and regional scales under different emission scenarios. Atmospheric aerosols play an important role in global climate change (IPCC 2001). They perturb the earth’s radiative budget directly by scattering and absorbing solar and long wave radiation, and indirectly by changing cloud reflectivity, lifetime, and precipitation efficiency via their role as cloud condensation nuclei. Because aerosols have much shorter lifetime (days to weeks) compared to most greenhouse gases, they tend to concentrate near their emission sources and distribute very unevenly both in time and space. This non-uniform distribution of aerosols, in conjunction with the greenhouse effect, may lead to differential net heating in some areas and net cooling in others (Penner et al. 1994). Sulfate aerosols come mainly from the oxidation of sulfur dioxide (SO2) emitted from fossil fuel burning. Black carbon aerosols are directly emitted during incomplete combustion of biomass, coal, and diesel derived sources. Due to the different optical properties, sulfate and black carbon affect climate in different ways. Because of the massive emissions of sulfur and black carbon that accompany the rapid economic expansions in East Asia, understanding the effects of aerosols on climate is particularly important scientifically and politically in order to develop adaptation and mitigation strategies.

  13. Symmetry, Optical Properties and Thermodynamics of Neptunium(V) Complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, Linfeng; Tian, Guoxin

    2009-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent results on the optical absorption and symmetry of the Np(V) complexes with dicarboxylate and diamide ligands are reviewed. The importance of recognizing the 'silent' feature of centrosymmetric Np(V) species in analyzing the absorption spectra and calculating the thermodynamic constants of Np(V) complexes is emphasized.

  14. Effective optical properties of absorbing nanoporous and nanocomposite thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilon, Laurent

    in particular, have been the subject of intense study.1­4 Potential applica- tions include dye-sensitized solar cells,5­7 low-k dielectric materials,8,9 biosensors,10­12 and optical devices including waveguides,13

  15. MASS SPECTROMETRIC APPROACHES FOR CHEMICAL CHARACTERISATION OF ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS: CRITICAL REVIEW OF MOST RECENT ADVANCES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey

    2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This manuscript presents an overview of the most recent instrument developments, field and laboratory applications of mass spectrometry (MS) in chemistry and physics of atmospheric aerosols. A broad range of MS instruments employing different sample introduction methods, ionization and mass detection techniques are utilized for both “on?line” and “off?line” characterization of aerosols. On?line MS techniques enable detection of individual particles with simultaneous measurements of particle size distributions and aerodynamic characteristics, and are ideally suited for field studies which require high temporal resolution. Off?line MS techniques provide means for detailed molecular?level analysis of aerosol samples which is essential to fundamental knowledge on aerosol chemistry, mechanisms of particle formation and atmospheric aging. Combined together, complementary MS techniques provide comprehensive information on the chemical composition, size, morphology and phase of aerosols ? data of key importance for evaluating hygroscopic and optical properties of particles, their health effects, understanding their origins, and atmospheric evolution. Developments and applications of MS techniques in the aerosol research have expanded remarkably over a couple of last years as evidenced by sky?rocketing publication statistics. The goal of this review is to period of late 2010 ? early2012, which were not conveyed in previous reviews.

  16. Investigation of Thin Cirrus Cloud Optical and Microphysical Properties on the Basis of Satellite Observations and Fast Radiative Transfer Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chenxi

    2013-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation focuses on the global investigation of optically thin cirrus cloud optical thickness (tau) and microphysical properties, such as, effective particle size (D_(eff)) and ice crystal habits (shapes), based on the global satellite...

  17. Effective Optical Properties of Non-Absorbing Nanoporous Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Matthew M.; Pilon, Laurent

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    C. J. Brinker, Self- assembled aerogel-like low dielectricCharacterization of thin-?lm aerogel porosity and sti?nessDielectric properties of aerogels, J. Mater. Res. 8 (7) (

  18. 7, 71717233, 2007 Aerosol absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    black carbon refractive indices, new cloud radiative properties considering the effect of aerosol absorption and radiative forcing. The effect of the usage of more accurate effective medium approximations radiative properties re- sults in a small global annual-mean all-sky absorption of 0.05 W m-2 and a positive

  19. Engineering of the band gap and optical properties of thin films of yttrium hydride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    You, Chang Chuan; Mongstad, Trygve; Maehlen, Jan Petter; Karazhanov, Smagul, E-mail: smagulk@ife.no [Institute for Energy Technology, P.O. Box 40, NO-2027 Kjeller (Norway)

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Thin films of oxygen-containing yttrium hydride show photochromic effect at room temperature. In this work, we have studied structural and optical properties of the films deposited at different deposition pressures, discovering the possibility of engineering the optical band gap by variation of the oxygen content. In sum, the transparency of the films and the wavelength range of photons triggering the photochromic effect can be controlled by variation of the deposition pressure.

  20. Doping-level-dependent optical properties of GaN:Mn O. Gelhausen,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    for system response. The optical absorption spectra recorded at 2 K of nomi- nally undoped GaN, GaN:Mn, and GaN:Mn:Si are presented in Fig. 1. An absorption band with a zero phonon line ZPL at 1.414 0.002 eDoping-level-dependent optical properties of GaN:Mn O. Gelhausen,a) E. Malguth, and M. R. Phillips

  1. The optical properties of equatorial cirrus in the pilot radiation observation experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Platt, C.M.R.; Young, S.A.; Manson, P.; Patterson, G.R. [CSIRO, Victoria (Australia)] [and others

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of a sensitive filter radiometer for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has been reported. The aim was to develop a reliable and fast instrument that could be used alongside a lidar to obtain near realtime optical properties of clouds, particularly high ice clouds, as they drifted over an ARM Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site allowing calculation of the radiation divergence in the atmosphere over the site. Obtaining cloud optical properties by the lidar/radiometer, or LIRAD, method was described by Platt et al.; the latter paper also describes a year`s data on mid-latitude cirrus. The optical properties of equatorial cirrus (i.e., cirrus within a few degrees of the equator) have hardly been studied at all. The same is true of tropical cirrus, although a few observations have been reported by Davis and Platt et al.This paper describes obersvations performed on cirrus clouds, analysis methods used, and results.

  2. Optical filtering and luminescence property of some molybdates prepared by combustion synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yadav, P. J., E-mail: yadav.pooja75@yahoo.in [Department of Electronics, RTM Nagpur University, Nagpur (India); Joshi, C. P. [Physics Department, RCOEM, Nagpur (India); Moharil, S. V., E-mail: svmoharil@yahoo.com [Physics Department, RTM Nagpur University, Nagpur (India)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    As an important class of lanthanide inorganic compounds, rare earth ions doped molybdates have gained much attention due to their attractive luminescence and structural properties, supporting various promising applications as phosphor materials in the fields such as white light-emitting diodes, optical fibers, biolabel, lasers, and so on. The molybdate family has promising trivalent cation conducting properties and most of the optical properties result from electron transitions of the 4f shell, which are greatly affected by the composition and structures of rare-earth compounds. In this paper we report the molybdate CaMoO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} for red SSL and Bi{sub 1.4}Y{sub 0.6}MoO{sub 6}, Y{sub 6}MoO{sub 12} for optical filtering, prepared by one step combustion synthesis.

  3. Preparation, magnetic and optical properties of layered oxychalcogenides SmCuOCh (Ch = S or Se)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Llanos, Jaime [Departamento de Quimica, Universidad Catolica del Norte, Avda. Angamos 0610, Casilla 1280, Antofagasta (Chile)]. E-mail: jllanos@ucn.cl; Cortes, Rodrigo [Departamento de Quimica, Universidad Catolica del Norte, Avda. Angamos 0610, Casilla 1280, Antofagasta (Chile); Guizouarn, T. [Laboratoire de Chimie du Solide et Inorganique Moleculaire, UMR 6511-CNRS, Universite de Rennes 1-Institut de Chimie de Rennes, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France); Pena, Octavio [Laboratoire de Chimie du Solide et Inorganique Moleculaire, UMR 6511-CNRS, Universite de Rennes 1-Institut de Chimie de Rennes, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France)

    2006-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on the synthesis and the electrical, magnetic and optical properties of SmCuOS and SmCuOSe. The magnetic properties reveal that Sm is in its 3+ oxidation state ({mu} {sup theo} = g{radical}J(J + 1) = 0.85 {mu}{sub B}; g = 2/7) with a large Van Vleck contribution, and exclude the possibility of a divalent oxidation state for samarium (Sm{sup 2+}; {sup 7}F{sub 0} state, g = J = 0, {mu} {sub eff} = 0). Optical properties were studied by means of diffuse reflectance and photoluminescence spectra in the UV-vis range. The electrical measurements show that the two samarium copper oxychalcogenides, SmCuOSe and SmCuOS are semiconductors with optical band gap (E {sub g}) values of 2.60 and 2.90 eV, respectively.

  4. Optical, vibrational, thermal, electrical, damage and phase-matching properties of lithium thioindate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fossier, S; Mangin, J F; Bidault, O; Thnot, I; Zondy, J J; Chen, W; Rotermund, F; Petrov, V; Petrov, P; Henningsen, J; Yelisseyev, A; Isaenko, L; Lobanov, S; Balachninaite, O; Slekys, G; Sirutkaitis, V; Zelt, S

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lithium thioindate (LiInS$_{2}$) is a new nonlinear chalcogenide bi-axial material transparent from 0.4 to 12 $\\mu$m, that has been successfully grown in large sizes and good optical quality. As a result of a three-year intensive characterization campaign of its main properties, we report new and updated physical parameters that are relevant for laser and nonlinear optics applications: lattice phonon vibrational spectra, thermal expansion and thermo-optic coefficients, specific heat at constant pressure, thermal conductivity, piezo-electric and electro-optic coefficients, laser damage thresholds, accurate optical linear dispersion and nonlinear second-order susceptibility coefficients. We provide also a detailed study of the in and out-of-principal plane phase-matching characteristics and associated effective nonlinear coefficients. New experimental results on direct mid-IR (5 - $12 \\mu$m) down-conversion (femtosecond parametric amplification and continuous-wave (cw) difference-frequency generation) pumped by...

  5. Aerosol Cans? -Aerosol cans use a pressurized

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    WHAT TO DO WITH... Aerosol Cans? -Aerosol cans use a pressurized propellant to distribute the product. Propellants are often flammable and/or toxic. Therefore, never store aerosol cans near ignition aerosol cans must be disposed of as hazardous waste. PROPER SAFETY EQUIPMENT Safety Glasses - Proper eye

  6. Observer-dependent optical properties of stationary axisymmetric spacetimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donato Bini; Fernando de Felice; Andrea Geralico

    2014-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The world lines of null particles admit arbitrary parametrizations. In the presence of a family of observers one may introduce along a null world line an extension of the so-called Cattaneo's relative standard time parameter (valid for massive particles) which plays a special role. Another possibility is to use the coordinate time itself as a parameter. The relation between relative standard time and coordinate time allows for the introduction of an observer-dependent optical path and associated refraction index. Both these quantities are studied here working out explicit examples concerning familiar null orbits and observers in black hole spacetimes.

  7. Electrical and optical properties of gadolinium doped bismuth ferrite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukherjee, A., E-mail: soumen.basu@phy.nitdgp.ac.in; Banerjee, M., E-mail: soumen.basu@phy.nitdgp.ac.in; Basu, S., E-mail: soumen.basu@phy.nitdgp.ac.in [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Durgapur-713209 (India); Pal, M. [CSIR-Central Mechanical Engineering Research Institute, Durgapur-713209 (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiferroic bismuth ferrite (BFO) and gadolinium (Gd) doped bismuth ferrite had been synthesized by a sol-gel method. Particle size had been estimated by Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and found to decrease with Gd doping. We studied the temperature and frequency dependence of impedance and electric modulus and calculated the grain and grain boundary resistance and capacitance of the investigated samples. We observed that electrical activation energy increases for all the doped samples. Optical band gap also increases for the doped samples which can be used in photocatalytic application of BFO.

  8. Aerosol characterization study using multi-spectrum remote sensing measurement techniques.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glen, Crystal Chanea; Sanchez, Andres L.; Lucero, Gabriel Anthony; Schmitt, Randal L.; Johnson, Mark S.; Tezak, Matthew Stephen; Servantes, Brandon Lee

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A unique aerosol flow chamber coupled with a bistatic LIDAR system was implemented to measure the optical scattering cross sections and depolarization ratio of common atmospheric particulates. Each of seven particle types (ammonium sulfate, ammonium nitrate, sodium chloride, potassium chloride, black carbon and Arizona road dust) was aged by three anthropogenically relevant mechanisms: 1. Sulfuric acid deposition, 2. Toluene ozonolysis reactions, and 3. m-Xylene ozonolysis reactions. The results of pure particle scattering properties were compared with their aged equivalents. Results show that as most particles age under industrial plume conditions, their scattering cross sections are similar to pure black carbon, which has significant impacts to our understanding of aerosol impacts on climate. In addition, evidence emerges that suggest chloride-containing aerosols are chemically altered during the organic aging process. Here we present the direct measured scattering cross section and depolarization ratios for pure and aged atmospheric particulates.

  9. Ultra-High Temperature Sensors Based on Optical Property

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nabeel Riza

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In this program, Nuonics, Inc. has studied the fundamentals of a new Silicon Carbide (SiC) materials-based optical sensor technology suited for extreme environments of coal-fired engines in power production. The program explored how SiC could be used for sensing temperature, pressure, and potential gas species in a gas turbine environment. The program successfully demonstrated the optical designs, signal processing and experimental data for enabling both temperature and pressure sensing using SiC materials. The program via its sub-contractors also explored gas species sensing using SiC, in this case, no clear commercially deployable method was proven. Extensive temperature and pressure measurement data using the proposed SiC sensors was acquired to 1000 deg-C and 40 atms, respectively. Importantly, a first time packaged all-SiC probe design was successfully operated in a Siemens industrial turbine rig facility with the probe surviving the harsh chemical, pressure, and temperature environment during 28 days of test operations. The probe also survived a 1600 deg-C thermal shock test using an industrial flame.

  10. Optical properties of chemical-vapor-deposited diamond films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bi, X.X.; Eklund, P.C.; Zhang, J.G.; Rao, A.M. (Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (USA)); Perry, T.A.; Beetz, C.P. Jr. (Physics Department, General Motors Research Laboratory, Warren, MI (USA))

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of room-temperature optical studies on {similar to}10 micron thick, free-standing diamond films are reported. The films were grown on Si(100) substrates by hot filament-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from a methane/hydrogen mixture. The as-grown, free surface of the films exhibited a surface roughness of scale {sigma}{similar to}0.2 to 5 microns, depending on the methane/hydrogen mixture, which introduces significant optical scattering loss for frequencies greater than 0.5 eV. Specular reflection and transmission spectra in the range 0.01--10 eV were collected. Below the threshold for interband adsorption near {similar to}5 eV, the films studied behaved approximately as thin parallel plates of refractive index 2.4, with the rough free surface leading to increasingly larger loss of specular transmission/reflection with decreasing wavelength. Structure in the mid-infrared transmission spectra was observed and attributed to disorder-induced one-phonon absorption, intrinsic multi-phonon absorption, and infrared active --C--H{sub 2} stretching modes. The strength of the C--H band was observed to increase with increasing methane pressure in the growth chamber. At 5.3 eV, the onset of interband absorption was observed, in good agreement with the value of the indirect bandgap in type IIa (intrinsic) diamond.

  11. Third order nonlinear optical properties of bismuth zinc borate glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shanmugavelu, B.; Ravi Kanth Kumar, V. V., E-mail: ravi.phy@pondiuni.edu.in [Department of Physics, Pondicherry University, Puducherry 605 014 (India); Kuladeep, R.; Narayana Rao, D. [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046, Andhra Pradesh (India)

    2013-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Third order nonlinear optical characterization of bismuth zinc borate glasses are reported here using different laser pulse durations. Bismuth zinc borate glasses with compositions xBi{sub 2}O{sub 3}-30ZnO-(70-x) B{sub 2}O{sub 3} (where x?=?30, 35, 40, and 45?mol. %) have been prepared by melt quenching method. These glasses were characterized by Raman, UV-Vis absorption, and Z scan measurements. Raman and UV-Vis spectroscopic results indicate that non-bridging oxygens increase with increase of bismuth content in the glass. Nonlinear absorption and refraction behavior in the nanosecond (ns), picosecond (ps), and femtosecond (fs) time domains were studied in detail. Strong reverse saturable absorption due to dominant two-photon absorption (TPA) was observed with both ps and fs excitations. In the case of ns pulse excitations, TPA and free-carrier absorption processes contribute for the nonlinear absorption. Two-photon absorption coefficient (?) and the absorption cross section due to free carriers (?{sub e}) are estimated by theoretical fit of the open aperture Z-scan measurements and found to be dependent on the amount of bismuth oxide in the glass composition. In both ns and fs regimes the sign and magnitude of the third order nonlinearity are evaluated, and the optical limiting characteristics are also reported.

  12. Modeling Space-Time Dynamics of Aerosols Using Satellite Data and Atmospheric Transport Model Output

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Tao

    Modeling Space-Time Dynamics of Aerosols Using Satellite Data and Atmospheric Transport Model of aerosol optical depth across mainland Southeast Asia. We include a cross validation study to assess

  13. Determining biological tissue optical properties via integrating sphere spatial measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baba, Justin S. (Knoxville, TN); Letzen, Brian S. (Coral Springs, FL)

    2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical sample is mounted on a spatial-acquisition apparatus that is placed in or on an enclosure. An incident beam is irradiated on a surface of the sample and the specular reflection is allowed to escape from the enclosure through an opening. The spatial-acquisition apparatus is provided with a light-occluding slider that moves in front of the sample to block portions of diffuse scattering from the sample. As the light-occluding slider moves across the front of the sample, diffuse light scattered into the area of the backside of the light-occluding slider is absorbed by back side surface of the light-occluding slider. By measuring a baseline diffuse reflectance without a light-occluding slider and subtracting measured diffuse reflectance with a light-occluding slider therefrom, diffuse reflectance for the area blocked by the light-occluding slider can be calculated.

  14. Optical properties of tetravalent uranium in the solid state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edelstein, N.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The optical spectra are fit to the parameters of a phenomenological Hamiltonian from which a calculated spectrum is obtained. The goodness of fit is determined by the value of sigma (cm/sup -1/), the rms deviation. The sigma and crystal field are tabulated for U/sup 4 +/ in various host crystals, Pr/sup 3 +/ or Nd/sup 3 +/ in various crystals, and the free ion U/sup 4 +/. The rms deviation sigma for the U/sup 4 +/ compounds is much worse on the average than for the Pr/Nd examples. There appears to be a correlation between a poor fit and a large sigma, and a large crystal field. 28 refs., 1 tab. (DLC)

  15. Synthesis, structure, magnetism, and optical properties of the ordered mixed-lanthanide sulfides gamma-LnLn'S3 (Ln=La, Ce; Ln'=Er, Tm, Yb)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Syntheses, Structure, Magnetism, and Optical Properties ofcan be changed as Magnetism, and Optical a function of theSusceptibility Measurements. Magnetism data were measured on

  16. Effect of aerosols and NO2 concentration on ultraviolet actinic flux near Mexico City during MILAGRO: Measurements and model calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palancar, Gustavo G.; Lefer, Barry; Hall, Samual R.; Shaw, William J.; Corr, Chelsea A.; Herndon, Scott C.; Slusser, J. R.; Madronich, Sasha

    2013-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultraviolet (UV) actinic ?uxes (AF) measured with three Scanning Actinic Flux Spectroradiometers (SAFS) are compared with the Tropospheric Ultraviolet-Visible (TUV) model v.5 in order to assess the effects of aerosols and NO2 concentrations on the radiation. Measurements were made during the MILAGRO campaign near Mexico City in March 2006, at a ground-based station near Mexico City (the T1 supersite) and from the NSF/NCAR C-130 aircraft. At the surface, measurements are typically smaller by up to 25 % in the morning, 10% at noon, and 40% in the afternoon, than actinic flux modeled for clean, cloud-free conditions. When measurements of PBL height, NO2 concentration and aerosols optical properties are included in the model, the agreement improves to within ±10% in the morning and afternoon, and ±3% at noon. Based on daily averages, aerosols account for 68%, NO2 for 25%, and residual uncertainties for 7% of these AF reductions observed at the surface. Several overpasses from the C-130 aircraft provided the opportunity to examine the actinic flux perturbations aloft, and also show better agreement with the model when aerosol and NO2 effects are included above and below the flight altitude. TUV model simulations show that the vertical structure of the actinic flux is sensitive to the choice of the aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA) at UV wavelengths. Typically, aerosols caused enhanced AF above the PBL and reduced AF near the surface. However, for highly scattering aerosols (SSA > 0.95), enhancements can penetrate well into the PBL, while for strongly absorbing aerosols (SSA<0.7) reductions in AF are computed in the free troposphere as well as in the PBL. Additional measurements of the SSA at these wavelengths are needed to better constrain the effect of aerosols on the vertical structure of the actinic flux.

  17. EC 577: Electrical Optical and Magnetic Properties of Materials Professor Theodore. D. Moustakas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Radiation for Crystal Diffraction (X-Rays, electrons, neutrons) - Scattering of X-Rays by an Atom Conductivity - Scattering of X-Rays, Neutrons and Light by Phonons - Microwave Untrasonic - Lattice Optical - Scattering of X-Rays by a Crystal - The Reciprocal Lattice and its Properties. - Diffraction Condition

  18. The electrical and optical properties of thin lm diamond implanted with silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolodzey, James

    :Si alloys were formed by the implantation of Si into polycrystalline diamond ®lms grown by che- mical vaporThe electrical and optical properties of thin ®lm diamond implanted with silicon K.J. Roea,* , J of diamond make it an attractive material for use in extreme conditions. Diamond devices have been fabricated

  19. Electrical and optical properties of diamond-like carbon films deposited by pulsed laser ablation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    films, which make them more useful than polycrystalline diamond films for many applications. For exampleElectrical and optical properties of diamond-like carbon films deposited by pulsed laser ablation K e i n f o Available online 11 March 2010 Keyword: Pulsed laser ablation Diamond-like carbon films

  20. How do rewritable DVDs work? Optical properties of phase-change materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botti, Silvana

    How do rewritable DVDs work? Optical properties of phase-change materials W. Welnic,1,2 Silvana;Outline 1 Introduction to Phase Change Materials (PCMs) 2 Open questions for Phase Change Materials;Introduction to Phase Change Materials (PCMs) Outline 1 Introduction to Phase Change Materials (PCMs) 2 Open

  1. Near-band edge optical properties of exfoliated h-BN layers , J. Barjon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Near-band edge optical properties of exfoliated h-BN layers J. Loayza 1,2 , J. Barjon 2 , A when it is supported by a h-BN film, in particular when mechanically exfoliated from h-BN crystallites layers have been obtained by mechanically exfoliating small crystallites. Exfoliated flakes were reported

  2. Optical measurement of biomechanical properties of individual erythrocytes from a sickle cell patient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dao, Ming

    . 1. Introduction Sickle cell disease (SCD) or sickle cell anemia is an inherited autosomal bloodOptical measurement of biomechanical properties of individual erythrocytes from a sickle cell July 2012 Available online 20 July 2012 Keywords: Sickle cell disease Red blood cell Cell biomechanics

  3. Optical properties of InN grown on templates with controlled surface polarities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dietz, Nikolaus

    controlled GaN/sapphire substrates leads to unstrained layers with good structural and optical properties. ß is the choice of the substrate. Typical substrate templates for InN are sapphire, ZnO or GaN [13], with GaN samples [16]. We will demonstrate that the use of polarity controlled GaN/sapphire substrates leads

  4. Optical Properties and Radiation-Enhanced Evaporation of Nanofluid Fuels Containing Carbon-Based Nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiao, Li

    Optical Properties and Radiation-Enhanced Evaporation of Nanofluid Fuels Containing Carbon characteristics of nanofluid fuels with stable suspension of carbon-based nanostructures under radiation-based nanofluids containing multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) or carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) are both higher

  5. Implications of optical properties of ocean, lake, and ice for ultrahigh-energy neutrino detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, P. Buford

    Implications of optical properties of ocean, lake, and ice for ultrahigh-energy neutrino detection P. Buford Price The collecting power and imaging ability of planned ultrahigh-energy neutrino, and for deep seawater. The effective scattering coefficient is smallest for the clearest deep ocean sites

  6. InAs/InAsSb strain balanced superlattices for optical detectors: Material properties and energy band simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishna, Sanjay

    InAs/InAsSb strain balanced superlattices for optical detectors: Material properties and energyAs/InAsSb strain balanced superlattices for optical detectors: Material properties and energy band simulations D February 2012) InAsSb/InAs type II strain balanced superlattices lattice matched to GaSb have recently been

  7. TOWARDS CIGS SOLAR CELLS WITH REDUCED FILM THICKNESS: A STUDY OF OPTICAL PROPERTIES AND OF PHOTONIC STRUCTURES FOR LIGHT TRAPPING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TOWARDS CIGS SOLAR CELLS WITH REDUCED FILM THICKNESS: A STUDY OF OPTICAL PROPERTIES AND OF PHOTONIC ABSTRACT: In view of large-scale exploitation of CuIn1-xGaxSe2 (CIGS) solar cells for photovoltaic energy. In this work we perform a full study of optical properties of CIGS solar cells grown by a hybrid sputtering

  8. Advanced optical measurements for characterizing photophysical properties of single nanoparticles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polsky, Ronen; Davis, Ryan W.; Arango, Dulce C.; Brozik, Susan Marie; Wheeler, David Roger

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Formation of complex nanomaterials would ideally involve single-pot reaction conditions with one reactive site per nanoparticle, resulting in a high yield of incrementally modified or oriented structures. Many studies in nanoparticle functionalization have sought to generate highly uniform nanoparticles with tailorable surface chemistry necessary to produce such conjugates, with limited success. In order to overcome these limitations, we have modified commercially available nanoparticles with multiple potential reaction sites for conjugation with single ssDNAs, proteins, and small unilamellar vesicles. These approaches combined heterobifunctional and biochemical template chemistries with single molecule optical methods for improved control of nanomaterial functionalization. Several interesting analytical results have been achieved by leveraging techniques unique to SNL, and provide multiple paths for future improvements for multiplex nanoparticle synthesis and characterization. Hyperspectral imaging has proven especially useful for assaying substrate immobilized fluorescent particles. In dynamic environments, temporal correlation spectroscopies have been employed for tracking changes in diffusion/hydrodynamic radii, particle size distributions, and identifying mobile versus immobile sample fractions at unbounded dilution. Finally, Raman fingerprinting of biological conjugates has been enabled by resonant signal enhancement provided by intimate interactions with nanoparticles and composite nanoshells.

  9. aerosol detection equipment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Daniel, Rosenfeld 464 Mixtures of pollution, dust, sea salt, and volcanic aerosol during ACE-Asia: Radiative properties Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization Websites...

  10. EMSL - Atmospheric Aerosol Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    scienceatmospheric The Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Science Theme focuses on understanding the chemistry, physics and molecular-scale dynamics of aerosols for model...

  11. Extensive aerosol optical properties and aerosol mass related measurements during TRAMP/TexAQS 2006 Implications for PM compliance and planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­ Implications for PM compliance and planning Monica E. Wright a , Dean B. Atkinson a,*, Luke Ziemba b , Robert Griffin b,1 , Naruki Hiranuma c , Sarah Brooks c , Barry Lefer d , James Flynn d , Ryan Perna d , Bernhard 2008 Received in revised form 16 December 2008 Accepted 17 December 2008 Keywords: Urban air quality PM

  12. Measurement and Modeling of Vertically Resolved Aerosol Optical Properties and Radiative Fluxes Over the ARM SGP Site During the May 2003 Aerosol IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand Retrievals from a NewCuneo Matthew1, 20121 H( 7 Be,

  13. A simple growth method for Nb?O? films and their optical properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dash, J. K. [Renesselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States); Kisslinger, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Chen, L. [Renesselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States); Topka, Michael R. [Renesselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States); Dinolfo, Peter H. [Renesselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States); Zhang, L. H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Lu, T. -M. [Renesselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States); Wang, G. -C. [Renesselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple method for the synthesis of Nb?O? films of thicknesses ranging from tens to several hundreds of nanometers on amorphous silicon dioxide or quartz substrates is presented. Nb?O? films were formed by annealing the sputter deposited Nb films under an Ar flow and without oxygen plasma in a quartz tube within a furnace at 850 °C. The structural, compositional, optical, and vibrational properties were characterized by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ultraviolet visible spectroscopy, and Raman scattering. Each of the Nb?O? films is polycrystalline with an orthorhombic crystal structure. We observed vibrational modes including longitudinal optical, transverse optical, and triply degenerate modes, and measured the indirect optical band gap to be ~3.65 eV. The transmittance spectrum of the ~20 nm thick Nb?O? film shows over 90% transmittance below the band gap energy in the visible wavelength range and decreases to less than 20% in the ultraviolet regime. The optical properties of the films in the UV-vis range show potential applications as UV detectors.

  14. A simple growth method for Nb?O? films and their optical properties

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dash, J. K.; Kisslinger, K.; Chen, L.; Topka, Michael R.; Dinolfo, Peter H.; Zhang, L. H.; Lu, T. -M.; Wang, G. -C.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple method for the synthesis of Nb?O? films of thicknesses ranging from tens to several hundreds of nanometers on amorphous silicon dioxide or quartz substrates is presented. Nb?O? films were formed by annealing the sputter deposited Nb films under an Ar flow and without oxygen plasma in a quartz tube within a furnace at 850 °C. The structural, compositional, optical, and vibrational properties were characterized by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ultraviolet visible spectroscopy, and Raman scattering. Each of the Nb?O? films is polycrystalline with an orthorhombic crystal structure. We observed vibrational modes includingmore »longitudinal optical, transverse optical, and triply degenerate modes, and measured the indirect optical band gap to be ~3.65 eV. The transmittance spectrum of the ~20 nm thick Nb?O? film shows over 90% transmittance below the band gap energy in the visible wavelength range and decreases to less than 20% in the ultraviolet regime. The optical properties of the films in the UV-vis range show potential applications as UV detectors.« less

  15. Aerosol Characterization Data from the Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Project (ACE-Asia)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Aerosol Characterization Experiments (ACE) were designed to increase understanding of how atmospheric aerosol particles affect the Earth's climate system. These experiments integrated in-situ measurements, satellite observations, and models to reduce the uncertainty in calculations of the climate forcing due to aerosol particles and improve the ability of models to predict the influences of aerosols on the Earth's radiation balance. ACE-Asia was the fourth in a series of experiments organized by the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry (IGAC) Program (A Core Project of the International Geosphere Biosphere Program). The Intensive Field Phase for ACE-Asia took place during the spring of 2001 (mid-March through early May) off the coast of China, Japan and Korea. ACE-Asia pursued three specific objectives: 1) Determine the physical, chemical, and radiative properties of the major aerosol types in the Eastern Asia and Northwest Pacific region and investigate the relationships among these properties. 2) Quantify the physical and chemical processes controlling the evolution of the major aerosol types and in particular their physical, chemical, and radiative properties. 3) Develop procedures to extrapolate aerosol properties and processes from local to regional and global scales, and assess the regional direct and indirect radiative forcing by aerosols in the Eastern Asia and Northwest Pacific region [Edited and shortened version of summary at http://data.eol.ucar.edu/codiac/projs?ACE-ASIA]. The Ace-Asia collection contains 174 datasets.

  16. Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 91 (2007) 17261732 Optical and structural properties of Ta2O5CeO2 thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thirumalai, Devarajan

    Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 91 (2007) 1726­1732 Optical and structural properties of Ta2O5

  17. Investigations of Optical Coherence Properties in an Erbium-doped Silicate Fiber for Quantum State Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthias U. Staudt; Sara R. Hastings-Simon; Mikael Afzelius; Didier Jaccard; Wolfgang Tittel; Nicolas Gisin

    2006-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We studied optical coherence properties of the 1.53 $\\mu$m telecommunication transition in an Er$^{3+}$-doped silicate optical fiber through spectral holeburning and photon echoes. We find decoherence times of up to 3.8 $\\mu$s at a magnetic field of 2.2 Tesla and a temperature of 150 mK. A strong magnetic-field dependent optical dephasing was observed and is believed to arise from an interaction between the electronic Er$^{3+}$ spin and the magnetic moment of tunneling modes in the glass. Furthermore, we observed fine-structure in the Erbium holeburning spectrum originating from superhyperfine interaction with $^{27}$Al host nuclei. Our results show that Er$^{3+}$-doped silicate fibers are promising material candidates for quantum state storage.

  18. Study of optical properties of Erbium doped Tellurite glass-polymer composite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sushama, D., E-mail: sushasukumar@gmail.com [Research Awardee, LAMP, Dept. of Physics, Nit, Calicut, India and Dept. of Physics, M.S.M. College, Kayamkulam, Kerala (India)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Chalcogenide glasses have wide applications in optical device technology. But it has some disadvantages like thermal instability. Among them Tellurite glasses exhibits high thermal Stability. Doping of rare earth elements into the Tellurite glasses improve its optical properties. To improve its mechanical properties composites of this Tellurite glasses with polymer are prepared. Bulk samples of Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} doped TeO{sub 2}?WO{sub 3}?La{sub 2}O{sub 3} Tellurite glasses are prepared from high purity oxide mixtures, melting in an alumina crucible in air atmosphere. Composites of this Tellurite glasses with polymer are prepared by powder mixing method and the thin films of these composites are prepared using polymer press. Variations in band gap of these composites are studied from the UV/Vis/NIR absorption.

