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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aerodynamic diameter pm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Projected compliance with the PM2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standards. Final report  

SciTech Connect

In 1997, the State of Maryland had no available ambient Federal Reference Method data on particulate matter less than 2.5 microns in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) but did have annual ambient data for particulate matter smaller than 10 microns (PM10) at twenty-four sites. The PM10 data was analyzed in conjunction with local annual and seasonal ZIP code-level emission inventories and with speciated PM2.5 data from four nearby monitors in the IMPROVE network (located in the national parks and wilderness areas) in an effort to predict annual average and seasonal high PM2.5 concentrations at the twenty-four PM10 monitor sites operated from 1992 to 1996. All seasonal high concentrations were predicted to be below the 24-hour PM2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) at the sites operated in Maryland between 1992 and 1996. A geographic analysis of the emission inventories was also performed to evaluate the impact of PM2.5 emissions from Maryland`s power plants on fourteen monitor locations that were predicted to have a reading exceeding the annual NAAQS for any year.

Walsh, K.; Gardner, R.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

A Study of the Effect of Size on Ice Nucleation in the Aerodynamic Range of Particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of size on ice nucleation has been experimentally investigated for aerosol particles in the aerodynamic range. Aerosol particles are separated according to their aerodynamic diameter while airborne and deposited on a membrane filter ...

F. Prodi; G. Santachiara; V. Prodi

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

LL Pm  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

LL LL Pm ' F II c iJr Fa, i n m n ys m * t F t F c* F F -- ORAU 89/G-77 IL. 17- Prepared by Oak Ridge Associated Universities Prepared for Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning U.S. Department of Energy RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY AT 18 HENDERSON STREET JOLIET, ILLINOIS M. R. LANDIS Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program Energy/Environment Systems Division FINAL REPORT OCTOBER 1989 . rlly mfhct Ez of the 8pmnmtng Institutiona of Oak Ridga Asaodatd ThsoplnlonBoxpmnsdhDrDlndonotnnasn IJnm T~~m~rdnM~ofvrorks~byt~Unk~S~~ Gowmmat. N&her tha Unltd States Govsmmmrtl nor~US.~punmtatErmpy,nor8nyof~r~plqow.nw)cn~w~,orpm~orknplkd,oruruma~y~8Ii~bUby or msponslbUlty lor tlu sccumcy. complot~nass. or udutfan of my InformWon, l pparatu% product, or procow

4

Conformity or Equivalent Diameter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...7(a), at left) and two external (Fig. 7(b), at right). The equations for the equivalent diameter, DE, are given in Fig. 7 for both modes. The equivalent diameter is the size of wheel that

5

Aerodynamic interference between two Darrieus wind turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effect of aerodynamic interference on the performance of two curved bladed Darrieus-type vertical axis wind turbines has been calculated using a vortex/lifting line aerodynamic model. The turbines have a tower-to-tower separation distance of 1.5 turbine diameters, with the line of turbine centers varying with respect to the ambient wind direction. The effects of freestream turbulence were neglected. For the cases examined, the calculations showed that the downwind turbine power decrement (1) was significant only when the line of turbine centers was coincident with the ambient wind direction, (2) increased with increasing tipspeed ratio, and (3) is due more to induced flow angularities downstream than to speed deficits near the downstream turbine.

Schatzle, P.R.; Klimas, P.C.; Spahr, H.R.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

The diameter game  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. A large class of the so-called Positional Games are defined on the complete graph on n vertices. The players, Maker and Breaker, take the edges of the graph in turns, and Maker wins iff his subgraph has a given – usually monotone – property. Here we introduce the d-diameter game, which means that Maker wins iff the diameter of his subgraph is at most d. We investigate the biased version of the game; i.e., when the players may take more than one, and not necessarily the same number of edges, in a turn. The 2-diameter game has the property that Breaker wins the game in which each player chooses one edge per turn, but Maker wins as long as he is permitted to choose 2 edges in each turn whereas Breaker can choose as many as 0.25n 1/7 /(lnn) 3/7. In addition, we investigate d-diameter games for d> 1. The diameter games are strongly related to the degree games. Thus, we also provide a generalization of the fair degree game for the biased case. 1.

József Balogh; Ryan Martin; András Pluhár

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Freight Wing Trailer Aerodynamics  

SciTech Connect

Freight Wing Incorporated utilized the opportunity presented by this DOE category one Inventions and Innovations grant to successfully research, develop, test, patent, market, and sell innovative fuel and emissions saving aerodynamic attachments for the trucking industry. A great deal of past scientific research has demonstrated that streamlining box shaped semi-trailers can significantly reduce a truck's fuel consumption. However, significant design challenges have prevented past concepts from meeting industry needs. Market research early in this project revealed the demands of truck fleet operators regarding aerodynamic attachments. Products must not only save fuel, but cannot interfere with the operation of the truck, require significant maintenance, add significant weight, and must be extremely durable. Furthermore, SAE/TMC J1321 tests performed by a respected independent laboratory are necessary for large fleets to even consider purchase. Freight Wing used this information to create a system of three practical aerodynamic attachments for the front, rear and undercarriage of standard semi trailers. SAE/TMC J1321 Type II tests preformed by the Transportation Research Center (TRC) demonstrated a 7% improvement to fuel economy with all three products. If Freight Wing is successful in its continued efforts to gain market penetration, the energy and environmental savings would be considerable. Each truck outfitted saves approximately 1,100 gallons of fuel every 100,000 miles, which prevents over 12 tons of CO2 from entering the atmosphere. If all applicable trailers used the technology, the country could save approximately 1.8 billion gallons of diesel fuel, 18 million tons of emissions and 3.6 billion dollars annually.

Graham, Sean (Primary Investigator); Bigatel, Patrick

2004-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

8

Double diameter boring tool  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A boring tool and a method of operation are provided for boring two concentric holes of precision diameters and depths in a single operation. The boring tool includes an elongated tool body, a shank for attachment to a standard adjustable boring head which is used on a manual or numerical control milling machine and first and second diametrically opposed cutting edges formed for cutting in opposite directions. The diameter of the elongated tool body is substantially equal to the distance from the first cutting edge tip to the axis of rotation plus the distance from the second cutting edge tip to the axis of rotation. The axis of rotation of the tool is spaced from the tool centerline a distance substantially equal to one-half the distance from the second cutting edge tip to the axis of rotation minus one-half the distance from the first cutting edge tip to the axis of rotation. The method includes the step of inserting the boring tool into the boring head, adjusting the distance between the tool centerline and the tool axis of rotation as described above and boring the two concentric holes.

Ashbaugh, Fred N. (Belton, MO); Murry, Kenneth R. (Odessa, MO)

1988-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

9

Double diameter boring tool  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A boring tool and a method of operation are provided for boring two concentric holes of precision diameters and depths in a single operation. The boring tool includes an elongated tool body, a shank for attachment to a standard adjustable boring head which is used on a manual or numerical control milling machine and first and second diametrically opposed cutting flutes formed for cutting in opposite directions. The diameter of the elongated tool body is substantially equal to the distance from the first flute tip to the axis of rotation plus the distance from the second flute tip to the axis of rotation. The axis of rotation of the tool is spaced from the tool centerline a distance substantially equal to one-half the distance from the second flute tip to the axis of rotation minus one-half the distance from the first flute tip to the axis of rotation. The method includes the step of inserting the boring tool into the boring head, adjusting the distance between the tool centerline and the tool axis of rotation as described above and boring the two concentric holes.

Ashbaugh, F.A.; Murry, K.R.

1986-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

10

Aerodynamic Contrails: Phenomenology and Flow Physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerodynamic contrails have been recognized for a long time although they appear sporadically. Usually one observes them under humid conditions near the ground, where they are short-lived phenomena. Aerodynamic contrails appear also at cruise ...

K. Gierens; B. Kärcher; H. Mannstein; B. Mayer

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

diameter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 11013S, Per Gage (over 50 mm), At Cost. 11014S, Roundness trace, price per trace, 209. ... 11021C, Single Wire, price per wire, 112. ...

2013-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

12

Aerodynamic size associations of natural radioactivity with ambient aerosols  

SciTech Connect

The aerodynamic size of /sup 214/Pb, /sup 212/Pb, /sup 210/Pb, /sup 7/Be, /sup 32/P, /sup 35/S (as SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/), and stable SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ was measured using cascade impactors. The activity distribution of /sup 212/Pb and /sup 214/Pb, measured by alpha spectroscopy, was largely associated with aerosols smaller than 0.52 ..mu..m. Based on 46 measurements, the activity median aerodynamic diameter of /sup 212/Pb averaged 0.13 ..mu..m (sigma/sub g/ = 2.97), while /sup 214/Pb averaged 0.16 ..mu..m (sigma/sub g/ = 2.86). The larger median size of /sup 214/Pb was attributed to ..cap alpha..-recoil depletion of smaller aerosols following decay of aerosol-associated /sup 218/Po. Subsequent /sup 214/Pb condensation on all aerosols effectively enriches larger aerosols. /sup 212/Pb does not undergo this recoil-driven redistribution. Low-pressure impactor measurements indicated that the mass median aerodynamic diameter of SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ was about three times larger than the activity median diameter /sup 212/Pb, reflecting differences in atmospheric residence times as well as the differences in surface area and volume distributions of the atmospheric aerosol. Cosmogenic radionuclides, especially /sup 7/Be, were associated with smaller aerosols than SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ regardless of season, while /sup 210/Pb distributions in summer measurements were similar to sulfate but smaller in winter measurements. Even considering recoil following /sup 214/Po ..cap alpha..-decay, the avervage /sup 210/Pb labeled aerosol grows by about a factor of two during its atmospheric lifetime. The presence of 5 to 10% of the /sup 7/Be on aerosols greater than 1 ..mu..m was indicative of post-condensation growth, probably either in the upper atmosphere or after mixing into the boundary layer.

Bondietti, E.A.; Papastefanou, C.; Rangarajan, C.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

P/M Superalloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 24   Aerospace applications of P/M superalloys...turbine vanes Selected engines � � X Stellite 31 Turbine blade dampers TF 30-P100 USAF F-111F X � Inconel MA-6000E Turbine blades TFE 731 � � X Source: Ref 41...

14

P/M Superalloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 24   Aerospace applications of P/M superalloys...turbine vanes Selected engines � � X Stellite 31 Turbine blade dampers TF30-P100 USAF F-111F X � Inconel MA-6000E Turbine blades TFE 731 � � X Source: Ref 41...

15

Sunsets and solar diameter measurement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A sunset over the sea surface offers the possibility to chronometrate a solar transit across the horizon. The vertical solar diameter is proportional to the duration of the sunset, the cosine of the azimuth and the cosine of the latitude of the observing site. The same formula applies to every circle of equal height, called in arabic almucantarat, and it is exploited in the measurements of the solar diameter made with the Danjon's solar astrolabes. The analogies between sunsets and astrolabes observations are presented, showing advantages and sources of errors of these methods of solar astrometry.

Sigismondi, Costantino

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Diameter-constrained steiner tree  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given an edge-weighted undirected graph G = (V, E, c, w), where each edge e ? E has a cost c(e) and a weight w(e), a set S ? V of terminals and a positive constant D0, ... Keywords: diameter-constrained steiner tree, fixed topology, fully polynomial time approximation scheme

Wei Ding; Guohui Lin; Guoliang Xue

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Aerodynamic Losses and Heat Transfer in a Blade Cascade with...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerodynamic Losses and Heat Transfer in a Aerodynamic Losses and Heat Transfer in a Blade Cascade with 3 Blade Cascade with 3 - - D D Endwall Endwall Contouring Contouring...

18

Aerodynamic Drag and Gyroscopic Stability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the effects on aerodynamic drag of rifle bullets as the gyroscopic stability is lowered from 1.3 to 1.0. It is well known that a bullet can tumble for stability less than 1.0. The Sierra Loading Manuals (4th and 5th Editions) have previously reported that ballistic coefficient decreases significantly as gyroscopic stability, Sg, is lowered below 1.3. These observations are further confirmed by the experiments reported here. Measured ballistic coefficients were compared with gyroscopic stabilities computed using the Miller Twist Rule for nearly solid metal bullets with uniform density and computed using the Courtney-Miller formula for plastic-tipped bullets. The experiments reported here also demonstrate a decrease in aerodynamic drag near Sg = 1.23 +/- 0.02. It is hypothesized that this decrease in drag over a narrow band of Sg values is due to a rapid damping of coning motions (precession and nutation). Observation of this drag decrease at a consistent value of Sg demonstrates the relative accuracy of the twist formulas used to compute Sg. The relationship between Sg and drag may be used to test the applicability of existing twist formulas to given bullet designs and to evaluate the accuracy of alternate formulas in cases where the existing twist formulas are not as accurate.

Elya R. Courtney; Michael W. Courtney

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

19

High voltage variable diameter insulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high voltage feedthrough assembly (10) having a tubular insulator (15) extending between the ground plane ring (16) and the high voltage ring (30). The insulator (15) is made of Pyrex and decreases in diameter from the ground plane ring (16) to the high voltage ring (30), producing equipotential lines almost perpendicular to the wall (27) of the insulator (15) to optimize the voltage-holding capability of the feedthrough assembly (10).

Vanecek, David L. (Martinez, CA); Pike, Chester D. (Pinole, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Free-air performance tests of a 5-metre-diameter Darrieus turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A five-meter-diameter vertical-axis wind turbine has been tested at the Sandia Laboratories Wind Turbine Site. The results of these tests and some of the problems associated with free-air testing of wind turbines are presented. The performance data obtained follow the general trend of data obtained in extensive wind tunnel tests of a 2-meter-diameter turbine. However, the power coefficient data are slightly lower than anticipated. The reasons for this discrepancy are explored along with comparisons between experimental data and a computerized aerodynamic prediction model.

Sheldahl, R.E.; Blackwell, B.F.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aerodynamic diameter pm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Aerodynamic Contrails: Microphysics and Optical Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerodynamic contrails form when air flows across the wings of subsonic aircraft in cruise. During a short adiabatic expansion phase, high supersaturations trigger burstlike homogeneous ice formation on ambient liquid aerosol particles within a ...

B. Kärcher; B. Mayer; K. Gierens; U. Burkhardt; H. Mannstein; R. Chatterjee

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

16.100 Aerodynamics, Fall 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This course extends fluid mechanic concepts from Unified Engineering to the aerodynamic performance of wings and bodies in sub/supersonic regimes. 16.100 generally has four components: subsonic potential flows, including ...

Darmofal, David L.

23

Mechanisms for Diameter service performance enhancement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the basic requirements of service providers is to deliver fast processing, highly available, scalable, redundant and unobtrusive AAA services. In this paper we present incorporation of Diameter service into a legacy switching system. Our approach ... Keywords: diameter protocol, diameter relay agent, load balancing

D. Matijaševic; I. Gizdic; D. Huljenic

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

The Influence of Meteorological Conditions and Atmospheric Circulation Types on PM10 and Visibility in Tel Aviv  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 3-yr dataset (February 2000–November 2002) of 30-min averages for particulates, visibility, and meteorological data were analyzed to examine the dependence of particulate matter of less than 10 ?m in diameter (PM10) mass concentrations and ...

Uri Dayan; Ilan Levy

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Aerodynamic particle size measurement by laser--Doppler velocimetry. Publication number 343  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method of measuring the aerodynamic diameter of aerosol particles was investigated. The method consists of accelerating particles in a coverging nozzle and measuring their velocities near the exit of th nozzle with a laser--Doppler velocimeter. The experimental studies utilized a test nozzle with a converging angle of approximately 15/sup 0/ and an exit diameter of about .1 cm. The pressure drop across the nozzle was varied from 2.54 to 276 cm of H/sub 2/O, and particle velocity was observed to vary from approximately 0.5 to 1.0 times the gas velocity at the exit of the nozzle. A theoretical analysis utilized boundary layer theory to predict the velocity of the gas in the nozzle, and then the equations of particle motion were integrated to give the theoretical particle velocities. These values agreed with the experimental values to within a few percent. The effects of nozzle geometry, flow rate, particle density, and particle size were studied using the results of calculations made with dimensionless equations. The velocity of a particle in a given nozzle and flow depends upon the aerodynamic diameter of the particle and the particle density. The geometry and flow can be chosen to minimize the effect of particle density. Assuming that the density of particles in the atmosphere ranges from 1 g/cm/sup 3/ to 3 g/cm/sup 3/, the aerodynamic diameter of particles can be measured with an uncertainty of +- 10% in the size range from .5 ..mu..m to 10 ..mu..m.

Wilson, J.C.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Freight Wing Trailer Aerodynamics Final Technical Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Freight Wing Incorporated utilized the opportunity presented by a DOE category two Inventions and Innovations grant to commercialize and improve upon aerodynamic technology for semi-tuck trailers, capable of decreasing heavy vehicle fuel consumption, related environmental damage, and U.S. consumption of foreign oil. Major project goals included the demonstration of aerodynamic trailer technology in trucking fleet operations, and the development and testing of second generation products. A great deal of past scientific research has demonstrated that streamlining box shaped semi-trailers can significantly reduce a truck’s fuel consumption. However, significant design challenges have prevented past concepts from meeting industry needs. Freight Wing utilized a 2003 category one Inventions and Innovations grant to develop practical solutions to trailer aerodynamics. Fairings developed for the front, rear, and bottom of standard semi-trailers together demonstrated a 7% improvement to fuel economy in scientific tests conducted by the Transportation Research Center (TRC). Operational tests with major trucking fleets proved the functionality of the products, which were subsequently brought to market. This category two grant enabled Freight Wing to further develop, test and commercialize its products, resulting in greatly increased understanding and acceptance of aerodynamic trailer technology. Commercialization was stimulated by offering trucking fleets 50% cost sharing on trial implementations of Freight Wing products for testing and evaluation purposes. Over 230 fairings were implemented through the program with 35 trucking fleets including industry leaders such as Wal-Mart, Frito Lay and Whole Foods. The feedback from these testing partnerships was quite positive with product performance exceeding fleet expectations in many cases. Fleet feedback also was also valuable from a product development standpoint and assisted the design of several second generation products intended to further improve efficiency, lower costs, and enhance durability. Resulting products demonstrated a 30% efficiency improvement in full scale wind tunnel tests. The fuel savings of our most promising product, the “Belly Fairing” increased from 4% to 6% in scientific track and operational tests. The project successfully demonstrated the economic feasibility of trailer aerodynamics and positioned the technology to realize significant public benefits. Scientific testing conducted with partners such as the EPA Smartway program and Transport Canada clearly validated the fuel and emission saving potential of the technology. The Smartway program now recommends trailer aerodynamics as a certified fuel saving technology and is offering incentives such as low interest loans. Trailer aerodynamics can save average trucks over 1,100 gallons of fuel an 13 tons of emissions every 100,000 miles, a distance many trucks travel annually. These fuel savings produce a product return on investment period of one to two years in average fleet operations. The economic feasibility of the products was validated by participating fleets, several of which have since completed large implementations or demonstrated an interest in volume orders. The commercialization potential of the technology was also demonstrated, resulting in a national distribution and manufacturing partnership with a major industry supplier, Carrier Transicold. Consequently, Freight Wing is well positioned to continue marketing trailer aerodynamics to the trucking industry. The participation of leading fleets in this project served to break down the market skepticism that represents a primary barrier to widespread industry utilization. The benefits of widespread utilization of the technology could be quite significant for both the transportation industry and the public. Trailer aerodynamics could potentially save the U.S. trucking fleet over a billion gallons of fuel and 20 million tons of emissions annually.

Sean Graham

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

27

PM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RD RD Start Finish PBS030_1.4.1 ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION PROJECT - VL-NV-00 2807 10-02-06 A 07-03-18 PBS030_1.4.1.1 SOILS 2807 10-01-07 07-03-18 PBS030_1.4.1.1.03 CAU 413 CLEAN SLATE II PLUTONIUM DISPERSION (TTR) 2807 10-01-07 07-03-18 PBS030_1.4.1.1.03.09 PROJECT MANAGEMENT 2807 10-01-07 07-03-18 Project Management 2807 10-01-07* 07-03-18 PBS030_1.4.1.1.06 CAU 366 AREA 11 PLUTONIUM VALLEY UNIT SAFETY SHO 476 12-01-10 09-26-12 PBS030_1.4.1.1.06.01 CORRECTIVE ACTION INVESTIGATION PLAN (CAIP) 185 12-01-10 08-16-11 Corrective Action Investigation Plan 185 12-01-10* 08-16-11 PBS030_1.4.1.1.06.02 CADD/CR 426 02-09-11 09-26-12 CADD/CR 426 02-09-11 09-26-12 CADD/CR to State 0 09-26-12 PBS030_1.4.1.1.07 CAU 365 AREA 5 GMX UNIT SAFETY SHOTS 526 11-02-09 11-07-11 PBS030_1.4.1.1.07.01 CORRECTIVE ACTION INVESTIGATION PLAN (CAIP)

28

PM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Bldgs, Phase 1 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Calendar YearQuarter Layout: CP - ConstrDemo Phase...

29

PM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assembly & Shipment 03-May-13 04-Feb-14 187.5 3100 50175 Insulate Install Heat Shield 03-May-13 07-May-13 3.0 3110 50175 Install in Cryostat 08-May-13 09-May-13 2.0 3112...

30

P/M Stainless Steels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 12   Applications for P/M stainless steels...Seatback tray slides 316L Galley latches 316L Jet fuel refueling impellers 316L Foam generators 316L Agriculture Fungicide spray equipment 316L Appliances Automatic dishwasher components 304L Automatic washer components 304L Garbage disposal components 410L Pot handles 316L Coffee filters 316L-Si...

31

Indigenous development and performance evaluation of BARC aerodynamic size separator (BASS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commercially available cascade impactors, commonly used for aerodynamic size separation of aerosol particles, are based on the principle of inertial impaction. As of now, these instruments are imported at a cost of several lakhs of rupees; hence an effort has been made to develop an aerodynamic particle sizer indigenously in BARC. This unit, referred to as BARC Aerodynamic Size Separator (BASS), separates aerosols into seven size classes ranging from 0.53 mu m to 10 mu m and operates at a flow rate of 45 Ipm. Intercomparison studies between the standard Andersen Mark-II (Grasbey Andersen Inc.) impactor and BASS using nebulizer generated aerosols have consistently shown excellent performance by BASS in all respects. In particular, BASS yielded the parameters of polydisperse aerosols quite accurately. Experiments to evaluate the individual stage cut-off diameters show that these are within 8% of their designed value for all stages except the higher two stages which indicate about 30% lower values than the desig...

Singh, S; Khan, A; Mayya, Y S; Narayanan, K P; Purwar, R C; Sapra, B K; Sunny, F

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Fireball yield from fractional intensity diameters  

SciTech Connect

It is desired to develop an empirical formula of the type Y=KD[sup n] where Y is the yield in kilotons and D is the `effective diameter` in feet corrected for temperature and pressure variations if necessary.

Gellert, E. R.

1963-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

33

Precision wire feeder for small diameter wire  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for feeding small diameter wire having a diameter less than 0.04 mm (16 mil) to a welding station includes a driving wheel for controllably applying a non-deforming driving force to the wire to move the free end of the wire towards the welding station; and a tension device such as a torque motor for constantly applying a reverse force to the wire in opposition to the driving force to keep the wire taut. 1 figure.

Brandon, E.D.; Hooper, F.M.; Reichenbach, M.L.

1992-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

34

Precision wire feeder for small diameter wire  

SciTech Connect

A device for feeding small diameter wire having a diameter less than 0.04 mm (16 mil) to a welding station includes a driving wheel for controllably applying a non-deforming driving force to the wire to move the free end of the wire towards the welding station; and a tension device such as a torque motor for constantly applying a reverse force to the wire in opposition to the driving force to keep the wire taut.

Brandon, Eldon D. (Albuquerque, NM); Hooper, Frederick M. (Albuquerque, NM); Reichenbach, Marvin L. (Albuquerque, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Isolating the Industrial Contribution of PM2.5 in Hamilton and Burlington, Ontario  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hourly measurements of particulate matter that is smaller than 2.5 ?m in diameter (PM2.5) have been made at air-monitoring sites in Hamilton and Burlington, Ontario, Canada, since 2003. These sites are separated by ~6 km; Burlington is right on ...

H. W. Barker

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

The Aerodynamic, Dual- Wavelength Optical Spectrometer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Determination of Real and Imaginary Refractive Indices, Diameter and Density with a Compact Instrument (A-DWOPS) * DWOPS: Two Wavelengths, Two Angles. - A. Nagy, W.W. Szymanski,...

37

Precision wire feeder for small diameter wire  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a device for feeding small diameter wire having a diameter less than .04 mm (16 mil) to a welding station which includes a driving wheel for controllably applying a non-deforming driving force to the wire to move the free end of the wire towards the welding station; and a tension device such as a torque motor for constantly applying a reverse force to the wire in opposition to the driving force to keep the wire taut. 1 fig.

Brandon, E.D.; Hooper, F.M.; Reichenbach, M.L.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

38

Corona losses dependence from the conductor diameter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents possibility to decrease the corona power losses in overhead transmission lines. Corona power losses can be reduced by increasing the diameter of the conductor and used bundled conductors per phase. The objectives were to determine ... Keywords: corona model, critical disruptive voltage, electric discharge, electric field, power losses, transmission line

Isuf Krasniqi; Vjollca Komoni; Avni Alidemaj; Gazmend Kabashi

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Ground-based measurements of solar diameter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The solar diameter changes or not? Whatever will be the answer the methods used for its measurements are more and more challenging, and facing new astrophysical and optical problems since the required space resolution is of astrometric quality. A quick overview on different methods is here presented, as well as the problem of the solar limb definition, emerging after the flash spectrum during eclipses.

Sigismondi, Costantino

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Wind Turbine Blade Flow Fields and Prospects for Active Aerodynamic Control: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes wind turbine flow fields that can cause adverse aerodynamic loading and can impact active aerodynamic control methodologies currently contemplated for wind turbine applications.

Schreck, S.; Robinson, M.

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aerodynamic diameter pm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Representative Microstructures of P/M Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...finishing and fabrication operations, such as steam blackening and joining, are also discussed. An extensive atlas of P/M microstructures

42

NETL: IEP - PM Emissions Control: Regulatory Drivers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impact of PM2.5 NAAQS Regulations Visibility (Regional Haze) Opacity Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) Primary Particulates Currently, coal-fired electric utility boilers built or...

43

Airborne Fine Particulate Matter (PM) Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for reducing the PM contribution from energy production, especially from coal fired power plants. The program was initiated in 1998 when Congress appropriated funds to the DOE...

44

CFD calculations of S809 aerodynamic characteristics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Steady-state, two-dimensional CFD calculations were made for the S809 laminar-flow, wind-turbine airfoil using the commercial code CFD-ACE. Comparisons of the computed pressure and aerodynamic coefficients were made with wind tunnel data from the Delft University 1.8 m x 1.25 m low-turbulence wind tunnel. This work highlights two areas in CFD that require further investigation and development in order to enable accurate numerical simulations of flow about current generation wind-turbine airfoils: transition prediction and turbulence modeling. The results show that the laminar-to-turbulent transition point must be modeled correctly to get accurate simulations for attached flow. Calculations also show that the standard turbulence model used in most commercial CFD codes, the k-{epsilon} model, is not appropriate at angles of attack with flow separation.

Wolfe, W.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ochs, S.S. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Methods of reducing vehicle aerodynamic drag  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A small scale model (length 1710 mm) of General Motor SUV was built and tested in the wind tunnel for expected wind conditions and road clearance. Two passive devices, rear screen which is plate behind the car and rear fairing where the end of the car is aerodynamically extended, were incorporated in the model and tested in the wind tunnel for different wind conditions. The conclusion is that rear screen could reduce drag up to 6.5% and rear fairing can reduce the drag by 26%. There were additional tests for front edging and rear vortex generators. The results for drag reduction were mixed. It should be noted that there are aesthetic and practical considerations that may allow only partial implementation of these or any drag reduction options.

Sirenko V.; Rohatgi U.

2012-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

46

Thread gauge for measuring thread pitch diameters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thread gauge which attaches to a vernier caliper to measure the thread pitch diameter of both externally threaded and internally threaded parts is disclosed. A pair of anvils are externally threaded with threads having the same pitch as those of the threaded part. Each anvil is mounted on a stem having a ball on which the anvil can rotate to properly mate with the parts to which the anvils are applied. The stems are detachably secured to the caliper blades by attachment collars having keyhole openings for receiving the stems and caliper blades. A set screw is used to secure each collar on its caliper blade. 2 figs.

Brewster, A.L.

1985-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

47

Thread gauge for measuring thread pitch diameters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thread gauge which attaches to a vernier caliper to measure the thread pitch diameter of both externally threaded and internally threaded parts. A pair of anvils are externally threaded with threads having the same pitch as those of the threaded part. Each anvil is mounted on a stem having a ball on which the anvil can rotate to properly mate with the parts to which the anvils are applied. The stems are detachably secured to the caliper blades by attachment collars having keyhole openings for receiving the stems and caliper blades. A set screw is used to secure each collar on its caliper blade.

Brewster, Albert L. (R.R. 2, Box 190A, Pleasant Hill, MO 64080)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Aerodynamic performance measurements in a counter-rotating aspirated compressor.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis is an experimental investigation of the aerodynamic performances of a counter-rotating aspirated compressor. This compressor is implemented in a blow-down facility, which gives… (more)

Onnée, Jean-François

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Ris-R-1543(EN) Aerodynamic investigation of Winglets on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an aerodynamic load such that the vortex from the winglet spreads out the influence of the tip vortex decreasing, or profile drag, of the winglet is smaller than the decrease in induced drag such that the total drag

50

Aerodynamic performance measurements in a counter-rotating aspirated compressor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is an experimental investigation of the aerodynamic performances of a counter-rotating aspirated compressor. This compressor is implemented in a blow-down facility, which gives rigorous simulation of the ...

Onnée, Jean-François

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Full-scale wind turbine rotor aerodynamics research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are conducting research to improve wind turbine technology at the NREL National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). One program, the Combined Experiment, has focused on making measurements needed to understand aerodynamic and structural responses of horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWT). A new phase of this program, the Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment, will focus on quantifying unsteady aerodynamic phenomena prevalent in stall-controlled HAWTs. Optimally twisted blades and innovative instrumentation and data acquisition systems will be used in these tests. Data can now be acquired and viewed interactively during turbine operations. This paper describes the NREL Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment and highlights planned future research activities.

Simms, D A; Butterfield, C P

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Aerodynamic optimization of a solar powered race vehicle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aerodynamic optimization was performed on Tesseract, the MIT Solar Electric Vehicle Team's 2003-2005 solar car using Wind Tunnel 8 at Jacobs/Sverdrup Drivability Test Facility in Allen Park, MI. These tests include angle ...

Augenbergs, Peteris K

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Reduced-order aerodynamic models for aeroelastic control of turbomachines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aeroelasticity is a critical consideration in the design of gas turbine engines, both for stability and forced response. Current aeroelastic models cannot provide high-fidelity aerodynamics in a form suitable for design ...

Willcox, Karen Elizabeth

54

DOE Project on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag  

SciTech Connect

Class 8 tractor-trailers consume 11-12% of the total US petroleum use. At highway speeds, 65% of the energy expenditure for a Class 8 truck is in overcoming aerodynamic drag. The project objective is to improve fuel economy of Class 8 tractor-trailers by providing guidance on methods of reducing drag by at least 25%. A 25% reduction in drag would present a 12% improvement in fuel economy at highway speeds, equivalent to about 130 midsize tanker ships per year. Specific goals include: (1) Provide guidance to industry in the reduction of aerodynamic drag of heavy truck vehicles; (2) Develop innovative drag reducing concepts that are operationally and economically sound; and (3) Establish a database of experimental, computational, and conceptual design information, and demonstrate the potential of new drag-reduction devices. The studies described herein provide a demonstration of the applicability of the experience developed in the analysis of the standard configuration of the Generic Conventional Model. The modeling practices and procedures developed in prior efforts have been applied directly to the assessment of new configurations including a variety of geometric modifications and add-on devices. Application to the low-drag 'GTS' configuration of the GCM has confirmed that the error in predicted drag coefficients increases as the relative contribution of the base drag resulting from the vehicle wake to the total drag increases and it is recommended that more advanced turbulence modeling strategies be applied under those circumstances. Application to a commercially-developed boat tail device has confirmed that this restriction does not apply to geometries where the relative contribution of the base drag to the total drag is reduced by modifying the geometry in that region. Application to a modified GCM geometry with an open grille and radiator has confirmed that the underbody flow, while important for underhood cooling, has little impact on the drag coefficient of the vehicle. Furthermore, the evaluation of the impact of small changes in radiator or grille dimensions has revealed that the total drag is not particularly sensitive to those changes. This observation leads to two significant conclusions. First, a small increase in radiator size to accommodate heat rejection needs related to new emissions restrictions may be tolerated without significant increases in drag losses. Second, efforts to reduce drag on the tractor requires that the design of the entire tractor be treated in an integrated fashion. Simply reducing the size of the grille will not provide the desired result, but the additional contouring of the vehicle as a whole which may be enabled by the smaller radiator could have a more significant effect.

McCallen, R; Salari, K; Ortega, J; Castellucci, P; Pointer, D; Browand, F; Ross, J; Storms, B

2007-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

55

Performance characteristics of PM??? samplers in the presence of agricultural dusts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The EPA revised the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) in 1997 to include a standard for fine particulates (PM???), and was unanimously upheld by the US Supreme Court in February of 2001. The long-term standard was set at 15 mg/scm, and the short-term standard was set at 65 mg/scm. A PM??? sampler was developed for the Federal Reference Method shortly after the revision of the NAAQS, and was mandated "by design" rather than "by performance," due to the limited available performance data. Methods for determining PM??? concentrations in the ambient air are designated as either reference or equivalent methods. Accuracy of the subject method is determined by collocating the subject method with a FRM sampler in an urban environment. However, these samplers are not tested in the presence of agriculture dusts, which have a larger mass median diameter (MMD) than urban dusts. This research addressed the performance characteristics of PM??? samplers in the presence of agricultural dusts. Tests in a controlled laboratory environment were performed on three PM??? samplers: a FRM sampler with Wells Impactor Ninety-Six, a FRM sampler with Sharp-Cut Cyclone, and a High-Volume PM??? Sampler. Three dusts were used for sampling: alumina, corn starch, and wheat flour. Ten replications were performed for each sampler in each dust for a total of ninety replications. Performance characteristics, by way of fractional efficiency curves, could not be determined for all of the samplers. The cut-point and slope for the FRM sampler with WINS were found to be 1.95 ± 0.10 [u]m and 1.31 ± 0.04, respectively. Concentration measurements for the test samplers were compared to the "true" PM??? concentrations, determined by multiplying the fraction less than 10 [u]m from the Coulter Counter PSD times the TSP concentration. The results showed the percent error of the PM??? samplers increased with the MMD of the dust sampled. The hypothesis was that the PM??? samplers used to monitor PM??? concentrations in the ambient air will not accurately perform in an agricultural environment. It was concluded that the use of these PM??? samplers would result in unfair regulation of the agricultural industry.

Pargmann, Amber Rae

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

W-band Frequency Synthesis and AM/PM Noise ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... W-band Frequency Synthesis and AM/PM Noise Measurement System. ... Dual-channel W-band AM/PM noise measurement system. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

57

Investigation of aerodynamic braking devices for wind turbine applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the selection and preliminary design of a new aerodynamic braking system for use on the stall-regulated AWT-26/27 wind turbines. The goal was to identify and design a configuration that offered improvements over the existing tip brake used by Advanced Wind Turbines, Inc. (AWT). Although the design objectives and approach of this report are specific to aerodynamic braking of AWT-26/27 turbines, many of the issues addressed in this work are applicable to a wider class of turbines. The performance trends and design choices presented in this report should be of general use to wind turbine designers who are considering alternative aerodynamic braking methods. A literature search was combined with preliminary work on device sizing, loads and mechanical design. Candidate configurations were assessed on their potential for benefits in the areas of cost, weight, aerodynamic noise, reliability and performance under icing conditions. As a result, two configurations were identified for further study: the {open_quotes}spoiler-flap{close_quotes} and the {open_quotes}flip-tip.{close_quotes} Wind tunnel experiments were conducted at Wichita State University to evaluate the performance of the candidate aerodynamic brakes on an airfoil section representative of the AWT-26/27 blades. The wind tunnel data were used to predict the braking effectiveness and deployment characteristics of the candidate devices for a wide range of design parameters. The evaluation was iterative, with mechanical design and structural analysis being conducted in parallel with the braking performance studies. The preliminary estimate of the spoiler-flap system cost was $150 less than the production AWT-26/27 tip vanes. This represents a reduction of approximately 5 % in the cost of the aerodynamic braking system. In view of the preliminary nature of the design, it would be prudent to plan for contingencies in both cost and weight.

