Sample records for aerodynamics iv skirts

  1. Skirted projectiles for railguns

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hawke, R.S.; Susoeff, A.R.

    1994-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A single skirt projectile (20) having an insulating skirt (22) at its rear, or a dual trailing skirt projectile (30, 40, 50, 60) having an insulating skirt (32, 42, 52, 62) succeeded by an arc extinguishing skirt (34, 44, 54, 64), is accelerated by a railgun accelerator 10 having a pair of parallel conducting rails (1a, 1b) which are separated by insulating wall spacers (11). The insulating skirt (22, 32, 42, 52, 62) includes a plasma channel (38). The arc extinguishing skirt (34, 44, 54, 64) interrupts the conduction that occurs in the insulating skirt channel (38) by blocking the plasma arc (3) from conducting current from rail to rail (1a, 1b) at the rear of the projectile (30, 40, 50, 60). The arc extinguishing skirt may be comprised of two plates (36a, 36b) which form a horseshoe wherein the plates are parallel to the rails (1a, b); a chisel-shape design; cross-shaped, or it may be a cylindrical (64). The length of the insulating skirt channel is selected such that there is sufficient plasma in the channel to enable adequate current conduction between the rails (1a, 1b).

  2. Skirted projectiles for railguns

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hawke, Ronald S. (Livermore, CA); Susoeff, Allan R. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A single skirt projectile (20) having an insulating skirt (22) at its rear, or a dual trailing skirt projectile (30, 40, 50, 60) having an insulating skirt (32, 42, 52, 62) succeeded by an arc extinguishing skirt (34, 44, 54, 64), is accelerated by a railgun accelerator 10 having a pair of parallel conducting rails (1a, 1b) which are separated by insulating wall spacers (11). The insulating skirt (22, 32, 42, 52, 62) includes a plasma channel (38). The arc extinguishing skirt (34, 44, 54, 64) interrupts the conduction that occurs in the insulating skirt channel (38) by blocking the plasma arc (3) from conducting current from rail to rail (1a, 1b) at the rear of the projectile (30, 40, 50, 60). The arc extinguishing skirt may be comprised of two plates (36a, 36b) which form a horseshoe wherein the plates are parallel to the rails (1a, b); a chisel-shape design; cross-shaped, or it may be a cylindrical (64). The length of the insulating skirt channel is selected such that there is sufficient plasma in the channel to enable adequate current conduction between the rails (1a, 1b).

  3. aerodynamics: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aerodynamic Engineering Websites Summary: AIAA 96-0409 Automatic Aerodynamic Optimization on Distributed Memory Architectures Antony Jameson-0409 Automatic Aerodynamic...

  4. SKIRT: the design of a suite of input models for Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baes, Maarten

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monte Carlo method is the most popular technique to perform radiative transfer simulations in a general 3D geometry. The algorithms behind and acceleration techniques for Monte Carlo radiative transfer are discussed extensively in the literature, and many different Monte Carlo codes are publicly available. On the contrary, the design of a suite of components that can be used for the distribution of sources and sinks in radiative transfer codes has received very little attention. The availability of such models, with different degrees of complexity, has many benefits. For example, they can serve as toy models to test new physical ingredients, or as parameterised models for inverse radiative transfer fitting. For 3D Monte Carlo codes, this requires algorithms to efficiently generate random positions from 3D density distributions. We describe the design of a flexible suite of components for the Monte Carlo radiative transfer code SKIRT. The design is based on a combination of basic building blocks (which can...

  5. aiaa aerodynamic measurement: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aerodynamic Engineering Websites Summary: AIAA 96-0409 Automatic Aerodynamic Optimization on Distributed Memory Architectures Antony Jameson-0409 Automatic Aerodynamic...

  6. aiaa applied aerodynamics: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aerodynamic Engineering Websites Summary: AIAA 96-0409 Automatic Aerodynamic Optimization on Distributed Memory Architectures Antony Jameson-0409 Automatic Aerodynamic...

  7. Computer subroutine for estimating aerodynamic blade loads on Darrieus vertical axis wind turbines. [FORCE code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, W. N.; Leonard, T. M.

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An important aspect of structural design of the Darrieus rotor is the determination of aerodynamic blade loads. This report describes a load generator which has been used at Sandia for quasi-static and dynamic rotor analyses. The generator is based on the single streamtube aerodynamic flow model and is constructed as a FORTRAN IV subroutine to facilitate its use in finite element structural models. Input and output characteristics of the subroutine are described and a complete listing is attached as an appendix.

  8. Freight Wing Trailer Aerodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, Sean (Primary Investigator); Bigatel, Patrick

    2004-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Freight Wing Incorporated utilized the opportunity presented by this DOE category one Inventions and Innovations grant to successfully research, develop, test, patent, market, and sell innovative fuel and emissions saving aerodynamic attachments for the trucking industry. A great deal of past scientific research has demonstrated that streamlining box shaped semi-trailers can significantly reduce a truck's fuel consumption. However, significant design challenges have prevented past concepts from meeting industry needs. Market research early in this project revealed the demands of truck fleet operators regarding aerodynamic attachments. Products must not only save fuel, but cannot interfere with the operation of the truck, require significant maintenance, add significant weight, and must be extremely durable. Furthermore, SAE/TMC J1321 tests performed by a respected independent laboratory are necessary for large fleets to even consider purchase. Freight Wing used this information to create a system of three practical aerodynamic attachments for the front, rear and undercarriage of standard semi trailers. SAE/TMC J1321 Type II tests preformed by the Transportation Research Center (TRC) demonstrated a 7% improvement to fuel economy with all three products. If Freight Wing is successful in its continued efforts to gain market penetration, the energy and environmental savings would be considerable. Each truck outfitted saves approximately 1,100 gallons of fuel every 100,000 miles, which prevents over 12 tons of CO2 from entering the atmosphere. If all applicable trailers used the technology, the country could save approximately 1.8 billion gallons of diesel fuel, 18 million tons of emissions and 3.6 billion dollars annually.

  9. Integrated External Aerodynamic and Underhood Thermal Analysis...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    External Aerodynamic and Underhood Thermal Analysis for Heavy Vehicles Integrated External Aerodynamic and Underhood Thermal Analysis for Heavy Vehicles 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel...

  10. Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium Risk Assessment during the Production of Marinated Beef Inside Skirts and Tri-tip Roasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muras, Tiffany Marie

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    and 18 tri-tips were used during this study. Both inside skirts and tri-tips were vacuum tumbled for a total of 1 h. Samples of products were tested immediately following tumbling (day 0), or were vacuum packaged and stored in the cooler (approximately 2...

  11. Aeroelastic Analysis of Bridges: Effects of Turbulence and Aerodynamic Nonlinearities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kareem, Ahsan

    of bridges under turbulent winds. The nonlinear force model separates the aerodynamic force into low; Buffeting; Turbulence; Bridges; Wind forces; Aerodynamics. Introduction The aerodynamic performance under aerodynamic force model and associated time domain analysis framework for predicting the aeroelastic response

  12. CFD-based Optimization for Automotive Aerodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dumas, Laurent

    Chapter 1 CFD-based Optimization for Automotive Aerodynamics Laurent Dumas Abstract The car drag- ments. An overview of the main characteristics of automotive aerodynamics and a detailed presentation.dumas@upmc.fr) 1 #12;2 Laurent Dumas 1.1 Introducing Automotive Aerodynamics 1.1.1 A Major Concern for Car

  13. AIAA 20030185 Aerodynamically Controlled Expansion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    undesirable over-expansion in generalized supersonic nozzle flows. Nomenclature A cross-sectional area fgAIAA 2003­0185 Aerodynamically Controlled Expansion Nozzle for STOVL Aircraft D.A. Terrier Lockheed Controlled Expansion Nozzle for STOVL Aircraft Douglas A. Terrier* Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company, Fort

  14. The aerodynamic characteristics of an airfoil utilizing boundary layer and circulation control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boothe, Edward Milton

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE AERODYNAMIC CHARACTERISTICS OF AN AIRFOIL UTILIZING BOUNDARY LAYER AND CIRCULATION CONTROL A Thesis By EDWARD MILTON BOOTHE Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... . Wind Tunnel IV Auxiliary Equipment EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURES . 13 Preliminary Tests 13 Measurement of Boundary Layer And Circulation Control Parameters 16 Wind Tunnel Tests of Airfoil Model. 19 Reduction of Experimental Results 20 V RESULTS...

  15. aerodynamic blade optimisation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The aerodynamic performance of an existing wind turbine blade optimised for low wind speed conditions (more) Pierce, Warrick Taite 2009-01-01 4 Aerodynamic optimisation of a...

  16. aerodynamic features vehicle body components: Topics by E-print...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is a considerable body of information available Kreinovich, Vladik 2 Aerodynamic optimization of a solar powered race vehicle MIT - DSpace Summary: Aerodynamic optimization was...

  17. Computational Aerodynamics and Aeroacoustics for Wind Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    wind turbine flows. A few papers deal with applications of Blade Element Momentum (BEM) theory to wind, the BEM technique is employed by industry when designing new wind turbine blades. However, in orderComputational Aerodynamics and Aeroacoustics for Wind Turbines #12;#12;Computational Aerodynamics

  18. Anisotropic Grid Adaptation for Multiple Aerodynamic Outputs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venditti, David A.

    Anisotropic grid–adaptive strategies are presented for viscous flow simulations in which the accurate prediction of multiple aerodynamic outputs (such as the lift, drag, and moment coefficients) is required from a single ...

  19. aerodynamic measurement technology: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aerodynamic measurement technology First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Aerodynamic...

  20. Optimizing the aerodynamic efficiency of intermodal freight trains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    and energy efficiency of railroad intermodal trains. Several recommendations regarding railway equipment use efficiency; Aerodynamics; Fuel use; Railroad intermodal transportation; Loading assignment; Urban freight 1 practices on train make-up and energy efficiency. They found that aerodynamic characteristics significantly

  1. aerodynamic decelerator systems: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gensen 1987-01-01 9 Tracking an Aerodynamic Model in a Wind Tunnel with a Stereo High-speed Imaging System Engineering Websites Summary: Tracking an Aerodynamic Model in a Wind...

  2. Comparison of the Coulter Multisizer and Aerodynamic Particle Sizer for obtaining the aerodynamic particle size of irregularly shaped dust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClure, Joshua Wayne

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When studying air quality it is often necessary to measure the aerodynamic size distribution of particles. True aerodynamic diameter must be measured using a gravitational settling method, which is impractical. Other methods exist that use other...

  3. Ris-R-1543(EN) Aerodynamic investigation of Winglets on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø-R-1543(EN) Aerodynamic investigation of Winglets on Wind Turbine Blades using CFD Jeppe Johansen and Niels N. Sørensen Title: Aerodynamic investigation of Winglets on Wind Turbine Blades using of the aerodynamics around a wind turbine blade with a winglet using Computational Fluid Dynamics, CFD. Five winglets

  4. Modelling and Simulation in Aerodynamic Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mosegaard, Klaus

    when it breaks loose from the gear of a wind generator. A common feature of such simulations turbine blade, two design features are important. The aerodynamic design attempts to optimize the blade could si- mulate the bending of the wing under operating con- ditions during one rotation

  5. Anisotropic Grid Adaptation for Multiple Aerodynamic Outputs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peraire, Jaime

    Anisotropic Grid Adaptation for Multiple Aerodynamic Outputs David A. Venditti and David L Anisotropic grid­adaptive strategies are presented for viscous flow simulations in which the accurate estimation and Hessian-based anisotropic grid adaptation. Airfoil test cases are presented to demonstrate

  6. Device for reducing vehicle aerodynamic resistance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Graham, Sean C.

    2006-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for reducing vehicle aerodynamic resistance for vehicles having a generally rectangular body disposed above rear wheels, comprising a plurality of load bearing struts attached to the bottom of the rectangular body adjacent its sides, a plurality of opposing flat sheets attached to the load bearing struts, and angled flaps attached to the lower edge of the opposing sheets defining an obtuse angle with the opposing flat sheets extending inwardly with respect to the sides of the rectangular body to a predetermined height above the ground, which, stiffen the opposing flat sheets, bend to resist damage when struck by the ground, and guide airflow around the rear wheels of the vehicle to reduce its aerodynamic resistance when moving.

  7. Device for reducing vehicle aerodynamic resistance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Graham, Sean C.

    2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for reducing vehicle aerodynamic resistance for vehicles having a generally rectangular flat front face comprising a plurality of load bearing struts of a predetermined size attached to the flat front face adjacent the sides and top thereof, a pair of pliable opposing flat sheets having an outside edge portion attached to the flat front face adjacent the sides thereof and an upper edge with a predetermined curve; the opposing flat sheets being bent and attached to the struts to form effective curved airfoil shapes, and a top pliable flat sheet disposed adjacent the top of the flat front face and having predetermined curved side edges, which, when the top sheet is bent and attached to the struts to form an effective curved airfoil shape, mate with the curved upper edges of the opposing sheets to complete the aerodynamic device.

  8. Device for reducing vehicle aerodynamic resistance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Graham, Sean C.

    2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for a vehicle with a pair of swinging rear doors, which converts flat sheets of pliable material hinged to the sides of the vehicle adjacent the rear thereof into effective curved airfoils that reduce the aerodynamic resistance of the vehicle, when the doors are closed by hand, utilizing a plurality of stiffeners disposed generally parallel to the doors and affixed to the sheets and a plurality of collapsible tension bearings struts attached to each stiffener and the adjacent door.

  9. Inequality design limits in optimal aerodynamic shapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seaman, Charles Knight

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I would like to thank Mr. Stan Lowy for his assistance. ABSTRACT The investigation is concerned with ways of including design con- straints in the problem of optimum aerodynamic shapes. Inequality constraints are examined in the report as one... means of describing design limits in the optimization problem. The use of inequality con- straints to consider design limits in a variational solution is illustrated with an example problem. In the example problem, the admissable profiles for a...

  10. aerodynamic noise generated: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the capabilities of a new transonic, two-dimensional design method, based Giles, Mike 322 GAs for aerodynamic shape design II: multiobjective optimization and multi-criteria design...

  11. aerodynamic surface quantities: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aircraft (also transportation for intrathe- ater missions. Wind tunnel tests on high-lift configura- tions have been conducted Xu, Kun 20 Title: Aerodynamic and Scalar Roughness...

  12. aerodynamic noise: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    various vane Papamoschou, Dimitri 8 Aerodynamic investigations of noise-reducing high-lift systems for passenger transport aircraft. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary:...

  13. aerodynamic side loads: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    S. G.; Martin, V.; Falk, M. A. 2004-01-01 290 Parametric Reduced-Order Models for Probabilistic Analysis of Unsteady Aerodynamic Applications Engineering Websites Summary:...

  14. aerodynamic shape design: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1968... Seaman, Charles Knight 2012-06-07 2 Numerical Shape Optimization of Airfoils With Practical Aerodynamic Design Requirements. Open Access Theses and...

  15. advanced aerodynamic devices: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    power line icing and wind turbine icing Hu, Hui 2 Advances in Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Antony Jameson1 Engineering Websites Summary: implicitly via a second order...

  16. aerodynamic response approximation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page Topic Index 1 Managing Approximate Models in Evolutionary Aerodynamic Design Optimization Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: algorithm to a...

  17. aerodynamic control preprint: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of 2 Aerodynamic design via control theory CiteSeer Summary: wing design; optimization. flow; inverse I. INTRODUCTION AND HISTORICAL SURVEY Computers have had a twofold...

  18. UPWIND, Aerodynamics and aero-elasticity Rotor aerodynamics in atmospheric shear flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    wind turbines with rotor diameters in the order of 100 meters, the influence of upstream turbine wakes codes for wind turbines utilize aerodynamics based on BEM methods, see [1, 2]. For modern large scale. Sørensen Wind Energy Department, Risø National Laboratory & Department of Civil Engineering, Aalborg

  19. Aerodynamic Focusing Of High-Density Aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruiz, D. E.; Fisch, Nathaniel

    2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    High-density micron-sized particle aerosols might form the basis for a number of applications in which a material target with a particular shape might be quickly ionized to form a cylindrical or sheet shaped plasma. A simple experimental device was built in order to study the properties of high-density aerosol focusing for 1#22; m silica spheres. Preliminary results recover previous findings on aerodynamic focusing at low densities. At higher densities, it is demonstrated that the focusing properties change in a way which is consistent with a density dependent Stokes number.

  20. Wind Turbine Blade Flow Fields and Prospects for Active Aerodynamic Control: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schreck, S.; Robinson, M.

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes wind turbine flow fields that can cause adverse aerodynamic loading and can impact active aerodynamic control methodologies currently contemplated for wind turbine applications.

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - aerodynamic stability Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aerodynamics... Measurements of Air Quality Gas Dynamics High-Speed Aerodynamics and Heat Transfer Kinetic Theory-Based CFD... Professors 3 Non-tenuredNon-tenure Track 6...

  2. Hybrid method for aerodynamic shape optimization in automotive industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dumas, Laurent

    Hybrid method for aerodynamic shape optimization in automotive industry Freedeerique Muyl April 2003; accepted 4 June 2003 Abstract An aerodynamic shape optimization tool for complex industrial precisely the reduction of their drag coefficient, becomes one of the main topics of the automotive research

  3. aerodynamic design optimization: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aerodynamic design optimization First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Aerodynamic design...

  4. aerodynamic shape optimization: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aerodynamic shape optimization First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 AIAA 982538 Aerodynamic...

  5. Methods of reducing vehicle aerodynamic drag

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sirenko V.; Rohatgi U.

    2012-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A small scale model (length 1710 mm) of General Motor SUV was built and tested in the wind tunnel for expected wind conditions and road clearance. Two passive devices, rear screen which is plate behind the car and rear fairing where the end of the car is aerodynamically extended, were incorporated in the model and tested in the wind tunnel for different wind conditions. The conclusion is that rear screen could reduce drag up to 6.5% and rear fairing can reduce the drag by 26%. There were additional tests for front edging and rear vortex generators. The results for drag reduction were mixed. It should be noted that there are aesthetic and practical considerations that may allow only partial implementation of these or any drag reduction options.

  6. Active Aerodynamic Blade Distributed Flap Control Design Procedure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Active Aerodynamic Blade Distributed Flap Control Design Procedure for Load Reduction on the UpWind 5MW Wind Turbine David G. Wilson , Brian R. Resor , Dale E. Berg ...

  7. Aerodynamic optimization of a solar powered race vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Augenbergs, Peteris K

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aerodynamic optimization was performed on Tesseract, the MIT Solar Electric Vehicle Team's 2003-2005 solar car using Wind Tunnel 8 at Jacobs/Sverdrup Drivability Test Facility in Allen Park, MI. These tests include angle ...

  8. Aerodynamic performance measurements in a counter-rotating aspirated compressor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Onnée, Jean-François

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is an experimental investigation of the aerodynamic performances of a counter-rotating aspirated compressor. This compressor is implemented in a blow-down facility, which gives rigorous simulation of the ...

  9. aerodynamic design features: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Aerodynamic design optimization using flow feature parameterization. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary:...

  10. airfoil aerodynamic performance: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Adjoint based aerodynamic optimization of supersonic biplane airfoils Engineering Websites Summary: demonstrates very good...

  11. DOE Project on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCallen, R; Salari, K; Ortega, J; Castellucci, P; Pointer, D; Browand, F; Ross, J; Storms, B

    2007-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Class 8 tractor-trailers consume 11-12% of the total US petroleum use. At highway speeds, 65% of the energy expenditure for a Class 8 truck is in overcoming aerodynamic drag. The project objective is to improve fuel economy of Class 8 tractor-trailers by providing guidance on methods of reducing drag by at least 25%. A 25% reduction in drag would present a 12% improvement in fuel economy at highway speeds, equivalent to about 130 midsize tanker ships per year. Specific goals include: (1) Provide guidance to industry in the reduction of aerodynamic drag of heavy truck vehicles; (2) Develop innovative drag reducing concepts that are operationally and economically sound; and (3) Establish a database of experimental, computational, and conceptual design information, and demonstrate the potential of new drag-reduction devices. The studies described herein provide a demonstration of the applicability of the experience developed in the analysis of the standard configuration of the Generic Conventional Model. The modeling practices and procedures developed in prior efforts have been applied directly to the assessment of new configurations including a variety of geometric modifications and add-on devices. Application to the low-drag 'GTS' configuration of the GCM has confirmed that the error in predicted drag coefficients increases as the relative contribution of the base drag resulting from the vehicle wake to the total drag increases and it is recommended that more advanced turbulence modeling strategies be applied under those circumstances. Application to a commercially-developed boat tail device has confirmed that this restriction does not apply to geometries where the relative contribution of the base drag to the total drag is reduced by modifying the geometry in that region. Application to a modified GCM geometry with an open grille and radiator has confirmed that the underbody flow, while important for underhood cooling, has little impact on the drag coefficient of the vehicle. Furthermore, the evaluation of the impact of small changes in radiator or grille dimensions has revealed that the total drag is not particularly sensitive to those changes. This observation leads to two significant conclusions. First, a small increase in radiator size to accommodate heat rejection needs related to new emissions restrictions may be tolerated without significant increases in drag losses. Second, efforts to reduce drag on the tractor requires that the design of the entire tractor be treated in an integrated fashion. Simply reducing the size of the grille will not provide the desired result, but the additional contouring of the vehicle as a whole which may be enabled by the smaller radiator could have a more significant effect.

  12. Inertial and Aerodynamic Tail Steering of a Meso-scale Legged Robot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohut, Nicholas Jospeh

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aerodynamic Force Modeling and Wind Tunnel Measurements 3.5Aerodynamic Force Modeling and Wind Tunnel Measurements Thesail, v is the wind speed, and F is the force on the sail.

  13. Product design and development of an aerodynamic hydration system for bicycling and triathlon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cote, Mark (Mark Brian)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proper hydration and aerodynamic performance are both essential needs of a competitive cyclist or triathlete. Several aerodynamic systems have been developed for use on bicycles but few have been designed to be truly ...

  14. Investigation of aerodynamic braking devices for wind turbine applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, D.A. [R. Lynette & Associates, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the selection and preliminary design of a new aerodynamic braking system for use on the stall-regulated AWT-26/27 wind turbines. The goal was to identify and design a configuration that offered improvements over the existing tip brake used by Advanced Wind Turbines, Inc. (AWT). Although the design objectives and approach of this report are specific to aerodynamic braking of AWT-26/27 turbines, many of the issues addressed in this work are applicable to a wider class of turbines. The performance trends and design choices presented in this report should be of general use to wind turbine designers who are considering alternative aerodynamic braking methods. A literature search was combined with preliminary work on device sizing, loads and mechanical design. Candidate configurations were assessed on their potential for benefits in the areas of cost, weight, aerodynamic noise, reliability and performance under icing conditions. As a result, two configurations were identified for further study: the {open_quotes}spoiler-flap{close_quotes} and the {open_quotes}flip-tip.{close_quotes} Wind tunnel experiments were conducted at Wichita State University to evaluate the performance of the candidate aerodynamic brakes on an airfoil section representative of the AWT-26/27 blades. The wind tunnel data were used to predict the braking effectiveness and deployment characteristics of the candidate devices for a wide range of design parameters. The evaluation was iterative, with mechanical design and structural analysis being conducted in parallel with the braking performance studies. The preliminary estimate of the spoiler-flap system cost was $150 less than the production AWT-26/27 tip vanes. This represents a reduction of approximately 5 % in the cost of the aerodynamic braking system. In view of the preliminary nature of the design, it would be prudent to plan for contingencies in both cost and weight.

  15. Reentry aerodynamic disruption analysis of thermionic reactor-thermo-converter TOPAZ-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grinberg, E.I.; Nikolaev, V.S. (Scientific Production Association Krasnaya Zvezda'', Moscow 115230 (Russian Federation)); Usov, V.A. (RRC Kurchatov Institute'', Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation)); Gafarov, A.A. (Research Institute of Thermal Processes, Moscow (Russian Federation))

    1993-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents preliminary results of analysis for the TOPAZ-2 thermionic converter-reactor aerodynamic disruption during reentry.

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - aerodynamic characteristics research Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    117692007 Summary: Evaluating parameterizations of aerodynamic resistance to heat transfer using field measurements Shaomin Liu1... , Beijing Normal University, China...

  17. Hotline IV ?High Temperature ESP

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Hotline IV - High Temperature ESP Brindesh Dhruva (principal Inv.) Michael Dowling (presenter) Schlumberger Track Name May 18, 2010 This presentation does not contain any...

  18. EnvWiltonIV-EIS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wilton IV Wind Energy Center Draft EIS Western Area Power Administration (Western) prepared this draft environmental impact statement (DEIS) in response to a request from NextEra...

  19. POLICY IV.4.1 Volume IV: Human Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    POLICY IV.4.1 Volume IV: Human Resources Chapter 4: Classification Issuing Office: Human Resource Resource Services Originally Issued: August 19, 1968 Most Recently Revised: March 3, 2006 1 Classification Responsibilities 7 History 7 Official Documentation 7 Statement of Policy Human Resource Services classifies

  20. Plasma Aerodynamic Control Effectors for Improved Wind Turbine Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehul P. Patel; Srikanth Vasudevan; Robert C. Nelson; Thomas C. Corke

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Orbital Research Inc is developing an innovative Plasma Aerodynamic Control Effectors (PACE) technology for improved performance of wind turbines. The PACE system is aimed towards the design of "smart" rotor blades to enhance energy capture and reduce aerodynamic loading and noise using flow-control. The PACE system will provide ability to change aerodynamic loads and pitch distribution across the wind turbine blade without any moving surfaces. Additional benefits of the PACE system include reduced blade structure weight and complexity that should translate into a substantially reduced initial cost. During the Phase I program, the ORI-UND Team demonstrated (proof-of-concept) performance improvements on select rotor blade designs using PACE concepts. Control of both 2-D and 3-D flows were demonstrated. An analytical study was conducted to estimate control requirements for the PACE system to maintain control during wind gusts. Finally, independent laboratory experiments were conducted to identify promising dielectric materials for the plasma actuator, and to examine environmental effects (water and dust) on the plasma actuator operation. The proposed PACE system will be capable of capturing additional energy, and reducing aerodynamic loading and noise on wind turbines. Supplementary benefits from the PACE system include reduced blade structure weight and complexity that translates into reduced initial capital costs.

  1. aerodynamic test facilities: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aerodynamic test facilities First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Adapting to Limitations of...

  2. Aerodynamic Drag Reduction Apparatus For Wheeled Vehicles In Ground Effect

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ortega, Jason M. (Pacifica, CA); Salari, Kambiz (Livermore, CA)

    2005-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for reducing the aerodynamic drag of a wheeled vehicle in a flowstream, the vehicle having a vehicle body and a wheel assembly supporting the vehicle body. The apparatus includes a baffle assembly adapted to be positioned upstream of the wheel assembly for deflecting airflow away from the wheel assembly so as to reduce the incident pressure on the wheel assembly.

  3. AERODYNAMICS AND DESIGN FOR ULTRA-LOW REYNOLDS NUMBER FLIGHT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    AERODYNAMICS AND DESIGN FOR ULTRA-LOW REYNOLDS NUMBER FLIGHT A DISSERTATION SUBMITTED at Reynolds numbers below 10,000, here termed ultra-low Reynolds numbers. The effects of airfoil geometry at ultra-low Reynolds numbers. To further explore this design space, the flow solver has been coupled

  4. Aerodynamic performance measurements of a film-cooled turbine stage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keogh, Rory (Rory Colm), 1968-

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this research is to measure the aerodynamic performance of a film-cooled turbine stage and to quantify the loss caused by film-cooling. A secondary goal of the research is to provide a detailed breakdown of the ...

  5. LABORATORY IV CONSERVATION OF ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Lab IV - 1 LABORATORY IV CONSERVATION OF ENERGY In this lab you will begin to use the principle of conservation of energy to determine the motion resulting from interactions that are difficult to analyze using force concepts alone. You will explore how conservation of energy is applied to real interactions. Keep

  6. Inclusion of nonlinear aerodynamics in the FLAP code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, T. (Solar Energy Research Inst., Golden, CO (USA)) [Solar Energy Research Inst., Golden, CO (USA)

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Horizontal axis wind turbines usually operate with significant portions of the blade in deep stall. This contradicts the assumption in the FLAP code that a linear relation exists between the angle of attack and the lift coefficient. The objective of this paper is to determine the importance of nonlinear aerodynamics in the prediction of loads. The FLAP code has been modified to include the nonlinear relationships between the lift and drag coefficients with the angle of attack. The modification affects the calculation of the induced velocities and the aerodynamic loads. This requires an iterative procedure to determine the induced velocities instead of a closed form solution. A more advanced tower interference model has also been added that accounts for both upwind and downwind tower effects. 7 refs., 14 figs.

  7. Synergies Between Generation-IV and Advanced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /17 Outline · Background Gen IV Program Fusion Power Plant Programs · Materials · Environmental Impact of experimental scenarios #12;9/14/2004 16th TOFE: Gen IV + ARIES 10/17 Environmental Impact · Gen IV & Fusion these concepts #12;9/14/2004 16th TOFE: Gen IV + ARIES 6/17 Advanced Fusion Power Plants · ARIES Long history

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - aerodynamic localizer pal Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    using field measurements Shaomin Liu1... . Parameterizations of aerodynamic resistance to heat and water transfer have a significant impact on the ac- curacy... that the diurnal...

  9. Aerodynamic size associations of natural radioactivity with ambient aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bondietti, E.A.; Papastefanou, C.; Rangarajan, C.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aerodynamic size of /sup 214/Pb, /sup 212/Pb, /sup 210/Pb, /sup 7/Be, /sup 32/P, /sup 35/S (as SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/), and stable SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ was measured using cascade impactors. The activity distribution of /sup 212/Pb and /sup 214/Pb, measured by alpha spectroscopy, was largely associated with aerosols smaller than 0.52 ..mu..m. Based on 46 measurements, the activity median aerodynamic diameter of /sup 212/Pb averaged 0.13 ..mu..m (sigma/sub g/ = 2.97), while /sup 214/Pb averaged 0.16 ..mu..m (sigma/sub g/ = 2.86). The larger median size of /sup 214/Pb was attributed to ..cap alpha..-recoil depletion of smaller aerosols following decay of aerosol-associated /sup 218/Po. Subsequent /sup 214/Pb condensation on all aerosols effectively enriches larger aerosols. /sup 212/Pb does not undergo this recoil-driven redistribution. Low-pressure impactor measurements indicated that the mass median aerodynamic diameter of SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ was about three times larger than the activity median diameter /sup 212/Pb, reflecting differences in atmospheric residence times as well as the differences in surface area and volume distributions of the atmospheric aerosol. Cosmogenic radionuclides, especially /sup 7/Be, were associated with smaller aerosols than SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ regardless of season, while /sup 210/Pb distributions in summer measurements were similar to sulfate but smaller in winter measurements. Even considering recoil following /sup 214/Po ..cap alpha..-decay, the avervage /sup 210/Pb labeled aerosol grows by about a factor of two during its atmospheric lifetime. The presence of 5 to 10% of the /sup 7/Be on aerosols greater than 1 ..mu..m was indicative of post-condensation growth, probably either in the upper atmosphere or after mixing into the boundary layer.

  10. Aerodynamic Lightweight Cab Structure Components | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of1 AAcceleratedDepartmentDepartment2AdvisoryAerodynamic Lightweight

  11. Aerodynamic Focusing of High-Density Aerosols D.E. Ruiza,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aerodynamic Focusing of High-Density Aerosols D.E. Ruiza, , L. Gundersona , M.J. Haya , E. Merinob Abstract High-density micron-sized particle aerosols might form the basis for a number of applications-density aerosol focusing for 1µm silica spheres. Preliminary results recover previous findings on aerodynamic

  12. Aerodynamic focusing of high-density aerosols D.E. Ruiz a,n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aerodynamic focusing of high-density aerosols D.E. Ruiz a,n , L.M. Gunderson a , M.J. Hay a , E Accepted 24 May 2014 Available online 17 June 2014 Keywords: Aerodynamic lens High-density aerosol beam Inertial focusing Particle focusing a b s t r a c t High-density micron-sized particle aerosols might form

  13. Aerodynamic Shape Optimization of Airfoils in Ultra-Low Reynolds Number Flow using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Aerodynamic Shape Optimization of Airfoils in Ultra-Low Reynolds Number Flow using Simultaneous;Aerodynamic Shape Optimization of Airfoils in Ultra-Low Reynolds Number Flow using Simultaneous Pseudo Abstract. The paper presents numerical results of optimized airfoils at ultra-low Reynolds numbers

  14. Numerical Investigation of a Wind Turbine Rotor with an aerodynamically redesigned hub-region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Numerical Investigation of a Wind Turbine Rotor with an aerodynamically redesigned hub-region J methods on a redesigned modern Mega-Watt sized wind turbine, where the new design includes an increase of the blade in the vicinity of the wind turbine nacelle, to obtain an aerodynamically more efficient rotor

  15. WIND-TUNNEL STUDY ON AERODYNAMIC PERFORMANCE OF SMALL VERTICAL-AXIS WIND TURBINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leu, Tzong-Shyng "Jeremy"

    1 WIND-TUNNEL STUDY ON AERODYNAMIC PERFORMANCE OF SMALL VERTICAL-AXIS WIND TURBINES J. J. Miau*1 were carried out to study the aerodynamic performance of three vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs. On the other hand, the characteristics of unsteady flow around the helical wind turbine were studied with a hot

  16. Wind turbine trailing-edge aerodynamic brake design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quandt, G.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the design of a centrifugally actuated aerodynamic-overspeed device for a horizontal-axis wind turbine. The device will meet the following criteria; (1) It will be effective for airfoil angles of attack 0{degrees} to 45{degrees}. (2) It will be stowed inside the blade profile prior to deployment. (3) It will be capable of offsetting the positive torque produced by the overall blade. (4) Hinge moments will be minimized to lower actuator loads and cost. (5) It will be evaluated as a potential power modulating active rotor-control system. A literature review of aerodynamic braking devices was conducted. Information from the literature review was used to conceptualize the most effective devices for subsequent testing and design. Wind-tunnel test data for several braking devices are presented in this report. Using the data for the most promising configuration, a preliminary design was developed for a MICON 65/13 wind turbine with Phoenix 7.9-m rotor blades.

  17. Aerodynamic testing of a rotating wind turbine blade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butterfield, C.P.; Nelsen, E.N.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aerodynamic, load, flow-visualization, and inflow measurements were taken on a downwind horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT). A video camera mounted on the rotor recorded video images of tufts attached to the low-pressure side of the blade. Strain gages, mounted every 10% of the blade's span, provided load and pressure measurements. Pressure taps at 32 chordwise positions recorded pressure distributions. Wind inflow was measured via a vertical-plane array of anemometers located 10 m upwind. The objectives of the test were to address whether airfoil pressure distributions measured on a rotating blade differed from those measured in the wind tunnel, if radial flow near or in the boundary layer of the airfoil affected pressure distributions, if dynamic stall could result in increased dynamic loads, and if the location of the separation boundary measured on the rotating blade agreed with that measured in two-dimensional flow in the wind tunnel. 6 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Shiloh IV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey JumpAirPower Partners WindSherbino 2ShikunIII JumpIV

  19. Miravalles IV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio:Menomonee|MililaniMindanaoMinuanoIV Jump to: navigation, search

  20. Challenges in Simulation of Aerodynamics, Hydrodynamics, and Mooring-Line Dynamics of Floating Offshore Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matha, D.; Schlipf, M.; Cordle, A.; Pereira, R.; Jonkman, J.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the current major modeling challenges for floating offshore wind turbine design tools and describes aerodynamic and hydrodynamic effects due to rotor and platform motions and usage of non-slender support structures.

  1. Influence of low-speed aerodynamic performance on airport community noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    March, Andrew I. (Andrew Irving)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Properly assessing proposed aviation policies requires a thorough trade study of noise, emissions, fuel consumption, and cost. Aircraft low-speed aerodynamic performance is an important driver of all these impacts, and ...

  2. Effect of aerodynamic uncertainties on unconventional lateral control at high angle of attack

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eller, Bob Gensen

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECT OF AERODYNAMIC UNCERTAINTIES ON UNCONVENTIONAL LATERAL CONTROL AT HIGH ANGLE OF ATTACK A Thesis by BOB GENSEN ELLER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1987 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering EFFECT OF AERODYNAMIC UNCERTAINTIES ON UNCONVENTIONAL LATEHAI CONTROL AT HIGH ANGI. E (&F A'I'TACK A Thesis by BOB GENSEN ELLER Approved as to style and content by: Donald T...

  3. Generation IV International Forum Updates Technology Roadmap...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Updates Technology Roadmap and Builds Future Collaboration Generation IV International Forum Updates Technology Roadmap and Builds Future Collaboration December 31, 2013 - 12:14pm...

  4. Chapter IV LNA Design and Optimization Chapter IVChapter IVChapter IVChapter IV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Amplifier Design and Optimization IV.1 CMOS LNA Design and Optimization Overview Low Noise Amplifier (LNAChapter IV LNA Design and Optimization 84 Chapter IVChapter IVChapter IVChapter IV Low Noise proper circuit depends on the specific application for which the LNA is designed and the designer

  5. IV. Environmental Impact, Setting, and Mitigation Measures LBNL LRDP EIR IV.G-1 ESA / 201074

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jason R.

    IV. Environmental Impact, Setting, and Mitigation Measures LBNL LRDP EIR IV.G-1 ESA / 201074 Public discusses existing surface water and groundwater conditions at LBNL and analyzes the potential Setting IV.G.2.1 Hydrologic Setting Surface Water LBNL is situated within Blackberry and Strawberry

  6. AIAA Applied Aerodynamics Conference, 7th, Seattle, WA, July 31-Aug. 2, 1989, Technical Papers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present conference discusses the comparative aerodynamic behavior of half-span and full-span delta wings, TRANAIR applications to engine/airframe integration, a zonal approach to V/STOL vehicle aerodynamics, an aerodynamic analysis of segmented aircraft configurations in high-speed flight, unstructured grid generation and FEM flow solvers, surface grid generation for flowfields using B-spline surfaces, the use of chimera in supersonic viscous calculations for the F-15, and hypersonic vehicle forebody design studies. Also discussed are the aerothermodynamics of projectiles at hypersonic speeds, flow visualization of wing-rock motion in delta wings, vortex interaction over delta wings at high alpha, the analysis and design of dual-rotation propellers, unsteady pressure loads from plunging airfoils, the effects of riblets on the wake of an airfoil, inverse airfoil design with Navier-Stokes methods, flight testing for a 155-mm base-burn projectile, experimental results on rotor/fuselage aerodynamic interactions, the high-alpha aerodynamic characteristics of crescent and elliptic wings, and the effects of free vortices on lifting surfaces.

  7. Stage IV work hardening in cubic metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rollett, A.D.; Kocks, U.F.; Doherty, R.D.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work hardening of fcc metals at large strains is discussed with reference to the linear stress-strain behavior often observed at large strains and known as Stage IV. The experimental evidence shows that Stage IV is a work hardening phenomenon that is found quite generally, even in pure fcc metals subjected to homogeneous deformation. A simple model for Stage IV in pure metals is presented, based on the accumulation of dislocation debris. Experiments are described for large strain torsion tests on four aluminum alloys. The level and extent of Stage IV scaled with the saturation stress that would represent the end of Stage III in the absence of a Stage IV. Reversing the torsion after large prestrains produced transient reductions in the work hardening. The strain rate sensitivity was also measured before and during the transient and found not to vary significantly. The microstructure observed at large strains in an Mg alloy suggest that Stage IV can occur in the absence of microband formation. Previous proposals for the cause of Stage IV are reviewed and found to be not supported by recent experimental data.

  8. Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Marine Renewable Energy Test...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Marine Renewable Energy Test Centers and Environmental Effects Research Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Marine Renewable Energy Test Centers and...

  9. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies on Vanadium(IV) Electrolyte...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magnetic Resonance Studies on Vanadium(IV) Electrolyte Solutions for Vanadium Redox Flow Battery . Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies on Vanadium(IV) Electrolyte Solutions for...

  10. Developing Supersonic Impactor and Aerodynamic Lens for Separation and Handling of Nano-Sized Particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodarz Ahmadi

    2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A computational model for supersonic flows of compressible gases in an aerodynamic lens with several lenses and in a supersonic/hypersonic impactor was developed. Airflow conditions in the aerodynamic lens were analyzed and contour plots for variation of Mach number, velocity magnitude and pressure field in the lens were evaluated. The nano and micro-particle trajectories in the lens and their focusing and transmission efficiencies were evaluated. The computational model was then applied to design of a aerodynamic lens that could generate focus particle beams while operating under atmospheric conditions. The computational model was also applied to airflow condition in the supersonic/hypersonic impactor. Variations of airflow condition and particle trajectories in the impactor were evaluated. The simulation results could provide understanding of the performance of the supersonic and hypersonic impactors that would be helpful for the design of such systems.

  11. Administration of IV Tylenol (Glass Bottle) IV Acetaminophen ( Tylenol) is clinically appropriate when an antipyretic is indicated or in cases where

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Administration of IV Tylenol (Glass Bottle) IV Acetaminophen ( Tylenol) is clinically appropriate and rectal suppositories for most patients. Since the manufacturer provided bottle of IV Tylenol (OFIRMEV

  12. A Tour of the Aerodynamic and Hydraulic Research Infrastructure, Department of Engineering, University of Leicester

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gorban, Alexander N.

    A Tour of the Aerodynamic and Hydraulic Research Infrastructure, Department of Engineering of the experimental facilities that are more relevant to fundamental and applied flow turbine research. The tour-section wind tunnel. This will be followed by a visit to the Hydraulics laboratory, Engineering Tower (13

  13. The Natural Aerodynamic Sampling of Trace Explosives from the Human Body

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Settles, Gary S.

    The Natural Aerodynamic Sampling of Trace Explosives from the Human Body Gary S. Settles, Huban A. Gowadia, Sean B. Strine, and Timothy E. Johnson Gas Dynamics Lab, Mechanical Engineering Dept., 301D Reber developed for this purpose, their widespread use may be too slow for airport security use and may

  14. Aerodynamic and Performance Measurements on a SWT-2.3-101 Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Medina, P.; Singh, M.; Johansen, J.; Jove, A.R.; Machefaux, E.; Fingersh, L. J.; Schreck, S.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides an overview of a detailed wind turbine field experiment being conducted at NREL under U.S. Department of Energy sponsorship. The purpose of the experiment is to obtain knowledge about the aerodynamics, performance, noise emission and structural characteristics of the Siemens SWT-2.3-101 wind turbine.