  19. Electrical resistivity, optical and magnetic properties of the layered oxyselenide SmCuOSe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Llanos, Jaime [Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Catolica del Norte, Casa Central Antofagasta Pab. Avda. Angamos 0610, Casilla 1280, Antofagasta (Chile)]. E-mail: jllanos@ucn.cl; Pena, Octavio [Laboratoire de Chimie du Solide et Inorganique Moleculaire, UMR 6511-CNRS, Universite Rennes 1-Institut de Chimie de Rennes, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France)

    2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The electrical and magnetic properties of the tetragonal phase SmCuOSe are reported as a function of the temperature. The optical properties were studied by means of diffuse reflectance spectrum in the UV-Vis range. The electrical resistivity measurements as well as diffuse reflectance spectrum show that SmCuOSe is a semiconductor with an optical band gap (E{sub g}) of 2.6eV. In this phase, Cu is at its monovalent oxidation state and, as such, it does not contribute to the total magnetic moment, whereas Sm is in its 3+ oxidation state, with a large VanVleck contribution due to the admixture of the fundamental state with higher energy levels.

  20. Modeling of the optical properties of nonspherical particles in the atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Guang

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    , Richard Orville August 2007 Major Subject: Atmospheric Sciences iii ABSTRACT Modeling of the Optical Properties of Nonspherical Particles in the Atmosphere. (August 2007) Guang Chen, B.S., Jilin University; M.S., University of Southern..., the computation demand also goes up with 8 the increase of the spatial resolution. Alternatively, the pseudo-spectral time-domain (PSTD) method pioneered by Liu [63, 67] in 1997 and 1998 to solve Maxwell?s equations and study propagations of acoustic waves...

  1. (In,Mn)As quantum dots: Molecular-beam epitaxy and optical properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bouravleuv, A. D., E-mail: bour@mail.ioffe.ru; Nevedomskii, V. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Ubyivovk, E. V. [St. Petersburg State University (Russian Federation)] [St. Petersburg State University (Russian Federation); Sapega, V. F. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Khrebtov, A. I. [St. Petersburg Academic University, Nanotechnology Research and Education Centre (Russian Federation)] [St. Petersburg Academic University, Nanotechnology Research and Education Centre (Russian Federation); Samsonenko, Yu. B.; Cirlin, G. E.; Ustinov, V. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Self-assembled (In,Mn)As quantum dots are synthesized by molecular-beam epitaxy on GaAs (001) substrates. The experimental results obtained by transmission electron microscopy show that doping of the central part of the quantum dots with Mn does not bring about the formation of structural defects. The optical properties of the samples, including those in external magnetic fields, are studied.

  2. Optical Properties of Mn-doped GaN O. Gelhausen1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    measurements. In the GaN:Mn, an intense absorption peak at 1.414 +/- 0.002 eV was observed. This peakOptical Properties of Mn-doped GaN O. Gelhausen1 , E. Malguth1,3 , M. R. Phillips1 , E. M. Goldys2, Germany ABSTRACT Molecular beam epitaxy-grown GaN with different Mn concentrations (5-23 x 1019 cm-3

  3. East Asian Studies of Tropospheric Aerosols and their Impact on Regional Climate (EAST-AIRC): An Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Zhanqing; Li, C.; Chen, H.; Tsay, S. C.; Holben, B. N.; Huang, J.; Li, B.; Maring, H.; Qian, Yun; Shi, Guangyu; Xia, X.; Yin, Y.; Zheng, Y.; Zhuang, G.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the most populated region of the world, Asia is a major source of aerosols with potential large impact over vast downstream areas. Papers published in this special section describe the variety of aerosols observed in China and their effects and interactions with the regional climate as part of the East Asian Study of Tropospheric Aerosols and Impact on Regional Climate (EAST-AIRC). The majority of the papers are based on analyses of observations made under three field projects, namely, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Mobile Facility mission in China (AMF10 China), the East Asian Study of Tropospheric Aerosols: an International Regional Experiment (EAST-AIRE), and the Atmospheric Aerosols of China and their Climate Effects (AACCE). The former two are US-China collaborative projects and the latter is a part of the China’s National Basic Research program (or often referred to as “973 project”). Routine meteorological data of China are also employed in some studies. The wealth of general and specialized measurements lead to extensive and close-up investigations of the optical, physical and chemical properties of anthropogenic, natural, and mixed aerosols; their sources, formation and transport mechanisms; horizontal, vertical and temporal variations; direct and indirect effects and interactions with the East Asian monsoon system. Particular efforts are made to advance our understanding of the mixing and interaction between dust and anthropogenic pollutants during transport. Several modeling studies were carried out to simulate aerosol impact on radiation budget, temperature, precipitation, wind and atmospheric circulation, fog, etc. In addition, impacts of the Asian monsoon system on aerosol loading are also simulated.

  4. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Shouxian, China for the Study of Aerosol Indirect Effects in China

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    In a complex ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) deployment, monitoring data was collected at four locations in China during 2008. The various sites are located in regions with different climate regimes and with high aerosol loadings of different optical, physical, and chemical properties. Measurements obtained at all the AMF sites during the 8-month deployment in China will help scientists to validate satellite-based findings, understand the mechanisms of the aerosol indirect effects in the region, and examine the roles of aerosols in affecting regional climate and atmospheric circulation, with a special focus on the impact of the East Asian monsoon system. As with other collections from the ARM Mobile Facility, the datasets are available from the ARM Archive. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  5. ARM - Measurement - Aerosol optical depth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDC documentationBarrow, AlaskaWhenimage ARM Data Discovery

  6. Project Overview: Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS): Proposed Summer 2007 ASP Field Campaign

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berkowitz, Carl M.; Berg, Larry K.; Ogren, J. A.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Ferrare, Richard

    2006-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This white paper presents the scientific motivation and preliminary logistical plans for a proposed ASP field campaign to be carried out in the summer of 2007. The primary objective of this campaign is to use the DOE Gulfstream-1 aircraft to make measurements characterizing the chemical, physical and optical properties of aerosols below, within and above large fields of fair weather cumulus and to use the NASA Langley Research Center’s High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) to make independent measurements of aerosol backscatter and extinction profiles in the vicinity of these fields. Separate from the science questions to be addressed by these observations will be information to add in the development of a parameterized cumulus scheme capable of including multiple cloud fields within a regional or global scale model. We will also be able to compare and contrast the cloud and aerosol properties within and outside the Oklahoma City plume to study aerosol processes within individual clouds. Preliminary discussions with the Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) science team have identified overlap between the science questions posed for the CLASIC Intensive Operation Period (IOP) and the proposed ASP campaign, suggesting collaboration would benefit both teams.

  7. Simultaneous Retrieval of Effective Refractive Index and Density from Size Distribution and Light Scattering Data: Weakly-Absorbing Aerosol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Berg, Larry K.; Shilling, John E.; Flynn, Connor J.; Mei, Fan; Jefferson, Anne

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose here a novel approach for retrieving in parallel the effective density and real refractive index of weakly absorbing aerosol from optical and size distribution measurements. Here we define “weakly absorbing” as aerosol single-scattering albedos that exceed 0.95 at 0.5 um.The required optical measurements are the scattering coefficient and the hemispheric backscatter fraction, obtained in this work from an integrating nephelometer. The required size spectra come from a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer and an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer. The performance of this approach is first evaluated using a sensitivity study with synthetically generated but measurement-related inputs. The sensitivity study reveals that the proposed approach is robust to random noise; additionally the uncertainties of the retrieval are almost linearly proportional to the measurement errors, and these uncertainties are smaller for the real refractive index than for the effective density. Next, actual measurements are used to evaluate our approach. These measurements include the optical, microphysical, and chemical properties of weakly absorbing aerosol which are representative of a variety of coastal summertime conditions observed during the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP; http://campaign.arm.gov/tcap/). The evaluation includes calculating the root mean square error (RMSE) between the aerosol characteristics retrieved by our approach, and the same quantities calculated using the conventional volume mixing rule for chemical constituents. For dry conditions (defined in this work as relative humidity less than 55%) and sub-micron particles, a very good (RMSE~3%) and reasonable (RMSE~28%) agreement is obtained for the retrieved real refractive index (1.49±0.02) and effective density (1.68±0.21), respectively. Our approach permits discrimination between the retrieved aerosol characteristics of sub-micron and sub-10micron particles. The evaluation results also reveal that the retrieved density and refractive index tend to decrease with an increase of the relative humidity.

  8. AEROSOL OPTICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES WITHIN AND WITHOUT CLOUDS DURING AN AIRBORNE FIELD CAMPAIGN IN CENTRAL OKLAHOMA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Upton, NY 11973 Alexander, M L , lizabeth.alexander@pnl.gov , PNNL, PNNL PO Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 Hubbe, J M , john.hubbe@pnl.gov , PNNL, PNNL PO Box 999, Richland, WA 99352, Ogren, J A , John

  9. Nitrous Oxide and Molecular Nitrogen Isotopic Compositions and Aerosol Optical Properties: Experiments and Observations Relevant to Planetary Atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Croteau, Philip Louis

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stratospheric enrichment, isotope-budgets and the 17O-18Olead to enrichments or depletions in the isotope ratios of

  10. Investigations of the Absorption Properties of Near-Ground Aerosol by the Methods of Optical-Acoustic Spectrometry and Diff...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 Investigation Peer Review 2012 May 9, 2012

  11. Optical properties of polycrystalline diamond films in the far-infrared A. J. Gatesman, R. H. Giles, J. Waldman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

    Optical properties of polycrystalline diamond films in the far-infrared A. J. Gatesman, R. H. Giles for the complex refractive index (n - ik) of polycrystalline diamond films grown by microwave plasma enhanced a CO2 optically pumped submillimeter laser. Due to their polycrystalline nature, the diamond films

  12. Quantum Monte Carlo Study of the Optical and Diffusive Properties of theVacancy Defect in Diamond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kent, Paul

    associated with radiation damage. It is also very interesting scientifically, with a wide variety of physicalQuantum Monte Carlo Study of the Optical and Diffusive Properties of theVacancy Defect in Diamond]. The best-known optical transition, GR1 at 1.673 eV [5], long associated with the neutral vacancy, cannot

  13. Optical properties of bismuth-doped SiO2- or GeO2-based glass core optical fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firstova, Elena G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed study of optical properties of bismuth-doped fibers based on SiO2 and GeO2 glasses containing no other dopants has been carried out. To provide important information about spectroscopic properties of IR bismuth-related active centers (BAC) the excitation-emission fluorescence spectra for a spectral region of 220-2000 nm have been measured. The obtained three-dimensional spectra have been presented for different host glass compositions: silicate, germanate, aluminosilicate and phosphosilicate. Energy-level configuration and main radiative transitions associated with BACs in GeO2 and SiO2 glasses have been revealed. Fluorescence lifetime analysis of the basic radiative transitions of BAC have been carried out. It has been shown that the energy-level schemes of BAC-Si and BAC-Ge (BAC associated with silicon and germanium, respectively) are similar, corresponding BAC-Ge energy levels lying 10-16% lower than those of BAC-Si. It has been determined that BAC-Si, BAC-Ge and BAC-Si, BAC-P can exist simultan...

  14. The Optical Polarization Properties of X-ray Selected BL Lacertae Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. T. Jannuzi; P. S. Smith; R. Elston

    1993-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the optical polarization properties of X-ray selected BL Lacertae objects (XSBLs) as determined from three years of monitoring 37 BL Lac objects and candidates. The observed objects include a complete X-ray flux limited sample drawn from the EMS Survey. The majority of the XSBLs classi- fied solely on the appearance of their spectra are members of the class of BL~Lacs since they possess intrinsically polarized and variable continua. The duty cycle of polarized emission from XSBLs is 40\\%. The majority of XSBLs ($\\approx 85$\\%) have preferred polarization position angles on time scales as long as three years. This reflects stability in the geometry of the region emitting the polarized optical emission. We discuss the observed spectral dependence of the degree of polarization and some of the possible mechanisms for producing the observed characteristics. While dilution of the polarized emission by the host galaxy starlight is present in some objects, we demon- strate that the average polarization properties derived from our observations are not drastically affected by this effect. The objects in our monitored sample did not display the larger than one magnitude variations generally used to characterize the optical variability of blazars in general.

  15. Optical waveguiding properties into porous gallium nitride structures investigated by prism coupling technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alshehri, Bandar; Dogheche, Elhadj, E-mail: elhadj.dogheche@univ-valenciennes.fr [Institute Electronics, Microelectronics and Nanotechnology (IEMN CNRS), University of Valenciennes, Villeneuve d'Ascq (France); Lee, Seung-Min; Kang, Jin-Ho; Ryu, Sang-Wan, E-mail: sangwan@chonnam.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Gong, Su-Hyun; Cho, Yong-Hoon [Department of Physics and KI for the NanoCentury, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to modulate the refractive index and the birefringence of Gallium Nitride (GaN), we have developed a chemical etching method to perform porous structures. The aim of this research is to demonstrate that optical properties of GaN can be tuned by controlling the pores density. GaN films are prepared on sapphire by metal organic chemical vapor deposition and the microstructure is characterized by transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscope analysis. Optical waveguide experiment is demonstrated here to determine the key properties as the ordinary (n{sub 0}) and extraordinary (n{sub e}) refractive indices of etched structures. We report here the dispersion of refractive index for porous GaN and compare it to the bulk material. We observe that the refractive index decreases when the porous density p is increased: results obtained at 0.975??m have shown that the ordinary index n{sub 0} is 2.293 for a bulk layer and n{sub 0} is 2.285 for a pores density of 20%. This value corresponds to GaN layer with a pore size of 30?nm and inter-distance of 100?nm. The control of the refractive index into GaN is therefore fundamental for the design of active and passive optical devices.

  16. WRF-Chem Simulations of Aerosols and Anthropogenic Aerosol Radiative Forcing in East Asia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Yi; Zhao, Chun; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Meigen; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study aims to provide a first comprehensive evaluation of WRF-Chem for modeling aerosols and anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing (RF) over East Asia. Several numerical experiments were conducted from November 2007 to December 2008. Comparison between model results and observations shows that the model can generally reproduce the observed spatial distributions of aerosol concentration, aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA) from measurements at different sites, including the relatively higher aerosol concentration and AOD over East China and the relatively lower AOD over Southeast Asia, Korean, and Japan. The model also depicts the seasonal variation and transport of pollutions over East Asia. Particulate matter of 10 um or less in the aerodynamic diameter (PM10), black carbon (BC), sulfate (SO42-), nitrate (NO3-) and ammonium (NH4+) concentrations are higher in spring than other seasons in Japan due to the pollutant transport from polluted area of East Asia. AOD is high over Southwest and Central China in winter, spring and autumn and over North China in summer while is low over South China in summer due to monsoon precipitation. SSA is lowest in winter and highest in summer. The model also captures the dust events at the Zhangye site in the semi-arid region of China. Anthropogenic aerosol RF is estimated to range from -5 to -20 W m-2 over land and -20 to -40 W m-2 over ocean at the top of atmosphere (TOA), 5 to 30 W m-2 in the atmosphere (ATM) and -15 to -40 W m-2 at the bottom (BOT). The warming effect of anthropogenic aerosol in ATM results from BC aerosol while the negative aerosol RF at TOA is caused by scattering aerosols such as SO4 2-, NO3 - and NH4+. Positive BC RF at TOA compensates 40~50% of the TOA cooling associated with anthropogenic aerosol.

  17. Optical properties are an important way to understand how climate change is altering the oceans we rely on. Dr David Antoine leads the BIOCAREX project in improving analysis of optical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antoine, David

    Optical properties are an important way to understand how climate change is altering the oceans we rely on. Dr David Antoine leads the BIOCAREX project in improving analysis of optical properties. Here, he discusses bio-optics and their application in the Mediterranean Sea As an introduction could you

  18. Aerosol collection characteristics of ambient aerosol samplers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ortiz, Carlos A

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are contained in Appendix C. Dichotomous Sam ler The basic principle of operation of the dichotomous, Figure 9, is that aerosol particles are passed through an acceleration nozzle where the particle velocity is increased to a speed V. at the nozzle exit... AEROSOL COLLECTION CHARACTERISTICS OF AMBIENT AEROSOL SAMPLERS A Thesis by CARLOS A. ORTIZ Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978...

  19. Optical and phonon properties of ZnO:CuO mixed nanocomposite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Udayabhaskar, R.; Karthikeyan, B., E-mail: bkarthik@nitt.edu [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Tiruchirappalli 620 015 (India)

    2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical and phonon properties of ZnO:CuO nanocrystals which are prepared through sol-gel method are reported here. From X-ray diffraction studies, observed that Cu doping replaces the Zn and also forms secondary phase. Optical absorption spectral studies shows that the exciton and plasmon related bands of ZnO and CuO phase, respectively. Fluorescence studies of the prepared samples shows that green emission from ZnO is completely depleted and the same is attributed to CuO Plasmon. Raman spectral studies reveal that secondary phase (impurity) induced profile changes in 1LO and E{sub 2High} modes. Asymmetry in peak shape is analyzed using Fano profile with the combination of Lorentzian profile. Moreover, the monotonic increase of Fano factor and full width at half maxima is hopefully attributed to the continuum arises by the plasmons of Cu-O phase in ZnO nanosystem.

  20. Spectral dependence of third-order nonlinear optical properties in InN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahn, H., E-mail: hyahn@mail.nctu.edu.tw; Lee, M.-T.; Chang, Y.-M. [Department of Photonics and Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China)

    2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the nonlinear optical properties of InN measured in a wide near-infrared spectral range with the femtosecond Z-scan technique. The above-bandgap nonlinear absorption in InN is found to originate from the saturation of absorption by the band-state-filling and its cross-section increases drastically near the bandgap energy. With below-bandgap excitation, the nonlinear absorption undergoes a transition from saturation absorption (SA) to reverse-SA (RSA), attributed to the competition between SA of band-tail states and two-photon-related RSA. The measured large nonlinear refractive index of the order of 10{sup ?10} cm{sup 2}/W indicates InN as a potential material for all-optical switching and related applications.

  1. Optical and electronic properties of mixed Ag-Au tetramer cations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shayeghi, A., E-mail: shayeghi@cluster.pc.chemie.tu-darmstadt.de; Schäfer, R. [Eduard-Zintl-Institut, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Straße 8, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)] [Eduard-Zintl-Institut, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Straße 8, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Heard, C. J.; Johnston, R. L. [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)] [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We present experimental and theoretical studies of the optical response of mixed Ag {sub n} Au {sub 4?n}{sup +} (n=1–3) clusters in the photon energy range ?? = 1.9–3.5 eV. Absorption spectra are recorded by a newly built longitudinal molecular beam depletion spectroscopy apparatus providing lower limits to absolute photodissociation cross sections. The experimental data are compared to optical response calculations in the framework of long-range corrected time-dependent density functional theory with initial cluster geometries obtained by the unbiased Birmingham Cluster Genetic Algorithm coupled with density functional theory. Experiments and excited state calculations shed light on the structural and electronic properties of the mixed Ag-Au tetramer cations.

  2. Self-energy and excitonic effects in the electronic and optical properties of TiO? crystalline phases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiodo, Letizia; Garcia-Lastra, Juan M.; Iaocomino, Amilcare; Ossicini, Stefano; Zhao, Jin; Petek, Hrvoje; Rubio, Angel

    2010-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a unified ab initio study of electronic and optical properties of TiO? rutile and anatase phases with a combination of density-functional theory and many-body perturbation-theory techniques. The consistent treatment of exchange and correlation, with the inclusion of many-body one-particle and two-particles effects in self-energy and electron-hole interaction, produces a high-quality description of electronic and optical properties, giving, for some quantities, the first available estimation for this compound. In particular, we give a quantitative estimate of the electronic and direct optical gaps, clarifying their role with respect to previous measurements obtained by various experimental techniques. We obtain a description for both electronic gap and optical spectra that is consistent with experiments by analyzing the role of different contributions to the experimental optical gap and relating them to the level of theory used in our calculations. We also show the spatial properties of excitons in the two crystalline phases, highlighting the localization character of different optical transitions. This paper aims at understanding and firmly establishing electro-optical bulk properties, yet to be clarified, of this material of fundamental and technological interest for green energy applications.

  3. Evaluating Clouds, Aerosols, and their Interactions in Three Global Climate Models using COSP and Satellite Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ban-Weiss, George; Jin, Ling; Bauer, S.; Bennartz, Ralph; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Kai; Ming, Yi; Guo, Huan; Jiang, Jonathan

    2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurately representing aerosol-cloud interactions in global climate models is challenging. As parameterizations evolve, it is important to evaluate their performance with appropriate use of observations. In this work we compare aerosols, clouds, and their interactions in three climate models (AM3, CAM5, ModelE) to MODIS satellite observations. Modeled cloud properties were diagnosed using the CFMIP Observations Simulator Package (COSP). Cloud droplet number concentrations (N) were derived using the same algorithm for both satellite-simulated model values and observations. We find that aerosol optical depth tau simulated by models is similar to observations. For N, AM3 and CAM5 capture the observed spatial pattern of higher values in near-coast versus remote ocean regions, though modeled values in general are higher than observed. In contrast, ModelE simulates lower N in most near-coast versus remote regions. Aerosol- cloud interactions were computed as the sensitivity of N to tau for marine liquid clouds off the coasts of South Africa and Eastern Asia where aerosol pollution varies in time. AM3 and CAM5 are in most cases more sensitive than observations, while the sensitivity for ModelE is statistically insignificant. This widely used sensitivity could be subject to misinterpretation due to the confounding influence of meteorology on both aerosols and clouds. A simple framework for assessing the N – tau sensitivity at constant meteorology illustrates that observed sensitivity can change from positive to statistically insignificant when including the confounding influence of relative humidity. Satellite simulated values of N were compared to standard model output and found to be higher with a bias of 83 cm-3.

  4. Variation in Morphology, Hygroscopicity, and Optical Properties of Soot Particles Coated by Dicarboxylic Acids 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Huaxin

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    particles upon coating with succinic and glutaric acids. The effective densities, fractal dimensions and dynamic shape factors of fresh and coated soot aerosol particles have been determined. Significant size-dependent increases of soot particle mobility...

  5. Variation in Morphology, Hygroscopicity, and Optical Properties of Soot Particles Coated by Dicarboxylic Acids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Huaxin

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Soot aerosols are well known to be atmospheric constituents, but the hydrophobic nature of fresh soot likely prohibits them from encouraging cloud development. Soot aged through contact with oxygenated organic compounds may become hydrophilic enough...

  6. Fundamental optical properties of InN grown by epitaxial lateral overgrowth method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kametani, Tatsuma; Kamimura, Jumpei; Inose, Yuta; Kunugita, Hideyuki; Kikuchi, Akihiko; Kishino, Katsumi; Ema, Kazuhiro [Department of Engineering and Applied Science, Sophia University, 7-1 Kioi-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan)

    2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical properties of InN grown by the epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) method have been studied using photoluminescence (PL) and excitation-correlation (EC) measurements. The PL spectrum is analyzed by free-electron recombination band (FERB) model, which shows that the ELO sample has a very low background carrier concentration (n=5.5*10{sup 16}[cm{sup ?3]}). EC measurements show that the dependences of the band gap renormalization and Auger effect on the carrier concentrations are similar in spite of the different physical origins.

  7. The optimal thermo-optical properties and energy saving potential of adaptive glazing technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Favoino, Fabio; Overend, Mauro; Jin, Quian

    2015-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    is plotted in Fig. 2 by a black dashed line. 142 143 Fig 2. Tvis and g-value of smart glazing technologies compared to commercially available static DGUs. 144 3. The ideal adaptive glazed façade 145 An ideal adaptive façade can be defined as a façade... are identified. Of these one of the most important 24 findings is that a unique optimized technology, varying its thermo-optical properties between a limited number 25 of states could be effective in different climates and orientations. 26 Keywords: smart...

  8. Synthesis, morphology and optical properties of LaFeO{sub 3} nanospheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, R. Dhinesh [Crystal Growth Centre, Anna University, Chennai - 600 025 (India); Jayavel, R., E-mail: rjvel@annauniv.edu [Crystal Growth Centre, Anna University, Chennai - 600 025, India and Centre for Nanoscience and Technology, Anna University, Chennai - 600 025 (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    LaFeO{sub 3} nanospheres have been successively synthesized via hydrothermal method. Structural, morphological and optical properties of the prepared nanopowder were analyzed by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV–Vis absorption spectroscopy. The UV–Vis shows strong absorption at 475 nm which has excellent visible light absorption ability. Band gap energy of the prepared nanosphere was found to be 2.60 eV. The results indicate that the LaFeO{sub 3} nanospheres prepared by this method could be a kind of photocatalytic material.

  9. InGaN: Direct correlation of nanoscopic morphology features with optical and structural properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, Holger, E-mail: holger.koch@osram-os.com [OSRAM Opto Semiconductors GmbH, Leibnizstr. 4, 93055 Regensburg (Germany); GaN Device Technology, RWTH Aachen University, Sommerfeldstraße 24, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Bertram, Frank; August, Olga; Christen, Jürgen [Institute of Experimental Physics, Otto-von-Guericke-University Magdeburg, Universitätsplatz 2, 39106 Magdeburg (Germany); Pietzonka, Ines; Ahl, Jan-Philipp; Strassburg, Martin; Lugauer, Hans-Jürgen [OSRAM Opto Semiconductors GmbH, Leibnizstr. 4, 93055 Regensburg (Germany); Kalisch, Holger; Vescan, Andrei [GaN Device Technology, RWTH Aachen University, Sommerfeldstraße 24, 52074 Aachen (Germany)

    2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive study on the impact of growth modes on the structural and optical properties of thick InGaN layers suitable for photovoltaic application is presented. Samples grown by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy with different growth rates and thicknesses have been analyzed. The application of slow growth rates result in smooth layers while higher growth rates induce a meandering surface morphology. Using low-temperature cathodoluminescence, a direct correlation of the morphology to local luminescent properties is obtained: the top of meandering structures reveals a spectrally red-shifted emission compared to the emission wavelength expected from the average indium content determined by X-ray diffraction. The origin of this shift is identified and explained by increased indium incorporation on top of the meander due to a spatially localized compositional pulling effect.

  10. Aerosol remote sensing in polar regions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tomasi, C.; Wagener, R.; Kokhanovsky, A. A.; Lupi, A.; Ritter, C.; Smirnov, A.; O Neill, N. T.; Stone, R. S.; Holben, B. N.; Nyeki, S.; Wehrli, C.; Stohl, A.; Mazzola, M.; Lanconelli, C.; Vitale, V.; Stebel, K.; Aaltonen, V.; de Leeuw, G.; Rodriguez, E.; Herber, A. B.; Radionov, V. F.; Zielinski, T.; Petelski, T.; Sakerin, S. M.; Kabanov, D. M.; Xue, Y.; Mei, L.; Istomina, L.; Wagener, R.; McArthur, B.; Sobolewski, P. S.; Kivi, R.; Courcoux, Y.; Larouche, P.; Broccardo, S.; Piketh, S. J.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-year sets of ground-based sun-photometer measurements conducted at 12 Arctic sites and 9 Antarctic sites were examined to determine daily mean values of aerosol optical thickness ?(?) at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, from which best-fit values of Ångström's exponent ? were calculated. Analysing these data, the monthly mean values of ?(0.50 ?m) and ? and the relative frequency histograms of the daily mean values of both parameters were determined for winter–spring and summer–autumn in the Arctic and for austral summer in Antarctica. The Arctic and Antarctic covariance plots of the seasonal median values of ? versus ?(0.50 ?m) showed: (i) a considerable increase in ?(0.50 ?m) for the Arctic aerosol from summer to winter–spring, without marked changes in ?; and (ii) a marked increase in ?(0.50 ?m) passing from the Antarctic Plateau to coastal sites, whereas ? decreased considerably due to the larger fraction of sea-salt aerosol. Good agreement was found when comparing ground-based sun-photometer measurements of ?(?) and ? at Arctic and Antarctic coastal sites with Microtops measurements conducted during numerous AERONET/MAN cruises from 2006 to 2013 in three Arctic Ocean sectors and in coastal and off-shore regions of the Southern Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans, and the Antarctic Peninsula. Lidar measurements were also examined to characterise vertical profiles of the aerosol backscattering coefficient measured throughout the year at Ny-Ålesund. Satellite-based MODIS, MISR, and AATSR retrievals of ?(?) over large parts of the oceanic polar regions during spring and summer were in close agreement with ship-borne and coastal ground-based sun-photometer measurements. An overview of the chemical composition of mode particles is also presented, based on in-situ measurements at Arctic and Antarctic sites. Fourteen log-normal aerosol number size-distributions were defined to represent the average features of nuclei, accumulation and coarse mode particles for Arctic haze, summer background aerosol, Asian dust and boreal forest fire smoke, and for various background austral summer aerosol types at coastal and high-altitude Antarctic sites. The main columnar aerosol optical characteristics were determined for all 14 particle modes, based on in-situ measurements of the scattering and absorption coefficients. Diurnally averaged direct aerosol-induced radiative forcing and efficiency were calculated for a set of multimodal aerosol extinction models, using various Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function models over vegetation-covered, oceanic and snow-covered surfaces. These gave a reliable measure of the pronounced effects of aerosols on the radiation balance of the surface–atmosphere system over polar regions.

  11. Aerosol remote sensing in polar regions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tomasi, C.; Wagener, R.; Kokhanovsky, A. A.; Lupi, A.; Ritter, C.; Smirnov, A.; O Neill, N. T.; Stone, R. S.; Holben, B. N.; Nyeki, S.; et al

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-year sets of ground-based sun-photometer measurements conducted at 12 Arctic sites and 9 Antarctic sites were examined to determine daily mean values of aerosol optical thickness ?(?) at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, from which best-fit values of Ångström's exponent ? were calculated. Analysing these data, the monthly mean values of ?(0.50 ?m) and ? and the relative frequency histograms of the daily mean values of both parameters were determined for winter–spring and summer–autumn in the Arctic and for austral summer in Antarctica. The Arctic and Antarctic covariance plots of the seasonal median values of ? versus ?(0.50 ?m) showed: (i)more »a considerable increase in ?(0.50 ?m) for the Arctic aerosol from summer to winter–spring, without marked changes in ?; and (ii) a marked increase in ?(0.50 ?m) passing from the Antarctic Plateau to coastal sites, whereas ? decreased considerably due to the larger fraction of sea-salt aerosol. Good agreement was found when comparing ground-based sun-photometer measurements of ?(?) and ? at Arctic and Antarctic coastal sites with Microtops measurements conducted during numerous AERONET/MAN cruises from 2006 to 2013 in three Arctic Ocean sectors and in coastal and off-shore regions of the Southern Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans, and the Antarctic Peninsula. Lidar measurements were also examined to characterise vertical profiles of the aerosol backscattering coefficient measured throughout the year at Ny-Ålesund. Satellite-based MODIS, MISR, and AATSR retrievals of ?(?) over large parts of the oceanic polar regions during spring and summer were in close agreement with ship-borne and coastal ground-based sun-photometer measurements. An overview of the chemical composition of mode particles is also presented, based on in-situ measurements at Arctic and Antarctic sites. Fourteen log-normal aerosol number size-distributions were defined to represent the average features of nuclei, accumulation and coarse mode particles for Arctic haze, summer background aerosol, Asian dust and boreal forest fire smoke, and for various background austral summer aerosol types at coastal and high-altitude Antarctic sites. The main columnar aerosol optical characteristics were determined for all 14 particle modes, based on in-situ measurements of the scattering and absorption coefficients. Diurnally averaged direct aerosol-induced radiative forcing and efficiency were calculated for a set of multimodal aerosol extinction models, using various Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function models over vegetation-covered, oceanic and snow-covered surfaces. These gave a reliable measure of the pronounced effects of aerosols on the radiation balance of the surface–atmosphere system over polar regions.« less

  12. Techniques for measuring atmospheric aerosols at the High Resolution Fly's Eye experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The HiRes Collaboration

    2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe several techniques developed by the High Resolution Fly's Eye experiment for measuring aerosol vertical optical depth, aerosol horizontal attenuation length, and aerosol phase function. The techniques are based on measurements of side-scattered light generated by a steerable ultraviolet laser and collected by an optical detector designed to measure fluorescence light from cosmic-ray air showers. We also present a technique to cross-check the aerosol optical depth measurement using air showers observed in stereo. These methods can be used by future air fluorescence experiments.

  13. Aerosol observing system platform integration and AAF instrumentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Springston, S.; Sedlacek, A.