Griffin, D.A. [R. Lynette & Associates, Seattle, WA (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Four-stage computational technology with adaptive numerical methods for computational aerodynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Computational aerodynamics is a key technology in aircraft design which is ahead of physical experiment and complements it. Of course all three components of computational modeling are actively developed: mathematical models of real aerodynamic processes

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

ACARS Aerodynamic (Research Incorporated) Communication and Recording System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ix ix Acrononyms and Abbreviations Acronyms and Abbreviations ACARS Aerodynamic (Research Incorporated) Communication and Recording System ACSYS Arctic Climate System Study AER Atmospheric Environmental Research, Inc. AERI Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer AFOSR Air Force Office of Scientific Research AGARD Advisory Group for Aerospace Research and Development ALFA AER Local Forecast and Assimilation (model) AMIP Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project ARCS Atmosphere Radiation and Cloud Stations ARCSS Arctic System Science (NSF) ARCSYM Arctic Regional Climate System Model ARINC Aerodynamic Research Incorporated Communication ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program AS anvil stratus ASTER Atmosphere-Surface Turbulent Exchange Research ASTEX Altantic Stratocumulus Transition EXperiment

60

Applications of P/M Structural Parts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 16   Automotive applications for P/M parts...Exhaust flanges EGR base plate HEGOS bosses HVAC Air conditioner compressor clutch hub Air conditioner compressor swash plate Interior fittings Lock parts (striking plate/latch) Rearview mirror mounts Pinion gears (door windows) Seat safety belt locks Speedometer gear Airbag hardware Seat...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aerodynamic diameter pm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Modeling Reluctance-Assisted PM Motors  

SciTech Connect

This report contains a derivation of the fundamental equations used to calculate the base speed, torque delivery, and power output of a reluctance-assisted PM motor which has a saliency ratio greater than 1 as a function of its terminal voltage, current, voltage-phase angle, and current-phase angle. The equations are applied to model Motor X using symbolically-oriented methods with the computer tool Mathematica to determine: (1) the values of current-phase angle and voltage-phase angle that are uniquely determined once a base speed has been selected; (2) the attainable current in the voltage-limited region above base speed as a function of terminal voltage, speed, and current-phase angle; (3) the attainable current in the voltage-limited region above base speed as a function of terminal voltage, speed, and voltage-phase angle; (4) the maximum-power output in the voltage-limited region above base speed as a function of speed; (5) the optimal voltage-phase angle in the voltage-limited region above base speed required to obtain maximum-power output; (6) the maximum-power speed curve which was linear from rest to base speed in the current limited region below base speed; (7) the current angle as a function of saliency ratio in the current-limited region below base speed; and (8) the torque as a function of saliency ratio which is almost linear in the current-limited region below base speed. The equations were applied to model Motor X using numerically-oriented methods with the computer tool LabVIEW. The equations were solved iteratively to find optimal current and voltage angles that yield maximum power and maximum efficiency from rest through the current-limited region to base speed and then through the voltage-limited region to high-rotational speeds. Currents, voltages, and reluctance factors were all calculated and external loops were employed to perform additional optimization with respect to PM pitch angle (magnet fraction) and with respect to magnet strength. The conclusion was that the optimal-magnet fraction for Motor X is 0.72 which corresponds to a PM pitch angle of 130{sup o}, a value close to the maximum-saliency ratio in a plot of saliency ratio versus PM pitch angle. Further, the strength of Motor X magnets may be lowered to 80% of full strength without significantly impacting motor performance for PM pitch angles between the peak saliency (130{sup o}) and peak-characteristic current (160{sup o}). It is recommended that future research involve maximizing a driving-cycle-weighted efficiency based on the Federal Urban Driving Cycle and the Federal Highway Driving Cycle as criteria for selecting the final optimal-PM fraction and magnet strength for this inset PM motor. Results of this study indicate that the reduction in PM torque due to reduced-magnet fraction will be more than compensated by the reluctance torque resulting from the higher saliency ratio. It seems likely that the best overall performance will require saliency; consequently, we think the best motor will be a reluctance-assisted PM motor. This should be explored for use with other types of PM motors, such as fractional-slot motors with concentrated windings.

Otaduy, P.J.

2006-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

62

Aerodynamic performance measurements of a film-cooled turbine stage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of this research is to measure the aerodynamic performance of a film-cooled turbine stage and to quantify the loss caused by film-cooling. A secondary goal of the research is to provide a detailed breakdown of the ...

Keogh, Rory (Rory Colm), 1968-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Plasma Aerodynamic Control Effectors for Improved Wind Turbine Performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Orbital Research Inc is developing an innovative Plasma Aerodynamic Control Effectors (PACE) technology for improved performance of wind turbines. The PACE system is aimed towards the design of "smart" rotor blades to enhance energy capture and reduce aerodynamic loading and noise using flow-control. The PACE system will provide ability to change aerodynamic loads and pitch distribution across the wind turbine blade without any moving surfaces. Additional benefits of the PACE system include reduced blade structure weight and complexity that should translate into a substantially reduced initial cost. During the Phase I program, the ORI-UND Team demonstrated (proof-of-concept) performance improvements on select rotor blade designs using PACE concepts. Control of both 2-D and 3-D flows were demonstrated. An analytical study was conducted to estimate control requirements for the PACE system to maintain control during wind gusts. Finally, independent laboratory experiments were conducted to identify promising dielectric materials for the plasma actuator, and to examine environmental effects (water and dust) on the plasma actuator operation. The proposed PACE system will be capable of capturing additional energy, and reducing aerodynamic loading and noise on wind turbines. Supplementary benefits from the PACE system include reduced blade structure weight and complexity that translates into reduced initial capital costs.

Mehul P. Patel; Srikanth Vasudevan; Robert C. Nelson; Thomas C. Corke

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Performance Comparison of Large Diameter Residential Drinking Water Wells.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Published scientific work indicates that residential large diameter drinking water wells are at a higher risk of contamination from surface water impacts than drilled wells.… (more)

Javor, Paul

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Pin diameter optimization in 1200 MWe heterogeneous vs. homogeneous LMFBRs  

SciTech Connect

LMFBRs with internal blankets (heterogeneous reactors) are known for reducing the sodium void reactivity and increasing the breeding ratio. As for homogeneous reactors, the optimization of the fuel pin diameter for heterogeneous reactors is of great interest. The optimum pin diameter is obtained by changing the fuel pin diameter until the homogenized fuel volume fraction is the same as the optimum fuel volume fraction of the homogeneous core. The optimization of the fuel pin diameter with respect to doubling time for a loosely coupled 1200 MWe oxide heterogeneous reactor is described. The results are compared with those of a homogeneous reactor.

Orechwa, Y.; Turski, R.B.; King, M.J.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Evaluating the Corrosion Resistance of P/M Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 2   Procedure used to clean P/M specimens after acid exposure testing...pores of the P/M samples with distilled water

67

An Aerodynamic Design Technique For Optimizing Fan Blade Spacing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTRODUCTION Aerodynamic shape optimization involves designing the most efficient shapes of bodies that move through fluids. An optimization algorithm perturbs the shape of an airfoil until it finds the shape which best exhibits a given design objective. For an inverse design technique, this objective is a prescribed aerodynamic distribution, usually the surface pressure distribution. Liebeck pressure distributions [1], for example, have been demonstrated to generate airfoils with high lift to drag ratios. When designing fans, consideration must be given not only to the shape of the fan blades, but also to the distance separating the fan blades. This spacing is defined by the pitch/chord ratio t/l, where the pitch, t, is the distance between fan blades, and the chord, l, is the length of each fan blade. In this work, an inverse algorithm is developed, then used to design fan blade shapes and to find the optimal blade spacing.

T. Rogalsky; R.W. Derksen; Rt N; Rt N; S. Kocabiyik

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Predicting aerodynamic characteristic of typical wind turbine airfoils using CFD  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An investigation was conducted into the capabilities and accuracy of a representative computational fluid dynamics code to predict the flow field and aerodynamic characteristics of typical wind-turbine airfoils. Comparisons of the computed pressure and aerodynamic coefficients were made with wind tunnel data. This work highlights two areas in CFD that require further investigation and development in order to enable accurate numerical simulations of flow about current generation wind-turbine airfoils: transition prediction and turbulence modeling. The results show that the laminar-to turbulent transition point must be modeled correctly to get accurate simulations for attached flow. Calculations also show that the standard turbulence model used in most commercial CFD codes, the k-e model, is not appropriate at angles of attack with flow separation. 14 refs., 28 figs., 4 tabs.

Wolfe, W.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ochs, S.S. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). Aerospace Engineering Dept.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Assessing Meteorological Variable and Process Relationships to Modeled PM2.5 Ammonium Nitrate and Ammonium Sulfate in the Central United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many counties are required to submit an emissions control plan to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to reduce concentrations of particulate matter of less than 2.5 ?m in diameter (PM2.5), which are dominated by ammonium sulfate and ...

Kirk Baker; Peter Scheff

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

PM2.5-Sampling and Analysis at NETL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PM PM 2.5 Sampling and Analysis at NETL United States Department of Energy - National Energy Technology Laboratory PM2.5rra, ST-10, 03/29/00 Why Is DOE Concerned About PM 2.5 ? * Coal-based power systems emit both primary fine particles and PM 2.5 precursors (SO 2 and NO x ) * PM 2.5 NAAQS require compliance determinations * Non-compliance will likely trigger emissions control strategies * What is the relationship between coal-fired boiler emissions and ambient PM 2.5 ? PM2.5rra, ST-10, 03/29/00 Eastern PM 2.5 Mass Apportionment - Current Understanding? 46.8% 1.1% 20.9% 3.9% 23.0% 4.3% Sulfate Nitrate Organic C Elemental C Unknown Minerals Source: EPA, April 1995 PM2.5rra, ST-10, 03/29/00 The NETL OST PM 2.5 research program has these specific research goals and objectives for FY2000: * Provide insight into the degree to which the local coal-fired electric

71

On the Median Volume Diameter Approximation for Droplet Collision Efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this note, we examine a shortcut for calculating the overall collision efficiency of a droplet spectrum, known as the “median volume diameter” (mvd) approximation. By calculating the overall collision efficiency of a circular cylinder for a ...

Karen J. Finstad; Edward P. Lozowski; Lasse Makkonen

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Eddy sensors for small diameter stainless steel tubes.  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project was to develop non-destructive, minimally disruptive eddy sensors to inspect small diameter stainless steel metal tubes. Modifications to Sandia's Emphasis/EIGER code allowed for the modeling of eddy current bobbin sensors near or around 1/8-inch outer diameter stainless steel tubing. Modeling results indicated that an eddy sensor based on a single axial coil could effectively detect changes in the inner diameter of a stainless steel tubing. Based on the modeling results, sensor coils capable of detecting small changes in the inner diameter of a stainless steel tube were designed, built and tested. The observed sensor response agreed with the results of the modeling and with eddy sensor theory. A separate limited distribution SAND report is being issued demonstrating the application of this sensor.

Skinner, Jack L.; Morales, Alfredo Martin; Grant, J. Brian; Korellis, Henry James; LaFord, Marianne Elizabeth; Van Blarigan, Benjamin; Andersen, Lisa E.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Parameterization of the Sedimentation of Raindrops with Finite Maximum Diameter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In common cloud microphysics parameterization models, the prognostic variables are one to three moments of the drop size distribution function. They are defined as integrals of the distribution function over a drop diameter ranging from zero to ...

Corinna Ziemer; Ulrike Wacker

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Maximal r-Diameter Sets and Solids of Constant Width  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We recall the definition of an r-maximal set in a metric space as a maximal subset of diameter r. In the special case when the metric space is Euclidean such a set is exactly a solid of constant diameter r. In the process of reviewing the theory of these objects we provide a simple construction which generates a large class of such solids.

Ethan Akin

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

75

IEA Wind Annex XX: HAWT Aerodynamics and Models from Wind Tunnel Measurements; Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work characterizes undocumented physical relationships that govern aerodynamic force time variations that take place in connection with rotational augmentation on rotating wind turbine blades.

Schreck, S.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Real Time Flux Control in PM Motors  

SciTech Connect

Significant research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center (PEEMRC) is being conducted to develop ways to increase (1) torque, (2) speed range, and (3) efficiency of traction electric motors for hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) within existing current and voltage bounds. Current is limited by the inverter semiconductor devices' capability and voltage is limited by the stator wire insulation's ability to withstand the maximum back-electromotive force (emf), which occurs at the upper end of the speed range. One research track has been to explore ways to control the path and magnitude of magnetic flux while the motor is operating. The phrase, real time flux control (RTFC), refers to this mode of operation in which system parameters are changed while the motor is operating to improve its performance and speed range. RTFC has potential to meet an increased torque demand by introducing additional flux through the main air gap from an external source. It can augment the speed range by diverting flux away from the main air gap to reduce back-emf at high speeds. Conventional RTFC technology is known as vector control [1]. Vector control decomposes the stator current into two components; one that produces torque and a second that opposes (weakens) the magnetic field generated by the rotor, thereby requiring more overall stator current and reducing the efficiency. Efficiency can be improved by selecting a RTFC method that reduces the back-emf without increasing the average current. This favors methods that use pulse currents or very low currents to achieve field weakening. Foremost in ORNL's effort to develop flux control is the work of J. S. Hsu. Early research [2,3] introduced direct control of air-gap flux in permanent magnet (PM) machines and demonstrated it with a flux-controlled generator. The configuration eliminates the problem of demagnetization because it diverts all the flux from the magnets instead of trying to oppose it. It is robust and could be particularly useful for PM generators and electric vehicle drives. Recent efforts have introduced a brushless machine that transfers a magneto-motive force (MMF) generated by a stationary excitation coil to the rotor [4]. Although a conventional PM machine may be field weakened using vector control, the air-gap flux density cannot be effectively enhanced. In Hsu's new machine, the magnetic field generated by the rotor's PM may be augmented by the field from the stationery excitation coil and channeled with flux guides to its desired destination to enhance the air-gap flux that produces torque. The magnetic field can also be weakened by reversing the current in the stationary excitation winding. A patent for advanced technology in this area is pending. Several additional RTFC methods have been discussed in open literature. These include methods of changing the number of poles by magnetizing and demagnetizing the magnets poles with pulses of current corresponding to direct-axis (d-axis) current of vector control [5,6], changing the number of stator coils [7], and controlling the air gap [8]. Test experience has shown that the magnet strengths may vary and weaken naturally as rotor temperature increases suggesting that careful control of the rotor temperature, which is no easy task, could yield another method of RTFC. The purpose of this report is to (1) examine the interaction of rotor and stator flux with regard to RTFC, (2) review and summarize the status of RTFC technology, and (3) compare and evaluate methods for RTFC with respect to maturity, advantages and limitations, deployment difficulty and relative complexity.

Otaduy, P.J.

2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

77

Atomic Resolution Imaging with a sub-50 pm Electron Probe  

SciTech Connect

Using a highly coherent focused electron probe in a 5th order aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope, we report on resolving a crystal spacing less than 50 pm. Based on the geometrical source size and residual coherent and incoherent axial lens aberrations, an electron probe is calculated, which is theoretically capable of resolving an ideal 47 pm spacing with 29percent contrast. Our experimental data show the 47 pm spacing of a Ge 114 crystal imaged with 11-18percent contrast at a 60-95percent confidence level, providing the first direct evidence for sub 50-pm resolution in ADF STEM imaging.

Erni, Rolf P.; Rossell, Marta D.; Kisielowski, Christian; Dahmen, Ulrich

2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

78

Mircoalloyed and Bar Forging Steel Symposium: Monday PM Session  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"PRECIPITATION IN MICROALLOYED HIGHER CARBON STEELS:" D. V. Edmonds, University of Leeds, School of Materials, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK. 2:00 pm

79

PM Alloy 625M for High Strength Corrosion Resistant Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mechanical properties and stress corrosion cracking data of PM 625M are presented ... However, these alloys have shown a tendency to fail by stress corrosion.

80

NETL: Health Effects - Source Contributions to PM Health Effects...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Source Contributions to PM Health Effects: DOE Office of Fossil Energy Analysis DOE's Division of Planning and Environmental Analysis, within its Office of Fossil Energy, Office of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aerodynamic diameter pm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment Phase VI: Wind Tunnel Test Configurations and Available Data Campaigns  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of the insteady aerodynamics experiment was to provide information needed to quantify the full-scale, three-dimensional aerodynamic behavior of horizontal-axis wind turbines. This report is intended to familiarize the user with the entire scope of the wind tunnel test and to support the use of the resulting data.

Hand, M. M.; Simms, D. A.; Fingersh, L. J.; Jager, D. W.; Cotrell, J. R.; Schreck, S.; Larwood, S. M.

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Study on Aerodynamic Design of Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine Generator System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the choosing principles of design parameters and multi-airfoils in horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) generator system aerodynamic design are introduced. On the basis of the comparison analysis of wind turbine aerodynamic design method ... Keywords: Schmitz, airfoil, partial load, horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT), blade tip speed ratio (BTSR)

Li Dong; Mingfu Liao; Yingfeng Li; Xiaoping Song; Ke Xu

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

25th AIAA Applied Aerodynamics Conference 25 -28 June 2007, Miami, FL AIAA 2007-4442  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

25th AIAA Applied Aerodynamics Conference 25 - 28 June 2007, Miami, FL AIAA 2007-4442 Copyright , Diego Saer3 and Ge-Cheng Zha4 University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida 33124 A flying wing personal and Aerospace Engineering A #12;25th AIAA Applied Aerodynamics Conference 25 - 28 June 2007, Miami, FL AIAA 2007

Zha, Gecheng

84

Computationally fast harmonic balance methods for unsteady aerodynamic predictions of helicopter rotors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A harmonic balance technique for the analysis of unsteady flows about helicopter rotors in forward flight and hover is presented in this paper. The aerodynamics of forward flight are highly nonlinear, with transonic flow on the advancing blade, subsonic ... Keywords: Computational fluid dynamics, Frequency-domain methods, Harmonic balance technique, Helicopter rotors, Unsteady aerodynamics

Kivanc Ekici; Kenneth C. Hall; Earl H. Dowell

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

WIND-TUNNEL STUDY ON AERODYNAMIC PERFORMANCE OF SMALL VERTICAL-AXIS WIND TURBINES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a building was explored [2]. Referred to such applications, a VAWT can be so small in physical size that its by the present authors to study the aerodynamic performance of small VAWTs using the experimental and numerical1 WIND-TUNNEL STUDY ON AERODYNAMIC PERFORMANCE OF SMALL VERTICAL-AXIS WIND TURBINES J. J. Miau*1

Leu, Tzong-Shyng "Jeremy"

86

Wind turbine aerodynamics using ALE---VMS: validation and the role of weakly enforced boundary conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article we present a validation study involving the full-scale NREL Phase VI two-bladed wind turbine rotor. The ALE---VMS formulation of aerodynamics, based on the Navier---Stokes equations of incompressible flows, is employed in conjunction ... Keywords: ALE---VMS, Finite elements, NREL 5MW offshore, NREL Phase VI, Weakly enforced essential boundary conditions, Wind turbine aerodynamics

Ming-Chen Hsu; Ido Akkerman; Yuri Bazilevs

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Wind turbine trailing-edge aerodynamic brake design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the design of a centrifugally actuated aerodynamic-overspeed device for a horizontal-axis wind turbine. The device will meet the following criteria; (1) It will be effective for airfoil angles of attack 0{degrees} to 45{degrees}. (2) It will be stowed inside the blade profile prior to deployment. (3) It will be capable of offsetting the positive torque produced by the overall blade. (4) Hinge moments will be minimized to lower actuator loads and cost. (5) It will be evaluated as a potential power modulating active rotor-control system. A literature review of aerodynamic braking devices was conducted. Information from the literature review was used to conceptualize the most effective devices for subsequent testing and design. Wind-tunnel test data for several braking devices are presented in this report. Using the data for the most promising configuration, a preliminary design was developed for a MICON 65/13 wind turbine with Phoenix 7.9-m rotor blades.

Quandt, G.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

A new measurement of the $K^\\pm\\to?^\\pm??$ decay at the NA48/2 experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The NA48/2 experiment at CERN collected two data samples with minimum bias trigger conditions in 2003 and 2004. A measurement of the rate and dynamic properties of the rare decay $K^\\pm\\to\\pi^\\pm\\gamma\\gamma$ from these data sets based on 149 decay candidates with an estimated background of $15.5\\pm0.7$ events is reported.

NA48/2 collaboration

2013-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

89

Absolute Calibration of a Large-diameter Light Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A method of absolute calibration for large aperture optical systems is presented, using the example of the Pierre Auger Observatory fluorescence detectors. A 2.5 m diameter light source illuminated by an ultra--violet light emitting diode is calibrated with an overall uncertainty of 2.1 % at a wavelength of 365 nm.

Brack, J T; Dorofeev, A; Gookin, B; Harton, J L; Petrov, Y; Rovero, A C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Drilling Large Diameter Holes in Rocks Using Multiple Laser Beams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Drilling Large Diameter Holes in Rocks Using Multiple Laser Beams (504) Drilling Large Diameter Holes in Rocks Using Multiple Laser Beams (504) Richard Parker,. Parker Geoscience Consulting, LLC, Arvada, Colorado, USA; Zhiyue Xu and Claude Reed, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois, USA; Ramona Graves, Department of Petroleum Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado, USA; Brian Gahan and Samih Batarseh, Gas Technology Institute, Des Plaines, Illinois, USA ABSTRACT Studies on drilling petroleum reservoir rocks with lasers show that modern infrared lasers have the capability to spall (thermally fragment), melt and vaporize natural earth materials with the thermal spallation being the most efficient rock removal mechanism. Although laser irradiance as low as 1000 W/cm 2 is sufficient to spall rock, firing the

91

Vacuum chamber with a supersonic flow aerodynamic window  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A supersonic flow aerodynamic window, whereby a steam ejector situated in a primary chamber at vacuum exhausts superheated steam toward an orifice to a region of higher pressure, creating a barrier to the gas in the region of higher pressure which attempts to enter through the orifice. In a mixing chamber outside and in fluid communication with the primary chamber, superheated steam and gas are combined into a mixture which then enters the primary chamber through the orifice. At the point of impact of the ejector/superheated steam and the incoming gas/superheated steam mixture, a barrier is created to the gas attempting to enter the ejector chamber. This barrier, coupled with suitable vacuum pumping means and cooling means, serves to keep the steam ejector and primary chamber at a negative pressure, even though the primary chamber has an orifice to a region of higher pressure.

Hanson, Clark L. (Livermore, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Vacuum chamber with a supersonic-flow aerodynamic window  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A supersonic flow aerodynamic window is disclosed whereby a steam ejector situated in a primary chamber at vacuum exhausts superheated steam toward an orifice to a region of higher pressure, creating a barrier to the gas in the region of higher pressure which attempts to enter through the orifice. In a mixing chamber outside and in fluid communication with the primary chamber, superheated steam and gas are combined into a mixture which then enters the primary chamber through the orifice. At the point of impact of the ejector/superheated steam and the incoming gas/superheated steam mixture, a barrier is created to the gas attempting to enter the ejector chamber. This barrier, coupled with suitable vacuum pumping means and cooling means, serves to keep the steam ejector and primary chamber at a negative pressure, even though the primary chamber has an orifice to a region of higher pressure.

Hanson, C.L.

1980-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

93

Aerodynamic testing of a rotating wind turbine blade  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Aerodynamic, load, flow-visualization, and inflow measurements were taken on a downwind horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT). A video camera mounted on the rotor recorded video images of tufts attached to the low-pressure side of the blade. Strain gages, mounted every 10% of the blade's span, provided load and pressure measurements. Pressure taps at 32 chordwise positions recorded pressure distributions. Wind inflow was measured via a vertical-plane array of anemometers located 10 m upwind. The objectives of the test were to address whether airfoil pressure distributions measured on a rotating blade differed from those measured in the wind tunnel, if radial flow near or in the boundary layer of the airfoil affected pressure distributions, if dynamic stall could result in increased dynamic loads, and if the location of the separation boundary measured on the rotating blade agreed with that measured in two-dimensional flow in the wind tunnel. 6 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

Butterfield, C.P.; Nelsen, E.N.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Aeroacoustics and aerodynamic performance of a rotor with flatback airfoils.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aerodynamic performance and aeroacoustic noise sources of a rotor employing flatback airfoils have been studied in field test campaign and companion modeling effort. The field test measurements of a sub-scale rotor employing nine meter blades include both performance measurements and acoustic measurements. The acoustic measurements are obtained using a 45 microphone beamforming array, enabling identification of both noise source amplitude and position. Semi-empirical models of flatback airfoil blunt trailing edge noise are developed and calibrated using available aeroacoustic wind tunnel test data. The model results and measurements indicate that flatback airfoil noise is less than drive train noise for the current test turbine. It is also demonstrated that the commonly used Brooks, Pope, and Marcolini model for blunt trailing edge noise may be over-conservative in predicting flatback airfoil noise for wind turbine applications.

Paquette, Joshua A.; Barone, Matthew Franklin; Christiansen, Monica (Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA); Simley, Eric (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO)

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Advanced multistage turbine blade aerodynamics, performance, cooling, and heat transfer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The gas turbine has the potential for power production at the highest possible efficiency. The challenge is to ensure that gas turbines operate at the optimum efficiency so as to use the least fuel and produce minimum emissions. A key component to meeting this challenge is the turbine. Turbine performance, both aerodynamics and heat transfer, is one of the barrier advanced gas turbine development technologies. This is a result of the complex, highly three-dimensional and unsteady flow phenomena in the turbine. Improved turbine aerodynamic performance has been achieved with three-dimensional highly-loaded airfoil designs, accomplished utilizing Euler or Navier-Stokes Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes. These design codes consider steady flow through isolated blade rows. Thus they do not account for unsteady flow effects. However, unsteady flow effects have a significant impact on performance. Also, CFD codes predict the complete flow field. The experimental verification of these codes has traditionally been accomplished with point data - not corresponding plane field measurements. Thus, although advanced CFD predictions of the highly complex and three-dimensional turbine flow fields are available, corresponding data are not. To improve the design capability for high temperature turbines, a detailed understanding of the highly unsteady and three-dimensional flow through multi-stage turbines is necessary. Thus, unique data are required which quantify the unsteady three-dimensional flow through multi-stage turbine blade rows, including the effect of the film coolant flow. Also, as design CFD codes do not account for unsteady flow effects, the next logical challenge and the current thrust in CFD code development is multiple-stage analyses that account for the interactions between neighboring blade rows. Again, to verify and or direct the development of these advanced codes, complete three-dimensional unsteady flow field data are needed.

Fleeter, S.; Lawless, P.B. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). School of Mechanical Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

96

The mid-infrared diameter of W Hydrae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mid-infrared (8-13 microns) interferometric data of W Hya were obtained with MIDI/VLTI between April 2007 and September 2009, covering nearly three pulsation cycles. The spectrally dispersed visibility data of all 75 observations were analyzed by fitting a circular fully limb-darkened disk (FDD) model to all data and individual pulsation phases. Asymmetries were studied with an elliptical FDD. Modeling results in an apparent angular FDD diameter of W Hya of about (80 +/- 1.2) mas (7.8 AU) between 8 and 10 microns, which corresponds to an about 1.9 times larger diameter than the photospheric one. The diameter gradually increases up to (105 +/- 1.2) mas (10.3 AU) at 12 microns. In contrast, the FDD relative flux fraction decreases from (0.85 +/- 0.02) to (0.77 +/- 0.02), reflecting the increased flux contribution from a fully resolved surrounding silicate dust shell. The asymmetric character of the extended structure could be confirmed. An elliptical FDD yields a position angle of (11 +/- 20) deg and an axis ra...

Zhao-Geisler, R; Koehler, R; Lopez, B; Leinert, C

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Experimental and analytical research on the aerodynamics of wind driven turbines. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This aerodynamic research program was aimed at providing a reliable, comprehensive data base on a series of wind turbine models covering a broad range of the prime aerodynamic and geometric variables. Such data obtained under controlled laboratory conditions on turbines designed by the same method, of the same size, and tested in the same wind tunnel had not been available in the literature. Moreover, this research program was further aimed at providing a basis for evaluating the adequacy of existing wind turbine aerodynamic design and performance methodology, for assessing the potential of recent advanced theories and for providing a basis for further method development and refinement.

Rohrbach, C.; Wainauski, H.; Worobel, R.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

A Case Study of Wide Diameter Casing for Geothermal Systems  

SciTech Connect

Three wells have been drilled in the central resistivity area of a geothermal field in the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand. Using a well bore simulator, WELL SIM V3.0, reservoir conditions and well characteristics are evaluated to determine the increase in output by increasing production casing diameters from either 8-5/8 inches OD or 9-5/8 inches OD to 13-3/8 inches OD. Increases in well drilling costs are determined to provide a commentary on the economics. While open hole size is effectively doubled, well costs increase by 10% and, in this study, output increases by an average of 18%.

King, T.R.; Freeston, D.H.; Winmill, R.L.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Strengthening Precipitates in Argon Atomized PM Alloy 625  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

particle size which is less than 500 rnp for most applications. PM A625 consistently achieves 517 MPa (75 ksi) (API specification 6A Type III strength) and higher.

100

Aerodynamic Losses and Heat Transfer in a Blade Cascade with 3-D Endwall Contouring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerodynamic Losses and Heat Transfer in a Aerodynamic Losses and Heat Transfer in a Aerodynamic Losses and Heat Transfer in a Aerodynamic Losses and Heat Transfer in a Blade Cascade with 3 Blade Cascade with 3 - - D D Endwall Endwall Contouring Contouring Principal Investigator Principal Investigator Sumanta Acharya, Professor Sumanta Acharya, Professor Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana Collaborators Collaborators Gazi Mahmood, Ph.D., Research Asqociate Gazi Mahmood, Ph.D., Research Asqociate Arun Saha, Ph.D., Research Associate Arun Saha, Ph.D., Research Associate Ross Gustafson, M.S. student Ross Gustafson, M.S. student SCIES Project 02 SCIES Project 02 - - 01 01 - - SR098 SR098 DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT DE DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT DE - - FC26 FC26 - - 02NT41431 02NT41431 Tom J. George, Program Manager, DOE/NETL

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aerodynamic diameter pm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

A Comparison of Sensible and Latent Heat Flux Calculations Using the Bowen Ratio and Aerodynamic Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis technique is outlined that calculates the sensible and latent heat fluxes by the Bowen ratio and aerodynamic methods, using profile measurements at any number of heights. Field measurements at two sites near Churchill, Manitoba, ...

David H. Halliwell; Wayne R. Rouse

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Aerodynamic Properties of Urban Areas Derived from Analysis of Surface Form  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several methods to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of a site through analysis of its surface form (morphometry) are considered in relation to cities. The measures discussed include zero-plane displacement length (zd), roughness length (...

C. S. B. Grimmond; T. R. Oke

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

LES Analysis of the Aerodynamic Surface Properties for Turbulent Flows over Building Arrays with Various Geometries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes aerodynamic roughness properties for turbulent flows over various building arrays that represent realistic urban surface geometries. First, building morphological characteristics such as roughness density ?f and building ...

Hiromasa Nakayama; Tetsuya Takemi; Haruyasu Nagai

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Derivation of Effective Aerodynamic Surface Roughness in Urban Areas from Airborne Lidar Terrain Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automated technique was developed that uses only airborne lidar terrain data to derive the necessary parameters for calculation of effective aerodynamic surface roughness in urban areas. The technique provides parameters for geometric models ...

Donald E. Holland; Judith A. Berglund; Joseph P. Spruce; Rodney D. McKellip

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Prediction of loaded airfoil unsteady aerodynamic gust response by a locally analytical method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A complete first order model is formulated to analyze the effects of steady loading on the incompressible unsteady aerodynamics generated by a two-dimensional gust convected with the steady mean flow past an arbitrary airfoil at finite nonzero angle ...

Hsiao-Wei D. Chiang; Sanford Fleeter

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Which Bulk Aerodynamic Algorithms are Least Problematic in Computing Ocean Surface Turbulent Fluxes?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bulk aerodynamic algorithms are needed to compute ocean surface turbulent fluxes in weather forecasting and climate models and in the development of global surface flux datasets. Twelve such algorithms are evaluated and ranked using direct ...

Michael A. Brunke; Chris W. Fairall; Xubin Zeng; Laurence Eymard; Judith A. Curry

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Challenges in Simulation of Aerodynamics, Hydrodynamics, and Mooring-Line Dynamics of Floating Offshore Wind Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the current major modeling challenges for floating offshore wind turbine design tools and describes aerodynamic and hydrodynamic effects due to rotor and platform motions and usage of non-slender support structures.

Matha, D.; Schlipf, M.; Cordle, A.; Pereira, R.; Jonkman, J.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Stabilized space---time computation of wind-turbine rotor aerodynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We show how we use the Deforming-Spatial-Domain/Stabilized Space---Time (DSD/SST) formulation for accurate 3D computation of the aerodynamics of a wind-turbine rotor. As the test case, we use the NREL 5MW offshore baseline wind-turbine rotor. This class ... Keywords: DSD/SST formulation, Rotating turbulent flow, Space---time variational multiscale method, Torque values, Wind-turbine aerodynamics

Kenji Takizawa; Bradley Henicke; Tayfun E. Tezduyar; Ming-Chen Hsu; Yuri Bazilevs

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Computer subroutine for estimating aerodynamic blade loads on Darrieus vertical axis wind turbines. [FORCE code  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An important aspect of structural design of the Darrieus rotor is the determination of aerodynamic blade loads. This report describes a load generator which has been used at Sandia for quasi-static and dynamic rotor analyses. The generator is based on the single streamtube aerodynamic flow model and is constructed as a FORTRAN IV subroutine to facilitate its use in finite element structural models. Input and output characteristics of the subroutine are described and a complete listing is attached as an appendix.

Sullivan, W. N.; Leonard, T. M.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Allowable pillar to diameter ratio for strategic petroleum reserve caverns.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report compiles 3-D finite element analyses performed to evaluate the stability of Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) caverns over multiple leach cycles. When oil is withdrawn from a cavern in salt using freshwater, the cavern enlarges. As a result, the pillar separating caverns in the SPR fields is reduced over time due to usage of the reserve. The enlarged cavern diameters and smaller pillars reduce underground stability. Advances in geomechanics modeling enable the allowable pillar to diameter ratio (P/D) to be defined. Prior to such modeling capabilities, the allowable P/D was established as 1.78 based on some very limited experience in other cavern fields. While appropriate for 1980, the ratio conservatively limits the allowable number of oil drawdowns and hence limits the overall utility and life of the SPR cavern field. Analyses from all four cavern fields are evaluated along with operating experience gained over the past 30 years to define a new P/D for the reserve. A new ratio of 1.0 is recommended. This ratio is applicable only to existing SPR caverns.

Ehgartner, Brian L.; Park, Byoung Yoon

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Progress on building a predictive model of indoor concentrations of outdoor PM-2.5 in homes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to develop a physically-based, semi-empirical model that describes the concentration of indoor concentration of PM-2.5 (particle mass that is less than 2.5 microns in diameter) and its sulfate, nitrate, organic and black carbon constituents, derived from outdoor sources. We have established the methodology and experimental plan for building the model. Experimental measurements in residential style houses, in Richmond and Fresno, California, are being conducted to provide parameters for and evaluation of this model. The model will be used to improve estimates of human exposures to PM-2.5 of outdoor origin. The objectives of this study are to perform measurement and modeling tasks that produce a tested, semi-mechanistic description of chemical species-specific and residential PM-2.5 arising from the combination of outdoor PM and gas phase sources (HNO{sub 3} and NH{sub 3}), and indoor gas phase (e.g. NH{sub 3}) sources. We specifically address how indoor PM is affected by differences between indoor and outdoor temperature and relative humidity. In addition, we are interested in losses of particles within the building and as they migrate through the building shell. The resulting model will be general enough to predict probability distributions for species-specific indoor concentrations of PM-2.5 based on outdoor PM, and gas phase species concentrations, meteorological conditions, building construction characteristics, and HVAC operating conditions. Controlled intensive experiments were conducted at a suburban research house located in Clovis, California. The experiments utilized a large suite of instruments including conventional aerosol, meteorological and house characterization devices. In addition, two new instruments were developed providing high time resolution for the important particulate species of nitrate, sulfate, and carbon as well as important gaseous species including ammonia and nitric acid. Important initial observations include the result that, with rare exceptions, there is virtually no nitrate found inside the house. This nitrate appears to dissociate into ammonia and nitric acid with the nitric acid quickly depositing out. Initial model development has included work on characterizing penetration and deposition rates, the dynamic behavior of the indoor/outdoor ratio, and predicting infiltration rates. Results from the exploration of the indoor/outdoor ratio show that the traditional assumption of steady state conditions does not hold in general. Many values of the indoor/outdoor ratio exist for any single value of the infiltration rate. Successful prediction of the infiltration rate from measured driving variables is important for extending the results from the Clovis house to the larger housing stock.

Lunden, Melissa M.; Thatcher, Tracy L.; Littlejohn, David; Fischer, Marc L.; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Brown, Nancy J.; Hering, Susanne

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Part I--A Rational Aerodynamic Design Procedure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

'The design of a turbine stage is described in which all leading parameters (stage loading, flow coefficient, pitch/chord ratio, blade profile shape and aspect ratio) have been selected conservatively to accord with current ideas for ensuring a reasonably high level of aerodynamic efficiency. From consideration of the influence of stage loading KpAT V~ U,2, flow coefficient ~ and rotor exit swirl angle c ~ 3, the stage design was selected such that these parameters were 1.15, 0.65 and 10 degrees respectively. At the design speed of U ~ = 34 the resulting stage pressure ratio is approximately 1.65. Such a stage duty is 'light ' by aero engine standards but very comparable to much industrial gas turbine design practice. Blade spacing and profile shapes are 'finally selected in such a way as to preclude severe opposing pressure gradients on the suction surface which might result in local separation of the boundary layer from the blade surfaces. The methods applied and described for predicting blade surface velocities are simple and approximate only, and might readily be imitated by designers not wishing or able to exploit more elaborate and complex digital techniques.