  15. Benchmark of aerodynamic cycling helmets using a refined wind tunnel test protocol for helmet drag research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sidelko, Stephanie

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of aerodynamics is very important in the world of cycling. Wind tunnel research is conducted on most of the equipment that is used by a rider and is a critical factor in the advancement of the sport. However, to ...

  16. Fan Aerodynamic Performance Guarantees: Do Your Policies, Procedures and Penalties Provide Adequate Certainty?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaufman, S. G.; Martin, V.; Falk, M. A.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With few exceptions, fan vendors do not provide a written guarantee regarding aerodynamic performance. Some fan vendors even go so far as to state in their terms and conditions of sale that fan performance is not guaranteed unless it is specifically...

  17. AIAA 2002-3298 AERODYNAMICS OF TWO SIDE-BY-SIDE PLATES IN HYPERSONIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riabov, Vladimir V.

    AIAA 2002-3298 AERODYNAMICS OF TWO SIDE-BY-SIDE PLATES IN HYPERSONIC RAREFIED-GAS FLOWS Vladimir V. Riabov* Rivier College, Nashua, New Hampshire 03060 Abstract Hypersonic rarefied-gas flows near two side transitional rarefied-gas-flow conditions (Knudsen numbers from 0.024 to 1.8). Strong influences

  18. Aerodynamics of Two Interfering Simple-Shape Bodies in Hypersonic Rarefied-Gas Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riabov, Vladimir V.

    ] for transition rarefied-gas flows. Supersonic, subsonic, and pressure-driven, low-speed flows in twoAerodynamics of Two Interfering Simple-Shape Bodies in Hypersonic Rarefied-Gas Flows Vladimir V. Riabov Rivier College, Nashua, New Hampshire, USA Abstract. Hypersonic rarefied-gas flows near two side

  19. Structural effects of unsteady aerodynamic forces on horizontal-axis wind turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, M.S.; Shipley, D.E. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). BioServe Space Technologies

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to its renewable nature and abundant resources, wind energy has the potential to fulfill a large portion of this nation`s energy needs. The simplest means of utilizing wind energy is through the use of downwind, horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWT) with fixed-pitch rotors. This configuration regulates the peak power by allowing the rotor blade to aerodynamically stall. The stall point, the point of maximum coefficient of lift, is currently predicted using data obtained from wind tunnel tests. Unfortunately, these tests do not accurately simulate conditions encountered in the field. Flow around the tower and nacelle coupled with inflow turbulence and rotation of the turbine blades create unpredicted aerodynamic forces. Dynamic stall is hypothesized to occur. Such aerodynamic loads are transmitted into the rotor and tower causing structural resonance that drastically reduces the design lifetime of the wind turbine. The current method of alleviating this problem is to structurally reinforce the tower and blades. However, this adds unneeded mass and, therefore, cost to the turbines. A better understanding of the aerodynamic forces and the manner in which they affect the structure would allow for the design of more cost effective and durable wind turbines. Data compiled by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for a downwind HAWT with constant chord, untwisted, fixed-pitch rotors is analyzed. From these data, the actual aerodynamic characteristics of the rotor are being portrayed and the potential effects upon the structure can for the first time be fully analyzed. Based upon their understanding, solutions to the problem of structural resonance are emerging.

  20. Incommensurate Structure of Phosphorus Phase IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujihisa, Hiroshi; Gotoh, Yoshito; Yamawaki, Hiroshi; Sakashita, Mami; Takeya, Satoshi; Honda, Kazumasa [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), AIST Tsukuba Central 5, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan); Akahama, Yuichi; Kawamura, Haruki [Graduate School of Material Science, University of Hyogo, 3-2-1 Kouto, Kamigori, Ako-gun, Hyogo 678-1297 (Japan); Ohishi, Yasuo [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI), 1-1-1 Kouto, Mikazuki, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2007-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    There are six known phases for phosphorus at room temperature under high pressure. Only the structure of phase IV, which exists from 107 GPa to 137 GPa, remains unsolved. We performed a powder x-ray diffraction experiment and a Rietveld analysis and successfully determined its structure to be an incommensurately modulated structure by only 1 site of atomic position. High-pressure phases of halogens and chalcogens have previously been shown to have a similar modulated structure; however, phosphorus phase IV is different from them and was shown to be the third case.

  1. A Computational Method for Determining Distributed Aerodynamic Loads on Planforms of Arbitrary Shape in Compressible Subsonic Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Matthew Alan

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    wings and wings with control surface deflection. A method for accounting for the shift in the locus of aerodynamic centers is also presented and applied to the lifting line theory to mitigate singularities inherent in its formulation. Comparisons...

  2. Neurons and Neural Transmission Part I / IV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of neurons ­ Classification of neurons ­ Neuron Doctrine "Father of modern neuroscience" #12;Ramon y CajalNeurons and Neural Transmission Part I / IV Anton Kapliy February 24, 2009 #12;Nervous system of optical nerve #12;Ramon y Cajal's neurons Information in neurons flows in one direction: "from dendrites

  3. Industrial Waste Landfill IV upgrade package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Y-12 Plant, K-25 Site, and ORNL are managed by DOE`s Operating Contractor (OC), Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) for DOE. Operation associated with the facilities by the Operating Contractor and subcontractors, DOE contractors and the DOE Federal Building result in the generation of industrial solid wastes as well as construction/demolition wastes. Due to the waste streams mentioned, the Y-12 Industrial Waste Landfill IV (IWLF-IV) was developed for the disposal of solid industrial waste in accordance to Rule 1200-1-7, Regulations Governing Solid Waste Processing and Disposal in Tennessee. This revised operating document is a part of a request for modification to the existing Y-12 IWLF-IV to comply with revised regulation (Rule Chapters 1200-1-7-.01 through 1200-1-7-.08) in order to provide future disposal space for the ORR, Subcontractors, and the DOE Federal Building. This revised operating manual also reflects approved modifications that have been made over the years since the original landfill permit approval. The drawings referred to in this manual are included in Drawings section of the package. IWLF-IV is a Tennessee Department of Environmental and Conservation/Division of Solid Waste Management (TDEC/DSWM) Class 11 disposal unit.

  4. Synthesis and Characterization of Pt(IV) Fluorescein Conjugates to Investigate Pt(IV) Intracellular Transformations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Ying

    Pt(IV) anticancer compounds typically operate as prodrugs that are reduced in the hypoxic environment of cancer cells, losing two axial ligands in the process to generate active Pt(II) species. Here we report the synthesis ...

  5. Aerodynamic Models For Hurricanes I. Model description and horizontal motion of hurricane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonov, Arkady I

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aerodynamic models are developed to describe coherent structures and transport processes in hurricanes moving over open seas. The models consist of the lower boundary layer and upper adiabatic layer. Except friction at the air/sea interface,proposed modeling avoids the common turbulent approximations while using explicitly or implicitly basic stability constraints. The models analyze dynamics of upper hurricane adiabatic layer, dynamics and transport processes in hurricane boundary layer, and genesis and maturing of hurricane. The proposed modeling provides a rude enough but consistent analytical description of basic processes in hurricanes. The present paper qualitatively describes the model of mature hurricane, briefly discusses the basic thermodynamic relations and aerodynamic equations, and establishes the principles of horizontal motion for mature hurricane.

  6. Stochastic model for aerodynamic force dynamics on wind turbine blades in unsteady wind inflow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luhur, Muhammad Ramzan; Kühn, Martin; Wächter, Matthias

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper presents a stochastic approach to estimate the aerodynamic forces with local dynamics on wind turbine blades in unsteady wind inflow. This is done by integrating a stochastic model of lift and drag dynamics for an airfoil into the aerodynamic simulation software AeroDyn. The model is added as an alternative to the static table lookup approach in blade element momentum (BEM) wake model used by AeroDyn. The stochastic forces are obtained for a rotor blade element using full field turbulence simulated wind data input and compared with the classical BEM and dynamic stall models for identical conditions. The comparison shows that the stochastic model generates additional extended dynamic response in terms of local force fluctuations. Further, the comparison of statistics between the classical BEM, dynamic stall and stochastic models' results in terms of their increment probability density functions gives consistent results.

  7. Experimental investigation of aerodynamic devices for wind turbine rotational speed control. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, L.S. [Wichita State Univ., KS (United States)

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation was undertaken to identify the aerodynamic performance of five separate trailing-edge control devices, and to evaluate their potential for wind turbine overspeed and power modulation applications. A modular two-dimensional wind tunnel model was constructed and evaluated during extensive wind tunnel testing. Aerodynamic lift, drag, suction, and pressure coefficient data were acquired and analyzed for various control configurations and angles of attack. To further interpret their potential performance, the controls were evaluated numerically using a generic wind turbine geometry and a performance analysis computer program. Results indicated that the Spoiler-Flap control configuration was best softed for turbine braking applications. It exhibited a large negative suction coefficient over a broad angle-of-attack range, and good turbine braking capabilities, especially at low tip-speed ratio.

  8. Fleet Evaluation and Factory Installation of Aerodynamic Heavy Duty Truck Trailers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck, Jason; Salari, Kambiz; Ortega, Jason; Brown, Andrea

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of DE-EE0001552 was to develop and deploy a combination of trailer aerodynamic devices and low rolling resistance tires that reduce fuel consumption of a class 8 heavy duty tractor-trailer combination vehicle by 15%. There were 3 phases of the project: Phase 1 – Perform SAE Typed 2 track tests with multiple device combinations. Phase 2 – Conduct a fleet evaluation with selected device combination. Phase 3 – Develop the devices required to manufacture the aerodynamic trailer. All 3 phases have been completed. There is an abundance of available trailer devices on the market, and fleets and owner operators have awareness of them and are purchasing them. The products developed in conjunction with this project are at least in their second round of refinement. The fleet test undertaken showed an improvement of 5.5 – 7.8% fuel economy with the devices (This does not include tire contribution).

  9. APD IV, 22-25 April 2013, NIST Bill David,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    APD IV, 22-25 April 2013, NIST Bill David, ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK, 22-25 April 2013, NIST , but... RAL: Diamond & ISIS ISIS TSII Oxford Chemistry Oxford #12;APD IV, 22-ray diffractometer CMS @ CERN CMS @ CERN (II) WISH detectors PILATUS ISIS electronics PILATUS electronics #12;APD IV

  10. Texas Rice, Volume IV, Number 6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas A&M University System Agricultural Research and Extension Center Beaumont, Texas August 2004 Volume IV Number 6 Texas Rice Bacterial and Fungal Endophytes in Rice Endophytes are plant-associ- ated organisms that often form... plant/endophyte associations, may infer resistance to insects such as aphids and armyworms. The following is a layman’s review of research conducted by scientists worldwide on endophytic continued on page 4 associations that pertain to rice pro- duction...

  11. Numerical simulation of VAWT stochastic aerodynamic loads produced by atmospheric turbauence: VAWT-SAL code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Homicz, G.F.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Blade fatigue life is an important element in determining the economic viability of the Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT). A principal source of blade fatigue is thought to be the stochastic (i.e., random) aerodynamic loads created by atmospheric turbulence. This report describes the theoretical background of the VAWT Stochastic Aerodynamic Loads (VAWT-SAL) computer code, whose purpose is to numerically simulate these random loads, given the rotor geometry, operating conditions, and assumed turbulence properties. A Double-Multiple-Stream Tube (DMST) analysis is employed to model the rotor's aerodynamic response. The analysis includes the effects of Reynolds number variations, different airfoil sections and chord lengths along the blade span, and an empirical model for dynamic stall effects. The mean ambient wind is assumed to have a shear profile which is described by either a power law or a logarithmic variation with height above ground. Superimposed on this is a full 3-D field of turbulence: i.e., in addition to random fluctuations in time, the turbulence is allowed to vary randomly in planes perpendicular to the mean wind. The influence of flow retardation on the convection of turbulence through the turbine is also modeled. Calculations are presented for the VAWT 34-m Test Bed currently in operation at Bushland, Texas. Predicted time histories of the loads, as well as their Fourier spectra, are presented and discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on the differences between so-called steady-state'' (mean wind only) predictions, and those produced with turbulence present. Somewhat surprisingly, turbulence is found to be capable of either increasing or decreasing the average output power, depending on the turbine's tip-speed ratio. A heuristic explanation for such behavior is postulated, and a simple formula is derived for predicting the magnitude of this effect without the need for a full stochastic simulation. 41 refs., 32 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Impacts of Title IV in Maryland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherwell, J. [Dept. of Natural Resources, Annapolis, MD (United States); Ellis, H. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Corio, L.; Seinfelt, J. [Versar, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Maryland Department of Natural Resources` Power Plant Research Program has evaluated the environmental effects of acid deposition on Maryland`s air, land, water (especially the Chesapeake Bay), and human resources since the mid-1980`s. Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA90) has focused much attention on the mandated reductions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) to control acid deposition. Baseline data on acidic deposition and air emissions/pollution control for NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} acquired through PPRP studies have proved useful in evaluating the impacts of Title IV on Maryland power plants and resources. Three example programs are discussed: The first is an evaluation of SO{sub 2} emissions on ecosystems through the use of critical loads--the amount of acid rain that an ecosystem can tolerate without continuing to acidify. Results support the use of broadly based emissions trading scenarios: The second study is an evaluation of the potential for reducing nitrate loading in the Chesapeake Bay by reducing NO{sub x} emissions. Results indicate substantial NO{sub x} emission reductions could offer significant reductions in nitrate deposition to the Bay: The final study is a review of the impacts of Title IV on the Maryland coal industry and the prospects for coal cleaning and advanced combustion technologies. Current results indicate that Maryland coal will meet Phase 2 SO{sub 2} emission standards using advanced combustion techniques, such as fluidized bed technologies, but that additional emissions controls, such as a scrubber would be required in a conventional boiler.

  13. Aerodynamic Models for Hurricanes II. Model of the upper hurricane layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonov, Arkady I

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This second paper of the series (see the first one in [1]) models the dynamics and structure of upper hurricane layer in adiabatic approximation. Formulation of simplified aerodynamic model allows analytically express the radial istributions of pressure and wind speed components. The vertical evolution of these distributions and hurricane structure in the layer are described by a coupled set of equations for the vertical mass flux and vertical momentum balance, averaged over the eye wall cross section. Several realistic predictions of the model are demonstrated, including the change of directions for the component of radial wind speed and angular velocity of hurricane with altitude.

  14. Variation in the aerodynamic drag coefficient due to changes in the shape of an automobile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, John Gilbert

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Air Density C HAFTER I IliiTRODUCTION During the early years of the automobile, little or no effort was made to explore the problem of aerodynamic drag. This situation was the result oi' two factors. First, the passenger cars of shat time were.... The lack of public acceptance of these cars was caused primarily by their being too evolut. 'onary in concept. Foi. lowing this experience, changes in ai tomobile shapes have tended to be more evolutionary. Experimental work, both in the laboratory...

  15. New Materials for NGNP/Gen IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert W. Swindeman; Douglas L. Marriott

    2009-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The bounding conditions were briefly summarized for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) that is the leading candidate in the Department of Energy Generation IV reactor program. Metallic materials essential to the successful development and proof of concept for the NGNP were identified. The literature bearing on the materials technology for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors was reviewed with emphasis on the needs identified for the NGNP. Several materials were identified for a more thorough study of their databases and behavioral features relative to the requirements ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III, Division 1, Subsection NH.

  16. Gen IV Materials Handbook Functionalities and Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Weiju [ORNL

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is prepared for navigation and operation of the Gen IV Materials Handbook, with architecture description and new user access initiation instructions. Development rationale and history of the Handbook is summarized. The major development aspects, architecture, and design principles of the Handbook are briefly introduced to provide an overview of its past evolution and future prospects. Detailed instructions are given with examples for navigating the constructed Handbook components and using the main functionalities. Procedures are provided in a step-by-step fashion for Data Upload Managers to upload reports and data files, as well as for new users to initiate Handbook access.

  17. Texas Rice, Volume IV, Number 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    have from 1-8 markers multiplexed. Last year they produced 1.3 million data points using 3 machines, about 25,000 data points a week – or about 8,333 data points per machine per week. RiceTec continued... continued on next page seed from parent lines...Texas A&M University System Agricultural Research and Extension Center Beaumont, Texas September 2004 Volume IV Number 7 Texas Rice Hybrid Rice: Another Tool in Varietal Improvement The breeding method in which crosses are made between...

  18. Generation IV International Forum | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM Flash2011-12 OPAMGeneral Guidance on NEPA GeneralForum Generation IV

  19. Pomeroy IV Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BV Jump to: navigation, searchPocatelloIII Wind Farm Jump to:IV Wind

  20. Cours-IV/Clavin2015.key

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution AndControllingCoolCorrectiveCosts ofCountingIV

  1. Meadow Lake IV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend <StevensMcClellan,II Jump to: navigation,MeadIII Jump to:IV

  2. Mountain View IV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasole IncMinutemanVistaZephyr)Mountain Air JumpIV Jump to:

  3. SECTION IV: ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR SCIENCE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited Release PrintedDEVIATIONS F OSuperallowedProjectileIV:

  4. Multipolar corneal-shaping electrode with flexible removable skirt

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doss, James D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure relates to a multipolar probe using radiofrequency energy to reshape the cornea of an eye. The surface of the cornea is flushed continuously with a conductive coolant during operation.

  5. Modeling piston skirt lubrication in internal combustion engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bai, Dongfang, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ever-increasing demand for reduction of the undesirable emissions from the internal combustion engines propels broader effort in auto industry to design more fuel efficient engines. One of the major focuses is the reduction ...

  6. ARIES-IV Nested Shell Blanket Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, C.P.C.; Redler, K.; Reis, E.E.; Will, R. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Cheng, E. [TSI Research, Inc. (United States); Hasan, C.M.; Sharafat, S. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ARIES-IV Nested Shell Blanket (NSB) Design is an alternate blanket concept of the ARIES-IV low activation helium-cooled reactor design. The reference design has the coolant routed in the poloidal direction and the inlet and outlet plena are located at the top and bottom of the torus. The NSB design has the high velocity coolant routed in the toroidal direction and the plena are located behind the blanket. This is of significance since the selected structural material is SiC-composite. The NSB is designed to have key high performance components with characteristic dimensions of no larger than 2 m. These components can be brazed to form the blanket module. For the diverter design, we eliminated the use of W as the divertor coating material by relying on the successful development of the gaseous divertor concept. The neutronics and thermal-hydraulic performance of both blanket concepts are similar. The selected blanket and divertor configurations can also meet all the projected structural, neutronics and thermal-hydraulics design limits and requirements. With the selected blanket and divertor materials, the design has a level of safety assurance rate of I (LSA-1), which indicates an inherently safe design.

  7. Coupling a Mesoscale Numerical Weather Prediction Model with Large-Eddy Simulation for Realistic Wind Plant Aerodynamics Simulations (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Draxl, C.; Churchfield, M.; Mirocha, J.; Lee, S.; Lundquist, J.; Michalakes, J.; Moriarty, P.; Purkayastha, A.; Sprague, M.; Vanderwende, B.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind plant aerodynamics are influenced by a combination of microscale and mesoscale phenomena. Incorporating mesoscale atmospheric forcing (e.g., diurnal cycles and frontal passages) into wind plant simulations can lead to a more accurate representation of microscale flows, aerodynamics, and wind turbine/plant performance. Our goal is to couple a numerical weather prediction model that can represent mesoscale flow [specifically the Weather Research and Forecasting model] with a microscale LES model (OpenFOAM) that can predict microscale turbulence and wake losses.

  8. Advanced Aerodynamic Devices to Improve the Performance, Economics, Handling, and Safety of Heavy Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert J. Englar

    2001-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Research is being conducted at the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) to develop advanced aerodynamic devices to improve the performance, economics, stability, handling and safety of operation of Heavy Vehicles by using previously-developed and flight-tested pneumatic (blown) aircraft technology. Recent wind-tunnel investigations of a generic Heavy Vehicle model with blowing slots on both the leading and trailing edges of the trailer have been conducted under contract to the DOE Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies. These experimental results show overall aerodynamic drag reductions on the Pneumatic Heavy Vehicle of 50% using only 1 psig blowing pressure in the plenums, and over 80% drag reductions if additional blowing air were available. Additionally, an increase in drag force for braking was confirmed by blowing different slots. Lift coefficient was increased for rolling resistance reduction by blowing only the top slot, while downforce was produced for traction increase by blowing only the bottom. Also, side force and yawing moment were generated on either side of the vehicle, and directional stability was restored by blowing the appropriate side slot. These experimental results and the predicted full-scale payoffs are presented in this paper, as is a discussion of additional applications to conventional commercial autos, buses, motor homes, and Sport Utility Vehicles.

  9. Aerodynamic pressure and flow-visualization measurement from a rotating wind turbine blade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butterfield, C.P.

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aerodynamic, load, flow-visualization, and inflow measurements have been made on a 10-m, three-bladed, downwind, horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT). A video camera mounted on the rotor was used to record nighttime and daytime video images of tufts attached to the low-pressure side of a constant-chord, zero-twist blade. Load measurements were made using strain gages mounted at every 10% of the blade's span. Pressure measurements were made at 80% of the blade's span. Pressure taps were located at 32 chordwise positions, revealing pressure distributions comparable with wind tunnel data. Inflow was measured using a vertical-plane array of eight propvane and five triaxial (U-V-W) prop-type anemometers located 10 m upwind in the predominant wind direction. One objective of this comprehensive research program was to study the effects of blade rotation on aerodynamic behavior below, near, and beyond stall. To this end, flow patterns are presented here that reveal the dynamic and steady behavior of flow conditions on the blade. Pressure distributions are compared to flow patterns and two-dimensional wind tunnel data. Separation boundary locations are shown that change as a function of spanwise location, pitch angle, and wind speed. 6 refs., 23 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Aerodynamically induced radial forces in a centrifugal gas compressor: Part 2 -- Computational investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flathers, M.B.; Bache, G.E.

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radial loads and direction of a centrifugal gas compressor containing a high specific speed mixed flow impeller and a single tongue volute were determined both experimentally and computationally at both design and off-design conditions. The experimental methodology was developed in conjunction with a traditional ASME PTC-10 closed-loop test to determine radial load and direction. The experimental study is detailed in Part 1 of this paper (Moore and Flathers, 1998). The computational method employs a commercially available, fully three-dimensional viscous code to analyze the impeller and the volute interaction. An uncoupled scheme was initially used where the impeller and volute were analyzed as separate models using a common vaneless diffuser geometry. The two calculations were then repeated until the boundary conditions at a chosen location in the common vaneless diffuser were nearly the same. Subsequently, a coupled scheme was used where the entire stage geometry was analyzed in one calculation, thus eliminating the need for manual iteration of the two independent calculations. In addition to radial load and direction information, this computational procedure also provided aerodynamic stage performance. The effect of impeller front face and rear face cavities was also quantified. The paper will discuss computational procedures, including grid generation and boundary conditions, as well as comparisons of the various computational schemes to experiment. The results of this study will show the limitations and benefits of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) for determination of radial load, direction, and aerodynamic stage performance.

  11. Computerized method and system for designing an aerodynamic focusing lens stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gard, Eric (San Francisco, CA); Riot, Vincent (Oakland, CA); Coffee, Keith (Diablo Grande, CA); Woods, Bruce (Livermore, CA); Tobias, Herbert (Kensington, CA); Birch, Jim (Albany, CA); Weisgraber, Todd (Brentwood, CA)

    2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A computerized method and system for designing an aerodynamic focusing lens stack, using input from a designer related to, for example, particle size range to be considered, characteristics of the gas to be flowed through the system, the upstream temperature and pressure at the top of a first focusing lens, the flow rate through the aerodynamic focusing lens stack equivalent at atmosphere pressure; and a Stokes number range. Based on the design parameters, the method and system determines the total number of focusing lenses and their respective orifice diameters required to focus the particle size range to be considered, by first calculating for the orifice diameter of the first focusing lens in the Stokes formula, and then using that value to determine, in iterative fashion, intermediate flow values which are themselves used to determine the orifice diameters of each succeeding focusing lens in the stack design, with the results being output to a designer. In addition, the Reynolds numbers associated with each focusing lens as well as exit nozzle size may also be determined to enhance the stack design.

  12. Modcomp MAX IV System Processors reference guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cummings, J.

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A user almost always faces a big problem when having to learn to use a new computer system. The information necessary to use the system is often scattered throughout many different manuals. The user also faces the problem of extracting the information really needed from each manual. Very few computer vendors supply a single Users Guide or even a manual to help the new user locate the necessary manuals. Modcomp is no exception to this, Modcomp MAX IV requires that the user be familiar with the system file usage which adds to the problem. At General Atomics there is an ever increasing need for new users to learn how to use the Modcomp computers. This paper was written to provide a condensed Users Reference Guide'' for Modcomp computer users. This manual should be of value not only to new users but any users that are not Modcomp computer systems experts. This Users Reference Guide'' is intended to provided the basic information for the use of the various Modcomp System Processors necessary to, create, compile, link-edit, and catalog a program. Only the information necessary to provide the user with a basic understanding of the Systems Processors is included. This document provides enough information for the majority of programmers to use the Modcomp computers without having to refer to any other manuals. A lot of emphasis has been placed on the file description and usage for each of the System Processors. This allows the user to understand how Modcomp MAX IV does things rather than just learning the system commands.

  13. CMAD IV 11/14/96 Information Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    utilities, power pools, vendors etc.. #12;CMAD IV 11/14/96 #12; #12; GridCo LineCo PoolCo Energy Merchant INFO INFO INFO $ $ $ PWR PWR PWR #12;CMAD IV 11/14/96 "Future" Is At Hand · Federal Energy Regulatory protection and audit practices inadequate. · Internal priorities limiting attention to security concerns

  14. MOOS-IvP Autonomy Tools Users Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin, Michael R.

    2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes seven common MOOS-IvP autonomy tools. The uHelmScope application provides a run-time scoping window into the state of an active IvP Helm executing its mission. The pMarineViewer application is a ...

  15. MOOS-IvP Autonomy Tools Users Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin, Michael R.

    2010-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes fifteen MOOS-IvP autonomy tools. uHelmScope provides a run-time scoping window into the state of an active IvP Helm executing its mission. pMarineViewer is a geo-based GUI tool for rendering marine ...

  16. Aerodynamic Analysis of Intermodal Freight Trains Using Machine Vision World Congress on Railway Research, May 22-26, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    train loading can be more energy efficient. #12; 2 1.0 Introduction One of the largest sources for North American freight railroads and has experienced considerable growth over the past few decades developed to automatically monitor and analyze an intermodal train's aerodynamic efficiency based

  17. Subunit IV-PetL chimeras in cytochrome b6f complex Chimeric fusions of subunit IV and PetL in the b6 f complex of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subunit IV-PetL chimeras in cytochrome b6f complex - 1 - Chimeric fusions of subunit IV and Pet IV-PetL chimeras in cytochrome b6 f complex Additional keywords : PetG, PetM, PetN, transmembrane topology, mass spectrometry, State Transitions, protein phosphorylation. #12;Subunit IV-PetL chimeras

  18. Actinide Corroles: Synthesis and Characterization of Thorium(IV) and Uranium(IV) bis(-chloride) Dimers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Ashleigh L.; Buckley, Heather L.; Gryko, Daniel T.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Arnold, John

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first synthesis and structural characterization of actinide corroles is presented. Thorium(IV) and uranium(IV) macrocycles of Mes2(p-OMePh)corrole were synthesised and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, UV-Visible spectroscopy, variable-temperature 1H NMR, ESI mass spectrometry and cyclic voltammetry.

  19. New mono-organotin (IV) dithiocarbamate complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muthalib, Amirah Faizah Abdul; Baba, Ibrahim [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Eighteen new mono-organotin dithiocarbamate compounds derived each nine from methyltin(IV) and phenyltin(IV) reacted using in-situ method with various type of N-dialkylamine together with carbon disulphide with the ratio of 1:3:3. Elemental and gravimetric analysis showed that the general formula of these compounds were RSnCl[S{sub 2}CNR?R?]{sub 2} (R= Ph, CH{sub 3}, R? = CH{sub 3}, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}, C{sub 7}H{sub 7} and R? = C{sub 2}H{sub 5}, C{sub 6}H{sub 11}, iC{sub 3}H{sub 7}, C{sub 7}H{sub 7}). These compounds had been characterized by infrared spectroscopy, ultraviolet spectroscopy, {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray crystallography. The infrared spectra of these compounds showed three important peaks indicating the formation of dithiocarbamate compounds, ?(CN), ?(CS) and ?(Sn-S) band which present in the region of 1444–1519, 954–1098 and 318–349 cm{sup ?1} respectively. The ultraviolet-visible spectra showed an absorption band for the ? - ?* transition of NCS group in the range of 253 – 259 nm due to the intramolecular charge transfer of the ligand. The {sup 13}C NMR spectra showed an important shift for ?(N{sup 13}CS{sub 2}) in the range of 196.8 – 201.9 ppm.. Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies showed three new structures with the general formula of PhSnCl[S{sub 2}CN(Et)(i?Pr)]{sub 2}, MeSnCl[S{sub 2}CN(Me)(Cy)]{sub 2} and MeSnCl[S{sub 2}CN(i?Pr)(CH{sub 2}Ph)]{sub 2}. All structures having a distorted octahedral geometry set by CClS{sub 4} donor atom from the two chelating dithiocarbamate ligands.

  20. Test, Evaluation, and Demonstration of Practical Devices/Systems to Reduce Aerodynamic Drag of Tractor/Semitrailer Combination Unit Trucks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Smith; Karla Younessi; Matt Markstaller; Dan Schlesinger; Bhaskar Bhatnagar; Donald Smith; Bruno Banceu; Ron Schoon; V.K. Sharma; Mark Kachmarsky; Srikant Ghantae; Michael Sorrels; Conal Deedy; Justin Clark; Skip Yeakel; Michael D. Laughlin; Charlotte Seigler; Sidney Diamond

    2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Class 8 heavy-duty trucks account for over three-quarters of the total diesel fuel used by commercial trucks (trucks with GVWRs more than 10,000 pounds) in the United States each year. At the highway speeds at which these trucks travel (i.e., 60 mph or greater), aerodynamic drag is a major part of total horsepower needed to move the truck down the highway, Reductions in aerodynamic drag can yield measurable benefits in fuel economy through the use of relatively inexpensive and simple devices. The goal of this project was to examine a number of aerodynamic drag reduction devices and systems and determine their effectiveness in reducing aerodynamic drag of Class 8 tractor/semitrailer combination-units, thus contributing to DOE's goal of reducing transportation petroleum use. The project team included major heavy truck manufacturers in the United States, along with the management and industry expertise of the Truck Manufacturers Association as the lead investigative organization. The Truck Manufacturers Association (TMA) is the national trade association representing the major North American manufacturers of Class 6-8 trucks (GVWRs over 19,500 lbs). Four major truck manufacturers participated in this project with TMA: Freightliner LLC; International Truck and Engine Corporation; Mack Trucks Inc.; and Volvo Trucks North America, Inc. Together, these manufacturers represent over three-quarters of total Class 8 truck sales in the United States. These four manufacturers pursued complementary research efforts as part of this project. The project work was separated into two phases conducted over a two-year period. In Phase I, candidate aerodynamic devices and systems were screened to focus research and development attention on devices that offered the most potential. This was accomplished using full-size vehicle tests, scale model tests, and computational fluid dynamics analyses. In Phase II, the most promising devices were installed on full-size trucks and their effect on fuel economy was determined, either through on-road testing or full-size wind tunnel testing. All of the manufacturers worked with devices and systems that offer practical solutions to reduce aerodynamic drag, accounting for functionality, durability, cost effectiveness, reliability, and maintainability. The project team members and their roles and responsibilities are shown in Figure 2-1. Figure 2-2 shows the Phase I and II project schedules for all four projects and associated management activities.

  1. ARM - Field Campaign - ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements IV (ARM-ACME IV)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006Observations of the Madden(ARM-ACME III)IV

  2. Cotton responses to mepiquat chloride and PGR-IV treatments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biles, Stephen Paul

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plant growth regulators (PGRS) are applied to cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) to control vegetative growth, increase yields and hasten maturity. Two of these PGRS, mepiquat chloride (MC) and PGR-IV, affect plant growth in different ways. MC inhibits...

  3. actinide iv borohydrides: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Na(H3 Girolami, Gregory S. 8 Influence of addition order and contact time on thorium (IV) retention by hematite in the presence Physics Websites Summary: 1 Influence of...

  4. action phase iv: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on all fields of N4 vector multiplet. We also consider the derivation of leading low-enrgy effective action at two loops. I. L. Buchbinder 2004-02-12 256 Painleve IV and...

  5. Cotton responses to mepiquat chloride and PGR-IV treatments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biles, Stephen Paul

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plant growth regulators (PGRS) are applied to cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) to control vegetative growth, increase yields and hasten maturity. Two of these PGRS, mepiquat chloride (MC) and PGR-IV, affect plant growth in ...

  6. Synthesis, Characterization, and Cytotoxicity of Platinum(IV) Carbamate Complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Justin Jeff

    The synthesis, characterization, and cytotoxicity of eight new platinum(IV) complexes having the general formula cis,cis,trans-[Pt(NH[subscript 3)[subscript 2]Cl[subscript 2](O[subscript 2]CNHR)[subscript 2

  7. Advanced Electric Systems and Aerodynamics for Efficiency Improvements in Heavy Duty Trucks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry Slone; Jeffrey Birkel

    2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Electric Systems and Aerodynamics for Efficiency Improvements in Heavy Duty Trucks program (DE-FC26-04NT42189), commonly referred to as the AES program, focused on areas that will primarily benefit fuel economy and improve heat rejection while driving over the road. The AES program objectives were to: (1) Analyze, design, build, and test a cooling system that provided a minimum of 10 percent greater heat rejection in the same frontal area with no increase in parasitic fan load. (2) Realize fuel savings with advanced power management and acceleration assist by utilizing an integrated starter/generator (ISG) and energy storage devices. (3) Quantify the effect of aerodynamic drag due to the frontal shape mandated by the area required for the cooling system. The program effort consisted of modeling and designing components for optimum fuel efficiency, completing fabrication of necessary components, integrating these components into the chassis test bed, completing controls programming, and performance testing the system both on a chassis dynamometer and on the road. Emission control measures for heavy-duty engines have resulted in increased engine heat loads, thus introducing added parasitic engine cooling loads. Truck electrification, in the form of thermal management, offers technological solutions to mitigate or even neutralize the effects of this trend. Thermal control offers opportunities to avoid increases in cooling system frontal area and forestall reduced fuel economy brought about by additional aerodynamic vehicle drag. This project explored such thermal concepts by installing a 2007 engine that is compliant with current regulations and bears additional heat rejection associated with meeting these regulations. This newer engine replaced the 2002 engine from a previous project that generated less heat rejection. Advanced power management, utilizing a continuously optimized and controlled power flow between electric components, can offer additional fuel economy benefits to the heavy-duty trucking industry. Control software for power management brings added value to the power distribution and energy storage architecture on board a truck with electric accessories and an ISG. The research team has built upon a previous truck electrification project, formally, 'Parasitic Energy Loss Reduction and Enabling Technologies for Class 7/8 Trucks', DE-FC04-2000AL6701, where the fundamental concept of electrically-driven accessories replacing belt/gear-driven accessories was demonstrated on a Kenworth T2000 truck chassis. The electrical accessories, shown in Figure 1, were controlled to provide 'flow on demand' variable-speed operation and reduced parasitic engine loads for increased fuel economy. These accessories also provided solutions for main engine idle reduction in long haul trucks. The components and systems of the current project have been integrated into the same Kenworth T2000 truck platform. Reducing parasitic engine loading by decoupling accessory loads from the engine and driving them electrically has been a central concept of this project. Belt or gear-driven engine accessories, such as water pump, air conditioning compressor, or air compressor, are necessarily tied to the engine speed dictated by the current vehicle operating conditions. These conventional accessory pumps are sized to provide adequate flow or pressure at low idle or peak torque speeds, resulting in excess flow or pressure at cruising or rated speeds. The excess flow is diverted through a pressure-minimizing device such as a relief valve thereby expending energy to drive unnecessary and inefficient pump operation. This inefficiency causes an increased parasitic load to the engine, which leads to a loss of usable output power and decreased fuel economy. Controlling variable-speed electric motors to provide only the required flow or pressure of a particular accessory system can yield significant increases in fuel economy for a commercial vehicle. Motor loads at relatively high power levels (1-5 kW, or higher) can be efficiently provided

  8. Remote Handling Experiments with the MASCOT IV Servomanipulator at JET and Prospects of Enhancements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Remote Handling Experiments with the MASCOT IV Servomanipulator at JET and Prospects of Enhancements

  9. Inflow Characterization and Aerodynamics Measurements on a SWT-2.3-101 Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Medina, P.; Singh, M.; Johansen, J.; Jove, A. R.; Fingersh, L.; Schreck, S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Post processing techniques for aerodynamic data acquired from a Siemens SWT-2.3101 turbine have been developed and applied in this paper. The turbine is installed at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as part of Cooperative Research and Development Agreement between Siemens Wind Power and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsorship. The results indicate that the use of these corrections is essential for accurate analysis of the data. An example of local inflow angles, velocities, and inflow velocity over the rotor plane derived from measurements from a 5-hole probe is also presented. Finally, the pressure measurements are used to characterize unsteady phenomenon, namely, rotational augmentation and dynamic stall on an inboard station. The results show that the rotational augmentation can considerably increase the attached flow regime compared to the 2D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) results. The dynamic stall event was seen to significantly delay the stall. Furthermore, the non-dimensionalized vortex convection derived from the dynamic stall event was found to agree well with results from others studies.

  10. Inflow Characterization and Aerodynamics Measurements on a SWT-2.3-101 Wind Turbine: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Medina, P.; Singh, M.; Johansen, J.; Jove, A.; Fingersh, L.; Schreck, S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Post processing techniques for aerodynamic data acquired from a Siemens SWT-2.3-101 turbine have been developed and applied in this paper. The turbine is installed at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as part of Cooperative Research And Development Agreement between Siemens Wind Power and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsorship. The results indicate that the use of these corrections is essential for accurate analysis of the data. An example of local inflow angles, velocities, and inflow velocity over the rotor plane derived from measurements from a 5-hole probe is also presented. Finally the pressure measurements are used to characterize unsteady phenomenon, namely, rotational augmentation and dynamic stall on an inboard station. The results show that the rotational augmentation can considerably increase the attached flow regime compared to the 2D CFD results. The dynamic stall event was seen to significantly delay the stall. Furthermore, the nondimensionalized vortex convection derived from the dynamic stall event was found to agree well with results from others studies.

  11. Preliminary Measurements From A New Flat Plate Facility For Aerodynamic Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. M. McEligot; D. W. Nigg; E. J. Walsh; D. Hernon; M.R.D. Davies

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper details the design and preliminary measurements used in the characterisation of a new flat plate research facility. The facility is designed specifically to aid in the understanding of entropy generation throughout the boundary layer with special attention given to non-equilibrium flows. Hot-wire measurements were obtained downstream of two turbulence generating grids. The turbulence intensity, integral and dissipation length scale ranges measured are 1.6%-7%, 5mm-17mm and 0.7mm-7mm, respectively. These values compared well to existing correlations. The flow downstream of both grids was found to be homogenous and isotropic. Flow visualisation is employed to determine aerodynamic parameters such as flow 2-dimensionality and the effect of the flap angle on preventing separation at the leading edge. The flow was found to be 2-dimensional over all measurement planes. The non-dimensional pressure distribution of a modern turbine blade suction surface is simulated on the flat plate through the use of a variable upper wall. The Reynolds number range based on wetted plate length and inlet velocity is 70,000-4,000,000.

  12. Endonuclease IV of Escherichia coli is induced by paraquat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, E.; Weiss, B.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The addition of paraquat (methyl viologen) to a growing culture of Escherichia coli K-12 led within 1 hr to a 10- to 20-fold increase in the level of endonuclease IV, a DNase for apurinic/apyrimidinic sites. The induction was blocked by chloramphenicol. Increases of 3-fold or more were also seen with plumbagin, menadione, and phenazine methosulfate. H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ produced no more than a 2-fold increase in endonuclease IV activity. The following agents had no significant effect: streptonigrin, nitrofurantoin, tert-butyl hydroperoxide, ..gamma.. rays, 260-nm UV radiation, methyl methanesulfonate, mitomycin C, and ascorbate. Paraquat, plumbagin, menadione, and phenazine methosulfate are known to generate superoxide radical anions via redox cycling in vivo. A mutant lacking superoxide dismutase was unusually sensitive to induction by paraquat. In addition, endonuclease IV could be induced by merely growing the mutant in pure O/sub 2/. The levels of endonuclease IV in uninduced or paraquat-treated cells were unaffected by mutations of oxyR, a H/sub 2/O/sub 2/-inducible gene that governs an oxidative-stress regulon. The results indicate that endonuclease IV is an inducible DNA-repair enzyme and that its induction can be mediated via the production of superoxide radicals.

  13. Automatic generation and analysis of solar cell IV curves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kraft, Steven M.; Jones, Jason C.

    2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A photovoltaic system includes multiple strings of solar panels and a device presenting a DC load to the strings of solar panels. Output currents of the strings of solar panels may be sensed and provided to a computer that generates current-voltage (IV) curves of the strings of solar panels. Output voltages of the string of solar panels may be sensed at the string or at the device presenting the DC load. The DC load may be varied. Output currents of the strings of solar panels responsive to the variation of the DC load are sensed to generate IV curves of the strings of solar panels. IV curves may be compared and analyzed to evaluate performance of and detect problems with a string of solar panels.