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the federal government’s 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), the U.S. DOE Office of Science allocated funds for the capital upgrade of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility to improve and expand observational capabilities related to cloud and aerosol properties. The ARM Facility was established as a national user facility for the global scientific community to conduct a wide range of interdisciplinary science. Part of the ARRA-funded expansion of the ARM Facility includes four new Aerosol Observing Systems (AOS) to be designed, instrumented, and mentored by BNL. The enclosures will be customized SeaTainers. These new platforms ([AMF2]: ARM Mobile Facility-2; [TWP-D]: Tropical Western Pacific at Darwin; and [MAOS-A]/[MAOS-C]: Mobile Aerosol Observing System-Aerosol/-Chemistry) will provide a laboratory environment for fielding instruments to collect data on aerosol life cycle, microphysics, and optical/physical properties. The extensive instrument suite includes both established methods and initial deployments of new techniques to add breadth and depth to the AOS data sets. The platforms are designed: (1) to have all instruments pre-installed before deployment, allowing a higher measurement duty cycle; (2) with a standardized configuration improving the robustness of data inter-comparability; (3) to provide remote access capability for instrument mentors; and (4) to readily accommodate guest instrumentation. The first deployment of the AMF2 platform will be at the upcoming StormVEx campaign held at Steamboat Springs, Colorado, October 15, 2010–March 31, 2011 while the TWP-D AOS will be stationed at the ARM Darwin site. The maiden deployments of the MAOS-A and MAOS-C platforms will be during the Ganges Valley Experiment (GVAX) scheduled for April 2011–April 2012. In addition to the ground-based AOS platforms, thee major instrument builds for the AAF are also being undertaken (new trace gas package [NO, NOx, NOy, CO, O3, and SO2]; Scanning Mobility Particle Sampler [SMPS]; and Particle into Liquid Sampler [PILS]). The current status of the AOS platforms, instrument suites, instituted QA/QC activities, projected AOS VAPs, and inlet design, as well as still-unresolved issues, will be presented.

  14. Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 92 (2008) 821829 Modeling the optical properties of WO3 and WO3SiO2 thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thirumalai, Devarajan

    Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 92 (2008) 821­829 Modeling the optical properties of WO3 the optical response of the films in the near-UV and visible region: two interband transitions for energies E

  15. Tuning the Optical Properties of Mesoporous TiO2 Films by Nanoscale Engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwenzer, Birgit; Wang, Liang; Swensen, James S.; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.; Silverman, Gary; Korotkov, Roman; Gaspar, Daniel J.

    2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Introducing mesoscale pores into spincoated titanium dioxide films, prepared by spincoating different sol-gel precursor solutions on silicon substrates and subsequent annealing at 350 C, 400 C or 450 C, respectively, affects several optical properties of the material. The change in refractive index observed for different mesoporous anatase films directly correlates with changes in pore size, but is also in a more complex manner influenced by the film thickness and the density of pores within the films. Additionally, the band gap of the films is blueshifted by the stress the introduction of pores exerts on the inorganic matrix. The differently sized pores were templated by Pluronic{reg_sign} block copolymers in the solgel solutions and tuned by employing different annealing temperatures for the film preparation. This study focused on elucidating the effect different templating materials (F127 and P123) have on the pore size of the final mesoporous titania film, and on understanding the relation of varying polymer concentration (taking P123 as an example) in the sol-gel solution to the pore concentration and size in the resultant titania film. Titania thin film samples or corresponding titanium dioxide powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction, nitrogen adsorption, ellipsometery, UV/Vis spectrometry and other techniques to understand the interplay between mesoporosity and optical properties.

  16. Production flux of sea spray aerosol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Leeuw, G.; Lewis, E.; Andreas, E. L.; Anguelova, M. D.; Fairall, C. W.; O’Dowd, C.; Schulz, M.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2011-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowledge of the size- and composition-dependent production flux of primary sea spray aerosol (SSA) particles and its dependence on environmental variables is required for modeling cloud microphysical properties and aerosol radiative influences, interpreting measurements of particulate matter in coastal areas and its relation to air quality, and evaluating rates of uptake and reactions of gases in sea spray drops. This review examines recent research pertinent to SSA production flux, which deals mainly with production of particles with r{sub 80} (equilibrium radius at 80% relative humidity) less than 1 {micro}m and as small as 0.01 {micro}m. Production of sea spray particles and its dependence on controlling factors has been investigated in laboratory studies that have examined the dependences on water temperature, salinity, and the presence of organics and in field measurements with micrometeorological techniques that use newly developed fast optical particle sizers. Extensive measurements show that water-insoluble organic matter contributes substantially to the composition of SSA particles with r{sub 80} < 0.25 {micro}m and, in locations with high biological activity, can be the dominant constituent. Order-of-magnitude variation remains in estimates of the size-dependent production flux per white area, the quantity central to formulations of the production flux based on the whitecap method. This variation indicates that the production flux may depend on quantities such as the volume flux of air bubbles to the surface that are not accounted for in current models. Variation in estimates of the whitecap fraction as a function of wind speed contributes additional, comparable uncertainty to production flux estimates.

  17. Significant reduction of surface solar irradiance induced by aerosols in a suburban region in northeastern China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zhanqing

    Significant reduction of surface solar irradiance induced by aerosols in a suburban region in northeastern China Xiangao Xia,1 Hongbin Chen,1 Zhanqing Li,1,2 Pucai Wang,1 and Jiankai Wang1 Received 25 May region in northeastern China. Aerosol properties derived from Sun photometer measurements and aerosol

  18. OAK 270 - The use of Lidar/radiometer (LIRAD) in the ARM program to obtain optical properties and microphysics of high and midlevel clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.M.R. Platt; R.T. Austin; S.A. Young; and G.L. Stephens

    2002-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK 270 - The use of Lidar/Radiometer (LIRAD) in the ARM program to obtain optical properties and microphysics of high and midlevel clouds

  19. RESEARCH ON THE ELECTRONIC AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF POLYMER AND OTHER ORGANIC MOLECULAR THIN FILMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ALEXEI G. VITUKHNOVSKY; IGOR I. SOBELMAN - RUSSIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES

    1995-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical properties of highly ordered films of poly(p-phenylene) (PPP) on different substrates, thin films of mixtures of conjugated polymers, of fullerene and its composition with polymers, molecular J-aggregates of cyanine dyes in frozen matrices have been studied within the framework of the Agreement. Procedures of preparation of high-quality vacuum deposited PPP films on different substrates (ITO, Si, GaAs and etc.) were developed. Using time-correlated single photon counting technique and fluorescence spectroscopy the high quality of PPP films has been confirmed. Dependence of structure and optical properties on the conditions of preparation were investigated. The fluorescence lifetime and spectra of highly oriented vacuum deposited PPP films were studied as a function of the degree of polymerization. It was shown for the first time that the maximum fluorescence quantum yield is achieved for the chain length approximately equal to 35 monomer units. The selective excitation of luminescence of thin films of PPP was performed in the temperature range from 5 to 300 K. The total intensity of luminescence monotonically decreases with decreasing temperature. Conditions of preparation of highly cristallyne fullerene C{sub 60} films by the method of vacuum deposition were found. Composites of C{sub 60} with conjugated polymers PPV and polyacetylene (PA) were prepared. The results on fluorescence quenching, IR and resonant Raman spectroscopy are consistent with earlier reported ultrafast photoinduced electron transfer from PPV to C{sub 60} and show that the electron transfer is absent in the case of the PA-C{sub 60} composition. Strong quenching of PPV fluorescence was observed in the PPV-PA blends. The electron transfer from PPV to PA can be considered as one of the possible mechanisms of this quenching. The dynamics of photoexcitations in different types of J-aggregates of the carbocyanine dye was studied at different temperatures in frozen matrices. The optical properties of relatively simple J-aggregates with pure intrasegment relaxation, which they have found, may clarify the problem of the relationship between intrasegment and intersegment processes in the formation of luminescent states in more complicated conjugated polymers, which is important for construction of electroluminescence and photosensitive devices.

  20. Optical properties of strain-free AlN nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy on Si substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Q.; Zhao, S.; Connie, A. T.; Shih, I.; Mi, Z., E-mail: zetian.mi@mcgill.ca [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, McGill University, 3480 University Street, Montreal, Quebec H3A 0E9 (Canada); Gonzalez, T.; Andrews, M. P. [Department of Chemistry, McGill University, 801 Sherbrooke St West, Montreal, Quebec H3A 0B8 (Canada); Du, X. Z.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States)

    2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The optical properties of catalyst-free AlN nanowires grown on Si substrates by molecular beam epitaxy were investigated. Such nanowires are nearly free of strain, with strong free exciton emission measured at room temperature. The photoluminescence intensity is significantly enhanced, compared to previously reported AlN epilayer. Moreover, the presence of phonon replicas with an energy separation of ?100?meV was identified to be associated with the surface-optical phonon rather than the commonly reported longitudinal-optical phonon, which is further supported by the micro-Raman scattering experiments.

  1. Direct observations of the effects of aerosol loading on net ecosystem CO2 exchanges over different landscapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niyogi, Dev

    radiation; effect of cloud cover; and effect of high and low aerosol optical depths (AOD). Results indicateDirect observations of the effects of aerosol loading on net ecosystem CO2 exchanges over different, and croplands) with collocated aerosol and surface radiation measurements were analyzed for high and low diffuse

  2. Regional variation of organic functional groups in aerosol particles on four U.S. east coast platforms during the International Consortium for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. SOA can be formed by condensation of species produced by gas aerosol mass spectrometers for OM, a Sunset Laboratory thermo-optical analysis instrument for OC

  3. Aerodynamic Focusing Of High-Density Aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruiz, D. E.; Fisch, Nathaniel

    2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    High-density micron-sized particle aerosols might form the basis for a number of applications in which a material target with a particular shape might be quickly ionized to form a cylindrical or sheet shaped plasma. A simple experimental device was built in order to study the properties of high-density aerosol focusing for 1#22; m silica spheres. Preliminary results recover previous findings on aerodynamic focusing at low densities. At higher densities, it is demonstrated that the focusing properties change in a way which is consistent with a density dependent Stokes number.

  4. Optical properties of ITO films obtained by high-frequency magnetron sputtering with accompanying ion treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krylov, P. N., E-mail: ftt@uni.udm.ru; Zakirova, R. M.; Fedotova, I. V. [Udmurt State University (Russian Federation)] [Udmurt State University (Russian Federation)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A variation in the properties of indium-tin-oxide (ITO) films obtained by the method of reactive magnetron sputtering with simultaneous ion treatment is reported. The ITO films feature the following parameters in the optical range of 450-1100 nm: a transmission coefficient of 80%, band gap of 3.50-3.60 eV, and a refractive index of 1.97-2.06. All characteristics of the films depend on the ion-treatment current. The latter, during the course of deposition, reduces the resistivity of the ITO films with the smallest value of the resistivity being equal to 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} {Omega} cm. The degradation of films with a high resistivity when kept in air is observed.

  5. Dielectric function and optical properties of quaternary AlInGaN alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakalauskas, E.; Gobsch, G. [Institut fuer Physik, Technische Universitaet Ilmenau, PF 100565, 98684 Ilmenau (Germany); Reuters, B.; Khoshroo, L. Rahimzadeh; Kalisch, H.; Vescan, A. [GaN Device Technology, RWTH Aachen University, Sommerfeldstr. 24, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Heuken, M. [GaN Device Technology, RWTH Aachen University, Sommerfeldstr. 24, 52074 Aachen (Germany); AIXTRON SE, Kaiserstr. 98, 52134 Herzogenrath (Germany); Roeppischer, M.; Cobet, C. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Analytische Wissenschaften - ISAS - e.V., Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Goldhahn, R. [Institut fuer Physik, Technische Universitaet Ilmenau, PF 100565, 98684 Ilmenau (Germany); Institut fuer Experimentelle Physik, Otto-von-Guericke-Universitaet Magdeburg, PF 4120, 39016 Magdeburg (Germany)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The optical properties of quaternary Al{sub x}In{sub y}Ga{sub 1-x-y}N alloy films with 0.16optical quality of the material. These features are correlated to the critical points of the band structure (van Hove singularities). An analytical model, which permits us to accurately describe the dielectric function (or optical constants) in the range of 1-10 eV, is also presented. The band-gap and high-energy interband transition values are obtained by fitting the experimental DF with the analytical model. The strain influence on the bandgap is evaluated by using the kxp formalism. Furthermore, an empirical expression is proposed which allows us to calculate the AlInGaN band-gap and high-energy inter-band transitions in the whole compositional range (x, y). The band-gap values obtained from the empirical expression are in good agreement with both the calculated ab initio and the experimental values determined by SE.

  6. Statistical Properties of Multiple Optical Emission Components in Gamma-Ray Bursts and Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, En-Wei; Tang, Qing-Wen; Chen, Jie-Min; Zhang, Bing

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Well-sampled optical lightcurves of 146 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are complied from the literature. Multiple optical emission components are extracted with power-law function fits to these lightcurves. We present a systematical analysis for statistical properties and their relations to prompt gamma-ray emission and X-ray afterglow for each component. We show that peak luminosity in the prompt and late flares are correlated and the evolution of the peak luminosity may signal the evolution of the accretion rate. No tight correlation between the shallow decay phase/plateau and prompt gamma-ray emission is found. Assuming that they are due to a long-lasting wind injected by a compact object, we show that the injected behavior favors the scenarios of a long-lasting wind after the main burst episode. The peak luminosity of the afterglow onset is tightly correlated with Eiso, and it is dimmer as peaking later. Assuming that the onset bump is due to the fireball deceleration by the external medium, we examine the Gamma...

  7. Optimization of the optical properties of nanostructured silicon surfaces for solar cell applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Di; Pennec, Y.; Djafari-Rouhani, B.; Lambert, Y.; Deblock, Y.; Stiévenard, D., E-mail: didier.stievenard@isen.fr [Institut d'Electronique et de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologies, IEMN, (CNRS, UMR 8520), Groupe de Physique, Cité scientifique, avenue Poincaré, 59652 Villeneuve d'Ascq (France); Cristini-Robbe, O. [PHLAM, UMR8523, Université de Lille 1, 59652 Villeneuve d'Asq Cedex (France); Xu, T. [Key Laboratory of Advanced Display and System Application, Shanghai University, 149 Yanchang Road, Shanghai 200072 (China); Faucher, M. [Institut d'Electronique et de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologies, IEMN, (CNRS, UMR 8520), Groupe NAM6, Cité scientifique, avenue Poincaré, 59652 Villeneuve d'Asq (France)

    2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface nanostructuration is an important challenge for the optimization of light trapping in solar cell. We present simulations on both the optical properties and the efficiency of micro pillars—MPs—or nanocones—NCs—silicon based solar cells together with measurements on their associated optical absorption. We address the simulation using the Finite Difference Time Domain method, well-adapted to deal with a periodic set of nanostructures. We study the effect of the period, the bottom diameter, the top diameter, and the height of the MPs or NCs on the efficiency, assuming that one absorbed photon induces one exciton. This allows us to give a kind of abacus involving all the geometrical parameters of the nanostructured surface with regard to the efficiency of the associated solar cell. We also show that for a given ratio of the diameter over the period, the best efficiency is obtained for small diameters. For small lengths, MPs are extended to NCs by changing the angle between the bottom surface and the vertical face of the MPs. The best efficiency is obtained for an angle of the order of 70°. Finally, nanostructures have been processed and allow comparing experimental results with simulations. In every case, a good agreement is found.

  8. Surface chemistry : a non-negligible parameter in determining optical properties of small colloidal metal nanoparticles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Y.; Gray, S. K.; Peng, S. (Center for Nanoscale Materials)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface chemistry can become pronounced in determining the optical properties of colloidal metal nanoparticles as the nanoparticles become so small (diameters <20 nm) that the surface atoms, which can undergo chemical interactions with the environment, represent a significant fraction of the total number of atoms although this effect is often ignored. For instance, formation of chemical bonds between surface atoms of small metal nanoparticles and capping molecules that help stabilize the nanoparticles can reduce the density of conduction band electrons in the surface layer of metal atoms. This reduced electron density consequently influences the frequency-dependent dielectric constant of the metal atoms in the surface layer and, for sufficiently high surface to volume ratios, the overall surface plasmon resonance (SPR) absorption spectrum. The important role of surface chemistry is highlighted here by carefully analyzing the classical Mie theory and a multi-layer model is presented to produce more accurate predictions by considering the chemically reduced density of conduction band electrons in the outer shell of metal atoms in nanoparticles. Calculated absorption spectra of small Ag nanoparticles quantitatively agree with the experimental results for our monodispersed Ag nanoparticles synthesized via a well-defined chemical reduction process, revealing an exceptional size-dependence of absorption peak positions: the peaks first blue-shift followed by a turnover and a dramatic red-shift as the particle size decreases. A comprehensive understanding of the relationship between surface chemistry and optical properties is beneficial to exploit new applications of small colloidal metal nanoparticles, such as colorimetric sensing, electrochromic devices, and surface enhanced spectroscopies.

  9. Modeling Atmospheric Aerosols V. Rao Kotamarthi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling Atmospheric Aerosols V. Rao Kotamarthi and Yan Feng Climate Research Section Environmental Science Division Argonne National Laboratory #12;Outline Atmospheric Aerosols and gas phase heterogeneous reactions Regional Scales and Atmospheric Aerosols Regional Scale Aerosols: Ganges Valley Aerosol

  10. Origin of atmospheric aerosols at the Pierre Auger Observatory using studies of air mass trajectories in South America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curci, Gabriele

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pierre Auger Observatory is making significant contributions towards understanding the nature and origin of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. One of its main challenges is the monitoring of the atmosphere, both in terms of its state variables and its optical properties. The aim of this work is to analyze aerosol optical depth $\\tau_{\\rm a}(z)$ values measured from 2004 to 2012 at the observatory, which is located in a remote and relatively unstudied area of the Pampa Amarilla, Argentina. The aerosol optical depth is in average quite low - annual mean $\\tau_{\\rm a}(3.5~{\\rm km})\\sim 0.04$ - and shows a seasonal trend with a winter minimum - $\\tau_{\\rm a}(3.5~{\\rm km})\\sim 0.03$ -, and a summer maximum - $\\tau_{\\rm a}(3.5~{\\rm km})\\sim 0.06$ -, and an unexpected increase from August to September - $\\tau_{\\rm a}(3.5~{\\rm km})\\sim 0.055$). We computed backward trajectories for the years 2005 to 2012 to interpret the air mass origin. Winter nights with low aerosol concentrations show air masses originating from t...

  11. Aerosol–climate interactions in the Norwegian Earth System Model – NorESM1-M

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkevag, A.; Iversen, T.; Seland, O.; Hoose, C.; Kristjansson, J. E.; Struthers, H.; Ekman, A. M.; Ghan, Steven J.; Griesfeller, Jan; Nilsson, E. D.; Schulz, M.

    2013-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to document and evaluate recent changes and updates to the module for aerosols and aerosol–cloud–radiation interactions in the atmospheric module CAM4-Oslo of the core version of the Norwegian Earth System Model (NorESM), NorESM1-M. Particular attention is paid to the role of natural organics, sea salt, and mineral dust in determining the gross aerosol properties as well as the anthropogenic contribution to these properties and the associated direct and indirect radiative forcing. The aerosol module is extended from earlier versions that have been published, and includes life-cycling of sea salt, mineral dust, particulate sulphate, black carbon, and primary and secondary organics. The impacts of most of the numerous changes since previous versions are thoroughly explored by sensitivity experiments. The most important changes are: modified prognostic sea salt emissions; updated treatment of precipitation scavenging and gravitational settling; inclusion of biogenic primary organics and methane sulphonic acid (MSA) from oceans; almost doubled production of land-based biogenic secondary organic aerosols (SOA); and increased ratio of organic matter to organic carbon (OM/OC) for biomass burning aerosols from 1.4 to 2.6. Compared with in situ measurements and remotely sensed data, the new treatments of sea salt and dust aerosols give smaller biases in near-surface mass concentrations and aerosol optical depth than in the earlier model version. The model biases for mass concentrations are approximately unchanged for sulphate and BC. The enhanced levels of modeled OM yield improved overall statistics, even though OM is still underestimated in Europe and overestimated in North America. The global anthropogenic aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF) at the top of the atmosphere has changed from a small positive value to ?0.08 W m?2 in CAM4-Oslo. The sensitivity tests suggest that this change can be attributed to the new treatment of biomass burning aerosols and gravitational settling. Although it has not been a goal in this study, the new DRF estimate is closer both to the median model estimate from the AeroCom intercomparison and the best estimate in IPCC AR4. Estimated DRF at the ground surface has increased by ca. 60%, to ?1.89 W m?2. We show that this can be explained by new emission data and omitted mixing of constituents between updrafts and downdrafts in convective clouds. The increased abundance of natural OM and the introduction of a cloud droplet spectral dispersion formulation are the most important contributions to a considerably decreased estimate of the indirect radiative forcing (IndRF). The IndRF is also found to be sensitive to assumptions about the coating of insoluble aerosols by sulphate and OM. The IndRF of ?1.2 W m?2, which is closer to the IPCC AR4 estimates than the previous estimate of ?1.9 W m?2, has thus been obtained without imposing unrealistic artificial lower bounds on cloud droplet number concentrations.

  12. Morphology and Optical Properties of Mg Doped GaNNanowires in Dependence of Growth Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutter, E.

    2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of the substrate temperature and Mg doping on the morphological and optical properties of catalyst-free GaN nanowires grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on Si(111) has been investigated in a large temperaturerange between 665 °C and 785 °C. The density and wire sizes in Mg-doped nanowires are found to change with substrate temperature in a similar way as undoped nanowires. Between 725 °C and 785 °C a trimodal size distribution and an increase of the wire density from 5.0x109 cm-2 to 9.5x109 cm-2 were observed. Transmission electron microscopy indicates that the upper parts of the nanowires are free of structural defects. Raman spectroscopy measurements confirm a high crystalline quality of doped wires, with a line width of the E2 H of 3.3 cm-1 for samples grown at Ts=785 °C. Photoluminescence measurements show a strong influence of Mg on the emission properties, namely the increase of thedonor-acceptor pair emission and its phonon replicas.

  13. Development of a device for the measurement of biological tissue optical properties using the single Monte Carlo method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bendele, Travis Henry

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A honeycomb probe was designed to measure the optical properties of biological tissues using single Monte Carlo method. The ongoing project is intended to be a multi-wavelength, real time, and in-vivo technique to detect breast cancer. Preliminary...

  14. From 1D Chain to 3D Network: Tuning Hybrid II-VI Nanostructures and Their Optical Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jing

    and synthesized a family of novel organic-inorganic hybrid nanocomposites based on II-VI semiconductorsFrom 1D Chain to 3D Network: Tuning Hybrid II-VI Nanostructures and Their Optical Properties of these nanocomposite materials have been characterized by single crystal and/or powder X-ray diffraction methods. [Zn

  15. Correlation between structural properties and optical amplification in InGaN/GaN heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    . The lateral homogeneity can be drastically improved using a template of GaN grown on the sapphire substrate-grown heterostructures can drastically be reduced by using a template of MOVPE-GaN on the sapphire substrate, which leadsCorrelation between structural properties and optical amplification in InGaN/GaN heterostructures

  16. Non-intrusive characterization of heat transfer fluid aerosol formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishna, Kiran

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat transfer fluids are widely used in the chemical process industry and are available in a wide range of properties. These fluids are flammable above their flash points and can cause explosions. Though the possibility of aerosol explosions has...

  17. Characterizing the Vertical Distribution of Aerosols Over the ARM SGP Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Ferrare, Connor Flynn, David Turner

    2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This project focused on: 1) evaluating the performance of the DOE ARM SGP Raman lidar system in measuring profiles of water vapor and aerosols, and 2) the use of the Raman lidar measurements of aerosol and water vapor profiles for assessing the vertical distribution of aerosols and water vapor simulated by global transport models and examining diurnal variability of aerosols and water vapor. The highest aerosol extinction was generally observed close to the surface during the nighttime just prior to sunrise. The high values of aerosol extinction are most likely associated with increased scattering by hygroscopic aerosols, since the corresponding average relative humidity values were above 70%. After sunrise, relative humidity and aerosol extinction below 500 m decreased with the growth in the daytime convective boundary layer. The largest aerosol extinction for altitudes above 1 km occurred during the early afternoon most likely as a result of the increase in relative humidity. The water vapor mixing ratio profiles generally showed smaller variations with altitude between day and night. We also compared simultaneous measurements of relative humidity, aerosol extinction, and aerosol optical thickness derived from the ARM SGP Raman lidar and in situ instruments on board a small aircraft flown routinely over the ARM SGP site. In contrast, the differences between the CARL and IAP aerosol extinction measurements are considerably larger. Aerosol extinction derived from the IAP measurements is, on average, about 30-40% less than values derived from the Raman lidar. The reasons for this difference are not clear, but may be related to the corrections for supermicron scattering and relative humidity that were applied to the IAP data. The investigators on this project helped to set up a major field mission (2003 Aerosol IOP) over the DOE ARM SGP site. One of the goals of the mission was to further evaluate the aerosol and water vapor retrievals from this lidar system. Analysis of the aerosol and water vapor data collected by the Raman lidar during the 2003 Aerosol IOP indicated that the sensitivity of the lidar was significantly lower than when the lidar was initially deployed. A detailed analysis after the IOP of the long-term dataset demonstrated that the lidar began degrading in early 2002, and that it lost approximately a factor of 4 in sensitivity between 2002 and 2004. We participated in the development of the remediation plan for the system to restore its initial performance. We conducted this refurbishment and upgrade from May- September 2004. This remediation lead to an increase in the signal-to-noise ratio of 10 and 30 for the Raman lidar's water vapor mixing ratio and aerosol backscatter coefficient data, respectively as compared to the signal strengths when the system was first deployed. The DOE ARM Aerosol Lidar Validation Experiment (ALIVE), which was conducted during September 2005, evaluated the impact of these modifications and upgrades on the SGP Raman lidar measurements of aerosol extinction and optical thickness. The CARL modifications significantly improved the accuracy and temporal resolution of the aerosol measurements. Aerosol extinction profiles measured by the Raman lidar were also used to evaluate aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness (AOT) simulated by aerosol models as part of the Aerosol module inter-Comparison in global models (AEROCOM) (http://nansen.ipsl.jussieu.fr/AEROCOM/aerocomhome.html) project. There was a wide range in how the models represent the aerosol extinction profiles over the ARM SGP site, even though the average annual AOT represented by the various models and measured by CARL and the Sun photometer were in general agreement, at least within the standard deviations of the averages. There were considerable differences in the average vertical distributions among the models, even among models that had similar average aerosol optical thickness. Deviations between mean aerosol extinction profiles were generally small (~20-30%) for altitudes above 2 km, and grew consider

  18. Smoke inputs to climate models: optical properties and height distribution for nuclear winter studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penner, J.E.; Haselman, L.C. Jr.

    1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Smoke from fires produced in the aftermath of a major nuclear exchange has been predicted to cause large decreases in land surface temperatures. The extent of the decrease and even the sign of the temperature change depend on the optical characteristics of the smoke and how it is distributed with altitude. The height distribution of smoke over a fire is determined by the amount of buoyant energy produced by the fire and the amount of energy released by the latent heat of condensation of water vapor. The optical properties of the smoke depend on the size distribution of smoke particles which changes due to coagulation within the lofted plume. We present calculations demonstrating these processes and estimate their importance for the smoke source term input for climate models. For high initial smoke densities and for absorbing smoke ( m = 1.75 - 0.3i), coagulation of smoke particles within the smoke plume is predicted to first increase, then decrease, the size-integrated extinction cross section. However, at the smoke densities predicted in our model (assuming a 3% emission rate for smoke) and for our assumed initial size distribution, the attachment rates for brownian and turbulent collision processes are not fast enough to alter the smoke size distribution enough to significantly change the integrated extinction cross section. Early-time coagulation is, however, fast enough to allow further coagulation, on longer time scales, to act to decrease the extinction cross section. On these longer time scales appropriate to climate models, coagulation can decrease the extinction cross section by almost a factor of two before the smoke becomes well mixed around the globe. This process has been neglected in past climate effect evaluations, but could have a significant effect, since the extinction cross section enters as an exponential factor in calculating the light attenuation due to smoke. 10 refs., 20 figs.

  19. Ganges valley aerosol experiment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotamarthi, V.R.; Satheesh, S.K. (Environmental Science Division); (Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, India)

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In June 2011, the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX) began in the Ganges Valley region of India. The objective of this field campaign is to obtain measurements of clouds, precipitation, and complex aerosols to study their impact on cloud formation and monsoon activity in the region.

  20. 7, 55535593, 2007 Nitrate aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 7, 5553­5593, 2007 Nitrate aerosols today and in 2030 S. E. Bauer et al. Title Page Abstract Discussions Nitrate aerosols today and in 2030: importance relative to other aerosol species and tropospheric, 5553­5593, 2007 Nitrate aerosols today and in 2030 S. E. Bauer et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction

  1. Aerosol Retrievals from ARM SGP MFRSR Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Alexandrov, Mikhail

    The Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) makes precise simultaneous measurements of the solar direct normal and diffuse horizontal irradiances at six wavelengths (nominally 415, 500, 615, 673, 870, and 940 nm) at short intervals (20 sec for ARM instruments) throughout the day. Time series of spectral optical depth are derived from these measurements. Besides water vapor at 940 nm, the other gaseous absorbers within the MFRSR channels are NO2 (at 415, 500, and 615 nm) and ozone (at 500, 615, and 670 nm). Aerosols and Rayleigh scattering contribute atmospheric extinction in all MFRSR channels. Our recently updated MFRSR data analysis algorithm allows us to partition the spectral aerosol optical depth into fine and coarse modes and to retrieve the fine mode effective radius. In this approach we rely on climatological amounts of NO2 from SCIAMACHY satellite retrievals and use daily ozone columns from TOMS.

  2. Pencil-like zinc oxide micro/nano-scale structures: Hydrothermal synthesis, optical and photocatalytic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moulahi, A. [Laboratoire de Chimie de la Matière Condensée, IPEIT, Université de Tunis, 2 rue Jawaher Lel Nehru 1008, B. P. 229 Montfleury (Tunisia); Sediri, F., E-mail: faouzi.sediri@ipeit.rnu.tn [Laboratoire de Chimie de la Matière Condensée, IPEIT, Université de Tunis, 2 rue Jawaher Lel Nehru 1008, B. P. 229 Montfleury (Tunisia); Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Université de Tunis El Manar, 2092 El Manar (Tunisia)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Zinc oxide micro/nanopencils have been synthesized hydrothermally. • Photocatalytic activity has been evaluated by the degradation of methylene blue under UV light irradiation. • ZnO nanopencils exhibit much higher photocatalytic activity than the commercial ZnO. - Abstract: Zinc oxide micro/nanopencils have been successfully synthesized by hydrothermal process using zinc acetate and diamines as structure-directing agents. The morphology, the structure, the crystallinity and the composition of the materials were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The optical properties of synthesized ZnO were investigated by UV–vis spectroscopy. The photocatalytic activity of the material has been evaluated by the degradation of methylene blue under UV irradiation. As a result, after the lapse of 150 min, around 82% bleaching was observed, with ZnO nanopencils yielding more photodegradation compared to that of commercial ZnO (61%)

  3. Structural, optical and ethanol sensing properties of Cu-doped SnO{sub 2} nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johari, Anima, E-mail: animajohari@gmail.com; Sharma, Manish [Center for Applied Research in Electronics (CARE), IIT Delhi, Hauz khas, New Delhi-110016 (India); Johari, Anoopshi [THDC Institute of Hydropower Institute of Engineering and Technology, Tehri-249124 (India); Bhatnagar, M. C. [Physics Department, IIT Delhi, Hauz khas, New Delhi-110016 (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In present work, one-dimensional nanostructure of Cu-doped Tin oxide (SnO{sub 2}) was synthesized by using thermal evaporation method in a tubular furnace under Nitrogen (N{sub 2}) ambience. The growth was carried out at atmospheric pressure. SEM and TEM images reveal the growth of wire-like nanostructures of Cu-doped SnO{sub 2} on Si substrate. The XRD analysis confirms that the synthesized SnO{sub 2} nanowires have tetragonal rutile structure with polycrystalline nature and X-ray diffraction pattern also showed that Cu gets incorporated into the SnO{sub 2} lattice. EDX spectra confirm the doping of Cu into SnO{sub 2} nanowires and atomic fraction of Cu in nanowires is ? 0.5 at%. The Vapor Liquid Solid (VLS) growth mechanism for Cu-doped SnO{sub 2} nanowires was also confirmed by EDX spectra. The optical properties of as grown Cu-doped SnO{sub 2} nanowires were studied by using UV-vis spectra which concludes the band gap of about 3.7 eV. As synthesized single Cu-doped SnO{sub 2} nanowire based gas sensor exhibit relatively good performance to ethanol gas. This sensing behaviour offers a suitable application of the Cu-doped SnO{sub 2} nanowire sensor for detection of ethanol gas.

  4. Ge/SiGe quantum wells on Si(111): Growth, structural, and optical properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gatti, E., E-mail: eleonora.gatti@mater.unimib.it; Pezzoli, F.; Grilli, E. [L-NESS and Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Università di Milano Bicocca, via Cozzi 55, I-20125 Milano (Italy); Isa, F.; Chrastina, D.; Isella, G. [L-NESS and Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, Polo di Como, via Anzani 42, I - 22100 Como (Italy); Müller Gubler, E. [Electron Microscopy Center of ETH Zürich (EMEZ), August-Piccard-Hof 1, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The epitaxial growth of Ge/Si{sub 0.15}Ge{sub 0.85} multiple quantum wells (MQWs) on Si(111) substrates is demonstrated. A 3??m thick reverse, double-step virtual substrate with a final composition of Si{sub 0.10}Ge{sub 0.90} has been employed. High resolution XRD, TEM, AFM and defect etching analysis has been used for the study of the structural properties of the buffer and of the QWs. The QW stack is characterized by a threading dislocation density of about 3?×?10{sup 7?}cm{sup ?2} and an interdiffusion layer at the well/barrier interface of 2.1?nm. The quantum confined energy levels of this system have been calculated using the k·p and effective mass approximation methods. The Ge/Si{sub 0.15}Ge{sub 0.85} MQWs have been characterized through absorption and photoluminescence measurements. The optical spectra have been compared with those of Ge/Si{sub 0.15}Ge{sub 0.85} QWs grown on Si(001) through a thick graded virtual substrate.