M. No; D. J. L. Smith; I. H. Johnston; D. J. L. Smith; D. J. Fullbrook; D. J. L. Smith; I. H. Johnston

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer/Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS) Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) is a single instrument that cycles through a series of complementary measurements of the physical properties of size-resolved submicron particles. In 2008, the TDMA was augmented through the addition of an aerodynamic particle sizer (APS), which extends the upper limit of the measured size distribution into the supermicron range. These two instruments are operated in parallel, but because they are controlled by a common computer and because the size distributions measured by the two are integrated in the produced datastreams, they are described together here. Throughout the day, the TDMA sequentially measures submicron aerosol size distributions and size-resolved hygroscopic growth distributions. More specifically, the instrument is operated as a scanning DMA to measure size distributions and as a TDMA to measure size-resolved hygroscopicity. A typical measurement sequence requires roughly 45 minutes. Each morning additional measurements are made of the relative humidity (RH) dependent hygroscopicity and temperature-dependent volatility of size-resolved particles. When the outside temperature and RH are within acceptable ranges, the hydration state of size-resolved particles is also characterized. The measured aerosol distributions complement the array of aerosol instruments in the Aerosol Observing System (AOS) and provide additional details of the light-scattering and cloud-nucleating characteristics of the aerosol.

Collins, D

2010-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

114

Diameter-controlled Growth of Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes by Using Nano-Diamonds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diameter-controlled Growth of Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes by Using Nano-Diamonds Shohei Chiashi diameter attract attention. Here, we perform CVD growth by using nano-diamond particles as the catalyst [1] and investigate the CVD condition dependence of SWNT tube diameter. The average diameter of the as-received nano

Maruyama, Shigeo

115

Modular PM Motor Drives for Automotive Traction Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents modular permanent magnet (PM) motor drives for automotive traction applications. A partially modularized drive system consisting of a single PM motor and multiple inverters is described. The motor has multiple three-phase stator winding sets and each winding set is driven with a separate three-phase inverter module. A truly modularized inverter and motor configuration based on an axial-gap PM motor is then introduced, in which identical PM motor modules are mounted on a common shaft and each motor module is powered by a separate inverter module. The advantages of the modular approach for both inverter and motor include: (1) power rating scalability--one design meets different power requirements by simply stacking an adequate number of modules, thus avoiding redesigning and reducing the development cost, (2) increased fault tolerance, and (3) easy repairing. A prototype was constructed by using two inverters and an axial-gap PM motor with two sets of three-phase stat or windings, and it is used to assist the diesel engine in a hybrid electric vehicle converted from a Chevrolet Suburban. The effect of different pulse-width-modulation strategies for both motoring and regenerative modes on current control is analyzed. Torque and regenerative control algorithms are implemented with a digital signal processor. Analytical and initial testing results are included in the paper.

Su, G.J.

2001-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

116

Amplitude and phase?modulation (AM?PM) wide?band photothermal spectrometry. II. Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Amplitude and phase?modulation (AM?PM) wide?band photothermal spectrometry is experimentally demonstrated

J. F. Power

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Initial Takeaways from the PM Workshop | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Initial Takeaways from the PM Workshop Initial Takeaways from the PM Workshop Home > Groups > EERE - Energy Data Initiative Ianjkalin's picture Submitted by Ianjkalin(84) Contributor 14 July, 2012 - 12:00 Thanks again to everyone who participated in the PM Workshop. Here are the top ideas, action items and datasets that we all collectively determined to be most important: Top "Big Ideas" A. Create, implement and then develop skills / tools to execute Programs with more of a "Customer Centric" approach to Data. B. Utilize a "reverse auction" approach in order to drive down costs for early-stage company adoption. C. Integrate potential of Data into R&D planning process. D. Improve integration of electric and gas generation assets during the (oftentimes long) comissioning periods.

118

PM-1 NUCLEAR POWER PLANT PROGRAM PARAMETRIC STUDY REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The study deals with narrowing the range of parameters prior to preliminary design of the PM-1, a factory prepackaged, air-transportable, pressurized water nuclear power plant. The plant is to produce 1000 kw of net electrical power and 7 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/hr of space heat that is suitable for use with a central heating system. The data and conclusions resulting from the parametric study will provide the basis for the preliminary design of the PM-1 power plant. (W.D.M.)

Sieg, J.S.

1959-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

AUTOMATED WATER LEVEL MEASUREMENTS IN SMALL-DIAMETER AQUIFER TUBES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Groundwater contaminated with hexavalent chromium, strontium-90, and uranium discharges into the Columbia River along approximately 16 km (10 mi) of the shoreline. Various treatment systems have and will continue to be implemented to eliminate the impact of Hanford Site contamination to the river. To optimize the various remediation strategies, it is important to understand interactions between groundwater and the surface water of the Columbia River. An automated system to record water levels in aquifer sampling tubes installed in the hyporheic zone was designed and tested to (1) gain a more complete understanding of groundwater/river water interactions based on gaining and losing conditions ofthe Columbia River, (2) record and interpret data for consistent and defensible groundwater/surface water conceptual models that may be used to better predict subsurface contaminant fate and transport, and (3) evaluate the hydrodynamic influence of extraction wells in an expanded pump-and-treat system to optimize the treatment system. A system to measure water levels in small-diameter aquifer tubes was designed and tested in the laboratory and field. The system was configured to allow manual measurements to periodically calibrate the instrument and to permit aquifer tube sampling without removing the transducer tube. Manual measurements were collected with an e-tape designed and fabricated especially for this test. Results indicate that the transducer system accurately records groundwater levels in aquifer tubes. These data are being used to refine the conceptual and numeric models to better understand interactions in the hyporheic zone of the Columbia River and the adjacent river water and groundwater, and changes in hydrochemistry relative to groundwater flux as river water recharges the aquifer and then drains back out in response to changes in the river level.

PETERSEN SW; EDRINGTON RS; MAHOOD RO; VANMIDDLESWORTH PE

2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

120

Developing Supersonic Impactor and Aerodynamic Lens for Separation and Handling of Nano-Sized Particles  

SciTech Connect

A computational model for supersonic flows of compressible gases in an aerodynamic lens with several lenses and in a supersonic/hypersonic impactor was developed. Airflow conditions in the aerodynamic lens were analyzed and contour plots for variation of Mach number, velocity magnitude and pressure field in the lens were evaluated. The nano and micro-particle trajectories in the lens and their focusing and transmission efficiencies were evaluated. The computational model was then applied to design of a aerodynamic lens that could generate focus particle beams while operating under atmospheric conditions. The computational model was also applied to airflow condition in the supersonic/hypersonic impactor. Variations of airflow condition and particle trajectories in the impactor were evaluated. The simulation results could provide understanding of the performance of the supersonic and hypersonic impactors that would be helpful for the design of such systems.

Goodarz Ahmadi

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aerodynamic diameter pm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The Formation of Systems with Tightly-packed Inner Planets (STIPs) via Aerodynamic Drift  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The NASA Kepler mission has revealed an abundant class of Systems with Tightly-packed Inner Planets (STIPs). The current paradigm for planet formation suggests that small planetesimals will quickly spiral into the host star due to aerodynamic drag, preventing rocky planet formation. In contrast, we find that aerodynamic drift, when acting on an ensemble of solids, can concentrate mass at short orbital periods in gaseous disks. Sublimation fronts may further aid this process. Kepler data suggest that the innermost known planets are found near the silicate sublimation zone. STIP planets should have a wide range of volatile fractions due to aerodynamic drift and H2 dissociation-driven gas accretion. We further propose that the low mass of Mars is evidence that the Solar System was once a proto-STIP.

Boley, Aaron C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Experimental and analytical research on the aerodynamics of wind driven turbines. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The successful development of reliable, cost competitive horizontal axis, propeller-type wind energy conversion systems (WECS) is strongly dependent on the availability of advanced technology for each of the system components. This aerodynamic research program was aimed at providing a reliable, comprehensive data base on a series of wind turbine models covering a broad range of the prime aerodynamic and geometric variables. Such data obtained under controlled laboratory conditions on turbines designed by the same method, of the same size, and tested in the same wind tunnel had not been available in the literature. Moreover, this research program was further aimed at providing a basis for evaluating the adequacy of existing wind turbine aerodynamic design and performance methodology, for assessing the potential of recent advanced theories and for providing a basis for further method development and refinement.

Rohrbach, C.; Wainauski, H.; Worobel, R.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

ETC Alert Disaster Procedure, 8am 5pm Weekdays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

work area "The hospital disaster response plan is in effect. Remain at your regular duties and awaitETC Alert Disaster Procedure, 8am ­ 5pm Weekdays ETC ALERT DISASTER ETC Charge Nurse Hospital Operator ETC Tech 3JCP Reception Pager 3735 Phone 6-3350 General Diagnostic Supervisor (Disaster Only) Ass

124

Characterization of aerodynamic drag force on single particles: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An electrodynamic balance was used to measure the drag coefficient and also to record the size and shape of spheres, and coal and oil shale particles (100 ..mu..m to 200 ..mu..m in size). The electrodynamic balance consisted of a central, and two end electrodes. The resulting electric field stably suspended a charged particle. A suspended particle, back illuminated by a light emitting diode, was viewed by a video camera. The image was analyzed for particle position control and was calibrated to give the diameter of spheres, or the area equivalent diameter of nonspherical particles. The drag coefficient was calculated from the air velocity and the dc voltage required to keep the particle at the balance center. The particle Reynolds number varied from 0.2 to 13. Three particles each of coal and oil shale were captured and photographed by a scanning electron microscope and the motion of all the particles was recorded on video tape. Drag coefficient vs Reynolds number data for spheres agreed well with correlations. Data for thirteen particles each of coal and oil shale indicated a power law relationship between drag coefficient and Reynolds number. All these particles exhibited higher drag than spheres and were also observed to rotate. The rotation, however, did not affect the drag coefficient. The choice of characteristic dimension affects the drag characteristics of oil shale more strongly than for coal, owing to the flake-like shape of oil shale. 38 figs., 5 tabs.

Kale, S.R.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Diameter tuning of single-walled carbon nanotubes by diffusion plasma CVD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have realized a diameter tuning of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by adjusting process gas pressures with plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Detailed photoluminescence measurements reveal that the diameter distribution of SWNTs clearly ...

Toshiaki Kato; Shunsuke Kuroda; Rikizo Hatakeyama

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Numerical prediction of aerodynamic characteristics of prismatic cylinder by finite element method with Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerodynamic characteristic of prismatic cylinders is numerically investigated by using finite element method with Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. The developed model is verified against the available experimental and numerical results for turbulent ... Keywords: Aerodynamic characteristic, Afterbody shape, Finite element method, Prismatic cylinder, Turbulent flow, Unsteady S-A model

Yan Bao; Dai Zhou; Cheng Huang; Qier Wu; Xiang-qiao Chen

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Original papers: Aerodynamic analysis and CFD simulation of several cellulose evaporative cooling pads used in Mediterranean greenhouses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present work makes an aerodynamic analysis and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of the four commercial models of corrugated cellulose evaporative cooling pads that are most widely used in Mediterranean greenhouses. The geometric characteristics ... Keywords: Aerodynamic analysis, CFD, Evaporative cooling, Fan and pad, Greenhouse, Pressure drop

A. Franco; D. L. Valera; A. Peña; A. M. Pérez

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Guidance for the network design and optimum site exposure for PM2.5 and PM10  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guidance provides a method and rationale for designing monitoring networks to determine compliance with newly enacted PM 2.5 and PM 10 national ambient air quality standards. It defines concepts and terms of network design, presents a methodology for defining planning areas and community monitoring zones, identifies data resources and the uses of those resources for network design, and provides some practical examples of applying the guidance. Existing metropolitan statistical areas are first examined to determine where the majority of the people live in each state. These are then broken down into smaller populated entities which may include country, zip code, census tract, or census block boundaries. Combinations of these population entities are combined to define metropolitan planning areas. These may be further sub-divided into community monitoring zones, based on examination of existing PM measurements, source locations, terrain, and meteorology. Finally, PM 2.5 monitors are located at specific sites that represent neighborhood or urban scales to determine compliance with the annual standard and at maximum, population oriented locations for comparison with the 24-hour standard.

Watson, J.G.; Chow, J.C.; DuBois, D.; Green, M.; Frank, N.

1997-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

129

A computer program for monitoring and controlling ultrasonic anemometers for aerodynamic measurements in animal buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ultrasonic anemometers (USAs) are widely implemented in animal housing to measure the air velocity in different measuring points throughout the whole barn, which ultimately leads to determine the velocity fields and the air flow patterns drawing a clear ... Keywords: Aerodynamics, Air profile, Airflow, Computer program, Precision livestock farming, Ultrasonic anemometer

M. Samer; C. Loebsin; K. von Bobrutzki; M. Fiedler; C. Ammon; W. Berg; P. Sanftleben; R. Brunsch

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

A New Drag Relation for Aerodynamically Rough Flow over the Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From almost 7000 near-surface eddy-covariance flux measurements over the sea, the authors deduce a new air–sea drag relation for aerodynamically rough flow:Here u* is the measured friction velocity, and UN10 is the neutral-stability wind speed at ...

Edgar L Andreas; Larry Mahrt; Dean Vickers

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Aerodynamic and Performance Measurements on a SWT-2.3-101 Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of a detailed wind turbine field experiment being conducted at NREL under U.S. Department of Energy sponsorship. The purpose of the experiment is to obtain knowledge about the aerodynamics, performance, noise emission and structural characteristics of the Siemens SWT-2.3-101 wind turbine.

Medina, P.; Singh, M.; Johansen, J.; Jove, A.R.; Machefaux, E.; Fingersh, L. J.; Schreck, S.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Estimating Monthly Averaged Air-Sea Transfers of Heat and Momentum Using the Bulk Aerodynamic Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air-sea transfers of sensible heat, latent heat and momentum are computed from 25 years of middle-latitude and subtropical ocean weather ship data in the North Atlantic and North Pacific using the bulk aerodynamic method. The results show that ...

Steven K. Esbensen; Richard W. Reynolds

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Fan Aerodynamic Performance Guarantees: Do Your Policies, Procedures and Penalties Provide Adequate Certainty?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With few exceptions, fan vendors do not provide a written guarantee regarding aerodynamic performance. Some fan vendors even go so far as to state in their terms and conditions of sale that fan performance is not guaranteed unless it is specifically reque

Kaufman, S. G.; Martin, V.; Falk, M. A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

SiPM Development for Astroparticle Physics Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The SiPM is a novel solid state photodetector which can be operated in the single photon counting mode. It has excellent features, such as high quantum efficiency, good charge resolution, fast response, very compact size, high gain of 106, very low power consumption, immunity to the magnetic field and low bias voltage (30-70V). Drawbacks of this device currently are a large dark current, crosstalk between micropixels and relatively low sensitivity to UV and blue light. In the last few years, we have developed large size SiPMs (9 mm^2 and 25 mm^2) for applications in the imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes, MAGIC and CTA, and in the space-borne fluorescence telescope EUSO. The current status of the SiPM development by MPI and MEPhI will be presented.

M. Teshima; B. Dolgoshein; R. Mirzoyan; J. Nincovic; E. Popova

2007-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

135

Microsoft PowerPoint - 09 Lehman final 1003 SC PM Workshop |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- 09 Lehman final 1003 SC PM Workshop Microsoft PowerPoint - 09 Lehman final 1003 SC PM Workshop More Documents & Publications Microsoft PowerPoint - 16.1045Peer Reviews...

136

Reflecting the Revised PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reflecting the Revised PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard in NEPA Evaluations Reflecting the Revised PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard in NEPA Evaluations This...

137

Compilation of Published PM2.5 Emission Rates for Cooking, Candles...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compilation of Published PM2.5 Emission Rates for Cooking, Candles and Incense for Use in Modeling of Exposures in Residences Title Compilation of Published PM2.5 Emission Rates...

138

Structural effects of unsteady aerodynamic forces on horizontal-axis wind turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Due to its renewable nature and abundant resources, wind energy has the potential to fulfill a large portion of this nation`s energy needs. The simplest means of utilizing wind energy is through the use of downwind, horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWT) with fixed-pitch rotors. This configuration regulates the peak power by allowing the rotor blade to aerodynamically stall. The stall point, the point of maximum coefficient of lift, is currently predicted using data obtained from wind tunnel tests. Unfortunately, these tests do not accurately simulate conditions encountered in the field. Flow around the tower and nacelle coupled with inflow turbulence and rotation of the turbine blades create unpredicted aerodynamic forces. Dynamic stall is hypothesized to occur. Such aerodynamic loads are transmitted into the rotor and tower causing structural resonance that drastically reduces the design lifetime of the wind turbine. The current method of alleviating this problem is to structurally reinforce the tower and blades. However, this adds unneeded mass and, therefore, cost to the turbines. A better understanding of the aerodynamic forces and the manner in which they affect the structure would allow for the design of more cost effective and durable wind turbines. Data compiled by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for a downwind HAWT with constant chord, untwisted, fixed-pitch rotors is analyzed. From these data, the actual aerodynamic characteristics of the rotor are being portrayed and the potential effects upon the structure can for the first time be fully analyzed. Based upon their understanding, solutions to the problem of structural resonance are emerging.

Miller, M.S.; Shipley, D.E. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). BioServe Space Technologies

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Aerodynamic Design Criteria for Class 8 Heavy Vehicles Trailer Base Devices to Attain Optimum Performance  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as part of its Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), and Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP) effort has investigated class 8 tractor-trailer aerodynamics for many years. This effort has identified many drag producing flow structures around the heavy vehicles and also has designed and tested many new active and passive drag reduction techniques and concepts for significant on the road fuel economy improvements. As part of this effort a database of experimental, computational, and conceptual design for aerodynamic drag reduction devices has been established. The objective of this report is to provide design guidance for trailer base devices to improve their aerodynamic performance. These devices are commonly referred to as boattails, base flaps, tail devices, and etc. The information provided here is based on past research and our most recent full-scale experimental investigations in collaboration with Navistar Inc. Additional supporting data from LLNL/Navistar wind tunnel, track test, and on the road test will be published soon. The trailer base devices can be identified by 4 flat panels that are attached to the rear edges of the trailer base to form a closed cavity. These devices have been engineered in many different forms such as, inflatable and non-inflatable, 3 and 4-sided, closed and open cavity, and etc. The following is an in-depth discussion with some recommendations, based on existing data and current research activities, of changes that could be made to these devices to improve their aerodynamic performance. There are 6 primary factors that could influence the aerodynamic performance of trailer base devices: (1) Deflection angle; (2) Boattail length; (3) Sealing of edges and corners; (4) 3 versus 4-sided, Position of the 4th plate; (5) Boattail vertical extension, Skirt - boattail transition; and (6) Closed versus open cavity.

Salari, K; Ortega, J

2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

140

Connecting Subseasonal Movements of the Winter Mean Ridge in Western North America to Inversion Climatology in Cache Valley, Utah  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 10-yr record of PM2.5 (particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter ? 2.5 ?m), collected in Cache Valley near downtown Logan, Utah, reveals a strong peak in the PM2.5 concentration climatology that is tightly localized in mid-January. The cause of ...

Shih-Yu Wang; Robert R. Gillies; Randy Martin; Robert E. Davies; Marty R. Booth

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aerodynamic diameter pm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

SITE VISITS IN ROME 2011 (8:30 AM 1:00 PM) *ENTRANCE FEE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Vincoli, *Capitoline Museum, *Crypta Balbi, 7:00 PM Trastevere Walk 7/01 Saturday *Bus Trip to Roman

Tsien, Roger Y.

142

Neuro-Fuzzy Controller of a Sensorless PM Motor Drive For Washing Machines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

algorithms to enable direct drive from permanent magnet (PM) synchronous motors[3]. #12;Among AC drives, the permanent magnet (PM) motors have became popular, due to its high torque to current ration, large powerNeuro-Fuzzy Controller of a Sensorless PM Motor Drive For Washing Machines Kasim M. Al

143

Large-Eddy Simulation of Wind-Plant Aerodynamics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this work, we present results of a large-eddy simulation of the 48 multi-megawatt turbines composing the Lillgrund wind plant. Turbulent inflow wind is created by performing an atmospheric boundary layer precursor simulation, and turbines are modeled using a rotating, variable-speed actuator line representation. The motivation for this work is that few others have done large-eddy simulations of wind plants with a substantial number of turbines, and the methods for carrying out the simulations are varied. We wish to draw upon the strengths of the existing simulations and our growing atmospheric large-eddy simulation capability to create a sound methodology for performing this type of simulation. We used the OpenFOAM CFD toolbox to create our solver. The simulated time-averaged power production of the turbines in the plant agrees well with field observations, except with the sixth turbine and beyond in each wind-aligned. The power produced by each of those turbines is overpredicted by 25-40%. A direct comparison between simulated and field data is difficult because we simulate one wind direction with a speed and turbulence intensity characteristic of Lillgrund, but the field observations were taken over a year of varying conditions. The simulation shows the significant 60-70% decrease in the performance of the turbines behind the front row in this plant that has a spacing of 4.3 rotor diameters in this direction. The overall plant efficiency is well predicted. This work shows the importance of using local grid refinement to simultaneously capture the meter-scale details of the turbine wake and the kilometer-scale turbulent atmospheric structures. Although this work illustrates the power of large-eddy simulation in producing a time-accurate solution, it required about one million processor-hours, showing the significant cost of large-eddy simulation.

Churchfield, M. J.; Lee, S.; Moriarty, P. J.; Martinez, L. A.; Leonardi, S.; Vijayakumar, G.; Brasseur, J. G.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Characterization of Fine Particulate Matter (PM) and Secondary PM Precursor Gases in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area  

SciTech Connect

This project was one of three collaborating grants funded by DOE/ASP to characterize the fine particulate matter (PM) and secondary PM precursors in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) during the MILAGRO Campaign. The overall effort of MCMA-2006, one of the four components, focused on i) examination of the primary emissions of fine particles and precursor gases leading to photochemical production of atmospheric oxidants and secondary aerosol particles; ii) measurement and analysis of secondary oxidants and secondary fine PM production, with particular emphasis on secondary organic aerosol (SOA), and iii) evaluation of the photochemical and meteorological processes characteristic of the Mexico City Basin. The collaborative teams pursued the goals through three main tasks: i) analyses of fine PM and secondary PM precursor gaseous species data taken during the MCMA-2002/2003 campaigns and preparation of publications; ii) planning of the MILAGRO Campaign and deployment of the instrument around the MCMA; and iii) analysis of MCMA-2006 data and publication preparation. The measurement phase of the MILAGRO Campaign was successfully completed in March 2006 with excellent participation from the international scientific community and outstanding cooperation from the Mexican government agencies and institutions. The project reported here was led by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology/Molina Center for Energy and the Environment (MIT/MCE2) team and coordinated with DOE/ASP-funded collaborators at Aerodyne Research Inc., University of Colorado at Boulder and Montana State University. Currently 24 papers documenting the findings from this project have been published. The results from the project have improved significantly our understanding of the meteorological and photochemical processes contributing to the formation of ozone, secondary aerosols and other pollutants. Key findings from the MCMA-2003 include a vastly improved speciated emissions inventory from on-road vehicles: the MCMA motor vehicles produce abundant amounts of primary PM, elemental carbon, particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide and a wide range of air toxics; the feasibility of using eddy covariance techniques to measure fluxes of volatile organic compounds in an urban core and a valuable tool for validating local emissions inventory; a much better understanding of the sources and atmospheric loadings of volatile organic compounds; the first spectroscopic detection of glyoxal in the atmosphere; a unique analysis of the high fraction of ambient formaldehyde from primary emission sources; characterization of ozone formation and its sensitivity to VOCs and NOx; a much more extensive knowledge of the composition, size distribution and atmospheric mass loadings of both primary and secondary fine PM, including the fact that the rate of MCMA SOA production greatly exceeded that predicted by current atmospheric models; evaluations of significant errors that can arise from standard air quality monitors for O3 and NO2; and the implementation of an innovative Markov Chain Monte Carlo method for inorganic aerosol modeling as a powerful tool to analyze aerosol data and predict gas phase concentrations where these are unavailable. During the MILAGRO Campaign the collaborative team utilized a combination of central fixed sites and a mobile laboratory deployed throughout the MCMA to representative urban and boundary sites to measure trace gases and fine particles. Analysis of the extensive 2006 data sets has confirmed the key findings from MCMA-2002/2003; additionally MCMA-2006 provided more detailed gas and aerosol chemistry and wider regional scale coverage. Key results include an updated 2006 emissions inventory; extension of the flux system to measure fluxes of fine particles; better understanding of the sources and apportionment of aerosols, including contribution from biomass burning and industrial sources; a comprehensive evaluation of metal containing particles in a complex urban environment; identification of a close correlation between

Luisa T. Molina, Rainer Volkamer, Benjamin de Foy, Wenfang Lei, Miguel Zavala, Erik Velasco; Mario J. Molina

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

145

Performance of Large Diameter Residential Drinking Water Wells - Biofilm Growth: Laboratory and Field Testing.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the first phase of this project three enhanced large diameter (> 60 cm) residential wells were constructed at a study site in Lindsay, Ontario.… (more)

Ruiz Salazar, Hector Fabio

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

A comparative study of the aerodynamics of several wind turbines using flow visualization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports flow visualization techniques used to study the flows over the Enertech 21-5, Carter 25, and Enertech 44-50. Despite centrifugal effects superimposed on the aerodynamics, tufting (gross aerodynamic behavior) and oil flow (average boundary layer behavior), tests reveal the nature and many of the details of the flows involved. Results were compared to expected flow patterns based on angles of attack calculated from the PROPPC code. Chord Reynolds numbers ranged between 75,000 (Enertech 21-5) to 1,340,000 (Enertech 44-50). The typical low Reynolds number flow characteristics of these airfoils, including laminar separation bubbles, turbulent reattachment, and complete separation were observed. full or partial reattachment due to tower shadow was observed on each machine. Spanwise flow was observed near the leading edge of the Enertech 21-5. Cyclic radial flow from tower dam effect was also noted.

Eggleston, D.M. (Control Engineering, Univ. of Texas of the Permian Basin, Odessa, TX (US)); Starcher, K. (Alternative Energy Inst., West Texas State Univ., Canyon, TX (US))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Effects of flow curvature on the aerodynamics of Darrieus wind turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A theoretical and experimental investigation was conducted which clearly showed the effects of flow curvature to be significant determinants of Darrieus turbine blade aerodynamics; qualitatively, these results apply equally to straight or curved bladed machines. Unusually large boundary layer radial pressure gradients and virtually altered camber and incidence are the phenomena of primary importance. Conformal mapping techniques were developed which transform the geometric turbine airfoils in curved flow to their virtual equivalents in rectilinear flow, thereby permitting the more accurate selection of airfoil aerodynamic coefficients from published sectional data. It is demonstrated that once the flow idiosyncracies are fully understood, they may be used to advantage to improve the wind energy extraction efficiency of these machines.

Migliore, P. G.; Wolfe, W. P.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

July 2004 Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag: Presentation, Summary of Comments, and Conclusions  

SciTech Connect

A Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag was held in Portland, Oregon on July 1, 2004. The purpose of the meeting was to provide a summary of achievements, discuss pressing issues, present a general overview of future plans, and to provide a forum for dialogue with the Department of Energy (DOE) and industry representatives. The meeting was held in Portland, because the DOE Aero Team participated in an exclusive session on Heavy Truck Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag at the 34th AIAA Fluid Dynamics Conference and Exhibit in Portland on the morning of July 1st, just preceding our Working Group meeting. Even though the paper session was on the last day of the Conference, the Team presented to a full room of interested attendees.

McCallen, R; Salari, K; Ortega, J; Castellucci, P; Eastwood, C; DeChant, L; Hassan, B; Browand, F; Arcas, D; Ross, J; Heineck, J; Storms, B; Walker, S; Leonard, A; Roy, C; Whitfield, D; Pointer, D; Sofu, T; Englar, R; Funk, R

2004-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

149

Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science Department (PM)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science Department (PM) Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science Department (PM) Last modified 12/7/2012 LastName First MI Bldg Room Ext1 Ext2 Fax E-mail ABEYKOON MILINDA 510B 1-21 2915 3827 2739 aabeykoon@bnl.gov AKHANJEE SHIMUL 510A 2-6 5089 3995 2918 sakhanjee@bnl.gov ARONSON MEIGAN 703 2A 4915 7090 4071 maronson@bnl.gov BERLIJN TOM COS 3995 3995 tberlijn@bnl.gov BILLINGE SIMON 510B 1-29 5661 3827 2739 sb2896@columbia.edu BLUME MARTIN 510A 1-6 3735 3995 2739 blume@bnl.gov BOLLINGER ANTHONY 480 139 2601 7090 4071 abolling@bnl.gov BOZIN EMIL 510B 1-26 4963 3827 2739 bozin@bnl.gov BOZOVIC IVAN 480 126 4973 7090 4071 bozovic@bnl.gov CHECCO ANTONIO 510B 1-20 3319 3827 2739 checco@bnl.gov CHOU CHUNG-PIN 510A 2-12 3784 3995 2918 cpchou@bnl.gov DAI YAOMIN 510B 1-18 3788 3827 2739 ymdai@bnl.gov DAVIS SEAMUS 480 3827 4071 jcdavis@ccmr.cornell.edu and/or sdavis@bnl.gov DEAN

150

Embedding a carbon nanotube across the diameter of a solid state nanopore  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A fabrication method for positioning and embedding a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) across the diameter of a solid state nanopore is presented. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is used to grow SWNTs over arrays of focused ion beam (FIB) milled pores in a thin silicon nitride membrane. This typically yields at least one pore whose diameter is centrally crossed by a SWNT. The final diameter of the FIB pore is adjusted to create a nanopore of any desired diameter by atomic layer deposition (ALD), simultaneously embedding and insulating the SWNT everywhere but in the region that crosses the diameter of the final nanopore, where it remains pristine and bare. This nanotube-articulated nanopore is an important step towards the realization of a new type of detector for biomolecule sensing and electronic characterization, including DNA sequencing.

E. S. Sadki; S. Garaj; D. Vlassarev; J. A. Golovchenko; D. Branton

2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

151

Near Infrared Angular Diameters of a few AGB variables by Lunar Occultations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The uniform disk (UD) angular diameter measurements of two oxygen-rich Mira variables (AW Aur and BS Aur) and three semiregular (SRb) variables (GP Tau, RS Cap, RT Cap), in near Infrared K-band (2.2 micron) by lunar occultation observations are reported. UD angular diameters of the two Miras and one SRV are first time measurements. In addition a method of predicting angular diameters from (V-K) colour is discussed and applied to the five sources. The effect of mass-loss enhancing measured K-band diameters is examined for Miras using (K-[12]) colour excess as an index. In our sample the measured angular diameter of one of the Miras (BS Aur) is found enhanced by nearly 40% compared to its expected value, possibly due to mass loss effects leading to formation of a circumstellar shell.

Baug, Tapas

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

A Multi-Year Program Plan for the Aerodynamic Design of Heavy Vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project tasks and deliverables are as follows: Computations and Experiments--(1) Simulation and analysis of a range of generic shapes, simplified to more complex, representative of tractor and integrated tractor-trailer flow characteristics using computational tools, (2) The establishment of an experimental data base for tractor-trailer models for code/computational method development and validation. The first shapes to be considered will be directed towards the investigation of tractor-trailer gaps and mismatch of tractor-trailer heights. (3) The evaluation and documentation of effective computational approaches for application to heavy vehicle aerodynamics based on the benchmark results with existing and advanced computational tools compared to experimental data, and (4) Computational tools and experimental methods for use by industry, National Laboratories, and universities for the aerodynamic modeling of heavy truck vehicles. Evaluation of current and new technologies--(1) The evaluation and documentation of current and new technologies for drag reduction based on published literature and continued communication with the heavy vehicle industry (e.g., identification and prioritization of tractor-trailer drag-sources, blowing and/or suction devices, body shaping, new experimental methods or facilities), and the identification and analysis of tractor and integrated tractor-trailer aerodynamic problem areas and possible solution strategies. (2) Continued industrial site visits. It should be noted that ''CFD tools'' are not only the actual computer codes, but descriptions of appropriate numerical solution methods. Part of the project effort will be to determine the restrictions or avenues for technology transfer.

None

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Tribological and mechanical comparison of sintered and HIPped PM212 - high temperature self-lubricating composites  

SciTech Connect

Selected tribological, mechanical and thermophysical properties of two versions of PM212 (sintered and hot isostatically pressed, HIPped) are compared. PM212, a high temperature self-lubricating composite, contains 70 wt percent metal bonded chromium carbide, 15 wt percent CaF2/BaF2 eutectic and 15 wt percent silver. PM212 in the sintered form is about 80 percent dense and has previously been shown to have good tribological properties from room temperature to 850 C. Tribological results of a fully densified, HIPped version of PM212 are given. They are compared to sintered PM212. In addition, selected mechanical and thermophysical properties of both types of PM212 are discussed and related to the tribological similarities and differences between the two PM212 composites. In general, both composites display similar friction and wear properties. However, the fully dense PM212 HIPped composite exhibits slight lower friction and wear than sintered PM212. This may be attributed to its generally higher strength properties. The sintered version displays stable wear properties over a wide load range indicating its promise for use in a variety of applications. Based upon their properties, both the sintered and HIPped PM212 have potential as bearing and seal materials for advanced high temperature applications. 12 refs.

Dellacorte, C.; Sliney, H.E.; Bogdanski, M.S. (NASA, Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH (United States) Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States))

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Hangout with Solar Decathlon 2013 Teams on Sept. 18 at 2 pm ET | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hangout with Solar Decathlon 2013 Teams on Sept. 18 at 2 pm ET Hangout with Solar Decathlon 2013 Teams on Sept. 18 at 2 pm ET Hangout with Solar Decathlon 2013 Teams on Sept. 18 at 2 pm ET September 11, 2013 - 4:24pm Q&A Have questions about the Solar Decathlon? Ask the teams now! Ask Us Addthis Mark your calendars for a Google+ Hangout on Solar Decathlon 2013: The Path to a Brighter Future on Wednesday, Sept. 18, at 2 pm ET. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department. Mark your calendars for a Google+ Hangout on Solar Decathlon 2013: The Path to a Brighter Future on Wednesday, Sept. 18, at 2 pm ET. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department. Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs How can I participate? Watch it on energy.gov/live or on our Google+ Event page. Tweet questions to @ENERGY with the hashtag #askSD.

155

Aerodynamic characteristics of seven symmetrical airfoil sections through 180-degree angle of attack for use in aerodynamic analysis of vertical axis wind turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When work began on the Darrieus vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) program at Sandia National Laboratories, it was recognized that there was a paucity of symmetrical airfoil data needed to describe the aerodynamics of turbine blades. Curved-bladed Darrieus turbines operate at local Reynolds numbers (Re) and angles of attack (..cap alpha..) seldom encountered in aeronautical applications. This report describes (1) a wind tunnel test series conducted at moderate values of Re in which 0 less than or equal to ..cap alpha.. less than or equal to 180/sup 0/ force and moment data were obtained for four symmetrical blade-candidate airfoil sections (NACA-0009, -0012, -0012H, and -0015), and (2) how an airfoil property synthesizer code can be used to extend the measured properties to arbitrary values of Re (10/sup 4/ less than or equal to Re less than or equal to 10/sup 7/) and to certain other section profiles (NACA-0018, -0021, -0025).

Sheldahl, R E; Klimas, P C

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Development of a Production Technique for P/M Alloy 625 Clad Low ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

duced defect-free in practical production facilities through the P/M CIP-Extrusion process. These pipes exhibited appro- priate mechanical properties, excellent.

157

PM PEM’s On-Road Investigation – With and Without DPF Equipped Engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

results for engines without PM aftertreatment and with PMThis engine was not equipped with an aftertreatment systemThis engine was not equipped with an aftertreatment system

Durbin, T; Jung, H; Cocker III, D R; Johnson, K

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Ultrasonic Acceptance Small Diameter Boiler Tube Butt Weld: Project Status Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is an interim report documenting the progress of a multiyear project for developing an alternative ultrasonic testing (UT) acceptance guideline for small diameter boiler tube butt welds.BackgroundHistorically, small diameter boiler tube butt welds have either been examined for defects using radiography or not inspected, with the owner relying only on a hydrostatic pressure test at 1.5 times the design pressure to assess weld quality. This reliance is ...