  14. Tethys and Annex IV Progress Report for FY 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanna, Luke A.; Butner, R. Scott; Whiting, Jonathan M.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) environmental Impacts Knowledge Management System, dubbed “Tethys” after the mythical Greek titaness of the seas, is being developed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to support the U.S. Department of Energy’s Wind and Water Power Program (WWPP). Functioning as a smart database, Tethys enables its users to identify key words or terms to help gather, organize and make available information and data pertaining to the environmental effects of MHK and offshore wind (OSW) energy development. By providing and categorizing relevant publications within a simple and searchable database, Tethys acts as a dissemination channel for information and data which can be utilized by regulators, project developers and researchers to minimize the environmental risks associated with offshore renewable energy developments and attempt to streamline the permitting process. Tethys also houses a separate content-related Annex IV data base with identical functionality to the Tethys knowledge base. Annex IV is a collaborative project among member nations of the International Energy Agency (IEA) Ocean Energy Systems – Implementing Agreement (OES-IA) that examines the environmental effects of ocean energy devices and projects. The U.S. Department of Energy leads the Annex IV working with federal partners such as the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), and the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). While the Annex IV database contains technical reports and journal articles, it is primarily focused on the collection of project site and research study metadata forms (completed by MHK researchers and developers around the world, and collected by PNNL) which provide information on environmental studies and the current progress of the various international MHK developments in the Annex IV member nations. The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the content, accessibility and functionality enhancements made to the Annex IV and Tethys knowledge bases in FY12.

  15. Surface plasmon resonance shows that type IV pili are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buckling, Angus

    REPORT Surface plasmon resonance shows that type IV pili are important in surface attachment. Here, using the surface analytical technique, surface plasmon resonance (SPR), we follow the attachment; pili; surface plasmon resonance; biofilm formation 1. INTRODUCTION Bacterial attachment is a critical

  16. Economic Impact Report BInghamton UnIvERsIty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    Economic Impact Report 2007 #12;BInghamton UnIvERsIty 8:1 return on investment The term "return will be returned to the state economy and $6 to the local economy -- delivering an economic impact of $8.65 billion as an engine of economic growth that improves the financial health of our region and state. EconomIc Impact

  17. Appendix IV. Risks Associated with Conventional Uranium Milling Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ", uranium is removed from the processed ore with sulfuric acid. Sodium chlorate is also addedAppendix IV. Risks Associated with Conventional Uranium Milling Operations Introduction Although uranium mill tailings are considered byproduct materials under the AEA and not TENORM, EPA's Science

  18. Constraints to Stop Deforestation FB IV Informatik, Universitat Trier,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seidl, Helmut

    Constraints to Stop Deforestation H. Seidl FB IV ­ Informatik, Universit¨at Trier, D­54286 Trier, Universitetsparken 1, DK­2100 Copenhagen �, Denmark. rambo@diku.dk Abstract Wadler's deforestation algorithm, deforestation must terminate on all programs. Several techniques exist to ensure termination of de­ forestation

  19. Constraints to Stop HigherOrder Deforestation FB IV Informatik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seidl, Helmut

    Constraints to Stop Higher­Order Deforestation H. Seidl FB IV ­ Informatik Universit¨at Trier, D of Copenhagen Universitetsparken 1, DK­2100 Copenhagen �, Denmark rambo@diku.dk Abstract Wadler's deforestation in a compiler, it must terminate on all programs. Several techniques to ensure termi­ nation of deforestation

  20. 221B Lecture Notes Quantum Field Theory IV (Radiation Field)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    221B Lecture Notes Quantum Field Theory IV (Radiation Field) 1 Quantization of Radiation Field was quantized: photons. Now that we have gone through quantization of a classical field (Schr¨odinger field so far), we can proceed to quantize the Maxwell field. The basic idea is pretty much the same, except

  1. UNIVERSITE MONTESQUIEU BORDEAUX IV ECOLE DOCTORALE de SCIENCES ECONOMIQUES, GESTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    PLANIFICATION URBAINE SUR LES PRIX IMMOBILIERS ET FONCIERS EN ZONE LITTORALE : LE CAS DU BASSIN D'ARCACHON ThèseUNIVERSITE MONTESQUIEU ­ BORDEAUX IV ECOLE DOCTORALE de SCIENCES ECONOMIQUES, GESTION ET professionnalisme dans la gestion administrative. Un grand merci à Sébastien Lavaud pour son énorme patience face à

  2. Oxidative Reforming of Biodiesel Over Molybdenum (IV) Oxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Oxidative Reforming of Biodiesel Over Molybdenum (IV) Oxide Jessica Whalen, Oscar Marin Flores, Su University INTRODUCTION Energy consumption continues to skyrocket worldwide. Biodiesel is a renewable fuel as potential feedstock in solid oxide fuel cells. Petroleum based fuels become scarcer daily, and biodiesel

  3. The effects of heat transfer on the aerodynamic characteristics of a hot wing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macha, John Michael

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    &'? (13) Noir! trl' rmoiilentu!"I eclila ti orl cail 0 &&rl L" e'n as o2, . . . ?2. ?, o ?dul - liP ? I. ? a'( a SY (la) LIS r 9 tile equatin 1 of state irl the for!'s P. &r I P i ty &an bc r . Ciotve&I exp I icti y Fran tho i& oriantuni...7!1!! EFF!tCT. OF II OV! '!!Ct'iV, S( . ;I! O~( 'I HE AEROOV I'IAi~l!C CF!AI(FACTEA! ST I CS 0, A t'. Gi yi I (IG A I I, ;-t= i s I. , y OOF;I !II Ct" , EE I'?CI(A IlAST:. "t OF S' "Et!CE ! nFi-. CPS IV 4Fl~ I ' IOs?ISFFR Old T!~L A', n...

  4. COMPUTATIONS OF NUCLEAR RESPONSE FUNCTIONS WITH MACK-IV M. A. Abdou and Y. Gohar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    COMPUTATIONS OF NUCLEAR RESPONSE FUNCTIONS WITH MACK-IV M. A. Abdou and Y. Gohar Ttm ttpait * i OF NUCLEAR RESPONSE FUNCTIONS WITH MACK-IV M. A. Abdou and Y. Gohar APPLIED PHYSICS DIVISION, ARGONNE

  5. A Tetrapositive Metal Ion in the Gas Phase: Thorium(IV) Coordinated...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tetrapositive Metal Ion in the Gas Phase: Thorium(IV) Coordinated by Neutral Tridentate Ligands. A Tetrapositive Metal Ion in the Gas Phase: Thorium(IV) Coordinated by Neutral...

  6. Structures of Domains I and IV from YbbR are representative of...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Domains I and IV from YbbR are representative of a widely distributed protein family. Structures of Domains I and IV from YbbR are representative of a widely distributed protein...

  7. Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Effects of Energy Removal on Physical Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Please mark your calendars for the next Annex IV Environmental webinar titled: Effects of Energy Removal on Physical Systems. Held under the auspices of the Annex IV initiative to the IEA Ocean...

  8. Edinburgh Research Explorer Europium-IV: An Incommensurately Modulated Crystal Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millar, Andrew J.

    Edinburgh Research Explorer Europium-IV: An Incommensurately Modulated Crystal Structure 2012, 'Europium-IV: An Incommensurately Modulated Crystal Structure in the Lanthanides' Physical Review to the work immediately and investigate your claim. Download date: 27. Jun. 2014 #12;Europium

  9. Influence of addition order and contact time on thorium (IV) retention by hematite in the presence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Influence of addition order and contact time on thorium (IV) retention by hematite.reiller@cea.fr The influence of addition order and contact time in the system hematite (-Fe2O3) ­ humic acid (HA) ­ thorium (IV) was studied in batch experiments. Thorium (IV) is considered here as a chemical analogue of other actinides

  10. A COMPARISON OF BKY-FTN4 AND VAX-FORTRAN IV-PLUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horne, Christopher

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a statement label. name block sn lJ VAX-FORTRAN IV-Plus sneestat fn type 'L~ VAX-FORTRAN IV-Plus the label of anskip a line- Separator VAX-FORTRAN IV-Plus 4.0 Description

  11. Study of Low Energy Electron Anti-neutrinos at Super-Kamiokande IV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokyo, University of

    Study of Low Energy Electron Anti-neutrinos at Super-Kamiokande IV Dissertation Submitted neutrino physics. A forced trigger scheme has been implemented in Super-Kamiokande IV to search for the 2 the Sun. No events are found for both signals in 960 days of Super-Kamiokande IV data. The 90% CL upper

  12. Biosynthesis and SupramolecularAssemblyof ProcollagenIV in Neonatal Lung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blumberg, Bruce

    Biosynthesis and SupramolecularAssemblyof ProcollagenIV in Neonatal Lung Bruce Blumberg, and the concentration of specific RNAs coding for pro- collagen IV were measured in neonatal rat lungs. Both decreased IV was followed in neonatal rat, mouse, and chick lungs, which actively elaborate endothelial

  13. Safety evaluation of RTG launches aboard Titan IV launch vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosko, Robert J.; Loughin, Stephen [Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space P.O. Box 8555 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19101 (United States)

    1997-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The analytical tool used to evaluate accidents aboard a Titan IV launch vehicle involving a Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) is discussed. The Launch Accident Scenario Evaluation Program-Titan IV version (LASEP-T) uses a Monte Carlo approach to determine the response of an RTG to various threatening environments. The threatening environments arise from a complex interplay of probabilistic and deterministic processes, and are therefore parameterized by a set of random variables with probability distributions. The assessment of the RTG response to a given environment is based on both empirical data and theoretical modeling. Imbedding detailed, complex response models into the LASEP-T calculation was not practical. Simpler response models have been constructed to capture both the inherent variability due to the phenomenology of the accident scenario along with the uncertainty of predicting response behavior. The treatment of variability and uncertainty as it pertains to the launch accident evaluation of RTG response will be discussed.

  14. Metallicity of the intergalactic medium using pixel statistics: IV. Oxygen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anthony Aguirre; Corey Dow-Hygelund; Joop Schaye; Tom Theuns

    2008-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the abundance of oxygen in the IGM by analyzing OVI, CIV, SiIV, and HI pixel optical depths derived from a set of high-quality VLT and Keck spectra of 17 QSOs at 2.1 ~ 0.2. Consistent results are obtained by similarly comparing OVI to HI or OVI to SiIV optical depth ratios to simulation values, and also by directly ionization-correcting OVI optical depths as function of HI optical depths into [O/H] as a function of density. Subdividing the sample reveals no evidence for evolution, but low- and high-density samples are inconsistent, suggesting either density-dependence of [O/C] or -- more likely -- prevalence of collisionally-ionized gas at high density.

  15. Method of synthesis of anhydrous thorium(IV) complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kiplinger, Jaqueline L; Cantat, Thibault

    2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Method of producing anhydrous thorium(IV) tetrahalide complexes, utilizing Th(NO.sub.3).sub.4(H.sub.2O).sub.x, where x is at least 4, as a reagent; method of producing thorium-containing complexes utilizing ThCl.sub.4(DME).sub.2 as a precursor; method of producing purified ThCl.sub.4(ligand).sub.x compounds, where x is from 2 to 9; and novel compounds having the structures: ##STR00001##

  16. Wind Tunnel Aerodynamic Tests of Six Airfoils for Use on Small Wind Turbines; Period of Performance: October 31, 2002--January 31, 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selig, M. S.; McGranahan, B. D.

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Tunnel Aerodynamic Tests of Six Airfoils for Use on Small Wind Turbinesrepresents the fourth installment in a series of volumes documenting the ongoing work of th University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Low-Speed Airfoil Tests Program. This particular volume deals with airfoils that are candidates for use on small wind turbines, which operate at low Reynolds numbers.

  17. To cite this document: Bechet, S. and Negulescu, C. and Chapin, Vincent and Simon, Frank Integration of CFD tools in aerodynamic design of contra-rotating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mailhes, Corinne

    efficient aircraft propulsion systems [1]. This concept promises significant reductions of fuel consumption. Béchet and C. A. Negulescu Airbus Operations S.A.S. - Aerodynamics Department, Toulouse, France V. Chapin ISAE DAEP, Toulouse, France F. Simon ONERA DMAE, Toulouse, France Keywords: Contra-Rotating Propellers

  18. 43rd AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit, January 10-13, 2005, Reno, Nevada Aerodynamic Design of Turbine Blades Using an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Feng

    is an inviscid design case for a VKI turbine stator, and the design objective is to minimize the entropy for a standard configuration 4 turbine stator. The design objective is to minimize the entropy generation rate but also an optimization tool for aerodynamic design problems. Some optimization process that used to take

  19. Foreign Trip Report MATGEN-IV Sep 24- Oct 26, 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Caro, M S

    2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Gen-IV activities in France, Japan and US focus on the development of new structural materials for Gen-IV nuclear reactors. Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) F/M steels have raised considerable interest in nuclear applications. Promising collaborations can be established seeking fundamental knowledge of relevant Gen-IV ODS steel properties (see attached travel report on MATGEN- IV 'Materials for Generation IV Nuclear Reactors'). Major highlights refer to results on future Ferritic/Martensitic steel cladding candidates (relevant to Gen-IV materials properties for LFR Materials Program) and on thermodynamic and mechanic behavior of metallic FeCr binary alloys, base matrix for future candidate steels (for the LLNL-LDRD project on Critical Issues on Materials for Gen-IV Reactors).

  20. C-terminal region of DNA ligase IV drives XRCC4/DNA ligase IV complex to chromatin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Sicheng; Liu, Xunyue; Kamdar, Radhika Pankaj; Wanotayan, Rujira; Sharma, Mukesh Kumar [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors and Department of Nuclear Engineering, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)] [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors and Department of Nuclear Engineering, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Adachi, Noritaka [Graduate School of Nanobioscience, Yokohama City University, Yokohama 236-0027 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Nanobioscience, Yokohama City University, Yokohama 236-0027 (Japan); Matsumoto, Yoshihisa, E-mail: yoshim@nr.titech.ac.jp [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors and Department of Nuclear Engineering, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)] [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors and Department of Nuclear Engineering, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •Chromatin binding of XRCC4 is dependent on the presence of DNA ligase IV. •C-terminal region of DNA ligase IV alone can recruit itself and XRCC4 to chromatin. •Two BRCT domains of DNA ligase IV are essential for the chromatin binding of XRCC4. -- Abstract: DNA ligase IV (LIG4) and XRCC4 form a complex to ligate two DNA ends at the final step of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). It is not fully understood how these proteins are recruited to DSBs. We recently demonstrated radiation-induced chromatin binding of XRCC4 by biochemical fractionation using detergent Nonidet P-40. In the present study, we examined the role of LIG4 in the recruitment of XRCC4/LIG4 complex to chromatin. The chromatin binding of XRCC4 was dependent on the presence of LIG4. The mutations in two BRCT domains (W725R and W893R, respectively) of LIG4 reduced the chromatin binding of LIG4 and XRCC4. The C-terminal fragment of LIG4 (LIG4-CT) without N-terminal catalytic domains could bind to chromatin with XRCC4. LIG4-CT with W725R or W893R mutation could bind to chromatin but could not support the chromatin binding of XRCC4. The ability of C-terminal region of LIG4 to interact with chromatin might provide us with an insight into the mechanisms of DSB repair through NHEJ.

  1. The structure of molten CaSiO3: A neutron diffraction isotope substitution and aerodynamic levitation study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skinner, Lawrie [State University of New York, Stony Brook; Benmore, Chris J [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Weber, Richard [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Santodonato, Louis J [ORNL; Tumber, Sonia [Materials Development, Inc., Evanston, IL; Neuefeind, Joerg C [ORNL; Lazareva, Lena [State University of New York, Stony Brook; Du, Jincheng [University of North Texas; Parise, John B [Stony Brook University (SUNY)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have performed neutron diffraction isotopic substitution experiments on aerodynamically levitated droplets of CaSiO3, to directly extract intermediate and local structural information on the Ca environment. The results show a substantial broadening of the Ca-O peak in the pair distribution function of the melt compared to the glass, which comprises primarily of 6- and 7-fold coordinated Ca-polyhedra. The broadening can be explained by a re-distribution of Ca-O bond lengths, especially towards longer distances in the liquid. The first order neutron difference function provides a rigorous test of recent molecular dynamics simulations and supports the model of the presence of short chains or channels of edge shared Ca-octahedra in the liquid state. It is suggested that the polymerization of Ca-polyhedra is responsible for the fragile viscosity behavior of the melt and the glass forming ability in CaSiO3.

  2. International Conference on Mechanical Engineering, December 26-28, 2001, Dhaka, Bangladesh/pp. IV 37-40 Section IV: Fluid Mechanics 37

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hossain, M. Enamul

    on gas wells, asserted that field measurements of the time it takes for a pressure disturbance at one/pp. IV 37-40 Section IV: Fluid Mechanics 37 ROLES OF PRESSURE AND FLOW RATE IN DEFINING THE RADIUS through the well bore, pressure changes occur everywhere within certain region around the well bore

  3. Supporting Technology for Enhanced Oil Recovery-EOR Thermal Processes Report IV-12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izequeido, Alexandor

    2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the results of efforts under the six tasks of the Ninth Amendment and Extension of Annex IV, Enhanced Oil Recovery Thermal Processes of the Venezuela/USA Agreement. The report is presented in sections (for each of the 6 tasks) and each section contains one or more reports prepared by various individuals or groups describing the results of efforts under each of the tasks. A statement of each task, taken from the agreement, is presented on the first page of each section. The tasks are numbered 62 through 67. The first, second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh, eight, and ninth reports on Annex IV, [Venezuela MEM/USA-DOE Fossil Energy Report IV-1, IV-2, IV-3, IV-4, IV-5, IV-6, IV-7, and IV-8 (DOE/BETC/SP-83/15, DOE/BC-84/6/SP, DOE/BC-86/2/SP, DOE/BC-87/2/SP, DOE/BC-89/1/SP, DOE/BC-90/1/SP) DOE/BC-92/1/SP, DOE/BC-93/3/SP, and DOE/BC-95/3/SP] contain the results from the first 61 tasks. Those reports are dated April 1983, August 1984, March 1986, July 1! 987, November 1988, December 1989, October 1991, February 1993, and March 1995 respectively.

  4. Relativistic Modeling of Quark Stars with Tolman IV Type Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malaver, Manuel

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we studied the behavior of relativistic objects with anisotropic matter distribution considering Tolman IV form for the gravitational potential Z. The equation of state presents a quadratic relation between the energy density and the radial pressure. New exact solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell system are generated. A physical analysis of electromagnetic field indicates that is regular in the origin and well behaved. We show as the presence of an electrical field modifies the energy density, the radial pressure and the mass of the stellar object and generates a singular charge density.

  5. Relativistic Modeling of Quark Stars with Tolman IV Type Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manuel Malaver

    2015-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we studied the behavior of relativistic objects with anisotropic matter distribution considering Tolman IV form for the gravitational potential Z. The equation of state presents a quadratic relation between the energy density and the radial pressure. New exact solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell system are generated. A physical analysis of electromagnetic field indicates that is regular in the origin and well behaved. We show as the presence of an electrical field modifies the energy density, the radial pressure and the mass of the stellar object and generates a singular charge density.

  6. Foote Creek Rim IV Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489Information HydroFontana, California: Energy ResourcesIV Wind

  7. HNUtHUl I IV1-30 I

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.NewofGeothermal HeatonHEP/NERSC/ASCRJuneSave84047HNUtHUl I IV1-30

  8. Salton Sea IV Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey Jump to:WY)Project Jump to: navigation,Salton SeaIV

  9. Table IV: Technical Targets for Membranes: Stationary | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic| Department of EnergyFOREnergy IV: Technical Targets for

  10. Generation IV PR and PP Methods and Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bari,R.A.

    2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an evaluation methodology for proliferation resistance and physical protection (PR&PP) of Generation IV nuclear energy systems (NESs). For a proposed NES design, the methodology defines a set of challenges, analyzes system response to these challenges, and assesses outcomes. The challenges to the NES are the threats posed by potential actors (proliferant States or sub-national adversaries). The characteristics of Generation IV systems, both technical and institutional, are used to evaluate the response of the system and determine its resistance against proliferation threats and robustness against sabotage and terrorism threats. The outcomes of the system response are expressed in terms of six measures for PR and three measures for PP, which are the high-level PR&PP characteristics of the NES. The methodology is organized to allow evaluations to be performed at the earliest stages of system design and to become more detailed and more representative as design progresses. Uncertainty of results are recognized and incorporated into the evaluation at all stages. The results are intended for three types of users: system designers, program policy makers, and external stakeholders. Particular current relevant activities will be discussed in this regard. The methodology has been illustrated in a series of demonstration and case studies and these will be summarized in the paper.

  11. CRYSTAL AND MOLECULAR STRUCTURE OF HYDRIDOTIS (BIS(TRIMETHYLSILYL)AMIDO]URANIUM(IV)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andersen, Richard A.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemistry CRYSTAL AND MOLECULAR STRUCTURE OF HYDRIDOTRIS[BIS(TRIMETHYLSILYL)AMIDO]URANIUM(Chemistry University of California Berkeley, California 94720 New hydride derivatives of thorium (IV) and uranium (

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - annual iv zoledronic Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Corporation Prostate Cancer Summary: to treatment with zoledronic acid (4 mg) IV infusion or placebo every 3 months. BMD of the lumbar spine, left... randomly assigned to...

  13. Technical Session IV Talks | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    IV Talks Scientific User Facilities (SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities Projects Accelerator & Detector Research Science Highlights Principal Investigators' Meetings BES...

  14. CRYSTAL AND MOLECULAR STRUCTURE OF HYDRIDOTIS (BIS(TRIMETHYLSILYL)AMIDO]URANIUM(IV)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andersen, Richard A.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemistry University of California Berkeley, California 94720 New hydride derivatives of thorium (IV) and uranium (Chemistry CRYSTAL AND MOLECULAR STRUCTURE OF HYDRIDOTRIS[BIS(TRIMETHYLSILYL)AMIDO]URANIUM(

  15. Generation-IV Roadmap Report of the Fuel Cycle Crosscut Group...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Charter of the Generation IV Roadmap Fuel Cycle Crosscut Group (FCCG) is to (1) examine the fuel cycle implications for alternative nuclear power scenarios in terms of Generation...

  16. What controls the C IV line profile in active galactic nuclei?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexei Baskin; Ari Laor

    2004-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The high ionization lines in active galactic nuclei (AGN), such as C IV, tend to be blueshifted with respect to the lower ionization lines, such as H beta, and often show a strong blue excess asymmetry not seen in the low ionization lines. There is accumulating evidence that the H beta profile is dominated by gravity, and thus provides a useful estimate of the black hole mass in AGN. The shift and asymmetry commonly seen in C IV suggest that non gravitational effects, such as obscuration and radiation pressure, may affect the line profile. We explore the relation between the H beta and C IV profiles using UV spectra available for 81 of the 87 z 4000 km/s. This argues against the view that C IV generally originates closer to the center, compared to H beta. (3) C IV appears to provide a significantly less accurate, and possibly biased estimate of the black hole mass in AGN, compared with H beta. (4) All objects where C IV is strongly blueshifted and asymmetric have a high L/L_Edd, but the reverse is not true. This suggests that a high L/L_Edd is a necessary but not sufficient condition for generating a blueshifted asymmetric C IV emission. (5) We also find indications for dust reddening and scattering in `normal' AGN. In particular, PG quasars with a redder optical-UV continuum slope show weaker C IV emission, stronger C IV absorption, and a higher optical continuum polarization.

  17. Unexpected formation of a trinuclear complex containing a Ta(IV)-Ta(IV) bond in the reactions of ButN=Ta(NMe2)3 with silanes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Shu-Jian [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Dougan, Brenda A. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Steren, Carlos A. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Wang, Xiaoping [ORNL; Chen, Xue-Tai [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Lin, Zhenyang [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Xue, Zi-Ling [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new trinuclear species containing a Ta(IV)-Ta(IV) bond, Ta{sub 3}({mu}-H)({mu}-NMe{sub 2})({mu}NBu{sup t}){sub 2}(NBu{sup t})(NMe{sub 2}){sub 5}, has been formed by reductive elimination of H{sub 2}. Ta{sub 2}H{sub 2}({mu}-NMe{sub 2}){sub 2}(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2}(NBu{sup t}){sub 2} has also been isolated. O{sub 2} oxidizes the Ta(IV)-Ta(IV) bond to yield Ta{sub 3}({mu}{sub 3}-O)(H)({mu}NBu{sup t})({mu}-NMe{sub 2}){sub 2}(NMe{sub 2}){sub 4}(NBu{sup t}){sub 2} under ligand exchange. Delocalization of d electrons is discussed.

  18. TASS Mark IV Photometric Survey of the Northern Sky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas F. Droege; Michael W. Richmond; Michael P. Sallman; Robert P. Creager

    2006-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Amateur Sky Survey (TASS) is a loose confederation of amateur and professional astronomers. We describe the design and construction of our Mark IV systems, a set of wide-field telescopes with CCD cameras which take simultaneous images in the $V$ and $I_C$ passbands. We explain our observational procedures and the pipeline which processes and reduces the images into lists of stellar positions and magnitudes. We have compiled a large database of measurements for stars in the northern celestial hemisphere with $V$-band magnitudes in the range 7 < V < 13. This paper describes data taken over the four-year period starting November, 2001. One of our results is a catalog of repeated measurements on the Johnson-Cousins system for over 4.3 million stars.

  19. Boattail Plates With Non-Rectangular Geometries For Reducing Aerodynamic Base Drag Of A Bluff Body In Ground Effect

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ortega, Jason M. (Pacifica, CA); Sabari, Kambiz (Livermore, CA)

    2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for reducing the aerodynamic base drag of a bluff body having a leading end, a trailing end, a top surface, opposing left and right side surfaces, and a base surface at the trailing end substantially normal to a longitudinal centerline of the bluff body, with the base surface joined (1) to the left side surface at a left trailing edge, (2) to the right side surface at a right trailing edge, and (3) to the top surface at a top trailing edge. The apparatus includes left and right vertical boattail plates which are orthogonally attached to the base surface of the bluff body and inwardly offset from the left and right trailing edges, respectively. This produces left and right vertical channels which generate, in a flowstream substantially parallel to the longitudinal centerline, respective left and right vertically-aligned vortical structures, with the left and right vertical boattail plates each having a plate width defined by a rear edge of the plate spaced from the base surface. Each plate also has a peak plate width at a location between top and bottom ends of the plate corresponding to a peak vortex of the respective vertically-aligned vortical structures.

  20. CATALYTIC OXIDATION OF S(IV) ON ACTIVATED CARBON IN AQUEOUS SUSPENSION: KINETICS AND MECHANISM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brodzinsky, Richard

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    oxidation" data. A A A A o lo Cx o o.o3 ~% ex ex v 'O f() NN '-.A CUI e II v-4 /It [Cx] (g/L) XBL 806-10264 Figure 3.3y = rate = d[S(IV)]/dt + [Cx] and x = S(IV) concentration.

  1. DOE Hydrogen Program FY 2005 Progress Report IV.F Photoelectrochemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DOE Hydrogen Program FY 2005 Progress Report 13 IV.F Photoelectrochemical IV.F.1 High-Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Using Solar Thermochemical Splitting of Water - UNLV: Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen hydrogen using solar energy to photoelectrochemically split water · Specific focus on developing multi

  2. Critical evaluation of PASSER IV: a progression-based network signal timing program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chada, Shireen Reddy

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . TRANSYT-7F showed less delay than PASSER 11 or PASSER IV in case of total intersection delay especially for runs having larger cycle lengths. PASSER IV proved to be an excellent tool for arterial progression when compared to PASSER 11. The green splits...

  3. Plutonium(IV) precipitates formed in alkaline media in the presence of various anions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krot, N.N.; Shilov, V.P.; Yusov, A.B.; Tananaev, I.G.; Grigoriev, M.S.; Garnov, A.Yu.; Perminov, V.P.; Astafurova, L.N.

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The tendency of Pu(IV) to hydrolyze and form true solutions, colloid solutions, or insoluble precipitates has been known since the Manhattan Project. Since then, specific studies have been performed to examine in detail the equilibria of Pu(IV) hydrolytic reactions in various media. Great attention also has been paid to the preparation, structure, and properties of Pu(IV) polymers or colloids. These compounds found an important application in sol-gel technology for the preparation of nuclear fuel materials. A most important result of these works was the conclusion that Pu(IV) hydroxide, after some aging, consists of very small PuO{sub 2} crystallites and should therefore be considered to be Pu(IV) hydrous oxide. However, studies of the properties and behavior of solid Pu(IV) hydroxide in complex heterogeneous systems are rare. The primary goal of this investigation was to obtain data on the composition and properties of Pu(IV) hydrous oxide or other compounds formed in alkaline media under different conditions. Such information is important to understand Pu(IV) behavior and the forms of its existence in the Hanford Site alkaline tank waste sludge. This knowledge then may be applied in assessing plutonium criticality hazards in the storage, retrieval, and treatment of Hanford Site tank wastes as well as in understanding its contribution to the transuranic waste inventory (threshold at 100 nCi/g or about 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} M) of the separate solution and solid phases.

  4. MOOS-IvP Autonomy Tools Users Manual Release 4.2.1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin, Michael R.

    2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes 19 MOOS-IvP autonomy tools. uHelmScope provides a run-time scoping window into the state of an active IvP Helm executing its mission. pMarineViewer is a geo-based GUI tool for rendering marine ...

  5. CAMIRD III: Computer Assisted Medical Internal Radiation Dosimetry. FORTRAN IV version

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellina, C. R.; Guzzardi, R.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper desribes the FORTRAN IV version of the P.A. Feller's CAMIRD/II Package (1) revised. In addition another FORTRAN IV program named TILDY (2), which determines the cumulated activity, has been revised and modified to be used as a subroutine of CAMIRD's main program. With such an organization all the calculation involved in dose computation becomes easier and quicker.

  6. SPECIFIC SEQUESTERING AGENTS FOR THE ACTINIDES. 6. SYNTHETIC AND STRUCTURAL CHEMISTRY OF TETRAKIS(DIALKYLHYDROXAMATE)-THORIUM(IV) COMPLEXES.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, William L.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TETRAKIS(DIALKYLHYDROXAMATE)-THORIUM(IV) COMPLEXES William3,3-dimethylbutanamido)thorium(IV), Using N-hydroxy-N-dimethyl- In contrast to the thorium complex, on exposure to

  7. The SMC Complex MukBEF Recruits Topoisomerase IV to the Origin of Replication Region in Live Escherichia coli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolas, Emilien

    The Escherichia coli structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) complex, MukBEF, and topoisomerase IV (TopoIV) interact in vitro through a direct contact between the MukB dimerization hinge and the C-terminal domain of ...

  8. Selection of Correlations and Look-Up Tables for Critical Heat Flux Prediction in the Generation IV "IRIS" Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romano, A.

    In order to fulfill the goals set forth by the Generation IV International Forum, the current NERI funded

  9. Venezuela-MEM/USA-DOE Fossil Energy Report IV-11: Supporting technology for enhanced oil recovery - EOR thermal processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venezuela

    2000-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the results of efforts under the six tasks of the Tenth Amendment anti Extension of Annex IV, Enhanced Oil Recovery Thermal Processes of the Venezuela/USA Energy Agreement. This report is presented in sections (for each of the six Tasks) and each section contains one or more reports that were prepared to describe the results of the effort under each of the Tasks. A statement of each Task, taken from the Agreement Between Project Managers, is presented on the first page of each section. The Tasks are numbered 68 through 73. The first through tenth report on research performed under Annex IV Venezuela MEM/USA-DOE Fossil Energy Report Number IV-1, IV-2, IV-3, IV-4, IV-5, IV-6, IV-7, IV-8, IV-9, IV-10 contain the results of the first 67 Tasks. These reports are dated April 1983, August 1984, March 1986, July 1987, November 1988, December 1989, October 1991, February 1993, March 1995, and December 1997, respectively.

  10. Titanium(IV) Chloride Promoted Syntheses of New Imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine Derivatives under Microwave Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Jun

    PAPER 133 Titanium(IV) Chloride Promoted Syntheses of New Imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine Derivatives under Microwave Conditions Titanium(IV)Chloride-PromotedSynthesesofNewImidazo[1,2-a]pyridinesLisheng Cai,* Chad of 2-aminopy- ridines with a-haloketones. The critical reagent is titanium(IV) chloride, which appears

  11. Rocky Mountain area petroleum product availability with reduced PADD IV refining capacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadder, G.R.; Chin, S.M.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of Rocky Mountain area petroleum product availability with reduced refining capacity in Petroleum Administration for Defense IV (PADD IV, part of the Rocky Mountain area) have been performed with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Refinery Yield Model, a linear program which has been updated to blend gasolines to satisfy constraints on emissions of nitrogen oxides and winter toxic air pollutants. The studies do not predict refinery closures in PADD IV. Rather, the reduced refining capacities provide an analytical framework for probing the flexibility of petroleum refining and distribution for winter demand conditions in the year 2000. Industry analysts have estimated that, for worst case scenarios, 20 to 35 percent of PADD IV refining capacity could be shut-down as a result of clean air and energy tax legislation. Given these industry projections, the study scenarios provide the following conclusions: The Rocky Mountain area petroleum system would have the capability to satisfy winter product demand with PADD IV refinery capacity shut-downs in the middle of the range of industry projections, but not in the high end of the range of projections. PADD IV crude oil production can be maintained by re-routing crude released from PADD IV refinery demands to satisfy increased crude oil demands in PADDs II (Midwest), III (Gulf Coast), and Washington. Clean Air Act product quality regulations generally do not increase the difficulty of satisfying emissions reduction constraints in the scenarios.

  12. Computational mechanics research and support for aerodynamics and hydraulics at TFHRC, year 1 quarter 3 progress report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lottes, S.A.; Kulak, R.F.; Bojanowski, C. (Energy Systems)

    2011-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and computational structural mechanics (CSM) focus areas at Argonne's Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center (TRACC) initiated a project to support and compliment the experimental programs at the Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center (TFHRC) with high performance computing based analysis capabilities in August 2010. The project was established with a new interagency agreement between the Department of Energy and the Department of Transportation to provide collaborative research, development, and benchmarking of advanced three-dimensional computational mechanics analysis methods to the aerodynamics and hydraulics laboratories at TFHRC for a period of five years, beginning in October 2010. The analysis methods employ well-benchmarked and supported commercial computational mechanics software. Computational mechanics encompasses the areas of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), Computational Wind Engineering (CWE), Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM), and Computational Multiphysics Mechanics (CMM) applied in Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) problems. The major areas of focus of the project are wind and water loads on bridges - superstructure, deck, cables, and substructure (including soil), primarily during storms and flood events - and the risks that these loads pose to structural failure. For flood events at bridges, another major focus of the work is assessment of the risk to bridges caused by scour of stream and riverbed material away from the foundations of a bridge. Other areas of current research include modeling of flow through culverts to assess them for fish passage, modeling of the salt spray transport into bridge girders to address suitability of using weathering steel in bridges, vehicle stability under high wind loading, and the use of electromagnetic shock absorbers to improve vehicle stability under high wind conditions. This quarterly report documents technical progress on the project tasks for the period of April through June 2011.

  13. Type-IV Pilus Deformation Can Explain Retraction Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ranajay Ghosh; Aloke Kumar; Ashkan Vaziri

    2014-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymeric filament like type IV Pilus (TFP) can transfer forces in excess of 100pN during their retraction before stalling, powering surface translocation(twitching). Single TFP level experiments have shown remarkable nonlinearity in the retraction behavior influenced by the external load as well as levels of PilT molecular motor protein. This includes reversal of motion near stall forces when the concentration of the PilT protein is lowered significantly. In order to explain this behavior, we analyze the coupling of TFP elasticity and interfacial behavior with PilT kinetics. We model retraction as reaction controlled and elongation as transport controlled process. The reaction rates vary with TFP deformation which is modeled as a compound elastic body consisting of multiple helical strands under axial load. Elongation is controlled by monomer transport which suffer entrapment due to excess PilT in the cell periplasm. Our analysis shows excellent agreement with a host of experimental observations and we present a possible biophysical relevance of model parameters through a mechano-chemical stall force map

  14. Energy modeling IV--planning for energy disruptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feingold, B.W.; Courtney, L. (eds.)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On May 10-12, 1982, the Institute of Gas Technology held the symposium ''Energy Modeling IV: Planning for Energy Disruptions,'' the fourth in a series of energy modeling symposia. Although all four of the energy modeling symposia presented by IGT emphasized new modeling techniques, each had a specific theme. This symposium addressed the role of modeling in dealing with the problems of disruptions in the supply and price of energy. The symposium brought together modelers and planners from federal and state governmental agencies, utilities, management and consulting organizations, and academic institutions. The participants discussed the complex planning problems presented by both gradual and sudden fluctuations in energy supply or price, whether caused by political, physical, economic, or natural events, and the resultant threats to the stability of businesses and the security of nations. A separate abstract was pepared for each paper for the Energy Data Base (EDB); on paper is included in Energy Research Abstracts (ERA) and 22 for Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA).

  15. Design and Performance of Odyssey IV: A Deep Ocean Hover-Capable AUV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eskesen, Justin

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Odyssey IV class AUV was designed to fill the evolving needs of research and industry for a deep rated (6000 meter) vehicle, which is capable of both efficient cruising and precise hovering. This AUV is powerful enough ...

  16. Reforming the EU: The Future of European Law and Policy IV CONFERENCE PROGRAMME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    Reforming the EU: The Future of European Law and Policy IV CONFERENCE session "Reforming the EU" Chair: Dr Luca Rubini, Deputy Director Institute Rubini Reforming European competition law: should the European Commission have

  17. Stark broadening of B IV lines for astrophysical and laboratory plasma research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimitrijevi?, Milan S; Simi?, Zoran; Kova?evi?, Andjelka; Sahal-Bréchot, Sylvie

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stark broadening parameters for 36 multiplets of B IV have been calculated using the semi-classical perturbation formalism. Obtained results have been used to investigate the regularities within spectral series and temperature dependence.

  18. Nitrogen adsorption data for the powder form of the PMO shows a diagnostic type IV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vinnikov, Konstantin

    Nitrogen adsorption data for the powder form of the PMO shows a diagnostic type IV isotherm). This adsorption data together with the d spacing of 4.7 nm given by PXRD provide an independent estimate

  19. Feasibility of risk-informed regulation for Generation-IV reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matos, Craig H

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the advent of new and innovative Generation-IV reactor designs, new regulations must be developed to assure the safety of these plants. In the past a purely deterministic way of developing design basis accidents was ...

  20. Cyclic 3',5'-AMP Relay in Dictyostelium discoideum IV. Recovery of the CAMP Signaling Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devreotes, Peter

    Cyclic 3',5'-AMP Relay in Dictyostelium discoideum IV. Recovery of the CAMP Signaling Response to test stimuli, although reduced in magnitude, had an accelerated time-course when they closely followed

  1. Architecture and urbanism in Henri IV's Paris : the Place Royale, Place Dauphine, and Hôpital St. Louis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ballon, Hilary Meg

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation concerns the extensive building program which Henri IV undertook in Paris from 1600 to 1610. Focusing on the place Royale (now called the place des Vosges) , the place Dauphine, rue Dauphine, and Pont ...

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF RISK-BASED AND TECHNOLOGY-INDEPENDENT SAFETY CRITERIA FOR GENERATION IV SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William E. Kastenberg; Edward Blandford; Lance Kim

    2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This project has developed quantitative safety goals for Generation IV (Gen IV) nuclear energy systems. These safety goals are risk based and technology independent. The foundations for a new approach to risk analysis has been developed, along with a new operational definition of risk. This project has furthered the current state-of-the-art by developing quantitative safety goals for both Gen IV reactors and for the overall Gen IV nuclear fuel cycle. The risk analysis approach developed will quantify performance measures, characterize uncertainty, and address a more comprehensive view of safety as it relates to the overall system. Appropriate safety criteria are necessary to manage risk in a prudent and cost-effective manner. This study is also important for government agencies responsible for managing, reviewing, and for approving advanced reactor systems because they are charged with assuring the health and safety of the public.

  3. New seismological results on the G0 IV eta Bootis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Carrier; P. Eggenberger; F. Bouchy

    2005-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Several attempts have been made to detect solar-like oscillations in the G0 IV star eta Boo. We present here new observations on this star simultaneously conducted with two spectrographs: Coralie mounted on the 1.2-m Swiss telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory (Chile) and Elodie based on the 1.93-m telescope at the Observatoire de Haute Provence (France). In total, 1239 spectra were collected over 13 nights. The power spectrum of the high precision velocity time series clearly presents several identifiable peaks between 0.4 and 1.0 mHz showing regularity with a large and small separations of Delta_nu = 39.9 uHz and delta_nu02 = 3.95 uHz respectively. Twenty-two individual frequencies have been identified. Detailed models based on these measurements and non-asteroseismic observables were computed using the Geneva evolution code including shellular rotation and atomic diffusion. By combining these seismological data with non-asteroseismic observations, we determine the following global parameters for eta Boo: a mass of 1.57 +- 0.07 M_sol, an age t=2.67 +- 0.10 Gyr and an initial metallicity Z/X_i=0.0391 +- 0.0070. We also show that the mass of eta Boo is very sensitive to the choice of the observed metallicity, while the age of eta Boo depends on the input physics used. Indeed, a higher metallicity favours a higher mass, while non-rotating models without overshooting predict a smaller age.

  4. Reactivity of Pb(II) at the Mn(III,IV) (Oxyhydr)Oxide-Water Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    , the reactivity of lead (Pb(II)) on naturally occurring Mn(III,IV) (oxyhydr)oxide minerals was evaluated using to suggest oxidation as an operative sorption mechanism. Lead appeared to coordinate to vacancy sitesReactivity of Pb(II) at the Mn(III,IV) (Oxyhydr)Oxide-Water Interface C H R I S T O P H E R J . M

  5. A Virtual Reality Framework to Optimize Design, Operation and Refueling of GEN-IV Reactors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rizwan-uddin; Nick Karancevic; Stefano Markidis; Joel Dixon; Cheng Luo; Jared Reynolds

    2008-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    many GEN-IV candidate designs are currently under investigation. Technical issues related to material, safety and economics are being addressed at research laboratories, industry and in academia. After safety, economic feasibility is likely to be the most important crterion in the success of GEN-IV design(s). Lessons learned from the designers and operators of GEN-II (and GEN-III) reactors must play a vital role in achieving both safety and economic feasibility goals.