  5. Optical devices having flakes suspended in a host fluid to provide a flake/fluid system providing flakes with angularly dependent optical properties in response to an alternating current electric field due to the dielectric properties of the system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kosc, Tanya Z. (Rochester, NY); Marshall, Kenneth L. (Rochester, NY); Jacobs, Stephen D. (Pittsford, NY)

    2006-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical devices utilizing flakes (also called platelets) suspended in a host fluid have optical characteristics, such as reflective properties, which are angular dependent in response to an AC field. The reflectivity may be Bragg-like, and the characteristics are obtained through the use of flakes of liquid crystal material, such as polymer liquid crystal (PLC) materials including polymer cholesteric liquid crystal (PCLC) and polymer nematic liquid crystal (PNLC) material or birefringent polymers (BP). The host fluid may be propylene carbonate, poly(ethylene glycol) or other fluids or fluid mixtures having fluid conductivity to support conductivity in the flake/host system. AC field dependent rotation of 90.degree. can be obtained at rates and field intensities dependent upon the frequency and magnitude of the AC field. The devices are useful in providing displays, polarizers, filters, spatial light modulators and wherever switchable polarizing, reflecting, and transmission properties are desired.

  6. Toxicity of atmospheric aerosols on marine phytoplankton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    metals added from these aerosols to the bioassay incubationsreleased to seawater from the aerosol filters after Author4605 CHEMISTRY Atmospheric aerosol deposition CHEMISTRY

  7. Radiative and climate impacts of absorbing aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Aihua

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    P.M. Forster (2004), The semi-direct aerosol effect: Impactof absorbing aerosols on marine stratocumulus. Q. J .2005), Global anthropogenic aerosol direct forcing derived

  8. Phase transformation and growth of hygroscopic aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, I.N.

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ambient aerosols play an important role in many atmospheric processes affecting air quality, visibility degradation, and climatic changes as well. Both natural and anthropogenic sources contribute to the formation of ambient aerosols, which are composed mostly of sulfates, nitrates, and chlorides in either pure or mixed forms. These inorganic salt aerosols are hygroscopic by nature and exhibit the properties of deliquescence and efflorescence in humid air. For pure inorganic salt particles with diameter larger than 0.1 micron, the phase transformation from a solid particle to a saline droplet occurs only when the relative humidity in the surrounding atmosphere reaches a certain critical level corresponding to the water activity of the saturated solution. The droplet size or mass in equilibrium with relative humidity can be calculated in a straightforward manner from thermodynamic considerations. For aqueous droplets 0.1 micron or smaller, the surface curvature effect on vapor pressure becomes important and the Kelvin equation must be used.

  9. Aerosol direct, indirect, semidirect, and surface albedo effects from sector contributions based on the IPCC AR5 emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    radiation. In addition, atmospheric aerosols alter cloud cover and cloud properties. Historically, aerosols the overall effect of aerosols on solar radiation and clouds is most certainly negative, some individual-induced changes on cloud cover often depends on cloud type and geographical region. The indirect (includes only

  10. Nanomaterials from Aerosols Aerosols are suspensions of liquid or solid particles in a gas. Aerosol particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beaucage, Gregory

    1 Nanomaterials from Aerosols Aerosols are suspensions of liquid or solid particles in a gas. Aerosol particles can range in size from molecular-scale to hundreds of microns with a typical example be synthesized by aerosol routes where precursor species are dispersed either in a vapor or in micron

  11. Comparative Study of Optical and Magneto-Optical Properties of Normal, Disordered and Inverse Spinel Type Oxides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zviagin, Vitaly; Böntgen, Tammo; Lorenz, Michael; Ziese, Michael; Zahn, Dietrich R T; Salvan, Georgeta; Grundmann, Marius; Schmidt-Grund, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    $Co_3O_4$, $ZnFe_2O_4$, $CoFe_2O_4$, $ZnCo_2O_4$, and $Fe_3O_4$ thin films were fabricated by pulsed laser deposition at high and low temperatures resulting in crystalline single-phase normal, inverse, as well as disordered spinel oxide thin films with smooth surface morphology. The dielectric function, determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry in a wide spectral range from 0.5 eV to 8.5 eV, is compared with the magneto-optical response of the dielectric tensor, investigated by magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) spectroscopy in the range of 1.7 eV to 5.5 eV with an applied magnetic field of 1.7 T. Crystal field, inter-valence and inter-sublattice charge transfer transitions, and transitions from $O_{2p}$ to metal cation 3d or 4s bands are identified in both the principal diagonal elements and the magneto-optically active off-diagonal elements of the dielectric tensor. Depending on the degree of cation disorder, resulting in local symmetry distortion, due to mixtures of normal and inverse spinel structures, the...

  12. Modal aerosol dynamics modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitby, E.R.; McMurry, P.H.; Shankar, U.; Binkowski, F.S.

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report presents the governing equations for representing aerosol dynamics, based on several different representations of the aerosol size distribution. Analytical and numerical solution techniques for these governing equations are also reviewed. Described in detail is a computationally efficient numerical technique for simulating aerosol behavior in systems undergoing simultaneous heat transfer, fluid flow, and mass transfer in and between the gas and condensed phases. The technique belongs to a general class of models known as modal aerosol dynamics (MAD) models. These models solve for the temporal and spatial evolution of the particle size distribution function. Computational efficiency is achieved by representing the complete aerosol population as a sum of additive overlapping populations (modes), and solving for the time rate of change of integral moments of each mode. Applications of MAD models for simulating aerosol dynamics in continuous stirred tank aerosol reactors and flow aerosol reactors are provided. For the application to flow aerosol reactors, the discussion is developed in terms of considerations for merging a MAD model with the SIMPLER routine described by Patankar (1980). Considerations for incorporating a MAD model into the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Regional Particulate Model are also described. Numerical and analytical techniques for evaluating the size-space integrals of the modal dynamics equations (MDEs) are described. For multimodal logonormal distributions, an analytical expression for the coagulation integrals of the MDEs, applicable for all size regimes, is derived, and is within 20% of accurate numerical evaluation of the same moment coagulation integrals. A computationally efficient integration technique, based on Gauss-Hermite numerical integration, is also derived.

  13. Optical and morphological properties of MBE grown wurtzite CdxZn1xO thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kik, Pieter

    Optical and morphological properties of MBE grown wurtzite CdxZn1ÀxO thin films J.W. Mares a , F January 2007 Abstract Wurtzite CdxZn1ÀxO epilayers with cadmium concentrations ranging from x = 0.02 to 0 wurtzite CdxZn1ÀxO compounds for visible light emission in future optoelectronic devices. Ó 2006 Elsevier B

  14. Optical Properties of Wurtzite GaN and ZnO Quantum Dots Vladimir A. Fonoberov and Alexander A. Balandin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fonoberov, Vladimir

    Optical Properties of Wurtzite GaN and ZnO Quantum Dots Vladimir A. Fonoberov and Alexander A-Riverside, Riverside, California 92521, U.S.A. ABSTRACT We have investigated exciton states in wurtzite GaN/AlN and ZnO quantum dots. A strong piezoelectric field in GaN/AlN quantum dots is found to tilt conduction and valence

  15. Structural, morphological, and optical properties of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures with AlN buffer and interlayer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozbay, Ekmel

    N buffer layer BL grown on an Al2O3 substrate and an AlN IL grown under the AlGaN ternary layer TL. In the present study, we investigate the effects of an AlN BL on an Al2O3 substrate and an AlN IL between an AlGaNStructural, morphological, and optical properties of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures with AlN buffer

  16. Reply to Quaas et al.: Can satellites be used to estimate indirect climate forcing by aerosols?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penner, J. E.; Zhou, Cheng; Xu, Li; Wang, Minghuai

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We welcome the comments by Quaas et al. (1). In our paper (2), we used a model to show that the methods used to estimate indirect aerosol forcing using satellite data, especially those based on relating the slope of present-day (PD) drop number (Nc) to aerosol optical depth (AOD), underestimate the forcing calculated when both PD and preindustrial (PI) data are available.

  17. Surface aerosol radiative forcing derived from collocated ground-based radiometric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liou, K. N.

    Surface aerosol radiative forcing derived from collocated ground-based radiometric observations-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer data match closely with those from the Cimel sun- photometer data for two of the sunphotometer to retrieve aerosol optical depths, a, along with observed surface flux data from field campaigns

  18. Point and column aerosol radiative closure during ACE 1: Effects of particle shape and size

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    impact the earth's climate and photo- chemistry by directly scattering and absorbing solar radia- tion these impacts [e.g., Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, 2001]. Because of the short temporal and spatial scales of aerosol heterogeneity, numerical models of aerosol optical behavior are required to make

  19. Direct and semidirect aerosol effects of Southern African biomass burning aerosol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakaeda, Naoko; Wood, Robert; Rasch, Philip J.

    2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The direct and semi-direct radiative effects of biomass burning aerosols from Southern African fires during July-October are investigated using 20 year runs of the Community Atmospheric Model (CAM) coupled to a slab ocean model. The aerosol optical depth is constrained using observations in clear skies from MODIS and for aerosol layers above clouds from CALIPSO. Over the ocean, where the absorbing biomass burning aerosol layers are primarily located above cloud, negative top of atmosphere (TOA) semi-direct radiative effects associated with increased low cloud cover dominate over a weaker positive all-sky direct radiative effect (DRE). In contrast, over the land where the aerosols are often below or within cloud layers, reductions in cloud liquid water path (LWP) lead to a positive semi-direct radiative effect that dominates over a near-zero DRE. Over the ocean, the cloud response can be understood as a response to increased lower tropospheric stability (LTS) which is caused both by aerosol absorptive warming in overlying layers and surface cooling in response to direct aerosol forcing. The ocean cloud changes are robust to changes in the cloud parameterization (removal of the hard-wired dependence of clouds on LTS), suggesting that they are physically realistic. Over land where cloud cover changes are minimal, decreased LWP is consistent with weaker convection driven by increased static stability. Over the entire region the overall TOA radiative effect from the biomass burning aerosols is almost zero due to opposing effects over the land and ocean. However, the surface forcing is strongly negative requiring a reduction in precipitation. This is primarily realized through reductions in convective precipitation on both the southern and northern flanks of the convective precipitation region spanning the equatorial rainforest and the ITCZ in the southern Sahel. The changes are consistent with the low-level aerosol forced cooling pattern. The results highlight the importance of semi-direct radiative effects and precipitation responses for determining the climatic effects of aerosols in the African region.

  20. Effect of Aerosol Humidification on the Column Aerosol Optical Thickness

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA :Work4/11ComputationalEdNERSC: DeliveringEdwinover the ARM

  1. First-principles study of electronic and optical properties in wurtzite Zn_{1-x}Cd_xO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, X D; Li, W X; Liu, C L; 10.1063/1.2901033

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A first-principles study has been performed to evaluate the electronic and optical properties of wurtzite Zn1-xCdxO up to x=0.25. We have employed the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) form of generalized gradient approximation within the framework of density functional theory (DFT). Calculations have been carried out in different configurations. With the increasing Cd concentrations, the band gap of Zn1-xCdxO is decreased due to the increase of s states in conduction band. The results of imaginary part of dielectric function indicate that the optical transition between O 2p states in the highest valence band and Zn 4s states in the lowest conduction band has shifted to low energy range as the Cd concentrations increase. Besides, the optical band gap decreases from 3.2 to 2.84 eV with increasing Cd concentrations from 0 to 0.25. Meanwhile, the bowing parameter b, which has been obtained by fitting the results of optical band gap, is about 1.21 eV. The optical constants of pure ZnO and Zn0.75Cd0.25O, such as optica...

  2. Aerosol Sampler Operations Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Emily V.

    -1123 Laboratory FAX (916) 752-4107 Standard Operating Procedures Technical Information Document TI 201A #12;TI 201.................................................................................................................................................. 3 1.0 Weekly Maintenance ProceduresIMPROVE Aerosol Sampler Operations Manual February 10, 1997 Air Quality Group Crocker Nuclear

  3. The Radiative Role of Free Tropospheric Aerosols and Marine Clouds over the Central North Atlantic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazzoleni, Claudio [Michigan Technological University; Kumar, Sumit [Michigan Technological University; Wright, Kendra [Michigan Technological University; Kramer, Louisa [Michigan Technological University; Mazzoleni, Lynn [Michigan Technological University; Owen, Robert [Michigan Technological University; Helmig, Detlev [University of Colorado at Boulder

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The scientific scope of the project was to exploit the unique location of the Pico Mountain Observatory (PMO) located in the summit caldera of the Pico Volcano in Pico Island in the Azores, for atmospheric studies. The observatory, located at 2225m a.s.l., typically samples free tropospheric aerosols laying above the marine low-level clouds and long-range transported from North America. The broad purpose of this research was to provide the scientific community with a better understanding of fundamental physical processes governing the effects of aerosols on radiative forcing and climate; with the ultimate goal of improving our abilities to understand past climate and to predict future changes through numerical models. The project was 'exploratory' in nature, with the plan to demonstrate the feasibility of deploying for the first time, an extensive aerosol research package at PMO. One of the primary activities was to test the deployment of these instruments at the site, to collect data during the 2012 summer season, and to further develop the infrastructure and the knowledge for performing novel research at PMO in follow-up longer-term aerosol-cloud studies. In the future, PMO could provide an elevated research outpost to support the renewed DOE effort in the Azores that was intensified in 2013 with the opening of the new sea-level ARM-DOE Eastern North Atlantic permanent facility at Graciosa Island. During the project period, extensive new data sets were collected for the planned 2012 season. Thanks to other synergistic activities and opportunities, data collection was then successfully extended to 2013 and 2014. Highlights of the scientific findings during this project include: a) biomass burning contribute significantly to the aerosol loading in the North Atlantic free troposphere; however, long-range transported black carbon concentrations decreased substantially in the last decade. b) Single black carbon particles – analyzed off-line at the electron microscope – were often very compacted, suggesting cloud processing and exhibiting different optical properties from fresh emissions. In addition, black carbon was found to be sometimes mixed with mineral dust, affecting its optical properties and potential forcing. c) Some aerosols collected at PMO acted as ice nuclei, potentially contributing to cirrus cloud formation during their transport in the upper free troposphere. Identified good ice nuclei were often mineral dust particles. d) The free tropospheric aerosols studied at PMO have relevance to low level marine clouds due, for example, to synoptic subsidence entraining free tropospheric aerosols into the marine boundary layer. This has potentially large consequences on cloud condensation nuclei concentrations and compositions in the marine boundary layer; therefore, having an effect on the marine stratus clouds, with potentially important repercussions on the radiative forcing. The scientific products of this project currently include contributions to two papers published in the Nature Publishing group (Nature Communications and Scientific Reports), one paper under revision for Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, one in review in Geophysical Research Letters and one recently submitted to Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussion. In addition, four manuscripts are in advanced state of preparation. Finally, twenty-eight presentations were given at international conferences, workshops and seminars.

  4. Structural characterization and novel optical properties of defect chalcopyrite ZnGa{sub 2}Te{sub 4} thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fouad, S.S., E-mail: icgegypt@link.net [Department of Physics, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt); Sakr, G.B., E-mail: gamalsaker@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt); Yahia, I.S., E-mail: dr_isyahia@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt); Basset, D.M. Abdel, E-mail: dalia.physics@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt)] [Department of Physics, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: {yields} Preparation and characterization of ZnGa{sub 2}Te{sub 4} in powder and thin film forms. {yields} Structure properties such as XRD and EDX. {yields} Optical constant of the as-deposited ZnGa{sub 2}Te{sub 4} for the first time. {yields} Extraction of the optical parameters of the studied films. -- Abstract: Stoichiometric thin film samples of the ternary ZnGa{sub 2}Te{sub 4} defect chalcopyrite compound were prepared and characterized by X-ray diffraction technique. The elemental chemical composition of the prepared bulk material as well as of the as-deposited film was determined by energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry. ZnGa{sub 2}Te{sub 4} thin films were deposited, by conventional thermal evaporation technique onto highly cleaned glass substrates. The X-ray and electron diffraction studies revealed that the as-deposited and the annealed ZnGa{sub 2}Te{sub 4} films at annealing temperature t{sub a} {<=} 548 K are amorphous, while those annealed at t{sub a} {>=} 573 K (for 1 h), are polycrystalline. The optical properties of the as-deposited films have been investigated for the first time at normal incidence in the spectral range from 500 to 2500 nm. The refractive index dispersion in the transmission and low absorption region is adequately described by the Wemple-DiDomenico single oscillator model, whereby, the values of the oscillator parameters have been calculated. The analysis of the optical absorption coefficient revealed an in-direct optical transition with energy of 1.33 eV for the as-deposited sample. This work suggested that ZnGa{sub 2}Te{sub 4} is a good candidate in solar cell devices as an absorbing layer.

  5. Aircraft Observations of Aerosol Composition and Ageing in New England and Mid-Atlantic States during the Summer 2002 New England Air Quality Study Field Campaign

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kleinman, Lawrence I.; Daum, Peter H.; Lee, Y.- N.; Senum, Gunar; Springston, Stephen R.; Wang, Jian; Berkowitz, Carl M.; Hubbe, John M.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Brechtel, Fred J.; Jayne, J. T.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2007-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Aerosol chemical composition, size distributions, and optical properties were measured during 17 aircraft flights in New England and Middle Atlantic States as part of the summer 2002 NEAQS field campaign. An Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) was operated with a measurement cycle of 30 s, about an order of magnitude faster than used for ground-based measurements. Noise levels within a single measurement period were sub ?g m-3. Volume data derived from the AMS were compared with volume measurements from a PCASP optical particle detector and an Scanning Mobility Particle Spectrometer (SMPS); calculated light scattering was compared with measured values from an integrating nephelometer. The median ratio for AMS/SMPS volume was 1.25; the median ratio for AMS/nephelometer scattering was 1.18. Size spectra were compared for subsets of samples with different effective diameters (Deff). There is good agreement between the AMS, PCASP, and SMPS spectra for larger values of Deff but an unexplained over-prediction in the AMS for small values. A dependence of the AMS collection efficiency on aerosol acidity was quantified by a comparison between AMS and PCASP volumes in 2 high sulfate plumes. Average aerosol concentrations were 11 ?g m-3. The organic content was high in comparison to monitoring data from the IMPROVE network, varying from 70% in clean air to 40% in high concentration sulfate plumes. The ratio of organic aerosol to CO and light absorption acting were examined as a function of photochemical age. CO is a conservative tracer for urban emissions and light absorption is a surrogate for black carbon which is also conservative. Comparisons were made to surface ratios measured under conditions where there is little secondary organic aerosol (SOA). An increase in these ratios relative to surface values indicates that 70 - 80% of the organic aerosol in polluted air masses was secondary. Most of this SOA is rapidly formed within a few hours. At longer time scales there is a slow accumulation of organic aerosol and a slow increase in light absorption per unit mass of black carbon. Our results demonstrate the utility of the AMS as a rapid response instrument suitable for aircraft operations.

  6. Organic Aerosol Component (OACOMP) Value-Added Product Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fast, J; Zhang, Q; Tilp, A; Shippert, T; Parworth, C; Mei, F

    2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Significantly improved returns in their aerosol chemistry data can be achieved via the development of a value-added product (VAP) of deriving OA components, called Organic Aerosol Components (OACOMP). OACOMP is primarily based on multivariate analysis of the measured organic mass spectral matrix. The key outputs of OACOMP are the concentration time series and the mass spectra of OA factors that are associated with distinct sources, formation and evolution processes, and physicochemical properties.

  7. What controls the recent changes in African mineral dust aerosol across the Atlantic?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ridley, David Andrew

    Dust from Africa strongly perturbs the radiative balance over the Atlantic, with emissions that are highly variable from year to year. We show that the aerosol optical depth (AOD) of dust over the mid-Atlantic observed by ...

  8. Laboratory Experiments and Instrument Development for the Study of Atmospheric Aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidovits, Paul

    2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Soot particles are generated by incomplete combustion of fossil and biomass fuels. Through direct effects clear air aerosols containing black carbon (BC) such as soot aerosols, absorb incoming light heating the atmosphere, while most other aerosols scatter light and produce cooling. Even though BC represents only 1-2% of the total annual emissions of particulate mass to the atmosphere, it has been estimated that the direct radiative effect of BC is the second-most important contributor to global warming after absorption by CO2. Ongoing studies continue to underscore the climate forcing importance of black carbon. However, estimates of the radiative effects of black carbon on climate remain highly uncertain due to the complexity of particles containing black carbon. Quantitative measurement of BC is challenging because BC often occurs in highly non-spherical soot particles of complex morphology. Freshly emitted soot particles are typically fractal hydrophobic aggregates. The aggregates consist of black carbon spherules with diameters typically in the range of about 15-40 nm, and they are usually coated by adsorbed polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) produced during combustion. Diesel-generated soot particles are often emitted with an organic coating composed primarily of lubricating oil and unburned fuel, as well as well as PAH compounds. Sulfuric acid has also been detected in diesel and aircraft-emitted soot particles. In the course of aging, these particle coatings may be substantially altered by chemical reactions and/or the deposition of other materials. Such processes transform the optical and CCN properties of the soot aerosols in ways that are not yet well understood. Our work over the past seven years consisted of laboratory research, instrument development and characterization, and field studies with the central focus of improving our understanding of the black carbon aerosol climate impacts. During the sixth year as well as during this seventh year (no-cost extension period) of our grant, we extended our studies to perform experiments on the controlled production and characterization of secondary organic aerosol.

  9. Investigation of the optical properties of MoS{sub 2} thin films using spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yim, Chanyoung; O'Brien, Maria; Winters, Sinéad [School of Chemistry, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN), Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); McEvoy, Niall [Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN), Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Mirza, Inam; Lunney, James G. [Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN), Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Duesberg, Georg S., E-mail: duesberg@tcd.ie [School of Chemistry, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN), Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Advanced Materials and BioEngineering Research (AMBER) Centre, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) characterization of layered transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) thin films grown by vapor phase sulfurization is reported. By developing an optical dispersion model, the extinction coefficient and refractive index, as well as the thickness of molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) films, were extracted. In addition, the optical band gap was obtained from SE and showed a clear dependence on the MoS{sub 2} film thickness, with thinner films having a larger band gap energy. These results are consistent with theory and observations made on MoS{sub 2} flakes prepared by exfoliation, showing the viability of vapor phase derived TMDs for optical applications.

  10. Correlation Between Optical Properties And Chemical Composition Of Sputter-deposited Germanium Cxide (GeOx) Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Neil R.; Grant, J. T.; Sun, L.; Jones, J. G.; Jakubiak, R.; Shutthanandan, V.; Ramana, Chintalapalle V.

    2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Germanium oxide (GeOx) films were grown on (1 0 0) Si substrates by reactive Direct-Current (DC) magnetron sputter-deposition using an elemental Ge target. The effects of oxygen gas fraction, ? = O2/(Ar + O2), on the deposition rate, structure, chemical composition and optical properties of GeOx films have been investigated. The chemistry of the films exhibits an evolution from pure Ge to mixed Ge + GeO + GeO2 and then finally to GeO2 upon increasing ? from 0.00 to 1.00. Grazing incidence X-ray analysis indicates that the GeOx films grown were amorphous. The optical properties probed by spectroscopic ellipsometry indicate that the effect of ? is significant on the optical constants of the GeOx films. The measured index of refraction (n) at a wavelength (?) of 550 nm is 4.67 for films grown without any oxygen, indicating behavior characteristic of semiconducting Ge. The transition from germanium to mixed Ge + GeO + GeO2 composition is associated with a characteristic decrease in n (? = 550 nm) to 2.62 and occurs at ? = 0.25. Finally n drops to 1.60 for ? = 0.50–1.00, where the films become GeO2. A detailed correlation between ?, n, k and stoichiometry in DC sputtered GeOx films is presented and discussed.

  11. Investigation of optical limiting properties of Aluminium nanoparticles prepared by pulsed laser ablation in different carrier media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuladeep, Rajamudili; Jyothi, L.; Narayana Rao, D. [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Prof. C. R. Rao Road, Hyderabad 500046 (India)] [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Prof. C. R. Rao Road, Hyderabad 500046 (India); Prakash, P.; Mayank Shekhar, S. [Center of Excellence in Lasers and Optoelectronic Sciences, International School of Photonics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Kochi (India)] [Center of Excellence in Lasers and Optoelectronic Sciences, International School of Photonics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Kochi (India); Durga Prasad, M. [Center for Nanotechnology, University of Hyderabad, Prof. C. R. Rao Road, Hyderabad 500046 (India)] [Center for Nanotechnology, University of Hyderabad, Prof. C. R. Rao Road, Hyderabad 500046 (India)

    2013-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In this communication, we carried out the systematic investigation of nonlinear absorption and scattering properties of Aluminium nanoparticles (Al NPs) in various polar and non-polar solvents. Al NPs were synthesized with pulsed Nd:YAG laser operated at 1064 nm by ablating Al target in polar and non-polar liquid environment like chloroform, chlorobenzene, toluene, benzene, and carbon tetrachloride. Synthesized Al NPs colloids of various solvents differ in appearance and UV-Vis extinction spectra exhibit absorption in the UV region. The characterization of Al NPs performed by Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies reveal that NPs are made up of a well crystallized Al inner part (bright zone) embedded with an amorphous metal Al shell (dark region). Growth, aggregation, and precipitation mechanisms which influence the optical properties and stability of NPs are found to be related to the dipole moment of the surrounding liquid environment. The nonlinear absorption and scattering studies are performed by open aperture Z-scan technique with 532 nm under nanosecond pulse excitation. The Z-scan measurements are fitted theoretically to estimate both two-photon absorption (TPA) and nonlinear scattering (NLS) coefficients. In polar solvents like chlorobenzene, chloroform synthesized Al NPs exhibited higher TPA, NLS coefficient values, and lower optical limiting threshold values in comparison with partially polar solvent like toluene and non-polar solvents like benzene and carbontetrachloride. These results indicate the potential use of Al NPs as a versatile optical limiting material.

  12. Development of an aerosol microphysical module: Aerosol Two-dimensional bin module for foRmation and Aging Simulation (ATRAS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsui, H.; Koike, Makoto; Kondo, Yutaka; Fast, Jerome D.; Takigawa, M.

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Number concentrations, size distributions, and mixing states of aerosols are essential parameters for accurate estimation of aerosol direct and indirect effects. In this study, we developed an aerosol module, designated Aerosol Two-dimensional bin module for foRmation and Aging Simulation (ATRAS), that can represent these parameters explicitly by considering new particle formation (NPF), black carbon (BC) aging, and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) processes. A two-dimensional bin representation is used for particles with dry diameters from 40 nm to 10 µm to resolve both aerosol size (12 bins) and BC mixing state (10 bins) for a total of 120 bins. The particles with diameters from 1 to 40 nm are resolved using an additional 8 size bins to calculate NPF. The ATRAS module was implemented in the WRF-chem model and applied to examine the sensitivity of simulated mass, number, size distributions, and optical and radiative parameters of aerosols to NPF, BC aging and SOA processes over East Asia during the spring of 2009. BC absorption enhancement by coating materials was about 50% over East Asia during the spring, and the contribution of SOA processes to the absorption enhancement was estimated to be 10 – 20% over northern East Asia and 20 – 35% over southern East Asia. A clear north-south contrast was also found between the impacts of NPF and SOA processes on cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations: NPF increased CCN concentrations at higher supersaturations (smaller particles) over northern East Asia, whereas SOA increased CCN concentrations at lower supersaturations (larger particles) over southern East Asia. Application of ATRAS to East Asia also showed that the impact of each process on each optical and radiative parameter depended strongly on the process and the parameter in question. The module can be used in the future as a benchmark model to evaluate the accuracy of simpler aerosol models and examine interactions between NPF, BC aging, and SOA processes under different meteorological conditions and emissions.

  13. Sensitivity of the Mueller matrix to the optical and microphysical properties of cirrus clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawless, Ryan Lee

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    by considering four different incident polarization states. The sensitivity of these elements is observed by comparing different ice crystal habits, effective sizes, and optical depth. The Mueller elements are strongly dependent on habit. The three habits...

  14. Controlled Growth of ZnO Nanowires and Their Optical Properties**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Peidong

    , Samuel Mao, Richard Russo, Justin Johnson, Richard Saykally, Nathan Morris, Johnny Pham, Rongrui He-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) studies on single nanowires. ± [*] Prof. P. Yang, H. Yan, J. Johnson

  15. Retrieval of optical and microphysical properties of ice clouds using Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinney, Jacqueline Anne

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research presented here retrieves the cloud optical thickness and particle effective size of cirrus clouds using surface radiation measurements obtained during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) field campaign. The algorithm used...

  16. Construction of force measuring optical tweezers instrumentation and investigations of biophysical properties of bacterial adhesion organelles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andersson, Magnus

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical tweezers are a technique in which microscopic-sized particles, including living cells and bacteria, can be non-intrusively trapped with high accuracy solely using focused light. The technique has therefore become a powerful tool in the field of biophysics. Optical tweezers thereby provide outstanding manipulation possibilities of cells as well as semi-transparent materials, both non-invasively and non-destructively, in biological systems. In addition, optical tweezers can measure minute forces (< 10-12 N), probe molecular interactions and their energy landscapes, and apply both static and dynamic forces in biological systems in a controlled manner. The assessment of intermolecular forces with force measuring optical tweezers, and thereby the biomechanical structure of biological objects, has therefore considerably facilitated our understanding of interactions and structures of biological systems. Adhesive bacterial organelles, so called pili, mediate adhesion to host cells and are therefore crucial...

  17. Phase-space properties of magneto-optical traps utilising micro-fabricated gratings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGilligan, James P; Riis, Erling; Arnold, Aidan S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used diffraction gratings to simplify the fabrication, and dramatically increase the atomic collection efficiency, of magneto-optical traps using micro-fabricated optics. The atom number enhancement was mainly due to the increased beam capture volume, afforded by the large area (4cm^2) shallow etch (200nm) binary grating chips. Here we provide a detailed theoretical and experimental investigation of the on-chip magneto-optical trap temperature and density in four different chip geometries using 87Rb, whilst studying effects due to MOT radiation pressure imbalance. With optimal initial MOTs on two of the chips we obtain both large atom number (2x10^7) _and_ sub-Doppler temperatures (50uK) after optical molasses.

  18. Author's personal copy Effective optical properties of highly ordered mesoporous thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilon, Laurent

    2009 Keywords: Mesoporous Optical materials Photocatalysis Coatings Optoelectronics devices Dielectric include dye-sensitized solar cells [8­10], low-k dielectric materials [11,12], photocatalysis [13

  19. Role of ammonia chemistry and coarse mode aerosols in global climatological inorganic aerosol distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, Chao; Zender, Charles S; Bian, Huisheng; Metzger, Swen

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    times of tropospheric aerosols inferred from a global three-sional simulation of 210Pb aerosols. Journal of Geophysicalof sulfate and nitrate aerosol. Atmospheric Environ- ment

  20. Climate implications of carbonaceous aerosols: An aerosol microphysical study using the GISS/MATRIX climate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Susanne E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and R. Ruedy, Matrix (multiconfiguration aerosol tracker ofmixing state): An aerosol microphysical module for globalAn investigative review, Aerosol Sci. Technol. , Vol. 40,

  1. A New Aerosol Flow System for Photochemical and Thermal Studies...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aerosol Flow System for Photochemical and Thermal Studies of Tropospheric Aerosols. A New Aerosol Flow System for Photochemical and Thermal Studies of Tropospheric Aerosols....

  2. Correlation of optical properties and temperature-induced irreversible phase transitions in europium-doped yttrium carbonate nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunawidjaja, Ray; Myint, Thandar [Applied Sciences Laboratory, Institute for Shock Physics, Washington State University, Spokane, WA 99210-1495 (United States); Eilers, Hergen, E-mail: eilers@wsu.edu [Applied Sciences Laboratory, Institute for Shock Physics, Washington State University, Spokane, WA 99210-1495 (United States)

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanophase europium-doped yttrium carbonate precursors are subjected to heat treatments, ranging from 300 Degree-Sign C to 1100 Degree-Sign C for dwell times of 5 min, 30 min, and 180 min. XRD, TEM, FT-IR, fluorescence, fluorescence excitation, and fluorescence lifetime measurements are used to characterize the materials. Upon heating, the material transitions through several amorphous stages until it reaches the crystalline cubic Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase. DSC measurements show an exothermic transition at 665.7 Degree-Sign C, indicating the formation of crystalline Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The grain size development is fitted by the relaxation equation and yields an activation energy of 50.3 kJ/mol. The amorphous phases are characterized by inhomogenously broadened optical spectra. Heating up to 700 Degree-Sign C leads to an increased fluorescence lifetime (from about 1 ms to 2.4 ms). As the material is heated to higher temperatures and completes the formation of the crystalline cubic Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase, the optical spectra become narrower and the fluorescence lifetime decreases to about 1.2 ms. - Graphical abstract: Fluorescence lifetimes of Eu-doped Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} precursors heated for 5, 30, and 180 min to various temperatures. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Irreversible phase transitions in nanoparticles are of interest for thermometry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Eu-doped nanophase yttrium carbonate precursors were heat-treated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The material undergoes decomposition and crystallization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Morphological and optical properties are measured. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optical properties can be used to deduce the temperature.