2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

159

Development of Pneumatic Aerodynamic Devices to Improve the Performance, Economics, and Safety of Heavy Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

Under contract to the DOE Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies, the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) is developing and evaluating pneumatic (blown) aerodynamic devices to improve the performance, economics, stability and safety of operation of Heavy Vehicles. The objective of this program is to apply the pneumatic aerodynamic aircraft technology previously developed and flight-tested by GTRI personnel to the design of an efficient blown tractor-trailer configuration. Recent experimental results obtained by GTRI using blowing have shown drag reductions of 35% on a streamlined automobile wind-tunnel model. Also measured were lift or down-load increases of 100-150% and the ability to control aerodynamic moments about all 3 axes without any moving control surfaces. Similar drag reductions yielded by blowing on bluff afterbody trailers in current US trucking fleet operations are anticipated to reduce yearly fuel consumption by more than 1.2 billion gallons, while even further reduction is possible using pneumatic lift to reduce tire rolling resistance. Conversely, increased drag and down force generated instantaneously by blowing can greatly increase braking characteristics and control in wet/icy weather due to effective ''weight'' increases on the tires. Safety is also enhanced by controlling side loads and moments caused on these Heavy Vehicles by winds, gusts and other vehicles passing. This may also help to eliminate the jack-knifing problem if caused by extreme wind side loads on the trailer. Lastly, reduction of the turbulent wake behind the trailer can reduce splash and spray patterns and rough air being experienced by following vehicles. To be presented by GTRI in this paper will be results developed during the early portion of this effort, including a preliminary systems study, CFD prediction of the blown flowfields, and design of the baseline conventional tractor-trailer model and the pneumatic wind-tunnel model.

Robert J. Englar

2000-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

160

Numerical simulation of VAWT stochastic aerodynamic loads produced by atmospheric turbauence: VAWT-SAL code  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Blade fatigue life is an important element in determining the economic viability of the Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT). A principal source of blade fatigue is thought to be the stochastic (i.e., random) aerodynamic loads created by atmospheric turbulence. This report describes the theoretical background of the VAWT Stochastic Aerodynamic Loads (VAWT-SAL) computer code, whose purpose is to numerically simulate these random loads, given the rotor geometry, operating conditions, and assumed turbulence properties. A Double-Multiple-Stream Tube (DMST) analysis is employed to model the rotor's aerodynamic response. The analysis includes the effects of Reynolds number variations, different airfoil sections and chord lengths along the blade span, and an empirical model for dynamic stall effects. The mean ambient wind is assumed to have a shear profile which is described by either a power law or a logarithmic variation with height above ground. Superimposed on this is a full 3-D field of turbulence: i.e., in addition to random fluctuations in time, the turbulence is allowed to vary randomly in planes perpendicular to the mean wind. The influence of flow retardation on the convection of turbulence through the turbine is also modeled. Calculations are presented for the VAWT 34-m Test Bed currently in operation at Bushland, Texas. Predicted time histories of the loads, as well as their Fourier spectra, are presented and discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on the differences between so-called steady-state'' (mean wind only) predictions, and those produced with turbulence present. Somewhat surprisingly, turbulence is found to be capable of either increasing or decreasing the average output power, depending on the turbine's tip-speed ratio. A heuristic explanation for such behavior is postulated, and a simple formula is derived for predicting the magnitude of this effect without the need for a full stochastic simulation. 41 refs., 32 figs., 1 tab.

Homicz, G.F.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aerodynamic diameter pm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Aerodynamics overview of the ground transportation systems (GTS) project for heavy vehicle drag reduction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The focus of the research was to investigate the fundamental aerodynamics of the base flow of a tractor trailer that would prove useful in fluid flow management. Initially, industry design needs and constraints were defined. This was followed by an evaluation of state-of-the-art Navier-Stokes based computational fluid dynamics tools. Analytical methods were then used in combination with computational tools in a design process. Several geometries were tested at 1:8 scale in a low speed wind tunnel. In addition to the baseline geometry, base add-on devices of the class of ogival boattails and slants were analyzed.

Gutierrez, W.T.; Hassan, B.; Croll, R.H.; Rutledge, W.H.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

162

The signal of $Z^\\pm(4430)$ in nucleon-antinucleon scattering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, we study the production of $Z^\\pm(4430)$ at nucleon-antinucleon scattering experiment. Considering the PANDA experiment to be a ideal platform to explore the production of the charmonium and charmonim-like states, we suggest the forthcoming PANDA experiment to pay attention to the production of $Z^\\pm(4430)$.

Ke, Hong-Wei

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

The signal of $Z^\\pm(4430)$ in nucleon-antinucleon scattering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the production of $Z^\\pm(4430)$ at a nucleon-antinucleon scattering experiment. Considering the PANDA experiment to be an ideal platform to explore the production of the charmonium and charmonim-like states, we suggest the forthcoming PANDA experiment to pay attention to the production of $Z^\\pm(4430)$.

Hong-Wei Ke; Xiang Liu

2008-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

164

Today at 2:30 pm ET: Hangout With Science, Tech, and Innovation Leaders |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Today at 2:30 pm ET: Hangout With Science, Tech, and Innovation Today at 2:30 pm ET: Hangout With Science, Tech, and Innovation Leaders Today at 2:30 pm ET: Hangout With Science, Tech, and Innovation Leaders February 27, 2013 - 9:00am Q&A What questions do you have about science, tech, engineering and math (STEM) education and careers? Ask Us Addthis Join our Google+ Hangout on bridging the diversity gap in STEM education and careers at 2:30 pm ET today. | Graphic courtesy of Sarah Gerrity. Join our Google+ Hangout on bridging the diversity gap in STEM education and careers at 2:30 pm ET today. | Graphic courtesy of Sarah Gerrity. Dot Harris Dot Harris The Honorable Dot Harris, Director, Office of Economic Impact and Diversity

165

COLLOQUIUM - NOTE SPECIAL TIME OF 3:15PM: Savannah River National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

May 15, 2013, 3:15pm to 5:30pm May 15, 2013, 3:15pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM - NOTE SPECIAL TIME OF 3:15PM: Savannah River National Laboratory: Underpinning Critical National Missions Dr. Jeff Griffin Savannah River National Laboratory The Cold War mission of the Savannah River Site in South Carolina was to produce nuclear materials for the national defense. Since the Cold War ended, SRS has continued to ensure United States national and energy security while cleaning up the environmental legacy from nuclear materials production. Throughout the history of SRS, the Savannah River National Laboratory has developed the processes to successfully accomplish the site's missions. SRNL is a multi-program laboratory dedicated to addressing the nation's present and future challenges in National Security, Clean Energy, and

166

Aerodynamically induced radial forces in a centrifugal gas compressor: Part 2 -- Computational investigation  

SciTech Connect

Radial loads and direction of a centrifugal gas compressor containing a high specific speed mixed flow impeller and a single tongue volute were determined both experimentally and computationally at both design and off-design conditions. The experimental methodology was developed in conjunction with a traditional ASME PTC-10 closed-loop test to determine radial load and direction. The experimental study is detailed in Part 1 of this paper (Moore and Flathers, 1998). The computational method employs a commercially available, fully three-dimensional viscous code to analyze the impeller and the volute interaction. An uncoupled scheme was initially used where the impeller and volute were analyzed as separate models using a common vaneless diffuser geometry. The two calculations were then repeated until the boundary conditions at a chosen location in the common vaneless diffuser were nearly the same. Subsequently, a coupled scheme was used where the entire stage geometry was analyzed in one calculation, thus eliminating the need for manual iteration of the two independent calculations. In addition to radial load and direction information, this computational procedure also provided aerodynamic stage performance. The effect of impeller front face and rear face cavities was also quantified. The paper will discuss computational procedures, including grid generation and boundary conditions, as well as comparisons of the various computational schemes to experiment. The results of this study will show the limitations and benefits of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) for determination of radial load, direction, and aerodynamic stage performance.

Flathers, M.B.; Bache, G.E.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Advanced Aerodynamic Devices to Improve the Performance, Economics, Handling, and Safety of Heavy Vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research is being conducted at the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) to develop advanced aerodynamic devices to improve the performance, economics, stability, handling and safety of operation of Heavy Vehicles by using previously-developed and flight-tested pneumatic (blown) aircraft technology. Recent wind-tunnel investigations of a generic Heavy Vehicle model with blowing slots on both the leading and trailing edges of the trailer have been conducted under contract to the DOE Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies. These experimental results show overall aerodynamic drag reductions on the Pneumatic Heavy Vehicle of 50% using only 1 psig blowing pressure in the plenums, and over 80% drag reductions if additional blowing air were available. Additionally, an increase in drag force for braking was confirmed by blowing different slots. Lift coefficient was increased for rolling resistance reduction by blowing only the top slot, while downforce was produced for traction increase by blowing only the bottom. Also, side force and yawing moment were generated on either side of the vehicle, and directional stability was restored by blowing the appropriate side slot. These experimental results and the predicted full-scale payoffs are presented in this paper, as is a discussion of additional applications to conventional commercial autos, buses, motor homes, and Sport Utility Vehicles.

Robert J. Englar

2001-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

168

Economic and Performance Benefits Resulting From the Use of Large Diameter  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Performance Benefits Resulting From the Use of Large Diameter and Performance Benefits Resulting From the Use of Large Diameter Fans on Air Cooled Heat Exchangers (A Case Study in the Use of Large Fan Air Cooled Condensers at the Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Power Plant, Oregon) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Economic and Performance Benefits Resulting From the Use of Large Diameter Fans on Air Cooled Heat Exchangers (A Case Study in the Use of Large Fan Air Cooled Condensers at the Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Power Plant, Oregon) Abstract A significant improvement in air cooler technology was implementedat the Neal Hot Springs geothermal power plant in Vale,Oregon. Large cooling tower fans were used in an induced draftarrangement (fans above the heat exchanger). The total numberof fans was reduced from 270 x 12ft / 3.7m fans

169

Large-diameter, high-plutonium metallic fuel testing in EBR-II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The integral fast reactor (IFR) concept makes use of U-Pu-Zr metallic fuel alloys because of favorable core behavior characteristics and compatibility with a pyrometallurgical reprocessing scheme. Advanced reactor designs use U-x Pu-10 Zr (where 20 {le} x {le} 28). Most of the IFR fuel performance database was obtained with fuel containing {le}20 wt% Pu having a 0.439-cm diameter irradiated in cladding tubes having a 0.584-cm o.d. However, commercial implementations of the IFR concept (e.g., the advanced liquid-metal reactor by General Electric) will likely use fuel of larger diameter and plutonium contents {ge}20 wt%. The HT9 advanced driver fuel test, irradiated in Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II), was initiated to obtain irradiation performance data from larger diameter fuel cast with a range of plutonium compositions and clad in the reference cladding alloy HT9.

Crawford, D.C.; Hayes, S.L.; Pahl, R.G. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

170

Subcooled and saturated water flow boiling pressure drop in small diameter helical coils at low pressure  

SciTech Connect

Experimental pressure drop results on boiling water flow through three helical coils of tube inner diameter of 4.03 mm and 4.98 mm and coil diameter to tube diameter ratio of 26.1, 64.1 and 93.3 are presented. Both subcooled and saturated flow boiling are investigated, covering operating pressures from 120 to 660 kPa, mass fluxes from 290 to 690 kg m{sup -2} s{sup -1} and heat fluxes from 50 to 440 kW m{sup -2}. Existing correlations for subcooled flow pressure drop are found not capable to fit the present subcooled database, while the measurements in saturated flow conditions are successfully reproduced by existing correlations for both straight and coiled pipe two-phase flow. The experimental database is included in tabular form. (author)

Cioncolini, Andrea; Santini, Lorenzo; Ricotti, Marco E. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Politecnico di Milano, via Ponzio 34/3, 20133 Milano (Italy)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

171

Prediction of Aortic Diameter Values in Healthy Turkish Infants, Children, and Adolescents by Using Artificial Neural Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aorta is the largest vessel in the systemic circuit. Its diameter is very important to guess for child before adult age, due to growing up body. Aortic diameter, one of the cardiac values, changes in time. Evaluation of the cardiac structures and ... Keywords: Aortic diameter, Artificial neural network, Echocardiography, Line based, Normalization, Pediatric cardiology

Bayram Akdemir; Bülent Oran; Salih Gunes; Sevim Karaaslan

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Prediction of Aortic Diameter Values in Healthy Turkish Infants, Children and Adolescents Via Adaptive Network Based Fuzzy Inference System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aorta diameter size one of the cardiac value is very important to guess for child before adult age, due to growing up body. In conventional method, the experts use curve charts to decide whether their measured aortic diameter size is normal or not. ... Keywords: ANFIS, Aortic Diameter, Line Base Normalization Method, Prediction

Bayram Akdemir; Salih Güne?; Bülent Oran

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Characterization of Ambient PM2.5 in the Upper  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization of Ambient PM2.5 in the Upper Midwest Characterization of Ambient PM2.5 in the Upper Midwest As part of a Cooperative Agreement with DOE-NETL, the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) is developing advanced sampling and analysis methodologies for particulate matter that can be used for source apportionment and to assist in health studies. These techniques will be used to determine sources of fine particulate matter in rural states such as North Dakota. Ambient particulate matter (PM) sampling and automated scanning electron microscopy, (ASEM) are being used to characterize and evaluate the sources of PM2.5 at three rural sites. Land use in the sampling site locations is dominated by ranching and small grain farming. Potential sources of PM in these areas include diesel- and gasoline-fueled motor vehicles, fugitive dust from gravel roads and agriculture, vegetation and fires, an oil refinery, and coal-fired power plants. PM2.5 samples were collected using an automatic cartridge collection unit for ASEM analysis. An ASEM method has been developed to size and chemically classify individual particles composing PM2.5.

174

Interested in STEM? Join us for a Tweet-up This Thursday at 4pm ET |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Interested in STEM? Join us for a Tweet-up This Thursday at 4pm ET Interested in STEM? Join us for a Tweet-up This Thursday at 4pm ET Interested in STEM? Join us for a Tweet-up This Thursday at 4pm ET May 8, 2012 - 3:37pm Q&A What do you want to know about the Energy Department's work in STEM investment? Ask Us Addthis Join Michelle Fox on Twitter this Thursday at 4:00pm for a Tweet-up about STEM investments in education and the workforce. Join Michelle Fox on Twitter this Thursday at 4:00pm for a Tweet-up about STEM investments in education and the workforce. Amanda Scott Amanda Scott Former Managing Editor, Energy.gov How can I participate? Send us your questions via Twitter (@ENERGY) using #STEM. Email us your questions at newmedia@hq.doe.gov. Join us on Thursday, May 10 at 4:00pm ET to get your questions answered on Twitter (@ENERGY).

175

Microlens rapid prototyping technique with capability for wide variation in lens diameter and focal length  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A ''mold-less'' method for rapid prototyping spherical microlenses using the surface tension of a transparent, temperature sensitive polymer is presented. The lens size can be varied with the volume of the polymer dispensed, with a diameter range of ... Keywords: Microlenses, Polymer, Rapid prototyping, Surface tension

J. L. Cruz-Campa; M. Okandan; M. L. Busse; G. N. Nielson

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Hardware and software efficacy in assessment of fine root diameter distributions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fine roots constitute the majority of root system surface area and thus most of the nutrient and water absorption surface. Fine roots are, however, the least understood of all plant roots. A sensitivity analysis of several software programs capable of ... Keywords: Diameter distribution, Digital image analysis, Fine roots, High resolution, Root length, Scanner

Richard W. Zobel

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

METHOD OF BUTT WELDING SMALL THERMOCOUPLES 0.001 TO 0.010 INCH IN DIAMETER  

SciTech Connect

A method of butt welding thermoeouples 0.001 to 0.010 in. in diameter is described. The thermocouple wires are positioned in a micro-manipulator, and a controlled welding pulse is applied to them. This welding method provides uniform upset welds through a simple preduction technique. (auth)

Stover, C.M.

1960-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Carbon nanotube diameter selection by pretreatment of metal catalysts on surfaces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new and useful nanotube growth substrate conditioning processes is herein disclosed that allows the growth of vertical arrays of carbon nanotubes where the average diameter of the nanotubes can be selected and/or controlled as compared to the prior art.

Hauge, Robert H. (Houston, TX); Xu, Ya-Qiong (Houston, TX); Shan, Hongwei (Houston, TX); Nicholas, Nolan Walker (South Charleston, WV); Kim, Myung Jong (Houston, TX); Schmidt, Howard K. (Cypress, TX); Kittrell, W. Carter (Houston, TX)

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

179

The Future State of HighSpeed Rail in Illinois April 29, 2011 1:005:00 pm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation Center 2:50 pm Models for Scheduling of High Speed and Freight Trains Krishna Jha ViceThe Future State of HighSpeed Rail in Illinois April 29, 2011 ­ 1:005:00 pm Symposium University Transportation Center 1:05 pm Introduction: Symposium Moderator Norman Carlson Chairman

Bustamante, Fabián E.

180

Last Name First Name Day & Time Group Location Abend Andrew Wednesday 3:10pm 44 Maginnes 113  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

21 Maginnes 112 Barr Dustin Thursday 12:10pm 25 Maginnes 101 #12;Barrera Francisco Thursday 8:10am 31 2 Maginnes 260 Herbert Sabrina Wednesday 7:10pm 50 Maginnes 112 Hernandez Francisco Friday 8:10am 10 Global Union Lounge (Coxe Hall) Hernandez Yashira Wednesday 3:10pm 48 Maginnes 105 Hernandez Emily

Gilchrist, James F.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aerodynamic diameter pm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Last Name First Name Time Group Location Abend Andrew Wednesday 3:10pm 44 Maginnes 113  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kristiana Monday 8:10am 21 Maginnes 112 Barr Dustin Thursday 12:10pm 25 Maginnes 101 Barrera Francisco Wednesday 7:10pm 50 Maginnes 112 Hernandez Francisco Friday 8:10am 10 Global Union Lounge (Coxe Hall) Hernandez Yashira Wednesday 3:10pm 48 Maginnes 105 Hernandez Emily Wednesday 8:10am 52 Lewis Lab 311

Gilchrist, James F.

182

Laboratory evaluation of fan/filter units' aerodynamic and energy performance  

SciTech Connect

The paper discusses the benefits of having a consistent testing method to characterize aerodynamic and energy performance of FFUs. It presents evaluation methods of laboratory-measured performance of ten relatively new, 1220 mm x 610 mm (or 4 ft x 2 ft) fan-filter units (FFUs), and includes results of a set of relevant metrics such as energy performance indices (EPI) based upon the sample FFUs tested. This paper concludes that there are variations in FFUs' performance, and that using a consistent testing and evaluation method can generate compatible and comparable FFU performance information. The paper also suggests that benefits and opportunities exist for our method of testing FFU energy performance to be integrated in future recommended practices.

Xu, Tengfang; Jeng, Ming-Shan

2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

183

Definition: Reduced Sox, Nox, And Pm-2.5 Emissions | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sox, Nox, And Pm-2.5 Emissions Sox, Nox, And Pm-2.5 Emissions Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Sox, Nox, And Pm-2.5 Emissions Functions that provide this benefit can lead to avoided vehicle miles, decrease the amount of central generation needed to their serve load (through reduced electricity consumption, reduced electricity losses, more optimal generation dispatch), and or reduce peak generation. These impacts translate into a reduction in pollutant emissions produced by fossil-based electricity generators and vehicles.[1] Related Terms electricity generation, reduced electricity losses, smart grid References ↑ SmartGrid.gov 'Description of Benefits' An in LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. line Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Reduced_Sox,_Nox,_And_Pm-2.5_Emissions&oldid=502508

184

Hangout with Clean Cities on Thursday, June 20, at 2:30 pm ET | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hangout with Clean Cities on Thursday, June 20, at 2:30 pm ET Hangout with Clean Cities on Thursday, June 20, at 2:30 pm ET Hangout with Clean Cities on Thursday, June 20, at 2:30 pm ET June 13, 2013 - 5:45pm Q&A Want to know what we are doing to cut the nation's oil use in transportation? Ask Us Addthis Mark your calendars for a Google+ Hangout on Clean Cities: Celebrating 20 Years of Sustainable Transportation. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department. Mark your calendars for a Google+ Hangout on Clean Cities: Celebrating 20 Years of Sustainable Transportation. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department. Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs How can I participate? Sign up at the Google+ Event page. Tweet questions to @ENERGY with the hashtag #AskEnergy. Ask us on the Energy Department's Facebook and Google+ pages.

185

#LabChat: Extreme Circumstances, Unique Solutions, June 28 at 1pm EDT |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Extreme Circumstances, Unique Solutions, June 28 at 1pm Extreme Circumstances, Unique Solutions, June 28 at 1pm EDT #LabChat: Extreme Circumstances, Unique Solutions, June 28 at 1pm EDT June 27, 2012 - 2:31pm Addthis The simple, portable device identifies materials through their characteristic energy signals as unique as fingerprints. The three detectors are housed in a thermos-sized container that is connected to a laptop computer. The device issues a signal turning the laptop display bright red when nuclear material of interest is identified. | Photo courtesy of Princeton University The simple, portable device identifies materials through their characteristic energy signals as unique as fingerprints. The three detectors are housed in a thermos-sized container that is connected to a laptop computer. The device issues a signal turning the laptop display

186

LiveChat Wed, 11/16, 2 pm ET: Industrial Energy Efficiency | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11/16, 2 pm ET: Industrial Energy Efficiency 11/16, 2 pm ET: Industrial Energy Efficiency LiveChat Wed, 11/16, 2 pm ET: Industrial Energy Efficiency November 14, 2011 - 1:40pm Addthis Do you have questions or ideas about how the U.S. Department of Energy can contribute to global competitiveness through industrial efficiency? Dr. Kathleen Hogan would like to hear them. Michael Hess Michael Hess Former Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs How can I participate? Send an email to Dr. Hogan at newmedia@hq.doe.gov, tweet to @energy with the hashtag #energymatters; or leave a question on Energy's Facebook page. Throughout the last two weeks, we've been highlighting specific examples of industrial and commercial energy efficiency measures - and how they are improving American competitiveness and the economy.

187

P/M Alloy 625 Special Composition for Redraw-Stock Welding Wire  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract. P/M Alloy 625 provides specific advantages for critical service oil and gas ... 6H2O solution and in a simulated oil and gas environment. No cracking ...

188

First and Second Tier Properties of HIP and Forged P/M 706  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

pin grain boundaries during thermo-mechanical treatments resulting in finer grain sizes [2,3]. In the HIP. P/M 706, fine intragranular precipitates of y '- and ...

189

4:45PM ET TODAY: On-the-Record Conference Call with Administration...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Discuss the Obama Administration's Announcement of 14 Initial Partners in the Better Buildings Challenge 4:45PM ET TODAY: On-the-Record Conference Call with Administration, Jobs...

190

NETL: IEP - PM Emissions Control: In-House R&D  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The NETL PM 2.5 In-house research program is aimed at specific research goals and objectives to provide insight into the degree that coal-fired electric power generating stations...

191

January 21, 2014 @ 5:00 PM (EST): 2014 NJ Regional Science Bowl...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tuesday, January 21, 2014 - 05:00 January 21, 2014 @ 5:00 PM (EST): 2014 NJ Regional Science Bowl registration closes Registration for the 2014 New Jersey Regional Science Bowl...

192

Air levels and mutagenicity of PM-10 in an indoor ice arena  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors report here their results from a preliminary study to evaluate a methodology for surveying air quality by measuring concentrations of PM-10 and the corresponding concentrations of mutagenic activity. The PM-10 was collected, during several hockey games at an ice arena using an Indoor Air Sampling Impactor (IASI) developed by Marple et al. During the course of the study, smoking restrictions were imposed in the stadium and the impact of these restrictions on PM-10 levels was also evaluated. The mutagenic activities of solvent extracts of the PM-10 were determined using the microsuspension modification of the Samonella typhimurium/microsome test. Mutagenic activity has often been used as a rough index of exposure to potential carcinogens and mutagens and to help define their sources.

Georghiou, P.E.; Blagden, P.A. (Memorial Univ. of Newfoundland, St. Johns (Canada)); Snow, D.A.; Winsor, L. (Geortec Ltd., St. Johns, Newfoundland (Canada)); Williams, D.T. (Health and Welfare Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada))

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Diesel Emissions Control- Sulfur Effects (DECSE): Summary of PM Results and Data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Determine the impact of fuel sulfur levels on emission control systems that could be implemented to lower emissions of NOx and PM from on-highway trucks in the 2002-2004 time frame.

Gorse, Jr. Robert A.

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

194

Contribution of garbage burning to chloride and PM[subscript 2.5] in Mexico City  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The contribution of garbage burning (GB) emissions to chloride and PM[subscript 2.5] in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) has been investigated for the period of 24 to 29 March during the MILAGRO-2006 campaign using ...

Li, G.

195

N 18, a New Damage Tolerant PM Superalloy for High Temperature ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

and the properties of N 18. This new. P.M. alloy was designed for application in high temperature turbine discs. N 18 is strengthened by a high volume fraction.

196

4:45PM ET TODAY: On-the-Record Conference Call with Administration, Jobs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4:45PM ET TODAY: On-the-Record Conference Call with Administration, 4:45PM ET TODAY: On-the-Record Conference Call with Administration, Jobs Council Officials to Discuss the Obama Administration's Announcement of 14 Initial Partners in the Better Buildings Challenge 4:45PM ET TODAY: On-the-Record Conference Call with Administration, Jobs Council Officials to Discuss the Obama Administration's Announcement of 14 Initial Partners in the Better Buildings Challenge June 30, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis THE WHITE HOUSE Office of the Press Secretary WASHINGTON, D.C. - Today at 4:45PM ET, Senior Administration Officials Maria Vargas and Michelle Moore, and Member of the President's Jobs Council Laura Tyson will hold an on-the-record conference call to discuss the Administration's announcement today at the Clinton Global Initiative America meeting of 14 initial partners in the Better Buildings Challenge.

197

A Quantitative Aerosol Generator Designed for Particulate Matter (PM) Continuous Emissions Monitoring Systems (CEMS) Calibration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A growing number of utilities are required to continuously monitor particulate matter (PM) emissions using continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMS). Currently, simultaneous EPA manual reference method tests (EPA Reference Method 5) must be used to calibrate and audit these PM CEMS following EPA Performance Specification 11 guidelines (PS-11). These calibrations are not only difficult, time consuming, and expensive to perform, but are particularly onerous because they require the utility to modify p...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

198

ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF REPLACEMENT CORES FOR SM AND PM TYPE REACTORS  

SciTech Connect

An economic analysis is presented for the fabrication of replacement cores for SM and PM type reactors, including analysis of various core types and core fabrication technologies. The analysis indicates that major savings are possible by utilizing Type 3 cores (40-mil plates, 25 wt% UO/sub 2/, welded assembly) in all SM and PM type reactors, and that significant savings are possible by multiple core procurement and reprocessing, and relaxation of cobalt and tantalum requirements in Type 347 stainless steel. (auth)

Wilder, A.S.

1961-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

#LabChat: What is Dark Energy? Oct 25 at 2pm ET | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

What is Dark Energy? Oct 25 at 2pm ET What is Dark Energy? Oct 25 at 2pm ET #LabChat: What is Dark Energy? Oct 25 at 2pm ET October 23, 2012 - 3:03pm Q&A #LabChat Oct 25, 2 pm ET | These physicists are using advanced telescopes and cameras to look for proof of dark energy. Ask them your questions. Ask Us Addthis What is dark energy? Learn about the force we think accounts for three-quarters of the mass and energy in the known universe. What is dark energy? Learn about the force we think accounts for three-quarters of the mass and energy in the known universe. Michael Hess Michael Hess Former Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs How can I participate? Send us your questions via Twitter (@ENERGY) using #labchat. Email us your questions at newmedia@hq.doe.gov. This Thursday, October 25, at 2 p.m. EDT, three physicists studying dark

200

Vessel-Spanning Bubble Formation in K-Basin Sludge Stored in Large-Diameter Containers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The K Basin sludge to be retrieved and stored in the large diameter containers (LDCs) contains some fraction of uranium metal that generates hydrogen gas, which introduces potential upset conditions. One postulated upset condition is a rising plug of sludge supported by a hydrogen bubble that is driven into the vent filters at the top of the container. In laboratory testing with actual K Basin sludge, vessel-spanning bubbles that lifted plugs of sludge were observed in 3-inch-diameter graduated cylinders. This report presents a series of analytical assessments performed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to address the potential for the generation of a vessel spanning bubble in the LDCs. The assessments included the development and evaluation of static and dynamic bubble formation models over the projected range of K Basin sludge physical properties. Additionally, the theory of circular plates was extrapolated to examine conditions under which a plug of sludge would collapse and release a spanning bubble.

Terrones, Guillermo; Gauglitz, Phillip A.

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aerodynamic diameter pm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Test, Evaluation, and Demonstration of Practical Devices/Systems to Reduce Aerodynamic Drag of Tractor/Semitrailer Combination Unit Trucks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Class 8 heavy-duty trucks account for over three-quarters of the total diesel fuel used by commercial trucks (trucks with GVWRs more than 10,000 pounds) in the United States each year. At the highway speeds at which these trucks travel (i.e., 60 mph or greater), aerodynamic drag is a major part of total horsepower needed to move the truck down the highway, Reductions in aerodynamic drag can yield measurable benefits in fuel economy through the use of relatively inexpensive and simple devices. The goal of this project was to examine a number of aerodynamic drag reduction devices and systems and determine their effectiveness in reducing aerodynamic drag of Class 8 tractor/semitrailer combination-units, thus contributing to DOE's goal of reducing transportation petroleum use. The project team included major heavy truck manufacturers in the United States, along with the management and industry expertise of the Truck Manufacturers Association as the lead investigative organization. The Truck Manufacturers Association (TMA) is the national trade association representing the major North American manufacturers of Class 6-8 trucks (GVWRs over 19,500 lbs). Four major truck manufacturers participated in this project with TMA: Freightliner LLC; International Truck and Engine Corporation; Mack Trucks Inc.; and Volvo Trucks North America, Inc. Together, these manufacturers represent over three-quarters of total Class 8 truck sales in the United States. These four manufacturers pursued complementary research efforts as part of this project. The project work was separated into two phases conducted over a two-year period. In Phase I, candidate aerodynamic devices and systems were screened to focus research and development attention on devices that offered the most potential. This was accomplished using full-size vehicle tests, scale model tests, and computational fluid dynamics analyses. In Phase II, the most promising devices were installed on full-size trucks and their effect on fuel economy was determined, either through on-road testing or full-size wind tunnel testing. All of the manufacturers worked with devices and systems that offer practical solutions to reduce aerodynamic drag, accounting for functionality, durability, cost effectiveness, reliability, and maintainability. The project team members and their roles and responsibilities are shown in Figure 2-1. Figure 2-2 shows the Phase I and II project schedules for all four projects and associated management activities.

Scott Smith; Karla Younessi; Matt Markstaller; Dan Schlesinger; Bhaskar Bhatnagar; Donald Smith; Bruno Banceu; Ron Schoon; V.K. Sharma; Mark Kachmarsky; Srikant Ghantae; Michael Sorrels; Conal Deedy; Justin Clark; Skip Yeakel; Michael D. Laughlin; Charlotte Seigler; Sidney Diamond

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

202

Measurements of Aerodynamic Roughness, Bowen Ratio, and Atmospheric Surface Layer Height by Eddy Covariance and Tethersonde Systems Simultaneously over a Heterogeneous Rice Paddy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aerodynamic roughness, Bowen ratio, and friction velocity were measured over a rice paddy using tethersonde and eddy covariance (EC) systems. In addition, the height ranges of the atmospheric inertial sublayer (ISL) were derived using the ...

Jeng-Lin Tsai; Ben-Jei Tsuang; Po-Sheng Lu; Ken-Hui Chang; Ming-Hwi Yao; Yuan Shen

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Significant Decrease of Uncertainties in Sensible Heat Flux Simulation Using Temporally Variable Aerodynamic Roughness in Two Typical Forest Ecosystems of China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerodynamic roughness length zom is an important parameter for reliably simulating surface fluxes. It varies with wind speed, atmospheric stratification, terrain, and other factors. However, it is usually considered a constant. It is known that ...

Yanlian Zhou; Weimin Ju; Xiaomin Sun; Xuefa Wen; Dexin Guan

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Advanced Electric Systems and Aerodynamics for Efficiency Improvements in Heavy Duty Trucks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Electric Systems and Aerodynamics for Efficiency Improvements in Heavy Duty Trucks program (DE-FC26-04NT42189), commonly referred to as the AES program, focused on areas that will primarily benefit fuel economy and improve heat rejection while driving over the road. The AES program objectives were to: (1) Analyze, design, build, and test a cooling system that provided a minimum of 10 percent greater heat rejection in the same frontal area with no increase in parasitic fan load. (2) Realize fuel savings with advanced power management and acceleration assist by utilizing an integrated starter/generator (ISG) and energy storage devices. (3) Quantify the effect of aerodynamic drag due to the frontal shape mandated by the area required for the cooling system. The program effort consisted of modeling and designing components for optimum fuel efficiency, completing fabrication of necessary components, integrating these components into the chassis test bed, completing controls programming, and performance testing the system both on a chassis dynamometer and on the road. Emission control measures for heavy-duty engines have resulted in increased engine heat loads, thus introducing added parasitic engine cooling loads. Truck electrification, in the form of thermal management, offers technological solutions to mitigate or even neutralize the effects of this trend. Thermal control offers opportunities to avoid increases in cooling system frontal area and forestall reduced fuel economy brought about by additional aerodynamic vehicle drag. This project explored such thermal concepts by installing a 2007 engine that is compliant with current regulations and bears additional heat rejection associated with meeting these regulations. This newer engine replaced the 2002 engine from a previous project that generated less heat rejection. Advanced power management, utilizing a continuously optimized and controlled power flow between electric components, can offer additional fuel economy benefits to the heavy-duty trucking industry. Control software for power management brings added value to the power distribution and energy storage architecture on board a truck with electric accessories and an ISG. The research team has built upon a previous truck electrification project, formally, 'Parasitic Energy Loss Reduction and Enabling Technologies for Class 7/8 Trucks', DE-FC04-2000AL6701, where the fundamental concept of electrically-driven accessories replacing belt/gear-driven accessories was demonstrated on a Kenworth T2000 truck chassis. The electrical accessories, shown in Figure 1, were controlled to provide 'flow on demand' variable-speed operation and reduced parasitic engine loads for increased fuel economy. These accessories also provided solutions for main engine idle reduction in long haul trucks. The components and systems of the current project have been integrated into the same Kenworth T2000 truck platform. Reducing parasitic engine loading by decoupling accessory loads from the engine and driving them electrically has been a central concept of this project. Belt or gear-driven engine accessories, such as water pump, air conditioning compressor, or air compressor, are necessarily tied to the engine speed dictated by the current vehicle operating conditions. These conventional accessory pumps are sized to provide adequate flow or pressure at low idle or peak torque speeds, resulting in excess flow or pressure at cruising or rated speeds. The excess flow is diverted through a pressure-minimizing device such as a relief valve thereby expending energy to drive unnecessary and inefficient pump operation. This inefficiency causes an increased parasitic load to the engine, which leads to a loss of usable output power and decreased fuel economy. Controlling variable-speed electric motors to provide only the required flow or pressure of a particular accessory system can yield significant increases in fuel economy for a commercial vehicle. Motor loads at relatively high power levels (1-5 kW, or higher) can be efficiently provided

Larry Slone; Jeffrey Birkel

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

205

Advanced Electric Systems and Aerodynamics for Efficiency Improvements in Heavy Duty Trucks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Advanced Electric Systems and Aerodynamics for Efficiency Improvements in Heavy Duty Trucks program (DE-FC26-04NT42189), commonly referred to as the AES program, focused on areas that will primarily benefit fuel economy and improve heat rejection while driving over the road. The AES program objectives were to: (1) Analyze, design, build, and test a cooling system that provided a minimum of 10 percent greater heat rejection in the same frontal area with no increase in parasitic fan load. (2) Realize fuel savings with advanced power management and acceleration assist by utilizing an integrated starter/generator (ISG) and energy storage devices. (3) Quantify the effect of aerodynamic drag due to the frontal shape mandated by the area required for the cooling system. The program effort consisted of modeling and designing components for optimum fuel efficiency, completing fabrication of necessary components, integrating these components into the chassis test bed, completing controls programming, and performance testing the system both on a chassis dynamometer and on the road. Emission control measures for heavy-duty engines have resulted in increased engine heat loads, thus introducing added parasitic engine cooling loads. Truck electrification, in the form of thermal management, offers technological solutions to mitigate or even neutralize the effects of this trend. Thermal control offers opportunities to avoid increases in cooling system frontal area and forestall reduced fuel economy brought about by additional aerodynamic vehicle drag. This project explored such thermal concepts by installing a 2007 engine that is compliant with current regulations and bears additional heat rejection associated with meeting these regulations. This newer engine replaced the 2002 engine from a previous project that generated less heat rejection. Advanced power management, utilizing a continuously optimized and controlled power flow between electric components, can offer additional fuel economy benefits to the heavy-duty trucking industry. Control software for power management brings added value to the power distribution and energy storage architecture on board a truck with electric accessories and an ISG. The research team has built upon a previous truck electrification project, formally, 'Parasitic Energy Loss Reduction and Enabling Technologies for Class 7/8 Trucks', DE-FC04-2000AL6701, where the fundamental concept of electrically-driven accessories replacing belt/gear-driven accessories was demonstrated on a Kenworth T2000 truck chassis. The electrical accessories, shown in Figure 1, were controlled to provide 'flow on demand' variable-speed operation and reduced parasitic engine loads for increased fuel economy. These accessories also provided solutions for main engine idle reduction in long haul trucks. The components and systems of the current project have been integrated into the same Kenworth T2000 truck platform. Reducing parasitic engine loading by decoupling accessory loads from the engine and driving them electrically has been a central concept of this project. Belt or gear-driven engine accessories, such as water pump, air conditioning compressor, or air compressor, are necessarily tied to the engine speed dictated by the current vehicle operating conditions. These conventional accessory pumps are sized to provide adequate flow or pressure at low idle or peak torque speeds, resulting in excess flow or pressure at cruising or rated speeds. The excess flow is diverted through a pressure-minimizing device such as a relief valve thereby expending energy to drive unnecessary and inefficient pump operation. This inefficiency causes an increased parasitic load to the engine, which leads to a loss of usable output power and decreased fuel economy. Controlling variable-speed electric motors to provide only the required flow or pressure of a particular accessory system can yield significant increases in fuel economy for a commercial vehicle. Motor loads at relatively high power levels (1-5 kW, or higher) can be efficiently provided

Larry Slone; Jeffrey Birkel

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

206

Mathematical Modeling of Aerodynamic Space -to - Surface Flight with Trajectory for Avoid Intercepting Process for Safety and Security Issues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The research project has been made for mathematical modeling of aerospace system Space-to-Surface for avoid intercepting process by flight objects Surface-to-Air. The research has been completed and created mathematical models which used for research and statistical analysis. In mathematical modeling has been including a few models: Model of atmosphere, Model of speed of sound, Model of flight head in space, Model of flight in atmosphere, Models of navigation and guidance, Model and statistical analysis of approximation of aerodynamic characteristics. Modeling has been created for a Space-to-Surface system defined for an optimal trajectory in terminal phase. The modeling includes models for simulation atmosphere, aerodynamic flight and navigation by an infrared system. The modeling simulation includes statistical analysis of the modeling results.