  6. On the origin of the C IV Baldwin effect in AGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexei Baskin; Ari Laor

    2004-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The origin of the luminosity dependence of the equivalent width (EW) of broad emission lines in AGN (the Baldwin effect) is not firmly established yet. We explore this question for the broad C IV \\lambda 1549 line using the Boroson & Green sample of the 87 z < 0.5 Bright Quasar Survey (BQS) quasars. Useful UV spectra of the C IV region are available for 81 of the objects, which are used to explore the dependence of the C IV EW on various emission properties. We confirm earlier results on the strong correlations of the C IV EW with some of the emission parameters which define the Boroson & Green Eigenvector 1, and with the optical to X-ray slope \\alpha_ox. In addition, we find a strong correlation of the C IV EW with the relative accretion rate, L/L_Edd. Since L/L_Edd drives some of the Eigenvector 1 correlations, it may be the primary physical parameter which drives the Baldwin effect for C IV.

  7. Sayan Ranges, and Tian Shan, which skirt the border regions of Russia, Mongolia, China, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Ning

    , 903 (1996). 3. D. K. Lilly and P. F. Lester, J. Atmos. Sci. 31, 800 (1974). 4. J. T. Bacmeister, P. A-SPAS orbited 100 km behind the shuttle, with the CRISTA

  8. Numerical modeling of piston secondary motion and skirt lubrication in internal combustion engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClure, Fiona

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Internal combustion engines dominate transportation of people and goods, contributing significantly to air pollution, and requiring large amounts of fossil fuels. With increasing public concern about the environment and ...

  9. On the role of Mn(IV) vacancies in the photoreductive dissolution of hexagonal birnessite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwon, K.D.; Refson, K.; Sposito, G.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photoreductive dissolution of layer type Mn(IV) oxides (birnessite) under sunlight illumination to form soluble Mn(II) has been observed in both field and laboratory settings, leading to a consensus that this process is a key driver of the biogeochemical cycling of Mn in the euphotic zones of marine and freshwater ecosystems. However, the underlying mechanisms for the process remain unknown, although they have been linked to the semiconducting characteristics of hexagonal birnessite, the ubiquitous Mn(IV) oxide produced mainly by bacterial oxidation of soluble Mn(II). One of the universal properties of this biogenic mineral is the presence of Mn(IV) vacancies, long-identified as strong adsorption sites for metal cations. In this paper, the possible role of Mn vacancies in photoreductive dissolution is investigated theoretically using quantum mechanical calculations based on spin-polarized density functional theory (DFT). Our DFT study demonstrates unequivocally that Mn vacancies significantly reduce the band-gap energy for hexagonal birnessite relative to a hypothetical vacancy-free MnO{sub 2} and thus would increase the concentration of photo-induced electrons available for Mn(IV) reduction upon illumination of the mineral by sunlight. Calculations of the charge distribution in the presence of vacancies, although not fully conclusive, show a clear separation of photo-induced electrons and holes, implying a slow recombination of these charge-carriers that facilitates the two-electron reduction of Mn(IV) to Mn(II).

  10. Computational prediction of two-dimensional group-IV mono-chalcogenides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Arunima K.; Hennig, Richard G., E-mail: rhennig@cornell.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Density functional calculations determine the structure, stability, and electronic properties of two-dimensional materials in the family of group-IV monochalcogenides, MX (M?=?Ge, Sn, Pb; X?=?O, S, Se, Te). Calculations with a van der Waals functional show that the two-dimensional IV-VI compounds are most stable in either a highly distorted NaCl-type structure or a single-layer litharge type tetragonal structure. Their formation energies are comparable to single-layer MoS{sub 2}, indicating the ease of mechanical exfoliation from their layered bulk structures. The phonon spectra confirm their dynamical stability. Using the hybrid HSE06 functional, we find that these materials are semiconductors with bandgaps that are generally larger than for their bulk counterparts due to quantum confinement. The band edge alignments of monolayer group IV-VI materials reveal several type-I and type-II heterostructures, suited for optoelectronics and solar energy conversion.

  11. What every designated representative should know about Title IV and Title V enforcement provisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bischoff, C.A. [Gallagher and Kennedy, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Dayal, P. [Tucson Electric Power Co., Tucson, AZ (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Title IV of the Clean Air Act not only created a regulatory program unlike any other under the Clean Air Act, but also established a unique position--the designated representative--as an integral part of the program. The designated representative is required to meet certain basic obligations under Title IV, and a panoply of enforcement mechanisms are available to EPA in the event of noncompliance with these obligations. Also, because a designated representative may take on responsibilities under the permit provisions of Title V of the Clean Air Act, the designated representative can also be subject to an enforcement action for failure to comply with certain Title V permit requirements. This paper considers the basic definition of the designated representative under EPA`s Title IV and Title V regulations, identifies the responsibilities assigned to the designated representative, and then analyzes the enforcement mechanisms that may be applied to the designated representative if a regulatory responsibility has not been satisfied.

  12. Thorium nanochemistry: the solution structure of the Th(IV)?hydroxo pentamer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walther, Clemens; Rothe, Jörg; Schimmelpfennig, Bernd; Fuss, Markus (Karlsruher)

    2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Tetravalent thorium exhibits a strong tendency towards hydrolysis and subsequent polymerization. Polymeric species play a crucial role in understanding thorium solution chemistry, since their presence causes apparent solubility several orders of magnitude higher than predicted by thermodynamic data bases. Although electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI MS) identifies Th(IV) dimers and pentamers unequivocally as dominant species close to the solubility limit, the molecular structure of Th{sub 5}(OH){sub y} polymers was hitherto unknown. In the present study, X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy, high energy X-ray scattering (HEXS) measurements, and quantum chemical calculations are combined to solve the pentamer structure. The most favourable structure is represented by two Th(IV) dimers linked by a central Th(IV) cation through hydroxide bridges.

  13. The preparation for and survival of an EPA Title IV and Title V facility audit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Facca, G.L.; Faler, M.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, major facilities are required to obtain federally enforceable operating permits (Title V). In a separate permitting action, the electric utilities with units generating more then 25 megawatts are required to obtain permits for NO{sub x} and SO{sub x}, the emissions which contribute to acid rain (Title IV). The Title IV permit is included as part of the Title V permit. This paper will use an actual audit experience at a coal fired generation facility as a case study for the preparation for and outcome of an EPA Title IV Level 3 audit. The paper will document the procedures for preparation, the audit process, and the outcome. The audit is part of the EPA's process for review of the record keeping and instrument calibration methods outlined in Title IV. Both types of permits have many different record keeping and monitoring requirements as well as separate reporting requirements which are submitted to both federal; state and local regulatory agencies for review and evaluation. Title IV units include very specific instrument calibration/audit requirements, and Title V has compliance testing and monitoring requirements. Alliant Power was notified in August 1998 of the intent of EPA Region VII to conduct a Level 3 audit at the Lansing Generation Station. The US EPA and the State of Iowa intended to review all Title IV record keeping (Level 1), continuous emission monitoring calibrations and linearity testing (Level 2) and observe the annual Relative Accuracy Testing Audit performed by an outside contractor. In addition, during this facility site visit, the compliance with Title V permit requirements was also audited.

  14. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Task 5 Report: Generation IV Reactor Virtual Mockup Proof-of-Principle Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

    2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Task 5 report is part of a 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. Created a virtual mockup of PBMR reactor cavity and discussed applications of virtual mockup technology to improve Gen IV design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning.

  15. A comparison of spanwise aerodynamic loads estimated from measured bending moments versus direct pressure measurements on horizontal axis wind turbine blades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simms, D A; Butterfield, C P

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two methods can be used to determine aerodynamic loads on a rotating wind turbine blade. The first is to make direct pressure measurements on the blade surface. This is a difficult process requiring costly pressure instrumentation. The second method uses measured flap bending moments in conjunction with analytical techniques to estimate airloads. This method, called ALEST, was originally developed for use on helicopter rotors and was modified for use on horizontal axis wind turbine blades. Estimating airloads using flap bending moments in much simpler and less costly because measurements can be made with conventional strain gages and equipment. This paper presents results of airload estimates obtained using both methods under a variety of operating conditions. Insights on the limitations and usefulness of the ALEST bending moment technique are also included. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  16. EIS-0402: Remediation of Area IV of the Santa Susana Field Laboratory, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE is preparing an EIS for cleanup of Area IV, including the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), as well as the Northern Buffer Zone of the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) in eastern Ventura County, California, approximately 29 miles north of downtown Los Angeles. (DOE’s operations bordered the Northern Buffer Zone. DOE is responsible for soil cleanup in Area IV and the Northern Buffer Zone.) In the EIS, DOE will evaluate reasonable alternatives for disposition of radiological facilities and support buildings, remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater, and disposal of all resulting waste at permitted facilities.

  17. CONSTRUCTION OF WEB-ACCESSIBLE MATERIALS HANDBOOK FORGENERATION IV NUCLEAR REACTORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Weiju [ORNL

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of a web-accessible materials handbook in support of the materials selection and structural design for the Generation IV nuclear reactors is being planned. Background of the reactor program is briefly introduced. Evolution of materials handbooks for nuclear reactors over years is reviewed in light of the trends brought forth by the rapid advancement in information technologies. The framework, major features, contents, and construction considerations of the web-accessible Gen IV Materials Handbook are discussed. Potential further developments and applications of the handbook are also elucidated.

  18. Producing Early-Maturity (Group IV) Soybeans on the Texas Gulf Coast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klosterboer, Arlen; Miller, Travis; Livingston, Stephen

    1996-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Rhonda R. Kappler, Graphic Designer Producing Early-Maturity (Group IV) Soybeans On The Texas Gulf Coast A. D. Klosterboer, T. D. Miller, and S. D. Livingston* n Preparing a good and weed-free seed bed. n Cultivating in a timely manner. n Making and using... by the Texas Agricultural Extension Service is implied. Elizabeth Gregory, Editor Rhonda R. Kappler, Graphic Designer Producing Early-Maturity (Group IV) Soybeans On The Texas Gulf Coast A. D. Klosterboer, T. D. Miller, and S. D. Livingston* ...

  19. Comparison between steady-state and dynamic I-V measurements from a single-cell thermionic fuel element

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wernsman, Bernard [New Mexico Engineering Research Institute Thermionics Evaluation Facility 901 University SE Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 (United States)

    1997-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A comparison between steady-state and dynamic I-V measurements from a single-cell thermionic fuel element (TFE) is made. The single-cell TFE used in this study is the prototype for the 40 kW{sub e} space nuclear power system that is similar to the 6 kW{sub e} TOPAZ-II. The steady-state I-V measurements influence the emitter temperature due to electron cooling. Therefore, to eliminate the steady-state I-V measurement influence on the TFE and provide a better understanding of the behavior of the thermionic energy converter and TFE characteristics, dynamic I-V measurements are made. The dynamic I-V measurements are made at various input power levels, cesium pressures, collector temperatures, and steady-state current levels. From these measurements, it is shown that the dynamic I-V's do not change the TFE characteristics at a given operating point. Also, the evaluation of the collector work function from the dynamic I-V measurements shows that the collector optimization is not due to a minimum in the collector work function but due to an emission optimization. Since the dynamic I-V measurements do not influence the TFE characteristics, it is believed that these measurements can be done at a system level to understand the influence of TFE placement in the reactor as a function of the core thermal distribution.

  20. Ciencias Agrarias Plan de Actuacin 2014-2017 Anexo IV: Plan de Actuacin del rea de Ciencias Agrarias

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitze, Patrick

    1 1 4 7 Plan de Actuación Área de Ciencias Agrarias #12;2 Plan de Actuación 2014-2017 Anexo IV: Plan de Actuación del Área de Ciencias Agrarias 1 1 4 7 Plan de Actuación del Área de Ciencias Agrarias RESumEN EjECutIvO La misión del Área de Ciencias Agrarias (CCAGR) es generar el conocimiento cientí

  1. Metallapyrimidines and Metallapyrimidiniums from Oxidative Addition of Pyrazolate N-N Bonds to Niobium(III), Niobium(IV), and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    to Niobium(III), Niobium(IV), and Tantalum(IV) Metal Centers and Assessment of Their Aromatic Character T afforded (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-5-ketimidohept-3-en-3-imide)bis(3,5-di-tert-butylpyrazolate)niobium(V) (3, 32 to the niobium center. In 1, one of the nitrogen atoms abstracted a hydrogen atom from tetrahydrofuran solvent

  2. UMBC Policy # IV-2.20.01 Page 1 of 5 UMBC POLICY ON EXPORT CONTROL REGULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adali, Tulay

    UMBC Policy # IV-2.20.01 Page 1 of 5 UMBC POLICY ON EXPORT CONTROL REGULATIONS UMBC IV-2.20.01 I. POLICY STATEMENT It is the policy of the University to comply with U.S. Export control regulations nationals on U.S. soil. II. PURPOSE FOR POLICY Export control regulations are a group of federal regulations

  3. Media Transatlantic IV March 29 31, 2012, University of Paderborn, Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paderborn, Universität

    Media Transatlantic IV March 29 ­ 31, 2012, University of Paderborn, Germany Traffic Aiming to bring together media scholars from the United States, Canada, and Germany, the conference continues Schabacher (University of Siegen, Germany): Traffic as 'Dirt Experience'. Harold Innis' Tracing of Media. 04

  4. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Ten-Year Program Plan Fiscal Year 2005, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As reflected in the U.S. ''National Energy Policy'', nuclear energy has a strong role to play in satisfying our nation's future energy security and environmental quality needs. The desirable environmental, economic, and sustainability attributes of nuclear energy give it a cornerstone position, not only in the U.S. energy portfolio, but also in the world's future energy portfolio. Accordingly, on September 20, 2002, U.S. Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham announced that, ''The United States and nine other countries have agreed to develop six Generation IV nuclear energy concepts''. The Secretary also noted that the systems are expected to ''represent significant advances in economics, safety, reliability, proliferation resistance, and waste minimization''. The six systems and their broad, worldwide research and development (R&D) needs are described in ''A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems'' (hereafter referred to as the Generation IV Roadmap). The first 10 years of required U.S. R&D contributions to achieve the goals described in the Generation IV Roadmap are outlined in this Program Plan.

  5. Definition of the Floating System for Phase IV of OC3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonkman, J.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase IV of the IEA Annex XXIII Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration (OC3) involves the modeling of an offshore floating wind turbine. This report documents the specifications of the floating system, which are needed by the OC3 participants for building aero-hydro-servo-elastic models.

  6. Joint Implementation: Lessons from Title IV's Voluntary Compliance Programs1 by Erica Atkeson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ' 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA), also known as the Acid Rain Program, is the largest public policy-in participants from entering the Acid Rain Program. The differing response to Title IV's two voluntary programs ..................................................................................... 9 3. The United States Acid Rain Program

  7. Challenges in implementing efficient Title IV and Title V permit programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sprott, R. [Utah Division of Air Quality, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrating title IV acid rain and title V operating permits in an efficient manner poses numerous challenges. Federal rules and policy memos about these programs often conflict or lead to actions that are difficult to implement at best. Both permitting programs are complex and controversial, but the title IV permitting rules are particularly difficult to use and understand. Clear lines of jurisdiction for various aspects of the acid rain program are lacking in some cases, and regulators have been slow to recognize and solve these problems. There are numerous issues that have arisen during the initial stages of developing permits for title IV affected sources. Some have or are being resolved; others remain as potential impediments to efficient permitting. Utah and other western states have been working with the utility industry and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to resolve these and other issues and some problems have been resolved. However, some state and industry officials feel that EPA should take the lead to conduct a series title IV implementation workshops in partnership with states and the utilities. This paper describes solutions to some common implementation problems and identifies challenges that remain to be solved.

  8. OGLE-IV: Fourth Phase of the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Udalski, A; Szyma?ski, G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present both the technical overview and main science drivers of the fourth phase of the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (hereafter OGLE-IV). OGLE-IV is currently one of the largest sky variability surveys worldwide, targeting the densest stellar regions of the sky. The survey covers over 3000 square degrees in the sky and monitors regularly over a billion sources. The main targets include the inner Galactic Bulge and the Magellanic System. Their photometry spans the range of $12IV surveys provide photometry with milli-magnitude accuracy at the bright end. The cadence of observations varies from 19-60 minutes in the inner Galactic bulge to 1-3 days in the remaining Galactic bulge fields, Magellanic System and the Galactic disk. OGLE-IV provides the astronomical com...

  9. Effects of weld preheat temperature and heat input on type IV failure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Effects of weld preheat temperature and heat input on type IV failure J. A. Francis*1 , G. M. D of a welded joint due to an enhanced rate of creep void formation in the fine grained or intercritically standpoint, and comparatively little effort has been directed at understanding the effects of welding

  10. Chair of Information Systems IV (ERIS) Institute for Enterprise Systems (InES)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mannheim, Universität

    workarounds to fulfill daily tasks. Security concept for Enterprise Systems processing business critical data:Master Team Project: Adaptive Usage Control in Enterprise Systems Chair of Information Systems IV (Enterprise Definition and Motivation The Security Evolution Towards a Central Usage Control Policy Hub The Project

  11. THE NEW MULTICHANNEL RADIOSPECTROGRAPH ARTEMIS-IV/HECATE, OF THE UNIVERSITY OF ATHENS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Athens, University of

    THE NEW MULTICHANNEL RADIOSPECTROGRAPH ARTEMIS-IV/HECATE, OF THE UNIVERSITY OF ATHENS C. CAROUBALOS@cc.uoa.gr (Received 14 April 2000; accepted in revised form 5 February 2001) Abstract. We present the new solar shocks, the acceleration of energetic particles from shock waves, and the relation of energetic electrons

  12. ARTEMIS MARK-IV, THE NEW GREEKFRENCH DIGITAL RADIO SPECTROGRAPH AT THERMOPYLES, GREECE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Athens, University of

    ARTEMIS MARK-IV, THE NEW GREEK­FRENCH DIGITAL RADIO SPECTROGRAPH AT THERMOPYLES, GREECE D. MAROULIS the new digital solar radio spectrograph located at the Thermopyles station, Greece, operated. MAROULIS ET AL. planetary shocks, the acceleration of energetic particles from solar and interplan- etary

  13. IV. STATION CONFIGURATION AND SENSOR COMPARISONS Comparison of solar radiation data gathered at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    8 IV. STATION CONFIGURATION AND SENSOR COMPARISONS Comparison of solar radiation data gathered of the instruments used to monitor the incident solar radiation. Five types of so- lar sensors and several different data loggers have been used to gather the solar radiation data presented in this data book

  14. Role of type IV secretion systems in trafficking of virulence determinants of Burkholderia cenocepacia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engledow, Amanda Suzanne

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    protein effector (PtwE1) that is cytotoxic to plant cells. It was also determined that the positively charged C-terminal region of PtwE1 is important for translocation via the Ptw type IV secretion system. Strains of the epidemic B. cenocepacia PHDC...

  15. Part IV: Other International Arrangements of Interest Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Part IV: Other International Arrangements of Interest 176 Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) Committee on Fisheries (COFI) FAO The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) was founded in October 1945 with a mandate to raise levels of nutrition and standards of living, to improve

  16. Cloud Computing Forum & Workshop IV Agenda National Institute of Standards and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cloud Computing Forum & Workshop IV Agenda National Institute of Standards and Technology 100 Policy, Department of State 1. Yeong Ro Lee, National Standards Coordinator for Cloud Computing for Information Society and Media, European Commission 10:40 11:00 USG Cloud Computing Technology Roadmap

  17. Method of removing Pu(IV) polymer from nuclear fuel reclaiming liquid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tallent, Othar K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Mailen, James C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bell, Jimmy T. (Kingston, TN); Arwood, Phillip C. (Harriman, TN)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Pu(IV) polymer not extractable from a nuclear fuel reclaiming solution by conventional processes is electrolytically converted to Pu.sup.3+ and PuO.sub.2.sup.2+ ions which are subsequently converted to Pu.sup.4+ ions extractable by the conventional processes.

  18. Lectures 7-8 Thurs 23.iv.09 HAS 222d Introduction to energy &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lectures 7-8 Thurs 23.iv.09 HAS 222d Introduction to energy & environment Atmosphere-ocean of mechanical energy into thermal energy (`heat') A cannon barrel is bored from solid iron by a pair of horses of the rising water temperature. This established he equivalence of thermal energy and a known about

  19. IV CESPC, August 21 -25, 2011, Zlatibor, Serbia LIMITATIONS OF NOX REMOVAL BY PULSED CORONA REACTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ebert, Ute

    IV CESPC, August 21 - 25, 2011, Zlatibor, Serbia 37 LIMITATIONS OF NOX REMOVAL BY PULSED CORONA depends on the deposited energy. There are presently only a few papers investigating this problem [1 volume of 322 L. It is powered by pulses of 80 kV with 15 ns rise time, 150 ns width (power) and energy

  20. For Continuous Feeding with Pump Using the CORFLO Anti-IV Feeding Tube and Extension SetFor Continuous Feeding with Pump Using the CORFLO Anti-IV Feeding Tube and Extension Set For Gravity Feeding Using the CORFLO Anti-IV Enteral Feeding TubeFor Gravity F

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    1. 3. 4. 5. 2. 5. 6. 7. 6. 7. 3. 4. For Continuous Feeding with Pump Using the CORFLO Anti-IV Feeding Tube and Extension SetFor Continuous Feeding with Pump Using the CORFLO Anti-IV Feeding Tube the instructions above for Continuous Feeding. Simply hang the syringe rather than putting it in a syringe pump

  1. Updated Generation IV Reactors Integrated Materials Technology Program Plan, Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corwin, William R [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Halsey, William [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Hayner, George [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Klett, James William [ORNL; McGreevy, Timothy E [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Program will address the research and development (R&D) necessary to support next-generation nuclear energy systems. Such R&D will be guided by the technology roadmap developed for the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) over two years with the participation of over 100 experts from the GIF countries. The roadmap evaluated over 100 future systems proposed by researchers around the world. The scope of the R&D described in the roadmap covers the six most promising Generation IV systems. The effort ended in December 2002 with the issue of the final Generation IV Technology Roadmap [1.1]. The six most promising systems identified for next generation nuclear energy are described within the roadmap. Two employ a thermal neutron spectrum with coolants and temperatures that enable hydrogen or electricity production with high efficiency (the Supercritical Water Reactor - SCWR and the Very High Temperature Reactor - VHTR). Three employ a fast neutron spectrum to enable more effective management of actinides through recycling of most components in the discharged fuel (the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor - GFR, the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor - LFR, and the Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor - SFR). The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) employs a circulating liquid fuel mixture that offers considerable flexibility for recycling actinides, and may provide an alternative to accelerator-driven systems. A few major technologies have been recognized by DOE as necessary to enable the deployment of the next generation of advanced nuclear reactors, including the development and qualification of the structural materials needed to ensure their safe and reliable operation. Accordingly, DOE has identified materials as one of the focus areas for Gen IV technology development.

  2. Tracking the Sun IV: An Historical Summary of the Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998 to 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darghouth, Naim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    systems, Tracking the Sun IV: The Installed Cost of PhotovoltaicsSystems Tracking the Sun IV: The Installed Cost of Photovoltaicsof Photovoltaics in the U.S. from 1998-2010 Systems with

  3. Tracking the Sun IV: An Historical Summary of the Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998 to 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darghouth, Naim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficiency Tracking the Sun IV: The Installed Cost of Photovoltaicsefficiency ratings for ftp://ftp.bls.gov/pub/special.requests/cpi/cpiai.txt Tracking the Sun IV: The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics

  4. Comparison between steady-state and dynamic I-V measurements from a single-cell thermionic fuel element

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wernsman, B. [New Mexico Engineering Research Institute Thermionics Evaluation Facility 901 University SE Albuquerque, New Mexico87106 (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comparison between steady-state and dynamic I-V measurements from a single-cell thermionic fuel element (TFE) is made. The single-cell TFE used in this study is the prototype for the 40kW{sub e} space nuclear power system that is similar to the 6kW{sub e} TOPAZ-II. The steady-state I-V measurements influence the emitter temperature due to electron cooling. Therefore, to eliminate the steady-state I-V measurement influence on the TFE and provide a better understanding of the behavior of the thermionic energy converter and TFE characteristics, dynamic I-V measurements are made. The dynamic I-V measurements are made at various input power levels, cesium pressures, collector temperatures, and steady-state current levels. From these measurements, it is shown that the dynamic I-V{close_quote}s do not change the TFE characteristics at a given operating point. Also, the evaluation of the collector work function from the dynamic I-V measurements shows that the collector optimization is not due to a minimum in the collector work function but due to an emission optimization. Since the dynamic I-V measurements do not influence the TFE characteristics, it is believed that these measurements can be done at a system level to understand the influence of TFE placement in the reactor as a function of the core thermal distribution. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Making appropriate comparisons of estimated and actual costs of reducing SO{sub 2} emissions under Title IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, A.E. [DFI/Aeronomics Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A current sentiment within some parts of the environmental policy community is that market-based regulatory approaches such as emissions trading have proven so effective that actual costs will be only a small fraction of what ex ante cost estimation procedures would project. With this line of reasoning, some have dismissed available cost estimates for major proposed new regulations, such as the new PM and ozone NAAQS, as not meaningful for policy decisions. The most commonly used evidence in support of this position is the experience with SO{sub 2} reductions under Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. In Title IV, a market for emissions allowances has been used to achieve reductions in sulfur dioxides (SO{sub 2}) to ameliorate acid rain. It is commonly asserted today that the cost of achieving the SO{sub 2} emissions reductions has been only one-tenth or less of what Title IV was originally expected to cost. This paper demonstrates that, to the contrary, actual costs for SO{sub 2} reductions remain roughly in line with original estimates associated with Title IV. Erroneous conclusions about Title IV`s costs are due to inappropriate comparisons of a variety of different measures that appear to be comparable only because they are all stated in dollars per ton. Program cost estimates include the total costs of a fully-implemented regulatory program. The very low costs of Title IV that are commonly cited today are neither directly reflective of a fully implemented Title IV, (which is still many years away) nor reflective of all the costs already incurred. Further, a careful review of history finds that the initial cost estimates that many cite were never associated with Title IV. Technically speaking, people are comparing the estimated control costs for the most-costly power plant associated with earlier acid rain regulatory proposals with prices from a market that do not directly reflect total costs.

  6. Special Publication No. 3, Ticks and Tickborne Diseases, IV. Geographical Distribution of Ticks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doss, Mildred A.; Farr, Marion M.; Roach, Katharine F.; Anastos, George

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ADMINISTRATION On January 24, 1978, four USDA agencies?Agricultural Research Service (ARS), Cooperative State Research Service (CSRS), Extension Service (ES), and the National Agricultural Library (NAL)?merged to become a new organization, the Science... AND VETERINARY ZOOLOGY SPECIAL PUBLICATION No. 3 TICKS AND TICKBORNE DISEASES IV. GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION OF TICKS MILDRED A. DOSS MARION M. FARR KATHARINE F. ROACH GEORGE ANASTOS The result of a cooperative effort by the Department of Zoology...

  7. EIS-0469: Proposed Wilton IV Wind Energy Center Project, Burleigh County, North Dakota

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Western Area Power Administration is evaluating the potential environmental impacts of interconnecting NextEra Energy Resources proposed Wilton IV Wind Energy Center Project, near Bismarck, North Dakota, to Western’s existing Wilton/Baldwin substation and allowing NextEra’s existing wind projects in this area to operate above 50 annual MW. Western is preparing a Supplemental Draft EIS to address substantial changes to the proposal, including 30 turbine locations and 5 alternate turbine locations in Crofte Township.

  8. Public Utility Commission Regulation and Cost-Effectiveness of Title IV: Lessons for CAIR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sotkiewicz, Paul M.; Holt, Lynne

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is growing evidence that the cost savings potential of the Title IV SO{sub 2} cap-and-trade program is not being reached. PUC regulatory treatment of compliance options appears to provide one explanation for this finding. That suggests that PUCs and utility companies should work together to develop incentive plans that will encourage cost-minimizing behavior for compliance with the EPA's recently issued Clean Air Interstate Rule.

  9. IV. -PHOTOMAGNETISM AND CONDUCT I W r PHOTOMAGNETIC EFFECT IN A Li-Mn FERRITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    IV. - PHOTOMAGNETISM AND CONDUCT I W r PHOTOMAGNETIC EFFECT IN A Li-Mn FERRITE P. BERNSTEIN and T'effet photomagnCtique dans le ferrite Fez,I oLi0.45Mn0.4504 au moyen de la variation de la perm investigated in a Fez.loLi0.45Mn0.4504ferrite by looking at the variations of the permeability under light

  10. Landau Gallaye-Joachim Thse de science politique 2011 1 UNIVERSITE MONTESQUIEU BORDEAUX IV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Landau Gallaye-Joachim Thèse de science politique 2011 1 UNIVERSITE MONTESQUIEU ­ BORDEAUX IV #12 Gallaye-Joachim Landau Les impacts de la démocratisation sur un secteur culturel : le cinéma sud, Université de Bordeaux tel-00881078,version1-7Nov2013 #12;Landau Gallaye-Joachim Thèse de science politique

  11. Supernova Relic Neutrino Search with Neutron Tagging at Super-Kamiokande-IV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for Supernova Relic neutrinos in the energy range 13.3 MeV $Super-Kamiokande-IV is conducted using 960 days of data. We identify 13 inverse-beta-decay candidates, all of which can be attributed to background. In the absence of a signal, 90% C.L. upper limits are calculated with respect to different models. A differential flux upper limit is also given with no model dependence.

  12. Solid Waste Operations Complex W-113: Project cost estimate. Preliminary design report. Volume IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains Volume IV of the Preliminary Design Report for the Solid Waste Operations Complex W-113 which is the Project Cost Estimate and construction schedule. The estimate was developed based upon Title 1 material take-offs, budgetary equipment quotes and Raytheon historical in-house data. The W-113 project cost estimate and project construction schedule were integrated together to provide a resource loaded project network.

  13. Irradiation Alters MMP-2/TIMP-2 System and Collagen Type IV Degradation in Brain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Won Hee [School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia (United States); Warrington, Junie P.; Sonntag, William E. [Reynolds Oklahoma Center on Aging, Department of Geriatric Medicine, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (United States); Lee, Yong Woo, E-mail: ywlee@vt.edu [School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia (United States); Department of Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia (United States)

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption is one of the major consequences of radiation-induced normal tissue injury in the central nervous system. We examined the effects of whole-brain irradiation on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)/tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) and extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation in the brain. Methods and Materials: Animals received either whole-brain irradiation (a single dose of 10 Gy {gamma}-rays or a fractionated dose of 40 Gy {gamma}-rays, total) or sham-irradiation and were maintained for 4, 8, and 24 h following irradiation. mRNA expression levels of MMPs and TIMPs in the brain were analyzed by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The functional activity of MMPs was measured by in situ zymography, and degradation of ECM was visualized by collagen type IV immunofluorescent staining. Results: A significant increase in mRNA expression levels of MMP-2, MMP-9, and TIMP-1 was observed in irradiated brains compared to that in sham-irradiated controls. In situ zymography revealed a strong gelatinolytic activity in the brain 24 h postirradiation, and the enhanced gelatinolytic activity mediated by irradiation was significantly attenuated in the presence of anti-MMP-2 antibody. A significant reduction in collagen type IV immunoreactivity was also detected in the brain at 24 h after irradiation. In contrast, the levels of collagen type IV were not significantly changed at 4 and 8 h after irradiation compared with the sham-irradiated controls. Conclusions: The present study demonstrates for the first time that radiation induces an imbalance between MMP-2 and TIMP-2 levels and suggests that degradation of collagen type IV, a major ECM component of BBB basement membrane, may have a role in the pathogenesis of brain injury.

  14. Computational mechanics research and support for aerodynamics and hydraulics at TFHRC. Quarterly report January through March 2011. Year 1 Quarter 2 progress report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lottes, S. A.; Kulak, R. F.; Bojanowski, C. (Energy Systems)

    2011-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was established with a new interagency agreement between the Department of Energy and the Department of Transportation to provide collaborative research, development, and benchmarking of advanced three-dimensional computational mechanics analysis methods to the aerodynamics and hydraulics laboratories at the Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center for a period of five years, beginning in October 2010. The analysis methods employ well-benchmarked and supported commercial computational mechanics software. Computational mechanics encompasses the areas of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), Computational Wind Engineering (CWE), Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM), and Computational Multiphysics Mechanics (CMM) applied in Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) problems. The major areas of focus of the project are wind and water loads on bridges - superstructure, deck, cables, and substructure (including soil), primarily during storms and flood events - and the risks that these loads pose to structural failure. For flood events at bridges, another major focus of the work is assessment of the risk to bridges caused by scour of stream and riverbed material away from the foundations of a bridge. Other areas of current research include modeling of flow through culverts to assess them for fish passage, modeling of the salt spray transport into bridge girders to address suitability of using weathering steel in bridges, vehicle stability under high wind loading, and the use of electromagnetic shock absorbers to improve vehicle stability under high wind conditions. This quarterly report documents technical progress on the project tasks for the period of January through March 2011.

  15. Aerodynamics and Heat Transfer Studies of Parameters Specific to the IGCC-Requirements: Endwall Contouring, Leading Edge and Blade Tip Ejection under Rotating Turbine Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schobeiri, Meinhard; Han, Je-Chin

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report deals with the specific aerodynamics and heat transfer problematic inherent to high pressure (HP) turbine sections of IGCC-gas turbines. Issues of primary relevance to a turbine stage operating in an IGCC-environment are: (1) decreasing the strength of the secondary flow vortices at the hub and tip regions to reduce (a), the secondary flow losses and (b), the potential for end wall deposition, erosion and corrosion due to secondary flow driven migration of gas flow particles to the hub and tip regions, (2) providing a robust film cooling technology at the hub and that sustains high cooling effectiveness less sensitive to deposition, (3) investigating the impact of blade tip geometry on film cooling effectiveness. The document includes numerical and experimental investigations of above issues. The experimental investigations were performed in the three-stage multi-purpose turbine research facility at the Turbomachinery Performance and Flow Research Laboratory (TPFL), Texas A&M University. For the numerical investigations a commercial Navier-Stokes solver was utilized.

  16. Using Mesoscale Weather Model Output as Boundary Conditions for Atmospheric Large-Eddy Simulations and Wind-Plant Aerodynamic Simulations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Churchfield, M. J.; Michalakes, J.; Vanderwende, B.; Lee, S.; Sprague, M. A.; Lundquist, J. K.; Moriarty, P. J.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind plant aerodynamics are directly affected by the microscale weather, which is directly influenced by the mesoscale weather. Microscale weather refers to processes that occur within the atmospheric boundary layer with the largest scales being a few hundred meters to a few kilometers depending on the atmospheric stability of the boundary layer. Mesoscale weather refers to large weather patterns, such as weather fronts, with the largest scales being hundreds of kilometers wide. Sometimes microscale simulations that capture mesoscale-driven variations (changes in wind speed and direction over time or across the spatial extent of a wind plant) are important in wind plant analysis. In this paper, we present our preliminary work in coupling a mesoscale weather model with a microscale atmospheric large-eddy simulation model. The coupling is one-way beginning with the weather model and ending with a computational fluid dynamics solver using the weather model in coarse large-eddy simulation mode as an intermediary. We simulate one hour of daytime moderately convective microscale development driven by the mesoscale data, which are applied as initial and boundary conditions to the microscale domain, at a site in Iowa. We analyze the time and distance necessary for the smallest resolvable microscales to develop.

  17. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies on Vanadium(IV) Electrolyte Solutions for Vanadium Redox Flow Battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vijayakumar, M.; Burton, Sarah D.; Huang, Cheng; Li, Liyu; Yang, Zhenguo; Graff, Gordon L.; Liu, Jun; Hu, Jian Z.; Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The vanadium (IV) electrolyte solutions with various vanadium concentrations are studied by variable temperature 1H and 17O Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The structure and kinetics of vanadium (IV) species in the electrolyte solutions are explored with respect to vanadium concentration and temperature. It was found that the vanadium (IV) species exist as hydrated vanadyl ion, i.e. [VO(H2O)5]2+ forming an octahedral coordination with vanadyl oxygen in the axial position and the remaining positions occupied by water molecules. This hydrated vanadyl ion structure is stable in vanadium concentrations up to 3M and in the temperature range of 240 to 340 K. The sulfate anions in the electrolyte solutions are found to be weekly bound to this hydrated vanadyl ion and occupies its second coordination sphere. The possible effects of these sulfate anions in proton and water exchange between vanadyl ion and solvent molecules are discussed based on 1H and 17O NMR results.

  18. Fundamental Understanding of Crack Growth in Structural Components of Generation IV Supercritical Light Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iouri I. Balachov; Takao Kobayashi; Francis Tanzella; Indira Jayaweera; Palitha Jayaweera; Petri Kinnunen; Martin Bojinov; Timo Saario

    2004-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This work contributes to the design of safe and economical Generation-IV Super-Critical Water Reactors (SCWRs) by providing a basis for selecting structural materials to ensure the functionality of in-vessel components during the entire service life. During the second year of the project, we completed electrochemical characterization of the oxide film properties and investigation of crack initiation and propagation for candidate structural materials steels under supercritical conditions. We ranked candidate alloys against their susceptibility to environmentally assisted degradation based on the in situ data measure with an SRI-designed controlled distance electrochemistry (CDE) arrangement. A correlation between measurable oxide film properties and susceptibility of austenitic steels to environmentally assisted degradation was observed experimentally. One of the major practical results of the present work is the experimentally proven ability of the economical CDE technique to supply in situ data for ranking candidate structural materials for Generation-IV SCRs. A potential use of the CDE arrangement developed ar SRI for building in situ sensors monitoring water chemistry in the heat transport circuit of Generation-IV SCWRs was evaluated and proved to be feasible.

  19. On the origins of C IV absorption profile diversity in broad absorption line quasars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baskin, Alexei; Hamann, Fred

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a large diversity in the C IV broad absorption line (BAL) profile among BAL quasars (BALQs). We quantify this diversity by exploring the distribution of the C IV BAL properties, FWHM, maximum depth of absorption and its velocity shift ($v_{\\rm md}$), using the SDSS DR7 quasar catalogue. We find the following: (i) Although the median C IV BAL profile in the quasar rest-frame becomes broader and shallower as the UV continuum slope ($\\alpha_{\\rm UV}$ at 1700-3000 A) gets bluer, the median individual profile in the absorber rest-frame remains identical, and is narrow (FWHM = 3500 km/s) and deep. Only 4 per cent of BALs have FWHM > 10,000 km/s. (ii) As the He II emission equivalent-width (EW) decreases, the distributions of FWHM and $v_{\\rm md}$ extend to larger values, and the median maximum depth increases. These trends are consistent with theoretical models in which softer ionizing continua reduce overionization, and allow radiative acceleration of faster BAL outflows. (iii) As $\\alpha_{\\rm UV}$ become...

  20. The Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis IV. The Identity and Sequence fo the Intermediates in Sucrose Synthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calvin, M.; Benson, A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    B&TH OF CARBON IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS IV. THE IDENTITY Alii'])eigl, AMS Monograph on Photosynthesis, .in press. UCRL-254in a 9O-second photosynthesis, an activity of 30,000 cpm is

  1. Conjugation of vitamin E analog ?-TOS to Pt(IV) complexes for dual-targeting anticancer therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suntharalingam, Kogularamanan

    We report two platinum(IV) complexes conjugated with a vitamin E analog, ?-tocopherol succinate (?-TOS). One of the conjugates displays the activity of both cisplatin and ?-TOS in cancer cells, causing damage to DNA and ...

  2. Oxidative halogenation of cisplatin and carboplatin: synthesis, spectroscopy, and crystal and molecular structures of Pt(IV) prodrugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, Sarah M.

    A series of Pt(IV) prodrugs has been obtained by oxidative halogenation of either cisplatin or carboplatin. Iodobenzene dichloride is a general reagent that cleanly provides prodrugs bearing axial chlorides without the ...

  3. The economics of pollution permit banking in the context of Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schennach, Susanne M.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tradable pollution permits are the basis of a new market-based approach to environmental control. The Acid Rain Program, established under Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, and aimed at drastically reducing ...

  4. Rational Ligand Design for U(VI) and Pu(IV)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szigethy, Geza

    2009-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear power is an attractive alternative to hydrocarbon-based energy production at a time when moving away from carbon-producing processes is widely accepted as a significant developmental need. Hence, the radioactive actinide power sources for this industry are necessarily becoming more widespread, which is accompanied by the increased risk of exposure to both biological and environmental systems. This, in turn, requires the development of technology designed to remove such radioactive threats efficiently and selectively from contaminated material, whether that be contained nuclear waste streams or the human body. Raymond and coworkers (University of California, Berkeley) have for decades investigated the interaction of biologically-inspired, hard Lewis-base ligands with high-valent, early-actinide cations. It has been established that such ligands bind strongly to the hard Lewis-acidic early actinides, and many poly-bidentate ligands have been developed and shown to be effective chelators of actinide contaminants in vivo. Work reported herein explores the effect of ligand geometry on the linear U(IV) dioxo dication (uranyl, UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}). The goal is to utilize rational ligand design to develop ligands that exhibit shape selectivity towards linear dioxo cations and provides thermodynamically favorable binding interactions. The uranyl complexes with a series of tetradentate 3-hydroxy-pyridin-2-one (3,2-HOPO) ligands were studied in both the crystalline state as well as in solution. Despite significant geometric differences, the uranyl affinities of these ligands vary only slightly but are better than DTPA, the only FDA-approved chelation therapy for actinide contamination. The terepthalamide (TAM) moiety was combined into tris-beidentate ligands with 1,2- and 3,2-HOPO moieties were combined into hexadentate ligands whose structural preferences and solution thermodynamics were measured with the uranyl cation. In addition to achieving coordinative saturation, these ligands exhibited increased uranyl affinity compared to bis-Me-3,2-HOPO ligands. This result is due in part to their increased denticity, but is primarily the result of the presence of the TAM moiety. In an effort to explore the relatively unexplored coordination chemistry of Pu(IV) with bidentate moieties, a series of Pu(IV) complexes were also crystallized using bidentate hydroxypyridinone and hydroxypyrone ligands. The geometries of these complexes are compared to that of the analogous Ce(IV) complexes. While in some cases these showed the expected structural similarities, some ligand systems led to significant coordination changes. A series of crystal structure analyses with Ce(IV) indicated that these differences are most likely the result of crystallization condition differences and solvent inclusion effects.