  3. 6, 11791198, 2006 Aerosols closing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ACPD 6, 1179­1198, 2006 Aerosols closing open Benard cells D. Rosenfeld et al. Title Page Abstract of precipitation by aerosols D. Rosenfeld1 , Y. J. Kaufman2 , and I. Koren3 1 Institute of Earth Sciences­1198, 2006 Aerosols closing open Benard cells D. Rosenfeld et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction

  4. 8, 14571503, 2008 The aerosol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 8, 1457­1503, 2008 The aerosol distribution in Europe V. Matthias Title Page Abstract Discussions The aerosol distribution in Europe derived with the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model.matthias@gkss.de) 1457 #12;ACPD 8, 1457­1503, 2008 The aerosol distribution in Europe V. Matthias Title Page Abstract

  5. 5, 79658026, 2005 Simulating aerosol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    composition, number concentration, and size distribution of the global submicrometer aerosol. The present, coagulation, condensation, nucleation of sulfuric acid vapor, aerosol chemistry, cloud processing, and sizeACPD 5, 7965­8026, 2005 Simulating aerosol microphysics with ECHAM/MADE A. Lauer et al. Title Page

  6. A Novel Retrieval Algorithm for Cloud Optical Properties from the Atmopsheric Radiation Measurement Program's Two-Channel Narrow-Field-of-View Radiometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiscombe, Warren J.; Marshak, A.; Chiu, J.-Y. C.; Knyazikhin, Y.; Barnard, James C.; Luo, Yi

    2005-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Cloud optical depth is the most important of all cloud optical properties, and vital for any cloud-radiation parameterization. To estimate cloud optical depth, the atmospheric science community has widely used ground-based flux measurements from either broadband or narrowband radiometers in the past decade. However, this type of technique is limited to overcast conditions and, at best, gives us an "effective" cloud optical depth instead of its "local" value. Unlike flux observations, monochromatic narrow-field-of-view (NFOV) radiance measurements contain information of local cloud properties, but unfortunately, the use of radiance to interpret optical depth suffers from retrieval ambiguity. We have pioneered an algorithm to retrieve cloud optical depth in a fully three-dimensional cloud situation using new Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) ground-based passive two-channel (673 and 870 nm) NFOV measurements. The underlying principle of the algorithm is that these two channels have similar cloud properties but strong spectral contrast in surface reflectance. This algorthm offers the first opportunity to illustrate cloud evolution with high temporal resolution retrievals. A combination of two-channel NFOV radiances with multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) fluxes for the retrieval of cloud optical properties is also discussed.

  7. The importance of aerosol composition and mixing state on predicted CCN concentration and the variation of the importance with atmospheric processing of aerosol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, J.; Cubison, M.; Aiken, A.; Jimenez, J.; Collins, D.; Gaffney, J.; Marley, N.

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The influences of atmospheric aerosols on cloud properties (i.e., aerosol indirect effects) strongly depend on the aerosol CCN concentrations, which can be effectively predicted from detailed aerosol size distribution, mixing state, and chemical composition using Köhler theory. However, atmospheric aerosols are complex and heterogeneous mixtures of a large number of species that cannot be individually simulated in global or regional models due to computational constraints. Furthermore, the thermodynamic properties or even the molecular identities of many organic species present in ambient aerosols are often not known to predict their cloud-activation behavior using Köhler theory. As a result, simplified presentations of aerosol composition and mixing state are necessary for large-scale models. In this study, aerosol microphysics, CCN concentrations, and chemical composition measured at the T0 urban super-site in Mexico City during MILAGRO are analyzed. During the campaign in March 2006, aerosol size distribution and composition often showed strong diurnal variation as a result of both primary emissions and aging of aerosols through coagulation and local photochemical production of secondary aerosol species. The submicron aerosol composition was ~1/2 organic species. Closure analysis is first carried out by comparing CCN concentrations calculated from the measured aerosol size distribution, mixing state, and chemical composition using extended Köhler theory to concurrent CCN measurements at five supersaturations ranging from 0.11% to 0.35%. The closure agreement and its diurnal variation are studied. CCN concentrations are also derived using various simplifications of the measured aerosol mixing state and chemical composition. The biases associated with these simplifications are compared for different supersaturations, and the variation of the biases is examined as a function of aerosol age. The results show that the simplification of internally mixed, size-independent particle composition leads to substantial overestimation of CCN concentration for freshly emitted aerosols in early morning, but can reasonably predict the CCN concentration after the aerosols underwent atmospheric processing for several hours. This analysis employing various simplifications provides insights into the essential information of particle chemical composition that needs to be represented in models to adequately predict CCN concentration and cloud microphysics.

  8. Dispersion properties and low infrared optical losses in epitaxial AlN on sapphire substrate in the visible and infrared range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soltani, A., E-mail: ali.soltani@iemn.univ-lille1.fr; Stolz, A.; Gerbedoen, J.-C.; Rousseau, M.; Bourzgui, N.; De Jaeger, J.-C. [Institut d'Électronique, Microélectronique et Nanotechnologie, UMR-CNRS 8520, PRES Université Lille Nord de France, Cité Scientifique, Avenue Poincaré, CS 60069, 59652 Villeneuve d'Ascq Cedex (France); Charrier, J. [Fonctions Optiques pour les Technologies de l'informatiON, UMR-CNRS 6082, ENSSAT 6, rue de Kerampont, CS 80518, 22305 Lannion Cedex (France); Mattalah, M. [Laboratoire de Microélectronique, Université Djilali Liabes, 22000 Sidi Bel Abbes (Algeria); Barkad, H. A. [Institut Universitaire Technologique Industriel, Université de Djibouti, Avenue Georges Clémenceau, BP 1904 Djibouti (Djibouti); Mortet, V. [Institute of Physics of Academy of Sciences of Czech Republic, Fyzikální ústav AV CR, v.v.i., Na Slovance 1999/2 (Czech Republic); BenMoussa, A. [Solar Terrestrial Center of Excellence, Royal Observatory of Belgium, Circular 3, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical waveguiding properties of a thick wurtzite aluminum nitride highly [002]-textured hetero-epitaxial film on (001) basal plane of sapphire substrate are studied. The physical properties of the film are determined by X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, microRaman, and photocurrent spectroscopy. The refractive index and the thermo-optic coefficients are determined by m-lines spectroscopy using the classical prism coupling technique. The optical losses of this planar waveguide are also measured in the spectral range of 450–1553?nm. The lower value of optical losses is equal to 0.7 dB/cm at 1553?nm. The optical losses due to the surface scattering are simulated showing that the contribution is the most significant at near infrared wavelength range, whereas the optical losses are due to volume scattering and material absorption in the visible range. The good physical properties and the low optical losses obtained from this planar waveguide are encouraging to achieve a wide bandgap optical guiding platform from these aluminum nitride thin films.

  9. Optical and Physical Properties from Primary On-Road Vehicle Particle Emissions And Their Implications for Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , 2008). Many global climate models take particulate mass emissions from inventories, assume a size not always yield satisfactory results. In one study the amount of BC in current aerosol inventories had

  10. Effect of Terrestrial and Marine Organic Aerosol on Regional and Global Climate: Model Development, Application, and Verification with Satellite Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meskhidze, Nicholas; Zhang, Yang; Kamykowski, Daniel

    2012-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In this DOE project the improvements to parameterization of marine primary organic matter (POM) emissions, hygroscopic properties of marine POM, marine isoprene derived secondary organic aerosol (SOA) emissions, surfactant effects, new cloud droplet activation parameterization have been implemented into Community Atmosphere Model (CAM 5.0), with a seven mode aerosol module from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)���¢��������s Modal Aerosol Model (MAM7). The effects of marine aerosols derived from sea spray and ocean emitted biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) on microphysical properties of clouds were explored by conducting 10 year CAM5.0-MAM7 model simulations at a grid resolution 1.9�������°��������2.5�������° with 30 vertical layers. Model-predicted relationship between ocean physical and biological systems and the abundance of CCN in remote marine atmosphere was compared to data from the A-Train satellites (MODIS, CALIPSO, AMSR-E). Model simulations show that on average, primary and secondary organic aerosol emissions from the ocean can yield up to 20% increase in Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) at 0.2% Supersaturation, and up to 5% increases in droplet number concentration of global maritime shallow clouds. Marine organics were treated as internally or externally mixed with sea salt. Changes associated with cloud properties reduced (absolute value) the model-predicted short wave cloud forcing from -1.35 Wm-2 to -0.25 Wm-2. By using different emission scenarios, and droplet activation parameterizations, this study suggests that addition of marine primary aerosols and biologically generated reactive gases makes an important difference in radiative forcing assessments. All baseline and sensitivity simulations for 2001 and 2050 using global-through-urban WRF/Chem (GU-WRF) were completed. The main objective of these simulations was to evaluate the capability of GU-WRF for an accurate representation of the global atmosphere by exploring the most accurate configuration of physics options in GWRF for global scale modeling in 2001 at a horizontal grid resolution of 1�������° x 1�������°. GU-WRF model output was evaluated using observational datasets from a variety of sources including surface based observations (NCDC and BSRN), model reanalysis (NCEP/ NCAR Reanalysis and CMAP), and remotely-sensed data (TRMM) to evaluate the ability of GU-WRF to simulate atmospheric variables at the surface as well as aloft. Explicit treatment of nanoparticles produced from new particle formation in GU-WRF/Chem-MADRID was achieved by expanding particle size sections from 8 to 12 to cover particles with the size range of 1.16 nm to 11.6 �������µm. Simulations with two different nucleation parameterizations were conducted for August 2002 over a global domain at a 4�������º by 5�������º horizontal resolution. The results are evaluated against field measurement data from the 2002 Aerosol Nucleation and Real Time Characterization Experiment (ANARChE) in Atlanta, Georgia, as well as satellite and reanalysis data. We have also explored the relationship between ���¢��������clean marine���¢������� aerosol optical properties and ocean surface wind speed using remotely sensed data from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) on board the CALIPSO satellite and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) on board the AQUA satellite. Detailed data analyses

  11. SCIAMACHY'S ABSORBING AEROSOL INDEX AND THE CONSEQUENCES OF INSTRUMENT DEGRADATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tilstra, Gijsbert

    SCIAMACHY'S ABSORBING AEROSOL INDEX AND THE CONSEQUENCES OF INSTRUMENT DEGRADATION L. G. Tilstra1 a strong increase in the AAI with time, which is found to be caused completely by degradation of the optics. This we conclude from straightforward calculation of the effect of instrument degradation based

  12. ULTRA-HIGH TEMPERATURE SENSORS BASED ON OPTICAL PROPERTY MODULATION AND VIBRATION-TOLERANT INTERFEROMETRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nabeel A. Riza

    2005-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The goals of the first six months of this project were to begin laying the foundations for both the SiC front-end optical chip fabrication techniques for high pressure gas species sensing as well as the design, assembly, and test of a portable high pressure high temperature calibration test cell chamber for introducing gas species. This calibration cell will be used in the remaining months for proposed first stage high pressure high temperature gas species sensor experimentation and data processing. All these goals have been achieved and are described in detail in the report. Both design process and diagrams for the mechanical elements as well as the optical systems are provided. Photographs of the fabricated calibration test chamber cell, the optical sensor setup with the calibration cell, the SiC sample chip holder, and relevant signal processing mathematics are provided. Initial experimental data from both the optical sensor and fabricated test gas species SiC chips is provided. The design and experimentation results are summarized to give positive conclusions on the proposed novel high temperature high pressure gas species detection optical sensor technology.

  13. Highly stable aerosol generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeFord, H.S.; Clark, M.L.

    1981-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved compressed air nebulizer has been developed such that a uniform aerosol particle size and concentration may be produced over long time periods. This result is achieved by applying a vacuum pressure to the makeup assembly and by use of a vent tube between the atmosphere and the makeup solution. By applying appropriate vacuum pressures to the makeup solution container and by proper positioning of the vent tube, a constant level of aspirating solution may be maintained within the aspirating assembly with aspirating solution continuously replaced from the makeup solution supply. This device may also be adapted to have a plurality of aerosol generators and only one central makeup assembly. 2 figs.

  14. Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment: Science and Operations Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotamarthi, VR

    2010-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ganges Valley region is one of the largest and most rapidly developing sections of the Indian subcontinent. The Ganges River, which provides the region with water needed for sustaining life, is fed primarily by snow and rainfall associated with Indian summer monsoons. Impacts of changes in precipitation patterns, temperature, and the flow of the snow-fed rivers can be immense. Recent satellite-based measurements have indicated that the upper Ganges Valley has some of the highest persistently observed aerosol optical depth values. The aerosol layer covers a vast region, extending across the Indo-Gangetic Plain to the Bay of Bengal during the winter and early spring of each year. The persistent winter fog in the region is already a cause of much concern, and several studies have been proposed to understand the economic, scientific, and societal dimensions of this problem. During the INDian Ocean EXperiment (INDOEX) field studies, aerosols from this region were shown to affect cloud formation and monsoon activity over the Indian Ocean. This is one of the few regions showing a trend toward increasing surface dimming and enhanced mid-tropospheric warming. Increasing air pollution over this region could modify the radiative balance through direct, indirect, and semi-indirect effects associated with aerosols. The consequences of aerosols and associated pollution for surface insolation over the Ganges Valley and monsoons, in particular, are not well understood. The proposed field study is designed for use of (1) the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) to measure relevant radiative, cloud, convection, and aerosol optical characteristics over mainland India during an extended period of 9–12 months and (2) the G-1 aircraft and surface sites to measure relevant aerosol chemical, physical, and optical characteristics in the Ganges Valley during a period of 6–12 weeks. The aerosols in this region have complex sources, including burning of coal, biomass, and biofuels; automobile emissions; and dust. The extended AMF deployment will enable measurements under different regimes of the climate and aerosol abundance—in the wet monsoon period with low aerosol loading; in the dry, hot summer with aerosols dispersed throughout the atmospheric column; and in the cool, dry winter with aerosols confined mostly to the boundary later and mid-troposphere. Each regime, in addition, has its own distinct radiative and atmospheric dynamic drivers. The aircraft operational phase will assist in characterizing the aerosols at times when they have been observed to be at the highest concentrations. A number of agencies in India will collaborate with the proposed field study and provide support in terms of planning, aircraft measurements, and surface sites. The high concentration of aerosols in the upper Ganges Valley, together with hypotheses involving several possible mechanisms with direct impacts on the hydrologic cycle of the region, gives us a unique opportunity to generate data sets that will be useful both in understanding the processes at work and in providing answers regarding the effects of aerosols on climate in a region where the perturbation is the highest.

  15. Synthesis and evaluation of optical and electrochemical properties of a new conjugated polymer containing substituted thiophene and non-conjugation linkers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R, Prashanth Kumar K, E-mail: udayaravi80@gmail.com; D, Udayakumar, E-mail: udayaravi80@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, National Institute of Technology Karnataka, Surathkal, D.K 575 025 (India); K, Siji Narendran N; K, Chandrasekharan [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology Calicut, Kerala, 673 601 (India)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Conjugated polymers have been developed in a variety of applied fields owing to their promising optoelectronic properties. These are pursuing considerable interest as opto-electrical material because of their chemical stability and processability. This paper describes the synthesis and study of electro-optical properties of a new donoracceptor polymer composed of substituted thiophene and 4,4?-propane-2,2-diyldiphenol units as electron rich moieties and 1,3,4-oxadiazole unit as electron deficient moiety. The optical properties of the polymer are studied using UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and fluorescent emission spectroscopy. From the electrochemical data, HOMO and LUMO energy levels of the polymer are calculated.

  16. Systems and methods for optically measuring properties of hydrocarbon fuel gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adler-Golden, Steven (Newtonville, MA); Bernstein, Lawrence S. (Lexington, MA); Bien, Fritz (Concord, MA); Gersh, Michael E. (Bedford, MA); Goldstein, Neil (Belmont, MA)

    1998-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for optical interrogation and measurement of a hydrocarbon fuel gas includes a light source generating light at near-visible wavelengths. A cell containing the gas is optically coupled to the light source which is in turn partially transmitted by the sample. A spectrometer disperses the transmitted light and captures an image thereof. The image is captured by a low-cost silicon-based two-dimensional CCD array. The captured spectral image is processed by electronics for determining energy or BTU content and composition of the gas. The innovative optical approach provides a relatively inexpensive, durable, maintenance-free sensor and method which is reliable in the field and relatively simple to calibrate. In view of the above, accurate monitoring is possible at a plurality of locations along the distribution chain leading to more efficient distribution.

  17. Systems and methods for optically measuring properties of hydrocarbon fuel gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adler-Golden, S.; Bernstein, L.S.; Bien, F.; Gersh, M.E.; Goldstein, N.

    1998-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for optical interrogation and measurement of a hydrocarbon fuel gas includes a light source generating light at near-visible wavelengths. A cell containing the gas is optically coupled to the light source which is in turn partially transmitted by the sample. A spectrometer disperses the transmitted light and captures an image thereof. The image is captured by a low-cost silicon-based two-dimensional CCD array. The captured spectral image is processed by electronics for determining energy or BTU content and composition of the gas. The innovative optical approach provides a relatively inexpensive, durable, maintenance-free sensor and method which is reliable in the field and relatively simple to calibrate. In view of the above, accurate monitoring is possible at a plurality of locations along the distribution chain leading to more efficient distribution. 14 figs.

  18. Intra-Cavity Total Reflection For High Sensitivity Measurement Of Optical Properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pipino, Andrew C. R. (Gaithersburg, MD); Hudgens, Jeffrey W. (Rockville, MD)

    1999-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical cavity resonator device is provided for conducting sensitive murement of optical absorption by matter in any state with diffraction-limited spatial resolution through utilization of total internal reflection within a high-Q (high quality, low loss) optical cavity. Intracavity total reflection generates an evanescent wave that decays exponentially in space at a point external to the cavity, thereby providing a localized region where absorbing materials can be sensitively probed through alteration of the Q-factor of the otherwise isolated cavity. When a laser pulse is injected into the cavity and passes through the evanescent state, an amplitude loss resulting from absorption is incurred that reduces the lifetime of the pulse in the cavity. By monitoring the decay of the injected pulse, the absorption coefficient of manner within the evanescent wave region is accurately obtained from the decay time measurement.

  19. Intra-Cavity Total Reflection For High Sensitivity Measurement Of Optical Properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pipino, Andrew Charles Rule (Gaithersburg, MD)

    1999-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical cavity resonator device is provided for conducting sensitive murement of optical absorption by matter in any state with diffraction-limited spatial resolution through utilization of total internal reflection within a high-Q (high quality, low loss) optical cavity. Intracavity total reflection generates an evanescent wave that decays exponentially in space at a point external to the cavity, thereby providing a localized region where absorbing materials can be sensitively probed through alteration of the Q-factor of the otherwise isolated cavity. When a laser pulse is injected into the cavity and passes through the evanescent state, an amplitude loss resulting from absorption is incurred that reduces the lifetime of the pulse in the cavity. By monitoring the decay of the injected pulse, the absorption coefficient of manner within the evanescent wave region is accurately obtained from the decay time measurement.

  20. Aerosol collection characteristics of ambient aerosol samplers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ortiz, Carlos A

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . These samplers have an effic1ency approach1ng 100 percent for particles for which the gravitational and 1nertial forces are small (less than approximately 5 um); however, for larger-sized part1cles the efficiency is quite variable and depends not only upon.... According to Agarwal, representative samples can be collected by an aerosol instrument without meeting the Davies criter1a. Raynor ( 7), with the aid of a wind tunnel, observed the effects of environmental and physical parameters on the entrance effic1...

  1. The interplay of structure and optical properties in individual semiconducting nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brewster, Megan Marie

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Semiconductor nanostructures exhibit distinct properties by virtue of nano-scale dimensionality, allowing for investigations of fundamental physics and the improvement of optoelectronic devices. Nanoscale morphological ...

  2. Electronic and intraband optical properties of single quantum rings under intense laser field radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radu, A. [Department of Physics, Politehnica University of Bucharest, 313 Splaiul Independentei, Bucharest RO-060042 (Romania); Kirakosyan, A. A.; Baghramyan, H. M.; Barseghyan, M. G., E-mail: mbarsegh@ysu.am [Department of Solid State Physics, Yerevan State University, Alex Manoogian 1, 0025 Yerevan (Armenia); Laroze, D. [Instituto de Alta Investigación, Universidad de Tarapacá, Casilla 7D, Arica (Chile)

    2014-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of an intense laser field on one-electron states and intraband optical absorption coefficients is investigated in two-dimensional GaAs/Ga{sub 0.7}Al{sub 0.3}As quantum rings. An analytical expression of the effective lateral confining potential induced by the laser field is obtained. The one-electron energy spectrum and wave functions are found using the effective mass approximation and exact diagonalization technique. We have shown that changes in the incident light polarization lead to blue- or redshifts in the intraband optical absorption spectrum. Moreover, we found that only blueshift is obtained with increasing outer radius of the quantum ring.

  3. Mid infrared optical properties of Ge/Si quantum dots with different doping level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sofronov, A. N.; Firsov, D. A.; Vorobjev, L. E.; Shalygin, V. A.; Panevin, V. Yu.; Vinnichenko, M. Ya. [St. Petersburg State Polytechnic University, Polytechnicheskaya str. 29, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Tonkikh, A. A. [Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2 D-06120, Halle (Saale) (Germany); Danilov, S. N. [University of Regensburg, Regensburg (Germany)

    2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical characterization of the Ge/Si quantum dots using equilibrium and photo-induced absorption spectroscopy in the mid-infrared spectral range was performed in this work. Equilibrium absorption spectra were measured in structures with various doping levels for different light polarizations. Photo-induced absorption spectra measured in undoped structure under interband optical excitation of non-equilibrium charge carriers demonstrate the same features as doped sample in equilibrium conditions. Hole energy spectrum was determined from the analysis of experimental data.

  4. Absorbing Aerosol Index (AAI) The residue method for the detection of aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graaf, Martin de

    Absorbing Aerosol Index (AAI) The residue method for the detection of aerosols from space reflection and absorption Surface Rayleigh atmosphere #12;TOA Multiple scattering Multiple scattering Aerosol layer satellite Surface reflection and absorption Surface Rayleigh atmosphere Rayleigh atmophere Aerosol

  5. Electrostatics and radioactive aerosol behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clement, C.F.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioactive aerosols differ from their nonradioactive counterparts by their ability to charge themselves by emitting charged particles during the radioactive decay process. Evidence that electrostatics, including this charging process, can affect the transport of the aerosols was summarized previously. Charge distributions and the mean charge for a monodisperse radioactive aerosol have been considered in detail. The principal results of theory to calculate charge distributions on a aerosol with a size distribution, changes to Brownian coagulation rates for an aerosol in a reactor containment, and possible changes to aerosol deposition resulting from the charging will be presented. The main purpose of the work has been to improve calculations of aerosol behavior in reactor containments, but behavior in less ionizing environments will be affected more strongly, and some problems remain to be solved in performing reliable calculations.

  6. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: Study of Aerosol Sources and Processing at the GVAX Pantnagar Supersite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worsnop, Douglas R. [Principal Investigator

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This project funded the participation of scientists from seven research groups, running more than thirty instruments, in the Winter Intensive Operating Period (January-February 2012) of the Clean Air for London (ClearfLo) campaign at a rural site in Detling, UK, 45 km southeast of central London. The primary science questions for the ClearfLo Winter IOP were, 1) what is the urban increment of particulate matter (PM) and other pollutants in the greater London area, and, 2) what is the contribution of solid fuel use for home heating to wintertime PM? An additional motivation for the Detling measurements was the question of whether coatings on black carbon particles enhance absorption. The following four key accomplishments have been identified so far: 1) Chemical, physical and optical characterization of PM from local and regional sources (Figures 2, 4, 5 and 6). 2) Measurement of urban increment in particulate matter and gases in London (Figure 3). 3) Measurement of optical properties and chemical composition of coatings on black carbon containing particles indicates absorption enhancement. 4) First deployment of chemical ionization instrument (MOVI-CI-TOFMS) to measure both particle-phase and gas-phase organic acids. (See final report from Joel Thornton, University of Washington, for details.) Analysis of the large dataset acquired in Detling is ongoing and will yield further key accomplishments. These measurements of urban and rural aerosol properties will contribute to improved modeling of regional aerosol emissions, and of atmospheric aging and removal. The measurement of absorption enhancement by coatings on black carbon will contribute to improved modeling of the direct radiative properties of PM.

  7. NFRC Interlaboratory Comparison on Optical Properties Jacob C. Jonsson and Michael Rubin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    standards with international standards. In the solar range, NFRC 300 refers to ASTM E903 (currently of the International Glazing Database (IGDB). NFRC 302 specifies that submitters of optical data participated in an ILC conducted by some other reputable independent organization. What does it mean

  8. Optical properties and modulation characteristics of ultra-strong injection-locked distributed feedback lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sung, Hyuk-Kee; Lau, Erwin K.; Wu, Ming C.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Ultra-Strong Injection-Locked Distributed Feedback LasersUltra-high, 72 GHz resonance fre- quency and 44 GHz bandwidth of injection-locked 1.55-µm DFB lasers,”ultra-strong optical injection. The dynamic response of the slave laser

  9. The influence of substrate temperature on the structural and optical properties of ZnS thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashraf, M.; Akhtar, S. M. J.; Ali, Z. [Optics Laboratories (Pakistan); Qayyum, A., E-mail: qayyum@pinstech.org.pk [Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, P.O. Nilore, Physics Division (Pakistan)

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Thin films of ZnS were deposited on soda lime glass substrates by a modified close-space sublimation technique. The change in optical and structural properties of the films deposited at various substrate temperatures (150-450 Degree-Sign C) was investigated. X-ray diffraction spectra showed that films were polycrystalline in nature having cubic structure oriented only along (111) plan. The crystallinity of films increased with the substrate temperature up to 250 Degree-Sign C. However, crystallinity decreased with further increase of substrate temperature and films became amorphous at 450 Degree-Sign C. The atomic force microscopy data revealed that the films become more uniform and dense with the increase of substrate temperature. Optical properties of the films were determined from the transmittance data using Swanepoel model. It was observed that the energy band gap is increased from 3.52 to 3.65 eV and refractive index of the films are decreased with the increase of substrate temperature. Moreover, considerable improvement in blue response of the films was noticed with increasing substrate temperature.

  10. Optical, magnetic and electronic properties of Ln{sub 2}O{sub 2}Te (Ln = La, Sm and Gd)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Llanos, Jaime [Departamento de Quimica, Universidad Catolica del Norte, Avda. Angamos 0610, Casilla 1280, Antofagasta (Chile)], E-mail: jllanos@ucn.cl; Conejeros, Sergio; Cortes, Rodrigo; Sanchez, Victor [Departamento de Quimica, Universidad Catolica del Norte, Avda. Angamos 0610, Casilla 1280, Antofagasta (Chile); Barahona, Patricia; Pena, Octavio [Laboratoire de Chimie du Solide et Inorganique Moleculaire, UMR 6511-CNRS, Universite Rennes 1-Institut de Chimie de Rennes, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France)

    2008-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The synthesis, the optical and magnetic properties and the electronic structure of the rare-earth oxytellurides of formula Ln{sub 2}O{sub 2}Te (Ln = La, Sm and Gd) are reported. The magnetic measurements show that La{sub 2}O{sub 2}Te exhibit a diamagnetic behavior. The value of the magnetization M of Gd{sub 2}TeO{sub 2} at our highest available field (50 kOe) is about 5.5{mu}{sub B}, well below the expected value for two independent Gd ions (2gJ = 14{mu}{sub B}) confirming the antiferromagnetic character of this compound. The magnetic properties of Sm{sub 2}TeO{sub 2} reveal that Sm is in its 3+ oxidation state with a large Van Vleck contribution. The electronic structure calculations, studied by means of a first principles DFT approach, are consistent with the optical measurements and suggest an indirect band gap semiconductor behavior.

  11. aerosols and climate : uncertainties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    contributes to creating a level playing field. (BC emissions tradeble like CO2 emissions?) OUTLINE #12;size. policy measures, is even more uncertain (emissions & their chemical fingerprint are uncertain (not just aerosol emissions, not just climate impacts) OUTLINE #12;- Standardization doesn't reduce

  12. Long-term impacts of aerosols on vertical development of cloud and precipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Z.; Liu Y.; Niu, F.; Fan, J.; Rosenfeld, D.; Ding, Y.

    2011-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Aerosols alter cloud density and the radiative balance of the atmosphere. This leads to changes in cloud microphysics and atmospheric stability, which can either suppress or foster the development of clouds and precipitation. The net effect is largely unknown, but depends on meteorological conditions and aerosol properties. Here, we examine the long-term impact of aerosols on the vertical development of clouds and rainfall frequencies, using a 10-year dataset of aerosol, cloud and meteorological variables collected in the Southern Great Plains in the United States. We show that cloud-top height and thickness increase with aerosol concentration measured near the ground in mixed-phase clouds-which contain both liquid water and ice-that have a warm, low base. We attribute the effect, which is most significant in summer, to an aerosol-induced invigoration of upward winds. In contrast, we find no change in cloud-top height and precipitation with aerosol concentration in clouds with no ice or cool bases. We further show that precipitation frequency and rain rate are altered by aerosols. Rain increases with aerosol concentration in deep clouds that have a high liquid-water content, but declines in clouds that have a low liquid-water content. Simulations using a cloud-resolving model confirm these observations. Our findings provide unprecedented insights of the long-term net impacts of aerosols on clouds and precipitation.

  13. The effects of cerium doping on the size, morphology, and optical properties of ?-hematite nanoparticles for ultraviolet filtration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cardillo, Dean [Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, AIIM Facility, University of Wollongong Innovation Campus, Squires Way, North Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Konstantinov, Konstantin, E-mail: konstan@uow.edu.au [Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, AIIM Facility, University of Wollongong Innovation Campus, Squires Way, North Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Devers, Thierry [Centre de Recherche sur la Matière Divisée, Institut de Physique, site de Chartres, Université d’Orléans (France)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • Possible application of cerium-doped ?-hematite as ultraviolet filter. • Nanoparticles obtained through co-precipitation technique using various cerium doping levels followed by annealing. • Comprehensive materials characterisation utilizing XRD, DSC/TGA, STEM, UV–vis spectroscopy. • Increasing cerium content reduces particle sizing and alters morphology. • Solubility of cerium in hematite seen between 5 and 10% doping, 10% cerium doping greatly enhances attenuation in ultraviolet region and increases optical bandgap. - Abstract: Metal oxide nanoparticles have potential use in energy storage, electrode materials, as catalysts and in the emerging field of nanomedicine. Being able to accurately tailor the desirable properties of these nanoceramic materials, such as particle size, morphology and optical bandgap (E{sub g}) is integral in the feasibility of their use. In this study we investigate the altering of both the structure and physical properties through the doping of hematite (?-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanocrystals with cerium at a range of concentrations, synthesised using a one-pot co-precipitation method. This extremely simple synthesis followed by thermal treatment results in stable Fe{sub 2?x}Ce{sub x}O{sub y} nanoceramics resulting from the burning of any unreacted precursors and transformation of goethite-cerium doped nanoparticle intermediate. The inclusion of Ce into the crystal lattice of these ?-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles causes a significantly large reduction in mean crystalline size and alteration in particle morphology with increasing cerium content. Finally we report an increase optical semiconductor bandgap, along with a substantial increase in the ultraviolet attenuation found for a 10% Ce-doping concentration which shows the potential application of cerium-doped hematite nanocrystals to be used as a pigmented ultraviolet filter for cosmetic products.

  14. Estimating the Radiative Forcing of Carbonaceous Aerosols over California based on Satellite and Ground Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Yangyang; Bahadur, R.; Zhao, Chun; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbonaceous aerosols have the potential to impact climate both through directly absorbing incoming solar radiation, and by indirectly affecting the cloud layer. To quantify this impact recent modeling studies have made great efforts to simulate both the spatial and temporal distribution of carbonaceous aerosols and their associated radiative forcing. This study makes the first observationally constrained assessment of the direct radiative forcing of carbonaceous aerosols at a regional scale over California. By exploiting multiple observations (including ground sites and satellites), we constructed the distribution of aerosol optical depths and aerosol absorption optical depths over California for a ten-year period (2000-2010). The total solar absorption was then partitioned into contributions from elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC) and dust aerosols using a newly developed scheme. Aerosol absorption optical depth due to carbonaceous aerosols (EC and OC) at 440 nm is 50%-200% larger than natural dust, with EC contributing the bulk (70%-90%). Observationally constrained EC absorption agrees reasonably well with estimates from regional transport models, but the model underestimates the OC AAOD by at least 50%. We estimate that the TOA warming from carbonaceous aerosols is 0.7 W/m2 and the TOA forcing due to OC is close to zero. The atmospheric heating of carbonaceous aerosols is 2.2-2.9 W/m2, of which EC contributed about 80-90%. The atmospheric heating due to OC is estimated to be 0.1 to 0.4 W/m2, larger than model simulations. The surface brightening due to EC reduction over the last two decades is estimated to be 1.5-3.5 W/m2.