Gorneff, Serge

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Film Cooling, Heat Transfer and Aerodynamic Measurements in a Three Stage Research Gas Turbine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The existing 3-stage turbine research facility at the Turbomachinery Performance and Flow Research Laboratory (TPFL), Texas A and M University, is re-designed and newly installed to enable coolant gas injection on the first stage rotor platform to study the effects of rotation on film cooling and heat transfer. Pressure and temperature sensitive paint techniques are used to measure film cooling effectiveness and heat transfer on the rotor platform respectively. Experiments are conducted at three turbine rotational speeds namely, 2400rpm, 2550rpm and 3000rpm. Interstage aerodynamic measurements with miniature five hole probes are also acquired at these speeds. The aerodynamic data characterizes the flow along the first stage rotor exit, second stage stator exit and second stage rotor exit. For each rotor speed, film cooling effectiveness is determined on the first stage rotor platform for upstream stator-rotor gap ejection, downstream discrete hole ejection and a combination of upstream gap and downstream hole ejection. Upstream coolant ejection experiments are conducted for coolant to mainstream mass flow ratios of MFR=0.5%, 1.0%, 1.5% and 2.0% and downstream discrete hole injection tests corresponding to average hole blowing ratios of M = 0.5, 0.75, 1.0, 1.25, 1.5, 1.75 and 2.0 for each turbine speed. To provide a complete picture of hub cooling under rotating conditions, experiments with simultaneous injection of coolant gas through upstream and downstream injection are conducted for an of MFR=1% and Mholes=0.75, 1.0 and 1.25 for the three turbine speeds. Heat transfer coefficients are determined on the rotor platform for similar upstream and downstream coolant injection. Rotation is found to significantly affect the distribution of coolant on the platform. The measured effectiveness magnitudes are lower than that obtained with numerical simulations. Coolant streams from both upstream and downstream injection orient themselves towards the blade suction side. Passage vortex cuts-off the coolant film for the lower MFR for upstream injection. As the MFR increases, the passage vortex effects are diminished. Effectiveness was maximum when Mholes was closer to one as the coolant ejection velocity is approximately equal to the mainstream relative velocity for this blowing ratio. Heat transfer coefficient and film cooling effectiveness increase with increasing rotational speed for upstream rotor stator gap injection while for downstream hole injection the maximum effectiveness and heat transfer coefficients occur at the reference speed of 2550rpm.

Suryanarayanan, Arun

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

A small diameter, flexible, all attitude, self-contained germanium spectrometer. Operator`s manual  

SciTech Connect

The end of the Cold War has brought about tremendous changes in the nuclear complex of the Department of Energy. One of the many changes has been the shutdown or decommissioning of many facilities that performed nuclear work. One of the steps in the process of decommissioning a facility involves the decontamination or removal of drain lines or pipes that may have carried radioactive materials at one time. The removal of all these pipes and drain lines to a nuclear disposal facility could be quite costly. It was suggested by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) that a germanium spectrometer could be built that could fit through straight pipes with a diameter as small as 5.08 cm (2 inches) and pass through curved pipes with a diameter as small as 7.6 cm (3 inches) such as that of a 3-inch p-trap in a drain line. The germanium spectrometer could then be used to simultaneously determine all gamma-ray emitting radionuclides in or surrounding the pipe. By showing the absence of any gamma-ray emitting radionuclides, the pipes could then be reused in place or disposed of as non-radioactive material, thus saving significantly in disposal costs. A germanium spectrometer system has been designed by PNNL and fabricated by Princeton Gamma Tech (PGT) that consists of three segments, each 4.84 cm in diameter and about 10 cm in length. Flexible stainless steel bellows were used to connect the segments. Segment 1 is a small liquid nitrogen reservoir. The reservoir is filled with a sponge-like material which enables the detector to be used in any orientation. A Stirling cycle refrigerator is under development which can replace the liquid nitrogen reservoir to provide continuous cooling and operation.

Bordzindki, R.L.; Lepel, E.A.; Reeves, J.H. [Battelle, Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Kohli, R. [Battelle, Columbus Lab., OH (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Flooding Experiments with Steam and Water in a Large Diameter Vertical Tube  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental study on flooding with steam and water in a large diameter vertical tube was conducted. This research has been performed to provide a better prediction of flooding in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) pressurizer surge line to be used in reactor safety codes. Experiments were conducted using a 3-inch (76.2 mm) diameter tube 72 inches (1.83 m) long with subcooled water and super-heated steam at atmospheric pressure as the working fluids. Water flows down the inside walls of the tube as an annulus while the steam flows upward in the middle. The water flow rates ranged from 3.5 to 12 gallons per minute (GPM) (0.00022 to 0.00076 m^3/s) and the water inlet temperature was approximately 70 degrees C. The steam inlet temperature was approximately 110 degrees C. The size of the test section as well as the flow ranges of the working fluids was determined based on a scaling analysis of a PWR pressurizer surge line. Two distinct trends were observed in the data. It was found that for water flow rates below 6 GPM (0.00038 m3/s) the amount of steam required for flooding to occur decreases with an increasing water flow rate. For water flow rates above 6 GPM the amount of steam required for flooding to occur increases with an increasing water flow rate. In addition, axial water temperature data was collected. Axial water temperatures have not been recorded in previous flooding experiments with steam and water. A new correlation for predicting flooding with steam and water was proposed. This correlation was an improvement from previous correlations because it included the amount of steam condensation. Incorporation of steam-water mass exchange promotes a better prediction of behavior in reactor systems. This data for flooding with steam and water in a large diameter vertical tube can lead to a mechanistic model for flooding.

Williams, Susan Nicole

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

LiveChat Wed, 6/29, 2pm: Our Energy Independence | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LiveChat Wed, 6/29, 2pm: Our Energy Independence LiveChat Wed, 6/29, 2pm: Our Energy Independence LiveChat Wed, 6/29, 2pm: Our Energy Independence June 27, 2011 - 9:29am Addthis Ginny Simmons Ginny Simmons Former Managing Editor for Energy.gov, Office of Public Affairs How can I participate? Submit a question via E-mail, Facebook or Twitter Watch live on June 29 at 2 PM ET As many of us hit the road to celebrate America's independence this upcoming 4th of July weekend, we must once again confront the reality of our country's economy, environment and security dependence on foreign oil. On Wednesday, June 29th, at 2:00 pm ET, please join Dr. Arun Majumdar at Energy.gov for a frank, two-way discussion about the investments the federal government is making in innovative research and technology today that will move us off of foreign oil and toward the clean energy

211

Ultra-sensitive surface absorption spectroscopy using sub-wavelength diameter optical fibers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The guided modes of sub-wavelength diameter air-clad optical fibers exhibit a pronounced evanescent field. The absorption of particles on the fiber surface is therefore readily detected via the fiber transmission. We show that the resulting absorption for a given surface coverage can be orders of magnitude higher than for conventional surface spectroscopy. As a demonstration, we present measurements on sub-monolayers of 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) molecules at ambient conditions, revealing the agglomeration dynamics on a second to minutes timescale.

F. Warken; E. Vetsch; D. Meschede; M. Sokolowski; A. Rauschenbeutel

2007-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

212

PROCESSING METHOD EFFECT ON SUN DIAMETER MEASUREMENT WITH CCD SOLAR ASTROLABE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Photometric Sun diameter measurement is based on the calculation of the inflection point of the solar limb. In ground measurement, this point is located at a position on the solar limb where the signal-to-noise ratio is very high, which necessitates the appropriate filtering techniques to eliminate the noise while preserving its position. In this paper, we compare the filtering method currently in use to process the CCD solar astrolabe data, the FFTD method widely used, with a different method that we propose. Using the acquired data from the CCD astrolabe at Calern, France during 1997, we can obtain a mean difference of 130 mas in the measured radii.

Djafer, Djelloul [Unite de Recherche Appliquee en Energies Renouvelables, BP 88, Ghardaiea (Algeria); Irbah, Abdenour, E-mail: djdjafer@gmail.com, E-mail: abdenour.irbah@latmos.ipsl.fr [Laboratoire Atmospheres, Milieux, Observations Spatiales (LATMOS), CNRS UMR8190, Universite Paris VI, Pierre et Marie Curie, Universite de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines INSU, 78280 Guyancourt (France)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

THE MEGAMASER COSMOLOGY PROJECT. V. AN ANGULAR-DIAMETER DISTANCE TO NGC 6264 AT 140 Mpc  

SciTech Connect

We present the direct measurement of the Hubble constant, yielding the direct measurement of the angular-diameter distance to NGC 6264 using the H{sub 2}O megamaser technique. Our measurement is based on sensitive observations of the circumnuclear megamaser disk from four observations with the Very Long Baseline Array, the Green Bank Telescope (GBT), and the Effelsberg telescope. We also monitored the maser spectral profile for 2.3 years using the GBT to measure accelerations of maser lines by tracking their line-of-sight velocities as they change with time. The measured accelerations suggest that the systemic maser spots have a significantly wider radial distribution than in the archetypal megamaser in NGC 4258. We model the maser emission as arising from a circumnuclear disk with orbits dominated by the central black hole. The best fit of the data gives a Hubble constant of H{sub 0} = 68 {+-} 9 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1}, which corresponds to an angular-diameter distance of 144 {+-} 19 Mpc. In addition, the fit also gives a mass of the central black hole of (3.09 {+-} 0.42) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun }. The result demonstrates the feasibility of measuring distances to galaxies located well into the Hubble flow by using circumnuclear megamaser disks.

Kuo, C. Y. [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Braatz, J. A.; Lo, K. Y.; Condon, J. J.; Impellizzeri, C. M. V. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Reid, M. J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Henkel, C. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)

2013-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

214

Inflow Characterization and Aerodynamics Measurements on a SWT-2.3-101 Wind Turbine: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Post processing techniques for aerodynamic data acquired from a Siemens SWT-2.3-101 turbine have been developed and applied in this paper. The turbine is installed at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as part of Cooperative Research And Development Agreement between Siemens Wind Power and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsorship. The results indicate that the use of these corrections is essential for accurate analysis of the data. An example of local inflow angles, velocities, and inflow velocity over the rotor plane derived from measurements from a 5-hole probe is also presented. Finally the pressure measurements are used to characterize unsteady phenomenon, namely, rotational augmentation and dynamic stall on an inboard station. The results show that the rotational augmentation can considerably increase the attached flow regime compared to the 2D CFD results. The dynamic stall event was seen to significantly delay the stall. Furthermore, the nondimensionalized vortex convection derived from the dynamic stall event was found to agree well with results from others studies.

Medina, P.; Singh, M.; Johansen, J.; Jove, A.; Fingersh, L.; Schreck, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Inflow Characterization and Aerodynamics Measurements on a SWT-2.3-101 Wind Turbine  

SciTech Connect

Post processing techniques for aerodynamic data acquired from a Siemens SWT-2.3101 turbine have been developed and applied in this paper. The turbine is installed at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as part of Cooperative Research and Development Agreement between Siemens Wind Power and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsorship. The results indicate that the use of these corrections is essential for accurate analysis of the data. An example of local inflow angles, velocities, and inflow velocity over the rotor plane derived from measurements from a 5-hole probe is also presented. Finally, the pressure measurements are used to characterize unsteady phenomenon, namely, rotational augmentation and dynamic stall on an inboard station. The results show that the rotational augmentation can considerably increase the attached flow regime compared to the 2D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) results. The dynamic stall event was seen to significantly delay the stall. Furthermore, the non-dimensionalized vortex convection derived from the dynamic stall event was found to agree well with results from others studies.

Medina, P.; Singh, M.; Johansen, J.; Jove, A. R.; Fingersh, L.; Schreck, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Hurricane Sandy Situation Report # 9 November 1, 2012 (3:00 PM EDT)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 November 1, 2012 (3:00 PM EDT) http://www.oe.netl.doe.gov/emergency_sit_rpt.aspx Highlights: At 8:00 pm EDT October 29, the National Hurricane Center reported Sandy made landfall near Atlantic City, NJ as a post tropical cyclone. As of 2:00 pm EDT November 1 there are 4,454,650 customers without power in the affected States. This is a decrease from the 4,657,013 customers without power reported in Situation Report #8. Restoration estimates and efforts by electric utilities are reported below. Summary Impacted State Current Customer Outages Percentage of Customers Without Power Peak Outages Reported in DOE SitReps Customers Restored Since Peak Connecticut 348,294 17% 626,559 278,265 Maryland 40,760 2% 311,020 270,260 Massachusetts 12,883 < 1% 298,072

217

LiveChat Thurs, 10/20, 2pm ET: Clean Tech Markets | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LiveChat Thurs, 10/20, 2pm ET: Clean Tech Markets LiveChat Thurs, 10/20, 2pm ET: Clean Tech Markets LiveChat Thurs, 10/20, 2pm ET: Clean Tech Markets October 17, 2011 - 11:30am Addthis Liisa O'Neill Liisa O'Neill Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs How can I participate? Send an email to newmedia@hq.doe.gov; Tweeting your question to @energy with the hashtag #energymatters; or leaving a question for Kauffman at Facebook.com/energygov. On Energy.gov, we've been showcasing a series of stories about innovations from our National Laboratories that have been successfully commercialized - and how they impact Americans' lives. During 2010 alone, our National Laboratories engaged in more than 13,500 technology transfer transactions - from licensing lab-developed technologies to using lab resources to drive industry innovation and commercial success.

218

Hurricane Sandy Situation Report # 19 November 6, 2012 (3:00 PM EST)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 November 6, 2012 (3:00 PM EST) http://www.oe.netl.doe.gov/emergency_sit_rpt.aspx Highlights: At 8:00 pm EDT October 29, the National Hurricane Center reported Sandy made landfall near Atlantic City, NJ as a post tropical cyclone. As of 2:00 pm EST November 6, there are 930,783 customers without power in the affected States. 7,580,468 customers have been restored out of the 8,511,251 combined total peak outages reported in the Situation Reports for all 21 States affected. Restoration estimates and efforts by electric utilities are reported below. Summary Impacted State Current Customer Outages Percentage of Customers Without Power Peak Outages Reported in DOE SitReps Customers Restored Since Peak Connecticut 7,371 < 1% 626,559 619,188 Maryland

219

Fourth Novatek Hammer Field Test Department of Energy Well PM-2-31  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Novatek Hammer Field Test Novatek Hammer Field Test Department of Energy Well PM-2-31 Garfield County, Colorado September, 1995 Report Prepared for Mud Hammer Development Project Partners Mobil Oil Novatek Brian Tarr, MEPTEC Drilling MOBIL EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION TECHNICAL CENTER Dallas, Texas September 1995 Fourth Novatek Hammer Field Test Department of Energy Well PM-2-31 September 1995 Contents Page EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 3 CONCLUSIONS 4 RECOMMENDATIONS5 5 Field Test Procedure and Results 6 APPENDIX 1 - Well Data 10 APPENDIX 2 - ∆P Calculations APPENDIX 3 - Novatek hammer drawings and photo.'s Fourth Novatek Hammer Field Test Department of Energy Well PM-2-31 September 1995 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Objectives The primary objective of the fourth field test was to establish if the threshold level of power required to increase rock bit

220

FEDERAL ACQUISITION CERTIFICATION FOR PROGRAM AND PROJECT MANAGERS (FAC-P/PM)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CERTIFICATION FOR PROGRAM AND PROJECT CERTIFICATION FOR PROGRAM AND PROJECT MANAGERS (FAC-P/PM) EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. Purpose. The Federal Acquisition Certification for Program and Project Managers (FAC-P/PM) establishes general training and experience requirements for program and project managers in civilian agencies. The FAC- P/PM focuses on essential competencies needed for program and project managers; the program does not include functional or technical competencies, such as those for information technology, or agency- specific competencies. 2. Background. The quality and effectiveness of the federal acquisition process depend on the development of a capable and competent workforce. The Services Acquisition Reform Act of 2003 (SARA, P.L. 108-136) expanded the definition of acquisition to include functions performed by program and project managers.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aerodynamic diameter pm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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221

Earth Hour 2009: March 28, 8:30-9:30 PM Local Time | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Earth Hour 2009: March 28, 8:30-9:30 PM Local Time Earth Hour 2009: March 28, 8:30-9:30 PM Local Time Earth Hour 2009: March 28, 8:30-9:30 PM Local Time March 27, 2009 - 6:00am Addthis John Lippert The city of Greenbelt, Maryland, where I live, is living up to its "green" name by participating in Earth Hour. This global event asks everyone to "go dark" for an hour to make a powerful statement of concern about climate change. The city will be turning off all non-essential lights in municipal buildings. Residents are requested to turn off their lights (and other energy-consuming appliances). The Greenbelt Advisory Committee on Environmental Sustainability, which advises the mayor and city council and which I chair, will be sponsoring a flashlight walk around Old Greenbelt during Earth Hour. My wife and I will

222

Earth Hour 2009: March 28, 8:30-9:30 PM Local Time | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Earth Hour 2009: March 28, 8:30-9:30 PM Local Time Earth Hour 2009: March 28, 8:30-9:30 PM Local Time Earth Hour 2009: March 28, 8:30-9:30 PM Local Time March 27, 2009 - 6:00am Addthis John Lippert The city of Greenbelt, Maryland, where I live, is living up to its "green" name by participating in Earth Hour. This global event asks everyone to "go dark" for an hour to make a powerful statement of concern about climate change. The city will be turning off all non-essential lights in municipal buildings. Residents are requested to turn off their lights (and other energy-consuming appliances). The Greenbelt Advisory Committee on Environmental Sustainability, which advises the mayor and city council and which I chair, will be sponsoring a flashlight walk around Old Greenbelt during Earth Hour. My wife and I will

223

2:30 PM TODAY: On-the-Record Conference Call with Deputy Assistant to the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

:30 PM TODAY: On-the-Record Conference Call with Deputy Assistant :30 PM TODAY: On-the-Record Conference Call with Deputy Assistant to the President for Energy and Climate Change Heather Zichal and Deputy Energy Secretary Daniel Poneman to Discuss the President's Trip to Holland, Michigan to Tour the Johnson Controls I 2:30 PM TODAY: On-the-Record Conference Call with Deputy Assistant to the President for Energy and Climate Change Heather Zichal and Deputy Energy Secretary Daniel Poneman to Discuss the President's Trip to Holland, Michigan to Tour the Johnson Controls I August 10, 2011 - 11:27am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - Today, Deputy Assistant to the President for Energy and Climate Change Heather Zichal and Deputy Energy Secretary Daniel Poneman will hold an on-the-record conference call to preview the President's trip tomorrow to Holland, MI to tour the Johnson Controls

224

LiveChat Thurs, 10/20, 2pm ET: Clean Tech Markets | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LiveChat Thurs, 10/20, 2pm ET: Clean Tech Markets LiveChat Thurs, 10/20, 2pm ET: Clean Tech Markets LiveChat Thurs, 10/20, 2pm ET: Clean Tech Markets October 17, 2011 - 11:30am Addthis Liisa O'Neill Liisa O'Neill Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs How can I participate? Send an email to newmedia@hq.doe.gov; Tweeting your question to @energy with the hashtag #energymatters; or leaving a question for Kauffman at Facebook.com/energygov. On Energy.gov, we've been showcasing a series of stories about innovations from our National Laboratories that have been successfully commercialized - and how they impact Americans' lives. During 2010 alone, our National Laboratories engaged in more than 13,500 technology transfer transactions - from licensing lab-developed technologies to using lab resources to drive industry innovation and commercial success.

225

Hurricane Sandy Situation Report # 17 November 5, 2012 (3:00 PM EST)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 November 5, 2012 (3:00 PM EST) http://www.oe.netl.doe.gov/emergency_sit_rpt.aspx Highlights: At 8:00 pm EDT October 29, the National Hurricane Center reported Sandy made landfall near Atlantic City, NJ as a post tropical cyclone. As of 2:00 pm EST November 5, there are 1,351,683 customers without power in the affected States. 7,159,568 customers have been restored out of the 8,511,251 combined total peak outages reported in the Situation Reports for all 21 States affected. Restoration estimates and efforts by electric utilities are reported below. Summary Impacted State Current Customer Outages Percentage of Customers Without Power Peak Outages Reported in DOE SitReps Customers Restored Since Peak Connecticut 30,608 2% 626,559 595,951 Maryland

226

Hurricane Sandy Situation Report # 15 November 4, 2012 (3:00 PM EST)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 November 4, 2012 (3:00 PM EST) http://www.oe.netl.doe.gov/emergency_sit_rpt.aspx Highlights: At 8:00 pm EDT October 29, the National Hurricane Center reported Sandy made landfall near Atlantic City, NJ as a post tropical cyclone. As of 2:00 pm EST November 4, there are 1,855,958 customers without power in the affected States. 6,655,293 customers have been restored out of the 8,511,251 combined total peak outages reported in the Situation Reports for all 21 States affected. Restoration estimates and efforts by electric utilities are reported below. Summary Impacted State Current Customer Outages Percentage of Customers Without Power Peak Outages Reported in DOE SitReps Customers Restored Since Peak Connecticut 64,955 4% 626,559 561,604 Maryland

227

Hurricane Sandy Situation Report # 11 November 2, 2012 (3:00 PM EDT)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 November 2, 2012 (3:00 PM EDT) http://www.oe.netl.doe.gov/emergency_sit_rpt.aspx Highlights: At 8:00 pm EDT October 29, the National Hurricane Center reported Sandy made landfall near Atlantic City, NJ as a post tropical cyclone. As of 2:00 pm EDT November 2 there are 3,491,595 customers without power in the affected States. This is a decrease from the 3,628,739 customers without power reported in Situation Report #10. Restoration estimates and efforts by electric utilities are reported below. Summary Impacted State Current Customer Outages Percentage of Customers Without Power Peak Outages Reported in DOE SitReps Customers Restored Since Peak Connecticut 232,142 11% 626,559 394,417 Maryland 17,803 < 1% 311,020 293,217 Massachusetts 2,248 < 1% 298,072

228

Hurricane Sandy Situation Report # 13 November 3, 2012 (3:00 PM EDT)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 November 3, 2012 (3:00 PM EDT) http://www.oe.netl.doe.gov/emergency_sit_rpt.aspx Highlights: At 8:00 pm EDT October 29, the National Hurricane Center reported Sandy made landfall near Atlantic City, NJ as a post tropical cyclone. As of 2:00 pm EDT November 3 there are 2,497,421 customers without power in the affected States. 6,013,830 customers have been restored out of the 8,511,251 combined total peak outages reported in the Situation Reports for all 21 States affected. Restoration estimates and efforts by electric utilities are reported below. Summary Impacted State Current Customer Outages Percentage of Customers Without Power Peak Outages Reported in DOE SitReps Customers Restored Since Peak Connecticut 132,805 6% 626,559 493,754 Maryland

229

2:30 PM TODAY: On-the-Record Conference Call with Deputy Assistant to the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2:30 PM TODAY: On-the-Record Conference Call with Deputy Assistant 2:30 PM TODAY: On-the-Record Conference Call with Deputy Assistant to the President for Energy and Climate Change Heather Zichal and Deputy Energy Secretary Daniel Poneman to Discuss the President's Trip to Holland, Michigan to Tour the Johnson Controls I 2:30 PM TODAY: On-the-Record Conference Call with Deputy Assistant to the President for Energy and Climate Change Heather Zichal and Deputy Energy Secretary Daniel Poneman to Discuss the President's Trip to Holland, Michigan to Tour the Johnson Controls I August 10, 2011 - 11:27am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - Today, Deputy Assistant to the President for Energy and Climate Change Heather Zichal and Deputy Energy Secretary Daniel Poneman will hold an on-the-record conference call to preview the President's trip tomorrow to Holland, MI to tour the Johnson Controls

230

The effect of processing and compositional changes on the tribology of PM212 in air  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of processing and compositional variations on the tribological performance of PM212 were investigated. PM212 is a self-lubricating powder metallurgy composite, comprised of a wear-resistant metal bonded chromium carbide matrix, containing the solid lubricants barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic and silver. Several composites were formulated which had lubricant, matrix, and processing variations. Processing variations included sintering and hot isostatic pressing. Pins fabricated from the composites were slid against superalloy disks in a pinon-disk tribometer to study the tribological properties. Several composites exhibited low friction and wear in sliding against a nickel-based superalloy. The good tribological performance by several different composites showed that the composition of PM212 can be altered without dramatically affecting performance.

Bogdanski, M.S. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Sliney, H.E.; DellaCorte, C. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH (United States). Lewis Research Center

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Hurricane Sandy Situation Report # 1 October 28, 2012 (3:00 PM EDT)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 28, 2012 (3:00 PM EDT) http://www.oe.netl.doe.gov/emergency_sit_rpt.aspx Highlights: As of 2:00 pm EDT October 28, the National Hurricane Center reports Hurricane Sandy has maximum sustained winds of 75 mph. Sandy is 575 miles south of New York City moving northeast at 14 mph and on the forecast track the center of the storm is forecast to be near the Mid- Atlantic coast tomorrow night. As of 2:00 pm EDT October 28, there are fewer than 5,000 customers without power in Delaware, the District of Columbia, Florida, Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia. Utilities are preparing for the hurricane by pre-positioning supplies, securing workers, and requesting mutual assistance support to restore power after the storm makes landfall. Restoration

232

Controlling diesel NOx & PM emissions using fuel components and enhanced aftertreatment techniques: developing the next generation emission control system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The following research thesis focuses on methods of controlling nitrogen oxides (NO(X)) and particulate matter (PM) emissions emitted from a low temperature diesel exhaust. This… (more)

Gill, Simaranjit Singh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

The Engineering Design of the 1.5 m Diameter Solenoid for the MICERFCC Modules  

SciTech Connect

The RF coupling coil (RFCC) module of MICE is where muonsthat have been cooled within the MICE absorber focus (AFC) modules arere-accelerated to their original longitudinal momentum. The RFCC moduleconsists of four 201.25 MHz RF cavities in a 1.4 meter diameter vacuumvessel. The muons are kept within the RF cavities by the magnetic fieldgenerated by a superconducting coupling solenoid that goes around the RFcavities. The coupling solenoid will be cooled using a pair of 4 K pulsetube cooler that will generate 1.5 W of cooling at 4.2 K. The magnet willbe powered using a 300 A two-quadrant power supply. This report describesthe ICST engineering design of the coupling solenoid forMICE.

Wang, L.; Green, M.A.; Xu, F.Y.; Wu, H.; Li, L.K.; Gou, C.S.; Liu, C.S.; Han, G.; Jia, L.X.; Li, D.; Prestemon, S.O.; Virostek, S.P.

2007-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

234

Demonstration of the BioBaler harvesting system for collection of small-diameter woody biomass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of a project to investigate sustainable forest management practices for producing wood chips on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) for the ORNL steam plant, the BioBaler was tested in various Oak Ridge locations in August of 2011. The purpose of these tests and the subsequent economic analysis was to determine the potential of this novel woody biomass harvesting method for collection of small-diameter, low value woody biomass. Results suggest that opportunities may exist for economical harvest of low-value and liability or negative-cost biomass. (e.g., invasives). This could provide the ORR and area land managers with a tool to produce feedstock while improving forest health, controlling problem vegetation, and generating local employment.

Langholtz, Matthew H [ORNL; Caffrey, Kevin R [ORNL; Barnett, Elliott J [ORNL; Webb, Erin [ORNL; Brummette, Mark W [ORNL; Downing, Mark [ORNL

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Design Calculations for Gas Flow & Diffusion Behavior in the large Diameter Container & Cask  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the calculations for the gas behavior in the void volumes or gas spaces of the sludge Large Diameter Container (LDC) and Cask. The objective is to prevent flammable gas conditions in the LDC and Cask gas spaces. This is achieved by the Active Inert Ventilation System (AIVS), which uses argon gas for dilution purposes. With AIVS, the oxygen content is kept below 5 vol% in the LDC, and the hydrogen content is kept below 4 vol% in the Cask before its purge at the KE Basin. After the Cask sweep-through purge with argon at the KE Basin, oxygen is kept below 5% in both the Cask and the LDC. The analysis here assumes that any oxygen generated in the sludge is consumed by the uranium and uranium dioxide (SNF-18133, ''Gas Behavior in Large Diameter Containers (LDCs) During and Following Loading with 105K East Sludge''). Thus, oxygen production from radiolysis is intentionally not included in this report, but hydrogen from radiolysis and from chemical reactions between uranium and water are considered, depending on the scenario being analyzed. The analysis starts immediately after the final decant at K Basin, when argon is assumed to be the only gas in the LDC gas space, except for the normal water vapor. The oxygen ingress is calculated during the disconnecting of the lines hoses from the LDC, during the time that air is surrounding the LDC with two NucFil-type filters in place after the disconnect, before the Cask is sealed, and, finally, during the sweep-through Cask purge. Dissolution of oxygen from water due to increasing sludge temperatures (mainly during hot transport to the T Plant) is also included.

PIEPHO, M.G.

2003-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

236

CONSERVATION BIOLOGY SEMINAR Join us on Mondays, 4-5 pm in 150 Ecology!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONSERVATION BIOLOGY SEMINAR FALL 2013 Join us on Mondays, 4-5 pm in 150 Ecology! 9-Sep CB Faculty and Cultural Dimensions of Conservation USGS-Minnesota Cooperative Fish & Wildlife Research Unit Asst. Leader 7-Oct Yosef Cohen Evolutionary Distributions Fisheries, Wildlife and Conservation Biology 14-Oct David

Weiblen, George D

237

Reference variables generation using a fuzzy trajectory controller for PM tubular linear synchronous motor drive  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The usage of linear permanent-magnet (PM) actuators, and their associated controllers, increases in a wide variety of applications, due to the exhibited high force density, robustness, and accuracy. The s-curve motion profiling is the motion trajectory ... Keywords: fuzzy logic control, modelling and simulation, trajectory tracking

R. Luís; J. C. Quadrado

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

110 Plant Protection Quarterly Vol.19(3) 2004 The papaya mealybug (PM), Paracoc-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) in Africa (Neuenschwander 2001), mango mealybug, Rastrococcus in- vadens (Williams) (Hemiptera: Pseudococ and Technology 10, 245-54. Williams, D.J. and Granara de Willink, M.C. (1992). `Mealybugs of Central and South, biological control, Guam. Introduction The papaya mealybug (PM), Paracoc- cus marginatus Williams and Granara

Reddy, Gadi VP

239

Coal waste seen as valuable resource Published: March. 29, 2011 at 8:09 PM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coal waste seen as valuable resource Published: March. 29, 2011 at 8:09 PM ANAHEIM, Calif., March 29 (UPI) -- Fly ash, a byproduct of coal-burning electric power plants, could save billions. More than 450 coal-burning electric power plants in the United States produce about 130 million tons

Belogay, Eugene A.

240

Energy and Energy Policy by Steve Berry on September 29th, 2008, 1:37 pm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy and Energy Policy by Steve Berry on September 29th, 2008, 1:37 pm 29 September 2008 candidates. I say this as a scientist who has spent much of my research life studying energy, including energy efficiency, and environment. I've taught courses for years on energy and environmental management

Berry, R. Stephen

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aerodynamic diameter pm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Amplitude and phase modulation (AM?PM) wide?band photothermal spectrometry. I. Theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Amplitude and phase modulation (AM?PM) wide?band photothermal spectrometry is a new technique of excitation and signal recovery with extensive applications in thermal?wave imaging using linear photoacoustic and photothermal techniques. The excitation waveform consists of the superposition of two orthogonal amplitude?modulated frequency sweeps

J. F. Power

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Brazil in Africa: Africa in Brazil Tuesday 31 May 10am -6pm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Brazil in Africa: Africa in Brazil Tuesday 31 May 10am - 6pm Lucia Windsor Room, Newnham College (Witwatersrand) Abject Bodies: virginity testing in South Africa and Brazil Discussant: Megan Vaughan (Cambridge. . . Brazil? Discussant: David Lehmann (Cambridge) 13.00 Lunch 14.15 Chair: Anthony Pereira (Brazil Institute

Travis, Adrian

243

School of Allied Health Sciences 10:00 AM -12:00 PM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

School of Allied Health Sciences 09/09/11 10:00 AM -12:00 PM BHS 130 Minutes Meeting Called By in and won the 2011 National Athletic Trainers Association, National Quiz Bowl. This was in New Orleans, LA, 2011; International Journal of Exercise Science, 4(3): 192-198. o Laura Kruskall ­ It was announced

Hemmers, Oliver

244

January 12, 2013 9:30 AM -3:00 PM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

January 12, 2013 9:30 AM - 3:00 PM Walpole Elementary School 8 Bemis Lane, Walpole NH Quiz Bowl Silent Auction - To support Cheshire County Beef Field Day, Sheep Field Day and Animal Science Bonanza in: Beef Quiz Bowl Sheep Quiz Bowl Goat Quiz Bowl Check here if you have special needs in order

New Hampshire, University of

245

POEM-PM: an emission model for secondary pollution control scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper describes the POEM-PM (POllutant Emission Model for gas and Particulate Matter) emission model design. The model, providing actual and alternative emission scenarios, represents a decision support tool to evaluate emission control strategy ... Keywords: Air pollution control, Emission model, Emission model validation, Multiphase modelling system

Claudio Carnevale; Veronica Gabusi; Marialuisa Volta

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Seminar Center for Advanced Vehicle Technologies Thursday, 04/29 -2:00pm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seminar ­ Center for Advanced Vehicle Technologies Thursday, 04/29 - 2:00pm 101 Bevill Hall of engineering and R&D positions with the Ford Motor Company, where he led several electric and hybrid drive scientific and technical papers and four books, including Hybrid Vehicle Propulsion Systems, which

Carver, Jeffrey C.

247

B.Dolgoshein, Overview of SiPM development at MEPhI/Pulsar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

650 700 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 Absorption length x0 , m T (70 nm SiO2 ) SiPM (T = -60 0 C) Cooling helps (-50 C) DR increases with overvoltage (tunneling) -> deep cooling doesn't help! Dark Rate

Kemner, Ken

248

Development of Isothermally Forged P/M Udimet 720 for Turbine ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

application because of its high tensile strength characteristics as well as its resistance to .... ure 3, the highest cooling rate, which was produced by oil quenching a bored .... Figure 7: Total strain for 30,000 cycles mean life for P/M Udimet. 720.

249

Project due (before) Wednesday, April 13 (5 pm) Two to three pages of write-up  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project Project due (before) Wednesday, April 13 (5 pm) Two to three pages of write often as informative other methods of unsupervised learning include projection methods "classification measure Dii = p j=1 |xij - xi j| manhattan Dii = p j=1 |xij - xi j| |xij + xi j| Canberra STA 450/4000 S

Reid, Nancy

250

150,000 r/min-1.5 kW PM Efficiency Improvement by Means of Permeance Coefficient Optimization of 150,000-r/min, 1.5-kW PM Motor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Technology) This paper describes an ultra high-speed permanent-magnet synchronous motor design. Configuration of ultra high-speed PM motor. Core Coil (Winding) Air Permanent Magnet Shaft Stator Air 2 FEM Optimization of 150,000-r/min, 1.5-kW PM Motor Masaru Kano, Student Member, Toshihiko Noguchi, Member (Nagaoka

Fujimoto, Hiroshi

251

The concrete theory of numbers : New Mersenne conjectures. Simplicity and other wonderful properties of numbers $L(n) = 2^{2n}\\pm2^n\\pm1$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New Mersenne conjectures. The problems of simplicity, common prime divisors and free from squares of numbers $L(n) = 2^{2n}\\pm2^n\\pm1$ are investigated. Wonderful formulas $gcd $ for numbers $L (n) $ and numbers repunit are proved.