  5. Environmental effects of marine energy development around the world. Annex IV Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea; Hanna, Luke; Whiting, Johnathan; Geerlofs, Simon; Grear, Molly; Blake, Kara (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)); Coffey, Anna; Massaua, Meghan; Brown-Saracino, Jocelyn; Battey, Hoyt (US Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States))

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Annex IV is an international collaborative project to examine the environmental effects of marine energy devices among countries through the International Energy Agency’s Ocean Energy Systems Initiative (OES). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) serves as the Operating Agent for the Annex, in partnership with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM; formerly the Minerals Management Service), the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), and National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Numerous ocean energy technologies and devices are being developed around the world, and the few data that exist about the environmental effects of these technologies are dispersed among countries and developers. The purpose of Annex IV is to facilitate efficient government oversight of the development of ocean energy systems by compiling and disseminating information about the potential environmental effects of marine energy technologies and to identify methods of monitoring for these effects. Beginning in 2010, this three-year effort produced a publicly available searchable online database of environmental effects information (Tethys). It houses scientific literature pertaining to the environmental effects of marine energy systems, as well as metadata on international ocean energy projects and research studies. Two experts’ workshops were held in Dublin, Ireland (September 2010 and October 2012) to engage with international researchers, developers, and regulators on the scope and outcomes of the Annex IV project. Metadata and information stored in the Tethys database and feedback obtained from the two experts’ workshops were used as resources in the development of this report. This Annex IV final report contains three case studies of specific interactions of marine energy devices with the marine environment that survey, compile, and analyze the best available information in one coherent location. These case studies address 1) the physical interactions between animals and tidal turbines; 2) the acoustic impact of marine energy devices on marine animals; and 3) the effects of energy removal on physical systems. Each case study contains a description of environmental monitoring efforts and research studies, lessons learned, and analysis of remaining information gaps. The information collected through the Annex IV effort and referenced in this report, can be accessed on the Tethys database at http://mhk.pnnl.gov/wiki/index.php/Tethys_ Home.

  6. Selenium(IV) and (VI) sorption by soils surrounding fly ash management facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyun, S.; Burns, P.E.; Murarka, I.; Lee, L.S. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Leachate derived from unlined coal ash disposal facilities is one of the most significant anthropogenic sources of selenium to the environment. To establish a practical framework for predicting transport of selenium in ash leachate, sorption of Se(IV) and Se(VI) from 1 mM CaSO{sub 4} was measured for 18 soils obtained down-gradient from three ash landfill sites and evaluated with respect to several soil properties. Furthermore, soil attenuation from lab-generated ash leachate and the effect of Ca{sup 2+} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} concentrations as well as pH on both Se(IV) and Se(VI) was quantified for a subset of soils. For both Se(IV) and Se(VI), pH combined with either percentage clay or dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate (DCB)-extractable Fe described {gt} 80% of the differences in sorption across all soils, yielding an easy approach for making initial predictions regarding site-specific selenium transport to sensitive water bodies. Se(IV) consistently exhibited an order of magnitude greater sorption than Se(VI). Selenium sorption was highest at lower pH values, with Se(IV) sorption decreasing at pH values above 6, whereas Se(VI) decreased over the entire pH range (2.5-10). Using these pH adsorption envelopes, the likely effect of ash leachate-induced changes in soil pore water pH with time on selenium attenuation by down gradient soils can be predicted. Selenium sorption increased with increasing Ca{sup 2+} concentrations while SO{sub 4}2- suppressed sorption well above enhancements by Ca{sup 2+}. Soil attenuation of selenium from ash leachates agreed well with sorption measured from 1 mM CaSO{sub 4}, indicating that 1 mM CaSO{sub 4} is a reasonable synthetic leachate for assessing selenium behavior at ash landfill sites.

  7. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2007. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2007 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988; all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. In May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV were suspended until DOE completes the SSFL Area IV Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The environmental monitoring programs were continued throughout the year. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2007 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling. All radioactive wastes are processed for disposal at DOE disposal sites and/or other licensed sites approved by DOE for radioactive waste disposal. No liquid radioactive wastes were released into the environment in 2007.

  8. Section IV

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz is Taking OverEvaluating ' M M t .9Target-atom

  9. Generation IV Reactors Integrated Materials Technology Program Plan: Focus on Very High Temperature Reactor Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corwin, William R [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; McGreevy, Timothy E [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 2002, the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems (Gen IV) Program has addressed the research and development (R&D) necessary to support next-generation nuclear energy systems. The six most promising systems identified for next-generation nuclear energy are described within this roadmap. Two employ a thermal neutron spectrum with coolants and temperatures that enable hydrogen or electricity production with high efficiency (the Supercritical Water Reactor-SCWR and the Very High Temperature Reactor-VHTR). Three employ a fast neutron spectrum to enable more effective management of actinides through recycling of most components in the discharged fuel (the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor-GFR, the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor-LFR, and the Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor-SFR). The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) employs a circulating liquid fuel mixture that offers considerable flexibility for recycling actinides and may provide an alternative to accelerator-driven systems. At the inception of DOE's Gen IV program, it was decided to significantly pursue five of the six concepts identified in the Gen IV roadmap to determine which of them was most appropriate to meet the needs of future U.S. nuclear power generation. In particular, evaluation of the highly efficient thermal SCWR and VHTR reactors was initiated primarily for energy production, and evaluation of the three fast reactor concepts, SFR, LFR, and GFR, was begun to assess viability for both energy production and their potential contribution to closing the fuel cycle. Within the Gen IV Program itself, only the VHTR class of reactors was selected for continued development. Hence, this document will address the multiple activities under the Gen IV program that contribute to the development of the VHTR. A few major technologies have been recognized by DOE as necessary to enable the deployment of the next generation of advanced nuclear reactors, including the development and qualification of the structural materials needed to ensure their safe and reliable operation. The focus of this document will be the overall range of DOE's structural materials research activities being conducted to support VHTR development. By far, the largest portion of material's R&D supporting VHTR development is that being performed directly as part of the Next-Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. Supplementary VHTR materials R&D being performed in the DOE program, including university and international research programs and that being performed under direct contracts with the American Society for Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, will also be described. Specific areas of high-priority materials research that will be needed to deploy the NGNP and provide a basis for subsequent VHTRs are described, including the following: (1) Graphite: (a) Extensive unirradiated materials characterization and assessment of irradiation effects on properties must be performed to qualify new grades of graphite for nuclear service, including thermo-physical and mechanical properties and their changes, statistical variations from billot-to-billot and lot-to-lot, creep, and especially, irradiation creep. (b) Predictive models, as well as codification of the requirements and design methods for graphite core supports, must be developed to provide a basis for licensing. (2) Ceramics: Both fibrous and load-bearing ceramics must be qualified for environmental and radiation service as insulating materials. (3) Ceramic Composites: Carbon-carbon and SiC-SiC composites must be qualified for specialized usage in selected high-temperature components, such as core stabilizers, control rods, and insulating covers and ducting. This will require development of component-specific designs and fabrication processes, materials characterization, assessment of environmental and irradiation effects, and establishment of codes and standards for materials testing and design requirements. (4) Pressure Vessel Steels: (a) Qualification of short-term, high-temperature properties of light water rea

  10. Development of Modeling Techniques for A Generation IV Gas Fast Reactor 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dercher, Andrew Steven

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    to the harmful biological effects caused by excessive radiation exposure, one can understand why people are concerned about mankind?s ability to safely operate ____________ This thesis follows the style of International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer. 2... to increase plant life and plant safety, a new class of nuclear reactors is being considered in order to meet the world?s ever-growing energy demands. This class of new reactors has been termed as the Gen IV class of nuclear reactors. These new reactors...

  11. Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (Phase I). Project IV. Structural building response; Structural Building Response Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Healey, J.J.; Wu, S.T.; Murga, M.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Phase I effort of the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) being performed by the University of California Lawrence Livermore Laboratory for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the basic objective of Subtask IV.1 (Structural Building Response Review) is to review and summarize current methods and data pertaining to seismic response calculations particularly as they relate to the objectives of the SSMRP. This material forms one component in the development of the overall computational methodology involving state of the art computations including explicit consideration of uncertainty and aimed at ultimately deriving estimates of the probability of radioactive releases due to seismic effects on nuclear power plant facilities.

  12. Generic process for preparing a crystalline oxide upon a group IV semiconductor substrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKee, Rodney A. (Kingston, TN); Walker, Frederick J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Chisholm, Matthew F. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for growing a crystalline oxide epitaxially upon the surface of a Group IV semiconductor, as well as a structure constructed by the process, is described. The semiconductor can be germanium or silicon, and the crystalline oxide can generally be represented by the formula (AO).sub.n (A'BO.sub.3).sub.m in which "n" and "m" are non-negative integer repeats of planes of the alkaline earth oxides or the alkaline earth-containing perovskite oxides. With atomic level control of interfacial thermodynamics in a multicomponent semiconductor/oxide system, a highly perfect interface between a semiconductor and a crystalline oxide can be obtained.

  13. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

    2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Final report of 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. Mockups applied to design review of AP600/1000, Construction planning for AP 600, and AP 1000 maintenance evaluation. Proof of concept study also performed for GenIV PBMR models.

  14. Prospective study evaluating the use of IV contrast on IMRT treatment planning for lung cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Hua, E-mail: huli@radonc.wustl.edu; Bottani, Beth; DeWees, Todd; Michalski, Jeff M.; Mutic, Sasa; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Robinson, Clifford G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Low, Daniel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of exclusively using intravenous (IV) contrast x-ray computed tomography (CT) scans on lung cancer intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning. Methods: Eight patients with lung cancer (one small cell, seven nonsmall cell) scheduled to receive IMRT consented to acquisition of simulation CT scans with and without IV contrast. Clinical treatment plans optimized on the noncontrast scans were recomputed on contrast scans and dose coverage was compared, along with the ? passing rates. Results: IV contrast enhanced scans provided better target and critical structure conspicuity than the noncontrast scans. Using noncontrast scan as a reference, the median absolute/relative differences in mean, maximum, and minimum doses to the planning target volume (PTV) were ?4.5 cGy/?0.09%, 41.1 cGy/0.62%, and ?19.7 cGy/?0.50%, respectively. Regarding organs-at-risk (OARs), the median absolute/relative differences of maximum dose to heart was ?13.3 cGy/?0.32%, to esophagus was ?63.4 cGy/?0.89%, and to spinal cord was ?16.3 cGy/?0.46%. The median heart region of interest CT Hounsfield Unit (HU) number difference between noncontrast and contrast scans was 136.4 HU (range, 94.2–161.8 HU). Subjectively, the regions with absolute dose differences greater than 3% of the prescription dose were small and typically located at the patient periphery and/or at the beam edges. The median ? passing rate was 0.9981 (range, 0.9654–0.9999) using 3% absolute dose difference/3 mm distance-to-agreement criteria. Overall, all evaluated cases were found to be clinically equivalent. Conclusions: PTV and OARs dose differences between noncontrast and contrast scans appear to be minimal for lung cancer patients undergoing IMRT. Using IV contrast scans as the primary simulation dataset could increase treatment planning efficiency and accuracy by avoiding unnecessary scans, manually region overriding, and planning errors caused by nonperfect image registrations.

  15. Gen IV Materials Handbook Functionalities and Operation (4A) Handbook Version 4.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Weiju [ORNL

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is prepared for navigation and operation of the Gen IV Materials Handbook, with architecture description and new user access initiation instructions. Development rationale and history of the Handbook is summarized. The major development aspects, architecture, and design principles of the Handbook are briefly introduced to provide an overview of its past evolution and future prospects. Detailed instructions are given with examples for navigating the constructed Handbook components and using the main functionalities. Procedures are provided in a step-by-step fashion for Data Upload Managers to upload reports and data files, as well as for new users to initiate Handbook access.

  16. Differences between measured and linearly interpolated synoptic variables over a 12-h period during AVE IV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dupuis, Leonard Raymond

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Z4 April 1975. (after Fucik and Turner, 1975). 590 440 1D 1Dy ~ m 9 soo 530 560 18~ 530 I 22 ? g --' I / '3 22 0 590 20 338 530 16 850 mb 4 4 090 8 m 2D ? ? ? 6 ( ', -k 5 150 8 I '30 ~ 8O '4 210 210 700 BIb Fig. 6. (Cont3nued...DIFFERENCES BETWEEN MEASURED AND LINEARLY INTERPOLATED SYNOPTIC VARIABLES OVER A 12-h PERIOD DURING AVE IV A Thesis by LEONARD RAYMOND DUPUIS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial ful. fillment...

  17. Brookhaven National Laboratory - OU I/IV VOC | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesville Energy ResearchAchievingHydraulic Institute StandardsHFBRI/IV VOC

  18. Bifunction in Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} co-doped BaTi{sub 2}O{sub 5}–Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} glasses prepared by aerodynamic levitation method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Minghui [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Yu, Jianding; Pan, Xiuhong [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Cheng, Yuxing [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Liu, Yan, E-mail: liuyan@mail.sic.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Novel BaTi{sub 2}O{sub 5}–Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} based glasses have been prepared by aerodynamic levitation. • The obtained glasses show high thermal stability with T{sub g} = 763.3 °C. • Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} co-doped glasses show strong upconversion based on a two-photon process. • Red emission is stronger than green emissions for EBT by high Yb{sup 3+} concentration. • Magnetic ions are paramagnetic and the distribution is homogeneous in the glasses. - Abstract: Novel Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} co-doped BaTi{sub 2}O{sub 5}–Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} spherical glasses have been fabricated by aerodynamic levitation method. The thermal stability, upconversion luminescence, and magnetic properties of the present glass have been studied. The glasses show high thermal stability with 763.3 °C of the onset temperature of the glass transition. Red and green emissions centered at 671 nm, 548 nm and 535 nm are obtained at 980 nm excitation. The upconversion is based on a two-photon process by energy transfer, excited-state absorption, and energy back transfer. Yb{sup 3+} ions are more than Er{sup 3+} ions in the glass, resulting in efficient energy back transfer from Er{sup 3+} to Yb{sup 3+}. So the red emission is stronger than the green emissions. Magnetization curves indicate that magnetic rare earth ions are paramagnetic and the distribution is homogeneous and random in the glass matrix. Aerodynamic levitation method is an efficient way to prepare glasses with homogeneous rare earth ions.

  19. Status of advanced fuel candidates for Sodium Fast Reactor within the Generation IV International Forum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F. Delage; J. Carmack; C. B. Lee; T. Mizuno; M. Pelletier; J. Somers

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main challenge for fuels for future Sodium Fast Reactor systems is the development and qualification of a nuclear fuel sub-assembly which meets the Generation IV International Forum goals. The Advanced Fuel project investigates high burn-up minor actinide bearing fuels as well as claddings and wrappers to withstand high neutron doses and temperatures. The R&D outcome of national and collaborative programs has been collected and shared between the AF project members in order to review the capability of sub-assembly material and fuel candidates, to identify the issues and select the viable options. Based on historical experience and knowledge, both oxide and metal fuels emerge as primary options to meet the performance and the reliability goals of Generation IV SFR systems. There is a significant positive experience on carbide fuels but major issues remain to be overcome: strong in-pile swelling, atmosphere required for fabrication as well as Pu and Am losses. The irradiation performance database for nitride fuels is limited with longer term R&D activities still required. The promising core material candidates are Ferritic/Martensitic (F/M) and Oxide Dispersed Strengthened (ODS) steels.

  20. LITERATURE REVIEW: REDUCTION OF NP(V) TO NP (IV)-ALTERNATIVES TO FERROUS SULFAMATE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kessinger, G.; Kyser, E.; Almond, P.

    2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The baseline approach to control of Np oxidation in UREX and PUREX separation processes is the reduction of Np(V) and Np(VI) to Np(IV) using ferrous sulfamate. Use of this reagent results in increased sulfur and iron concentrations in the liquid waste streams from the process. Presence of these two elements, especially sulfur, increases the complexity of the development of wasteforms for immobilizing these effluents. Investigations are underway to identify reductants that eliminate sulfur and iron from the Np reduction process. While there are a variety of chemical reductants that will reduce Np to Np(IV) in nitric acid media, the reaction rates for most are so slow that the reductants are not be feasible for use in an operating plant process. In an attempt to identify additional alternatives to ferrous sulfamate, a literature search and review was performed. Based on the results of the literature review, it is concluded that photochemical and catalytic processes should also be investigated to test the utility of these two approaches. The catalytic process could be investigated for use in conjunction with chemical oxidants to speed the reaction rates for reductants that react slowly, but would otherwise be appropriate replacements for ferrous sulfamate. The photochemical approach, which has received little attention during the past few decades, also shows promise, especially the photocatalytic approach that includes a catalyst, such as Pt supported on SiC, which can be used in tandem with an oxidant, for Np reduction.

  1. A Project Management and Systems Engineering Structure for a Generation IV Very High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ed Gorski; Dennis Harrell; Finis Southworth

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) will be an advanced, very high temperature (approximately 1000o C. coolant outlet temperature), gas cooled nuclear reactor and is the nearest term of six Generation IV reactor technologies for nuclear assisted hydrogen production. In 2001, the Generation IV International Forum (GIF), a ten nation international forum working together with the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee (NERAC), agreed to proceed with the development of a technology roadmap and identified the next generation of nuclear reactor systems for producing new sources of power. Since a new reactor has not been licensed in the United States since the 1970s, the risks are too large for a single utility to assume in the development of an unprecedented Generation IV reactor. The government must sponsor and invest in the research to resolve major first of a kind (FOAK) issues through a full-scale demonstration prior to industry implementation. DOE’s primary mission for the VHTR is to demonstrate nuclear reactor assisted cogeneration of electricity and hydrogen while meeting the Generation IV goals for safety, sustainability, proliferation resistance and physical security and economics. The successful deployment of the VHTR as a demonstration project will aid in restarting the now atrophied U.S. nuclear power industry infrastructure. It is envisioned that VHTR project participants will include DOE Laboratories, industry partners such as designers, constructors, manufacturers, utilities, and Generation IV international countries. To effectively mange R&D, engineering, procurement, construction, and operation for this multi-organizational and technologically complex project, systems engineering will be used extensively to ensure delivery of the final product. Although the VHTR is an unprecedented FOAK system, the R&D, when assessed using the Office of Science and Technology Gate Model, falls primarily in the 3rd - Exploratory Development, 4th – Advanced Development, and 5th- Engineering Development stages of maturity rather than in the basic and viability stages. Therefore the R&D must be controlled and project driven from the top down to address specific issues of feasibility, proof of design or support of engineering. The design evolution must be through the systems approach including an iterative process of high-level requirements definition, engineering to focus R&D to verify feasibility, requirements development and conceptual design, R&D to verify design and refine detailed requirements for final detailed design. This paper will define a framework for project management and application of systems engineering at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The VHTR Project includes an overall reactor design and construction activity and four major supporting activities: fuel development and qualification, materials selection and qualification, NRC licensing and regulatory support, and the hydrogen production plant.

  2. Shipment and Disposal of Solidified Organic Waste (Waste Type IV) to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Amico, E. L [Washington TRU Solutions (United States); Edmiston, D. R. [John Hart and Associates (United States); O'Leary, G. A. [CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC (United States); Rivera, M. A. [Aspen Resources Ltd., Inc. (United States); Steward, D. M. [Boulder Research Enterprises, LLC (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In April of 2005, the last shipment of transuranic (TRU) waste from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site to the WIPP was completed. With the completion of this shipment, all transuranic waste generated and stored at Rocky Flats was successfully removed from the site and shipped to and disposed of at the WIPP. Some of the last waste to be shipped and disposed of at the WIPP was waste consisting of solidified organic liquids that is identified as Waste Type IV in the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC) document. Waste Type IV waste typically has a composition, and associated characteristics, that make it significantly more difficult to ship and dispose of than other Waste Types, especially with respect to gas generation. This paper provides an overview of the experience gained at Rocky Flats for management, transportation and disposal of Type IV waste at WIPP, particularly with respect to gas generation testing. (authors)

  3. Uncertainty Quantification in the Reliability and Risk Assessment of Generation IV Reactors: Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vierow, Karen; Aldemir, Tunc

    2009-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The project entitled, “Uncertainty Quantification in the Reliability and Risk Assessment of Generation IV Reactors”, was conducted as a DOE NERI project collaboration between Texas A&M University and The Ohio State University between March 2006 and June 2009. The overall goal of the proposed project was to develop practical approaches and tools by which dynamic reliability and risk assessment techniques can be used to augment the uncertainty quantification process in probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methods and PRA applications for Generation IV reactors. This report is the Final Scientific/Technical Report summarizing the project.

  4. Multiple Pathways for Benzyl Alcohol Oxidation by RuV=O3+ and RuIV=O2+

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, Amit; Hull, Jonathan F; Norris, Michael R; Chen, Zuofeng; Ess, Daniel H; Concepcion, Javier J; Meyer, Thomas J

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant rate enhancements are found for benzyl alcohol oxidation by the Ru{sup V}?O{sup 3+} form of the water oxidation catalyst [Ru(Mebimpy)(bpy)(OH{sub 2})]{sup 2+} [Mebimpy = 2,6-bis(1-methylbenzimidazol-2-yl)pyridine; bpy = 2,2?-bipyridine] compared to Ru{sup IV}?O{sup 2+} and for the Ru{sup IV}?O{sup 2+} form with added bases due to a new pathway, concerted hydride proton transfer (HPT).

  5. Multiple Pathways for Benzyl Alcohol Oxidation by Ru(V)?O3+ and Ru(IV)?O2+

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, Amit; Hull, Jonathan F; Norris, Michael R; Chen, Zuofeng; Ess, Daniel H.; Concepcion, Javier J; Meyer, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant rate enhancements are found for benzyl alcohol oxidation by the Ru{sup V}?O{sup 3+} form of the water oxidation catalyst [Ru(Mebimpy)(bpy)(OH{sub 2})]{sup 2+} [Mebimpy = 2,6-bis(1-methylbenzimidazol-2-yl)pyridine; bpy = 2,2?-bipyridine] compared to Ru{sup IV}?O{sup 2+} and for the Ru{sup IV}?O{sup 2+} form with added bases due to a new pathway involving concerted hydride proton transfer (HPT).

  6. EVALUATION METHODOLOGY FOR PROLIFERATION RESISTANCE AND PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF GENERATION IV NUCLEAR ENERGY SYSTEMS: AN OVERVIEW.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BARI, R.; ET AL.

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides an overview of the methodology approach developed by the Generation IV International Forum Expert Group on Proliferation Resistance & Physical Protection for evaluation of Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection robustness of Generation IV nuclear energy systems options. The methodology considers a set of alternative systems and evaluates their resistance or robustness to a collection of potential threats. For the challenges considered, the response of the system to these challenges is assessed and expressed in terms of outcomes. The challenges to the system are given by the threats posed by potential proliferant States and sub-national adversaries on the nuclear systems. The characteristics of the Generation IV systems, both technical and institutional, are used to evaluate their response to the threats and determine their resistance against the proliferation threats and robustness against sabotage and theft threats. System response encompasses three main elements: (1) System Element Identification. The nuclear energy system is decomposed into smaller elements (subsystems) at a level amenable to further analysis. (2) Target Identification and Categorization. A systematic process is used to identify and select representative targets for different categories of pathways, within each system element, that actors (proliferant States or adversaries) might choose to use or attack. (3) Pathway Identification and Refinement. Pathways are defined as potential sequences of events and actions followed by the proliferant State or adversary to achieve its objectives (proliferation, theft or sabotage). For each target, individual pathway segments are developed through a systematic process, analyzed at a high level, and screened where possible. Segments are connected into full pathways and analyzed in detail. The outcomes of the system response are expressed in terms of PR&PP measures. Measures are high-level characteristics of a pathway that include information important to the evaluation methodology users and to the decisions of a proliferant State or adversary. They are first evaluated for segments and then aggregated for complete pathways. Results are aggregated as appropriate to permit pathway comparisons and system assessment. The paper highlights the current achievements in the development of the Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection Evaluation Methodology. The way forward is also briefly presented together with some conclusions.

  7. Evaluation Methodology For Proliferation Resistance And Physical Protection Of Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems: An Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. Bjornard; R. Bari; R. Nishimura; P. Peterson; J. Roglans; D. Bley; J. Cazalet; G.G.M. Cojazzi; P. Delaune; M. Golay; G. Rendad; G. Rochau; M. Senzaki; I. Therios; M. Zentner

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides an overview of the methodology approach developed by the Generation IV International Forum Expert Group on Proliferation Resistance & Physical Protection for evaluation of Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection robustness of Generation IV nuclear energy systems options. The methodology considers a set of alternative systems and evaluates their resistance or robustness to a collection of potential threats. For the challenges considered, the response of the system to these challenges is assessed and expressed in terms of outcomes. The challenges to the system are given by the threats posed by potential proliferant States and sub-national adversaries on the nuclear systems. The characteristics of the Generation IV systems, both technical and institutional, are used to evaluate their response to the threats and determine their resistance against the proliferation threats and robustness against sabotage and theft threats. System response encompasses three main elements: 1.System Element Identification. The nuclear energy system is decomposed into smaller elements (subsystems) at a level amenable to further analysis. 2.Target Identification and Categorization. A systematic process is used to identify and select representative targets for different categories of pathways, within each system element, that actors (proliferant States or adversaries) might choose to use or attack. 3.Pathway Identification and Refinement. Pathways are defined as potential sequences of events and actions followed by the proliferant State or adversary to achieve its objectives (proliferation, theft or sabotage). For each target, individual pathway segments are developed through a systematic process, analyzed at a high level, and screened where possible. Segments are connected into full pathways and analyzed in detail. The outcomes of the system response are expressed in terms of PR&PP measures. Measures are high-level characteristics of a pathway that include information important to the evaluation methodology users and to the decisions of a proliferant State or adversary. They are first evaluated for segments and then aggregated for complete pathways. Results are aggregated as appropriate to permit pathway comparisons and system assessment. The paper highlights the current achievements in the development of the Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection Evaluation Methodology. The way forward is also briefly presented together with some conclusions.

  8. Multiwavelength Monitoring of the Dwarf Seyfert 1 Galaxy NGC 4395. IV. The Variable UV Absorption Lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexei Baskin; Ari Laor

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the detection of variable UV absorption lines in NGC 4395, based on UV observations with the HST STIS carried out in April and July, 2004, as part of a reverberation-mapping campaign. Low-ionization lines of O I, N I, Si II, C II, and Fe II, are present in the low-state spectra (April 2004) at a velocity v_shift=-250 km/s (system A_l), and additional high-ionization lines of C IV and N V appear in the high-state spectra (July 2004) at v_shift=-250 km/s (system A_h) and at v_shift=-840 km/s (system B). The absence of absorption from the low metastable levels of Si II implies a density <~10^3 cm^(-3) for system A_l, indicating a location outside the narrow line region (NLR). System A_h is peculiar as only N V absorption is clearly detected. A high N V/C IV absorption ratio is expected for a high metallicity absorber, but this is excluded here as the metallicity of the host galaxy and of the nuclear gas is significantly subsolar. A simple acceptable model for systems A_h and B is an absorber located between the broad line region (BLR) and the NLR, which absorbs only the continuum and the BLR. At the low-state the strong narrow emission lines of C IV and N V dominate the spectrum, making the absorption invisible. At the high-state the absorbed continuum and BLR emission dominate the spectrum. Thus, the change in the observed absorption does not reflect a change in the absorber, but rather a change in the continuum and BLR emission from behind the absorber, relative to the emission from the NLR in front of the absorber. Studies of the absorption line variability in highly variable objects can thus break the degeneracy in the absorber distance determination inherent to single epoch studies.

  9. Involvement of 5f-orbitals in the bonding and reactivity of organoactinide compounds: thorium(IV) and uranium(IV) bis (hydrazonato) complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantat, Thibault [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Graves, Christopher R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morris, David E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kiplinger, Jaqueline L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Migratory insertion of diphenyldiazomethane into both metal-carbon bonds of the bis(alkyl) and bis(aryl) complexes (C5Me5)2AnR2 yields the first f-element bis(hydrazonato) complexes (C5Me5)2An[2-(N,N')-R-N-NCPh2]2 [An = Th, R = CH3 (18), PhCH2 (15), Ph (16); An = U, R = CH3 (17), PhCH2 (14)], which have been characterized by a combination of spectroscopy, electrochemistry, and X-ray crystallography. The two hydrazonato ligands adopt an 2-coordination mode leading to 20-electron (for Th) and 22-electron (for U) complexes that have no transition-metal analogues. In fact, reaction of (C5H5)2Zr(CH3)2 or (C5Me5)2Hf(CH3)2 with diphenyldiazomethane is limited to the formation of the corresponding mono(hydrazonato) complex (C5R5)2M[2-(N,N')-CH3-N-NCPh2](CH3) (M = Zr, R = H or M = Hf, R = CH3). The difference in the reactivities of the group 4 metal complexes and the actinides was used as a unique platform for investigating in depth the role of 5f orbitals on the reactivity and bonding in actinide organometallic complexes. The electronic structure of the (C5H5)2M[2-(N,N')-CH3-N-NCH2]2 (M = Zr, Th, U) model complexes was studied using density functional theory (DFT) calculations and compared to experimental structural, electrochemical, and spectroscopic results. Whereas transition-metal bis(cyclopentadienyl) complexes are known to stabilize three ligands in the metallocene girdle to form saturated (C5H5)2ML3 species, in a bis(hydrazonato) system, a fourth ligand is coordinated to the metal center to give (C5H5)2ML4. DFT calculations have shown that 5f orbitals in the actinide complexes play a crucial role in stabilizing this fourth ligand by stabilizing both the s and p electrons of the two 2-coordinated hydrazonato ligands. In contrast, the stabilization of the hydrazonato ligands was found to be significantly less effective for the putative bis(hydrazonato) zirconium(IV) complex, yielding a higher energy structure. However, the difference in the reactivities of the group 4 metal and actinide complexes does not arise on thermodynamic grounds but is primarily of kinetic origin. Unfavorable steric factors have been ruled out as the sole influence to explain these different behaviors, and electronic factors were shown to govern the reactivity. For the actinides, both the C5H5 and more realistic C5Me5 ligands have been taken into account in computing the energy surface. The reaction profile for the C5Me5 system differs from that with the C5H5 ligand by a uniform shift of 5 kcal/mol in the relative energies of the transition state and products. The insertion of a second diazoalkane molecule into the sole metal-carbon bond in the mono(hydrazonato) complexes involves a high energy barrier (20 kcal/mol) for the zirconium(IV) system, whereas the actinides can facilitate the approach of the diazoalkane by coordination (formation of an adduct) and its insertion into the An-C bond with a very low barrier on the potential energy surface.

  10. DESIGN AND LAYOUT CONCEPTS FOR COMPACT, FACTORY-PRODUCED, TRANSPORTABLE, GENERATION IV REACTOR SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mynatt Fred R.; Townsend, L.W.; Williamson, Martin; Williams, Wesley; Miller, Laurence W.; Khan, M. Khurram; McConn, Joe; Kadak, Andrew C.; Berte, Marc V.; Sawhney, Rapinder; Fife, Jacob; Sedler, Todd L.; Conway, Larry E.; Felde, Dave K.

    2003-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this research project is to develop compact (100 to 400 MWe) Generation IV nuclear power plant design and layout concepts that maximize the benefits of factory-based fabrication and optimal packaging, transportation and siting. The reactor concepts selected were compact designs under development in the 2000 to 2001 period. This interdisciplinary project was comprised of three university-led nuclear engineering teams identified by reactor coolant type (water, gas, and liquid metal) and a fourth Industrial Engineering team. The reactors included a Modular Pebble Bed helium-cooled concept being developed at MIT, the IRIS water-cooled concept being developed by a team led by Westinghouse Electric Company, and a Lead-Bismuth-cooled concept developed by UT. In addition to the design and layout concepts this report includes a section on heat exchanger manufacturing simulations and a section on construction and cost impacts of proposed modular designs.

  11. Decay Heat Removal in GEN IV Gas-Cooled Fast Reactors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cheng, Lap-Yan; Wei, Thomas Y. C.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The safety goal of the current designs of advanced high-temperature thermal gas-cooled reactors (HTRs) is that no core meltdown would occur in a depressurization event with a combination of concurrent safety system failures. This study focused on the analysis of passive decay heat removal (DHR) in a GEN IV direct-cycle gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) which is based on the technology developments of the HTRs. Given the different criteria and design characteristics of the GFR, an approach different from that taken for the HTRs for passive DHR would have to be explored. Different design options based on maintaining core flow weremore »evaluated by performing transient analysis of a depressurization accident using the system code RELAP5-3D. The study also reviewed the conceptual design of autonomous systems for shutdown decay heat removal and recommends that future work in this area should be focused on the potential for Brayton cycle DHRs.« less

  12. Micro-unmanned aerodynamic vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reuel, Nigel (Rio Rancho, NM); Lionberger, Troy A. (Ann Arbor, MI); Galambos, Paul C. (Albuquerque, NM); Okandan, Murat (Albuquerque, NM); Baker, Michael S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A MEMS-based micro-unmanned vehicle includes at least a pair of wings having leading wing beams and trailing wing beams, at least two actuators, a leading actuator beam coupled to the leading wing beams, a trailing actuator beam coupled to the trailing wing beams, a vehicle body having a plurality of fulcrums pivotally securing the leading wing beams, the trailing wing beams, the leading actuator beam and the trailing actuator beam and having at least one anisotropically etched recess to accommodate a lever-fulcrum motion of the coupled beams, and a power source.

  13. Aerodynamic Lightweight Cab Structure Components

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  14. Sandia Energy - Rotor Aerodynamic Design

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol Home Distribution GridDocuments Home Stationary PowerResearchRisk and

  15. Neo Aerodynamic | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcerns Jump to: navigation,Nebraska/WindNeedham,AFB SolarNenana,Neo

  16. Optimized Active Aerodynamic Blade Control

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomass and Biofuels Biomass and Biofuels Find MoreRod Borup

  17. High Efficiency Thermionics (HET-IV) and Converter Advancement (CAP) programs. Final reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geller, C.B.; Murray, C.S.; Riley, D.R. [Bettis Atomic Power Lab., West Mifflin, PA (United States); Desplat, J.L.; Hansen, L.K.; Hatch, G.L.; McVey, J.B.; Rasor, N.S. [Rasor Associates, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA (United States)

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the final report of the High Efficiency Thermionics (HET-IV) Program, Attachment A, performed at Rasor Associates, Inc. (RAI); and the final report of the Converter Advancement Program (CAP), performed at the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory, Attachment B. The phenomenology of cesium-oxygen thermionic converters was elucidated in these programs, and the factors that had prevented the achievement of stable, enhanced cesium-oxygen converter performance for the previous thirty years were identified. Based on these discoveries, cesium-oxygen vapor sources were developed that achieved stable performance with factor-of-two improvements in power density and thermal efficiency, relative to conventional, cesium-only ignited mode thermionic converters. Key achievements of the HET-IV/CAP programs are as follows: a new technique for measuring minute traces of oxygen in cesium atmospheres; the determination of the proper range of oxygen partial pressures for optimum converter performance--10{sup {minus}7} to 10{sup {minus}9} torr; the discovery, and analysis of the cesium-oxygen liquid migration and compositional segregation phenomena; the successful use of capillary forces to contain the migration phenomenon; the use of differential heating to control compositional segregation, and induce vapor circulation; the development of mechanically and chemically stable, porous reservoir structures; the development of precise, in situ oxygen charging methods; stable improvements in emitter performance, up to effective emitter bare work functions of 5.4 eV; stable improvements in barrier index, to value below 1.8 Volts; the development of detailed microscopic models for cesium-oxygen reservoir dynamics and collector work function behavior; and the discovery of new relationships between electrode geometry and Schock Instability.

  18. UNIVERSITY OF SUSSEX RETURN OF TITLE IV FUNDS (R2T4) POLICY The University of Sussex will follow the US Department of Education's requirements for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    1 UNIVERSITY OF SUSSEX ­ RETURN OF TITLE IV FUNDS (R2T4) POLICY The University of Sussex. The University uses the `Treatment of Title IV Funds' form provided by the US Department of Education of Education all unearned funds for which the University is responsible. The student (or parent, if a PLUS loan

  19. KINETICS OF OXIDATION OF AQUEOUS SULFUR(IV) BY NITROGEN DIOXIDE YIN-NAN LEE AND STEPHEN E. SCHWARTZ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    clarified the role of aqueous-phase production of strong acids in the atmosphere. Oxidation of dissolvedKINETICS OF OXIDATION OF AQUEOUS SULFUR(IV) BY NITROGEN DIOXIDE YIN-NAN LEE AND STEPHEN E. SCHWARTZ) are the precursors of the strong acids (i.e., HzS04 and HN03) found in precipitation,! the detailed mechanisms

  20. Power losses in PV arrays due to variations in the I-V characteristics of PV modules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    Power losses in PV arrays due to variations in the I-V characteristics of PV modules Wolfgang Damm-V characteristics of the 36 individual modules of a PV generator at the University of Oldenburg were measured the basis for the calculations of the mismatch losses due to series and parallel connection of PV modules

  1. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV Colloque C1,supplement au Journal de Physique 111,Volume2, avril 1992

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    in the calculation of coupling factors from direct measurements have made Energy Based Structural Modelling more and the prediction and optimisation of the effects of noise control treatments. The term Energy Flow Analysis (EFAJOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV Colloque C1,supplement au Journal de Physique 111,Volume2, avril 1992 ENERGY

  2. Chemical modeling of arsenic(III, V) and selenium(IV, VI) adsorption by soils surrounding ash disposal facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, S.; Hyun, S.; Lee, L.S. [USDA, Riverside, CA (United States). US Salinity Laboratory

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Leachate derived from coal ash disposal facilities is a potential anthropogenic source of As and Se to the environment. To establish a practical framework for predicting attenuation and transport of As and Se in ash leachates, the adsorption of As(III), As(V), Se(IV), and Se(VI) had been characterized in prior studies for 18 soils obtained downgradient from ash landfill sites and representing a wide range of soil properties. The constant capacitance model was applied for the first time to describe As(III), As(V), Se(IV), and Se(VI) adsorption on soils as a function of equilibrium solution As(III), As(V), Se(IV), and Se(VI) concentrations. Prior applications of the model had been restricted to describing Se(IV) and As(V) adsorption by soils as a function of solution pH. The constant capacitance model was applied for the first time to describe As(III) and Se(VI) adsorption by soils. The model was able to describe adsorption of these ions on all soils as a function of solution ion concentration by optimizing only one adjustable parameter, the anion surface complexation constant. This chemical model represents an advancement over adsorption isotherm equation approaches that contain two empirical adjustable parameters. Incorporation of these anion surface complexation constants obtained with the constant capacitance model into chemical speciation transport models will allow simulation of soil solution anion concentrations under diverse environmental and agricultural conditions.

  3. Wavelet Applications in Signal and Image Processing IV, SPIE, Denver, 1996 1 Methods for Regular VLSI Implementations of Wavelet Filters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klappenecker, Andreas

    Wavelet Applications in Signal and Image Processing IV, SPIE, Denver, 1996 1 Methods for Regular VLSI Implementations of Wavelet Filters Andreas Klappenecker, Volker Baumgarte, Armin Nuckel implementation of wavelet lters. The direct form structure, the lattice form structure, and an algebraic

  4. Wavelet Applications in Signal and Image Processing IV, SPIE, Denver, 1996 1 Methods for Regular VLSI Implementations of Wavelet Filters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klappenecker, Andreas

    Wavelet Applications in Signal and Image Processing IV, SPIE, Denver, 1996 1 Methods for Regular VLSI Implementations of Wavelet Filters Andreas Klappenecker \\Lambda , Volker Baumgarte, Armin N implementation of wavelet filters. The direct form structure, the lattice form structure, and an algebraic

  5. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV Colloque C5, supplkment au Journal de Physique 11,Volume 5,juin 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV Colloque C5, supplkment au Journal de Physique 11,Volume 5,juin 1995 Remote oxide is deposited by remote microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (RMPECVD. Nevertheless the gas temperature remains in the range of 25-350°C avoiding excessive heating of the substrate

  6. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV Colloque C1,supplement au Journal de Physique 11, Volume3,mai 1993

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    concepts and complexfluids: long-rangepower-law correlations in DNA H.E. STANLEYJOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV Colloque C1,supplement au Journal de Physique 11, Volume3,mai 1993 Scaling,S.V.BULDYREV,A.L. GOLDBERGER*,S.HAVLIN,C.-K. PENG, E SCIORTINO and M. SIMONS*'** Centerfor Polymer Studies and Department

  7. F POWER MEASUREMENT FOR GENERATION IV SODIUM FAST R. COULON, S. NORMAND, M. MICHEL, L. BARBOT, T. DOMENECH,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    .F-84500 Bollène, France. ABSTRACT The Phénix nuclear power plant has been a French Sodium Fast Reactor the research of power tagging agents. Then, simulation study has been done to evaluate measurability using high20 F POWER MEASUREMENT FOR GENERATION IV SODIUM FAST REACTORS R. COULON, S. NORMAND, M. MICHEL, L

  8. Direct Sulfonation of Methane to Methanesulfonic Acid by Sulfur Trioxide Catalyzed by Cerium(IV) Sulfate in the Presence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, Alexis T.