  15. 6, 43414373, 2006 Cloud-borne aerosol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Discussions Impact of cloud-borne aerosol representation on aerosol direct and indirect effects S. J. Ghan of aerosols employ a variety of rep- resentations of such cloud-borne particles. Here we use a global aerosol- ulated aerosol, cloud and radiation fields to various approximations to the representa- tion of cloud

  16. Assessing the Effects of Anthropogenic Aerosols on Pacific Storm Track Using a Multiscale Global Climate Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yuan; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Renyi; Ghan, Steven J.; Lin, Yun; Hu, Jiaxi; Pan, Bowen; Levy, Misti; Jiang, Jonathan; Molina, Mario J.

    2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric aerosols impact weather and global general circulation by modifying cloud and precipitation processes, but the magnitude of cloud adjustment by aerosols remains poorly quantified and represents the largest uncertainty in estimated forcing of climate change. Here we assess the impacts of anthropogenic aerosols on the Pacific storm track using a multi-scale global aerosol-climate model (GCM). Simulations of two aerosol scenarios corresponding to the present day and pre-industrial conditions reveal long-range transport of anthropogenic aerosols across the north Pacific and large resulting changes in the aerosol optical depth, cloud droplet number concentration, and cloud and ice water paths. Shortwave and longwave cloud radiative forcing at the top of atmosphere are changed by - 2.5 and + 1.3 W m-2, respectively, by emission changes from pre-industrial to present day, and an increased cloud-top height indicates invigorated mid-latitude cyclones. The overall increased precipitation and poleward heat transport reflect intensification of the Pacific storm track by anthropogenic aerosols. Hence, this work provides for the first time a global perspective of the impacts of Asian pollution outflows from GCMs. Furthermore, our results suggest that the multi-scale modeling framework is essential in producing the aerosol invigoration effect of deep convective clouds on the global scale.

  17. Final Technical Report [Toward Simultaneous Single-Particle Chemical and Optical Characterization: Development of a Multi-Angle Optical Scattering Module for the Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buckley, Steven [Photon Machines, Inc.] [Photon Machines, Inc.

    2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was an initial effort to investigate the feasibility of an instrument combining real-time atmospheric particle composition measurements using an ATOFMS (Atmospheric Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometer) such as those performed by Prather’s group at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) with multi-wavelength scattering measurements of the type investigated by Sorensen et al., of Kansas State University (KSU). In this Phase I effort we proposed to investigate near-angle scattering and the possibility of integration of a multi-wavelength scattering instrument into the UCSD ATOFMS. After an initial optical design and calculations, we discovered issues with the theory of measurement and with mechanical integration. Evidence emerged that the method of multi-wavelength scattering is only efficacious for spherical particles, while most atmospheric particles are non-spherical fractal aggregates. We also determined that the integration of the detector into existing ATOFMS instruments would be severely limited by volume constraints, and additional volume would require prohibitive additional pumping compared with the existing ATOFMS systems. Based on this evidence, we decided not to pursue a Phase II effort.

  18. Characterising the optical properties of galaxy clusters with GMPhoRCC 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hood, Ross John

    2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The properties of galaxy clusters, such as abundance and mass to light ratios, have long been used to investigate and constrain cosmology. With vast numbers of newly detected clusters, such as from the Planck mission ...

  19. Extensional rheology of polymers and optical properties of blown polymer films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxey, Jason E

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of blown polymer films, the product of a major process with biaxial flows, are related to the mechanical properties of the alms and a novel lubricated squeezing rheometer for generating pure biaxial elongation is constructed and tested in constant strain...

  20. Optical Properties of Saharan Dust and Asian Dust: Application to Radiative Transfer Simulations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Guangyang

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    properties for radiative transfer simulations. Using a Rapid Radiative Transfer Model (RRTM), the radiative forcing of mineral dust was computed at both the top of the atmosphere and the surface. By analyzing samples from various in-situ measurements, we...

  1. Controlling the architectures and optical properties of conjugated polymer aggregates and films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satrijo, Andrew

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The semiconducting properties of conjugated polymers are finding use in various optoelectronic applications, including chemical sensors and light-emitting diodes. In this thesis, we investigate aggregation in conjugated ...

  2. Technical Progress Report for "Optical and Electrical Properties of III-Nitrides and Related Materials"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Hongxing

    2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Investigations have been conducted focused on the fundamental material properties of AIN and high AI-content AIGaN alloys and further developed MOCVD growth technologies for obtaining these materials with improved crystalline quality and conductivities.

  3. A fibre optic sensor for the in situ determination of rock physical properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reinsch, Thomas; Milsch, Harald; Bremer, Kort; Lewis, Elfed; Leen, Gabriel; Lochmann, Steffen; 10.1016/j.ijrmms.2012.06.011

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To understand the behaviour of rocks under changing load or temperature conditions, the determination of physical parameters like pore pressure or temperature within the pore space is essential. Within this study, the implementation of a novel fibre optic point sensor for pressure and temperature determination into a high pressure / high temperature triaxial cell is presented. For the first time, pressure was measured directly within the pore space of a Flechtinger sandstone specimen during a hydrostatic compression test at up to 70 MPa. The sensor used within this study consists of a miniature all-silica fibre optic Extrinsic Fabry-Perot Interferometer (EFPI) sensor which has an embedded Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) reference sensor element to determine temperature and pressure directly at the point of measurement.

  4. 8, 161179, 2008 UV Aerosol Optical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    'Optique Atmosph´erique (LOA), Universit´e des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, 59655 Villeneuve d'Ascq Cedex, France 2 Interactions Rayonnement Solaire Atmosph`ere (IRSA), Universit´e Joseph Fourier de Grenoble, 17

  5. ARM - PI Product - Niamey Aerosol Optical Depths

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowbandheatProductsISDAC MicrophysicsProductsNauru

  6. Proceedings and Conference Papers: 1. Optical properties of Hexagonal Arrays of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes, with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rao, D.V.G.L.N.

    . Nakashima, J.F. Roach, A.J. Jaglowski, and F.J. Aranda, SPIE Proc. 2853, 190 (1996). 14. Nonlinear.A. Akkara, D.L. Kaplan and J.F. Roach, Mat. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. 374, 185 (1995). 16. Nonlinear Optical, F.J. Aranda, J.A. Akkara, D.L. Kaplan, D.N. Ghosh Roy and J.F. Roach, Nonlinear Optica III, SPIE

  7. Electronic band structure and optical properties of the cubic, Sc, Y and La hydride systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterman, D.J.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electronic band structure calculations are used to interpret the optical spectra of the cubic Sc, Y and La hydride systems. Self-consistent band calculations of ScH/sub 2/ and YH/sub 2/ were carried out. The respective joint densities of states are computed and compared to the dielectric functions determined from the optical measurements. Additional calculations were performed in which the Fermi level or band gap energies are rigidly shifted by a small energy increment. These calculations are then used to simulate the derivative structure in thermomodulation spectra and relate the origin of experimental interband features to the calculated energy bands. While good systematic agreement is obtained for several spectral features, the origin of low-energy interband transitions in YH/sub 2/ cannot be explained by these calculated bands. A lattice-size-dependent premature occupation of octahedral sites by hydrogen atoms in the fcc metal lattice is suggested to account for this discrepancy. Various non-self-consistent calculations are used to examine the effect of such a premature occupation. Measurements of the optical absorptivity of LaH/sub x/ with 1.6 < x < 2.9 are presented which, as expected, indicate a more premature occupation of the octahedral sites in the larger LaH/sub 2/ lattice. These experimental results also suggest that, in contrast to recent calculations, LaH/sub 3/ is a small-band-gap semiconductor.

  8. Transport of anthropogenic and biomass burning aerosols from Europe to the Arctic during spring 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marelle, L.; Raut, Jean-Christophe; Thomas, J. L.; Law, K. S.; Quennehen, Boris; Ancellet, G.; Pelon, J.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Fast, Jerome D.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the POLARCAT-France airborne campaign in April 2008, pollution originating from anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions was measured in the European Arctic. We compare these aircraft measurements with simulations using the WRF-Chem model to investigate model representation of aerosols transported from Europe to the Arctic. Modeled PM2.5 is evaluated using EMEP measurements in source regions and POLARCAT aircraft measurements in the Scandinavian Arctic, showing a good agreement, although the model overestimates nitrate and underestimates organic carbon in source regions. Using WRF-Chem in combination with the Lagrangian model FLEXPART-WRF, we find that during the campaign the research aircraft sampled two different types of European plumes: mixed anthropogenic and fire plumes from eastern Europe and Russia transported below 2 km, and anthropogenic plumes from central Europe uplifted by warm conveyor belt circulations to 5–6 km. Both modeled plume types had significant wet scavenging (> 50% PM10) during transport. Modeled aerosol vertical distributions and optical properties below the aircraft are evaluated in the Arctic using airborne LIDAR measurements. Evaluating the regional impacts in the Arctic of this event in terms of aerosol vertical structure, we find that during the 4 day presence of these aerosols in the lower European Arctic (< 75° N), biomass burning emissions have the strongest influence on concentrations between 2.5 and 3 km altitudes, while European anthropogenic emissions influence aerosols at both lower (~1.5 km) and higher altitudes (~4.5 km). As a proportion of PM2.5, modeled black carbon and SO4= concentrations are more enhanced near the surface. The European plumes sampled during POLARCAT-France were transported over the region of springtime snow cover in Northern Scandinavia, where they had a significant local atmospheric warming effect. We find that, during this transport event, the average modeled top of atmosphere (TOA) shortwave direct and semi-direct radiative effect (DSRE) north of 60° N over snow and ice-covered surfaces reaches +0.58 W m?², peaking at +3.3 W m?² at noon over Scandinavia and Finland.

  9. Development of advanced cloud parameterizations to examine air quality, cloud properties, and cloud-radiation feedback in mesoscale models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, In Young

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The distribution of atmospheric pollutants is governed by dynamic processes that create the general conditions for transport and mixing, by microphysical processes that control the evolution of aerosol and cloud particles, and by chemical processes that transform chemical species and form aerosols. Pollutants emitted into the air can undergo homogeneous gas reactions to create a suitable environment for the production by heterogeneous nucleation of embryos composed of a few molecules. The physicochemical properties of preexisting aerosols interact with newly produced embryos to evolve by heteromolecular diffusion and coagulation. Hygroscopic particles wig serve as effective cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), while hydrophobic particles will serve as effective ice-forming nuclei. Clouds form initially by condensation of water vapor on CCN and evolve in a vapor-liquid-solid system by deposition, sublimation, freezing, melting, coagulation, and breakup. Gases and aerosols that enter the clouds undergo aqueous chemical processes and may acidity hydrometer particles. Calculations for solar and longwave radiation fluxes depend on how the respective spectra are modified by absorbers such as H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O, chlorofruorocarbons, and aerosols. However, the flux calculations are more complicated for cloudy skies, because the cloud optical properties are not well defined. In this paper, key processes such as tropospheric chemistry, cloud microphysics parameterizations, and radiation schemes are reviewed in terms of physicochemical processes occurring, and recommendations are made for the development of advanced modules applicable to mesoscale models.

  10. Alcohol CVD growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes and their optical properties Shigeo Maruyama, maruyama@photon.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp, Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    of single-walled carbon nanotubes and their optical properties 2007/02/24http://oasys2.confex.com/acs/232nm

  11. Structural and optical properties of core–shell Ag{sub 2}S/HgS nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basyach, Priyanka; Choudhury, Amarjyoti, E-mail: ajc@tezu.ernet.in

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Core–shell Ag{sub 2}S/HgS nanostructures are successfully synthesized. • The particle size and the structure were confirmed through TEM images. • The absorbance analysis reveals red shift with increasing shell concentration. • A transition from TYPE 1 to TYPE 2 core–shell nanostructure is observed. - Abstract: Here we report on a two-step synthesis route for fabrication of core–shell Ag{sub 2}S/HgS nanostructures. Nanoscale Ag{sub 2}S semiconductors are prepared by a standard redox reaction using AgNO{sub 3} and CS{sub 2} as the reactants in PVP. HgS layers are developed on Ag{sub 2}S cores through S-S bonding at the interface separating the two systems. The properties of these core–shell nanostructures are studied via various spectroscopic and microscopic tools like UV–Vis absorption spectra, photoluminescence spectra, X-ray diffraction pattern and transmission electron microscopic images. Change in optical properties is observed while varying the shell thickness in the sample. A detailed study on the luminescence properties reveal transition from TYPE 1 to TYPE 2 core–shell nanostructures is observed with increasing shell thickness.

  12. Structure and optical properties of a noncentrosymmetric borate RbSr{sub 4}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia, M.J. [Beijing Center for Crystal Research and Development, Key Laboratory of Functional Crystals and Laser Technology, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Li, R.K., E-mail: rkli@mail.ipc.ac.cn [Beijing Center for Crystal Research and Development, Key Laboratory of Functional Crystals and Laser Technology, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new noncentrosymmetric borate, RbSr{sub 4}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} (abbreviated as RSBO), has been grown from Rb{sub 2}O--B{sub 2}O{sub 3}--RbF flux and its crystal structure was determined by single crystal x-ray diffraction. It crystallizes in space group Ama2 with cell parameters of a=11.128(10) A, b=12.155(15) A, c=6.952(7) A, Z=4. The basic structural units are isolated planar BO{sub 3} groups. Second harmonic generation (SHG) test of the title compound by the Kurtz-Perry method shows that RSBO can be phase matchable with an effective SHG coefficient about two-thirds as large as that of KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} (KDP). Finally, based on the anionic group approximation, the optical properties of the title compound are compared with those of the structure-related apatite-like compounds with the formula 'A{sub 5}(TO{sub n}){sub 3}X'. - Graphical abstract: RbSr{sub 4}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} and some other borate NLO compounds, namely Ca{sub 5}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3}F RCa{sub 4}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3}O (R=Y or Gd) and Na{sub 3}La{sub 2}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} can be viewed as the derivatives of apatite. They have similar formula composed of five cations and three anion groups (we call them 5/3 structures). The detailed SHG coefficients and optical properties of the apatite-like NLO crystals were compared and summarized. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new noncentrosymmetric borate RbSr{sub 4}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} was grown from flux. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The RbSr{sub 4}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} can be viewed as a derivative of the apatite-like structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structure and its relationship to the optical properties of RbSr{sub 4}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} are compared with other NLO crystals with apatite-like structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The basic structural units are the planar BO{sub 3} groups in the structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Second harmonic generation (SHG) test shows that RbSr{sub 4}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} can be phase matchable with an effective SHG coefficient about two-thirds as large as that of KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}.

  13. Aerosol Retrieval Using Remote-sensed Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yueqing

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.2 Aerosols Impacts on HumanBayesian Approach for Aerosol Retrieval Using MISR Data 2.1for Including a Richer Variety of Aerosol Compositions . 2.5

  14. Relationship between environment and the broad-band optical properties of galaxies in the SDSS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. R. Blanton; D. J. Eisenstein; D. W. Hogg; D. J. Schlegel; J. Brinkmann

    2003-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the relationship between environment and the luminosities, surface brightnesses, colors, and profile shapes of luminous galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). For the SDSS sample, galaxy color is the galaxy property most predictive of the local environment. Galaxy color and luminosity jointly comprise the most predictive pair of properties. At fixed luminosity and color, density is not closely related to surface brightness or to Sersic index -- the parameter in this study that astronomers most often associate with morphology. In the text, we discuss what measureable residual relationships exist, generally finding that at red colors and fixed luminosity, the mean density decreases at the highest surface brightnesses and Sersic indices. In general, these results suggest that the morphological properties of galaxies are less closely related to galaxy environment than are their masses and star-formation histories.

  15. Dust Aerosol Impact on North Africa Climate: A GCM Investigation of Aerosol-Cloud-Radiation Interactions Using A-Train Satellite Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, Y.; Liou, K. N.; Jiang, Jonathan; Su, Hui; Liu, Xiaohong

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The climatic effects of dust aerosols in North Africa have been investigated using the atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) developed at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). The model includes an efficient and physically based radiation parameterization scheme developed specifically for application to clouds and aerosols. Parameterization of the effective ice particle size in association with the aerosol indirect effect based on cloud and aerosol data retrieved from A-Train satellite observations have been employed in the climate model simulations. Offline simulations reveal that the direct solar, IR, and net forcings by dust aerosols generally increase with increasing aerosol optical depth (AOD). When the dust semi-direct effect is included with the presence of ice clouds, positive IR radiative forcing is enhanced, since ice clouds trap substantial IR radiation, while the positive solar forcing with dust aerosols alone has been changed to negative values due to the strong reflection of solar radiation by clouds, indicating that cloud forcing could exceed aerosol forcing. With the aerosol indirect effect, the net cloud forcing is generally reduced for ice water path (IWP) larger than 20 g m-2. The magnitude of the reduction increases with IWP. AGCM simulations show that the reduced ice crystal mean effective size due to the aerosol first indirect effect result in less OLR and net solar flux at the top of the atmosphere over the cloudy area of the North Africa region because ice clouds with smaller size trap more IR radiation and reflect more solar radiation. The precipitation in the same area, however, increases due to the aerosol indirect effect on ice clouds, corresponding to the enhanced convection as indicated by reduced OLR. The increased precipitation seems to be associated with enhanced ice water contents in this region. The 200 mb radiative heating rate shows more cooling with the aerosol indirect effect since greater cooling is produced at the cloud top with smaller ice crystal size. The 500 mb omega indicates strong upward motion, which, together with the increased cooling effect, results in the increased ice water contents. Adding the aerosol direct effect into the model simulation reduces the precipitation in the normal rainfall band over North Africa, where precipitation is shifted to the south and the northeast produced by the absorption of sunlight and the subsequent heating of the air column by dust particles. As a result, rainfall is drawn further inland to the northeast. This study represents the first attempt to quantify the climate impact of aerosol indirect effect using a GCM in connection with A-train satellite data. The parameterization for the aerosol first indirect effect developed in this study can be readily incorporated for application to any other GCMs.

  16. CONFIRMING FUNDAMENTAL PROPERTIES OF THE EXOPLANET HOST STAR {epsilon} ERIDANI USING THE NAVY OPTICAL INTERFEROMETER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baines, Ellyn K.; Armstrong, J. Thomas, E-mail: ellyn.baines@nrl.navy.mil, E-mail: tarmstr@crater.nrl.navy.mil [Remote Sensing Division, Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We measured the angular diameter of the exoplanet host star {epsilon} Eridani using the Navy Optical Interferometer. We determined its physical radius, effective temperature, and mass by combining our measurement with the star's parallax, photometry from the literature, and the Yonsei-Yale isochrones, respectively. We used the resulting stellar mass of 0.82 {+-} 0.05 M{sub Sun} plus the mass function from Benedict et al. to calculate the planet's mass, which is 1.53 {+-} 0.22 M{sub Jupiter}. Using our new effective temperature, we also estimated the extent of the habitable zone for the system.

  17. EC 577 / MS 577: Electrical Optical and Magnetic Properties of Materials Professor Theodore. D. Moustakas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) - Types of Radiation for Crystal Diffraction (X-Rays, electrons, neutrons) - Scattering of X Conductivity - Inelastic Scattering of X-Rays and Neutrons by Phonons - Light scattering (Brillouin and Raman-Rays by an Atom - Scattering of X-Rays by a Crystal - The Reciprocal Lattice and its Properties (Brillouin zones

  18. Optical properties of metals: Infrared emissivity in the anomalous skin effect spectral region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Echániz, T. [Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnología, UPV/EHU, Sarriena s/n, Leioa 48940 (Spain); Pérez-Sáez, R. B., E-mail: raul.perez@ehu.es; Tello, M. J. [Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnología, UPV/EHU, Sarriena s/n, Leioa 48940 (Spain); Instituto de Síntesis y Estudio de Materiales, Universidad del País Vasco, Apdo. 644, Bilbao 48080 (Spain)

    2014-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    When the penetration depth of an electromagnetic wave in a metal is similar to the mean free path of the conduction electrons, the Drude classical theory is no longer satisfied and the skin effect becomes anomalous. Physical parameters of this theory for twelve metals were calculated and analyzed. The theory predicts an emissivity peak ?{sub peak} at room temperature in the mid-infrared for smooth surface metals that moves towards larger wavelengths as temperature decreases. Furthermore, the theory states that ?{sub peak} increases with the emission angle but its position, ?{sub peak}, is constant. Copper directional emissivity measurements as well as emissivity obtained using optical constants data confirm the predictions of the theory. Considering the relationship between the specularity parameter p and the sample roughness, it is concluded that p is not the simple parameter it is usually assumed to be. Quantitative comparison between experimental data and theoretical predictions shows that the specularity parameter can be equal to one for roughness values larger than those predicted. An exhaustive analysis of the experimental optical parameters shows signs of a reflectance broad peak in Cu, Al, Au, and Mo around the wavelength predicted by the theory for p?=?1.

  19. Structural, optical and dielectric property of Co doped Bi{sub 2}Fe{sub 4}O{sub 9}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swain, Smita, E-mail: singhanil@nitrkl.ac.in; Mohapatra, S. R., E-mail: singhanil@nitrkl.ac.in; Sahoo, B., E-mail: singhanil@nitrkl.ac.in; Singh, A. K., E-mail: singhanil@nitrkl.ac.in [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Rourkela -769008, Odisha (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiferroic Bi{sub 2}Fe{sub 4}O{sub 9} and Co doped Bi{sub 2}Fe{sub 4}O{sub 9} are prepared by solid state route reaction method using bismuth oxide(Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}), iron oxide(Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and cobalt oxide (Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}). Their structural optical and dielectric properties are studied and compared. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results confirm that there is no change in crystal structure due to Co doping. From dielectric constant measurement we conclude that dielectric constant increases due to Co doping. UV-Visible plot shows due to Co doping bang gap energy increases.

  20. Optical properties of chromium and neodymium in zirconium-barium-lanthanum-aluminum fluoride glass. Final report, October 1987-September 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, F.E.; Caspers, H.H.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The optical properties are reported of chromium and neodymium doped in zirconium-barium-lanthanum-aluminum fluoride glass (ZBLA). The fluorescence of Cr(3+) and of co-doped Cr(3+), Nd(3+) glasses is investigated. Fluorescence decay rates of Cr(3+) and Nd(3+) are measured at various temperatures, and the excitation transfer efficiency between Cr(3+) and Nd(3+) is determined. The absorption spectrum of Nd(3+):ZBLA is characterized in terms of the Judd-Ofelt model of crystal field-induced electric-dipole transitions. The three phenomenological intensity parameters for Nd(3+) in ZBLA glass Omega sub 2,4,6, are compared to those obtained for Nd(3+) in Y3Al5Ol2, Gd3S2Al3Ol2, and LHG-8 glass.

  1. Optical properties of InGaPN epilayer with low nitrogen content grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Kang Min [Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, 8-1, Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan); Nonoguchi, Shogo; Krishnamurthy, Daivasigamani; Emura, Shuichi; Hasegawa, Shigehiko; Asahi, Hajime [Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, 8-1, Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of nitrogen concentration on the optical properties of InGaP(N) epilayer was investigated. The temperature dependence of the photoluminescence (PL) peak energy of InGaPN (N = 1%) epilayer around room temperature was found to be almost one-half of that of InGaP epilayer. The incorporation of N causes the reduction of the coupling constant for the electron-phonon interaction, leading to the reduced temperature dependence of the PL peak shift. Thermal activation energy, which is deduced from the Arrhenius plot of PL intensity, was decreased by N incorporation. The reduced PL quenching is discussed in terms of the changes in the band alignment at the InGaPN/GaAs heterointerface by the increase in the N concentration.

  2. Nonequilibrium Atmospheric Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aerosol Formation and Growth. Abstract: Airborne particles play a critical role in air quality, human health effects, visibility and climate. Secondary organic aerosols (SOA)...

  3. Molecular Characterization of Biomass Burning Aerosols Using...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biomass Burning Aerosols Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry. Molecular Characterization of Biomass Burning Aerosols Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry. Abstract: Chemical...

  4. Synthesis of highly efficient antibacterial agent Ag doped ZnO nanorods: Structural, Raman and optical properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jan, Tariq; Iqbal, Javed, E-mail: javed.saggu@iiu.edu.pk [Laboratory of Nanoscience and Technology, Department of Physics, International Islamic University Islamabad (Pakistan); Ismail, Muhammad [Institute of Biomedical and Genetic Engineering (IBGE), Islamabad (Pakistan); Mahmood, Arshad [Nano Devices Labs, National Institute of Lasers and Optronics, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Here, synthesis, structural, morphological, Raman, optical properties and antibacterial activity of undoped and Ag doped ZnO nanorods by chemical co-precipitation technique have been reported. Structural analysis has revealed that Ag doping cannot deteriorate the structure of ZnO and wurtzite phase is maintained. Lattice constants are found to be decreased with the Ag doping. Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy also confirm the X-ray diffraction results. Scanning electron microscopy results have demonstrated the formation of ZnO nanorods with average diameter and length of 96?nm and 700?nm, respectively. Raman spectroscopy results suggest that the Ag doping enhances the number of defects in ZnO crystal. It has been found from optical study that Ag doping results in positional shift of band edge absorption peak. This is attributed to the successful incorporation of Ag dopant into ZnO host matrix. The antibacterial activity of prepared nanorods has been determined by two different methods and compared to that of undoped ZnO nanorods. Ag doped ZnO nanorods exhibit excellent antibacterial activity as compared to that of undoped ZnO nanorods. This excellent antibacterial activity may be attributed to the presence of oxygen vacancies and Zn{sup 2+} interstitial defects. Our preliminary findings suggest that Ag doped ZnO nanorods can be used externally to control the spreading of infections related with tested bacterial strains.

  5. Structural, optical, and magnetic properties of highly-resistive Sm-implanted GaN thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lo, Fang-Yuh, E-mail: fangyuhlo@ntnu.edu.tw; Huang, Cheng-De; Chou, Kai-Chieh; Guo, Jhong-Yu; Liu, Hsiang-Lin; Chia, Chi-Ta [Department of Physics, National Taiwan Normal University, 11677 Taipei City, Taiwan (China); Ney, Verena; Ney, Andreas [Experimentalphysik, Universität Duisburg-Essen, 47057 Duisburg (Germany); Shvarkov, Stepan; Reuter, Dirk; Wieck, Andreas D. [Lehrstuhl für Angewandte Festkörperphysik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Pezzagna, Sébastien [Lehrstuhl für Angewandte Festkörperphysik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Centre de Recherche sur l'Hétéroépitaxie et ses Application, 06560 Valbonne, UPR-CNRS (France); Chern, Ming-Yau [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, 10617 Taipei City, Taiwan (China); Massies, Jean [Centre de Recherche sur l'Hétéroépitaxie et ses Application, 06560 Valbonne, UPR-CNRS (France)

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Samarium ions of 200?keV in energy were implanted into highly-resistive molecular-beam-epitaxy grown GaN thin films with a focused-ion-beam implanter at room temperature. The implantation doses range from 1?×?10{sup 14} to 1?×?10{sup 16?}cm{sup ?2}. Structural properties studied by x-ray diffraction and Raman-scattering spectroscopy revealed Sm incorporation into GaN matrix without secondary phase. The optical measurements showed that the band gap and optical constants changed very slightly by the implantation. Photoluminescence measurements showed emission spectra similar to p-type GaN for all samples. Magnetic investigations with a superconducting quantum interference device identified magnetic ordering for Sm dose of and above 1?×?10{sup 15?}cm{sup ?2} before thermal annealing, while ferromagnetism was only observed after thermal annealing from the sample with highest Sm dose. The long-range magnetic ordering can be attributed to interaction of Sm ions through the implantation-induced Ga vacancy.

  6. Multicycle rapid thermal annealing optimization of Mg-implanted GaN: Evolution of surface, optical, and structural properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenlee, Jordan D., E-mail: jordan.greenlee.ctr@nrl.navy.mil [National Research Council, 500 Fifth St. NW, Washington, DC 20001 (United States); Feigelson, Boris N.; Anderson, Travis J.; Hite, Jennifer K.; Mastro, Michael A.; Eddy, Charles R.; Hobart, Karl D.; Kub, Francis J. [Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Tadjer, Marko J. [American Society for Engineering Education, 1818 N St. NW, Washington, DC 20036 (United States)

    2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The first step of a multi-cycle rapid thermal annealing process was systematically studied. The surface, structure, and optical properties of Mg implanted GaN thin films annealed at temperatures ranging from 900 to 1200?°C were investigated by Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence, UV-visible spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and Nomarski microscopy. The GaN thin films are capped with two layers of in-situ metal organic chemical vapor deposition -grown AlN and annealed in 24 bar of N{sub 2} overpressure to avoid GaN decomposition. The crystal quality of the GaN improves with increasing annealing temperature as confirmed by UV-visible spectroscopy and the full widths at half maximums of the E{sub 2} and A{sub 1} (LO) Raman modes. The crystal quality of films annealed above 1100?°C exceeds the quality of the as-grown films. At 1200?°C, Mg is optically activated, which is determined by photoluminescence measurements. However, at 1200?°C, the GaN begins to decompose as evidenced by pit formation on the surface of the samples. Therefore, it was determined that the optimal temperature for the first step in a multi-cycle rapid thermal anneal process should be conducted at 1150?°C due to crystal quality and surface morphology considerations.

  7. Structural, Optical and Electrical Properties of PbSe Nanocrystal Solids Treated Thermally or with Simple Amines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Law, M.; Luther, J. M.; Song, Q.; Hughes, B. K.; Perkins, C. L.; Nozik, A. J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the structural, optical, and electrical properties of films of spin-cast, oleate-capped PbSe nanocrystals that are treated thermally or chemically in solutions of hydrazine, methylamine, or pyridine to produce electronically coupled nanocrystal solids. Postdeposition heat treatments trigger nanocrystal sintering at {approx}200 C, before a substantial fraction of the oleate capping group evaporates or pyrolyzes. The sintered nanocrystal films have a large hole density and are highly conductive. Most of the amine treatments preserve the size of the nanocrystals and remove much of the oleate, decreasing the separation between nanocrystals and yielding conductive films. X-ray scattering, X-ray photoelectron and optical spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and field-effect transistor electrical measurements are used to compare the impact of these chemical treatments. We find that the concentration of amines adsorbed to the NC films is very low in all cases. Treatments in hydrazine in acetonitrile remove only 2-7% of the oleate yet result in high-mobility n-type transistors. In contrast, ethanol-based hydrazine treatments remove 85-90% of the original oleate load. Treatments in pure ethanol strip 20% of the oleate and create conductive p-type transistors. Methylamine- and pyridine-treated films are also p-type. These chemically treated films oxidize rapidly in air to yield, after short air exposures, highly conductive p-type nanocrystal solids. Our results aid in the rational development of solar cells based on colloidal nanocrystal films.

  8. Light Scattering by Ice Crystals and Mineral Dust Aerosols in the Atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bi, Lei

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling the single-scattering properties of nonspherical particles in the atmo¬sphere (in particular, ice crystals and dust aerosols) has important applications to climate and remote sensing studies. The ?rst part of the dissertation (Chapters II...

  9. High-Resolution Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Chemical Characterization of Organic Aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Roach, Patrick J.; Slysz, Gordon W.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Nizkorodov, Serguei; Bones, David L.; Nguyen, Lucas

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterization of the chemical composition and chemical transformations of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is both a major challenge and the area of greatest uncertainty in current aerosol research. This study presents the first application of desorption electrospray ionization combined with high-resolution mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) for detailed chemical characterization and studies of chemical aging of OA collected on Teflon substrates. DESI-MS offers unique advantages both for detailed characterization of chemically labile components in OA that cannot be detected using more traditional electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and for studying chemical aging of OA. DESI-MS enables rapid characterization of OA samples collected on substrates by eliminating the sample preparation stage. In addition, it enables detection and structural characterization of chemically labile molecules in OA samples by minimizing the residence time of analyte in the solvent. SOA produced by the ozonolysis of limonene (LSOA) was allowed to react with gaseous ammonia. Chemical aging resulted in measurable changes in the optical properties of LSOA observed using UV- visible spectroscopy. DESI-MS combined with tandem mass spectrometry experiments (MS/MS) enabled identification of species in aged LSOA responsible for absorption of the visible light. Detailed analysis of the experimental data allowed us to identify chemical changes induced by reactions of LSOA constituents with ammonia and distinguish between different mechanisms of chemical aging.

  10. Aerosol mass spectrometry systems and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fergenson, David P.; Gard, Eric E.

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A system according to one embodiment includes a particle accelerator that directs a succession of polydisperse aerosol particles along a predetermined particle path; multiple tracking lasers for generating beams of light across the particle path; an optical detector positioned adjacent the particle path for detecting impingement of the beams of light on individual particles; a desorption laser for generating a beam of desorbing light across the particle path about coaxial with a beam of light produced by one of the tracking lasers; and a controller, responsive to detection of a signal produced by the optical detector, that controls the desorption laser to generate the beam of desorbing light. Additional systems and methods are also disclosed.