Boris V. Tarasov

2008-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

252

PM Motor Parametric Design Analyses for Hybrid Electric Vehicle Traction Drive Application: Interim Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR (Cooperative Automotive Research) and Vehicle Technologies has a strong interest in making rapid progress in permanent magnet (PM) machine development. The program is directing various technology development projects that will advance the technology and lead to request for proposals (RFP) for manufacturer prototypes. This aggressive approach is possible because the technology is clearly within reach and the approach is deemed essential, based on strong market demand, escalating fuel prices, and competitive considerations. In response, this study began parallel development paths that included a literature search/review, development and utilization of multiple parametric models to determine the effects of design parameters, verification of the modeling methodology, development of an interior PM (IPM) machine baseline design, development of alternative machine baseline designs, and cost analyses for several candidate machines. This interim progress report summarizes the results of these activities as of June 2004. This report provides background and summary information for recent machine parametric studies and testing programs that demonstrate both the potential capabilities and technical limitations of brushless PM machines (axial gap and radial gap), the IPM machine, the surface-mount PM machines (interior or exterior rotor), induction machines, and switched reluctance machines. The FreedomCAR program, while acknowledging the progress made by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Delphi, Delco-Remy International, and others in these programs, has redirected efforts toward a ''short path'' to a marketable and competitive PM motor for hybrid electric vehicle traction applications. The program has developed a set of performance targets for the type of traction machine desired. The short-path approach entails a comprehensive design effort focusing on the IPM machine and meeting the performance targets. The selection of the IPM machine reflects industry's confidence in this market-proven design that exhibits a power density surpassed by no other machine design.

Staunton, R.H.

2004-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

253

PROBLEM 13.94 KNOWN: Diameter, temperature and emissivity of boiler tube. Thermal conductivity and emissivity of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROBLEM 13.94 KNOWN: Diameter, temperature and emissivity of boiler tube. Thermal conductivity of 0.5 mm), Td = 773 K nd the ash provides a significant resistance to heat transfer.a COMMENTS: Boiler

Rothstein, Jonathan

254

Retrieval of cloud properties using CALIPSO Imaging Infrared Radiometer. Part II: effective diameter and ice water path  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper describes the version 3 Level 2 operational analysis of the Imaging Infrared Radiometer (IIR) data collected in the framework of the CALIPSO mission to retrieve cirrus cloud effective diameter and ice water path in synergy with the ...

Anne Garnier; Jacques Pelon; Philippe Dubuisson; Ping Yang; Michaël Faivre; Olivier Chomette; Nicolas Pascal; Pat Lucker; Tim Murray

255

This paper describes the integrated modeling of a permanent magnet (PM) motor used in an electromechanical actuator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT This paper describes the integrated modeling of a permanent magnet (PM) motor used and Field Oriented Control of Permanent Magnet (PM) Motor for High Performance EMA 2010-01-1742 Published 11 of a permanent magnet motor and describes both the control and thermal performance of the motor in following

Wu, Shin-Tson

256

Analysis of a PM DC motor model for application in feedback design for electric-powered mobility vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate modelling of Permanent Magnet (PM) DC motors is a prerequisite for expedient feedback design of electric-powered mobility vehicles. This paper identifies the parameters in the ideal equations for PM DC motors and considers the methods ... Keywords: electric-powered mobility vehicles, feedback design, frictional torque, model accuracy, modelling, permanent magnet DC motors models

Patrick Wolm; XiaoQi Chen; J. Geoffrey Chase; Warren Pettigrew; Christopher E. Hann

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple castiron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1 (Program Management) and Task 2 (Establishment of Detailed Design Specifications) were completed in prior quarters while Task 3 (Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves) has progressed to installing prototype sleeves in cast iron test pipe segments. Efforts in this quarter continued to focus on Tasks 4-8, with significant progress made in each. Task 4 (Design, Fabricate and Test Patch Setting Robotic Train) progressed to the design of the control electronics and pneumatic system to inflate the bladder robotic patch setting module. Task 5 (Design & Fabricate Pipe-Wall Cleaning Robot Train with Pan/Zoom/Tilt Camera) continued with additional in-pipe testing required to optimize the design of the robot elements and surface control electronics and software. Task 6 (Design & Build Surface Control and Monitoring System) has been completed with the control and computer display functions being operated through LabView. Task 7 (Design & Fabricate Large Diameter Live Access System) progressed to completing the detailed design of the entry fitting for 12-inch diameter cast iron pipe. The fitting is now being manufactured. The 12-inch ball valve for allowing no-blow access was also procured. Task 8 (System Integration and Laboratory Validation) continued with the development of the robot module inter-connects and of a master LabView-based system display and control software.

Kiran M Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS  

SciTech Connect

Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple cast iron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1--Program Management and Task 2--were completed in prior quarters while Task 3--Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves has progressed to installing prototype sleeves in cast iron test pipe segments. Efforts in this quarter continued to focus on Tasks 4--8, with significant progress made in each. Task 4 (Design, Fabricate and Test Patch Setting Robotic Train) progressed to the design of the control electronics and pneumatic system to inflate the bladder robotic patch setting module. Task 5 (Design & Fabricate Pipe-Wall Cleaning Robot Train with Pan/Zoom/Tilt Camera) continued with additional in-pipe testing required to optimize the design of the robot elements and surface control electronics and software. Task 6 (Design & Build Surface Control and Monitoring System) has been completed with the control and computer display functions being operated through LabView. Task 7 (Design & Fabricate Large Diameter Live Access System) progressed to the design, fabrication and testing of a entry fitting in a 4-inch prototype and is now being used to complete drawings for use in 12-inch diameter pipe. Task 8--System Integration and Laboratory Validation continued developing the robot module inter-connects and development of a master LabView-based system display and control software.

Kiran M. Kothari, Gerard T. Pittard

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple cast-iron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1--Program Management and Task 2--were completed in prior quarters while Task 3--Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves has progressed to installing prototype sleeves in cast iron test pipe segments. Efforts in this quarter continued to focus on Tasks 4--8, with significant progress made in each. Task 4 (Design, Fabricate and Test Patch Setting Robotic Train) progressed to the design of the control electronics and pneumatic system to inflate the bladder robotic patch setting module. Task 5 (Design & Fabricate Pipe-Wall Cleaning Robot Train with Pan/Zoom/Tilt Camera) continued with additional in-pipe testing required to optimize the design of the robot elements and surface control electronics and software. Task 6 (Design & Build Surface Control and Monitoring System) has been completed with the control and computer display functions being operated through LabView. Task 7 (Design & Fabricate Large Diameter Live Access System) progressed to completing the detailed design of the entry fitting for 12-inch diameter cast iron pipe. The fitting is now being placed into manufacture. Task 8--System Integration and Laboratory Validation continued developing the robot module inter-connects and development of a master LabView-based system display and control software.

Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Experimental and analytical research on the aerodynamics of wind turbines. Mid-term technical report, June 1--December 31, 1975  

SciTech Connect

The successful development of reliable, cost competitive horizontal axis, propeller-type wind energy conversion systems (WECS) is strongly dependent on the availability of advanced technology for each of the system components. Past experience and current studies of this type of wind energy conversion systems have shown that the wind turbine subsystem most significantly effects the system's cost effectiveness and performance capability. Thus adequate technology bases are essential for all elements of the wind turbine design. Information is presented concerning aerodynamic design and performance technology, wind turbine parametric performance study, selection of model wind turbine configurations, and structural design of wind turbine models.

Rohrbach, C.

1976-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aerodynamic diameter pm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Experimental and analytical research on the aerodynamics of wind turbines. Mid-term technical report, June 1--December 31, 1975  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The successful development of reliable, cost competitive horizontal axis, propeller-type wind energy conversion systems (WECS) is strongly dependent on the availability of advanced technology for each of the system components. Past experience and current studies of this type of wind energy conversion systems have shown that the wind turbine subsystem most significantly effects the system's cost effectiveness and performance capability. Thus adequate technology bases are essential for all elements of the wind turbine design. Information is presented concerning aerodynamic design and performance technology, wind turbine parametric performance study, selection of model wind turbine configurations, and structural design of wind turbine models.

Rohrbach, C.

1976-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Apparatus and Method for Increasing the Diameter of Metal Alloy Wires Within a Molten Metal Pool  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a dip forming process the core material to be coated is introduced directly into a source block of coating material eliminating the need for a bushing entrance component. The process containment vessel or crucible is heated so that only a portion of the coating material becomes molten, leaving a solid portion of material as the entrance port of, and seal around, the core material. The crucible can contain molten and solid metals and is especially useful when coating core material with reactive metals. The source block of coating material has been machined to include a close tolerance hole of a size and shape to closely fit the core material. The core material moves first through the solid portion of the source block of coating material where the close tolerance hole has been machined, then through a solid/molten interface, and finally through the molten phase where the diameter of the core material is increased. The crucible may or may not require water-cooling depending upon the type of material used in crucible construction. The system may operate under vacuum, partial vacuum, atmospheric pressure, or positive pressure depending upon the type of source material being used.

Hartman, Alan D.; Argetsinger, Edward R.; Hansen, Jeffrey S.; Paige, Jack I.; King, Paul E.; Turner, Paul C.

2002-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

263

Subcooling Effects for Flooding Experiments with Steam and Water in a Large Diameter Vertical Tube  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A counter current annular flow experiment was performed to determine flooding conditions for varying degrees of subcooling using steam and water. The findings can be used in reactor safety codes to provide an improved model of flooding during accident analysis. The test section is a stainless steel tube which is approximately a 5/16 scale version of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) surge line. The water flows in an annular film down the inside of the tube and steam flows upward through the annulus. Flooding is the point at which the water film reverses direction and begins to travel upward. Flooding tests were conducted at atmospheric pressure for water flow rates between 3.5 gallons per minute (GPM) and 11 GPM and water inlet temperatures between 35 degrees C and 97 degrees C. The data obtained at high water subcooling indicate a significant departure from accepted flooding correlations developed for air-water systems which is expected because vapor condensation alters the steam inlet flow rate needed to induce flooding. The data more closely follow air-water data at low subcooling. Such data has not been seen in the literature for steam-water flooding experiments in a large diameter vertical tube and will serve as an important benchmark.

Cullum, Wes

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

DLA Energy RFP - Deadline: August 19, 2013 - 12:00pm EST | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DLA Energy RFP - Deadline: August 19, 2013 - 12:00pm EST DLA Energy RFP - Deadline: August 19, 2013 - 12:00pm EST Home > Groups > Renewable Energy RFPs Jim.leyshon's picture Submitted by Jim.leyshon(5) Member 15 August, 2013 - 12:14 DLA Energy RFP (Sol. #SPE600-13-R-0410) seeking 898,504,000 kWh of renewable energy certificates for ultimate transfer to U.S. Air Force and various Federal Civilian Agencies. Contract(s) are anticipated to include one-time deliveries in September 2013; quarterly deliveries starting in December 2013 and ending in September 2014; and a two-year delivery period beginning in September 2013 and ending May 2015. This is a combined synopsis/solicitation for commercial items prepared in accordance with the format in Subpart 12.6, as supplemented with additional information included in this notice. This announcement constitutes the only

265

#LabChat: Market Potential of Energy Efficient Technology, May 31 at 2 pm  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

#LabChat: Market Potential of Energy Efficient Technology, May 31 #LabChat: Market Potential of Energy Efficient Technology, May 31 at 2 pm EDT #LabChat: Market Potential of Energy Efficient Technology, May 31 at 2 pm EDT May 30, 2012 - 10:22am Addthis National Renewable Energy Laboratory engineer Eric Kozubal examines a prototype air flow channel of the DEVAP, a novel concept that uses membrane technology to combine the efficiency of evaporative cooling and the drying potential of liquid desiccant salt solutions. The graph superimposed on the photo shows shows how hot humid air, in red, changes to cool dry air, in blue, as the air passes through the core. National Renewable Energy Laboratory engineer Eric Kozubal examines a prototype air flow channel of the DEVAP, a novel concept that uses membrane technology to combine the efficiency of evaporative cooling and the drying

266

#LabChat: Innovations Driving More Efficient Vehicles, Dec. 13 at 2 pm ET |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

#LabChat: Innovations Driving More Efficient Vehicles, Dec. 13 at 2 #LabChat: Innovations Driving More Efficient Vehicles, Dec. 13 at 2 pm ET #LabChat: Innovations Driving More Efficient Vehicles, Dec. 13 at 2 pm ET December 11, 2012 - 10:09am Q&A Researchers are developing technologies that will help consumers drive farther using less fuel. Have questions? Ask us here or on #LabChat. Ask Us Addthis What improvements are making vehicles drive farther? Learn about the technologies that are increasing vehicle efficiency. What improvements are making vehicles drive farther? Learn about the technologies that are increasing vehicle efficiency. Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs How can I participate? Tweet your questions to @ENERGY using #LabChat. Send questions via email to NewMedia@hq.doe.gov.

267

Microsoft PowerPoint - 15.1025_Bosco_PM Workshop Mar15_2010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

13.3B 13.3B "Program and Project Management (PM) for the Acquisition of Capital Assets" q p Significant Changes to the Order Paul Bosco PE PMP LEED-AP Paul Bosco, PE, PMP, LEED-AP Director, Office of Engineering and , g g Construction Management (OECM) Independent PM Process & Critical Decisions (CD's) Request PED Funds Independent Review to Validate PB EIR for Major System Projects O ti O i PED C t ti Definition Initiation Execution Closeout Operating Funds Operating Funds PED Funds Construction Funds TPC CD-0 Approve Mission Need CD-1 Approve Alternative Selection and Cost CD-2 Approve Performance Baseline (PB) CD-3 Approve Start of Construction or Execution CD-4 Approve Start of Operations or Project CRITICAL DECISIONS By (AE) Acquisition Executive and Cost Range or Execution or Project

268

Radiofrequency Thermal Ablation: Increase in Lesion Diameter with Continuous Acetic Acid Infusion  

SciTech Connect

Purpose. To evaluate the influence of continuous infusion of acetic acid 50% during radiofrequency ablation (RFA) on the size of the thermal lesion produced. Methods. Radiofrequency (RF) was applied to excised bovine liver by using an expandable needle electrode with 10 retractable tines (LeVeen Needle Electrode, RadioTherapeutics, Sunnyvale, CA) connected to a commercially available RF generator (RF 2000, RadioTherapeutics, Sunnyvale, CA). Experiments were performed using three different treatment modalities: RF only (n = 15), RF with continuous saline 0.9% infusion (n = 15), and RF with continuous acetic acid 50% infusion (n = 15). RF duration, power output, tissue impedance, and time to a rapid rise in impedance were recorded. The ablated lesions were evaluated both macroscopically and histologically. Results. The ablated lesions appeared as spherical or ellipsoid, well-demarcated pale areas with a surrounding brown rim with both RF only and RF plus saline 0.9% infusion. In contrast, thermolesions generated with RF in combination with acetic acid 50% infusion were irregular in shape and the central portion was jelly-like. Mean diameter of the coagulation necrosis was 22.3 {+-} 2.1 mm (RF only), 29.2 {+-} 4.8 mm (RF + saline 0.9%) and 30.7 {+-} 5.7 mm (RF + acetic acid 50%), with a significant increase in the RF plus saline 0.9% and RF plus acetic acid 50% groups compared with RF alone. Time to a rapid rise in impedance was significantly prolonged in the RF plus saline 0.9% and RF plus acetic acid 50% groups compared with RF alone. Conclusions. A combination of RF plus acetic acid 50% infusion is able to generate larger thermolesions than RF only or RF combined with saline 0.9% infusion.

Lubienski, Andreas [Ruprecht-Karls-University Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Germany)], E-mail: lubienski@radiologie.uni-luebeck.de; Duex, Markus [Hospital Northwest Frankfurt, Department of Radiology (Germany); Lubienski, Katrin; Grenacher, Lars; Kauffmann, Guenter [Ruprecht-Karls-University Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Germany)

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

269

SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple castiron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1 (Program Management) and Task 2 (Establishment of Detailed Design Specifications) were completed in prior quarters while Task 3 (Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves) has progressed to installing prototype sleeves in cast iron test pipe segments. Efforts in this quarter continued to focus on Tasks 4-8, with significant progress made in each as well as field testing of the 4-inch gas pipe repair robot in cast iron pipe at Public Service Electric & Gas. The field tests were conducted August 23-26, 2004 in Oradell, New Jersey. The field tests identified several design issues which need to be implemented in both the small- and large-diameter cast iron repair robots to assure their commercial success. Task 4 (Design, Fabricate and Test Patch Setting Robotic Train) progressed to the design of the control electronics and pneumatic system to inflate the bladder robotic patch setting module in the last quarter 5. In this quarter, work has been concentrated on increasing the nitrogen bladder reservoir volume to allow at least two complete patch inflation/patch setting cycles in the event the sleeve does not set all ratchets in the same row on the first attempt. This problem was observed on a few of the repair sleeves that were recently installed during field tests with the small-diameter robotic system. For Task 5 (Design & Fabricate Pipe-Wall Cleaning Robot Train with Pan/Zoom/Tilt Camera) it was observed that it will be necessary to add a stiff brush to push debris away from the immediate vicinity of the bell and spigot joints in mains having low gas velocities. Otherwise, material removed by the cleaning flails (which were found to be very effective in cleaning bell and spigot joints) simply falls to the low side of the pipe and accumulates in a pile. This accumulation can prevent the sleeve from achieving a leak free repair. Similarly, it is also necessary to design a small magnet to capture existing service tap coupons and allow their removal from the inside of the pipe. These coupons were found to cause difficulty in launching and retrieving the small pipe repair robot; one coupon lodged beneath the end of the guide shoe. These new features require redesign of the pipe wall cleaning train and modification to the patch setting train. Task 6 (Design & Build Surface Control and Monitoring System) was previously completed with the control and computer display functions being operated through LabView. However, this must now be re-visited to add control routines for the coupon catcher to be added. This will most likely include a lift-off/place-on magnet translation function. Task 7 (Design & Fabricate Large Diameter Live Access System) progressed to completing the detailed design of th

Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

NREL Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment in the NASA-Ames Wind Tunnel: A Comparison of Predictions to Measurements  

SciTech Connect

Currently, wind turbine designers rely on safety factors to compensate for the effects of unknown loads acting on the turbine structure. This results in components that are overdesigned because precise load levels and load paths are unknown. To advance wind turbine technology, the forces acting on the turbine structure must be accurately characterized because these forces translate directly into loads imparted to the wind turbine structure and resulting power production. Once these forces are more accurately characterized, we will better understand load paths and can therefore optimize turbine structures. To address this problem, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducted the Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment (UAE), which was a test of an extensively instrumented wind turbine in the giant NASA-Ames 24.4-m (80 feet) by 36.6-m (120 feet) wind tunnel. To maximize the benefits from testing, NREL formed a Science Panel of advisers comprised of wind turbine aerodynamics and modeling experts throughout the world. NREL used the Science Panel's guidance to specify the conditions and configurations under which the turbine was operated in the wind tunnel. The panel also helped define test priorities and objectives that would be effective for wind turbine modeling tool development and validation.

Simms, D.; Schreck, S.; Hand, M.; Fingersh, L.J.

2001-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

271

Report of testing and sampling of municipal supply well PM-4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During drilling of regional aquifer characterization borehole R-25, located in the western part of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) at Technical Area (TA) 16, groundwater samples were collected from perched zones of saturation and the regional aquifer that contained elevated levels of high explosive (HE) compounds. One of the nearest Los Alamos County municipal supply wells potentially located down gradient from borehole R-25 is PM-4, located on Mesita del Buey at the west end of TA-54. During the winter of 1998 and 1999 the pump in PM-4 had been removed from the well for scheduled maintenance by the Los Alamos County Public Utilities Department (PUD). Because the pump was removed from PM-4, the opportunity existed to enter the well to (1) perform tests to determine where within the regional aquifer groundwater entered the well and (2) collect groundwater samples from the producing zones for analyses to determine if HE contaminants were present in discrete zones within the regional aquifer. The report of the activities that were performed during March 1999 for the testing and sampling of municipal supply well PM-4 is provided. The report provides a description of the field activities associated with the two phases of the project, including (1) the results of the static and dynamic spinner log surveys, and (2) a description of the sampling activities and the field-measured groundwater quality parameters that were obtained during sampling activities. This report also provides the analytical results of the groundwater samples and a brief discussion of the results of the project.

Richard J. Koch; Patrick Longmire; David B. Rogers; Ken Mullen

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Table 1. Design specifications of ultra-high speed PM motor. Supply voltage (V) 12  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis of Ultra-High Speed Permanent-Magnet Motor Masaru Kano, and Toshihiko Noguchi Department@vos.nagaokaut.ac.jp Abstract This paper describes a design of an ultra-high speed (UHS) permanent-magnet (PM) synchronous motor, a surface permanent-magnet (SPM) motor (150,000 r/min, 1.5 kW) fed by a low voltage battery (12 V

Fujimoto, Hiroshi

273

Hurricane Sandy Situation Report # 7 October 31, 2012 (3:00 PM EDT)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 October 31, 2012 (3:00 PM EDT) http://www.oe.netl.doe.gov/emergency_sit_rpt.aspx Highlights: At 8:00 pm EDT October 29, the National Hurricane Center reported Sandy made landfall near Atlantic City, NJ as a post tropical cyclone. As of 2:00 pm EDT October 31 there are 6,062,526 customers without power in the affected States. Summary Impacted State Current Customer Outages Percentage of Customers Without Power Peak Outages Reported in DOE SitReps Customers Restored Since Peak Connecticut 502,465 25% 626,559 124,094 Delaware 2,757 < 1% 45,137 42,380 Kentucky 2,941 < 1% 8,379 5,438 Maine 9,145 < 1% 90,727 81,582 Maryland 103,997 4% 311,020 207,023 Massachusetts 82,809 2% 298,072 215,263 Michigan 35,422 < 1% 120,637 85,215 New Hampshire 55,809 8% 141,992 86,183 New Jersey 2,052,724

274

Hurricane Sandy Situation Report # 5 October 30, 2012 (3:00 PM EDT)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 October 30, 2012 (3:00 PM EDT) http://www.oe.netl.doe.gov/emergency_sit_rpt.aspx Highlights: At 8:00 pm EDT October 29, the National Hurricane Center reported Sandy made landfall near Atlantic City, NJ as a post tropical cyclone. As of 2:00 pm EDT October 30, the impacted States report a total of 8,204,914 customers without power in the affected areas. There is some increase in outages as the storm moves west-northwest. See State totals below. Summary Impacted State Current Customer Outages Percentage of Customers Without Power Peak Outages Reported in DOE SitReps Customers Restored Since Peak Connecticut 626,559 31% 626,559 0 Delaware 18,611 4% 45,137 26,526 District of Columbia 3,010 1% 3,583 573 Illinois 1,149 < 1% 1,149 0 Indiana 9,224 < 1% 9,224 0 Kentucky

275

Search for Oscillation of the Electron-Capture Decay Probability of $^{142}$Pm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have searched for time modulation of the electron capture decay probability of $^{142}$Pm in an attempt to confirm a recent claim from a group at the Gesellschaft f\\"{u}r Schwerionenforschung (GSI). We produced $^{142}$Pm via the $^{124}$Sn($^{23}$Na, 5n)$^{142}$Pm reaction at the Berkeley 88-Inch Cyclotron with a bombardment time short compared to the reported modulation period. Isotope selection by the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator is followed by implantation and a long period of monitoring the $^{142}$Nd K$_{\\alpha}$ x-rays from the daughter. The decay time spectrum of the x-rays is well-described by a simple exponential and the measured half-life of 40.68(53) seconds is consistent with the accepted value. We observed no oscillatory modulation at the proposed frequency at a level 31 times smaller than that reported by Litvinov {\\it et al.} (Phys. Lett. B 664 (2008) 162; arXiv:0801.2079 [nucl-ex]). A literature search for previous experiments that might have been sensitive to the reported modulation uncovered another example in $^{142}$Eu electron-capture decay. A reanalysis of the published data shows no oscillatory behavior.

P. A. Vetter; R. M. Clark; J. Dvorak; S. J. Freedman; K. E. Gregorich; H. B. Jeppesen; D. Mittelberger; M. Wiedeking

2008-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

276

Charged Higgs Production in Association With W^{\\pm} at Large Hadron Colliders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many new physics models beyond the standard model, such as the littlest higgs models and the left right twin higgs models, predict the existence of the large charged higgs couplings H^-q\\bar b and H^+b\\bar q, where q=t or the new vector-like heavy quark T; On the other hand, some new physics models like the littlest higgs also predict the gauge-higgs couplings. Such couplings may have rich collider phenomenology. We focus our attention on these couplings induced by the littlest higgs models and the left right twin higgs models models and consider their contributions to the production cross section for W^\\pm H^\\mp production at the large hadron colliders. We find that the cross sections, in the littlest higgs models, on the parton level gg \\to W^\\pm H^\\mp and q\\bar q \\to W^\\pm H^\\mp (q=u,d,s,c,b) may reach tens of several dozen femtobarns in reasonable parameters space at the collision energy of 14 TeV and that the total cross section can even reach a few hundred femtobarns in certain favored space. While in the left right twin higgs models, the production rates are basically one order lower than these in littlest higgs. Therefore, due to the large cross sections of that in the littlest higgs, it may be possible to probe the charged higgs via this process in a large parameter space.

Guo-Li Liu; Fei Wang; Shuo Yang

2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

277

Tribological and microstructural investigation of the PM200 series of self-lubricating composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This master`s thesis describes an investigation of the effects of processing and compositional variations on the tribological, microstructural, and compressive strength characteristics of PM212. PM212 is a self-lubricating composite, comprised of a wear-resistant metal bonded (NiCo) chromium carbide matrix, containing the solid lubricants barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic and silver. Several alternate composites were formulated which had lubricant and matrix variations. Processing variations included sintering and hot isostatic pressing (HIPping). Pin-on-disk tests were used to screen the alternates for friction and wear properties. Several of the chromium carbide-based self-lubricating composites exhibited low friction and wear in sliding against a nickel-based superalloy. One specific composition contained gold in place of silver to minimize the potential reactivity of the composite with possible environmental contaminants such as sulfur. This formulation also resulted in a composite with good tribological properties. Results indicate that several of these composites have potential use as sliding bearing and seal materials in operation from 25{degrees}C to temperatures as high as 900{degrees}C. The good tribological performance by several different composites showed that the composition of PM212 can be altered without dramatically affecting performance.

Bogdanski, M.S.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Search for Oscillation of the Electron-Capture Decay Probability of Pm-142  

SciTech Connect

We have searched for time modulation of the electron capture decay probability of 142Pm in an attempt to confirm a recent claim from a group at the Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI). We produced 142Pm via the 124Sn(23Na, 5n)142Pm reaction at the Berkeley 88-Inch Cyclotron with a bombardment time short compared to the reported modulation period. Isotope selection by the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator is followed by implantation and a long period of monitoring the 142Nd K alpha x-rays from the daughter. The decay time spectrum of the x-rays is well-described by a simple exponential and the measured half-life of 40.68(53) seconds is consistent with the accepted value. We observed no oscillatory modulation at the proposed frequency at a level 31 times smaller than that reported by Litvinov (Phys. Lett. B 664 (2008) 162). A literature search for previous experiments that might have been sensitive to the reported modulation uncovered another example in 142Eu electron-capture decay. A reanalysis of the published data shows no oscillatory behavior.

Vetter, Paul A; Vetter, Paul; Clark, Roderick; Dvorak, Jan; Freedman, Stuart; Gregorich, Kenneth; Jeppesen, Henrik; Mittelberger, Daniel; Wiedeking, Mathis

2008-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

279

Chromatin fibers observed in situ in frozen hydrated sections. Native fiber diameter is not correlated with nucleosome repeat length  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Chromatin fibers have been observed and measured in frozen hydrated sections of three types of cell (chicken erythrocytes and sperm of Patiria miniata and Thyone briareus) representing an •20-bp range of nucleosomal repeat lengths. For sperm of the starfish P. miniata, it was possible to obtain images of chromatin fibers from cells that were swimming in seawater up to the moment of cryo-immobilization, thus providing a record of the native morphology of the chromatin of these cells. Glutaraldehyde fixation produced no significant changes in the ultrastructure or diameter of chromatin fibers, and fiber diameters observed in cryosections were similar to those recorded after low temperature embedding in Lowicryl KllM. Chromatin fiber diameters measured from

C. L. Woodcock

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Guidelines for Developing a Preventive Maintenance (PM) Program: Identifying, Prioritizing, and Implementing PM Tasks: Summary of Le ssons Learned for Maintenance Basis Optimization on Fossil, Combined-Cycle, Co Generation, and Renewable Assets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power generation utilities are under continued and increased pressure to reduce power generation costs while increasing equipment reliability. In addition, the industry’s aging engineering and maintenance work force is being replaced with less-experienced personnel; therefore, capturing the knowledge and information for sustaining and continuously improving the preventive maintenance (PM) task bases and the overall PM program are critical pieces to meeting these challenges.Over the ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aerodynamic diameter pm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

#LabChat: Supercomputing Our Way to the Future, Sept. 19 at 1:30 pm EDT |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LabChat: Supercomputing Our Way to the Future, Sept. 19 at 1:30 pm LabChat: Supercomputing Our Way to the Future, Sept. 19 at 1:30 pm EDT #LabChat: Supercomputing Our Way to the Future, Sept. 19 at 1:30 pm EDT September 18, 2012 - 12:21pm Q&A SEND US YOUR QUESTIONS | These scientists are using the most powerful supercomputers in the world to build some of the most complex machines ever. Have questions? Ask here or on #LabChat Ask Us Addthis Supercomputers like this petascale computer, Jaguar, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory are helping researchers build and experiment with next-generation nuclear reactors. Jaguar powers the virtual reactor at the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL). | Photo courtesy of Oak Ridge National Lab. Supercomputers like this petascale computer, Jaguar, at Oak Ridge National

282

Watch it Live at 1pm: Secretary Chu Talks "Sputnik Moment" at Press Club |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Watch it Live at 1pm: Secretary Chu Talks "Sputnik Moment" at Press Watch it Live at 1pm: Secretary Chu Talks "Sputnik Moment" at Press Club Watch it Live at 1pm: Secretary Chu Talks "Sputnik Moment" at Press Club November 29, 2010 - 11:39am Addthis At 1pm ET today, Secretary Chu will deliver a speech at the National Press Club in DC calling on the United States to sharply accelerate innovations in clean energy -- citing China and other countries' recent advances in clean technology as a critical "Sputnik Moment" for the U.S. The event will begin at 12:30, and Chu will deliver his remarks at 1, followed by a question and answer session. You'll be able to watch live online here. UPDATE: Follow along with Secretary Chu's "Energy Race/Sputnik Moment" powerpoint as he talks live at the Press Club right now. (PDF) , (PPT)

283

Associated Students of the Colorado School of Mines November 3, 2011, 7:05 p.m.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Large Report: Erin need a proxy for the faculty meeting #12; Next Tue. at 2pm Noah Josh Sarah wanted club was dropped a tier A few were derecognize Committee Reports Publicity #12; Noah should get

284

SEP. 1.2000 1:86PM DOE/ORK/IPLD N0.407 P.2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

makes the invention or the NIS institute whose employee makes the invention obtains the invention rights is left to the NIS institute. 3 SEP. 1.2000 1:07PM DOEORKIPLD N0.407...

285

Abstract--Pitch angle control is the most common means for adjusting the aerodynamic torque of the wind turbine when wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the wind turbine when wind speed is above rated speed and various controlling variables may be chosen Terms--Blade aerodynamic, Fatigue load, Fuzzy logic control, Pitch angle, Wind turbine I. INTRODUCTION of 40 GW. Pitch-adjusting variable-speed wind turbines have become the dominating type of yearly

Hansen, René Rydhof

286

Wind Tunnel Aerodynamic Tests of Six Airfoils for Use on Small Wind Turbines; Period of Performance: October 31, 2002--January 31, 2003  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind Tunnel Aerodynamic Tests of Six Airfoils for Use on Small Wind Turbinesrepresents the fourth installment in a series of volumes documenting the ongoing work of th University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Low-Speed Airfoil Tests Program. This particular volume deals with airfoils that are candidates for use on small wind turbines, which operate at low Reynolds numbers.

Selig, M. S.; McGranahan, B. D.

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

90Exploring the Large Hadron Collider The 27-kilometer diameter LHC ring, buried deep underground, uses thousands of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

90Exploring the Large Hadron Collider The 27-kilometer diameter LHC ring, buried deep underground Joules)? During November, 2009 the Large Hadron Collider experiment at CERN began a slow, step, uses thousands of magnets to steer two beams of protons so that they collide at specific points along

288

#LabChat Q&A: Biofuels of the Future, Sept. 26 at 2 pm EDT | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

#LabChat Q&A: Biofuels of the Future, Sept. 26 at 2 pm EDT #LabChat Q&A: Biofuels of the Future, Sept. 26 at 2 pm EDT #LabChat Q&A: Biofuels of the Future, Sept. 26 at 2 pm EDT September 25, 2012 - 1:23pm Addthis Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center researcher and University of Wisconsin - Madison Assistant Professor Brian Pfleger explains the term "next generation biofuel." You can ask him questions on Sept. 26 at 2 p.m. EDT by using #LabChat in a tweet. Michael Hess Michael Hess Former Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs How can I participate? Send us your questions via Twitter (@ENERGY) using #labchat. Email us your questions at newmedia@hq.doe.gov. This Wednesday, September 26, at 2 p.m. EDT, Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center will host #LabChat Q&A: Biofuels of the Future. The University of

289

April 2002 Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag: Presentations and Summary of Comments and Conclusions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag was held at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on April 3 and 4, 2002. The purpose of the meeting was to present and discuss technical details on the experimental and computational work in progress and future project plans. Representatives from the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Transportation Technology Office of Heavy Vehicle Technology (OHVT), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), NASA Ames Research Center, University of Southern California (USC), and California Institute of Technology (Caltech), Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI), and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Volvo Trucks, and Freightliner Trucks presented and participated in discussions. This report contains the technical presentations (viewgraphs) delivered at the Meeting, briefly summarizes the comments and conclusions, and outlines the future action items.

Salari, K; Dunn, T; Ortega, J; Yen-Nakafuji, D; Browand, F; Arcas, D; Jammache, M; Leoard, A; Chatelain, P; Rubel, M; Rutledge, W; McWherter-Payne, M; Roy, Ca; Ross, J; Satran, D; Heineck, J T; Storms, B; Pointer, D; Sofu, T; Weber, D; Chu, E; Hancock, P; Bundy, B; Englar, B

2002-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

290

Fractional-Slot Surface Mounted PM Motors with Concentrated Windings for HEV Traction Drives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-power density and efficiency resulting from elimination of rotor windings and reduced magnetic-flux losses have made the rare earth permanent magnet (PM) motor a leading candidate for the Department of Energy's Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (FCVTs) traction drive motor. These traction drives are generally powered by radial-gap motors, having the magnets on or embedded in a rotating cylinder separated from the inside surface of a slotted cylindrical stator by an annular gap. The two main types of radial-gap PM rotors are those with magnets mounted on the surface of a supporting back iron, called PM surface mounted (PMSM) motors, and those with magnets mounted in slots in the rotor, called interior PM (IPM) motors. Most early PM motor research was on the PMSM motor, which was thought to have an inherently low stator inductance. A low stator inductance can lead to currents dangerously exceeding rated current as the back-emf across the inductance increases with speed; consequently, part of the attempted solution has been to increase the stator inductance to reduce the rate of current rise. Although analysis suggested that there should be no problem designing sufficiently high stator inductance into PMSMs, attempts to do so were often not successful and a motor design was sought that would have a higher intrinsic inductance. Commercial research at Toyota has focused on IPM motors because they can achieve a high-saliency ratio, which helps them operate over a high constant power speed ratio (CPSR), but they are more difficult to fabricate. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) position has been to continue research on brushless direct current (dc) motors (BDCMs) because of ease of fabrication and increased power output. Recently there has been a revival of interest in a fractional-slot PMSMs [15] made with concentrated windings because they possess three important features. First, they can increase the motor's inductance sufficiently to reduce the characteristic current to value of the rated current, which will enable them to operate at high CPSR. This feature also limits short-circuit fault currents. Second, their segmented structure simplifies assembly problems and is expected to reduce assembly costs. Third, the back-emf waveform is nearly sinusoidal with low cogging. To examine in depth this design ORNL entered into a collaborative agreement with the University of Wisconsin to build and test a 6 kW laboratory demonstration unit. Design, fabrication, and testing of the unit to 4000 rpm were completed during FY 2005. The motor will be sent to ORNL to explore ways to control its inverter to achieve higher efficiency during FY 2006. This paper first reviews the concept of characteristic current and what is meant by optimal flux weakening. It then discusses application of the fractional-slot concentrated winding technique to increase the d-axis inductance of a PMSM showing how this approach differs from an integral-slot motor with sinusoidal-distributed windings. This discussion is followed by a presentation of collaborative analyses and comparison with the University of Wisconsin's measured data on a 6 kW, 36-slot, 30-pole motor with concentrated windings. Finally ORNL presents a PMSM design with integral-slot windings that appears to meet the FreedomCAR Specifications, but has some disadvantages. Further collaboration with the University of Wisconsin is planned for FY 2006 to design a motor that meets FreedomCAR specifications.

Bailey, J.M.