    , methane did not undergo sulfonation to MSA.[4] Hg-based catalysts have been used at elevated temperatureDirect Sulfonation of Methane to Methanesulfonic Acid by Sulfur Trioxide Catalyzed by Cerium(IV) Sulfate in the Presence of Molecular Oxygen Sudip Mukhopadhyay, Alexis T. Bell* Department of Chemical

  9. IMPAIRED PHYSICIAN FOCUS ON SUBSTANCE ABUSE 1. American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yates, Andrew

    IMPAIRED PHYSICIAN FOCUS ON SUBSTANCE ABUSE REFERENCES 1 1. American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV. 4th ed. Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association; 1994. 2. American Society of Addiction Medicine. Patient Placement Criteria for the Treatment

  10. Ni(III)/(IV) Bis(dicarbollide) as a Fast, Noncorrosive Redox Shuttle for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni(III)/(IV) Bis(dicarbollide) as a Fast, Noncorrosive Redox Shuttle for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells-marks@northwestern.edu; chadnano@northwestern.edu The favorable energetics of dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC) constituents have. Marks,*,, and Joseph T. Hupp*,,,§ Department of Chemistry, Argonne-Northwestern Solar Energy Research

  11. Bulk Power Systems Dynamics and Control -IV Restructuring, Santorini, Greece, August 1998 IS MODAL RESONANCE A PRECURSOR TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bulk Power Systems Dynamics and Control - IV Restructuring, Santorini, Greece, August 1998 IS MODAL RESONANCE A PRECURSOR TO POWER SYSTEM OSCILLATIONS? Ian Dobson Jianfeng Zhang Scott Greene Henrik Engdahl Peter W. Sauer POWER SYSTEMS ENGINEERING RESEARCH CENTER Electrical and Computer Engineering Department

  12. I-V analysis of high-energy lithium-ion-irradiated Si and GaAs solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Meulenberg Jr; B. Jayashree; Ramani; M. C. Radhakrishna; A. K. Saif

    2007-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Space-grade Si and GaAs solar cells were irradiated with 15 and 40 MeV lithium ions. Dark-IV analysis (with and without illumination) reveals differences in the effects of such irradiation on the different cell types

  13. Human health benefits of ambient sulfate aerosol reductions under Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chestnut, L.G. [Hagler Bailly Consulting, Inc., Boulder, CO (United States); Watkins, A.M. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Acid Rain Provisions (Title IV) of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 call for about a 10 million ton reduction in annual SO{sub 2} emissions in the United States by the year 2010. Although the provisions apply nationwide, most of the reduction will take place in the eastern half of the United States, where use of high sulfur coal for electricity generation is most common. One potentially large benefit of Title IV is the expected reduction in adverse human health effects associated with exposure to ambient sulfate aerosols, a secondary pollutant formed in the atmosphere when SO{sub 2} is present. Sulfate aerosols are a significant constituent of fine particulate (PM{sub 2.5}). This paper combines available epidemiologic evidence of health effects associated with sulfate aerosols and economic estimates of willingness to pay for reductions in risks or incidence of health effects with available estimates of the difference between expected ambient sulfate concentrations in the eastern United States and southeastern Canada with and without Title IV to estimate the expected health benefits of Title IV. The results suggest a mean annual benefit in the eastern United States of $10.6 billion (in 1994 dollars) in 1997 and $40.0 billion in 2010, with an additional $1 billion benefit each year in Ontario and Quebec provinces.

  14. The enigmatic He-sdB pulsator LS IV$-$14$^\\circ$116: new insights from the VLT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Randall, S K; Ziegerer, E; Geier, S; Fontaine, G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The intermediate Helium subdwarf B star LS IV$-$14$^\\circ$116 is a unique object showing extremely peculiar atmospheric abundances as well as long-period pulsations that cannot be explained in terms of the usual opacity mechanism. One hypothesis invoked was that a strong magnetic field may be responsible. We discredit this possibility on the basis of FORS2 spectro-polarimetry, which allows us to rule out a mean longitudinal magnetic field down to 300 G. Using the same data, we derive the atmospheric parameters for LS IV$-$14$^\\circ$116 to be $T_{\\rm eff}$ = 31,150$\\pm$111 K, $\\log{g}$ = 5.88$\\pm$0.02 and $\\log{N(\\rm He)/N(\\rm H)}$ = $-$0.62$\\pm$0.01. The high surface gravity in particular is at odds with the theory that LS IV$-$14$^\\circ$116 has not yet settled onto the Helium Main Sequence, and that the pulsations are excited by an $\\epsilon$ mechanism acting on the Helium-burning shells present after the main Helium flash. Archival UVES spectroscopy reveals LS IV$-$14$^\\circ$116 to have a radial velocity of...

  15. A Highly Reactive Mononuclear Non-Heme Manganese(IV)?Oxo Complex That Can Activate the Strong C?H Bonds of Alkanes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Xiujuan; Seo, Mi Sook; Davis, Katherine M.; Lee, Yong-Min; Chen, Junying; Cho, Kyung-Bin; Pushkar, Yulia N.; Nam, Wonwoo (Ewha); (Purdue)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A mononuclear non-heme manganese(IV)-oxo complex has been synthesized and characterized using various spectroscopic methods. The Mn(IV)-oxo complex shows high reactivity in oxidation reactions, such as C-H bond activation, oxidations of olefins, alcohols, sulfides, and aromatic compounds, and N-dealkylation. In C-H bond activation, the Mn(IV)-oxo complex can activate C-H bonds as strong as those in cyclohexane. It is proposed that C-H bond activation by the non-heme Mn(IV)-oxo complex does not occur via an oxygen-rebound mechanism. The electrophilic character of the non-heme Mn(IV)-oxo complex is demonstrated by a large negative {rho} value of {approx}4.4 in the oxidation of para-substituted thioanisoles.

  16. Subunit Compositions of the RNA-Silencing Enzymes Pol IV and Pol V Reveal Their Origins as Specialized Forms of RNA Polymerase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ream, Thomas S.; Haag, J. R.; Wierzbicki, A. T.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Hagen, Gretchen; Guilfoyle, Thomas J.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In addition to RNA polymerases I, II, and III, the essential RNA polymerases present in all eukaryotes, plants have two additional nuclear RNA polymerases, abbreviated as Pol IV and Pol V, that play nonredundant roles in siRNA-directed DNA methylation and gene silencing. We show that Arabidopsis Pol IV and Pol V are composed of subunits that are paralogous or identical to the 12 subunits of Pol II. Four subunits of Pol IV are distinct from their Pol II paralogs, six subunits of Pol V are distinct from their Pol II paralogs, and four subunits differ between Pol IV and Pol V. Importantly, the subunit differences occur in key positions relative to the template entry and RNA exit paths. Our findings support the hypothesis that Pol IV and Pol V are Pol II-like enzymes that evolved specialized roles in the production of noncoding transcripts for RNA silencing and genome defense.

  17. Separation of thorium (IV) from lanthanide concentrate (LC) and water leach purification (WLP) residue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AL-Areqi, Wadeeah M.; Majid, Amran Ab.; Sarmani, Sukiman [Nuclear Science Programme, School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Thorium (IV) content in industrial residue produced from rare earth elements production industry is one of the challenges to Malaysian environment. Separation of thorium from the lanthanide concentrate (LC) and Water Leach Purification (WLP) residue from rare earth elements production plant is described. Both materials have been tested by sulphuric acid and alkaline digestions. Th concentrations in LC and WLP were determined to be 1289.7 ± 129 and 1952.9±17.6 ppm respectively. The results of separation show that the recovery of Th separation from rare earth in LC after concentrated sulphuric acid dissolution and reduction of acidity to precipitate Th was found 1.76-1.20% whereas Th recovery from WLP was less than 4% after concentrated acids and alkali digestion processes. Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS) was used to determine Th concentrations in aqueous phase during separation stages. This study indicated that thorium maybe exists in refractory and insoluble form which is difficult to separate by these processes and stays in WLP residue as naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM)

  18. US Department of Energy Region IV Unconventional Gas Program: summary and analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Telle, W.R.; Thompson, D.A.

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE Region IV Unconventional Gas Program involved the evaluation of unconventional gas resources at ten sites in the coal fields of the Eastern US. These projects dealt mainly with coalbed methane resources, although three of them also examined potential gas resources in Devonian black shales. The resource evaluations were accomplished primarily through recovery of core samples of potential gas-bearing strata and determination of specific gas content using the US Bureau of Mines direct method. In some cases actual gas production from the test holes was evaluated. Four of the projects were sited in the Warrior Basin, three in the Central Appalachian Basin, and one each in the Northern Appalachian Basin, the Deep River Basin of North Carolina, and the Valley Coal Fields of Virginia. Results from three of the projects, two in the Warrior Basin and one in the Northern Appalachian Basin, indicated the potential for economic recovery of coalbed methane. The projects included in this program provided a large body of data which is valuable to subsequent unconventional gas research. The program also provides new direction for unconventional gas exploration. Adjustments to coalbed methane resource estimates for some Eastern coal basins may be indicated by the results obtained. An update on the legal status of coalbed methane ownership in states where projects were conducted is provided in Appendix I. 5 references, 33 figures, 2 tables.

  19. The Long-Life Core Encapsulated Nuclear Heat Source (ENHS) Generation IV Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenspan, E.; Barak, A.; Saphier, D. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Buongiorno, J. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Brown, N.W.; Hossain, Q. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Carelli, M.D.; Conway, L.; Dzodzo, M. [Westinghouse Electric Co., Sci. and Tech., 1344 Beulah Rd., Pittsburgh, PA 15235 (United States); Feldman, E.; Sienicki, J.J.; Sofu, T.; Wade, D.C. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Hong, S.G.; Kim, Y.I. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Yusong, Taejon 305-600, Rep. of Korea (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The long-life core for the Encapsulated Nuclear Heat Source (ENHS) reactor has been redesigned so as to provide for fuel rod clad integrity up to the discharge burnup design goal. It was found feasible to design a nearly zero burnup reactivity swing long-life core that will maintain the fuel rod integrity up to the peak discharge burnup while enabling to handle the rated power using natural circulation. The core life is limited by radiation damage to its structural material. The core power shape is exceptionally constant throughout the core life. The new reference core design can deliver 125 MW{sub th} while having very generous margins for maximum acceptable temperatures or temperature differences. Using a cover-gas lift-pump it may be possible to design an ENHS module to deliver {approx}50% more power than the set goal. Briefly reviewed are unique features of the ENHS reactor along with the potential of this reactor to meet the goals set for Generation IV reactors. (authors)

  20. Method and apparatus for I-V data acquisition from solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cole, Steven W. (Covina, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for logging current-voltage (I-V) characteristic d of a solar cell module (10) in two modes using a portable instrument. One mode controls the load current through a circuit (36) in 256 equal intervals while voltage is measured from open circuit to at least halfway into the knee of the curve and the other mode controls the load voltage through a circuit (34) in 256 equal intervals from the lowest voltage measurement possible (short circuit) to at least halfway into the knee of the curve, under control of a microcomputer (12). All measurements are packed by discarding each measurement that is within 0.5% of the value predicted from two previous measurements, except every ninth (9th) measurement which is retained. The remaining data is further packed into a memory block of a detachable storage medium (14) by recording the data points in sequence following a header containing data common to all points, with each point having the value of the controlled parameter recorded as the number of increments from the previous point recorded followed by the measured value. The detachable storage medium is preferably a solid state device for reliability, and is transferable to a playback terminal which unpacks the data for analysis and display.

  1. Assessing the potential visibility benefits of Clean Air Act Title IV emission reductions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trexler, E.C. Jr. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Shannon, J.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessments are made of the benefits of the 1990 Clean Air Act Title IV (COVE), Phase 2, SO2 and NOX reduction provisions, to the visibility in typical eastern and western Class 1 areas. Probable bands of visibility impairment distribution curves are developed for Shenandoah National Park, Smoky Mountain National Park and the Grand Canyon National Park, based on the existing emissions, ``Base Case``, and for the COVE emission reductions, ``CAAA Case``. Emission projections for 2010 are developed with improved versions of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program emission projection models. Source-receptor transfer matrices created with the Advanced Statistical Trajectory Regional Air Pollution (ASTRAP) model are used with existing emission inventories and with the emission projections to calculate atmospheric concentrations of sulfate and nitrate at the receptors of interest for existing and projected emission scenarios. The Visibility Assessment Scoping Model (VASM) is then used to develop distributions of visibility impairment. VASM combines statistics of observed concentrations of particulate species and relative humidity with ASTRAP calculations of the relative changes in atmospheric sulfate and nitrate particulate concentrations in a Monte Carlo approach to produce expected distributions of hourly particulate concentrations and RH. Light extinction relationships developed in theoretical and field studies are then used to calculate the resulting distribution of visibility impairment. Successive Monte Carlo studies are carried out to develop sets of visibility impairment distributions with and without the COVE emission reductions to gain insight into the detectability of expected visibility improvements.

  2. Encapsulation of titanium (IV) silsesquioxane into the NH{sub 4}USY zeolite: Preparation, characterization and application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ribeiro do Carmo, Devaney [Faculdade de Engenharia de Ilha Solteira (UNESP), Departamento de Fisica e Quimica, Av. Brasil Centro, 56 CEP 15385-000, Ilha Solteira, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: docarmo@dfq.feis.unesp.br; Dias Filho, Newton Luiz [Faculdade de Engenharia de Ilha Solteira (UNESP), Departamento de Fisica e Quimica, Av. Brasil Centro, 56 CEP 15385-000, Ilha Solteira, SP (Brazil); Ramos Stradiotto, Nelson [Universidade Estadual Paulista, UNESP, Instituto de Quimica PO Box, Araraquara, SP (Brazil)

    2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This work describes the encapsulation of titanium (IV) silsesquioxane into the supercavities of NH{sub 4}USY ultra stabilized zeolite, after chemical treatment. The modified zeolite was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectra, Nuclear magnetic resonance, scanning electronic microscopy, X-ray diffraction and thermogravity. This encapsulated titanium (IV) silsesquioxane can adsorb Azure A chloride after treatment with H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}, without modifier leaching problems. In an electrochemical study, the cyclic voltammograms of the graphite paste modified electrode, shows two redox couples with formal potential (E{sup 0}') -0.1 V and 0.21 V to I and II redox couples respectively (v=700mVs{sup -1}; Britton Robinson buffer (B-R) solution, pH 3) versus SCE ascribed to a monomer and dimmer of azure. This paper shows the use of ultra stabilized zeolite in the electrochemical field as host for molecules with nanometric dimensions.

  3. Fatal Peritoneal Bleeding Following Embolization of a Carotid-Cavernous Fistula in Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Usinskiene, Jurgita; Mazighi, Mikael; Bisdorff, Annouk; Houdart, Emmanuel [Hopital Lariboisiere, Department of Neuroradiology (France)], E-mail: emmanuel.houdart@lrb.ap-hop-paris.fr

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the case of a 25-year-old woman treated for a spontaneous carotid-cavernous fistula in a context of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV. Embolization with a transvenous approach was achieved without complications; however, the patient died 72 hr later of massive intraperitoneal bleeding. At autopsy, no lesion of the digestive arteries was identified. Possible causes of this bleeding are discussed.

  4. The determination of PCBs in Rocky Flats Type IV waste sludge by gas chromatography/electron capture detection. Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parish, K.J.; Applegate, D.V.; Postlethwait, P.D.; Boparai, A.S.; Reedy, G.T.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Before disposal, radioactive sludge (Type IV) from Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) must be evaluated for polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) content. The Type IV sludge consists of organic solvents, degreasers, cutting oils, and transuranic (TRU) waste mixed with calcium silicate (MicroCel E{reg_sign} and Oil Dri{reg_sign} to form a grease or paste-like material. For laboratory testing, a nonradioactive simulated Type 17V RFP sludge was prepared at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E). This sludge has a composition similar to that expected from field samples. In an earlier effort, a simplified method was developed for extraction, cleanup of extract, and determination of PCBs in samples of simulated sludge spiked with Aroclors 1254 and 1260. The simplified method has now been used to determine the presence and quantities of other Aroclors in the simulated sludge, namely, Aroclors 10 1 6, 1221, 1232, 1242, and 1248. The accuracy and precision of the data for these Aroclors were found to be similar to the data for sludges spiked with Aroclors 1254 and 1260. Since actual sludges may vary in composition, the method was also verified by analyzing another source of Type IV simulated sludge, prepared by Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W).

  5. 7216 J. Phys. Chem. 1993,97, 7216-7221 Ultrafast Electronic Deactivation and Vibrational Dynamics of Photoexcited Uranium(IV)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girolami, Gregory S.

    of Photoexcited Uranium(IV) Porphyrin Sandwich Complexes Osman Bilse1,t Stanley N. Milam,* Gregory S. Girolami intriguing but much less explored is the role of the metalioninthephotophysicalbehaviorof bis

  6. Report of the Court investigation of accident on the Tudor IV. Aircraft “Star Tiger” G-AHNP on the 30th January, 1948, held under Air Navigation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anonymous

    MINISTRY OF CIVIL AVIATION REPORT of the Court investigation of the accident to the Tudor IV. Aircraft "Star Tiger" G-AHNP on the 30th January, 1948, held under the Air Navigation (Investigation of Accidents) Regulations, 1922

  7. Mutant HNF-1{alpha} and mutant HNF-1{beta} identified in MODY3 and MODY5 downregulate DPP-IV gene expression in Caco-2 cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu Ning [Laboratory of Metabolism, Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Laboratory of Neurochemistry, Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Adachi, Tetsuya [Department of Genomic Drug Discovery Science, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Matsunaga, Tetsuro [Laboratory of Metabolism, Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Takeda, Jun [Department of Endocrinology Diabetes and Rheumatology, Graduate School of Medicine, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu (Japan); Tsujimoto, Gozoh [Department of Genomic Drug Discovery Science, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Ishihara, Akihiko [Laboratory of Neurochemistry, Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Yasuda, Koichiro [Laboratory of Metabolism, Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Diabetic Center, Tsunashimakai-Kosei Hospital, Himeji (Japan); Tsuda, Kinsuke [Laboratory of Metabolism, Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)]. E-mail: jinkan@tom.life.h.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Dipeptidylpeptidase IV (DPP-IV) is a well-documented drug target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Hepatocyte nuclear factors (HNF)-1{alpha} and HNF-1{beta}, known as the causal genes of MODY3 and MODY5, respectively, have been reported to be involved in regulation of DPP-IV gene expression. But, it is not completely clear (i) that they play roles in regulation of DPP-IV gene expression, and (ii) whether DPP-IV gene activity is changed by mutant HNF-1{alpha} and mutant HNF-1{beta} in MODY3 and MODY5. To explore these questions, we investigated transactivation effects of wild HNF-1{alpha} and 13 mutant HNF-1{alpha}, as well as wild HNF-1{beta} and 2 mutant HNF-1{beta}, on DPP-IV promoter luciferase gene in Caco-2 cells by means of a transient experiment. Both wild HNF-1{alpha} and wild HNF-1{beta} significantly transactivated DPP-IV promoter, but mutant HNF-1{alpha} and mutant HNF-1{beta} exhibited low transactivation activity. Moreover, to study whether mutant HNF-1{alpha} and mutant HNF-1{beta} change endogenous DPP-IV enzyme activity, we produced four stable cell lines from Caco-2 cells, in which wild HNF-1{alpha} or wild HNF-1{beta}, or else respective dominant-negative mutant HNF-1{alpha}T539fsdelC or dominant-negative mutant HNF-1{beta}R177X, was stably expressed. We found that DPP-IV gene expression and enzyme activity were significantly increased in wild HNF-1{alpha} cells and wild HNF-1{beta} cells, whereas they decreased in HNF-1{alpha}T539fsdelC cells and HNF-1{beta}R177X cells, compared with DPP-IV gene expression and enzyme activity in Caco-2 cells. These results suggest that both wild HNF-1{alpha} and wild HNF-1{beta} have a stimulatory effect on DPP-IV gene expression, but that mutant HNF-1{alpha} and mutant HNF-1{beta} attenuate the stimulatory effect.

  8. Dynamics of the Lyman alpha and C IV emitting gas in 3C 273

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephane Paltani; Marc Turler

    2002-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we study the variability properties of the Lyman alpha and C IV emission lines in 3C273 using archival IUE observations. Our data show for the first time the existence of variability on time scales of several years. We study the spatial distribution and the velocity field of the emitting gas by performing detailed analyses on the line variability using correlations, 1D and 2D response functions, and principal component analysis. In both lines we find evidence for two components, one which has the dynamic properties of gas in Keplerian motion around a black hole with a mass of the order of 10^9 Mo, and one which is characterized by high, blue-shifted velocities at large lag. There is no indication of the presence of optically thick emission medium neither in the Lya, nor in the Civ response functions. The component characterized by blue-shifted velocities, which is comparatively much stronger in Civ than in Lya, is more or less compatible with being the result of gas falling towards the central black hole with free-fall acceleration. We propose however that the line emission at high, blue-shifted velocities is better explained in terms of entrainment of gas clouds by the jet. This gas is therefore probably collisionally excited as a result of heating due to the intense infrared radiation from the jet, which would explain the strength of this component in Civ relative to Lya. This phenomenon might be a signature of disk-jet interaction.

  9. Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration within IEA Wind Task 23: Phase IV Results Regarding Floating Wind Turbine Modeling; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonkman, J.; Larsen, T.; Hansen, A.; Nygaard, T.; Maus, K.; Karimirad, M.; Gao, Z.; Moan, T.; Fylling, I.

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Offshore wind turbines are designed and analyzed using comprehensive simulation codes that account for the coupled dynamics of the wind inflow, aerodynamics, elasticity, and controls of the turbine, along with the incident waves, sea current, hydrodynamics, and foundation dynamics of the support structure. This paper describes the latest findings of the code-to-code verification activities of the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, which operates under Subtask 2 of the International Energy Agency Wind Task 23. In the latest phase of the project, participants used an assortment of codes to model the coupled dynamic response of a 5-MW wind turbine installed on a floating spar buoy in 320 m of water. Code predictions were compared from load-case simulations selected to test different model features. The comparisons have resulted in a greater understanding of offshore floating wind turbine dynamics and modeling techniques, and better knowledge of the validity of various approximations. The lessons learned from this exercise have improved the participants' codes, thus improving the standard of offshore wind turbine modeling.

  10. Validation of the Monte Carlo criticality program KENO IV and the Hansen-Roach sixteen-energy-group-cross sections for high-assay uranium systems. [KENO IV criticality code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Handley, G. R.; Masters, L. C.; Stachowiak, R. V.

    1981-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Validation of the Monte Carlo criticality code, KENO IV, and the Hansen-Roach sixteen-energy-group cross sections was accomplished by calculating the effective neutron multiplication constant, k/sub eff/, of 29 experimentally critical assemblies which had uranium enrichments of 92.6% or higher in the uranium-235 isotope. The experiments were chosen so that a large variety of geometries and of neutron energy spectra were covered. Problems, calculating the k/sub eff/ of systems with high-uranium-concentration uranyl nitrate solution that were minimally reflected or unreflected, resulted in the separate examination of five cases.

  11. NEPTUNIUM IV AND V SORPTIN TO END-MEMBER SUBSURFACE SEDIMENTS TO THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaplan, D.

    2009-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Migration of Np through the subsurface is expected to be primarily controlled by sorption to sediments. Therefore, understanding and quantifying Np sorption to sediments and sediments from the Savannah River Site (SRS) is vital to ensure safe disposal of Np bearing wastes. In this work, Np sorption to two sediments representing the geological extremes with respect to sorption properties expected in the SRS subsurface environment (named 'subsurface sandy sediment' and 'subsurface clayey sediment') was examined under a variety of conditions. First a series of baseline sorption tests at pH 5.5 under an oxic atmosphere was performed to understand Np sorption under typical subsurface conditions. These experiments indicated that the baseline K{sub d} values for the subsurface sandy and subsurface clayey sediments are 4.26 {+-} 0.24 L kg{sup -1} and 9.05 {+-} 0.61 L kg{sup -1}, respectively. These Np K{sub d} values of SRS sediments are the first to be reported since Sheppard et al. (1979). The previous values were 0.25 and 0.16 L kg{sup -1} for a low pH sandy sediment. To examine a possible range of K{sub d} values under various environmental scenarios, the effects of natural organic matter (NOM, also a surrogate for cellulose degradation products), the presence of various chemical reductants, and an anaerobic atmosphere on Np sorption were examined. The presence of NOM resulted in an increase in the Np K{sub d} values for both sediments. This behavior is hypothesized to be the result of formation of a ternary Np-NOM-sediment complex. Slight increases in the Np sorption (K{sub d} 13-24 L kg{sup -1}) were observed when performing experiments in the presence of chemical reductants (dithionite, ascorbic acid, zero-valent iron) or under anaerobic conditions. Presumably, the increased sorption can be attributed to a slight reduction of Np(V) to Np(IV), the stronger sorbing form of Np. The most significant result of this study is the finding that Np weakly sorbs to both end member sediments and that Np only has a slight tendency to reduce to its stronger sorbing form, even under the most strongly reducing conditions expected under natural SRS conditions. Also, it appears that pH has a profound effect on Np sorption. Based on the these new measurements and the revelations about Np redox chemistry, the following changes to 'Best K{sub d}' values, as defined in Kaplan (2006), for SRS performance assessment calculations are recommended.

  12. Overburden characterization and post-burn study of the Hanna IV, underground coal gasification site, Wyoming, and comparison to other Wyoming UCG sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marcouiller, B.A.; Burns, L.K.; Ethridge, F.G.

    1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of 21 post-burn cores taken from the Hanna IV UCG site allows 96 m (315 ft) of overburden to be subdivided into four local stratigraphic units. The 7.6 m (25 ft) thick Hanna No. 1 coal seam is overlain by a laterally discontinuous, 3.3 m (11 ft) thick shaley mudstone (Unit A') in part of the Hanna IV site. A more widespread, 30 m (90 ft) thick well-indurated sandstone (Unit A) overlies the A' unit. Unit A is the roof rock for both of the Hanna IV cavities. Overlying Unit A is a 33 m (108 ft) thick sequence of mudstone and claystone (Unit B), and the uppermost unit at the Hanna IV site (Unit C) is a coarse-grained sandstone that ranges in thickness from 40 to 67 m (131 to 220 ft). Two elliptical cavities were formed during the two phases of the Hanna IV experiment. The larger cavity, Hanna IVa, is 45 x 15 m in plan and has a maximum height of 18 m (59 ft) from the base of the coal seam to the top of the cavity; the Hanna IVb cavity is 40 x 15 m in plan and has a maximum height of 11 m (36 ft) from the base of the coal seam to the top of the cavity. Geotechnical tests indicated that the Hanna IV overburden rocks were moderately strong to strong, based on the empirical classification of Broch and Franklin (1972), and a positive, linear correlation exists between rock strength and volume percent calcite cement. There is an inverse linear correlation between rock strength and porosity for the Hanna IV overburden rocks. 28 refs., 34 figs., 13 tabs..

  13. Interaction of Pu(IV,VI) hydroxides/oxides with metal hydroxides/oxides in alkaline media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedoseev, A.M.; Krot, N.N.; Budantseva, N.A.; Bessonov, A.A.; Nikonov, M.V.; Grigoriev, M.S.; Garnov, A.Y.; Perminov, V.P.; Astafurova, L.N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. of Physical Chemistry

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of this investigation was to obtain data on the possibility, extent, and characteristics of interaction of Pu(IV) and (VI) with hydroxides and oxides of d-elements and other metals [Al(III), LA(III), and U(VI)] in alkaline media. Such information is important in fundamental understanding of plutonium disposition and behavior in Hanford Site radioactive tank waste sludge. These results supply essential data for determining criticality safety and in understanding transuranic waste behavior in storage, retrieval, and treatment of Hanford Site tank waste.

  14. Estimate of the allowable dimensions of diagnosed defects in category III and IV welded pipeline joints{sup 1}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grin', E. A.; Bochkarev, V. I. [JSC 'All-Russia Thermal Engineering Institute' (JSC 'VTI') (Russian Federation)] [JSC 'All-Russia Thermal Engineering Institute' (JSC 'VTI') (Russian Federation)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An approach for estimating the permissible dimensions of technological defects in butt welded joints in category III and IV pipelines is described. The allowable size of a welding defect is determined from the condition of compliance with the specifications on strength for a reference cross section (damaged joint) of the pipeline taking into account its weakening by a given defect.With regard to the fairly widespread discovery of technological defects in butt welded joints during diagnostics of auxiliary pipelines for thermal electric power plants, the proposed approach can be used in practice by repair and consulting organizations.

  15. Evidence That the [beta] Subunit of Chlamydia trachomatis Ribonucleotide Reductase Is Active with the Manganese Ion of Its Manganese(IV)/Iron(III) Cofactor in Site 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dassama, Laura M.K.; Boal, Amie K.; Krebs, Carsten; Rosenzweig, Amy C.; Bollinger, Jr., J. Martin (NWU); (Penn)

    2014-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The reaction of a class I ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) begins when a cofactor in the {beta} subunit oxidizes a cysteine residue {approx}35 {angstrom} away in the {alpha} subunit, generating a thiyl radical. In the class Ic enzyme from Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct), the cysteine oxidant is the Mn{sup IV} ion of a Mn{sup IV}/Fe{sup III} cluster, which assembles in a reaction between O{sub 2} and the Mn{sup II}/Fe{sup II} complex of {beta}. The heterodinuclear nature of the cofactor raises the question of which site, 1 or 2, contains the Mn{sup IV} ion. Because site 1 is closer to the conserved location of the cysteine-oxidizing tyrosyl radical of class Ia and Ib RNRs, we suggested that the Mn{sup IV} ion most likely resides in this site (i.e., {sup 1}Mn{sup IV}/{sup 2}Fe{sup III}), but a subsequent computational study favored its occupation of site 2 ({sup 1}Fe{sup III}/{sup 2}Mn{sup IV}). In this work, we have sought to resolve the location of the Mn{sup IV} ion in Ct RNR-{beta} by correlating X-ray crystallographic anomalous scattering intensities with catalytic activity for samples of the protein reconstituted in vitro by two different procedures. In samples containing primarily Mn{sup IV}/Fe{sup III} clusters, Mn preferentially occupies site 1, but some anomalous scattering from site 2 is observed, implying that both {sup 1}Mn{sup II}/{sup 2}Fe{sup II} and {sup 1}Fe{sup II}/{sup 2}Mn{sup II} complexes are competent to react with O{sub 2} to produce the corresponding oxidized states. However, with diminished Mn{sup II} loading in the reconstitution, there is no evidence for Mn occupancy of site 2, and the greater activity of these 'low-Mn' samples on a per-Mn basis implies that the {sup 1}Mn{sup IV}/{sup 2}Fe{sup III}-{beta} is at least the more active of the two oxidized forms and may be the only active form.

  16. Distinct kinetics of human DNA ligases I, IIIalpha, IIIbeta, and IV reveal direct DNA sensing ability and differential physiological functions in DNA repair

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Xi; Ballin, Jeff D.; Della-Maria, Julie; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; White, Elizabeth J.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Wilson, Gerald M.

    2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The three human LIG genes encode polypeptides that catalyze phosphodiester bond formation during DNA replication, recombination and repair. While numerous studies have identified protein partners of the human DNA ligases (hLigs), there has been little characterization of the catalytic properties of these enzymes. In this study, we developed and optimized a fluorescence-based DNA ligation assay to characterize the activities of purified hLigs. Although hLigI joins DNA nicks, it has no detectable activity on linear duplex DNA substrates with short, cohesive single-strand ends. By contrast, hLigIII{beta} and the hLigIII{alpha}/XRCC1 and hLigIV/XRCC4 complexes are active on both nicked and linear duplex DNA substrates. Surprisingly, hLigIV/XRCC4, which is a key component of the major non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway, is significantly less active than hLigIII on a linear duplex DNA substrate. Notably, hLigIV/XRCC4 molecules only catalyze a single ligation event in the absence or presence of ATP. The failure to catalyze subsequent ligation events reflects a defect in the enzyme-adenylation step of the next ligation reaction and suggests that, unless there is an in vivo mechanism to reactivate DNA ligase IV/XRCC4 following phosphodiester bond formation, the cellular NHEJ capacity will be determined by the number of adenylated DNA ligaseIV/XRCC4 molecules.

  17. Evaluation of three analytical techniques used to determine high levels of volatile organic compounds in type IV sludge from Rocky Flats Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parish, K.J.; Applegate, D.V.; Tsai, Y. [and others

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Before disposal, radioactive sludge (Type IV) from Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) must be evaluated for volatile organic compound (VOC) content. The Type IV sludge consists of organic solvents, degreasers, cutting oils, and transuranic (TRU) waste mixed with calcium silicate (MicroCel E{reg_sign}) and Oil Dri{reg_sign} to form a grease or paste-like material. For laboratory testing, a simulated Type IV RFP sludge (nonradioactive) was prepared at Argonne National Laboratory-East. This sludge has a composition similar to that expected from field samples. On the basis of historical information, a typical Type IV sludge is expected to contain approximately 1-10 percent of three target VOCs. The objective of this work is to evaluate three proposed methods for the determination of high levels of these three VOCs in Type IV sludge. The three methods are (1) static headspace gas analysis, (2) methanol extraction, and (3) ethylene glycol extraction. All three methods employ gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). They were evaluated regarding general method performance criteria, ease of operation, and amounts of secondary mixed waste generated.

  18. Effect of phase transition on quantum transport in group-IV two-dimensional U-shape device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadi, Mohammad Abdullah; Gupta, Gaurav, E-mail: a0089293@nus.edu.sg; Liang, Gengchiau [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of phase-transition from the quantum-spin-hall to the band-insulator phase on the transport through a three-terminal U-shape spin-separator has been computationally investigated via non-equilibrium green function formalism. Two-dimensional group-IV elements have been comprehensively appraised as the device material. The device separates the unpolarized current injected at the source-terminal into nearly 100% spin-polarized currents of the opposite polarities at the two drain terminals. The phase-transition activated by the electric-field orthogonal to the device is shown to extensively influence the current magnitude and its spin-polarization, and the effect is stronger for materials with smaller intrinsic spin-orbit coupling. Moreover, the device length and the area under field are shown to critically affect the device characteristics on phase change. It is shown that the same device can be operated as a spin-filter by inducing phase-transition selectively in the channel. The results are important for designing spin-devices from Group-IV monolayers.

  19. Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan for Operable Units 6-05 and 10-04, Phase IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. P. Wells

    2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This Phase IV Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan addresses the remediation of areas with the potential for UXO at the Idaho National Laboratory. These areas include portions of the Naval Proving Ground, the Arco High-Altitude Bombing Range, and the Twin Buttes Bombing Range. Five areas within the Naval Proving Ground that are known to contain UXO include the Naval Ordnance Disposal Area, the Mass Detonation Area, the Experimental Field Station, The Rail Car Explosion Area, and the Land Mine Fuze Burn Area. The Phase IV remedial action will be concentrated in these five areas. For other areas, such as the Arco High-Altitude Bombing Range and the Twin Buttes Bombing Range, ordnance has largely consisted of sand-filled practice bombs that do not pose an explosion risk. Ordnance encountered in these areas will be addressed under the Phase I Operations and Maintenance Plan that allows for the recovery and disposal of ordnance that poses an imminent risk to human health or the environment.

  20. Homoleptic Ce(III) and Ce(IV) Nitroxide Complexes: Significant Stabilization of the 4+ Oxidation State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogart, Justin A.; Lewis, Andrew J.; Medling, Scott A.; Piro, Nicholas A.; Carroll, Patrick J.; Booth, Corwin H.; Schelter, Eric J.

    2014-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrochemical experiments performed on the complex Ce-IV[2-((BuNO)-Bu-t)py](4), where [2-((BuNO)-Bu-t)py](-) = N-tert-butyl-N-2-pyridylnitroxide, indicate a 2.51 V stabilization of the 4+ oxidation state of Ce compared to [(Bu4N)-Bu-n](2)[Ce(NO3)(6)] in acetonitrile and a 2.95 V stabilization compared to the standard potential for the ion under aqueous conditions. Density functional theory calculations suggest that this preference for the higher oxidation state is a result of the tetrakis(nitroxide) ligand framework at the Ce cation, which allows for effective electron donation into, and partial covalent overlap with, vacant 4f orbitals with delta symmetry. The results speak to the behavior of CeO2 and related solid solutions in oxygen uptake and transport applications, in particular an inherent local character of bonding that stabilizes the 4+ oxidation state. The results indicate a cerium(IV) complex that has been stabilized to an unprecedented degree through tuning of its ligand-field environment.

  1. Inference for the Bivariate and Multivariate Hidden Truncated Pareto(type II) and Pareto(type IV) Distribution and Some Measures Of Divergence Related To Incompatibility of Probability Distribution.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Indranil

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for a hidden truncated bivariate P (IV ) distributionfor a hidden truncated bivariate P (II) distributionof ? and the large sample distribution of the likelihood ra-

  2. Inland EmpIrE mErchandIsE Exports calIfornIa statE UnIvErsIty fUllErton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Inland EmpIrE mErchandIsE Exports calIfornIa statE UnIvErsIty fUllErton 20122012 CSUF Mihaylo University, Fullerton An Overview and Analysis of Inland Empire Exports #12;novEmbEr 2011 InstItUtE for EconomIc and EnvIronmEntal stUdIEs33 #12;Inland EmpIrE mErchandIsE Exports calIfornIa statE UnIvErsIty f

  3. Investigation on the coprecipitation of transuranium elements from alkaline solutions by the method of appearing reagents. Study of the effects of waste components on decontamination from Np(IV) and Pu(IV)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bessonov, A.A.; Budantseva, N.A.; Gelis, A.V.; Nikonov, M.V.; Shilov, V.P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Institute of Physical Chemistry

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The third stage of the study on the homogeneous coprecipitation of neptunium and plutonium from alkaline high-level radioactive waste solutions by the Method of Appearing Reagents has been completed. Alkaline radioactive wastes exist at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site. The recent studies investigated the effects of neptunium chemical reductants, plutonium(IV) concentration, and the presence of bulk tank waste solution components on the decontamination from tetravalent neptunium and plutonium achieved by homogeneous coprecipitation. Data on neptunium reduction to its tetravalent state in alkaline solution of different NaOH concentrations are given. Eleven reductants were tested to find those most suited to remove neptunium, through chemical reduction, from alkaline solution by homogeneous coprecipitation. Hydrazine, VOSO{sub 4}, and Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 4} were found to be the most effective reductants. The rates of reduction with these reductants were comparable with the kinetics of carrier formation. Solution decontamination factors of about 400 were attained for 10{sup -6}M neptunium. Coprecipitation of plutonium(IV) with carriers obtained as products of thermal hydrolysis, redox transformations, and catalytic decomposition of [Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}]{sup 3+}, [Fe(CN){sub 5}NO]{sup 2-}, Cr(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}, KMnO{sub 4}, and Li{sub 4}UO{sub 2}(O{sub 2}){sub 3} was studied and results are described. Under optimum conditions, a 100-fold decrease of plutonium concentration was possible with each of these reagents.

  4. Y-shape spin-separator for two-dimensional group-IV nanoribbons based on quantum spin hall effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, Gaurav, E-mail: a0089293@nus.edu.sg; Abdul Jalil, Mansoor Bin; Liang, Gengchiau, E-mail: elelg@nus.edu.sg [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Lin, Hsin [Graphene Research Centre and Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Bansil, Arun [Department of Physics, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Huang, Cheng-Yi; Tsai, Wei-Feng [Department of Physics, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan (China)

    2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An efficient spin-separator that operates in quantum spin hall phase has been investigated for two-dimensional group-IV materials. A three-terminal Y-shaped device has been simulated via non-equilibrium Green Function to demonstrate the separation of unpolarized current at source terminal into spin-polarized current of opposite polarity at the two drain terminals. Device controls, i.e., tunable buckling and perpendicular magnetic field have been modeled comprehensively to evaluate the device feasibility and performance. It is shown that these controls can preferentially steer current between the two drains to create a differential charge current with complementary spin polarization, thus enabling a convenient regulation of output signal.

  5. A Comparison of the Safety Analysis Process and the Generation IV Proliferation Resistance/Physical Protection Assessment Methodology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. A. Bjornard; M. D. Zentner

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) is a vehicle for the cooperative international development of future nuclear energy systems. The Generation IV program has established primary objectives in the areas of sustainability, economics, safety and reliability, and Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection (PR&PP). In order to help meet the latter objective a program was launched in December 2002 to develop a rigorous means to assess nuclear energy systems with respect to PR&PP. The study of Physical Protection of a facility is a relatively well established methodology, but an approach to evaluate the Proliferation Resistance of a nuclear fuel cycle is not. This paper will examine the Proliferation Resistance (PR) evaluation methodology being developed by the PR group, which is largely a new approach and compare it to generally accepted nuclear facility safety evaluation methodologies. Safety evaluation methods have been the subjects of decades of development and use. Further, safety design and analysis is fairly broadly understood, as well as being the subject of federally mandated procedures and requirements. It is therefore extremely instructive to compare and contrast the proposed new PR evaluation methodology process with that used in safety analysis. By so doing, instructive and useful conclusions can be derived from the comparison that will help to strengthen the PR methodological approach as it is developed further. From the comparison made in this paper it is evident that there are very strong parallels between the two processes. Most importantly, it is clear that the proliferation resistance aspects of nuclear energy systems are best considered beginning at the very outset of the design process. Only in this way can the designer identify and cost effectively incorporate intrinsic features that might be difficult to implement at some later stage. Also, just like safety, the process to implement proliferation resistance should be a dynamic, iterative process that continually evolves with the design.

  6. Session IV Socio Economics of Natural Resources Proceedings of the International Forestry and Environment Symposium 2013 of the Department of Forestry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Session IV ­ Socio Economics of Natural Resources Proceedings of the International Forestry and Environment Symposium 2013 of the Department of Forestry and Environmental Science, University of Sri at Selected Sawmills in Moratuwa Caldera H.T.S.* and Amarasekera H.S. Department of Forestry and Environmental

  7. RELAP5/MOD3 simulation of the loss of residual heat removal during midloop operation experiment conducted at the ROSA-IV/ Large Scale Test Facility 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Sibashis Sanatkumar

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the RELAP5/MOD3 thermal hydraulic code. The experiment was conducted at the Rig of Safety Assessment (ROSA)-IV/ Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF). The experiment involved a 5% cold leg break along with the loss of the RHR system-The transient was simulated...

  8. Tests of an Ensemble Kalman Filter for Mesoscale and Regional-scale Data Assimilation. Part IV: Comparison with 3DVar in a Month-long Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tests of an Ensemble Kalman Filter for Mesoscale and Regional-scale Data Assimilation. Part IV@tamu.edu #12;2 Abstract In previous works in this series study, an ensemble Kalman filter (En System. #12;4 1. Introduction The Ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) (Evensen 1994), which estimates

  9. Sequential Extraction Method for Determination of Fe(II/III) and U(IV/ VI) in Suspensions of Iron-Bearing Phyllosilicates and Uranium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgos, William

    (IV/VI) in clay mineral-U suspensions such that advanced spectroscopic techniques are required. Instead, we-times more Fe(II) than U(VI). INTRODUCTION Uranium contamination is a problem at many U.S. Department associated with phyllosilicate minerals is higher than the mass of iron associated with oxide minerals

  10. ON THE GENERATION OF FLUX-TUBE WAVES IN STELLAR CONVECTION ZONES. IV. LONGITUDINAL WAVE ENERGY SPECTRA AND FLUXES FOR STARS WITH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulmschneider, Peter

    ON THE GENERATION OF FLUX-TUBE WAVES IN STELLAR CONVECTION ZONES. IV. LONGITUDINAL WAVE ENERGY- tudinal tube waves in stellar convection zones and used it to compute the wave energy spectra and fluxes are important only for cool stars with Teff wave energy decreases

  11. Development of Pillared M(IV) Phosphate Phosphonate Inorganic Organic Hybrid Ion Exchange Materials for Applications in Separations found in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burns, Jonathan

    2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    ..................................................................................................... 105 5.5.1 Basic sorption .............................................................................. 105 5.5.2 Plutonium redox .......................................................................... 107 5.5.3 Americium oxidation....1. ................................ 104 xiii FIGURE Page 32 Schematic of the ion exchange equilibrium for the M(IV) hybrids. ............................................................................................. 106 33 Latimer diagram for plutonium in 1 M perchloric...