  11. Soot particle aerosol dynamics at high pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, S.J. (General Motors Research Labs., Warren, MI (USA). Physics Dept.); Kennedy, I.M. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have used detailed calculations to analyze the coagulation dynamics of a soot aerosol at high pressures (20 and 50 atm). They find that the soot size distribution is altered compared to lower-pressure conditions because the mean free path at high pressures is reduced to the point that the particles are similar in size to the mean free path. At lower pressures the form of the size distribution becomes constant (self-preserving) in time, allowing optical measurements to be easily interpreted. However, the authors find that at pressures above about 5 atm the shape of the size distribution continually changes. As a result, proper and accurate interpretation of optical data at high pressures is more difficult than at lower pressures.

  12. Low-temperature Bessel beam trap for single submicrometer aerosol particle studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Jessica W.; Chasovskikh, Egor; Stapfer, David [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, ETH Zürich, Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 2, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Isenor, Merrill; Signorell, Ruth [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, ETH Zürich, Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 2, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Department of Chemistry, University of British Columbia, 2036 Main Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z1 (Canada)

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a new instrument for single aerosol particle studies at low temperatures that combines an optical trap consisting of two counter-propagating Bessel beams (CPBBs) and temperature control down to 223 K (?50?°C). The apparatus is capable of capturing and stably trapping individual submicrometer- to micrometer-sized aerosol particles for up to several hours. First results from studies of hexadecane, dodecane, and water aerosols reveal that we can trap and freeze supercooled droplets ranging in size from ?450 nm to 5500 nm (radius). We have conducted homogeneous and heterogeneous freezing experiments, freezing-melting cycles, and evaporation studies. To our knowledge, this is the first reported observation of the freezing process for levitated single submicrometer-sized droplets in air using optical trapping techniques. These results show that a temperature-controlled CPBB trap is an attractive new method for studying phase transitions of individual submicrometer aerosol particles.

  13. Structural and optical properties of self-assembled chains of plasmonic nanocubes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Klinkova, Anna [Univ., of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Gang, Oleg [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Therien-Aubin, Heloise [Univ., of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ahmed, Aftab [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Nykypanchuk, Dmytro [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Choueiri, Rachelle M. [Univ., of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Gagnon, Brandon [Univ., of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Muntyanu, Anastasiya [Univ., of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Walker, Gilbert C. [Univ., of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Kumacheva, Eugenia [Univ., of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Solution-based linear self-assembly of metal nanoparticles offers a powerful strategy for creating plasmonic polymers, which, so far, have been formed from spherical nanoparticles and nanorods. Here, we report linear solution-based self-assembly of metal nanocubes (NCs), examine the structural characteristics of the NC chains and demonstrate their advanced optical characteristics. Predominant face-to-face assembly of large NCs coated with short polymer ligands led to a larger volume of hot spots in the chains, a nearly uniform E-field enhancement in the gaps between co-linear NCs and a new coupling mode for NC chains, in comparison with chains of nanospheres with similar dimensions, composition and surface chemistry. The NC chains exhibited a stronger surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signal, in comparison with linear assemblies of nanospheres. The experimental results were in agreement with finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations.

  14. Structural and optical properties of self-assembled chains of plasmonic nanocubes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Klinkova, Anna; Gang, Oleg; Therien-Aubin, Heloise; Ahmed, Aftab; Nykypanchuk, Dmytro; Choueiri, Rachelle M.; Gagnon, Brandon; Muntyanu, Anastasiya; Walker, Gilbert C.; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2014-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Solution-based linear self-assembly of metal nanoparticles offers a powerful strategy for creating plasmonic polymers, which, so far, have been formed from spherical nanoparticles and nanorods. Here, we report linear solution-based self-assembly of metal nanocubes (NCs), examine the structural characteristics of the NC chains and demonstrate their advanced optical characteristics. Predominant face-to-face assembly of large NCs coated with short polymer ligands led to a larger volume of hot spots in the chains, a nearly uniform E-field enhancement in the gaps between co-linear NCs and a new coupling mode for NC chains, in comparison with chains of nanospheres with similar dimensions, compositionmore »and surface chemistry. The NC chains exhibited a stronger surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signal, in comparison with linear assemblies of nanospheres. The experimental results were in agreement with finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations.« less

  15. Synthesis, growth, structure determination and optical properties of chalcone derivative single crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karthi, S., E-mail: girijaeaswaradas@gmail.com; Girija, E. K., E-mail: girijaeaswaradas@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Periyar University, Salem - 636011 (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Acquiring large nonlinear optical (NLO) efficient organic material is essential for the development of optoelectronics and photonic devices. Chalcone is the donor - ? - acceptor - ? - donor (D-?-A-?-D) type conjugated molecule with appreciable hyperpolarizability of potential interest in NLO applications. The addition of vinyl and electron donor groups in the chalcone molecule may enhance the second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency. Here we report the synthesis, crystal growth and characterization of a chalcone derivative 1-(4-methylphenyl)-5-(4-methoxyphenyl)-penta-2,4-dien-1-one (MPMPP). The MPMPP crystal was grown by slow evaporation solution growth technique from acetone. The grown crystal structure was studied by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The SHG efficiency of the grown crystal was determined by Kurtz and Perry method.

  16. Nonlinear-optical and structural properties of nanocrystalline silicon carbide films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodyn, M. S.; Volkov, V. I., E-mail: volkov@iop.kiev.ua; Lyakhovetskii, V. R.; Rudenko, V. I. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Institute of Physics (Ukraine); Puzilkov, V. M.; Semenov, A. V. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Institute of Monocrystals (Ukraine)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this study is to investigate the nonlinearity of refraction in nanostructured silicon carbide films depending on their structural features (synthesis conditions for such films, substrate temperature during their deposition, concentration of the crystalline phase in the film, Si/C ratio of atomic concentrations in the film, and size of SiC nanocrystals formed in the film). The corresponding dependences are obtained, as well as the values of nonlinear-optical third-order susceptibility {chi}{sup (3)}({omega}; {omega}, -{omega}, {omega}) for various silicon polytypes (3C, 21R, and 27R) which exceed the value of {chi}{sup (3)} in bulk silicon carbide single crystals by four orders of magnitude.

  17. Ab initio structural, electronic and optical properties of orthorhombic CaGeO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henriques, J.M. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica e Experimental, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-900 Natal, Rio Grande do Norte (Brazil); Caetano, E.W.S. [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica do Ceara, Avenida 13 de Maio, 2081, Benfica, 60040-531 Fortaleza, Ceara (Brazil)], E-mail: ewcaetano@gmail.com; Freire, V.N. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, Centro de Ciencias, Caixa Postal 6030, Campus do Pici, 60455-760 Fortaleza, Ceara (Brazil); Costa, J.A.P. da [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, Centro de Ciencias, Caixa Postal 6030, Campus do Pici, 60455-760 Fortaleza, Ceara (Brazil); Albuquerque, E.L. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica e Experimental, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-900 Natal, Rio Grande do Norte (Brazil)

    2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Orthorhombic CaGeO{sub 3} is studied using density-functional theory (DFT) considering both the local density and generalized gradient approximations, LDA and GGA, respectively. The electronic band structure, density of states, dielectric function and optical absorption are calculated. Two very close indirect (S->{gamma}) and direct ({gamma}->{gamma}) band gap energies of 1.68eV (2.31eV) and 1.75eV (2.41eV) were obtained within the GGA (LDA) approximation, as well as the effective masses for electrons and holes. Comparing with orthorhombic CaCO{sub 3} (aragonite), the substitution of carbon by germanium changes the localization of the valence band maximum of the indirect transition, and decreases by almost 2.0eV the Kohn-Sham band gap energies.

  18. UV Degradation of the Optical Properties of Acrylic for Neutrino and Dark Matter Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryce Littlejohn; K. M. Heeger; T. Wise; E. Gettrust; M. Lyman

    2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    UV-transmitting (UVT) acrylic is a commonly used light-propagating material in neutrino and dark matter detectors as it has low intrinsic radioactivity and exhibits low absorption in the detectors' light producing regions, from 350 nm to 500 nm. Degradation of optical transmittance in this region lowers light yields in the detector, which can affect energy reconstruction, resolution, and experimental sensitivities. We examine transmittance loss as a result of short- and long-term UV exposure for a variety of UVT acrylic samples from a number of acrylic manufacturers. Significant degradation peaking at 343 nm was observed in some UVT acrylics with as little as three hours of direct sunlight, while others exhibited softer degradation peaking at 310 nm over many days of exposure to sunlight. Based on their measured degradation results, safe time limits for indoor and outdoor UV exposure of UVT acrylic are formulated.

  19. Effect of Mn Concentration on the Structural, optical and Magnetic Properties of GaMnN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thaler, G.; Frazier, R.; Gila, B.; Stapleton, J.; Davidson, M.; Abernathy, C.R.; Pearton, S.J.; Segre, C.U. (IIT); (Florida)

    2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The room temperature magnetization of GaMnN films grown by molecular beam epitaxy on (0001) sapphire substrates with Mn concentrations varying from 0 to 9 at. % was found to depend on Mn concentration, with a maximum magnetization found at -3 at. % Mn. High-resolution x-ray diffraction measurements show that the c-plane lattice constant initially decreases with increasing Mn concentration, then increases when the Mn content increases above -3 at. %. This increase is accompanied by a decrease in the full width at half maximum of the rocking curves. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure results indicate that the nonsubstitutional Mn is not present in the form of Ga{sub x}Mn{sub y} clusters and thus is most likely present in the form of an interstitial. Optical absorption measurements show only a slight increase in the band gap for material with 3 at. % Mn, relative to undoped GaN.

  20. Optical properties of Pr-doped BaY{sub 2}F{sub 8}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrade, Adriano B., E-mail: abandrade1@gmail.com; Mello, Ana C. S. de; Valerio, Mário E. G. [Physics Department, Federal University of Sergipe, 49100-000 São Cristovão, SE (Brazil); Rezende, Marcos V. dos S. [Physics Department, Federal University of Sergipe, 49500-000 Itabaiana, SE (Brazil); Baldochi, Sonia L. [IPEN-CNEN/SP, CEP 11049, 05422-970 São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Crystalline samples of Pr-doped BaY{sub 2}F{sub 8} (BaYF) were prepared by zone melting technique. The pure phase obtained was identified by X-ray diffraction measurement. Optical absorption result was evaluated and it showed that the formation of the absorption bands can be connected to color centers generated by radiation in the matrix. Radioluminescence emission measurements after excitation by X-ray showed that the material exhibited components responsible for long lasting phosphorescence. Short decay times were also evaluated, the measurements showed a fast component around 70?ns associated to the 4f{sup 1}5d{sup 1} ? 4f{sup 2} transition of the Pr{sup 3+} ion. The Thermoluminescence (TL) results indicate the presence of two trapping centers.

  1. Structural and optical properties of Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanocrystals in glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, Rakesh K., E-mail: mishrarake@gmail.com; Kashyap, Raman, E-mail: mishrarake@gmail.com; Vedeshwar, A. G., E-mail: mishrarake@gmail.com; Tandon, R. P., E-mail: mishrarake@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 1-10007 (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work conventional solid state precipitation method is adopted to fabricate Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanocrystals in glass. The glass composition is optimized for proper host glass matrix to grow antimony trisulphide semiconductor quantum dots. The dot size is modified by heat treatment of glass samples in the temperature range from 550°C to 700°C for various time durations. Structural studies are carried out by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy and nanoparticles with size ranges from 8 nm to 70 nm are obtained. Quantum dots so grown were further characterized by optical absorption spectroscopy and a blue shift is observed for absorption edge energy that conform the quantum confinement effect.

  2. Optical and magneto-optical properties of single crystals of RFe{sub 2} (R = Gd, Tb, Ho, and Lu) and GdCo{sub 2} intermetallic compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.J.

    1999-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The author has studied the diagonal and off-diagonal optical conductivity of RFe{sub 2}(R = Gd, Tb, Ho, Lu) and GdCo{sub 2} single crystals grown by the flux method. Using spectroscopic ellipsometry the author has measured the dielectric function from 1.5 to 5.5 eV. The magneto-optical Kerr spectrometer at temperatures between 7 and 295 K and applied magnetic fields between 0.5 to 1.6 T. The apparatus and calibration method are described in detail. Using magneto-optical data and optical constants he derives the experimental value of the off-diagonal conductivity components. Theoretical calculations of optical conductivities and magneto-optical parameters were performed using the tight binding-linear muffin tin orbitals method within the local spin density approximation. He applied this TB-LMTO method to LuFe{sub 2}. The theoretical results obtained agree well with the experimental data. The oxidation effects on the diagonal part of the optical conductivity were considered using a three-phase model. The oxidation effects on the magneto-optical parameters were also considered by treating the oxide layer as a nonmagnetic thin transparent layer. These corrections change not only the magnitude but also the shape of the optical conductivity and the magneto-optical parameters.

  3. TROPOSPHERIC AEROSOL PROGRAM, PROGRAM PLAN, MARCH 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SCHWARTZ,S.E.; LUNN,P.

    2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of Tropospheric Aerosol Program (TAP) will be to develop the fundamental scientific understanding required to construct tools for simulating the life cycle of tropospheric aerosols--the processes controlling their mass loading, composition, and microphysical properties, all as a function of time, location, and altitude. The TAP approach to achieving this goal will be by conducting closely linked field, modeling, laboratory, and theoretical studies focused on the processes controlling formation, growth, transport, and deposition of tropospheric aerosols. This understanding will be represented in models suitable for describing these processes on a variety of geographical scales; evaluation of these models will be a key component of TAP field activities. In carrying out these tasks TAP will work closely with other programs in DOE and in other Federal and state agencies, and with the private sector. A forum to directly work with our counterparts in industry to ensure that the results of this research are translated into products that are useful to that community will be provided by NARSTO (formerly the North American Research Strategy on Tropospheric Ozone), a public/private partnership, whose membership spans government, the utilities, industry, and university researchers in Mexico, the US, and Canada.

  4. Aerosols and their influence on radiation partitioning and savanna productivity in northern Australia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanniah, K. D.; Beringer, J.; Tapper, N. J.; Long, Charles N.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the effect of aerosols and clouds on the Net Ecosystem Productivity (NEP) of savannas in northern Australia using aerosol optical depth, clouds and radiation data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site in Darwin and carbon flux data measured from eddy covariance techniques from a site at Howard Springs, 35km southeast of Darwin. Generally we found that the concentration of aerosols in this region was relatively low than observed at other sites, therefore the proportion of diffuse radiation reaching the earths surface was only ~ 30%. As a result, we observed only a modest change in carbon uptake under aerosol laden skies and there was no significant difference for dry season Radiation Use Efficiency (RUE) between clear sky, aerosols or thin clouds. On the other hand thick clouds in the wet season produce much more diffuse radiation than aerosols or thin clouds and therefore the initial canopy quantum efficiency was seen to increase 45 and 2.5 times more than under thin clouds and aerosols respectively. The normalized carbon uptake under thick clouds is 57% and 50% higher than under aerosols and thin clouds respectively even though the total irradiance received under thick clouds was reduced 59% and 50% than under aerosols and thin clouds respectively. However, reduction in total irradiance decreases the mean absolute carbon uptake as much as 22% under heavy cloud cover compared to thin clouds or aerosols. Thus, any increase in aerosol concentration or cloud cover that can enhance the diffuse component may have large impacts on productivity in this region.

  5. AT772, Fall 2007 Aerosol Chemistry and Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Relevant program August 22 W 1 Introduction Aerosol size distributions Properties of lognormal distributions Fitting model size distribution functions to data [Other functions (e.g., gamma, power law)] 8 distribution 29 W Extra 1/2 31 3b 4 Overview, continued Time scales for diffusion, coagulation, condensational

  6. 6, 75197562, 2006 Simulating aerosol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , particle number concentration and aerosol size-distribution. The model takes into account sulfate (SO4. This model system enables explicit simulations of the particle number concentration and size-distribution of aerosol dynamical processes (nucleation, condensation, coagulation) is evaluated by comparison

  7. 7, 37193761, 2007 Aerosol indirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    effects and is defined as the difference in the top-of-the-atmosphere net radiation be- tween present when either a statistical cloud cover scheme or a different aerosol emission inventory are employed. 1ACPD 7, 3719­3761, 2007 Aerosol indirect effects in ECHAM5-HAM U. Lohmann et al. Title Page

  8. 7, 1268712714, 2007 Aerosols' influence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    in the polluted cloud is due to a more efficient collection process. 1 Introduction10 The effect of aerosol). Numerous studies have addressed the effect of aerosol on marine stratocumulus clouds, due to their key role in the global radiative energy. Marine stratocumuli, bounded by strong marine boundary layer inversion, have

  9. Synthesis and optical properties of CsC1-doped gallium-sodium-sulfide glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hehlen, Markus P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bennett, Bryan L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Williams, Darrick J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Muenchausen, Ross E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Castro, Alonso [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tornga, Stephanie C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ga{sub 2}S{sub 3}-Na{sub 2}S (GNS) glasses doped with CsCl were synthesized in open crucibles under inert atmosphere. The evaporative loss of CsCl during glass melting was measured by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and corrected for by biasing the CsCl concentration in the mixture of starting materials to obtain glasses with accurately controlled stoichiometry. Glass transition temperatures, refractive index dispersions, and band edge energies were measured for four GNS:CsCl glasses, and the respective values were found to significantly improve over earlier studies that did not mitigate CsCl evaporative losses. The refractive index dispersion measurements indicate that the Cs{sup +} and Cl{sup -} radii are 16% larger in GNS:CsCl glass than in bulk crystalline CsCl. The band edge energy increases from 2.97 eV in GNS glass to 3.32 eV in GNS glass doped with 20 mol% CsCl as a result of introducing Cl{sup -} ions having a large optical electronegativity. The large bandgap of 3.32 eV and the low (450 cm{sup -1}) phonon energy make GNS:20%CsCl an attractive host material for rare-earth ions with radiative transitions in the near ultra-violet, visible, and near-infrared spectral regions.

  10. The Electric and Optical Properties of Doped Small Molecular Organic Light-Emitting Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwang-Ohk Cheon

    2003-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) constitute a new and exciting emissive display technology. In general, the basic OLED structure consists of a stack of fluorescent organic layers sandwiched between a transparent conducting-anode and metallic cathode. When an appropriate bias is applied to the device, holes are injected from the anode and electrons from the cathode; some of the recombination events between the holes and electrons result in electroluminescence (EL). Until now, most of the efforts in developing OLEDs have focused on display applications, hence on devices within the visible range. However some organic devices have been developed for ultraviolet or infrared emission. Various aspects of the device physics of doped small molecular OLEDs were described and discussed. The doping layer thickness and concentration were varied systematically to study their effects on device performances, energy transfer, and turn-off dynamics. Low-energy-gap DCM2 guest molecules, in either {alpha}-NPD or DPVBi host layers, are optically efficient fluorophores but also generate deep carrier trap-sites. Since their traps reduce the carrier mobility, the current density decreases with increased doping concentration. At the same time, due to efficient energy transfer, the quantum efficiency of the devices is improved by light doping or thin doping thickness, in comparison with the undoped neat devices. However, heavy doping induces concentration quenching effects. Thus, the doping concentration and doping thickness may be optimized for best performance.

  11. Synthesis and optical properties of quantum-size metal sulfide particles in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nedeljkovic, J.M.; Patel, R.C.; Kaufman, P.; Joyce-Pruden, C.; O'Leary, N. (Clarkson Univ., Potsdam, NY (United States))

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past decade, small-particle' research has become quite popular in various fields of chemistry and physics. The recognition of quantum-size effects in very small colloidal particles has led to renewed interest in this area. Small particles' are clusters of atoms or molecules ranging in size from 1 nm to almost 10 nm or having agglomeration numbers from 10 up to a few hundred. In other words, small particles fall in size between single atoms or molecules and bulk materials. The agglomeration number specifies the number of individual atoms or molecules in a given cluster. The research in this area is interdisciplinary, and it links colloidal science and molecular chemistry. The symbiosis of these two areas of research has revealed some intriguing characteristics of small particles. This experiment illustrates the following: simple colloidal techniques for the preparation of two different types of quantum-size metal sulfide particles; the blue shift of the measured optical absorption spectra when the particle size is decreased in the quantum-size regime; and use of a simple quantum mechanical model to calculate the particle size from the absorption onset measured for CdS.

  12. Aerosol Science and Technology, 42:115, 2008 Copyright c American Association for Aerosol Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aerosol Science and Technology, 42:1­15, 2008 Copyright c American Association for Aerosol Research of a Fast-Response Aerosol Size Spectrometer Jason S. Olfert and Jian Wang Atmospheric Science Department by the mixing of the aerosol in the inlet of the instrument, which `smears' the detected aerosol over a range

  13. The effect of aging on smoke optical properties and scavenging characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penner, J.E.

    1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aging of smoke in dense smoke plumes is known to alter its size distribution and scavenging characteristics. In this paper, I review data pertaining to these processes and compare them to model simulations of the coagulation of smoke. Model simulations of the degree of smoke coagulation in the first few days after a nuclear war are summarized. The predicted size of smoke particles after several days of coagulation is found to be larger than that of any data pertaining to the absorption properties of smoke. Thus, it is suggested that more relevant data on the absorption properties of smoke is needed. I also review aging experiments pertaining to the number of cloud condensation nuclei in a smoke sample. I show that the fraction of smoke particles which act as CCN after aging depends on the number of particles initially present in the aging chamber. Smoke from an acetylene flame can quickly coagulate to sizes wherein nearly all of the particles act as CCN. On the other hand, only 10% of the smoke particles from an outdoor fire of gasoline and diesel fuel became CCN after 30 hours of aging. The development of CCN concentrations in this experiment may have been quenched by low initial concentrations in the aging chamber. Both experiments are consistent with particles as small as 0.08 micron in radius (and perhaps even smaller) acting as CCN. Model simulations of the coagulation of smoke particles above a large, intense fire show that coagulation would allow approximately 50% of the particles to become larger than 0.08 micron before the plume reaches cloud base. Furthermore, aging over several days time would transform nearly all the particles into the scavengable size range.

  14. The Nearby Supernova Factory Ozone + Aerosol + Rayleigh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rayleigh + Aerosol Extinction monitor filter Auxiliary Camera CCD Spectrograph picko ff mirror Umbra

  15. Structural, thermal, optical properties and simulation of white light of titanium-tungstate-tellurite glasses doped with dysprosium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jyothi, L. [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India); Upender, G. [Glass Science and Technology Section, Glass Division, CSIR-CGCRI, Kolkata 700032 (India); Kuladeep, R. [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India); Rao, D. Narayana, E-mail: dnrsp@uohyd.ernet.in [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India)

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: CIE coordinate diagram of different concentrations of the Dy{sup 3+}-doped TTWD glasses with coordinates in the white light region. - Highlights: • Radiative lifetime of {sup 4}F{sub 9/2} level of Dy{sup 3+} ions is longer in the tellurite glass. • Quantum efficiency is found to be high. • These glasses are suitable materials for generating white light. - Abstract: Structural, thermal, optical properties and simulation of white light of Dy{sup 3+}-doped tellurite glasses of composition TTWD: (75 ? x)TeO{sub 2} ? 10TiO{sub 2} ? 15WO{sub 3} ? xDy{sub 2}O{sub 3} (x = 0, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mol%) were investigated. Raman spectra revealed that the glass contains TeO{sub 4}, TeO{sub 3}, WO{sub 4} and WO{sub 6} units. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements were carried out to measure the glass transition temperature of all the glasses. From the optical absorption spectra, luminescence spectra and using the Judd–Ofelt (JO) analysis, we estimated the radiative transition probabilities, emission cross-sections, branching ratios and radiative lifetimes. The decay curves at lower concentrations are exponential while they show a non-exponential behavior at higher concentrations (?0.5 mol%) due to energy transfer processes. The effective lifetime for the {sup 4}F{sub 9/2} level decreases with increase in Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentration for the glasses under investigation. The non-exponential decay curves could fit well to the Inokuti–Hirayama (IH) model with S = 6, indicating that the nature of interaction responsible for energy transfer is of dipole–dipole type. Simulation of white light is examined with varying concentration and the results indicate that these glasses are suitable for white light emitting diode applications.

  16. The Soft X-Ray Properties of a Complete Sample of Optically Selected Quasars II. Final Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari Laor; Fabrizio Fiore; Martin Elvis; Belinda J. Wilkes; Jonathan C. McDowell

    1996-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the final results of a ROSAT PSPC program to study the soft X-ray emission properties of a complete sample of low $z$ quasars. The main results are: 1. There is no evidence for significant soft excess emission or excess foreground absorption by cold gas in 22 of the 23 quasars. 2. The mean 0.2-2 keV continuum of quasars agrees remarkably well with an extrapolation of the mean 1050-350A continuum recently determined by Zheng et al. (1996), indicating that there is no steep soft component below 0.2 keV. 3. The occurrence of warm absorbers in quasars is rather rare, in sharp contrast to lower luminosity AGN. 4. The strongest correlation found is between the spectral slope, alpha_x, and the Hb FWHM. This remarkably strong correlation may result from a dependence of alpha_x on L/L_Edd, as seen in Galactic black hole candidates. 5. There appears to exist a distinct class of ``X-ray weak'' quasars. These may be quasars where the direct X-ray source is obscured, and only scattered X-rays are observed. 6. Thin accretion disk models cannot reproduce the observed optical to soft X-ray spectral shape. An as yet unknown physical mechanism maintains a strong correlation between the optical and soft X-ray emission. 7. The well known difference in alpha_x between radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars may be due only to their different Hb FWHM. 8. The agreement of the 21 cm and X-ray columns implies that He in the diffuse H II component of the Galactic ISM is ionized to He II or He III (shortened abstract).

  17. Soft ionization of thermally evaporated hypergolic ionic liquid aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koh, Christine J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    + ][Dca ? ]. Figure 2. Aerosol particle size distribution ofhypergolic ionic liquid aerosols Christine J. Koh † , Chen-ionization of evaporated IL aerosols Isolated ion pairs of a

  18. Amine-Amine Exchange in Aminium-Methanesulfonate Aerosols. |...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Amine-Amine Exchange in Aminium-Methanesulfonate Aerosols. Amine-Amine Exchange in Aminium-Methanesulfonate Aerosols. Abstract: Aerosol particles are ubiquitous in the atmosphere...

  19. Effect of Hydrophobic Primary Organic Aerosols on Secondary Organic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrophobic Primary Organic Aerosols on Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation from Ozonolysis of ?-Pinene. Effect of Hydrophobic Primary Organic Aerosols on Secondary Organic...

  20. Mexico City Aerosol Analysis during MILAGRO using High Resolution...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2: Mexico City Aerosol Analysis during MILAGRO using High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometry at the Urban Supersite (T0). Part 2: Abstract: Submicron aerosol was analyzed during...

  1. Mexico City Aerosol Analysis during MILAGRO using High Resolution...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1: Mexico City Aerosol Analysis during MILAGRO using High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometry at the Urban Supersite (T0). Part 1: Abstract: Submicron aerosol was analyzed during...

  2. aerosol particles collected: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Saller 2002-05-07 6 Nanomaterials from Aerosols Aerosols are suspensions of liquid or solid particles in a gas. Aerosol particles Materials Science Websites Summary: being clouds...

  3. Research on the electronic and optical properties of polymer and other organic molecular thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main goal of the work is to find materials and methods of optimization of organic layered electroluminescent cells and to study such properties of polymers and other organic materials that can be used in various opto-electronic devices. The summary of results obtained during the first year of work is presented. They are: (1) the possibility to produce electroluminescent cells using a vacuum deposition photoresist technology for commercial photoresists has been demonstrated; (2) the idea to replace the polyaryl polymers by other polymers with weaker hole conductivity for optimization of electroluminescent cells with ITO-Al electrodes has been suggested. The goal is to obtain amorphous processable thin films of radiative recombination layers in electroluminescent devices; (3) procedures of preparation of high-quality vacuum-deposited poly (p-phenylene) (PPP) films on various substrates have been developed; (4) it was found for the first time that the fluorescence intensity of PPP films depends on the degree of polymerization; (5) the role of interfaces between organic compounds, on one side, and metals or semiconductors, on the other side, has been studied and quenching of the fluorescence caused by semiconductor layer in thin sandwiches has been observed; (6) studies of the dynamics of photoexcitations revealed the exciton self-trapping in quasi-one-dimensional aggregates; and (7) conditions for preparation of highly crystalline fullerene C{sub 60} films by vacuum deposition have been found. Composites of C{sub 60} with conjugated polymers have been prepared.

  4. Synthesis and optical properties of cadmium selenide quantum dots for white light-emitting diode application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Xianmei; Wang, Yilin; Gule, Teri; Luo, Qiang [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guangxi University, Nanning 53000 (China); Zhou, Liya, E-mail: zhouliyatf@163.com [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guangxi University, Nanning 53000 (China); Gong, Fuzhong [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guangxi University, Nanning 53000 (China)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: ? Stable CdSe QDs were synthesized by the one-step and two-level process respectively. ? The fabricated white LEDs show good white balance. ? CdSe QDs present well green to yellow band luminescence. ? CdSe QDs displayed a broad excitation band. - Abstract: Yellow light-emitting cadmium selenide quantum dots were synthesized using one-step and two-step methods in an aqueous medium. The structural luminescent properties of these quantum dots were investigated. The obtained cadmium selenide quantum dots displayed a broad excitation band suitable for blue or near-ultraviolet light-emitting diode applications. White light-emitting diodes were fabricated by coating the cadmium selenide samples onto a 460 nm-emitting indium gallium nitrite chip. Both samples exhibited good white balance. Under a 20 mA working current, the white light-emitting diode fabricated via the one-step and two-step methods showed Commission Internationale de l’Éclairage coordinates at (0.27, 0.23) and (0.27, 0.33), respectively, and a color rendering index equal to 41 and 37, respectively. The one-step approach was simpler, greener, and more effective than the two-step approach. The one-step approach can be enhanced by combining cadmium selenide quantum dots with proper phosphors.

  5. Multi-object spectroscopy of low redshift EIS clusters. III. Properties of optically selected clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. F. Olsen; C. Benoist; L. da Costa; L. Hansen; H. E. Jorgensen

    2005-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We have carried out an investigation of the properties of low redshift EIS clusters using both spectroscopy and imaging data. We present new redshifts for 738 galaxies in 21 ESO Imaging Survey (EIS) Cluster fields. We use the ``gap''-technique to search for significant overdensities in redshift space and to identify groups/clusters of galaxies corresponding to the original EIS matched filter cluster candidates. In this way we spectroscopically confirm 20 of the 21 cluster candidates with a matched-filter estimated redshift z_MF=0.2. We have now obtained spectroscopic redshifts for 34 EIS cluster candidates with z_MF=0.2 (see also Hansen et al., 2002; Olsen et al., 2003). Of those we spectroscopically confirm 32 with redshifts ranging from z=0.064 to 0.283. We find that: 1) the velocity dispersions of the systems range from sigma_v<=130km/s to sigma_v=1200km/s, typical of galaxy groups to rich clusters; 2) richnesses corresponding to Abell classes R<=1; and 3) concentration indices ranging from C=0.2 to C=1.2. From the analysis of the colours of the galaxy populations we find that 53% of the spectroscopically confirmed systems have a ``significant'' red sequence. These systems are on average richer and have higher velocity dispersions. We find that the colour of the red sequence galaxies matches passive stellar evolution predictions.