2005-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

291

Angular diameter measurements of evolved variables by lunar occultations at 2.2 and 3.8 micron  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the angular diameters of two Mira variables (U Ari and Z Sco), three semiregular (SR) and irregular variables (SW Vir, eta Gem and mu Gem) and a supergiant SR variable (TV Gem) by lunar occultation observations in the near-IR broad K-band (2.2 micron). Lunar occultations of eta Gem and mu Gem were also observed for the first time simultaneously in both the K and L' bands, yielding angular diameters at 2.2 and 3.8 micron. Effective temperatures and linear radii are also derived for all the observed sources and compared with earlier measurements. The mode of pulsation of both Mira and SR sources in our sample is discussed.

Soumen Mondal; T. Chandrasekhar

2005-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

292

Direct Detection of Planets Orbiting Large Angular Diameter Stars: Sensitivity of an Internally-Occulting Space-Based Coronagraph  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-contrast imaging observations of large angular diameter stars enable complementary science questions to be addressed compared to the baseline goals of proposed missions like the Terrestrial Planet Finder-Coronagraph, New World's Observer, and others. Such targets however present a practical problem in that finite stellar size results in unwanted starlight reaching the detector, which degrades contrast. In this paper, we quantify the sensitivity, in terms of contrast, of an internally-occulting, space-based coronagraph as a function of stellar angular diameter, from unresolved dwarfs to the largest evolved stars. Our calculations show that an assortment of band-limited image masks can accommodate a diverse set of observations to help maximize mission scientific return. We discuss two applications based on the results: the spectro-photometric study of planets already discovered with the radial velocity technique to orbit evolved stars, which we elucidate with the example of Pollux b, and the direct detecti...

Crepp, Justin R; Ge, Jian

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Angular diameter measurements of evolved variables by lunar occultations at 2.2 and 3.8 micron  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the angular diameters of two Mira variables (U Ari and Z Sco), three semiregular (SR) and irregular variables (SW Vir, eta Gem and mu Gem) and a supergiant SR variable (TV Gem) by lunar occultation observations in the near-IR broad K-band (2.2 micron). Lunar occultations of eta Gem and mu Gem were also observed for the first time simultaneously in both the K and L' bands, yielding angular diameters at 2.2 and 3.8 micron. Effective temperatures and linear radii are also derived for all the observed sources and compared with earlier measurements. The mode of pulsation of both Mira and SR sources in our sample is discussed.

Mondal, S A; Mondal, Soumen

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

On the Diameter of Zero-Divisor Graphs of Idealizations with Respect to Integral Manal Al-labadi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

@philadelphia.edu.jo Abstract Let R be a ring with unity and let M be an R - module. Let R(+)M be the idealization of the ring R by the R - module M. In this paper, we give new results on the diameter of (R(+)M) when R is an integral and 4]. Let R be a commutative ring with unity. We use the notation A to refer to the nonzero elements

295

Building a predictive model of indoor concentrations of outdoor PM-2.5 for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building a predictive model of indoor concentrations of outdoor PM-2.5 for Building a predictive model of indoor concentrations of outdoor PM-2.5 for a residential research house in Clovis, California Title Building a predictive model of indoor concentrations of outdoor PM-2.5 for a residential research house in Clovis, California Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2002 Authors Fischer, Marc L., Melissa M. Lunden, Tracy L. Thatcher, David Littlejohn, Thomas W. Kirchstetter, Susanne V. Hering, Richard G. Sextro, and Nancy J. Brown Abstract The prevalence of relocatable classrooms (RCs) at schools is rising due to federal and state initiatives to reduce K-3 class size, and limited capital resources. Concerns regarding inadequate ventilation and indoor air and environmental quality (IEQ) in RCs have been raised. Adequate ventilation is an important link between improved IEQ and energy efficiency for schools. Since students and teachers spend the majority of a 7-8 hour school day inside classrooms, indoor contaminant concentrations are assumed to drive personal school-day exposures. We conducted a demonstration project in new relocatable classrooms (RCs) during the 2001-02 school year to address these issues. Four new 24' x 40' (960 ft2) RCs were constructed and sited in pairs at an elementary school campus in each of two participant school districts (SD) in Northern California. Each RC was equipped with two heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems, one per module. The two HVAC systems were a standard heat pump with intermittent 25-50% outdoor air ventilation and an energy-efficient advanced system, based on indirect-direct evaporative cooling with an integrated natural gas-fired hydronic heating loop and improved particle filtration, providing continuous 100% outdoor air ventilation at = 15 ft3 min-1 occupant-1. Alternate carpets, wall panels, and ceiling panels were installed in two classrooms -- one in each pair -- based on the results of a laboratory study of VOC emissions from standard and alternate materials. Numerous IEQ and outdoor air quality and meteorological parameters were measured either continuously over the school year or as integrated school day samples during the fall cooling and winter heating seasons. Details of the RC designs, the field monitoring methodology including handling, storage, transport and management of chemical samples and data, and analyses to be conducted are presented

296

Market Enhancement for Small Diameter Timber in Florida Final Project Report to Florida Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services-Division of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biomass into electricity, industrial steam energy and fuel ethanol. A barrier to private sector investment .................................................................................................................... 7 Biomass Energy Uses................. 39 Small Diameter Timber for Fuel or Energy

Florida, University of

297

#LabChat: Science of the Very Fast and Very Small, June 11 at 2 pm EDT |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

#LabChat: Science of the Very Fast and Very Small, June 11 at 2 pm #LabChat: Science of the Very Fast and Very Small, June 11 at 2 pm EDT #LabChat: Science of the Very Fast and Very Small, June 11 at 2 pm EDT June 8, 2012 - 10:17am Addthis Greg Nielson holds a solar cell test prototype with a microscale lens array fastened to it. Together, the cell and lens help create a concentrated photovoltaic unit that when commercialized will revolutionize the way solar energy is collected. | Photo courtesy of Sandia National Lab Greg Nielson holds a solar cell test prototype with a microscale lens array fastened to it. Together, the cell and lens help create a concentrated photovoltaic unit that when commercialized will revolutionize the way solar energy is collected. | Photo courtesy of Sandia National Lab Michael Hess Michael Hess

298

WAPA REC RFP - Deadline: August 9, 2013 - 4:30 p.m. PT | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

WAPA REC RFP - Deadline: August 9, 2013 - 4:30 p.m. PT WAPA REC RFP - Deadline: August 9, 2013 - 4:30 p.m. PT Home > Groups > Renewable Energy RFPs Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(1992) Super contributor 5 August, 2013 - 14:26 Western Area Power Administration desires to purchase Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs) on behalf of Federal Agencies (If a message box asking for user name and password appears, click cancel until the document opens). Proposals submitted in response to this RFP must be received via MAIL or FAX to Western on or before August 9, 2013, at 4:30 p.m. PDT to be considered for evaluation. E-mail proposals will not be considered. Western reserves the right to not consider any proposals received after the prescribed dates and time. See Frequently Asked Questions (If a message

299

The effect of processing and compositional changes on the tribology of PM212 in air{copyright}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of processing and compositional variations on the tribological performance of PM212 were investigated. PM212 is a self lubricating powder metallurgy composite, comprised of a wear-resistant, metal-bonded chromium carbide matrix, containing the solid lubricants barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic and silver. Several composites were formulated which had lubricant, matrix, and processing variations. Processing variations included sintering and hot isostatic pressing (HIPing). Pins fabricated from the composites were slid against superalloy disks in a pin-on-disk tribometer to study the tribological properties. Several composites exhibited low friction and wear in sliding against a nickel-based superalloy. The results showed that, under these test conditions, the tribological properties of PM212 are not highly sensitive to compositional and processing variations within the matrix studied. 9 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

Bogdanski, M.S. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Sliney, H.E.; Dellacorte, C. [NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

In Situ Electrostatic Separation of Ambient PM2.5 into Source-Specific Fractions During Collection in a FRM Sampler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal combustion is generally viewed as a major source of PM2.5 emissions into the atmosphere. For some time, toxicologists have been asking for an exposure environment enriched with the coal combustion source specific PM{sub 2.5} to conduct meaningful exposure studies to better understand the mechanisms of the adverse health effects of coal combustion specific PM2.5 in the ambient environment. There are several unique characteristics of primary PM generated from coal combustion. In this research project, an attempt has been made to exploit some of the unique properties of PM generated from coal fired power plants to preferentially separate them out from the rest of the primary and secondary PM in the ambient environment. An existing FRM sampler used for monitoring amount of PM{sub 2.5} in the ambient air is modified to incorporate an electrostatic field. A DC corona charging device is also installed at the ambient air inlet to impart positive or negative charge to the PM. Visual Basic software has been written to simulate the lateral movement of PM as it passes through the electrostatic separator under varying operating conditions. The PM samples collected on polycarbonate filters under varying operating conditions were extensively observed for clustering and/or separation of PM in the direction parallel to the electric field. No systematic PM separation was observed under any of the operating conditions. A solution to overcome this kind of turbulence caused remixing has been offered. However, due to major programmatic changes in the DOE UCR program, there are no venues available to further pursue this research.

Naresh Shah; Frank E. Huggins; Gerald P. Huffman

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aerodynamic diameter pm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Effects of Carbon Nanotube Coating on Bubble Departure Diameter and Frequency in Pool Boiling on a Flat, Horizontal Heater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effects of a carbon nanotube (CNT) coating on bubble departure diameter and frequency in pool boiling experiments was investigated and compared to those on a bare silicon wafer. The pool boiling experiments were performed at liquid subcooling of 10 degrees Celsius and 20 degrees Celsius using PF-5060 as the test fluid and at atmospheric pressure. High-speed digital image acquisition techniques were used to perform hydrodynamic measurements. Boiling curves obtained from the experiments showed that the CNT coating enhanced critical heat flux (CHF) by 63% at 10 degrees Celsius subcooling. The CHF condition was not measured for the CNT sample at 20 degrees Celsius subcooling. Boiling incipience superheat for the CNT-coated surface is shown to be much lower than predicted by Hsu's hypothesis. It is proposed that bubble nucleation occurs within irregularities at the surface of the CNT coating. The irregularities could provide larger cavities than are available between individual nanotubes of the CNT coating. Measurements from high-speed imaging showed that the average bubble departing from the CNT coating in the nucleate boiling regime (excluding the much larger bubbles observed near CHF) was about 75% smaller (0.26 mm versus 1.01 mm)and had a departure frequency that was about 70% higher (50.46 Hz versus 30.10 Hz). The reduction in departure diameter is explained as a change in the configuration of the contact line, although further study is required. The increase in frequency is a consequence of the smaller bubbles, which require less time to grow. It is suggested that nucleation site density for the CNT coating must drastically increase to compensate for the smaller departure diameters if the rate of vapor creation is similar to or greater than that of a bare silicon surface.

Glenn, Stephen T.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Critical heat flux and boiling heat transfer to water in a 3-mm-diameter horizontal tube.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Boiling of the coolant in an engine, by design or by circumstance, is limited by the critical heat flux phenomenon. As a first step in providing relevant engine design information, this study experimentally addressed both rate of boiling heat transfer and conditions at the critical point of water in a horizontal tube of 2.98 mm inside diameter and 0.9144 m heated length. Experiments were performed at system pressure of 203 kPa, mass fluxes in range of 50 to 200 kg/m{sup z}s, and inlet temperatures in range of ambient to 80 C. Experimental results and comparisons with predictive correlations are presented.

Yu, W.; Wambsganss, M. W.; Hull, J. R.; France, D. M.

2000-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

303

Power Spectrum Analysis of Mount-Wilson Solar Diameter Measurements: Evidence for Solar Internal R-mode Oscillations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article presents a power-spectrum analysis of 39,024 measurements of the solar diameter made at the Mount Wilson Observatory from 1968.670 to 1997.965. This power spectrum contains a number of very strong peaks. We find that eight of these peaks agree closely with the frequencies of r-mode oscillations for a region of the Sun where the sidereal rotation frequency is 12.08 year$^{-1}$. We estimate that there is less than one chance in ten to the sixth power of finding this pattern by chance.

Sturrock, Peter A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

A computational study of tandem dual wheel aerodynamics and the effect of fenders and fairings on spray dispersion  

SciTech Connect

With the goal of understanding how to mitigate the safety hazard of splash and spray around heavy vehicles, a computational study of the aerodynamics and spray dispersion about a simplified trailer wheel assembly has been completed. A tandem dual slick (TDS) wheel model that neglects complex geometric features such as brakes, wheel bolts and wheel cutouts but with the same dimensions as an actual trailer wheel assembly was used . A detailed simulation of the wheels alone demonstrated that the flow field is both unsteady and complex, containing a number of vortical structures that interact strongly with spray. Preliminary simulations with fenders and fairings demonstrated that these devices prevent the ballistic transport of drops larger than approximately 0.1 mm, but the fine mist speculated to be responsible for visibility reduction is unaffected. This work suggests that to use computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to design and evaluate spray mitigation strategies the jet or sheet breakup processes can be modeled using an array of injectors of small (< 0.01 mm) water droplets; however the choice of size distribution, injection locations, directions and velocities is largely unknown and requires further study. Possible containment strategies would include using flow structures to 'focus' particles into regions away from passing cars or surface treatments to capture small drops.

Paschkewitz, J S

2006-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

305

Single round blasting of 10-foot diameter X 65-foot depth emplacement collar holes at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Since 1961 REECo has drilled and mined emplacement holes for testing nuclear devices underground. An oversize drill pattern was the primary method used. The application of drilling the final size configuration hole to a 65-foot depth and mucking with the Auger Rig was then investigated. Numerous drilling patterns, loading and time schemes and methods were tried. Some were successful. Most were expensive. All concerned looked for a better and less costly method for this collar casing installation. Poor fragmentation in the collar holes prior to Atlas Powder becoming involved resulted in slow hole cleanout and excessive rig maintenance with associated excessive costs. One of the more successful shots was a 120-inch diameter {times} 60-foot deep hole that was drilled using 3 1/2-inch holes and then casing them to a 2-inch diameter using PVC pipe. A 30-inch burn hole was drilled to total depth. Twenty-seven 3 1/2-inch holes were drilled and then loaded with 1 1/2-inch powder boosted with Detaprimes and wired using all 0 delay caps. This shot smooth walled and the blast holes were visible all the way from top to bottom. Fragmentation was excellent and the Auger Rig mucked out quickly. The 28-inch bit used for the burn hole was a high cost item in this test and other methods continued to be investigated.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Estimated Maximum Gas Retention from Uniformly Dispersed Bubbles in K Basin Sludge Stored in Large-Diameter Containers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This letter report addresses the KE Basin sludge that will be retrieved and stored in large-diameter containers (LDCs.) A fraction of the hydrogen gas bubbles generated from the corrosion of uranium metal and oxides may be retained within the sludge matrix. Those entrapped bubbles will expand the sludge bed volume and, therefore, will affect how much sludge can be loaded into a container. The entrapped gas bubbles will also impact the overall thermal conductivity and heat capacity of the sludge bed. The evaluation summarized here was performed to estimate the maximum gas holdup (volume fraction gas) that could occur sludge stored in large-diameter containers, assuming uniform gas generation (i.e., uniform distribution of metallic uranium particles). This report represents an evaluation of the retention of uniformly distributed bubbles and an estimate of the maximum gas fraction that might be retained in K Basin LDCs based on existing literature data on bubble retention and Basin sludge characterization data. Existing data show that the maximum gas fraction varies, depending on physical properties and the configuration of the material or waste.

Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Terrones, Guillermo

2002-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

307

Orbital inside diameter welder  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure relates to welding apparatus and more particularly to apparatus for welding together two abutted cylinders from the inside of the joint.

Patterson, R.A.; Mitchell, J.O.

1982-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

308

Tune In To Our Online Town Hall With Sec. Chu at 12:45PM EST | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tune In To Our Online Town Hall With Sec. Chu at 12:45PM EST Tune In To Our Online Town Hall With Sec. Chu at 12:45PM EST Tune In To Our Online Town Hall With Sec. Chu at 12:45PM EST January 26, 2011 - 8:35am Addthis Ginny Simmons Ginny Simmons Former Managing Editor for Energy.gov, Office of Public Affairs During the State of the Union address last night, President Obama placed the national spotlight on clean energy, saying that "we need to out-innovate, out-educate, and out-build the rest of the world," and that we must invest in clean energy in order to strengthen our security, protect our planet, and create countless new jobs for our people. Today, Secretary Steven Chu is hosting an online town hall to discuss the President's clean energy and innovation agenda. We hope you'll join at 12:45 PM EST at energy.gov/livechat.

309

Texas Agriculture Commissioner Todd Staples http://www.commissionertoddstaples.blogspot.com/[6/8/2010 12:27:49 PM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Agriculture Commissioner Todd Staples http://www.commissionertoddstaples.blogspot.com/[6/8/2010 12:27:49 PM] MONDAY, JUNE 7, 2010 Texas waters have not been affected by the Gulf oil disaster and Texas seafood remains both safe to eat and the high quality consumers across the nation have come

Rock, Chris

310

Oil Flow Rale Problem Behler, David D 0 McNutt, Marcia K 05/23/201001 :04 PM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil Flow Rale Problem t Behler, David D 0 McNutt, Marcia K 05/23/201001 :04 PM Marcia - just some thoughts on the oil flow rate problem. Over the past few weeks, it's become apparent that the oil flow rate it's best to frame a range of estimated oil flow rates and refine the range over time as the tools

Fleskes, Joe

311

Eco-Loco Arizona Renewable Energy Conference Friday, September 7th, 2012 9 AM to 4 PM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Eco-Loco Arizona Renewable Energy Conference Friday, September 7th, 2012 9 AM to 4 PM Keynote Speaker Ms. Leisa Brug director of the Governor's office of Energy Policy Renewable Energy projects projects that would benefit them. The Arizona Renewable Energy Conference provides an opportunity for all

Hall, Sharon J.

312

Abstract --An exact two-dimensional (2-D) analytical model (AM) of slotless permanent magnet (PM) machines in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

machines, one always tries to minimize the magnet thickness, in order to minimize the cost of the motor andAbstract -- An exact two-dimensional (2-D) analytical model (AM) of slotless permanent magnet (PM at no-load operation. The authors show that, for a radial magnetization, there is an optimal magnet

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

313

UNBC HPC Policy last revised: 2/1/2007, 2:49:29 PM UNBC Enhanced High Performance Computing Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNBC HPC Policy last revised: 2/1/2007, 2:49:29 PM UNBC Enhanced High Performance Computing Center and contracts are sought by Principal Investigators. Membership Policies The UNBC Enhanced High Performance Computing Center (called " UNBC HPC" hereafter) provides computing resources and services to members

Northern British Columbia, University of

314

Top Engineers to Investigate Cause of Oil by Lauren Schenkman on July 13, 2010 6:02 PM |  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Top Engineers to Investigate Cause of Oil Spill by Lauren Schenkman on July 13, 2010 6:02 PM | Investigations into the gulf oil disaster are multiplying. The National Academy of Engineering (NAE and industry engineers to take a technical look into the causes of the Deepwater Horizon rig explosion and oil

Southern California, University of

315

PNNL Lab Homes Ribbon Cutting Ceremony Tuesday, November 15, 2011 10:00 am 12:00 pm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PNNL Lab Homes Ribbon Cutting Ceremony Tuesday, November 15, 2011 · 10:00 am ­ 12:00 pm 6th Street and Q Avenue, PNNL Campus · Richland, Washington Sponsors DOE/BT/Building America · DOE/BT/Windows and Envelope R&D DOE/Office of Electricity · Bonneville Power Administration PNNL Facilities · City of Richland

316

Last printed 3/16/2004 3:01 PM High-Frequency (Light) Borehole-Radar System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Last printed 3/16/2004 3:01 PM High-Frequency (Light) Borehole-Radar System Ramac from Mala Geoscience Packing List 1) Radar control unit (Ramac surface GPR system) (Old or New CU2 is O.K.). 2) Laptop computer with acquisition software, manuals, logbook and protocol sheets. 3) Backup system; zip, jaz, or CD

Barrash, Warren

317

08FFL-0020Influence of High Fuel Rail Pressure and Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction on PM Formation in an Off-Highway Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of fuel rail pressure (FRP) and urea-selective catalytic reduction (SCR) on particulate matter (PM) formation is investigated in this paper along with notes regarding the NOx and other emissions. Increasing FRP was shown to reduce the overall soot and total PM mass for four operating conditions. These conditions included two high speed conditions (2400 rpm at 540 and 270 Nm of torque) and two moderated speed conditions (1400 rpm at 488 and 325 Nm). The concentrations of CO2 and NOx increased with fuel rail pressure and this is attributed to improved fuel-air mixing. Interestingly, the level of unburned hydrocarbons remained constant (or increased slightly) with increased FRP. PM concentration was measured using an AVL smoke meter and scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS); and total PM was collected using standard gravimetric techniques. These results showed that the smoke number and particulate concentrations decrease with increasing FRP. However the decrease becomes more gradual as very high rail pressures. Additionally, the total PM decreased with increasing FRP; however, the soluble organic fraction (SOF) reaches a maximum after which it declines with higher rail pressure. The total PM was collected for the two 1400 rpm conditions downstream of the engine, diesel oxidation catalyst, and a urea-SCR catalyst. The results show that significant PM reduction occurs in the SCR catalyst even during high rates of urea dosage. Analysis of the PM indicates that residual SOF is burned up in the SCR catalyst.

Kass, Michael D [ORNL; Domingo, Norberto [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Computational mechanics research and support for aerodynamics and hydraulics at TFHRC, year 1 quarter 3 progress report.  

SciTech Connect

The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and computational structural mechanics (CSM) focus areas at Argonne's Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center (TRACC) initiated a project to support and compliment the experimental programs at the Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center (TFHRC) with high performance computing based analysis capabilities in August 2010. The project was established with a new interagency agreement between the Department of Energy and the Department of Transportation to provide collaborative research, development, and benchmarking of advanced three-dimensional computational mechanics analysis methods to the aerodynamics and hydraulics laboratories at TFHRC for a period of five years, beginning in October 2010. The analysis methods employ well-benchmarked and supported commercial computational mechanics software. Computational mechanics encompasses the areas of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), Computational Wind Engineering (CWE), Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM), and Computational Multiphysics Mechanics (CMM) applied in Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) problems. The major areas of focus of the project are wind and water loads on bridges - superstructure, deck, cables, and substructure (including soil), primarily during storms and flood events - and the risks that these loads pose to structural failure. For flood events at bridges, another major focus of the work is assessment of the risk to bridges caused by scour of stream and riverbed material away from the foundations of a bridge. Other areas of current research include modeling of flow through culverts to assess them for fish passage, modeling of the salt spray transport into bridge girders to address suitability of using weathering steel in bridges, vehicle stability under high wind loading, and the use of electromagnetic shock absorbers to improve vehicle stability under high wind conditions. This quarterly report documents technical progress on the project tasks for the period of April through June 2011.

Lottes, S.A.; Kulak, R.F.; Bojanowski, C. (Energy Systems)

2011-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

319

Computational mechanics research and support for aerodynamics and hydraulics at TFHRC year 1 quarter 4 progress report.  

SciTech Connect

The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and computational structural mechanics (CSM) focus areas at Argonne's Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center (TRACC) initiated a project to support and compliment the experimental programs at the Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center (TFHRC) with high performance computing based analysis capabilities in August 2010. The project was established with a new interagency agreement between the Department of Energy and the Department of Transportation to provide collaborative research, development, and benchmarking of advanced three-dimensional computational mechanics analysis methods to the aerodynamics and hydraulics laboratories at TFHRC for a period of five years, beginning in October 2010. The analysis methods employ well-benchmarked and supported commercial computational mechanics software. Computational mechanics encompasses the areas of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), Computational Wind Engineering (CWE), Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM), and Computational Multiphysics Mechanics (CMM) applied in Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) problems. The major areas of focus of the project are wind and water effects on bridges - superstructure, deck, cables, and substructure (including soil), primarily during storms and flood events - and the risks that these loads pose to structural failure. For flood events at bridges, another major focus of the work is assessment of the risk to bridges caused by scour of stream and riverbed material away from the foundations of a bridge. Other areas of current research include modeling of flow through culverts to assess them for fish passage, modeling of the salt spray transport into bridge girders to address suitability of using weathering steel in bridges, CFD analysis of the operation of the wind tunnel in the TFCHR wind engineering laboratory, vehicle stability under high wind loading, and the use of electromagnetic shock absorbers to improve vehicle stability under high wind conditions. This quarterly report documents technical progress on the project tasks for the period of July through September 2011.

Lottes, S.A.; Kulak, R.F.; Bojanowski, C. (Energy Systems)

2011-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

320

Computational mechanics research and support for aerodynamics and hydraulics at TFHRC, year 2 quarter 1 progress report.  

SciTech Connect

The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and computational structural mechanics (CSM) focus areas at Argonne's Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center (TRACC) initiated a project to support and compliment the experimental programs at the Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center (TFHRC) with high performance computing based analysis capabilities in August 2010. The project was established with a new interagency agreement between the Department of Energy and the Department of Transportation to provide collaborative research, development, and benchmarking of advanced three-dimensional computational mechanics analysis methods to the aerodynamics and hydraulics laboratories at TFHRC for a period of five years, beginning in October 2010. The analysis methods employ well-benchmarked and supported commercial computational mechanics software. Computational mechanics encompasses the areas of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), Computational Wind Engineering (CWE), Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM), and Computational Multiphysics Mechanics (CMM) applied in Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) problems. The major areas of focus of the project are wind and water effects on bridges - superstructure, deck, cables, and substructure (including soil), primarily during storms and flood events - and the risks that these loads pose to structural failure. For flood events at bridges, another major focus of the work is assessment of the risk to bridges caused by scour of stream and riverbed material away from the foundations of a bridge. Other areas of current research include modeling of flow through culverts to improve design allowing for fish passage, modeling of the salt spray transport into bridge girders to address suitability of using weathering steel in bridges, CFD analysis of the operation of the wind tunnel in the TFHRC wind engineering laboratory. This quarterly report documents technical progress on the project tasks for the period of October through December 2011.

Lottes, S.A.; Bojanowski, C.; Shen, J.; Xie, Z.; Zhai, Y. (Energy Systems); (Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center)

2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aerodynamic diameter pm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Computational mechanics research and support for aerodynamics and hydraulics at TFHRC, year 2 quarter 2 progress report  

SciTech Connect

The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and computational structural mechanics (CSM) focus areas at Argonne's Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center (TRACC) initiated a project to support and compliment the experimental programs at the Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center (TFHRC) with high performance computing based analysis capabilities in August 2010. The project was established with a new interagency agreement between the Department of Energy and the Department of Transportation to provide collaborative research, development, and benchmarking of advanced three-dimensional computational mechanics analysis methods to the aerodynamics and hydraulics laboratories at TFHRC for a period of five years, beginning in October 2010. The analysis methods employ well benchmarked and supported commercial computational mechanics software. Computational mechanics encompasses the areas of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), Computational Wind Engineering (CWE), Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM), and Computational Multiphysics Mechanics (CMM) applied in Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) problems. The major areas of focus of the project are wind and water effects on bridges - superstructure, deck, cables, and substructure (including soil), primarily during storms and flood events - and the risks that these loads pose to structural failure. For flood events at bridges, another major focus of the work is assessment of the risk to bridges caused by scour of stream and riverbed material away from the foundations of a bridge. Other areas of current research include modeling of flow through culverts to improve design allowing for fish passage, modeling of the salt spray transport into bridge girders to address suitability of using weathering steel in bridges, CFD analysis of the operation of the wind tunnel in the TFHRC wind engineering laboratory. This quarterly report documents technical progress on the project tasks for the period of January through March 2012.

Lottes, S.A.; Bojanowski, C.; Shen, J.; Xie, Z.; Zhai, Y. (Energy Systems); (Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center)

2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

322

A study of production/injection data from slim holes and large-diameter wells at the Takigami Geothermal Field, Kyushu, Japan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Production and injection data from nine slim holes and sixteen large-diameter wells at the Takigami Geothermal Field, Kyushu, Japan were analyzed in order to establish relationships (1) between injectivity and productivity indices, (2) between productivity/injectivity index and borehole diameter, and (3) between discharge capacity of slim holes and large-diameter wells. Results are compared with those from the Oguni and Sumikawa fields. A numerical simulator (WELBOR) was used to model the available discharge rate from Takigami boreholes. The results of numerical modeling indicate that the flow rate of large-diameter geothermal production wells with liquid feedzones can be predicted using data from slim holes. These results also indicate the importance of proper well design.

Garg, S.K. [Maxwell Federal Div., Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)] [Maxwell Federal Div., Inc., San Diego, CA (United States); Combs, J. [Geo-Hills Associates, Los Altos Hills, CA (United States)] [Geo-Hills Associates, Los Altos Hills, CA (United States); Azawa, Fumio [Idemitsu Kosan Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)] [Idemitsu Kosan Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Gotoh, Hiroki [Idemitsu Oita Geothermal Co. Ltd., Oita (Japan)] [Idemitsu Oita Geothermal Co. Ltd., Oita (Japan)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Calidad del aire en la zona centro y oriente de la ciudad de Manizales : influencia del material particulado (pm10) y lluvia ácida = air quality in center and east zone of Manizales city : influence of particulate matter (pm10) and acid rain.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??González Duque, Carlos Mario (2012) Calidad del aire en la zona centro y oriente de la ciudad de Manizales : influencia del material particulado (pm10)… (more)

González Duque, Carlos Mario

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

SEP. 1.2000 1:86PM DOE/ORK/IPLD N0.407 P.2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SEP. 1.2000 1:86PM DOE/ORK/IPLD N0.407 P.2 SEP. 1.2000 1:86PM DOE/ORK/IPLD N0.407 P.2 Statement of Considerations Class Waiver of the Government's Patent Rights in Inventions Made by Employees of Institutes and Other Entities of the Newly Independent States of the Former Soviet Union in the Course of or under Agreements Entered into with Management and Operating Contractors of the Department of Energy: W(C) 95-008 The dissolution of the Former Soviet Union (FSU) and the resulting economic dislocation in the Newly Independent States (NIS) have created an extremely challenging situation for the scientists and engineers who were responsible for establishing and maintaining the FSU's technology base. One result of the FSU's dissolution has been to allow NIS institutes that previously had little to no interaction outside the Soviet Union

325

Testing the accuracy of the Hydro-PM approximation in numerical simulations of the Lyman-alpha forest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We implement the hydro-PM (HPM) technique (Gnedin & Hui 1998) in the hydrodynamical simulation code GADGET-II and quantify the differences between this approximate method and full hydrodynamical simulations of the Lyman-alpha forest in a concordance LCDM model. At redshifts z=3 and z=4, the differences between the gas and dark matter (DM) distributions, as measured by the one-point distribution of density fluctuations, the density power spectrum and the flux power spectrum, systematically decrease with increasing resolution of the HPM simulqation. However, reducing these differences to less than a few percent requires a significantly larger number of grid-cells than particles, with a correspondingly larger demand for memory. Significant differences in the flux decrement distribution remain even for very high resolution hydro-PM simulations, particularly at low redshift. At z=2, the differences between the flux power spectra obtained from HPM simulations and full hydrodynamical simulations are generally la...

Viel, M; Springel, V; Viel, Matteo; Haehnelt, Martin G.; Springel, Volker

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Huang ftoc.tex V3 -11/12/2012 7:37 P.M. Page v Acknowledgments xiii  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and References 145 #12;Huang ftoc.tex V3 - 11/12/2012 7:37 P.M. Page viii viii Contents Part II TUBULAR SOFC 7 Dynamic Modelling of Tubular SOFC: First-Principle Approach 149 7.1 SOFC Stack Design 149 7.2 Conversion Transfer 167 7.5.3 Energy Transfer in the Cathode Channel 168 7.5.4 Air in Injection Channel 168 7.6 SOFC

Huang, Biao

327

Demonstration of a novel technique to measure two-photon exchange effects in elastic $e^\\pm p$ scattering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The discrepancy between proton electromagnetic form factors extracted using unpolarized and polarized scattering data is believed to be a consequence of two-photon exchange (TPE) effects. However, the calculations of TPE corrections have significant model dependence, and there is limited direct experimental evidence for such corrections. We present the results of a new experimental technique for making direct $e^\\pm p$ comparisons, which has the potential to make precise measurements over a broad range in $Q^2$ and scattering angles. We use the Jefferson Lab electron beam and the Hall B photon tagger to generate a clean but untagged photon beam. The photon beam impinges on a converter foil to generate a mixed beam of electrons, positrons, and photons. A chicane is used to separate and recombine the electron and positron beams while the photon beam is stopped by a photon blocker. This provides a combined electron and positron beam, with energies from 0.5 to 3.2 GeV, which impinges on a liquid hydrogen target. The large acceptance CLAS detector is used to identify and reconstruct elastic scattering events, determining both the initial lepton energy and the sign of the scattered lepton. The data were collected in two days with a primary electron beam energy of only 3.3 GeV, limiting the data from this run to smaller values of $Q^2$ and scattering angle. Nonetheless, this measurement yields a data sample for $e^\\pm p$ with statistics comparable to those of the best previous measurements. We have shown that we can cleanly identify elastic scattering events and correct for the difference in acceptance for electron and positron scattering. The final ratio of positron to electron scattering: $R=1.027\\pm0.005\\pm0.05$ for $=0.206$ GeV$^2$ and $0.830\\leq \\epsilon\\leq 0.943$.

M. Moteabbed; M. Niroula; B. A. Raue; L. B. Weinstein; D. Adikaram; J. Arrington; W. K. Brooks; J. Lachniet; Dipak Rimal; M. Ungaro; K. P. Adhikari; M. Aghasyan; M. J. Amaryan; S. Anefalos Pereira; H. Avakian; J. Ball; N. A. Baltzell; M. Battaglieri; V. Batourine; I. Bedlinskiy; R. P. Bennett; A. S. Biselli; J. Bono; S. Boiarinov; W. J. Briscoe; V. D. Burkert; D. S. Carman; A. Celentano; S. Chandavar; P. L. Cole; P. Collins; M. Contalbrigo; O. Cortes; V. Crede; A. D'Angelo; N. Dashyan; R. De Vita; E. De Sanctis; A. Deur; C. Djalali; D. Doughty; R. Dupre; H. Egiyan; L. El Fassi; P. Eugenio; G. Fedotov; S. Fegan; R. Fersch; J. A. Fleming; N. Gevorgyan; G. P. Gilfoyle; K. L. Giovanetti; F. X. Girod; J. T. Goetz; W. Gohn; E. Golovatch; R. W. Gothe; K. A. Griffioen; M. Guidal; N. Guler; L. Guo; K. Hafidi; H. Hakobyan; C. Hanretty; N. Harrison; D. Heddle; K. Hicks; D. Ho; M. Holtrop; C. E. Hyde; Y. Ilieva; D. G. Ireland; B. S. Ishkhanov; E. L. Isupov; H. S. Jo; K. Joo; D. Keller; M. Khandaker; A. Kim; F. J. Klein; S. Koirala; A. Kubarovsky; V. Kubarovsky; S. E. Kuhn; S. V. Kuleshov; S. Lewis; H. Y. Lu; M. MacCormick; I . J . D. MacGregor; D. Martinez; M. Mayer; B. McKinnon; T. Mineeva; M. Mirazita; V. Mokeev; R. A. Montgomery; K. Moriya; H. Moutarde; E. Munevar; C. Munoz Camacho; P. Nadel-Turonski; R. Nasseripour; S. Niccolai; G. Niculescu; I. Niculescu; M. Osipenko; A. I. Ostrovidov; L. L. Pappalardo; R. Paremuzyan; K. Park; S. Park; E. Phelps; J. J. Phillips; S. Pisano; O. Pogorelko; S. Pozdniakov; J. W. Price; S. Procureur; D. Protopopescu; A. J. R. Puckett; M. Ripani; G. Rosner; P. Rossi; F. Sabatié; M. S. Saini; C. Salgado; D. Schott; R. A. Schumacher; E. Seder; H. Seraydaryan; Y. G. Sharabian; E. S. Smith; G. D. Smith; D. I. Sober; D. Sokhan; S. Stepanyan; S. Strauch; W. Tang; C. E. Taylor; Ye Tian; S. Tkachenko; H. Voskanyan; E. Voutier; N. K. Walford; M. H. Wood; N. Zachariou; L. Zana; J. Zhang; Z. W. Zhao; I. Zonta

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

328

PDSF Office Hours 10/17/13 from 2:00 to 4:00 pm at LBNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10/17/13 from 10/17/13 from 2:00 to 4:00 pm at LBNL PDSF Office Hours 10/17/13 from 2:00 to 4:00 pm at LBNL October 7, 2013 (0 Comments) I have biweekly office hours on Thursdays at LBNL. The next one is Thursday 10/17/13 from 2:00 - 4:00 pm in the NERSC drop in office at 050A-0143A (in the basement by the bus offices). Please feel free to stop by if you have any questions or want some hands on help with PDSF issues. Post your comment You cannot post comments until you have logged in. Login Here. Comments No one has commented on this page yet. RSS feed for comments on this page | RSS feed for all comments User Announcements Email announcement archive Subscribe via RSS Subscribe Browse by Date November 2013 October 2013 September 2013 August 2013 March 2012 February 2012 January 2012

329

PDSF Office Hours 9/5/13 from 2:00 to 4:00 pm at LBNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9/5/13 from 9/5/13 from 2:00 to 4:00 pm at LBNL PDSF Office Hours 9/5/13 from 2:00 to 4:00 pm at LBNL September 5, 2013 (0 Comments) I have biweekly office hours on Thursdays at LBNL. The next one is Thursday 9/5/13 from 2:00 - 4:00 pm in the NERSC drop in office at 050A-0143A (in the basement by the bus offices). Please feel free to stop by if you have any questions or want some hands on help with PDSF issues. Post your comment You cannot post comments until you have logged in. Login Here. Comments No one has commented on this page yet. RSS feed for comments on this page | RSS feed for all comments User Announcements Email announcement archive Subscribe via RSS Subscribe Browse by Date November 2013 October 2013 September 2013 August 2013 March 2012 February 2012 January 2012

330

Wake of the MOD-0A1 wind turbine at two rotor diameters downwind on December 3, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The wake of the MOD-0A1 wind turbine at Clayton, New Mexico has been measured using a vertical plane array of anemometers in a crosswind plane at a distance of two rotor diameters directly downwind of the turbine. Rotor blade vortices were well mixed into the wake turbulence and were not separately detectable. Wake swirl about the along-wind axis had a value not greater than 0.025 rad/s. Extra turbulence energy existed in the edge of the wake at a frequency of about n=0.025 Hz. The cross-wake plane analyses of wind speeds revealed a nearly circular inner portion and a strongly elliptical portion. The elliptical portion major axis was horizontal. An estimate of the average rate of reenergizing of the wake, using measurements of mean wind energy flow and turbine power, suggests that entrainment with ambient air may have been rapid. Some wake characteristics were compared with the corresponding ones for several simple wake models based upon concepts of mixing of ambient air into a wake or an equivalent coaxial jet. (LEW)

Connell, J.R.; George, R.L.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Pitch-to-diameter effect on two-phase flow across an in-line tube bundle  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on void fraction and friction pressure drop measurements that were made for an adiabatic, vertical two-phase flow of air-water across two horizontal, in-line, 5 {times} 20 rod bundles, one with a pitch-to-diameter ratio, P/D, of 1.3, the other 1.75. For both bundles the average void fraction showed a strong mass velocity effect and values were significantly less than those predicted by a homogeneous flow model. All void fraction data were found to be well correlated, with no P/D effect, using the dimensionless gas velocity, j*{sub g}. The two-phase friction multiplier data exhibited a strong effect of P/D and mass velocity, however, the data for both bundles could be well correlated with the Martinelli parameter for G {gt} 200 kg/m{sup 2}s. The correlations developed for void fraction and two-phase friction multiplier were successfully tested in predicting the total pressure drop in boiling freon experiments.