  12. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV C2-449 Colloque C2, suppl. au Journal de Physique 11, Vol. 1, septembre 1991

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    processors that handle reactive gas: - Require changes of oil and filters one to four times per month or moreJOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV C2-449 Colloque C2, suppl. au Journal de Physique 11, Vol. 1, septembre 1991 has created new requirements for gas scrubbing to address the safety, maintenance cost, and toxic

  13. Magnetic Exchange Coupling in Chloride-Bridged 5f-3d Heterometallic Complexes Generated via Insertion into a Uranium(IV) Dimethylpyrazolate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Insertion into a Uranium(IV) Dimethylpyrazolate Dimer Stosh A. Kozimor, Bart M. Bartlett, Jeffrey D. Rinehart, and Jeffrey R. Long* Department of Chemistry, UniVersity of California, Berkeley, California additional products were observed: a THF adduct, (Me2Pz)4U(THF), and a salt of the pentapyrazolate uranium

  14. OES-IA Annex IV: Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Devices - Report from the Experts’ Workshop September 27th – 28th 2010 Clontarf Castle, Dublin Ireland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea E.; O'Toole, Michael J.

    2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An experts' workshop was convened in Dublin Ireland September 27th – 28th 2010 in support of IEA Ocean Energy Systems Implementing Agreement Annex IV. PNNL was responsible for organizing the content of the workshop, overseeing the contractors (Irish Marine Institute) hosting the event, presenting material on Annex IV and materials applicable to the workshop intent. PNNL is also overseeing a contractor (Wave Energy Center/University of Plymouth – WEC/UP) in the collection and analysis of the Annex IV data. Fifty-eight experts from 8 countries attended the workshop by invitation, spending two days discussing the needs of Annex IV. Presentations by DOE (background on Annex IV), PNNL (process for developing Annex IV; presentation of the draft database for PNNL project, plans for incorporating Annex IV data), WEC/UP on the environmental effect matrix, and four MHK developers (two from the UK, one from Ireland and one from Sweden; each discussing their own projects and lessons learned for measuring and mitigating environmental effects, as well as interactions with consenting [permitting] processes) helped provide background. The workshop participants worked part of the time in the large group and most of the time in four smaller breakout groups. Participants engaged in the process and provided a wealth of examples of MHK environmental work, particularly in the European nations. They provided practical and actionable advice on the following: • Developing the Annex IV database, with specific uses and audiences • Strong consensus that we should collect detailed metadata on available data sets, rather than attempting to draw in copious datasets. The participants felt there would then be an opportunity to then ask for specific set of data as needed, with specific uses and ownership of the data specified. This is particularly important as many data collected, particularly in Europe but also in Canada, are proprietary; developers were not comfortable with the idea of handing over all their environmental effects data, but all said they would entertain the request if they specifics were clear. • The recommendation was to collect metadata via an online interactive form, taking no more than one hour to complete. • Although the idea of cases representing the “best practices” was recognized as useful, the participants pointed out that there are currently so few MHK projects in the water, that any and all projects were appropriate to highlight as “cases”. There was also discomfort at the implication that “best practices” implied “lesser practices”; this being unhelpful to a new and emerging industry. • Workshop participants were asked if they were willing to continue to engage in the Annex IV process; all expressed willingness. The workshop was successful in adequately addressing its objectives and through participation and interaction in the breakout sessions around the various topics. As a result of the workshop, many delegates are now better informed and have a greater understanding of the potential environmental effects of MHK devices on the marine environment. There is now a greater sense of understanding of the issues involved and consensus by those regulators, developers and scientists who attended the workshop. A strong network has also been built over the two days between European and US/Canadian technical experts in wave and tidal energy.

  15. Can Locoregional Treatment of the Primary Tumor Improve Outcomes for Women With Stage IV Breast Cancer at Diagnosis?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, David H.A., E-mail: dhanguyen@yahoo.com [British Columbia Cancer Agency, Department of Radiation Oncology, BC (Canada); Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hopital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Truong, Pauline T. [British Columbia Cancer Agency, Department of Radiation Oncology, BC (Canada) [British Columbia Cancer Agency, Department of Radiation Oncology, BC (Canada); Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, BC (Canada); Alexander, Cheryl; Walter, Caroline V.; Hayashi, Emily; Christie, Jennifer [Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, BC (Canada)] [Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, BC (Canada); Lesperance, Mary [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Victoria, BC (Canada)] [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Victoria, BC (Canada)

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To examine the effect of locoregional treatment (LRT) of the primary tumor on survival in patients with Stage IV breast cancer at diagnosis. Methods and Materials: The study cohort comprised 733 women referred to the British Columbia Cancer Agency between 1996 and 2005 with newly diagnosed clinical or pathologic M1 breast cancer. Tumor and treatment characteristics, overall survival (OS), and locoregional progression-free survival were compared between patients treated with (n = 378) and without (n = 355) LRT of the primary disease. Multivariable analysis was performed with Cox regression modeling. Results: The median follow-up time was 1.9 years. LRT consisted of surgery alone in 67% of patients, radiotherapy alone in 22%, and both in 11%. LRT was used more commonly in women with age <50 years, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status 0-1, Stage T1-2 tumors, N0-1 disease, limited M1 burden, and asymptomatic M1 disease (all p < 0.05). Systemic therapy was used in 92% of patients who underwent LRT and 85% of patients who did not. In patients treated with LRT compared with those without LRT, the 5-year OS rates were 21% vs. 14% (p < 0.001), and the rates of locoregional progression-free survival were 72% vs. 46% (p < 0.001). Among 378 patients treated with LRT, the rates of 5-year OS were higher in patients with age <50, ECOG performance status 0-1, estrogen receptor-positive disease, clear surgical margins, single subsite, bone-only metastasis, and one to four metastatic lesions (all p < 0.003). On multivariable analysis, LRT was associated with improved OS (hazard ratio, 0.78; 95% confidence interval, 0.64-0.94, p = 0.009). Conclusion: Locoregional treatment of the primary disease is associated with improved survival in some women with Stage IV breast cancer at diagnosis. Among those treated with LRT, the most favorable rates of survival were observed in subsets with young age, good performance status, estrogen receptor-positive disease, clear margins, and distant disease limited to one subsite, bone-only involvement, or fewer than five metastatic lesions.

  16. Three-Dimensional Topological Insulators in I-III-VI2 and II-IV-V2 Chalcopyrite Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, wanxiang [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Ding, Jun [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics/Chinese Academy of Scie; Xiao, Di [ORNL; Yao, yugui [Chinese Academy of Sciences

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent discovery of topological insulators with exotic metallic surface states has garnered great interest in the fields of condensed matter physics and materials science.1 A number of spectacular quantum phenomena have been predicted when the surface states are under the influence of magnetism and superconductivity,2 5 which could open up new opportunities for technological applications in spintronics and quantum computing. To achieve this goal, material realization of topological insulators with desired physical properties is of crucial importance. Based on first-principles calculations, here we show that a large number of ternary chalcopyrite compounds of composition I-III-VI2 and II-IV-V2 can realize the topological insulating phase in their native states. The crystal structure of chalcopyrites is derived from the frequently used zinc-blende structure, and many of them possess a close lattice match to important mainstream semiconductors, which is essential for a smooth integration into current semiconductor technology. The diverse optical, electrical and structural properties of chalcopyrite semiconductors,6 and particularly their ability to host room-temperature ferromagnetism,7 9 make them appealing candidates for novel spintronic devices.

  17. Three-Dimensional Topological Insulators in I-III-VI$_2$ and II-IV-V$_2$ Chalcopyrite Semiconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wanxiang Feng; Jun Ding; Di Xiao; Yugui Yao

    2010-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent discovery of topological insulators with exotic metallic surface states has garnered great interest in the fields of condensed matter physics and materials science. A number of spectacular quantum phenomena have been predicted when the surface states are under the influence of magnetism and superconductivity, which could open up new opportunities for technological applications in spintronics and quantum computing. To achieve this goal, material realization of topological insulators with desired physical properties is of crucial importance. Based on first-principles calculations, here we show that a large number of ternary chalcopyrite compounds of composition I-III-VI$_2$ and II-IV-V$_2$ can realize the topological insulating phase in their native states. The crystal structure of chalcopyrites is derived from the frequently used zinc-blende structure, and many of them possess a close lattice match to important mainstream semiconductors, which is essential for a smooth integration into current semiconductor technology. The diverse optical, electrical and structural properties of chalcopyrite semiconductors, and particularly their ability to host room-temperature ferromagnetism, make them appealing candidates for novel spintronic devices.

  18. Theoretical modeling of the uranium 4f XPS for U(VI) and U(IV) oxides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bagus, Paul S.; Nelin, Constance J.; Ilton, Eugene S.

    2013-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and in particular the U4f level, has been widely used to elucidate the chemical state of uranium in various materials. In large part, previous experimental work has relied on comparing the U4f spectra of an unknown to some “standard” or using qualitative intuitive judgments on the expected behavior of the primary lines and satellite structures as a function of oxidation state and bonding environment. Such approaches are useful and can be sufficiently robust to make defensible claims. Nonetheless, there is no quantitative understanding of the chemistry and physics that control satellite structures or even the shape of the primary peaks. To address this issue, we used a rigorous, strictly ab initio theoretical approach to investigate the U(4f) XPS of U oxides with formal U(VI) and U(IV) oxidation states. Our theoretical studies are based on the electronic structures of embedded cluster models, where bonding between U and O is explicitly incorporated. We demonstrate that treatment of the many-body character of the cluster wavefunctions is essential to correctly model and interpret the U4f XPS. Here we definitively show that shake configurations, where an electron is transferred from a dominantly O2p bonding orbital into dominantly 5f or 6d antibonding orbitals, are indeed responsible for the major satellite features. Based on this rigorous theoretical framework, it is possible to establish quantitative relationships between features of the XPS spectra and the chemistry of the material.

  19. In pursuit of clean air: a data book of problems and strategies at the state level. Volume 3: Federal Regions IV and VI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garvey, D.B.; Streets, D.G.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the third volume of a five-volume report, designed to provide useful information for policy analysis in the Department of Energy, especially for the examination of possible areas of conflict between the implementation of a national energy policy calling for the increased use of coal and the pursuit of clean air. Information is presented for each state in Federal Regions IV and VI under the following section headings: state title page (includes a summary of air quality data); revised state implementation plan outline; maps of nonattainment areas, as designated; Storage and Retrieval of Aerometric Data (SAROAD); SAROAD data maps; power plant data; power plant maps; and county maps. States in Federal Region IV include: Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee. Those in Federal Region VI include: Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. (JGB)

  20. AIAA 99--1467 LOW ORDER AERODYNAMIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peraire, Jaime

    . The technique is ap­ plicable to viscous and three­dimensional problems as well as multi­stage problems the stable operating range, potentially leading to better compressor performance. In addition, understanding. with permission. Various possible flow control methods for extending the stable operating range of compressors

  1. Electromyographic responses to aerodynamic vs. drop handlebars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Layne, Donald Jodel

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electrical stimulation of the muscles of the human body. Practical use of the knowledge that potentials exist within muscles first began with the development of the string galvanometer by Schweigger in 1820. Piper (1912) was the first to discuss...

  2. Aerodynamic flail for a spinning projectile

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cole, James K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A flail is provided which reduces the spin of a projectile in a recovery system which includes a parachute, a cable connected to the parachute, a swivel, and means for connecting the swivel to the projectile. The flail includes a plurality of flexible filaments and a rotor for attaching the filaments to the front end of the projectile. The rotor is located radially with respect to the spinning axis of the projectile. In one embodiment, the projectile includes a first nose cone section housing a deployable spin damping assembly; a second nose cone section, housing a deployable parachute assembly; a shell section, supporting the first and second nose cone sections during flight of the projectile; a mechanism for releasing the first nose cone section from the second cone section; and a mechanism for releasing the second nose cone section from the shell section. In operation of this embodiment, the deployable spin damping assembly deploys during flight of the projectile when the mechanism for releasing the first nose cone section from the second nose cone section are actuated. Then, upon actuation of the mechanism for releasing the second nose cone section from the shell section, two things happen: the spin damping assembly separates from the projectile; and the deployable parachute assembly is deployed.

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: reducing aerodynamic losses

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    wind plant research facility at Texas Tech University in Lubbock, Texas. The Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWiFT) facility is the first U.S. facility specifically designed and...

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: Rotor Aerodynamic Design

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Generator Modeling Radar Friendly Blades Special Programs Techno-Economic Modeling, Analysis, and Support Analysis, Modeling, Cost of Energy, and Policy Impact: Wind Vision 2014...

  5. Computational Aerodynamics for Aircraft Design Antony Jameson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jameson, Antony

    Karman's analysis of the vortex street, and more recently Jones's slender wing theory (1), and Hayes

  6. SUCCESSES AND CHALLENGES IN COMPUTATIONAL AERODYNAMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jameson, Antony

    's analysis of the vortex street, and more recently Jones' slender wing theory [I], and Hayes' theory include the airfoil theory of Kutta and Joukowski, Prandtl's wing and boundary layer theories, von Karman

  7. CFD Calculations of S809 Aerodynamic Characteristics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C o . C l a r k C o'IUHopper3 Environmental P.

  8. The Aerodynamic, Dual- Wavelength Optical Spectrometer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafetyTed DonatARM Program Data Quality

  9. Annex IV Environmental Webinar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Energy Department will present a live webcast on Instrumentation for Monitoring Around Marine Renewable Energy Devices, highlighting themes that arose during a related workshop.

  10. Abstract iv Acknowledgements v

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nygård, Jesper

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 2.1.1 Length scales, energy scales and dimensionality . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 2.1.2 Estimating: eects of wave coherence and interference 33 4.1 Weak localization om elektronens spin som bærer af information i en kvante computer eller en spin- transistor, har sat

  11. Classical QGP : IV. Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sungtae Cho; Ismail Zahed

    2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct the equation of a state of the classical QGP valid for all values of Gamma=V/K, the ratio of the mean Coulomb to kinetic energy. By enforcing the Gibbs relations, we derive the pertinent pressure and entropy densities for all Gamma. For the case of an SU(2) classical gluonic plasma our results compare well with lattice simulations. We show that the strongly coupled component of the classical QGP contributes significantly to the bulk thermodynamics across T_c.

  12. LABORATORY IV OSCILLATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    some of these laboratory problems before your lecturer addresses this material. It is very important, a stopwatch, a balance, a set of weights, and a computer with a video analysis application written in Lab with basic physics principles, show how you get an equation that gives the solution to the problem for each

  13. Foreword : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : iv Workshop Programme : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : :

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geuvers, Herman

    : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 1 P. Audebaud CC + : An extension of the Calculus of Constructions with fixpoints : : : 15 F : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 31 B. Boyer and G. Dowek Towards Checking Proof : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 157 L. Helmink, M. Sellink and F. Vaandrager Proof­Checking a Data Link Protocol 173 M. Hofmann

  14. Impact of Consolidation Radiation Therapy in Stage III-IV Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma With Negative Post-Chemotherapy Radiologic Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorth, Jennifer A., E-mail: jennifer.dorth@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Prosnitz, Leonard R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Broadwater, Gloria [Cancer Statistical Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Cancer Statistical Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Diehl, Louis F.; Beaven, Anne W. [Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Coleman, R. Edward [Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Kelsey, Chris R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: While consolidation radiation therapy (i.e., RT administered after chemotherapy) is routine treatment for patients with early-stage diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the role of consolidation RT in stage III-IV DLBCL is controversial. Methods and Materials: Cases of patients with stage III-IV DLBCL treated from 1991 to 2009 at Duke University, who achieved a complete response to chemotherapy were reviewed. Clinical outcomes were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method and were compared between patients who did and did not receive RT, using the log-rank test. A multivariate analysis was performed using Cox proportional hazards model. Results: Seventy-nine patients were identified. Chemotherapy (median, 6 cycles) consisted of anti-CD20 antibody rituximab combined with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP; 65%); cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP; 22%); or other (13%). Post-chemotherapy imaging consisted of positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) (73%); gallium with CT (14%); or CT only (13%). Consolidation RT (median, 25 Gy) was given to involved sites of disease in 38 (48%) patients. Receipt of consolidation RT was associated with improved in-field control (92% vs. 69%, respectively, p = 0.028) and event-free survival (85% vs. 65%, respectively, p = 0.014) but no difference in overall survival (85% vs. 78%, respectively, p = 0.15) when compared to patients who did not receive consolidation RT. On multivariate analysis, no RT was predictive of increased risk of in-field failure (hazard ratio [HR], 8.01, p = 0.014) and worse event-free survival (HR, 4.3, p = 0.014). Conclusions: Patients with stage III-IV DLBCL who achieve negative post-chemotherapy imaging have improved in-field control and event-free survival with low-dose consolidation RT.

  15. Locally Advanced Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: Impact of Pre-Radiotherapy Hemoglobin Level and Interruptions During Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rades, Dirk [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany)], E-mail: Rades.Dirk@gmx.net; Stoehr, Monika [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Kazic, Nadja [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Sarajevo, Sarajevo(Bosnia and Herzegowina); Hakim, Samer G. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Walz, Annette [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Schild, Steven E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Dunst, Juergen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany)

    2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Stage IV head and neck cancer patients carry a poor prognosis. Clear understanding of prognostic factors can help to optimize care for the individual patient. This study investigated 11 potential prognostic factors including pre-radiotherapy hemoglobin level and interruptions during radiotherapy for overall survival (OS), metastases-free survival (MFS), and locoregional control (LC) after radiochemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Eleven factors were investigated in 153 patients receiving radiochemotherapy for Stage IV squamous cell head and neck cancer: age, gender, Karnofsky performance score (KPS), tumor site, grading, T stage, N stage, pre-radiotherapy hemoglobin level, surgery, chemotherapy type, and interruptions during radiotherapy >1 week. Results: On multivariate analysis, improved OS was associated with KPS 90-100 (relative risk [RR], 2.36; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.20-4.93; p = .012), hemoglobin {>=}12 g/dL (RR, 1.88; 95% CI, 1.01-3.53; p = .048), and no radiotherapy interruptions (RR, 2.59; 95% CI, 1.15-5.78; p = .021). Improved LC was significantly associated with lower T stage (RR, 2.17; 95% CI, 1.16-4.63; p = .013), hemoglobin {>=}12 g/dL (RR, 4.12; 95% CI, 1.92-9.09; p < .001), surgery (RR, 2.67; 95% CI, 1.28-5.88; p = .008), and no radiotherapy interruptions (RR, 3.32; 95% CI, 1.26-8.79; p = .015). Improved MFS was associated with KPS 90-100 (RR, 3.41; 95% CI, 1.46-8.85; p = .012). Conclusions: Significant predictors for outcome in Stage IV head and neck cancer were performance status, stage, surgery, pre-radiotherapy hemoglobin level, and interruptions during radiotherapy >1 week. It appears important to avoid anemia and radiotherapy interruptions to achieve the best treatment results.

  16. Near-Infrared Photoluminescence Enhancement in Ge/CdS and Ge/ZnS Core/Shell Nanocrystals: Utilizing IV/II-VI Semiconductor Epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Yijun [Ames Laboratory; Rowland, Clare E [Argonne National Laboratory; Schaller, Richard D [Argonne National Laboratory; Vela, Javier [Ames Laboratory

    2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Ge nanocrystals have a large Bohr radius and a small, size-tunable band gap that may engender direct character via strain or doping. Colloidal Ge nanocrystals are particularly interesting in the development of near-infrared materials for applications in bioimaging, telecommunications and energy conversion. Epitaxial growth of a passivating shell is a common strategy employed in the synthesis of highly luminescent II–VI, III–V and IV–VI semiconductor quantum dots. Here, we use relatively unexplored IV/II–VI epitaxy as a way to enhance the photoluminescence and improve the optical stability of colloidal Ge nanocrystals. Selected on the basis of their relatively small lattice mismatch compared with crystalline Ge, we explore the growth of epitaxial CdS and ZnS shells using the successive ion layer adsorption and reaction method. Powder X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy techniques, including energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and selected area electron diffraction, clearly show the controllable growth of as many as 20 epitaxial monolayers of CdS atop Ge cores. In contrast, Ge etching and/or replacement by ZnS result in relatively small Ge/ZnS nanocrystals. The presence of an epitaxial II–VI shell greatly enhances the near-infrared photoluminescence and improves the photoluminescence stability of Ge. Ge/II–VI nanocrystals are reproducibly 1–3 orders of magnitude brighter than the brightest Ge cores. Ge/4.9CdS core/shells show the highest photoluminescence quantum yield and longest radiative recombination lifetime. Thiol ligand exchange easily results in near-infrared active, water-soluble Ge/II–VI nanocrystals. We expect this synthetic IV/II–VI epitaxial approach will lead to further studies into the optoelectronic behavior and practical applications of Si and Ge-based nanomaterials.

  17. Examination of utility Phase 1 compliance choices and state reactions to Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, K.A.; Elliott, T.J.; Carlson, L.J.; South, D.W.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Title IV (acid rain) of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 is imposing new limitations on the emission of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (N{sub x}) from electric power plants. The act requires utilities to develop compliance plans to reduce these emissions, and indications are that these plans will dramatically alter traditional operating procedures. A key provision of the SO{sub 2} control program deaned in Title IV is the creation of a system of emission allowances, with utilities having the option of complying by adjusting system emissions and allowance holdings. A compilation of SO{sub 2} compliance activities by the 110 utility plants affected by Phase I is summarized in this report. These compliance plans are presented in a tabular form, correlated with age, capacity, and power pool data. A large number of the Phase I units (46%) have chosen to blend or switch to lower sulfur coals. This choice primarily is in response to (1) prices of low-sulfur coal and (2) the need to maintain SO{sub 2} control flexibility because of uncertain future environmental regulations (e.g., air toxics, carbon dioxide) and compliance prices. The report also discusses the responses of state legislatures and public utility commissions to the compliance requirements in Title IV. Most states have taken negligible action regarding the regulatory treatment of allowances and compliance activities. To protect mine employment, states producing high-sulfur coal have enacted regulations encouraging continued use of that coal, but for the most part, this response has had little effect on utility compliance choices.

  18. The Effect of Radiation Timing on Patients With High-Risk Features of Parameningeal Rhabdomyosarcoma: An Analysis of IRS-IV and D9803

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spalding, Aaron C., E-mail: Aaron.Spalding@nortonhealthcare.org [Kosair Children's Hospital and Brain Tumor Center, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Hawkins, Douglas S. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Seattle Children's Hospital, and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Donaldson, Sarah S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California (United States); Anderson, James R.; Lyden, Elizabeth [University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Laurie, Fran [Quality Assurance Review Center, Providence, Rhode Island and Seattle, Washington (United States); Wolden, Suzanne L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Arndt, Carola A.S. [Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Michalski, Jeff M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Radiation therapy remains an essential treatment for patients with parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma (PMRMS), and early radiation therapy may improve local control for patients with intracranial extension (ICE). Methods and Materials: To address the role of radiation therapy timing in PMRMS in the current era, we reviewed the outcome from 2 recent clinical trials for intermediate-risk RMS: Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study (IRS)-IV and Children's Oncology Group (COG) D9803. The PMRMS patients on IRS-IV with any high-risk features (cranial nerve palsy [CNP], cranial base bony erosion [CBBE], or ICE) were treated immediately at day 0, and PMRMS patients without any of these 3 features received week 6-9 radiation therapy. The D9803 PMRMS patients with ICE received day 0 X-Ray Therapy (XRT) as well; however, those with either CNP or CBBE had XRT at week 12. Results: Compared with the 198 PMRMS patients from IRS-IV, the 192 PMRMS patients from D9803 had no difference (P<.05) in 5-year local failure (19% vs 19%), failure-free-survival (70% vs 67%), or overall survival (75% vs 73%) in aggregate. The 5-year local failure rates by subset did not differ when patients were classified as having no risk features (None, 15% vs 19%, P=.25), cranial nerve palsy/cranial base of skull erosion (CNP/CBBE, 15% vs 28%, P=.22), or intracranial extension (ICE, 21% vs 15%, P=.27). The D9083 patients were more likely to have received initial staging by magnetic resonance imaging (71% vs 53%). Conclusions: These data support that a delay in radiation therapy for high-risk PMRMS features of CNP/CBBE does not compromise clinical outcomes.

  19. SMALL-SCALE TESTING OF PLUTONIUM (IV) OXALATE PRECIPITATION AND CALCINATION TO PLUTONIUM OXIDE TO SUPPORT THE MOX FEED MISSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowder, M.; Pierce, R.; Scogin, J.; Daniel, G.; King, W.

    2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The H-Canyon facility will be used to dissolve Pu metal for subsequent purification and conversion to plutonium dioxide (PuO{sub 2}) using Phase II of HB-Line. To support the new mission, SRNL conducted a series of experiments to produce calcined plutonium (Pu) oxide and measure the physical properties and water adsorption of that material. This data will help define the process operating conditions and material handling steps for HB-Line. An anion exchange column experiment produced 1.4 L of a purified 52.6 g/L Pu solution. Over the next nine weeks, seven Pu(IV) oxalate precipitations were performed using the same stock Pu solution, with precipitator feed acidities ranging from 0.77 M to 3.0 M nitric acid and digestion times ranging from 5 to 30 minutes. Analysis of precipitator filtrate solutions showed Pu losses below 1% for all precipitations. The four larger precipitation batches matched the target oxalic acid addition time of 44 minutes within 4 minutes. The three smaller precipitation batches focused on evaluation of digestion time and the oxalic acid addition step ranged from 25-34 minutes because of pump limitations in the low flow range. Following the precipitations, 22 calcinations were performed in the range of 610-690 C, with the largest number of samples calcined at either 650 or 635 C. Characterization of the resulting PuO{sub 2} batches showed specific surface areas in the range of 5-14 m{sup 2}/g, with 16 of the 22 samples in the range of 5-10 m2/g. For samples analyzed with typical handling (exposed to ambient air for 15-45 minutes with relative humidities of 20-55%), the moisture content as measured by Mass Spectrometry ranged from 0.15 to 0.45 wt % and the total mass loss at 1000 C, as measured by TGA, ranged from 0.21 to 0.58 wt %. For the samples calcined between 635 and 650 C, the moisture content without extended exposure ranged from 0.20 to 0.38 wt %, and the TGA mass loss ranged from 0.26 to 0.46 wt %. Of these latter samples, the samples calcined at 650 C generally had lower specific surface areas and lower moisture contents than the samples calcined at 635 C, which matches expectations from the literature. Taken together, the TGA-MS results for samples handled at nominally 20-50% RH, without extended exposure, indicate that the Pu(IV) oxalate precipitation process followed by calcination at 635-650 C appears capable of producing PuO{sub 2} with moisture content < 0.5 wt% as required by the 3013 Standard. Exposures of PuO{sub 2} samples to ambient air for 3 or more hours generally showed modest mass gains that were primarily gains in moisture content. These results point to the need for a better understanding of the moisture absorption of PuO{sub 2} and serve as a warning that extended exposure times, particularly above the 50% RH level observed in this study will make the production of PuO{sub 2} with less than 0.5 wt % moisture more challenging. Samples analyzed in this study generally contained approximately 2 monolayer equivalents of moisture. In this study, the bulk of the moisture released from samples below 300 C, as did a significant portion of the CO{sub 2}. Samples in this study consistently released a minor amount of NO in the 40-300 C range, but no samples released CO or SO{sub 2}. TGA-MS results also showed that MS moisture content accounted for 80 {+-} 8% of the total mass loss at 1000 C measured by the TGA. The PuO{sub 2} samples produced had particles sizes that typically ranged from 0.2-88 {micro}m, with the mean particle size ranging from 6.4-9.3 {micro}m. The carbon content of ten different calcination batches ranged from 190-480 {micro}g C/g Pu, with an average value of 290 {micro}g C/g Pu. A statistical review of the calcination conditions and resulting SSA values showed that in both cases tested, calcination temperature had a significant effect on SSA, as expected from literature data. The statistical review also showed that batch size had a significant effect on SSA, but the narrow range of batch sizes tested is a compelling reason to set aside that result until tests

  20. Incidence and specificity of antibodies to types I, II, III, IV, and V collagen in rheumatoid arthritis and other rheumatic diseases as measured by 125I-radioimmunoassay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stuart, J.M.; Huffstutter, E.H.; Townes, A.S.; Kang, A.H.

    1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Antibodies to human native and denatured types I, II, III, IV, and V collagens were measured using 125I-radioimmunoassay. Mean levels of binding by sera from 30 rheumatoid arthritis patients were significantly higher than those from 20 normal subjects against all of the collagens tested. The relative antibody concentration was higher in synovial fluid than in simultaneously obtained serum. Many patients with gout or various other rheumatic diseases also had detectable anticollagen antibodies. With a few notable exceptions, the majority of the reactivity detected in all patient groups was directed against covalent structural determinants present on all of the denatured collagens, suggesting a secondary reaction to tissue injury.

  1. LAB-SCALE DEMONSTRATION OF PLUTONIUM PURIFICATION BY ANION EXCHANGE, PLUTONIUM (IV) OXALATE PRECIPITATION, AND CALCINATION TO PLUTONIUM OXIDE TO SUPPORT THE MOX FEED MISSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowder, M.; Pierce, R.

    2012-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    H-Canyon and HB-Line are tasked with the production of PuO{sub 2} from a feed of plutonium metal. The PuO{sub 2} will provide feed material for the MOX Fuel Fabrication Facility. After dissolution of the Pu metal in H-Canyon, the solution will be transferred to HB-Line for purification by anion exchange. Subsequent unit operations include Pu(IV) oxalate precipitation, filtration and calcination to form PuO{sub 2}. This report details the results from SRNL anion exchange, precipitation, filtration, calcination, and characterization tests, as requested by HB-Line1 and described in the task plan. This study involved an 80-g batch of Pu and employed test conditions prototypical of HB-Line conditions, wherever feasible. In addition, this study integrated lessons learned from earlier anion exchange and precipitation and calcination studies. H-Area Engineering selected direct strike Pu(IV) oxalate precipitation to produce a more dense PuO{sub 2} product than expected from Pu(III) oxalate precipitation. One benefit of the Pu(IV) approach is that it eliminates the need for reduction by ascorbic acid. The proposed HB-Line precipitation process involves a digestion time of 5 minutes after the time (44 min) required for oxalic acid addition. These were the conditions during HB-line production of neptunium oxide (NpO{sub 2}). In addition, a series of small Pu(IV) oxalate precipitation tests with different digestion times were conducted to better understand the effect of digestion time on particle size, filtration efficiency and other factors. To test the recommended process conditions, researchers performed two nearly-identical larger-scale precipitation and calcination tests. The calcined batches of PuO{sub 2} were characterized for density, specific surface area (SSA), particle size, moisture content, and impurities. Because the 3013 Standard requires that the calcination (or stabilization) process eliminate organics, characterization of PuO{sub 2} batches monitored the presence of oxalate by thermogravimetric analysis-mass spectrometry (TGA-MS). To use the TGA-MS for carbon or oxalate content, some method development will be required. However, the TGA-MS is already used for moisture measurements. Therefore, SRNL initiated method development for the TGA-MS to allow quantification of oxalate or total carbon. That work continues at this time and is not yet ready for use in this study. However, the collected test data can be reviewed later as those analysis tools are available.

  2. Syntheses, crystal structures and optical properties of the first strontium selenium(IV) and tellurium(IV) oxychlorides: Sr{sub 3}(SeO{sub 3})(Se{sub 2}O{sub 5})Cl{sub 2} and Sr{sub 4}(Te{sub 3}O{sub 8})Cl{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang Hailong [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Mao Jianggao [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou 350002 (China)], E-mail: mjg@fjirsm.ac.cn

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Two new quaternary strontium selenium(IV) and tellurium(IV) oxychlorides, namely, Sr{sub 3}(SeO{sub 3})(Se{sub 2}O{sub 5})Cl{sub 2} and Sr{sub 4}(Te{sub 3}O{sub 8})Cl{sub 4}, have been prepared by solid-state reaction. Sr{sub 3}(SeO{sub 3})(Se{sub 2}O{sub 5})Cl{sub 2} features a three-dimensional (3D) network structure constructed from strontium(II) interconnected by Cl{sup -}, SeO{sub 3}{sup 2-} as well as Se{sub 2}O{sub 5}{sup 2-} anions. The structure of Sr{sub 4}(Te{sub 3}O{sub 8})Cl{sub 4} features a 3D network in which the strontium tellurium oxide slabs are interconnected by bridging Cl{sup -} anions. The diffuse reflectance spectrum measurements and results of the electronic band structure calculations indicate that both compounds are wide band-gap semiconductors. - Graphical abstract: Solid-state reactions of SrO, SrCl{sub 2}, and SeO{sub 2} or TeO{sub 2} in different molar ratios and under different temperatures lead to two new strontium selenium(IV) or tellurium(IV) oxychlorides with two different types of structures, namely, Sr{sub 3}(SeO{sub 3})(Se{sub 2}O{sub 5})Cl{sub 2} and Sr{sub 4}(Te{sub 3}O{sub 8})Cl{sub 4}. Both compounds are wide band-gap semiconductors based on the diffuse reflectance spectra and the electronic band structures.

  3. Instrumentation and process control development for in situ coal gasification. Twentieth quarterly report: September-November 1979. [Hanna IV and Hoe Creek III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glass, R.E.

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The second phase of the Hanna IV in situ coal gasification test, Hanna IV-B, which was initiated on April 20, 1979, was completed on October 4, 1979. Sandia National Laboratories provided support by fielding and monitoring diagnostic and remote monitoring instrumentation techniques. During the final gasification stage, 765 tons of coal were reacted involving 17,000 cubic feet. The Hoe Creek III experiment conducted by Lawrence Livermore Laboratories began on August 15, 1979, and was terminated on October 10, 1979. The purpose of the experiment was to test the drilled borehole linking concept. Sandia National Laboratories' involvement consisted of fielding and monitoring both an inverted thermocouple and a surface electrical resistivity network. The inverted thermocouple was successfully tested and provided thermal data from beneath the burn zone. A real time analysis procedure for the electrical resistivity technique was implemented at Hoe Creek III. Unfortunately, there was insufficient change in the data for this to have been a useful diagnostic. Efforts are continuing to identify the reason for this lack of response.

  4. COE Reductions through Active Aerodynamic Control of Rotor Aerodynamics and Geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, D. A.; McCoy, T. J.

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigates potential cost of energy reductions that might be achieved by designing active systems to mitigate loads throughout the wind turbine system.

  5. Spring 2011 ME706 Acoustics and Aerodynamic Sound ME706 Acoustics and Aerodynamic Sound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are investigated (`vortex-surface' interactions) by the powerful and universal method of `compact Green's function problems. BOOKS Students should aim to build a library of classic texts. Many of these are out of print, but are available in libraries or second hand (e.g. from: http://www.abebooks.com/). Recommended classics: Batchelor

  6. Analysis of supercritical CO{sub 2} cycle control strategies and dynamic response for Generation IV Reactors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. J. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The analysis of specific control strategies and dynamic behavior of the supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle has been extended to the two reactor types selected for continued development under the Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative; namely, the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) and the Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR). Direct application of the standard S-CO{sub 2} recompression cycle to the VHTR was found to be challenging because of the mismatch in the temperature drop of the He gaseous reactor coolant through the He-to-CO{sub 2} reactor heat exchanger (RHX) versus the temperature rise of the CO{sub 2} through the RHX. The reference VHTR features a large temperature drop of 450 C between the assumed core outlet and inlet temperatures of 850 and 400 C, respectively. This large temperature difference is an essential feature of the VHTR enabling a lower He flow rate reducing the required core velocities and pressure drop. In contrast, the standard recompression S-CO{sub 2} cycle wants to operate with a temperature rise through the RHX of about 150 C reflecting the temperature drop as the CO{sub 2} expands from 20 MPa to 7.4 MPa in the turbine and the fact that the cycle is highly recuperated such that the CO{sub 2} entering the RHX is effectively preheated. Because of this mismatch, direct application of the standard recompression cycle results in a relatively poor cycle efficiency of 44.9%. However, two approaches have been identified by which the S-CO{sub 2} cycle can be successfully adapted to the VHTR and the benefits of the S-CO{sub 2} cycle, especially a significant gain in cycle efficiency, can be realized. The first approach involves the use of three separate cascaded S-CO{sub 2} cycles. Each S-CO{sub 2} cycle is coupled to the VHTR through its own He-to-CO{sub 2} RHX in which the He temperature is reduced by 150 C. The three respective cycles have efficiencies of 54, 50, and 44%, respectively, resulting in a net cycle efficiency of 49.3 %. The other approach involves reducing the minimum cycle pressure significantly below the critical pressure such that the temperature drop in the turbine is increased while the minimum cycle temperature is maintained above the critical temperature to prevent the formation of a liquid phase. The latter approach also involves the addition of a precooler and a third compressor before the main compressor to retain the benefits of compression near the critical point with the main compressor. For a minimum cycle pressure of 1 MPa, a cycle efficiency of 49.5% is achieved. Either approach opens up the door to applying the SCO{sub 2} cycle to the VHTR. In contrast, the SFR system typically has a core outlet-inlet temperature difference of about 150 C such that the standard recompression cycle is ideally suited for direct application to the SFR. The ANL Plant Dynamics Code has been modified for application to the VHTR and SFR when the reactor side dynamic behavior is calculated with another system level computer code such as SAS4A/SYSSYS-1 in the SFR case. The key modification involves modeling heat exchange in the RHX, accepting time dependent tabular input from the reactor code, and generating time dependent tabular input to the reactor code such that both the reactor and S-CO{sub 2} cycle sides can be calculated in a convergent iterative scheme. This approach retains the modeling benefits provided by the detailed reactor system level code and can be applied to any reactor system type incorporating a S-CO{sub 2} cycle. This approach was applied to the particular calculation of a scram scenario for a SFR in which the main and intermediate sodium pumps are not tripped and the generator is not disconnected from the electrical grid in order to enhance heat removal from the reactor system thereby enhancing the cooldown rate of the Na-to-CO{sub 2} RHX. The reactor side is calculated with SAS4A/SASSYS-1 while the S-CO{sub 2} cycle is calculated with the Plant Dynamics Code with a number of iterations over a timescale of 500 seconds. It is found that the RHX u

  7. Investigation of a Novel NDE Method for Monitoring Thermomechanical Damage and Microstructure Evolution in Ferritic-Martensitic Steels for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagy, Peter

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The main goal of the proposed project is the development of validated nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques for in situ monitoring of ferritic-martensitic steels like Grade 91 9Cr-1Mo, which are candidate materials for Generation IV nuclear energy structural components operating at temperatures up to ~650{degree}C and for steam-generator tubing for sodium-cooled fast reactors. Full assessment of thermomechanical damage requires a clear separation between thermally activated microstructural evolution and creep damage caused by simultaneous mechanical stress. Creep damage can be classified as "negligible" creep without significant plastic strain and "ordinary" creep of the primary, secondary, and tertiary kind that is accompanied by significant plastic deformation and/or cavity nucleation and growth. Under negligible creep conditions of interest in this project, minimal or no plastic strain occurs, and the accumulation of creep damage does not significantly reduce the fatigue life of a structural component so that low-temperature design rules, such as the ASME Section III, Subsection NB, can be applied with confidence. The proposed research project will utilize a multifaceted approach in which the feasibility of electrical conductivity and thermo-electric monitoring methods is researched and coupled with detailed post-thermal/creep exposure characterization of microstructural changes and damage processes using state-of-the-art electron microscopy techniques, with the aim of establishing the most effective nondestructive materials evaluation technique for particular degradation modes in high-temperature alloys that are candidates for use in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) as well as providing the necessary mechanism-based underpinnings for relating the two. Only techniques suitable for practical application in situ will be considered. As the project evolves and results accumulate, we will also study the use of this technique for monitoring other GEN IV materials. Through the results obtained from this integrated materials behavior and NDE study, new insight will be gained into the best nondestructive creep and microstructure monitoring methods for the particular mechanisms identified in these materials. The proposed project includes collaboration with a national laboratory partner and the results will also serve as a foundation to guide the efforts of scientists in the DOE laboratory, university, and industrial communities concerned with the technological challenges of monitoring creep and microstructural evolution in materials planned to be used in Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems.

  8. Synergies and conflicts in multimedia pollution control related to utility compliance with Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    South, D.W.; Bailey, K.A.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most analyses of the alternative strategies used by utilities to comply with Title IV requirements have focused on factors directly related to controlling sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emissions. However, utilities must meet a number of additional environmental requirements at the same tune they comply with the acid rain program. To illuminate the potential synergies and conflicts that might exist between the other regulatory mandates and the acid rain program, a thorough examination of all the various programs and their interrelationships must be conducted. This paper reviews the environmental mandates that utilities will have to plan to meet in the next decade concurrently with the acid rain program, and it analyzes the interactions among the various programs to identify potential synergies and conflicts.

  9. Cell, Vol. 120, 613622, March 11, 2005, Copyright 2005 by Elsevier Inc. DOI 10.1016/j.cell.2005.02.007 Plant Nuclear RNA Polymerase IV Mediates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pikaard, Craig

    School of Agriculture Faculty of Agriculture and N [nuclear] RPA, NRPB, and NRPC in Arabidopsis) largest.02.007 Plant Nuclear RNA Polymerase IV Mediates siRNA and DNA Methylation-Dependent Heterochromatin Formation genes were predicted, implying All eukaryotes have three nuclear DNA-dependent the existence

  10. A. Kusiak, Data Mining and Decision Making, in B.V. Dasarathy (Ed.), Proceedings of the SPIE Conference on Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery: Theory, Tools, and Technology IV, Vol. 4730, SPIE, Orlando, FL, April 2002, pp. 155-165.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusiak, Andrew

    A. Kusiak, Data Mining and Decision Making, in B.V. Dasarathy (Ed.), Proceedings of the SPIE Conference on Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery: Theory, Tools, and Technology IV, Vol. 4730, SPIE, Orlando, FL, April 2002, pp. 155-165. Data Mining and Decision Making Andrew Kusiak Department of Mechanical

  11. Photometry of symbiotic stars XI. EG And, Z And, BF Cyg, CH Cyg, CI Cyg, V1329 Cyg, TX CVn, AG Dra, RW Hya, QW Sge, IV Vir and the LMXB V934 Her

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Skopal; T. Pribulla; M. Vanko; Z. Velic; E. Semkov; M. Wolf; A. Jones

    2004-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new photometric observations of EG And, Z And, BF Cyg, CH Cyg, CI Cyg, V1329 Cyg, TX CVn, AG Dra, RW Hya, AR Pav, AG Peg, AX Per, QW Sge, IV Vir and the peculiar M giant V934 Her. The current issue gathers observations of these objects to December 2003.