  6. Optimal Estimation Retrieval Aerosol Microphysical Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    SAGE II Satellite Observations A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements or entirely insensitive. A successful retrieval algorithm must then be able (a) to fill the `blind spot functions. The three main parts of this thesis are (1) the development of the new OE retrieval algorithm, (2

  7. Emerging Technology for Measuring Atmospheric Aerosol Properties

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEAWater UseCElizabethTwo States CARLSBAD, N.M.,Emergingfor

  8. Role of ammonia chemistry and coarse mode aerosols in global climatological inorganic aerosol distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zender, Charles

    1 Role of ammonia chemistry and coarse mode aerosols in global climatological inorganic aerosol distributions Chao Luo1 , Charles S. Zender1 , Huisheng Bian2 , Swen Metzger3 Abstract We use an inorganic aerosol thermodynamic equilibrium model

  9. Evaluation of the aerosol indirect effect in marine stratocumulus clouds: Droplet number, size, liquid water path, and radiative impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Lynn

    Evaluation of the aerosol indirect effect in marine stratocumulus clouds: Droplet number, size stratocumulus clouds in the northeastern Pacific Ocean were analyzed to determine the effect of aerosol particles on cloud microphysical and radiative properties. Seven nighttime and two daytime cases were

  10. Transport of anthropogenic and biomass burning aerosols from Europe to the Arctic during spring 2008

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Marelle, L.; Raut, Jean-Christophe; Thomas, J. L.; Law, K. S.; Quennehen, Boris; Ancellet, G.; Pelon, J.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Fast, Jerome D.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the POLARCAT-France airborne campaign in April 2008, pollution originating from anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions was measured in the European Arctic. We compare these aircraft measurements with simulations using the WRF-Chem model to investigate model representation of aerosols transported from Europe to the Arctic. Modeled PM2.5 is evaluated using European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) measurements in source regions and POLARCAT aircraft measurements in the Scandinavian Arctic. Total PM2.5 agrees well with the measurements, although the model overestimates nitrate and underestimates organic carbon in source regions. Using WRF-Chem in combination with the Lagrangian model FLEXPART-WRF, we find that duringmore »the campaign the research aircraft sampled two different types of European plumes: mixed anthropogenic and fire plumes from eastern Europe and Russia transported below 2 km, and anthropogenic plumes from central Europe uplifted by warm conveyor belt circulations to 5–6 km. Both modeled plume types had undergone significant wet scavenging (> 50% PM10) during transport. Modeled aerosol vertical distributions and optical properties below the aircraft are evaluated in the Arctic using airborne lidar measurements. Model results show that the pollution event transported aerosols into the Arctic (> 66.6° N) for a 4-day period. During this 4-day period, biomass burning emissions have the strongest influence on concentrations between 2.5 and 3 km altitudes, while European anthropogenic emissions influence aerosols at both lower (~ 1.5 km) and higher altitudes (~ 4.5 km). As a proportion of PM2.5, modeled black carbon and SO4= concentrations are more enhanced near the surface in anthropogenic plumes. The European plumes sampled during the POLARCAT-France campaign were transported over the region of springtime snow cover in northern Scandinavia, where they had a significant local atmospheric warming effect. We find that, during this transport event, the average modeled top-of-atmosphere (TOA) shortwave direct and semi-direct radiative effect (DSRE) north of 60° N over snow and ice-covered surfaces reaches +0.58 W m?2, peaking at +3.3 W m?2 at noon over Scandinavia and Finland.« less

  11. Optical absorption and fluorescence properties of Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} codoped lead bismuth alumina borate glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goud, K. Krishna Murthy, E-mail: krishnamurthy.phy@gmail.com; Reddy, M. Chandra Shekhar, E-mail: krishnamurthy.phy@gmail.com; Rao, B. Appa, E-mail: krishnamurthy.phy@gmail.com [Dept. of Physics, Osmania University, Hyderabad-500007, Andhra Pradesh (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Lead bismuth alumina borate glasses codoped with Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} were prepared by melt quenching technique. Optical absorption, FTIR and photoluminescence spectra of these glasses have been studied. Judd-Ofelt theory has been applied to to the f ? f transitions for evaluating ?{sub 2}, ?{sub 4} and ?{sub 6} parameters. Radiative properties like branching ratio ?{sub r} and the radiative life time ?{sub R} have been determined on the basis of Judd-Ofelt theory. Upconversion emissions have been observed under 980nm laser excitation at room temperature. Green and red up-conversion emissions are centered at 530, 550 and 656 nm corresponding to {sup 2}H{sub 11/2}?{sup 4}I{sub 15/2}, {sup 4}S{sub 3/2}?{sup 4}I{sub 15/2} and {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}?{sup 4}I{sub 15/2} transitions of Er{sup 3+} respectively. The results obtained are discussed quantitatively based on the energy transfer between Yb{sup 3+} and Er{sup 3+}.

  12. Structural and optical properties of {beta}-FeSi{sub 2}/Si(100) prepared by laser ablation method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kakemoto, H.; Makita, Y.; Obara, A.; Tsai, Y.; Sakuragi, S.; Ando, S.; Tsukamoto, T.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    {beta}-FeSi{sub 2} is a promising material for the application of various electronic, optoelectronic and energy devices. The authors present here the semiconducting properties of {beta}-FeSi{sub 2} films on Si(100) substrate prepared by laser ablation method. Samples were grown using poly-crystalline bulk {beta}-FeSi{sub 2} prepared by horizontal gradient freeze method. For the monitoring of growth, in-situ observation of ablation plume was made through fluorescence spectroscopy. Reflection of high-energy electron beam diffraction (RHEED) was also made in-situ to see the surface morphology. Characterization of the films by X-ray diffraction presented purely {beta}(220) orientation. Raman scattering measurements at room temperature also indicated that the grown films are semiconducting {beta}-FeSi{sub 2}. Optical absorption spectra at room temperature showed absorption coefficient higher than 10{sup 5} cm{sup {minus}1} above the band-gap ({approximately}1.2 eV). It was revealed that high quality semiconducting {beta}-FeSi{sub 2} films can be fabricated by laser ablation method without post-annealing.

  13. Structural and optical properties of InGaN–GaN nanowire heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Limbach, F. [Institute of Bio- and Nanosystems (IBN-1), Research Centre Jülich GmbH and JARA-FIT Fundamentals of Future Information Technology (Germany); Gotschke, T. [Institute of Bio- and Nanosystems (IBN-1), Research Centre Jülich GmbH and JARA-FIT Fundamentals of Future Information Technology (Germany); Stoica, T. [Institute of Bio- and Nanosystems (IBN-1), Research Centre Jülich GmbH and JARA-FIT Fundamentals of Future Information Technology (Germany); Calarco, R. [Institute of Bio- and Nanosystems (IBN-1), Research Centre Jülich GmbH and JARA-FIT Fundamentals of Future Information Technology (Germany); Sutter, E. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Ciston, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Cusco, R. [Consell Superior d'Investigacions Cientifiques (CSIC), Barcelona (Spain); Artus, L. [Consell Superior d'Investigacions Cientifiques (CSIC), Barcelona (Spain); Kremling, S. [Univ. Wurzburg, Wilhelm Conrad Rontgen Research Centre Complex Matter Systems, Wurzburg (Germany); Hofling, S. [Univ. Wurzburg, Wilhelm Conrad Rontgen Research Centre Complex Matter Systems, Wurzburg (Germany); Worschech, L. [Univ. Wurzburg, Wilhelm Conrad Rontgen Research Centre Complex Matter Systems, Wurzburg (Germany); Grutzmacher, D. [Institute of Bio- and Nanosystems (IBN-1), Research Centre Jülich GmbH and JARA-FIT Fundamentals of Future Information Technology (Germany)

    2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    InGaN/GaN nanowire (NW) heterostructures grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy were studied in comparison to their GaN and InGaN counterparts. The InGaN/GaN heterostructure NWs are composed of a GaN NW, a thin InGaN shell, and a multifaceted InGaN cap wrapping the top part of the GaN NW. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images taken from different parts of a InGaN/GaN NW show a wurtzite structure of the GaN core and the epitaxial InGaN shell around it, while additional crystallographic domains are observed whithin the InGaN cap region. Large changes in the lattice parameter along the wire, from pure GaN to higher In concentration demonstrate the successful growth of a complex InGaN/GaN NW heterostructure. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of these heterostructure NW ensembles show rather broad and intense emission peak at 2.1 eV. However, ?-PL spectra measured on single NWs reveal a reduced broadening of the visible luminescence. The analysis of the longitudinal optical phonon Raman peak position and its shape reveal a variation in the In content between 20% and 30%, in agreement with the values estimated by PL and HRTEM investigations. The reported studies are important for understanding of the growth and properties of NW heterostructures suitable for applications in optoelectronics and photovoltaics.

  14. Structural, optical, and electrical properties of NiO-In composite films deposited by radio frequency cosputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Sheng-Chi, E-mail: chensc@mail.mcut.edu.tw; Wen, Chao-Kuang; Lin, Yu-Chin; Chen, Cong-Da [Department of Materials Engineering and Center for Thin Film Technologies and Applications, Ming Chi University of Technology, Taipei 243, Taiwan (China); Kuo, Tsung-Yen; Lin, Hsin-Chih [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In-doped NiO films with indium concentrations ranging from 0 to 30.3 at. % were deposited on glass substrates to investigate corresponding structural, optical, and electrical property variations. The x-ray diffraction patterns show that all films display only NiO peaks. When In atoms were added to NiO films, the NiO peaks shifted to lower angles, indicating that the lattice parameters of the films increased due to the larger In ions substituting for the smaller Ni ions. An electrical resistivity (?) too high to be measured occurred when the indium concentration in the NiO film was less than 15.6 at. %. The ? value dropped significantly to 0.06 ?·cm as the indium concentration increased to 26.9 at. %. Upon further raising the In to 30.3 at. %, the ? value decreased further to 0.01 ?·cm. All the In-doped NiO films showed n-type conduction. The transmittance of undoped NiO film is as high as 96%. On raising the indium concentration to 15.6, 19.9, 26.9, and 30.3 at. %, the transmittances decreased further to 68%, 62%, 57%, and 47%, respectively. Introducing higher In concentrations improved the films’ thermal stability of electrical resistivity.

  15. Chapter 3: Evaluating the impacts of carbonaceous aerosols on clouds and climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menon, Surabi; Del Genio, Anthony D.

    2007-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Any attempt to reconcile observed surface temperature changes within the last 150 years to changes simulated by climate models that include various atmospheric forcings is sensitive to the changes attributed to aerosols and aerosol-cloud-climate interactions, which are the main contributors that may well balance the positive forcings associated with greenhouse gases, absorbing aerosols, ozone related changes, etc. These aerosol effects on climate, from various modeling studies discussed in Menon (2004), range from +0.8 to -2.4 W m{sup -2}, with an implied value of -1.0 W m{sup -2} (range from -0.5 to -4.5 W m{sup -2}) for the aerosol indirect effects. Quantifying the contribution of aerosols and aerosol-cloud interactions remain complicated for several reasons some of which are related to aerosol distributions and some to the processes used to represent their effects on clouds. Aerosol effects on low lying marine stratocumulus clouds that cover much of the Earth's surface (about 70%) have been the focus of most of prior aerosol-cloud interaction effect simulations. Since cumulus clouds (shallow and deep convective) are short lived and cover about 15 to 20% of the Earth's surface, they are not usually considered as radiatively important. However, the large amount of latent heat released from convective towers, and corresponding changes in precipitation, especially in biomass regions due to convective heating effects (Graf et al. 2004), suggest that these cloud systems and aerosol effects on them, must be examined more closely. The radiative heating effects for mature deep convective systems can account for 10-30% of maximum latent heating effects and thus cannot be ignored (Jensen and Del Genio 2003). The first study that isolated the sensitivity of cumulus clouds to aerosols was from Nober et al. (2003) who found a reduction in precipitation in biomass burning regions and shifts in circulation patterns. Aerosol effects on convection have been included in other models as well (cf. Jacobson, 2002) but the relative impacts on convective and stratiform processes were not separated. Other changes to atmospheric stability and thermodynamical quantities due to aerosol absorption are also known to be important in modifying cloud macro/micro properties. Linkages between convection and boreal biomass burning can also impact the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, radiation and cloud microphysical properties via transport of tropospheric aerosols to the lower stratosphere during extreme convection (Fromm and Servranckx 2003). Relevant questions regarding the impact of biomass aerosols on convective cloud properties include the effects of vertical transport of aerosols, spatial and temporal distribution of rainfall, vertical shift in latent heat release, phase shift of precipitation, circulation and their impacts on radiation. Over land surfaces, a decrease in surface shortwave radiation ({approx} 3-6 W m{sup -2} per decade) has been observed between 1960 to 1990, whereas, increases of 0.4 K in land temperature during the same period that occurred have resulted in speculations that evaporation and precipitation should also have decreased (Wild et al. 2004). However, precipitation records for the same period over land do not indicate any significant trend (Beck et al. 2005). The changes in precipitation are thought to be related to increased moisture advection from the oceans (Wild et al. 2004), which may well have some contributions from aerosol-radiation-convection coupling that could modify circulation patterns and hence moisture advection in specific regions. Other important aspects of aerosol effects, besides the direct, semi-direct, microphysical and thermodynamical impacts include alteration of surface albedos, especially snow and ice covered surfaces, due to absorbing aerosols. These effects are uncertain (Jacobson, 2004) but may produce as much as 0.3 W m{sup -2} forcing in the Northern hemisphere that could contribute to melting of ice and permafrost and change in the length of the season (e.g. early arrival of Spring

  16. Microphysical Effects Determine Macrophysical Response for Aerosol Impacts on Deep Convective Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Chen, Qian; Li, Zhanqing; Zhang, Jinqiang; Yan, Hongru

    2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep convective clouds (DCCs) play a crucial role in the general circulation and energy and hydrological cycle of our climate system. Anthropogenic and natural aerosol particles can influence DCCs through changes in cloud properties, precipitation regimes, and radiation balance. Modeling studies have reported both invigoration and suppression of DCCs by aerosols, but none has fully quantified aerosol impacts on convection life cycle and radiative forcing. By conducting multiple month-long cloud-resolving simulations with spectral-bin cloud microphysics that capture the observed macro- and micro-physical properties of summer convective clouds in the tropics and mid-latitudes, this study provides the first comprehensive look at how aerosols affect cloud cover, cloud top height (CTH), and radiative forcing. Observations validate these simulation results. We find that microphysical aerosol effects contribute predominantly to increased cloud cover and CTH by inducing larger amount of smaller but longer lasting ice particles in the stratiform/anvils of DCCs with dynamical aerosol effects contributing at most ~ 1/4 of the total increase of cloud cover. The overall effect is a radiative warming in the atmosphere (3 to 5 W m-2) with strong surface cooling (-5 to -8 W m-2). Herein we clearly identified mechanisms more important than and additional to the invigoration effects hypothesized previously that explain the consistent signatures of increased cloud tops area and height by aerosols in DCCs revealed by observations.

  17. Aerosol penetration through transport lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dileep, V.R.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to predict aerosol penetration thrush shrouded probes and transition fitting('s. Experimnents were carried Out to validate the code. The experiments were carried out for different flow rates for a particle size of IO lam aerodynamic diameter (AD...

  18. 6, 55435583, 2006 Aerosol nucleation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    and cloud cover via the second indirect aerosol effect that would explain observed variations in global cloud cover. We esti- mate that the variation in radiative forcing resulting from a response of clouds

  19. Global observations of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graaf, Martin de

    Global observations of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols Martin de Graaf KNMI #12; Outline · Absorbing Aerosol Index - Theory · Absorbing Aerosol Index - Reality · Biomass burning and desert dust observations from GOME and SCIAMACHY · Conclusions and Outlook #12; · Absorbing Aerosol

  20. X-ray Vision for Aerosol Scientists: LCLS Snapshots of Soot (Narrated)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This short conceptual animation depicts how scientists can now simultaneously capture fractal morphology (structure), chemical composition and nanoscale imagery of individual aerosol particles in flight. These particles, known as "PM2.5" because they are smaller than 2.5 microns in diameter, affect climate by interacting with sunlight and impact human health by entering the lungs. The single LCLS laser pulses travel to the Atomic, Molecular and Optical Sciences (AMO) laboratory in the Near Experimental Hall. As we zoom in, we see deep inside a simplified aerosol inlet, where the complex fractal structure of the soot particles, each one completely unique, is shown. Individual soot particles are then delivered into the pulses of the LCLS beam, which destroys them. X-rays are scattered to the detector before the particle is destroyed, giving information about the morphology of the particle. Ion fragments released in the explosion are sent into a mass spectrometer, which measures their mass-to-charge ratio -- giving scientists information about the chemical composition of the particle. Many different particles are analyzed in this manner, allowing scientists to probe variations in the particles due to changes in their environment before being sent through the aerosol inlet. The final visual of aerosols emitted from a factory is representative of the goal that such LCLS aerosol dynamics experiments can provide critical feedback into modeling and understanding combustion, aerosol processes in manufacturing or aerosol effects on climate change.

  1. X-ray Vision for Aerosol Scientists: LCLS Snapshots of Soot (Narrated)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This short conceptual animation depicts how scientists can now simultaneously capture fractal morphology (structure), chemical composition and nanoscale imagery of individual aerosol particles in flight. These particles, known as "PM2.5" because they are smaller than 2.5 microns in diameter, affect climate by interacting with sunlight and impact human health by entering the lungs. The single LCLS laser pulses travel to the Atomic, Molecular and Optical Sciences (AMO) laboratory in the Near Experimental Hall. As we zoom in, we see deep inside a simplified aerosol inlet, where the complex fractal structure of the soot particles, each one completely unique, is shown. Individual soot particles are then delivered into the pulses of the LCLS beam, which destroys them. X-rays are scattered to the detector before the particle is destroyed, giving information about the morphology of the particle. Ion fragments released in the explosion are sent into a mass spectrometer, which measures their mass-to-charge ratio -- giving scientists information about the chemical composition of the particle. Many different particles are analyzed in this manner, allowing scientists to probe variations in the particles due to changes in their environment before being sent through the aerosol inlet. The final visual of aerosols emitted from a factory is representative of the goal that such LCLS aerosol dynamics experiments can provide critical feedback into modeling and understanding combustion, aerosol processes in manufacturing or aerosol effects on climate change.

  2. Method for producing monodisperse aerosols

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ortiz, Lawrence W. (Los Alamos, NM); Soderholm, Sidney C. (Pittsford, NY)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An aerosol generator is described which is capable of producing a monodisperse aerosol within narrow limits utilizing an aqueous solution capable of providing a high population of seed nuclei and an organic solution having a low vapor pressure. The two solutions are cold nebulized, mixed, vaporized, and cooled. During cooling, particles of the organic vapor condense onto the excess seed nuclei, and grow to a uniform particle size.

  3. Aerosols and clouds in chemical transport models and climate models.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lohmann,U.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2008-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Clouds exert major influences on both shortwave and longwave radiation as well as on the hydrological cycle. Accurate representation of clouds in climate models is a major unsolved problem because of high sensitivity of radiation and hydrology to cloud properties and processes, incomplete understanding of these processes, and the wide range of length scales over which these processes occur. Small changes in the amount, altitude, physical thickness, and/or microphysical properties of clouds due to human influences can exert changes in Earth's radiation budget that are comparable to the radiative forcing by anthropogenic greenhouse gases, thus either partly offsetting or enhancing the warming due to these gases. Because clouds form on aerosol particles, changes in the amount and/or composition of aerosols affect clouds in a variety of ways. The forcing of the radiation balance due to aerosol-cloud interactions (indirect aerosol effect) has large uncertainties because a variety of important processes are not well understood precluding their accurate representation in models.

  4. Aerosol tests conducted at Aberdeen Proving Grounds MD.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brockmann, John E.; Lucero, Daniel A.; Servantes, Brandon Lee; Hankins, Matthew Granholm

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Test data are reported that demonstrate the deposition from a spray dispersion system (Illinois Tool Works inductively charging rotary atomization nozzle) for application of decontamination solution to various surfaces in the passenger cabin of a Boeing 737 aircraft. The decontamination solution (EnviroTru) was tagged with a known concentration of fluorescein permitting determination of both airborne decontaminant concentration and surface deposited decontaminant solution so that the effective deposition rates and surface coverage could be determined and correlated with the amount of material sprayed. Six aerosol dispersion tests were conducted. In each test, aluminum foil deposition coupons were set out throughout the passenger area and the aerosol was dispersed. The aerosol concentration was measured with filter samplers as well as with optical techniques Average aerosol deposition ranged from 3 to 15 grams of decontamination solution per square meter. Some disagreement was observed between various instruments utilizing different measurement principles. These results demonstrate a potentially effective method to disperse decontaminant to interior surfaces of a passenger aircraft.

  5. Impact of Aerosols on Atmospheric Attenuation Loss in Central Receiver Systems: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sengupta, M.; Wagner, M. J.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric attenuation loss between the heliostat field and receiver has been recognized as a significant source of loss in Central Receiver Systems. In clear sky situations, extinction of Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI) is primarily by aerosols in the atmosphere. When aerosol loading is high close to the surface the attenuation loss between heliostat and receivers is significantly influenced by the amount of aerosols present on a particular day. This study relates measured DNI to aerosol optical depths close to the surface of the earth. The model developed in the paper uses only measured DNI to estimate the attenuation between heliostat and receiver in a central receiver system. The requirement that only a DNI measurement is available potentially makes the model a candidate for widespread use.

  6. Parameterizations of Cloud Microphysics and Indirect Aerosol Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo [NASA/GSFC] [NASA/GSFC

    2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    1. OVERVIEW Aerosols and especially their effect on clouds are one of the key components of the climate system and the hydrological cycle [Ramanathan et al., 2001]. Yet, the aerosol effect on clouds remains largely unknown and the processes involved not well understood. A recent report published by the National Academy of Science states "The greatest uncertainty about the aerosol climate forcing - indeed, the largest of all the uncertainties about global climate forcing - is probably the indirect effect of aerosols on clouds [NRC, 2001]." The aerosol effect on clouds is often categorized into the traditional "first indirect (i.e., Twomey)" effect on the cloud droplet sizes for a constant liquid water path [Twomey, 1977] and the "semi-direct" effect on cloud coverage [e.g., Ackerman et al., 2000]. Enhanced aerosol concentrations can also suppress warm rain processes by producing a narrow droplet spectrum that inhibits collision and coalescence processes [e.g., Squires and Twomey, 1961; Warner and Twomey, 1967; Warner, 1968; Rosenfeld, 1999]. The aerosol effect on precipitation processes, also known as the second type of aerosol indirect effect [Albrecht, 1989], is even more complex, especially for mixed-phase convective clouds. Table 1 summarizes the key observational studies identifying the microphysical properties, cloud characteristics, thermodynamics and dynamics associated with cloud systems from high-aerosol continental environments. For example, atmospheric aerosol concentrations can influence cloud droplet size distributions, warm-rain process, cold-rain process, cloud-top height, the depth of the mixed phase region, and occurrence of lightning. In addition, high aerosol concentrations in urban environments could affect precipitation variability by providing an enhanced source of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Hypotheses have been developed to explain the effect of urban regions on convection and precipitation [van den Heever and Cotton, 2007 and Shepherd, 2005]. Recently, a detailed spectral-bin microphysical scheme was implemented into the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model. Atmospheric aerosols are also described using number density size-distribution functions. A spectral-bin microphysical model is very expensive from a computational point of view and has only been implemented into the 2D version of the GCE at the present time. The model is tested by studying the evolution of deep tropical clouds in the west Pacific warm pool region and summertime convection over a mid-latitude continent with different concentrations of CCN: a low "clean" concentration and a high "dirty" concentration. The impact of atmospheric aerosol concentration on cloud and precipitation will be investigated. 2. MODEL DESCRIPTION AND CASE STUDIES 2.1 GCE MODEL The model used in this study is the 2D version of the GCE model. Modeled flow is anelastic. Second- or higher-order advection schemes can produce negative values in the solution. Thus, a Multi-dimensional Positive Definite Advection Transport Algorithm (MPDATA) has been implemented into the model. All scalar variables (potential temperature, water vapor, turbulent coefficient and all five hydrometeor classes) use forward time differencing and the MPDATA for advection. Dynamic variables, u, v and w, use a second-order accurate advection scheme and a leapfrog time integration (kinetic energy semi-conserving method). Short-wave (solar) and long-wave radiation as well as a subgrid-scale TKE turbulence scheme are also included in the model. Details of the model can be found in Tao and Simpson (1993) and Tao et al. (2003). 2.2 Microphysics (Bin Model) The formulation of the explicit spectral-bin microphysical processes is based on solving stochastic kinetic equations for the size distribution functions of water droplets (cloud droplets and raindrops), and six types of ice particles: pristine ice crystals (columnar and plate-like), snow (dendrites and aggregates), graupel and frozen drops/hail. Each type is described by a special size distribution function containing 33 categories (bin

  7. Impact of defects on the electrical transport, optical properties and failure mechanisms of GaN nanowires.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, Andrew M.; Aubry, Sylvie; Shaner, Eric Arthur; Siegal, Michael P.; Li, Qiming; Jones, Reese E.; Westover, Tyler; Wang, George T.; Zhou, Xiao Wang; Talin, Albert Alec; Bogart, Katherine Huderle Andersen; Harris, C. Thomas; Huang, Jian Yu

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of a three year LDRD project that focused on understanding the impact of defects on the electrical, optical and thermal properties of GaN-based nanowires (NWs). We describe the development and application of a host of experimental techniques to quantify and understand the physics of defects and thermal transport in GaN NWs. We also present the development of analytical models and computational studies of thermal conductivity in GaN NWs. Finally, we present an atomistic model for GaN NW electrical breakdown supported with experimental evidence. GaN-based nanowires are attractive for applications requiring compact, high-current density devices such as ultraviolet laser arrays. Understanding GaN nanowire failure at high-current density is crucial to developing nanowire (NW) devices. Nanowire device failure is likely more complex than thin film due to the prominence of surface effects and enhanced interaction among point defects. Understanding the impact of surfaces and point defects on nanowire thermal and electrical transport is the first step toward rational control and mitigation of device failure mechanisms. However, investigating defects in GaN NWs is extremely challenging because conventional defect spectroscopy techniques are unsuitable for wide-bandgap nanostructures. To understand NW breakdown, the influence of pre-existing and emergent defects during high current stress on NW properties will be investigated. Acute sensitivity of NW thermal conductivity to point-defect density is expected due to the lack of threading dislocation (TD) gettering sites, and enhanced phonon-surface scattering further inhibits thermal transport. Excess defect creation during Joule heating could further degrade thermal conductivity, producing a viscous cycle culminating in catastrophic breakdown. To investigate these issues, a unique combination of electron microscopy, scanning luminescence and photoconductivity implemented at the nanoscale will be used in concert with sophisticated molecular-dynamics calculations of surface and defect-mediated NW thermal transport. This proposal seeks to elucidate long standing material science questions for GaN while addressing issues critical to realizing reliable GaN NW devices.

  8. A simplified model of aerosol removal by natural processes in reactor containments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powers, D.A.; Washington, K.E.; Sprung, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Burson, S.B. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simplified formulae are developed for estimating the aerosol decontamination that can be achieved by natural processes in the containments of pressurized water reactors and in the drywells of boiling water reactors under severe accident conditions. These simplified formulae were derived by correlation of results of Monte Carlo uncertainty analyses of detailed models of aerosol behavior under accident conditions. Monte Carlo uncertainty analyses of decontamination by natural aerosol processes are reported for 1,000, 2,000, 3,000, and 4,000 MW(th) pressurized water reactors and for 1,500, 2,500, and 3,500 MW(th) boiling water reactors. Uncertainty distributions for the decontamination factors and decontamination coefficients as functions of time were developed in the Monte Carlo analyses by considering uncertainties in aerosol processes, material properties, reactor geometry and severe accident progression. Phenomenological uncertainties examined in this work included uncertainties in aerosol coagulation by gravitational collision, Brownian diffusion, turbulent diffusion and turbulent inertia. Uncertainties in aerosol deposition by gravitational settling, thermophoresis, diffusiophoresis, and turbulent diffusion were examined. Electrostatic charging of aerosol particles in severe accidents is discussed. Such charging could affect both the coagulation and deposition of aerosol particles. Electrostatic effects are not considered in most available models of aerosol behavior during severe accidents and cause uncertainties in predicted natural decontamination processes that could not be taken in to account in this work. Median (50%), 90 and 10% values of the uncertainty distributions for effective decontamination coefficients were correlated with time and reactor thermal power. These correlations constitute a simplified model that can be used to estimate the decontamination by natural aerosol processes at 3 levels of conservatism. Applications of the model are described.

  9. Evolution of organic aerosol mass spectra upon heating: implications for OA phase and partitioning behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    UC Davis; Cappa, Christopher D.; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2010-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization mass spectrometry has been used to measure the evolution of chemical composition for two distinct organic aerosol types as they are passed through a thermodenuder at different temperatures. The two organic aerosol types considered are primary lubricating oil (LO) aerosol and secondary aerosol from the alpha-pinene + O3 reaction (alphaP). The evolution of the VUV mass spectra for the two aerosol types with temperature are observed to differ dramatically. For LO particles, the spectra exhibit distinct changes with temperature in which the lower m/z peaks, corresponding to compounds with higher vapor pressures, disappear more rapidly than the high m/z peaks. In contrast, the alphaP aerosol spectrum is essentially unchanged by temperature even though the particles experience significant mass loss due to evaporation. The variations in the LO spectra are found to be quantitatively in agreement with expectations from absorptive partitioning theory whereas the alphaP spectra suggest that the evaporation of alphaP derived aerosol appears to not be governed by partitioning theory. We postulate that this difference arises from the alphaP particles existing as in a glassy state instead of having the expected liquid-like behavior. To reconcile these observations with decades of aerosol growth measurements, which indicate that OA formation is described by equilibrium partitioning, we present a conceptual model wherein the secondary OA is formed and then rapidly converted from an absorbing form to a non-absorbing form. The results suggest that although OA growth may be describable by equilibrium partitioning theory, the properties of organic aerosol once formed may differ significantly from the properties determined in the equilibrium framework.

  10. Aerosol Science and Technology, 43:641652, 2009 Copyright American Association for Aerosol Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aerosol Science and Technology, 43:641­652, 2009 Copyright © American Association for Aerosol is the irreversibility of the hygroscopic growth fac- tor of aerosol particles. The instrument uses the hysteresis for ideal instrument performance in application to a test aerosol of fully deliquesce- able particles

  11. Aerosol Science and Technology, 43:799807, 2009 Copyright American Association for Aerosol Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aerosol Science and Technology, 43:799­807, 2009 Copyright © American Association for Aerosol and Efflorescence of Potassium Salts Relevant to Biomass-Burning Aerosol Particles Evelyn J. Freney,1 Scot T. Martin mate- rial into the atmosphere. Such aerosol particles affect the climate in part because

  12. Aerosol Science and Technology, 47:9398, 2013 Copyright C American Association for Aerosol Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jiaxing

    Aerosol Science and Technology, 47:93­98, 2013 Copyright C American Association for Aerosol of Pt-Nanoparticles-Laden Graphene Crumples by Aerosol Spray Pyrolysis and Evaluation of aqueous chloroplatinic acid (H2PtCl6) and graphene oxide (GO) sheets via aerosol spray pyrol- ysis (ASP

  13. Simulating aerosols using a chemical transport model with assimilation of satellite aerosol retrievals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zender, Charles

    Simulating aerosols using a chemical transport model with assimilation of satellite aerosol for simulating aerosols has been developed using a chemical transport model together with an assimilation of satellite aerosol retrievals. The methodology and model components are described in this paper

  14. Aerosol Science and Technology, 46:12391245, 2012 Copyright C American Association for Aerosol Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    Aerosol Science and Technology, 46:1239­1245, 2012 Copyright C American Association for Aerosol of Surfactants in Nanoparticles Produced by an Electrospray Aerosol Generator Amanda C. MacMillan,1 John B, USA Electrospray aerosol generators (EAGs) disperse conducting solutions into air, promptly neutralize

  15. Aerosol Science and Technology, 41:10891101, 2007 Copyright c American Association for Aerosol Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aerosol Science and Technology, 41:1089­1101, 2007 Copyright c American Association for Aerosol Interferometric Aerosol Absorption Spectrometry Arthur Sedlacek and Jeonghoon Lee Brookhaven National Laboratory, Atmospheric Sciences, Upton, New York, USA Aerosol light absorption still remains a difficult quantity to mea

  16. Aerosol Science and Technology, 40:97106, 2006 Copyright c American Association for Aerosol Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aerosol Science and Technology, 40:97­106, 2006 Copyright c American Association for Aerosol the aerosol particles, namely by vaporizing and condensing granular sodium chloride and by electrospraying materials are available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of Aerosol Science and Tech

  17. Aerosol Science and Technology, 46:937949, 2012 Copyright C American Association for Aerosol Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aerosol Science and Technology, 46:937­949, 2012 Copyright C American Association for Aerosol Distributions following Condensational Growth in Continuous Flow Aerosol Reactors as Derived from Residence Time Distributions: Theoretical Development and Application to Secondary Organic Aerosol Mikinori Kuwata and Scot T

  18. Aerosol Science and Technology, 44:11401145, 2010 Copyright American Association for Aerosol Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jiaxing

    Aerosol Science and Technology, 44:1140­1145, 2010 Copyright © American Association for Aerosol-Assembly of Nanoparticles in Evaporating Aerosol Droplets: Preparation of Nanoporous Pt/TiO2 Composite Particles Hee Dong, USA Nanoporous Pt/TiO2 micro-particles were synthesized via an aerosol assisted co-assembly (AACA

  19. Single particle characterization, source apportionment, and aging effects of ambient aerosols in Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shields, Laura Grace

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    detection efficiencies of aerosol time of flight masscomposition of ambient aerosol particles. Environmentalsize dependent response of aerosol counters, Atmospheric

  20. Determination of the optical properties of La2-xBaxCuO? for several dopings, including the anomalous x=1/8 phase

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Homes, C. C.; Hücker, M.; Li, Q.; Xu, Z. J.; Wen, J. S.; Gu, G. D.; Tranquada, J. M.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The optical properties of single crystals of the high-temperature superconductor La2-xBaxCuO? have been measured over a wide frequency and temperature range for light polarized in the a-b planes and along the c axis. Three different Ba concentrations have been examined, x=0.095 with a critical temperature Tc=32 K, x=0.125 where the superconductivity is dramatically weakened with Tc?2.4 K, and x=0.145 with Tc?24 K. The in-plane behavior of the optical conductivity for these materials at high temperature is described by a Drude-like response with a scattering rate that decreases with temperature. Below Tc in the x=0.095 and 0.145 materials there is a clear signature of the formation of a superconducting state in the optical properties allowing the superfluid density (?s0) and the penetration depth to be determined. In the anomalous 1/8 phase, some spectral weight shifts from lower to higher frequency (?300 cm?¹) on cooling below the spin-ordering temperature Tso?42 K, associated with the onset of spin-stripe order; we discuss alternative interpretations in terms of a conventional density-wave gap versus the response to pair-density-wave superconductivity. The two dopings for which a superconducting response is observed both fall on the universal scaling line ?s0/8?4.4?dcTc, which is consistent with the observation of strong dissipation within the a-b planes. The optical properties for light polarized along the c axis reveal an insulating character dominated by lattice vibrations, superimposed on a weak electronic background. No Josephson plasma edge is observed in the low-frequency reflectance along the c axis for x=1/8; however, sharp plasma edges are observed for x=0.095 and 0.145 below Tc.