  12. Synergies and conflicts in multimedia pollution control related to utility compliance with Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, K.A.; Loeb, A.P.; Formento, J.W.; South, D.W.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most analyses of utility strategies for meeting Title IV requirements in the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 have focused on factors relating directly to utilities` sulfur dioxide control costs; however, there are a number of additional environmental requirements that utilities must meet at the same time they comply with the acid rain program. To illuminate the potential synergies and conflicts that these other regulatory mandates may have in connection with the acid rain program, it is necessary to conduct a thorough, simultaneous examination of the various programs. This report (1) reviews the environmental mandates that utilities must plant to meet in the next decade concurrently with those of the acid rain program, (2) evaluates the technologies that utilities may select to meet these requirements, (3) reviews the impacts of public utility regulation on the acid rain program, and (4) analyzes the interactions among the various programs for potential synergies and conflicts. Generally, this report finds that the lack of coordination among current and future regulatory programs may result in higher compliance costs than necessary. Failure to take advantage of cost-effective synergies and incremental compliance planning will increase control costs and reduce environmental benefits.

  13. Energy levels, oscillator strengths and transition probabilities for Si-like P II, S III, Cl IV, Ar V and K VI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abou El-Maaref, A., E-mail: aahmh@hotmail.com [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University, Assuit (Egypt); Uosif, M.A.M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University, Assuit (Egypt)] [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University, Assuit (Egypt); Allam, S.H.; El-Sherbini, Th.M. [Laboratory of Lasers and New Materials, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt)] [Laboratory of Lasers and New Materials, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fine-structure calculations of energy levels, oscillator strengths, and transition probabilities for transitions among the terms belonging to 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 2}, 3s3p{sup 3}, 3s{sup 2}3p3d, 3s{sup 2}3p4s, 3s{sup 2}3p4p, 3s{sup 2}3p4d, 3s{sup 2}3p5s and 3s{sup 2}3p5p configurations of silicon-like ions P II, S III, Cl IV, Ar V and K VI have been calculated using configuration-interaction version 3 (CIV3). We compared our data with the available experimental data and other theoretical calculations. Most of our calculations of energy levels and oscillator strengths (in length form) show good agreement with both experimental and theoretical data. Lifetimes of the excited levels are also given.

  14. Analysis of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990: A forecast of the electric utility industry response to Title IV, Acid Deposition Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molburg, J.C.; Fox, J.A.; Pandola, G.; Cilek, C.M.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 incorporate, for the first time, provisions aimed specifically at the control of acid rain. These provisions restrict emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) from electric power generating stations. The restrictions on SO{sub 2} take the form of an overall cap on the aggregate emissions from major generating plants, allowing substantial flexibility in the industry`s response to those restrictions. This report discusses one response scenario through the year 2030 that was examined through a simulation of the utility industry based on assumptions consistent with characterizations used in the National Energy Strategy reference case. It also makes projections of emissions that would result from the use of existing and new capacity and of the associated additional costs of meeting demand subject to the emission limitations imposed by the Clean Air Act. Fuel-use effects, including coal-market shifts, consistent with the response scenario are also described. These results, while dependent on specific assumptions for this scenario, provide insight into the general character of the likely utility industry response to Title IV.

  15. Analysis of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990: A forecast of the electric utility industry response to Title IV, Acid Deposition Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molburg, J.C.; Fox, J.A.; Pandola, G.; Cilek, C.M.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 incorporate, for the first time, provisions aimed specifically at the control of acid rain. These provisions restrict emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO[sub 2]) and oxides of nitrogen (NO[sub x]) from electric power generating stations. The restrictions on SO[sub 2] take the form of an overall cap on the aggregate emissions from major generating plants, allowing substantial flexibility in the industry's response to those restrictions. This report discusses one response scenario through the year 2030 that was examined through a simulation of the utility industry based on assumptions consistent with characterizations used in the National Energy Strategy reference case. It also makes projections of emissions that would result from the use of existing and new capacity and of the associated additional costs of meeting demand subject to the emission limitations imposed by the Clean Air Act. Fuel-use effects, including coal-market shifts, consistent with the response scenario are also described. These results, while dependent on specific assumptions for this scenario, provide insight into the general character of the likely utility industry response to Title IV.

  16. Important role of the non-uniform Fe distribution for the ferromagnetism in group-IV-based ferromagnetic semiconductor GeFe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wakabayashi, Yuki K.; Ohya, Shinobu; Ban, Yoshisuke; Tanaka, Masaaki [Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Systems, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the growth-temperature dependence of the properties of the group-IV-based ferromagnetic semiconductor Ge{sub 1?x}Fe{sub x} films (x?=?6.5% and 10.5%), and reveal the correlation of the magnetic properties with the lattice constant, Curie temperature (T{sub C}), non-uniformity of Fe atoms, stacking-fault defects, and Fe-atom locations. While T{sub C} strongly depends on the growth temperature, we find a universal relationship between T{sub C} and the lattice constant, which does not depend on the Fe content x. By using the spatially resolved transmission-electron diffractions combined with the energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, we find that the density of the stacking-fault defects and the non-uniformity of the Fe concentration are correlated with T{sub C}. Meanwhile, by using the channeling Rutherford backscattering and particle-induced X-ray emission measurements, we clarify that about 15% of the Fe atoms exist on the tetrahedral interstitial sites in the Ge{sub 0.935}Fe{sub 0.065} lattice and that the substitutional Fe concentration is not correlated with T{sub C}. Considering these results, we conclude that the non-uniformity of the Fe concentration plays an important role in determining the ferromagnetic properties of GeFe.

  17. Carrier transport properties of the Group-IV ferromagnetic semiconductor Ge{sub 1-x}Fe{sub x} with and without boron doping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ban, Yoshisuke, E-mail: ban@cryst.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Wakabayashi, Yuki; Akiyama, Ryota; Nakane, Ryosho; Tanaka, Masaaki, E-mail: masaaki@ee.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Electronic Engineering and Information Systems, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated the transport and magnetic properties of group-IV ferromagnetic semiconductor Ge{sub 1-x}Fe{sub x} films (x = 1.0 and 2.3%) with and without boron doping grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). In order to accurately measure the transport properties of 100-nm-thick Ge{sub 1-x}Fe{sub x} films, (001)-oriented silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers with an ultra-thin Si body layer (?5 nm) were used as substrates. Owing to the low Fe content, the hole concentration and mobility in the Ge{sub 1-x}Fe{sub x} films were exactly estimated by Hall measurements because the anomalous Hall effect in these films was found to be negligibly small. By boron doping, we increased the hole concentration in Ge{sub 1-x}Fe{sub x} from ?10{sup 18} cm{sup ?3} to ?10{sup 20} cm{sup ?3} (x = 1.0%) and to ?10{sup 19} cm{sup ?3} (x = 2.3%), but no correlation was observed between the hole concentration and magnetic properties. This result presents a contrast to the hole-induced ferromagnetism in III-V ferromagnetic semiconductors.

  18. DOE Underground-Coal-Conversion-Program field-test activities for 1979 and 1980. [Pricetown 1, Hoe Creek 3, Hanna IV, and SDB 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartke, T.C.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the US Department of Energy's Underground-Coal-Conversion program, four field tests were completed in 1979 and preparations were begun in 1980 for two additional field tests to be operated in 1981. The Laramie Energy Technology Center (LETC) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) completed Hanna IV, an air gasification test in Wyoming subbituminous coal. The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) completed Pricetown 1, an air gasification test in West Virginia bituminous coal. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) completed Hoe Creek 3, a steam-oxygen gasification test in Wyoming subbituminous coal. Gulf Research and Development Co. completed Steeply Dipping Beds (SDB) Test 1, primarily an air gasification test in Wyoming subbituminous coal and the first SDB test in the US. In 1980, Gulf R and D Co. began preparation of SDB Test 2, scheduled for operation in the fall of 1981. The DOE project teams at LETC, METC, LLNL, and SNL, in association with the Washington Irrigation and Development Co. (WIDCo), Washington Water Power (WWP), and the State of Washington, are preparing a field test site in the Centralia-Chehalis coal district of Washington. A series of large coal block tests will be completed prior to the field test, scheduled for operation in 1982 or 1983. This field test will utilize a directionally drilled link and steam-oxygen gasification system. This paper summarizes the results of the four recently completed field tests and the plans for additional tests.

  19. Structural And Physical Characterization of Tetranuclear [Mn**II(3)Mn**IV] And [Mn**II(2)Mn**III(2)] Valence-Isomer Manganese Complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaleski, C.M.; Weng, T.-C.; Dendrinou-Samara, C.; Alexiou, M.; Kanakaraki, P.; Hsieh, W.-Y.; Kampf, J.; Penner-Hahn, J.E.; Pecoraro, V.L.; Kessissoglou, D.P.

    2009-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Two tetranuclear Mn complexes with an average Mn oxidation state of +2.5 have been prepared. These valence isomers have been characterized by a combination of X-ray crystallography, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and magnetic susceptibility. The Mn{sup II}{sub 3}Mn{sup IV} tetramer has the Mn ions arranged in a distorted tetrahedron, with an S = 6 ground spin state, dominated by ferromagnetic exchange among the manganese ions. The Mn{sup II}{sub 2}Mn{sup III}{sub 2} tetramer also has a distorted tetrahedral arrangement of Mn ions but shows magnetic behavior, suggesting that it is a single-molecule magnet. The X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra for the two complexes are similar, suggesting that, while Mn XANES has sufficient sensitivity to distinguish between trinuclear valence isomers (Alexiou et al. Inorg. Chem. 2003, 42, 2185), similar distinctions are difficult for tetranuclear complexes such as that found in the photosynthetic oxygen-evolving complex.

  20. E F F I C I E N CY A N D R E N E W A B L E E N E R GY D IV I S I O N CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to a material's ability to reflect the sun's energy back into the atmosphere, much like how light is reflected by a mirror. Even for materials with high solar reflectance, a portion of the sun's energy is absorbedBLUEPRI NT E F F I C I E N CY A N D R E N E W A B L E E N E R GY D IV I S I O N CALIFORNIA ENERGY

  1. E F F I C I E N CY A N D R E N E W A B L E E N E R GY D IV I S I O N CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BLUEPRI NT E F F I C I E N CY A N D R E N E W A B L E E N E R GY D IV I S I O N CALIFORNIA ENERGYHERSComplianceDocumentationRegisteredonorAfterOctober1,2010 B l u e p r i n t 9 8 · N o v e m b e r ­ D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 0 Residential Radiant Barrier

  2. BIG IDEAS FOR JOB CREATIOn A PROJECT OF ThE UnIvERSITy OF CALIFORnIA, BERKELEy AnD ThE AnnIE E. CASEy FOUnDATIOn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    BIG IDEAS FOR JOB CREATIOn A PROJECT OF ThE UnIvERSITy OF CALIFORnIA, BERKELEy AnD ThE AnnIE E. CASEy FOUnDATIOn I n the aftermath of jobs speeches and counter proposals over the nation's stagnant unemployment rate, one thing is clear: The need for job creation will remain in the headlines as long as 25

  3. PART IV ? REPRESENTATIONS AND INSTRUCTIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a concern which submits an offer in its own name, other than on a construction or service contract, but which proposes to furnish a product which it did not itself manufacture, is...

  4. June 25, 2002 Appendix IV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    -picked oranges of various varieties are received ei- ther directly from the field or from local cold storage Received Inspection (Primary Culling) Cold Storage Package Re-sanitize Grading (2° Cull) Brush reduction at water rinse step. Ship/TransportCold Storage Metal Detector #12;Notes: June 25, 2002 Appendix

  5. Under the Saturn IV Rocket

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    I went to Space Camp! In January I went to the Davidson Space and Rocket Center (the home of Space Camp) in Huntsville Alabama for a workshop sponsored by the Advanced Manufacturing National Program Office (AMNPO). Over 350 people from private companies, universities, and state and federal government agencies came to learn more about and discuss the hot-off- the-press "Preliminary Design of the National Network for Manufacturing Innovation," a report issued by the National Science and Technology Council (NSTC).

  6. PREPARATION OF OXOPORPHINATOMANGANESE (IV) COMPLEX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willner, I.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    produced by hypochlorite oxidation of Mn(III)-porphyrins, oxidize water to H 02 or O in 8,9 However, we find that treatment

  7. Carbon Sequestration Atlas IV Video

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Rodosta, Traci

    2014-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Carbon Sequestration Atlas is a collection of all the storage sites of CO2 such as, petroleum, natural gas, coal, and oil shale.

  8. Geothermal Program Review IV: proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research and development program of DOE's Geothermal Technology Division is reviewed in separate presentations according to program area. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the individual papers. (ACR)

  9. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    of electricity and total emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2 )--a greenhouse gas. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, electricity generation currently produces about 40 percent of our CO2 emissions in per capita use of electricity and total emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2 )--a greenhouse gas

  10. Carbon Sequestration Atlas IV Video

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodosta, Traci

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Carbon Sequestration Atlas is a collection of all the storage sites of CO2 such as, petroleum, natural gas, coal, and oil shale.

  11. El IV Festival de Manizales.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luzuriaga, Gerardo

    1971-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    interpretación, esta obra fue considerada como una de las mejores del festival, a pesar de que no llegó a ofrecerse en el escenario "oficial" de Los Fundadores, quizás en razón de que el grupo vino por su propia cuenta. Otro de los espectáculos que mereció... polémica establecida por varios de los conjuntos, especialmente colombianos. Lamentablemente, tampoco ha gustado la participación mexicana en festivales anteriores, y por eso el público manizaleño comienza ya a preguntarse qué pasa con el teatro joven de...

  12. Alta IV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: Energy Resources Jump to:Almo, Idaho: Energy ResourcesAlta I JumpIIIIV

  13. SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF Pa(IV), Np(IV), AND Pu(IV) BOROHYDRIDES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banks, R.H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    due to B and 'H (in the deuteride spectra) are resolved inresonances compared to the deuteride and a reliable g_ valuethe calculations of the deuteride data improved the fit sven

  14. MODFLOW and More 2003: Understanding through Modeling -Conference Proceedings, Poeter, Zheng, Hill & Doherty -www.mines.edu/igwmc/ Inversion of Borehole Flowmeter Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    a gravel pack about a wellbore can significantly affect flow measurements of a flowmeter that uses a skirt

  15. (3,3-Difluoro-pyrrolidin-1-yl)-[(2S,4S)-(4-(4-pyrimidin-2-yl-piperazin-1-yl)-pyrrolidin-2-yl]-methanone: A potent, selective, orally active dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammirati, Mark J.; Andrews, Kim M.; Boyer, David D.; Brodeur, Anne M.; Danley, Dennis E.; Doran, Shawn D.; Hulin, Bernard; Liu, Shenping; McPherson, R. Kirk; Orena, Stephen J.; Parker, Janice C.; Polivkova, Jana; Qiu, Xiayang; Soglia, Carolyn B.; Treadway, Judith L.; VanVolkenburg, Maria A.; Wilder, Donald C.; Piotrowski, David W.; Pfizer

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of 4-substituted proline amides was synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of dipeptidyl pepdidase IV for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. (3,3-Difluoro-pyrrolidin-1-yl)-[(2S,4S)-(4-(4-pyrimidin-2-yl-piperazin-1-yl)-pyrrolidin-2-yl]-methanone (5) emerged as a potent (IC{sub 50} = 13 nM) and selective compound, with high oral bioavailability in preclinical species and low plasma protein binding. Compound 5, PF-00734200, was selected for development as a potential new treatment for type 2 diabetes.

  16. aerodynamics experiment phase: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: from rest onto a table surface. From the times between the ball-table impacts, the initial drop height-table collisions can be exploited to determine the height...

  17. Aerodynamic Models for Hurricanes III. Modeling hurricane boundary layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonov, Arkady I

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The third paper of the series (see previous ones in Refs.[1-2]) discusses basic physicalprocesses in the (quasi-) steady hurricane boundary layer (HBL), develops an approximate airflow model, establishes the HBL structure, and presents integral balance relations for dynamic and thermodynamic variables in HBL. Models of evaporation and condensation are developed, where the condensation is treated similarly to the slow combustion theory. A turbulent approximation for the lower sub-layer of HBL is applied to the sea-air interaction to establish the observed increase in angular momentum in the outer region of HBL.A closed set of balance relations has been obtained. Simple analytical solution of the set yields expressions for the basic dynamic variables - maximal tangential and radial velocities in hurricane, maximal vertical speed in eye wall, the affinity speed of hurricane travel, and the maximal temperature increase after condensation. Estimated values of the variables seem to be realistic. An attempt is also ...

  18. aerodynamics performance cooling: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    These components are of compact design, featuring low-pressure drop and handling very low pressure vapor at low temperature. Following a qualification phase of prototypes, a...

  19. aerodynamic load prediction: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    problem, partly because solving the inverse problem is more difficult. A nonlinear system identification technique is needed for solving the inverse problem. In this study, we...

  20. aerodynamic lift: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    USING A VISCOUS ADJOINT-BASED METHOD Engineering Websites Summary: of high-lift system configurations. Improve take-off and landing performance of high-lift systems...

  1. Characterization of aerodynamic drag force on single particles: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kale, S.R.

    1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrodynamic balance was used to measure the drag coefficient and also to record the size and shape of spheres, and coal and oil shale particles (100 ..mu..m to 200 ..mu..m in size). The electrodynamic balance consisted of a central, and two end electrodes. The resulting electric field stably suspended a charged particle. A suspended particle, back illuminated by a light emitting diode, was viewed by a video camera. The image was analyzed for particle position control and was calibrated to give the diameter of spheres, or the area equivalent diameter of nonspherical particles. The drag coefficient was calculated from the air velocity and the dc voltage required to keep the particle at the balance center. The particle Reynolds number varied from 0.2 to 13. Three particles each of coal and oil shale were captured and photographed by a scanning electron microscope and the motion of all the particles was recorded on video tape. Drag coefficient vs Reynolds number data for spheres agreed well with correlations. Data for thirteen particles each of coal and oil shale indicated a power law relationship between drag coefficient and Reynolds number. All these particles exhibited higher drag than spheres and were also observed to rotate. The rotation, however, did not affect the drag coefficient. The choice of characteristic dimension affects the drag characteristics of oil shale more strongly than for coal, owing to the flake-like shape of oil shale. 38 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. applied aerodynamics conference: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Proceedings of the 1. Conference on Applied Mathematics and Computation Dubrovnik, Croatia of Science and Technology, Republic of Croatia. Department of Mathematics, University...

  3. Large-Eddy Simulation of Wind-Plant Aerodynamics: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Churchfield, M. J.; Lee, S.; Moriarty, P. J.; Martinez, L. A.; Leonardi, S.; Vijayakumar, G.; Brasseur, J. G.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we present results of a large-eddy simulation of the 48 multi-megawatt turbines composing the Lillgrund wind plant. Turbulent inflow wind is created by performing an atmospheric boundary layer precursor simulation and turbines are modeled using a rotating, variable-speed actuator line representation. The motivation for this work is that few others have done wind plant large-eddy simulations with a substantial number of turbines, and the methods for carrying out the simulations are varied. We wish to draw upon the strengths of the existing simulations and our growing atmospheric large-eddy simulation capability to create a sound methodology for performing this type of simulation. We have used the OpenFOAM CFD toolbox to create our solver.

  4. aerodynamic flow simulation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mueller (Siegfried Muller). 12;1 Introduction The investigation of cavitation bubbles is of interest for different 408 An experimental and simulation study...

  5. aerodynamic heating computations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Aerospace Structures 81 Cooperative Autonomous Systems-Engine Laboratory 84 Turbomachinery and Heat Transfer Laboratory 86 Architecture and Town Planning 88 Visualization...

  6. aerodynamic flow control: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    retransmission and ensures Draper, Jeff 333 Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Network Protocols, pages 119128, 1998 Distributed Network Flow Control Based...

  7. RESEARCH ARTICLE Aerodynamic and functional consequences of wing compliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Tom

    and elastic forces that arise from periodic acceler- ations of the wing. Passive wing deformation frequency of 25 Hz. We used digital particle image ve- locimetry at exceptionally high temporal resolution

  8. Aerodynamic Design for Swept-wing Laminar Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belisle, Michael Joseph

    2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    (SARGE), a natural laminar flow and passive laminar flow control wing glove flight experiment funded by the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation initiative. The experiment seeks to raise the technology readiness level of the spanwise...

  9. System Identification of Post Stall Aerodynamics for UAV Perching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tedrake, Russ

    MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab, Cambridge, MA, 02139, USA For a UAV to perch enough lift or upward momentum to stay aloft. The resulting trajectories are characterized by nonlinear of barycentric interpolator basis functions to predict lift, drag, and moment coefficients as functions of angle

  10. aerodynamic noise propagation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    not known in full detail in experiments. For weak propagating microwaves, the detection process requires linear amplifiers which obscure the signal with random noise. Here, we...

  11. Six Degree of Freedom Morphing Aircraft Dynamical Model with Aerodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niksch, Adam

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Morphing aircraft are envisioned to have multirole capability where the ability to change shape allows for adaptation to a changing mission environment. In order to calculate the properties of many wing configurations efficiently and rapidly, a...

  12. The Aerodynamic Signature of Running Spiders Jero^ me Casas1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    and ecological terms, without considering the role of signals produced by predators and perceived by prey. Wolf of sensory ecology and is consistent with the escape distances and speeds of cricket prey. These findings may the Cricket Inspired perCeption and Autonomous Decision Automata (CICADA) project (IST-2001- 34718) and within

  13. Keywords: Aerodynamics, Phase Relationship, Photogram-metry, Odonata, Wing Kinematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    device that is within 1 inch to 1.5 feet in size and utilizes ÅPNO[ HZ H WYPTHY` TVKL MVY TV[PVU ;OPZ compensated for lost force production by manipulating phase difference in a manner that increased lift

  14. active aerodynamic control: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mat systems) was most effective, followed by sub-slab vapor barriers, increased house ventilation, improved slab-foundation design, improved concrete quality, sealed slab...

  15. Journal of Wind Engineering and Industrial Aerodynamics 96 (2008) 503523

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manuel, Lance

    with such spectral models can be in turn highly variable for different realizations. Turbine load and performance a wind velocity field over spatial dimensions on the scale of the turbine rotor diameter in accordance of uncertainty in inflow turbulence to wind turbine loads Korn Saranyasoontorn, Lance ManuelÃ? Department of Civil

  16. A Computational Study of the Aerodynamics and Aeroacoustics of...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, 87185-1124, USA C. Eric Lynch and Marilyn J. Smith Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia, 30332-0150, USA This work...

  17. aerodynamic heating: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of multiple local optima, and most importantly Stanford University 205 ABSORPTION HEAT PUMP IN THE DISTRICT HEATING Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization Websites...

  18. analytical aerodynamic model: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    model allows analytically express the radial istributions of pressure and wind speed components. The vertical evolution of these distributions and hurricane structure in...

  19. aerodynamic size range: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    hours and so on. This paper explores the effect of different sizes of battery bank and photovoltaic of battery size and photovoltaic array. The study is addressed to loads in...

  20. aerodynamic performance prediction: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    solar cells Engineering Websites Summary: and are being widely deployed in terrestrial, photovoltaic, power plants. However, the price of electricity from of the photovoltaic...

  1. AERODYNAMIC OPTIMIZATION BASED ON THE EULER AND NAVIERSTOKES EQUATIONS USING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peraire, Jaime

    and Kyle Anderson. Thanks to Tom Sorensen, Alex Budge, Ali Merchant, Bob Haimes, Bilal Mughal, Karen Willcox, Karen Bibb and Sean George for various technical discussions and assistance. Thanks to my officemates, David Oh, Robie Samantha Roy and the folks in the cluster. Oh, and Karen Willcox. But I already

  2. NREL Studies Wind Farm Aerodynamics to Improve Siting (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL researchers have used high-tech instruments and high-performance computing to understand atmospheric turbulence and turbine wake behavior in order to improve wind turbine design and siting within wind farms.

  3. aerodynamic forces acting: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that both of these length scales are much smaller than the wavelength of the ultrasound wave (mm in water at MHz frequencies). The acoustophoretic response of suspended...

  4. aerodynamic force acting: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that both of these length scales are much smaller than the wavelength of the ultrasound wave (mm in water at MHz frequencies). The acoustophoretic response of suspended...

  5. First international conference in numerical and experimental aerodynamics of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    separation location. Jet to crossflow velocity ratios (B) of 1.5 and 3 are explored. As the jets inject into the crossflow, counter-rotating vortex pairs (CVPs) are formed enhancing the mixing of high momentum outer fluid

  6. COMPUTATIONAL STUDY OF FLAPPING AIRFOIL AERODYNAMICS Ismail H.Tuncer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tuncer, Ismail H.

    oscillations t Nondimensional time INTRODUCTION The separated ows over helicopter, propeller and wind turbine blades have received considerable attention for quite some time because of the impact of dynamic stall #3

  7. aerodynamics final technical: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Insulation July 2008 Principal Investigators: Dr. J. G. Hemrick Dr. E. Lara-Curzio Oak Ridge National. Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN...

  8. Journal of Wind Engineering and Industrial Aerodynamics 90 (2002) 201221

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pryor, Sara C.

    due largely to lower surface roughness [1]. An additional benefit to offshore location of wind farms characteristics in the near-shore and offshore environment using data from the Danish wind monitoring network. In this relatively high wind speed environment the temporal auto-correlation of wind speeds measured in the offshore

  9. aerodynamic preliminary analysis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    significant (86%) contribution of natural gas, primarily from steam production, to UBC's GHG Scope 1 (directUBC 2006 Greenhouse Gas Inventory Faculty-Specific Preliminary Analysis...

  10. Bovine Aerodynamics in terms of Fuzzy Lagrangian Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Pierce

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    called the Lagrangian, given by the kinetic energy T minusthe potential energy V: Referring to the elegance ofterms, given the system’s energy. An adequate Lagrangian

  11. aerodynamic loads estimated: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of sector 78 1. The estimate of the helium inventory, a prerequisite for the heat load calculation, is also presented. Heat loads to the cold mass are evaluated from the...

  12. aerodynamic space to: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    during approach while maintaining good performance. The application of numer- ical optimization to airframe-generated noise has not received much attention yet, but with the...

  13. aerodynamic particle sizer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    system consisting of an array of high precision scintillator Time of Flight and silica Aerogel Counters, is discussed. The performances achieved in the beam tests are...

  14. aerodynamic predictions comparisons: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    all size scales ranging from the subatomic dynamics of quantum systems to macro-scale fluid flows. The model predicts the universal inverse power-law form of the statistical...

  15. The Aerodynamics of Deforming Wings at Low Reynolds Number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medina, Albert

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    there develops a Karman vortex street stemming from theedge vortex would occur at the onset of a von Karman street.

  16. aerodynamic accessorieswind turbines: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and the depletion of non-renewable energy resources has led to more advancement in the "Green Energy " field, including wind energy. An improvement in performance of a Wind...

  17. Freight Wing & Aerodynamic Fairings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdf Flash2010-60.pdf2 DOE March, 20152LLC and FLNG

  18. ACARS Aerodynamic (Research Incorporated) Communication and Recording System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See the EnergyTAMANG, APIL. A Multilevel Method3 -8

  19. Active Aerodynamic Blade Distributed Flap Control Design Procedure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973 1 IntroductionActinide Chemistry Turbines * Dale

  20. Aerodynamic and Aeroacoustic Properties of a Flatback Airfoil: An Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973 1BP-14Scripting for AdvancedSensitivity Analysis

  1. Advanced Aerodynamic Technologies for Improving Fuel Economy in Ground

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of1 AAccelerated aging of1.1EnergyEnergy8-00621Vehicles |

  2. Integrated External Aerodynamic and Underhood Thermal Analysis for Heavy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment of Energy InvestingS10IS007ofDepartmentPilotImportantVehicles |

  3. A modified model for calculating lattice thermal expansion of I{sub 2}-IV-VI{sub 3} and I{sub 3}-V-VI{sub 4} tetrahedral compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omar, M.S. [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Salahaddin, Arbil, Kurdistan (Iraq)]. E-mail: dr_m_s_omar@yahoo.com

    2007-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A general empirical formula was found for calculating lattice thermal expansion for compounds having their properties extended for compound groups having different mean ionicity as well as more than one type of cation atoms with that of different numbers of them such as I{sub 2}-IV-VI{sub 3} and I{sub 3}-V-VI{sub 4}. The difference in the valence electrons for cations and anions in the compound was used to correlate the deviations caused by the compound ionicity. The ionicity effects, which are due to their different numbers for their types, were also added to the correlation equation. In general, the lattice thermal expansion for a compound semiconductor can be calculated from a relation containing melting point, mean atomic distance and number of valence electrons for the atoms forming the compound. The mean ionicity for the group compounds forming I{sub 2}-IV-VI{sub 3} was found to be 0.323 and 0.785 for the ternary group compounds of I{sub 3}-V-VI{sub 4}.

  4. AIAA Paper 97-2220, Applied Aerodynamics Conference, June 1997 Aerodynamic Parameter Measurement Using the Wind Driven Manipulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Using the Wind Driven Manipulator: Inverse Force Measurement on Wings Richard G. Ames , N.M. KomerathInverse force measurement using a wind-driven dynamic manipulator is explored. Using system identification techniques, the WDM offers a method of measuring forces and moments on wind tunnel models during rapid, multi

  5. (2R)-4-Oxo-4[3-(Trifluoromethyl)-5,6-diihydro:1,2,4}triazolo[4,3-a}pyrazin-7(8H)-y1]-1-(2,4,5-trifluorophenyl)butan-2-amine: A Potent, Orally Active Dipeptidyl Peptidase IV Inhibitor for the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, D.; Wang, L.; Beconi, M.; Eiermann, G.; Fisher, M.; He, H.; Hickey, G.; Kowalchick, Jennifer; Leiting, Barbara; Lyons, K.; Marsilio, F.; McCann, F.; Patel, R.; Petrov, A.; Scapin, G.; Patel, S.; Roy, R.; Wu, J.; Wyvratt, M.; Zhang, B.; Zhu, L.; Thornberry, N.; Weber, A. (Merck)

    2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel series of {beta}-amino amides incorporating fused heterocycles, i.e., triazolopiperazines, were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. (2R)-4-Oxo-4-[3-(trifluoromethyl)-5,6-dihydro[1,2,4]triazolo[4,3-a]pyrazin-7(8H)-yl]-1-(2,4,5-trifluorophenyl)butan-2-amine (1) is a potent, orally active DPP-IV inhibitor (IC{sub 50} = 18 nM) with excellent selectivity over other proline-selective peptidases, oral bioavailability in preclinical species, and in vivo efficacy in animal models. MK-0431, the phosphate salt of compound 1, was selected for development as a potential new treatment for type 2 diabetes.

  6. Atlantic Coastal Experiment III: R/V KNORR cruise 68, 4-30 August 1977; FRV ALBATROSS IV cruise 77-07, 1-4, 16-31 August 1977. Data report, volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judkins, D.C.; von Bock, K.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data are reported from KNORR cruise 68, the major investigation of the third Atlantic Coastal Experiment (ACE), conducted during a period of pro-nounced water-column stratification. One hundred fifty-five stations, including 6 time-series sitings, were occupied within the shelf and shelf- break regimes of New York Bight. Measurements were made to assess water-mass characterization, nutrient cycling, carbon/nitrogen assimilation, bio-mass distribution and diel dynamics and benthic/water-column interfacial exchange. Data are also included from the cruise of ALBATROSS IV carried out contemporaneously with the KNORR investigations, in an area ranging from Nantucket Shoals to the upper reaches of the Gulf of Maine. 20 hydrographic stations were used to augment underway mapping in order to elucidate surface-layer chlorophyll and nutrient distributions occurring at an impor-tant boundary of the New York Bight.

  7. Regenerative Heater Optimization for Steam Turbo-Generation Cycles of Generation IV Nuclear Power Plants with a Comparison of Two Concepts for the Westinghouse International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, W.C.

    2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The intent of this study is to discuss some of the many factors involved in the development of the design and layout of a steam turbo-generation unit as part of a modular Generation IV nuclear power plant. Of the many factors involved in the design and layout, this research will cover feed water system layout and optimization issues. The research is arranged in hopes that it can be generalized to any Generation IV system which uses a steam powered turbo-generation unit. The research is done using the ORCENT-II heat balance codes and the Salisbury methodology to be reviewed herein. The Salisbury methodology is used on an original cycle design by Famiani for the Westinghouse IRIS and the effects due to parameter variation are studied. The vital parameters of the Salisbury methodology are the incremental heater surface capital cost (S) in $/ft{sup 2}, the value of incremental power (I) in $/kW, and the overall heat transfer coefficient (U) in Btu/ft{sup 2}-degrees Fahrenheit-hr. Each is varied in order to determine the effects on the cycles overall heat rate, output, as well as, the heater surface areas. The effects of each are shown. Then the methodology is then used to compare the optimized original Famiani design consisting of seven regenerative feedwater heaters with an optimized new cycle concept, INRC8, containing four regenerative heaters. The results are shown. It can be seen that a trade between the complexity of the seven stage regenerative Famiani cycle and the simplicity of the INRC8 cycle can be made. It is desired that this methodology can be used to show the ability to evaluate modularity through the value of size a complexity of the system as well as the performance. It also shows the effectiveness of the Salisbury methodology in the optimization of regenerative cycles for such an evaluation.

  8. FRA MAURO FORMATION, APOLLO 14: IV. SYNOPSIS AND SYNTHESIS OF CONSORTIUM STUDIES. D. ~ t 6 fflerl, K.D. ~obel,E.K. ~essber~er', S. ~ i n ~ n e rl, H. palme 3, B. sPettel3, .~tnde-nn2 , and H. ~ S n k e, Institut

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FRA MAURO FORMATION, APOLLO 14: IV. SYNOPSIS AND SYNTHESIS OF CONSORTIUM STUDIES. D. ~ t 6 fflerl. The aim of this paper is to discuss the results of a consortium study of Apollo 14 rocks (1, 2, 3 assumption that the Fra Muuro formation sampled by the Apollo 14 mission is part of the continuous ejecta

  9. Biotic and Abiotic Reduction and Solubilization of Pu(IV)O2•xH2O(am) as Affected by Anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) and Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plymale, Andrew E.; Bailey, Vanessa L.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Heald, Steve M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Resch, Charles T.; Moore, Dean A.; Bolton, Harvey

    2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In the presence of hydrogen (H{sub 2}), the synthetic chelating agent ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA), and the electron shuttle anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria (DMRB) Shewanella oneidensis and Geobacter sulfurreducens both reductively solubilized 100% of added 0.5 mM plutonium (IV) hydrous oxide (Pu(IV)O{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)}) in {approx}24 h at pH 7 in a non-complexing buffer. In the absence of AQDS, bioreduction was much slower ({approx}22 days) and less extensive ({approx}83-94%). In the absence of DMRB but under comparable conditions, 89% (without AQDS) to 98% (with AQDS) of added 0.5 mM PuO{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)} was reductively solubilized over 418 days. Under comparable conditions but in the absence of EDTA, <0.001% of the 0.5 mM PuO{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)} was solubilized, with or without bacteria. However, Pu(aq) increased by as much as an order of magnitude in some EDTA-free treatments, both biotic and abiotic, and increases in solubility were associated with the production of both Pu(OH)3(am) and Pu(III)(aq). Incubation with DMRB in the absence of EDTA increased the polymeric and crystalline content of the PuO{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)} and also decreased Pu solubility in 6-N HCl. Results from an in vitro assay demonstrated electron transfer to PuO{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)} from the S. oneidensis outer-membrane c-type cytochrome MtrC, and EDTA increased the oxidation of MtrC by PuO{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)}. Our results suggest that PuO{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)} biotic and abiotic reduction and solubilization may be important in anoxic, reducing environments, especially where complexing ligands and electron shuttling compounds are present.

  10. Radiative rates for E1, E2, M1, and M2 transitions in the Br-like ions Sr IV, Y V, Zr VI, Nb VII, and Mo VIII

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aggarwal, K M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energies and lifetimes are reported for the lowest 375 levels of five Br-like ions, namely Sr~IV, Y~V, Zr~VI, Nb~VII, and Mo~VIII, mostly belonging to the 4s$^2$4p$^5$, 4s$^2$4p$^4$4$\\ell$, 4s4p$^6$, 4s$^2$4p$^4$5$\\ell$, 4s$^2$4p$^3$4d$^2$, 4s4p$^5$4$\\ell$, and 4s4p$^5$5$\\ell$ configurations. Extensive configuration interaction has been included and the general-purpose relativistic atomic structure package ({\\sc grasp}) has been adopted for the calculations. Additionally, radiative rates are listed among these levels for all E1, E2, M1, and M2 transitions. From a comparison with the measurements, the majority of our energy levels are assessed to be accurate to better than 2\\%, although discrepancies between theory and experiment for a few are up to 6\\%. An accuracy assessment of the calculated radiative rates (and lifetimes) is more difficult, because no prior results exist for these ions.

  11. Carbon abundances of early B-type stars in the solar vicinity. Non-LTE line-formation for C II/III/IV and self-consistent atmospheric parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. F. Nieva; N. Przybilla

    2007-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Precise determinations of the chemical composition in early B-type stars consitute fundamental observational constraints on stellar and galactochemical evolution. Carbon is one of the most abundant metals in the Universe but analyses in early-type stars show inconclusive results, like large discrepancies between analyses of different lines in C II, a failure to establish the C II/III ionization balance and the derivation of systematically lower abundances than from other objects. We present a comprehensive and robust C II/III/IV model for non-LTE line-formation calculations based on carefully selected atomic data. The model is calibrated with high-S/N spectra of six apparently slow-rotating early B-type dwarfs and giants, which cover a wide parameter range and are randomly distributed in the solar neighbourhood. A self-consistent quantitative spectrum analysis is performed using an extensive iteration scheme to determine stellar atmospheric parameters and to select the appropriate atomic data used for the derivation of chemical abundances. We establish the carbon ionization balance for all sample stars based on a unique set of input atomic data, achieving consistency for all modelled lines. Highly accurate atmospheric parameters and a homogeneous carbon abundance with reduced systematic errors are derived. This results in a present-day stellar carbon abundance in the solar neighbourhood, which is in good agreement with recent determinations of the solar value and with the gas-phase abundance of the Orion H II region. The homogeneous present-day carbon abundance also conforms with predictions of chemical-evolution models for the Galaxy. The present approach allows us to constrain the effects of systematic errors on fundamental parameters and abundances. (abridged)

  12. Procurement Specialist IV | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (BOA). Incorporate appropriate terms and conditions e.g. Davis-Bacon Act and Service Contract Act. Implement formal bidding process and other procurement tool as required....

  13. Page 1 of 1 IV. Procedures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    earned on a fixed-price/fee-for-service contract to a departmental or center sponsored program residual in the same proportion as their aggregate F&A recoveries were distributed for the fixed-price/fee-for-service contract. Before the account is extended or funds transferred, the residual balance will be used to cover

  14. Texas Rice, Volume IV, Number 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ..........................................................3 Warming Climate Reduces Yields .....................................5 Beaumont Center Website Access ......................................6 Educator in the News - Ruben Stringer ............................9 Export Credit Program for Iraq.../main626471.shtml * 6 Beaumont Center Website Access What is Accessed and Who Accesses Web Information? Last month’s article on the Beaumont Center website described the site’s main features. In this ar- ticle, we present information on the website’s use, in...

  15. Volume IV, Issue 3 your connection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    research over the past 50 years have inspired improved cancer treatments and ex- plained the benefits in a symposium and press briefing exploring the lat- est advances and challenges in particle therapy for cancer at the 2014 AAAS meeting: Eric Colby (U.S. Department of Energy), Jim Deye (National Cancer Institute), Hak

  16. Part IV Council on Environmental Quality

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    at http:www.gao.govproductsGAO-13- 242; see also the International Center for Technology Assessment, Natural Resources Defense Council, and Sierra Club Petition...

  17. THE EXTRAGALACTIC DISTANCE SCALE WITHOUT CEPHEIDS. IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hislop, Lachlan; Mould, Jeremy [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Vic 3010 (Australia); Schmidt, Brian; Bessell, Michael S.; Da Costa, Gary; Francis, Paul; Keller, Stefan; Tisserand, Patrick; Rapoport, Sharon; Casey, Andy, E-mail: jmould@unimelb.edu.au, E-mail: brian@mso.anu.edu.au [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra (Australia)

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cepheid period-luminosity relation is the primary distance indicator used in most determinations of the Hubble constant. The tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) is an alternative basis. Using the new Australian National University (ANU) SkyMapper Telescope, we calibrate the Tully-Fisher relation in the I band. We find that the TRGB and Cepheid distance scales are consistent.

  18. Forschungsberichte der Fakultt IV Elektrotechnik und Informatik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wichmann, Felix

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 3.1.5 SAP R/3 Model Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 3.2 Relational Database Systems for describing software system inter- faces which can be used during software or data integration processes. The report is part of the BIZYCLE project, which examines applicability of model-based methods, technologies

  19. 24d STAR FORMATION IV Protostellar Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sitko, Michael L.

    balances the force of gravity, no accretion will occur. If it exceeds gravity, a radiationally-driven wind;3 Luckily, most of these parameters do not include raised to a high power ­ i.e., they are relatively

  20. Table of Contents List of Tables iv

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Focus of the Undergraduate Academic Program 18 Assessment to Measure Success 19 Writing Enhancement Bylaws E. Promotion and Tenure Guidelines F. Assessment Plans G. Undergraduate Courses H. Graduate-study takes a more global view of our department, as called for by the new guidelines for external evaluation