Dowlati, R.; Kawaji, M. (Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Univ. of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A4 (CA)); Chan, M.M.C. (Ontario Hydro Research Div., Ontario Hydro Toronto, Ontario (CA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Design report for an indirectly cooled 3-m diameter superconducting solenoid for the Fermilab Collider Detector Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Fermilab Collider Detector Facility (CDF) is a large detector system designed to study anti pp collisions at very high center of mass energies. The central detector for the CDF shown employs a large axial magnetic field volume instrumented with a central tracking chamber composed of multiple layers of cylindrical drift chambers and a pair of intermediate tracking chambers. The purpose of this system is to determine the trajectories, sign of electric charge, and momenta of charged particles produced with polar angles between 10 and 170 degrees. The magnetic field volume required for tracking is approximately 3.5 m long an 3 m in diameter. To provide the desired ..delta..p/sub T/p/sub T/ less than or equal to 1.5% at 50 GeV/c using drift chambers with approx. 200..mu.. resolution the field inside this volume should be 1.5 T. The field should be as uniform as is practical to simplify both track finding and the reconstruction of particle trajectories with the drift chambers. Such a field can be produced by a cylindrical current sheet solenoid with a uniform current density of 1.2 x 10/sup 6/ A/m (1200 A/mm) surrounded by an iron return yoke. For practical coils and return yokes, both central electromagnetic and central hadronic calorimetry must be located outside the coil of the magnet. This geometry requires that the coil and the cryostat be thin both in physical thickness and in radiation and absorption lengths. This dual requirement of high linear current density and minimal coil thickness can only be satisfied using superconducting technology. In this report we describe the design for an indirectly cooled superconducting solenoid to meet the requirements of the Fermilab CDF. The components of the magnet system are discussed in the following chapters, with a summary of parameters listed in Appendix A.

Fast, R.; Grimson, J.; Kephart, R.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Instructor's Name Email Address Office Hours Allen, Chris christopherallen@pdx.edu W 3:00-4:00pm CH 366  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Instructor's Name Email Address Office Hours Office Location Allen, Chris christopherallen CH 361 Fall 2011 Instructor Office Hours #12;Pickett-Cooper, Patty pickettp@pdx.edu F 11:30-1:30pm CH

334

COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF AMBIENT FINE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM2.5) DATA OBTAINED FROM URBAN AND RURAL MONITORING SITES ALONG THE UPPER OHIO RIVER VALLEY  

SciTech Connect

The report discusses the following conclusions: (1) The TEOM equipment performed as well as the sequential filter samplers in accounting for ambient PM{sub 2.5} levels; however, the FRM-obtained data was consistently lower than the averages from the TEOM/DRI-SFS measurements; (2) The trending in the PM{sub 2.5} levels was similar for Lawrenceville and Holbrook, which represent an urban and a rural site sixty-five miles apart. This implies that the PM{sub 2.5} levels appear to be impacted more by regional than by local effects; (3) The absolute median PM{sub 2.5} levels were slightly higher for Lawrenceville than for Holbrook, implying that local urban environmental contributions had a minor but measurable effect on total PM{sub 2.5} mass concentration; (4) PM{sub 2.5} and PM{sub 10} mass concentration levels were consistently higher in summer than in winter, with intermediate levels observed in the spring and fall; (5) Sulfate levels predominated in the speciation data obtained from both the Holbrook and the Lawrenceville sites during winter and summer intensive sampling. Sulfate level measured at Holbrook were higher than those taken at Lawrenceville regardless of the season; (6) Ammonium levels remained relatively constant between seasons and between sites; (7) Nitrate levels measured at Lawrenceville were higher than those measured at Holbrook during winter intensive sampling. Nitrate levels measured during the summer intensive period were found to be very low at both locations; (8) In general, the predominant inorganic fraction of the samples analyzed could be described as being composed of a mixture of ammonium bisulfate and ammonium sulfate with minor amounts of ammonium nitrate; (9) The PM10 fraction had a larger percentage of geological material and a smaller percentage of condensable material (ammonium bisulfate, ammonium sulfate, ammonium nitrate and total carbon species) than the PM{sub 2.5} fraction for samples collected in winter at Lawrenceville; and (10) Most high PM{sub 2.5} episodes occurred when the predominating wind direction was from the South-West. (11) Plots of ozone vs. NO{sub x} suggest chemical reaction between these molecules since a high concentration of one always results in a low concentration of the other. The analysis of the acquired data has so far addressed three of the four scientific questions originally posed. More data analysis is on-going including the correlation between O{sub 3} and PM{sub 2.5} levels and the correlation of mass data with meteorological observations.

Unknown

2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

335

Program on Technology Innovation: Galling and Sliding Wear Test Results for Candidate Hardfacing Alloys Manufactured by Power Metallurgy and Hot Isostatic Pressing (PM/HIP)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An alternative manufacturing method, powder metallurgy coupled with hot isostatic processing (PM/HIP), is being explored for the manufacture of large, pressure-retaining components that will be required to meet the demanding needs of nuclear, fossil, combined cycle, ultra-supercritical, and oxy-combustion power applications over the next few decades. Because of the inherent advantages of the PM/HIP process, there is the potential to integrate hardfacing materials into valve components, create ...

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

336

AM PM AM PM AM PM AM - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 7, 2002 ... Dimensional Printing (3DP): Rhonda Lynn Anderson1; 1Concurrent Tech- ...... Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA; 2University of California-Davis,.

337

NICKEL SPECIATION OF URBAN PARTICULATE MATTER  

SciTech Connect

A four-step sequential Ni extraction method, summarized in Table AB-1, was evaluated for identifying and quantifying the Ni species occurring in urban total suspended particulate (TSP) matter and fine particulate matter (<10 {micro}m [PM{sub 10}] and <2.5 {micro}m [PM{sub 2.5}] in aerodynamic diameter). The extraction method was originally developed for quantifying soluble, sulfidic, elemental, and oxidic forms of Ni that may occur in industrial atmospheres. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy were used to evaluate the Ni species selectivity of the extraction method. Uncertainties in the chemical speciation of Ni in urban PM{sub 10} and PM{sub 2.5} greatly affect inhalation health risk estimates, primarily because of the large variability in acute, chronic, and cancer-causing effects for different Ni compounds.

Kevin C. Galbreath; Charlene R. Crocker; Carolyn M. Nyberg; Frank E. Huggins; Gerald P. Huffman

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Performance of a Focused Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer for Measurements in the Stratosphere of Particle Size in the 0.06–2.0-µm-Diameter Range  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A focused cavity aerosol spectrometer aboard a NASA ER-2 high-altitude aircraft provided high-resolution measurements of the size of the stratospheric particles in the 0.06–2.0-µm-diameter range in flights following the eruption of Mount Pinatubo ...

H.H. Jonsson; J.C. Wilson; C.A. Brock; R.G. Knollenberg; T.R. Newton; J.E. Dye; D. Baumgardner; S. Borrmann; G.V. Ferry; R. Pueschel; Dave C. Woods; Mike C. Pitts

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

A comparison of spanwise aerodynamic loads estimated from measured bending moments versus direct pressure measurements on horizontal axis wind turbine blades  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two methods can be used to determine aerodynamic loads on a rotating wind turbine blade. The first is to make direct pressure measurements on the blade surface. This is a difficult process requiring costly pressure instrumentation. The second method uses measured flap bending moments in conjunction with analytical techniques to estimate airloads. This method, called ALEST, was originally developed for use on helicopter rotors and was modified for use on horizontal axis wind turbine blades. Estimating airloads using flap bending moments in much simpler and less costly because measurements can be made with conventional strain gages and equipment. This paper presents results of airload estimates obtained using both methods under a variety of operating conditions. Insights on the limitations and usefulness of the ALEST bending moment technique are also included. 10 refs., 6 figs.

Simms, D A; Butterfield, C P

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

NREL Studies Wind Farm Aerodynamics to Improve Siting (Fact Sheet), The Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Studies Wind Farm Studies Wind Farm Aerodynamics to Improve Siting NREL researchers have used high-tech instruments and high- performance computing to understand atmospheric turbulence and turbine wake behavior in order to improve wind turbine design and siting within wind farms. The knowledge gained from this research could lead to improved turbine design standards, increased productivity in large wind farms, and a lower cost of energy from wind power. This is key, because as turbines grow in size-approximately doubling in height over the past five years-they present more complex challenges to wind turbine designers and operators. To gain new insights into turbine wind wakes, NREL and the Renewable and Sustainable Energy Institute (RASEI) joined together with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aerodynamic diameter pm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF AMBIENT FINE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM2.5) DATA OBTAINED FROM URBAN AND RURAL MONITORING SITES ALONG THE UPPER OHIO RIVER VALLEY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS), with Desert Research Institute (DRI) and Ohio University as subcontractors, was contracted by the NETL in September 1998 to manage the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), which included the establishment and operation of four ambient air monitoring sites located in the Upper Ohio River Valley (UORV). Two urban and two rural monitoring sites were included in the UORVP. The four sites selected for the UOVRP were collocated at existing local and/or state air quality monitoring stations. The goal of the UORVP was to characterize the nature and composition of PM{sub 2.5} and its precursor gases. In the process, the objectives of the UORVP were to examine the ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5} as compared with the promulgated PM{sub 2.5} standards, the geographical, seasonal and temporal variations of ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5}, the primary chemical constituents of PM{sub 2.5}, and the correlations between ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5} and its precursor gases, other gaseous pollutants and meteorological parameters. A variety of meteorological and pollutant measurement devices, including several different PM{sub 2.5} samplers that provided either real-time or integrated concentration data, were deployed at the monitoring sites. The frequency of integrated sampling varied throughout the UORVP study period and was as follows: ''Intensive'' sampling periods were defined as periods in which samples were collected on a relatively frequent basis (ranged from 6-hour integrated samples collected round-the-clock to one 24-hour integrated sample collected every third day). ''Background'' sampling periods were defined as periods in which 24-hour integrated samples were collected every third or sixth day.

Robinson P. Khosah; John P. Shimshock; Jerry L. Penland

2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

342

Assessment of present state-of-the-art sawing technology of large diameter ingots for solar sheet material. Final report, September 1, 1977-February 28, 1978  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this program is to assess the present state-of-the-art sawing technology of large diameter silicon ingots (3'' and 4'' diameter) for solar sheet materials. During this program, work has progressed in: (1) slicing of the ingots with the multiblade slurry (MBS) saw, the multiwire slurry (MWS) saw and the I.D. saw, (2) characterization of the sliced wafers, and (3) analysis of add-on slicing cost based on SAMICS. Multiblade slurry slicing resulted in mechanical wafer yields of 95% for the 3'' diameter ingot and 84% for the 4'' diameter ingot (using a 230 blade package to cut 6'' ingot in length). A slicing test with the I.D. saw was performed to obtain mechanical yield versus both wafer thickness and cut rate, and the result showed a good yield (above 95%) down to 7 to 8 mils of wafer thickness for the 3'' wafers and 11 to 12 mils for the 4'' wafers if the cut rates were reduced to 1'' per minute. An ingot of 3'' in diameter and 3'' in length was sliced with a multiwire slurry saw to obtain wafer yield of about 97%; 163 wires were used, and wafer thickness and kerf width were 10 to 11 mils and 8 mils, respectively. Thickness, taper, bow, and roughness (RMS) were measured to characterize the sliced wafers. Four in. wafers sliced wih the multiblade slurry saw showed larger thickness variation (wafer to wafer) and more taper than 3'' wafers. Wafers sliced with the I.D. saw indicated that taper, bow, and roughness increased as the cut rate increased. Comparison showed the wafers cut with the I.D. saw (sliced below 3'' per minute of cut rate) and the multiwire slurry saw have much smaller values and variations than those cut with the multiblade slurry saw, indicating the need for less removal of silicon before solar cell formation.

Yoo, H.I.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

WEDNESD A Y PM WEDNESDAY PM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 18, 1998 ... Solvent extraction of iron from zinc refinery liquors has been inves- tigated before , mainly on ...... tions and mineral oil fluids were considered.

344

TUESD A Y PM TUESDAY PM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 17, 1998 ... search funded will not be exclusively devoted to processes dependent on microgravity, but ..... thickeners, and hyperbolic filtration is presented in terms of technol- ogy, economics ..... Gas and adsorpent enter the filter verti-.

345

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.4 Environmental Data  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

0 0 2010 Emissions Summary Table for U.S. Buildings Energy Consumption (Thousand Short Tons) (1) Buildings Buildings Percent Wood/SiteFossil Electricity Total U.S. Total of U.S. Total SO2 (2) 54% NOx 17% CO 5% VOCs 2% PM-2.5 15% PM-10 7% Note(s): Source(s): 1) VOCs = volatile organic compounds; PM-10 = particulate matter less than 10 micrometers in aerodynamic diameter. PM-2.5 = particulate matter less than 2.5 micrometers in aerodynamic diameter. CO and VOCs site fossil emissions mostly from wood burning. 2) Emissions of SO2 are 28% lower for 2002 than 1994 estimates since Phase II of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments began in 2000. Buildings Energy Consumption related to SO2 emissions dropped 27% from 1994 to 2002. EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release, Jan. 2012, Summary Reference Case Tables, Table A2, p. 3-5; and EPA, 1970-2010 National Emissions

346

Development of methods of producing large areas of silicon sheet by the slicing of silicon ingots using inside diameter (ID) saws. First quarterly report  

SciTech Connect

An STC 16 inch automated ID slicing machine (Model SMA-4401) is being used for this effort. The saw has been modified to accept an STC Programmable Electric Feed System, STC Crystal Rotating System and an STC Dyna-Track Blade Monitoring and Control System. The saw and accessories will be used to slice 100 mm diameter single crystal silicon ingots while rotating them. The automated saw will automatically recover the wafers and load them into a cassette. The amount of material lost during slicing is being reduced by using smaller blades than ones normally used to slice 100 mm wafers. Some blades have been manufactured with cutting edge thickness as low as 0.20 mm. Initial slicing runs on 75 mm diameter silicon has been successful on blades in the 0.23 to 0.24 mm cutting edge thickness range. The thinner blades will be used to slice 100 mm silicon while rotating the boule.

Aharonyan, P.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Microsoft PowerPoint - 01 Bosco PM Workshop BOSCO Feb22_2010PB final rcvd 5 Mar [Compatibility Mode]  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SUCCESS SUCCESS Get Off GAO High-Risk List (NNSA & EM): ( ) Improve Project (Contract) Management Paul Bosco, PE, PMP, LEED-AP Director, OECM 1 RCA/CAP: http://management.doe.gov/ Overview * Why on GAO High-Risk List? y g * What is Project Success? How Are We Doing? What's the Forecast? - How Are We Doing? What s the Forecast? * RCA/CAP* Initiatives: An Update * Dep Sec Project Management (PM) Policies * DOE Order 413.3A: Some Proposed Changes * Final Thoughts 2 * RCA: Root Cause Analysis; CAP: Corrective Action Plan Why on GAO High- Risk List? Risk List? * Since 1990 What's the Problem? Since 1990, What s the Problem? -Inadequate (Federal) Management -Inadequate (Federal) Oversight -Lack of Accountability -Lack of Accountability

348

Nondestructive Evaluation: Development of NDE Techniques for Detection of Outside Diameter Stress Corrosion Cracking on Stainless St eel Pipe Under Pipe Clamps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The commercial nuclear power industry has been dealing with stress corrosion cracking (SCC) for almost 50 years. This project worked to develop nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques for detecting outside diameter stress corrosion cracking (ODSCC) and pitting under pipe clamps or pipe hangers on Type 304 stainless steel piping. The NDE techniques to be evaluated for this application include conventional pulse-echo ultrasonics (PE UT), phased array ultrasonics (PA UT), guided wave, forward ...

2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

349

Testing the accuracy of the Hydro-PM approximation in numerical simulations of the Lyman-alpha forest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We implement the hydro-PM (HPM) technique (Gnedin & Hui 1998) in the hydrodynamical simulation code GADGET-II and quantify the differences between this approximate method and full hydrodynamical simulations of the Lyman-alpha forest in a concordance LCDM model. At redshifts z=3 and z=4, the differences between the gas and dark matter (DM) distributions, as measured by the one-point distribution of density fluctuations, the density power spectrum and the flux power spectrum, systematically decrease with increasing resolution of the HPM simulqation. However, reducing these differences to less than a few percent requires a significantly larger number of grid-cells than particles, with a correspondingly larger demand for memory. Significant differences in the flux decrement distribution remain even for very high resolution hydro-PM simulations, particularly at low redshift. At z=2, the differences between the flux power spectra obtained from HPM simulations and full hydrodynamical simulations are generally large and of the order of 20-30 %, and do not decrease with increasing resolution of the HPM simulation. This is due to the presence of large amounts of shock-heated gas, a situation which is not adequately modelled by the HPM approximation. We confirm the results of Gnedin & Hui (1998) that the statistical properties of the flux distribution are discrepant by > 5-20 % when compared to full hydrodynamical simulations. The discrepancies in the flux power spectrum are strongly scale- and redshift-dependent and extend to large scales. Considerable caution is needed in attempts to use calibrated HPM simulations for quantitative predictions of the flux power spectrum and other statistical properties of the Lyman-alpha forest.

Matteo Viel; Martin G. Haehnelt; Volker Springel

2005-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

350

Clean Energy Alliance Expansion Continues http://www.mmdnewswire.com/pdf-86054/clean-energy-alliance-expansion-continues.pdf[2/3/2012 12:13:14 PM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-expansion-continues.pdf[2/3/2012 12:13:14 PM] Clean Energy Alliance Expansion Continues UCSD and Chicago Members Expand CEA's Geographic Reach Golden, CO (MMD Newswire) February 1, 2012 -- Clean Energy Alliance, Inc. (CEA in the Department of Energy Small Business and Clean Energy Alliance Partnership that is managed by CEA. "CEA

Fainman, Yeshaiahu

351

Texas Tech University Accomplishments 2011: Research http://www.depts.ttu.edu/communications/test/accomplishments/research.php[3/22/2011 2:37:35 PM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Tech University Accomplishments 2011: Research http://www.depts.ttu.edu/communications/test/accomplishments/research.php[3/22/2011 2:37:35 PM] YEAR IN REVIEW STUDENTS RESEARCH OUTREACH EXCELLENCE Texas Tech researchers scientists and scholars will continue to find the answers that matter. Texas Tech is included in a $5

Rock, Chris

352

Journal of Asian Electric Vehicles, Volume 8, Number 1, June 2010 Simplified Thermal Model of PM Motors in Hybrid Vehicle Applications Taking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, thermal circuit, heat processes, pulse-width-modulated 1. INTRODUCTION Permanent magnet (PM) motors components in the system. Thermal studies on electric motors often approach the subject using FEA. Although to a cylinder. Reference [Hsu et al., 2005] shows that the thermal conductivity of Toyota Prius traction motor

Mi, Chunting "Chris"

353

http://blogs.universitybusiness.com/[7/14/2010 2:35:58 PM] Higher Ed's Help with Oil Spill Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

called "Oil and Water: The Gulf Oil Spill of 2010" centering on the Gulf's history and ecologyUB Buzz http://blogs.universitybusiness.com/[7/14/2010 2:35:58 PM] Higher Ed's Help with Oil Spill and universities across the country have been getting their hands dirty with the Gulf Coast oil spill

Rock, Chris

354

FREE SAFE RIDES HOME FOR UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA STUDENTS Fridays and Saturdays 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. (612) 388-6911  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GOPHER FREE SAFE RIDES HOME FOR UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA STUDENTS Fridays and Saturdays · 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. · (612) 388-6911 CHAUFFEUR© GOPHER FREE SAFE RIDES HOME FOR UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA STUDENTS CHAUFFEUR© FREE SAFE RIDES HOME FOR UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA STUDENTS Fridays and Saturdays · 10 p.m.­2 a

Minnesota, University of

355

InP-Based Oxide-Confined 16 p.m Microcavity Light Emitting Diodes Weidong Zhou, Omar Qasaimeh, and Pallab Bhattacharya  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

InP-Based Oxide-Confined 16 p.m Microcavity Light Emitting Diodes Weidong Zhou, Omar Qasaimeh light emitting diodes (MCLEDs) have been designed, fabricated and characterized. Oxide- confined MCLEDs region emission peak and cavity resonance peak. Key words: Microcavity light emitting diode (MCLED), wet

Zhou, Weidong

356

TOXICOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF REALISTIC EMISSIONS OF SOURCE AEROSOLS (TERESA): APPLICATION TO POWER PLANT-DERIVED PM2.5  

SciTech Connect

Determining the health impacts of different sources and components of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is an important scientific goal, because PM is a complex mixture of both inorganic and organic constituents that likely differ in their potential to cause adverse health outcomes. The TERESA (Toxicological Evaluation of Realistic Emissions of Source Aerosols) study focused on two PM sources - coal-fired power plants and mobile sources - and sought to investigate the toxicological effects of exposure to realistic emissions from these sources. The DOE-EPRI Cooperative Agreement covered the performance and analysis of field experiments at three power plants. The mobile source component consisted of experiments conducted at a traffic tunnel in Boston; these activities were funded through the Harvard-EPA Particulate Matter Research Center and will be reported separately in the peer-reviewed literature. TERESA attempted to delineate health effects of primary particles, secondary (aged) particles, and mixtures of these with common atmospheric constituents. The study involved withdrawal of emissions directly from power plant stacks, followed by aging and atmospheric transformation of emissions in a mobile laboratory in a manner that simulated downwind power plant plume processing. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) derived from the biogenic volatile organic compound {alpha}-pinene was added in some experiments, and in others ammonia was added to neutralize strong acidity. Specifically, four scenarios were studied at each plant: primary particles (P); secondary (oxidized) particles (PO); oxidized particles + secondary organic aerosol (SOA) (POS); and oxidized and neutralized particles + SOA (PONS). Extensive exposure characterization was carried out, including gas-phase and particulate species. Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed for 6 hours to filtered air or different atmospheric mixtures. Toxicological endpoints included (1) breathing pattern; (2) bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid cytology and biochemistry; (3) blood cytology; (4) in vivo oxidative stress in heart and lung tissue; and (5) heart and lung histopathology. In addition, at one plant, cardiac arrhythmias and heart rate variability (HRV) were evaluated in a rat model of myocardial infarction. Statistical analyses included analyses of variance (ANOVA) to determine differences between exposed and control animals in response to different scenario/plant combinations; univariate analyses to link individual scenario components to responses; and multivariate analyses (Random Forest analyses) to evaluate component effects in a multipollutant setting. Results from the power plant studies indicated some biological responses to some plant/scenario combinations. A number of significant breathing pattern changes were observed; however, significant clinical changes such as specific irritant effects were not readily apparent, and effects tended to be isolated changes in certain respiratory parameters. Some individual exposure scenario components appeared to be more strongly and consistently related to respiratory parameter changes; however, the specific scenario investigated remained a better predictor of response than individual components of that scenario. Bronchoalveolar lavage indicated some changes in cellularity of BAL fluid in response to the POS and PONS scenarios; these responses were considered toxicologically mild in magnitude. No changes in blood cytology were observed at any plant or scenario. Lung oxidative stress was increased with the POS scenario at one plant, and cardiac oxidative stress was increased with the PONS scenario also at one plant, suggesting limited oxidative stress in response to power plant emissions with added atmospheric constituents. There were some mild histological findings in lung tissue in response to the P and PONS scenarios. Finally, the MI model experiments indicated that premature ventricular beat frequency was increased at the plant studied, while no changes in heart rate, HRV, or electrocardiographic intervals were observed. Overall, the

Annette C. Rohr; Petros Koutrakis; John Godleski

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

357

COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF AMBIENT FINE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM2.5) DATA OBTAINED FROM URBAN AND RURAL MONITORING SITES ALONG THE UPPER OHIO RIVER VALLEY  

SciTech Connect

Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS), with Desert Research Institute (DRI) and Ohio University as subcontractors, was contracted by the NETL in September 1998 to manage the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), which included the establishment and operation of four ambient air monitoring sites located in the Upper Ohio River Valley (UORV). Two urban and two rural monitoring sites were included in the UORVP. The four sites selected for the UOVRP were collocated at existing local or state air quality monitoring stations. The goal of the UORVP was to characterize the nature and composition of PM{sub 2.5} and its precursor gases. In the process, the objectives of the UORVP were to examine the ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5} as compared with the promulgated PM{sub 2.5} standards, the geographical, seasonal and temporal variations of ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5}, the primary chemical constituents of PM{sub 2.5}, and the correlations between ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5} and its precursor gases, other gaseous pollutants and meteorological parameters. A variety of meteorological and pollutant measurement devices, including several different PM{sub 2.5} samplers that provided either real-time or integrated concentration data, were deployed at the monitoring sites. The frequency of integrated sampling varied throughout the UORVP study period and was as follows: (1) ''Intensive'' sampling periods were defined as periods in which samples were collected on a relatively frequent basis (ranged from 6-hour integrated samples collected round-the-clock to one 24-hour integrated sample collected every third day). (2) ''Background'' sampling periods were defined as periods in which 24-hour integrated samples were collected every third or sixth day. Sampling activities for the UORVP were initiated in February 1999 and concluded in February 2003. This Final Technical Progress Report summarizes the data analyses and interpretations conducted during the period from October 1998 through December 2004. This report was organized in accordance with the Guidelines for Organization of Technical Reports (September 2003).

Robinson P. Khosah; John P. Shimshock; Jerry L. Penland

2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

358

COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF AMBIENT FINE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM2.5) DATA OBTAINED FROM URBAN AND RURAL MONITORING SITES ALONG THE UPPER OHIO RIVER VALLEY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS), with Desert Research Institute (DRI) and Ohio University as subcontractors, was contracted by the NETL in September 1998 to manage the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), which included the establishment and operation of four ambient air monitoring sites located in the Upper Ohio River Valley (UORV). Two urban and two rural monitoring sites were included in the UORVP. The four sites selected for the UOVRP were collocated at existing local and/or state air quality monitoring stations. The goal of the UORVP was to characterize the nature and composition of PM{sub 2.5} and its precursor gases. In the process, the objectives of the UORVP were to examine the ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5} as compared with the promulgated PM{sub 2.5} standards, the geographical, seasonal and temporal variations of ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5}, the primary chemical constituents of PM{sub 2.5}, and the correlations between ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5} and its precursor gases, other gaseous pollutants and meteorological parameters. A variety of meteorological and pollutant measurement devices, including several different PM{sub 2.5} samplers that provided either real-time or integrated concentration data, were deployed at the monitoring sites. The frequency of integrated sampling varied throughout the UORVP study period and was as follows: (1) ''Intensive'' sampling periods were defined as periods in which samples were collected on a relatively frequent basis (ranged from 6-hour integrated samples collected round-the-clock to one 24-hour integrated sample collected every third day). (2) ''Background'' sampling periods were defined as periods in which 24-hour integrated samples were collected every third or sixth day. Sampling activities for the UORVP were initiated in February 1999 and concluded in February 2003. This semi-annual Technical Progress Report summarizes the data analyses and interpretations conducted during the period from October 2003 through March 2004. This report was organized in accordance with the Guidelines for Organization of Technical Reports (September 2003).

Robinson P. Khosah; John P. Shimshock; Jerry L. Penland

2004-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

359

Computational mechanics research and support for aerodynamics and hydraulics at TFHRC. Quarterly report January through March 2011. Year 1 Quarter 2 progress report.  

SciTech Connect

This project was established with a new interagency agreement between the Department of Energy and the Department of Transportation to provide collaborative research, development, and benchmarking of advanced three-dimensional computational mechanics analysis methods to the aerodynamics and hydraulics laboratories at the Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center for a period of five years, beginning in October 2010. The analysis methods employ well-benchmarked and supported commercial computational mechanics software. Computational mechanics encompasses the areas of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), Computational Wind Engineering (CWE), Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM), and Computational Multiphysics Mechanics (CMM) applied in Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) problems. The major areas of focus of the project are wind and water loads on bridges - superstructure, deck, cables, and substructure (including soil), primarily during storms and flood events - and the risks that these loads pose to structural failure. For flood events at bridges, another major focus of the work is assessment of the risk to bridges caused by scour of stream and riverbed material away from the foundations of a bridge. Other areas of current research include modeling of flow through culverts to assess them for fish passage, modeling of the salt spray transport into bridge girders to address suitability of using weathering steel in bridges, vehicle stability under high wind loading, and the use of electromagnetic shock absorbers to improve vehicle stability under high wind conditions. This quarterly report documents technical progress on the project tasks for the period of January through March 2011.

Lottes, S. A.; Kulak, R. F.; Bojanowski, C. (Energy Systems)

2011-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

360

RESULTS OF TESTS TO DEMONSTRATE A SIX-INCH DIAMETER COATER FOR PRODUCTION OF TRISO-COATED PARTICLES FOR ADVANCED GAS REACTOR EXPERIMENTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)/Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program includes a series of irradiation experiments in Idaho National Laboratory's (INL's) Advanced Test Reactor. TRISOcoated particles for the first AGR experiment, AGR-1, were produced at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in a twoinch diameter coater. A requirement of the NGNP/AGR Program is to produce coated particles for later experiments in coaters more representative of industrial scale. Toward this end, tests have been performed by Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) in a six-inch diameter coater. These tests are expected to lead to successful fabrication of particles for the second AGR experiment, AGR-2. While a thorough study of how coating parameters affect particle properties was not the goal of these tests, the test data obtained provides insight into process parameter/coated particle property relationships. Most relationships for the six-inch diameter coater followed trends found with the ORNL two-inch coater, in spite of differences in coater design and bed hydrodynamics. For example the key coating parameters affecting pyrocarbon anisotropy were coater temperature, coating gas fraction, total gas flow rate and kernel charge size. Anisotropy of the outer pyrolytic carbon (OPyC) layer also strongly correlates with coater differential pressure. In an effort to reduce the total particle fabrication run time, silicon carbide (SiC) was deposited with methyltrichlorosilane (MTS) concentrations up to 3 mol %. Using only hydrogen as the fluidizing gas, the high concentration MTS tests resulted in particles with lower than desired SiC densities. However when hydrogen was partially replaced with argon, high SiC densities were achieved with the high MTS gas fraction.

Douglas W. Marshall

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aerodynamic diameter pm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

RESULTS OF TESTS TO DEMONSTRATE A SIX-INCH-DIAMETER COATER FOR PRODUCTION OF TRISO-COATED PARTICLES FOR ADVANCED GAS REACTOR EXPERIMENTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)/Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program includes a series of irradiation experiments in Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL’s) Advanced Test Reactor. TRISOcoated particles for the first AGR experiment, AGR-1, were produced at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in a two inch diameter coater. A requirement of the NGNP/AGR Program is to produce coated particles for later experiments in coaters more representative of industrial scale. Toward this end, tests have been performed by Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) in a six-inch diameter coater. These tests are expected to lead to successful fabrication of particles for the second AGR experiment, AGR-2. While a thorough study of how coating parameters affect particle properties was not the goal of these tests, the test data obtained provides insight into process parameter/coated particle property relationships. Most relationships for the six-inch diameter coater followed trends found with the ORNL two-inch coater, in spite of differences in coater design and bed hydrodynamics. For example the key coating parameters affecting pyrocarbon anisotropy were coater temperature, coating gas fraction, total gas flow rate and kernel charge size. Anisotropy of the outer pyrolytic carbon (OPyC) layer also strongly correlates with coater differential pressure. In an effort to reduce the total particle fabrication run time, silicon carbide (SiC) was deposited with methyltrichlorosilane (MTS) concentrations up to 3 mol %. Using only hydrogen as the fluidizing gas, the high concentration MTS tests resulted in particles with lower than desired SiC densities. However when hydrogen was partially replaced with argon, high SiC densities were achieved with the high MTS gas fraction.

Charles M Barnes

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

A forgotten little chapter on isoperimetric inequalities: On the fraction of a convex and closed plane area lying outside a circle with which it shares a diameter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Often some interesting or simply curious points are left out when developing a theory. It seems that one of them is the existence of an upper bound for the fraction of area of a convex and closed plane area lying outside a circle with which it shares a diameter, a problem stemming from the theory of isoperimetric inequalities. In this paper such a bound is constructed and shown to be attained for a particular area. It is also shown that convexity is a necessary condition in order to avoid the whole area lying outside the circle.

Jose M. Pacheco

2007-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

363

Comparison of sampling methods for semi-volatile organic carbonAssociated with PM2.5  

SciTech Connect

This study evaluates the influence of denuder sampling methods and filter collection media on the measurement of semi-volatile organic carbon (SVOC) associated with PM2.5. Two types of collection media, charcoal (activated carbon) and XAD, were used both in diffusion denuders and impregnated back-up filters in two different samplers, the VAPS and the PC-BOSS. The two organic diffusion denuders were XAD-coated glass annular denuders and charcoal-impregnated cellulose fiber filter(CIF) denuders. In addition, recently developed XAD-impregnated quartz filters were compared to CIF filters as back-up filter collection media. The two denuder types resulted in equivalent measurement of particulate organic carbon and particle mass. The major difference observed between the XAD and charcoal BOSS denuders is the higher efficiency of charcoal for collection of more volatile carbon. This more volatile carbon does not contribute substantially to the particle mass or SVOC measured as OC on quartz filters downstream of the denuders. This volatile carbon does result in high OC concentrations observed in charcoal filters placed behind quartz filters downstream of the XAD denuders and would result in overestimating the SVOC in that configuration.

Lewtas, Joellen; Booth, Derrick; Pang, Yanbo; Reimer, Steve; Eatough, Delbert J.; Gundel, Lara A.

2001-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

364

Tuesday PM Session Abstracts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a considerable demand for thin film coatings to which other ..... The viability of the process highly depends on the price ratio of the caustic soda and .... in real-time, by assessing process response/noise in the context of energy input, ...

365

Tue PM Solidification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The modification mechanism of dendrite morphology by electric field was .... (2) defining of solute segregations in different scales and the basic principles for the  ...

366

Wednesday PM Session Abstracts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PRODUCTION OF RHENIUM-186 AND RHENIUM-188 AT ORNL HFIR: Saed Mirzadeh, A.L. Beets, F.F. (Russ) Knapp, Nuclear Medicine Group, Health Science ...

367

Monday PM Session Abstracts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With both pulsed-dc power and partial pressure control, films such as aluminum .... wide range of deviation from stoichiometry, involving many percent random atomic .... the Nadvoitsky Aluminium Smelter, Karelia, Russia commissioned the All-Russia ..... First of its generation, it is capable of casting a 2m wide strip under a ...

368

TOXICOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF REALISTIC EMISSIONS OF SOURCE AEROSOLS (TERESA): APPLICATION TO POWER PLANT-DERIVED PM2.5  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents progress made on the subject project during the period of March 1, 2004 through August 31, 2004. The TERESA Study is designed to investigate the role played by specific emissions sources and components in the induction of adverse health effects by examining the relative toxicity of coal combustion and mobile source (gasoline and/or diesel engine) emissions and their oxidative products. The study involves on-site sampling, dilution, and aging of coal combustion emissions at three coal-fired power plants, as well as mobile source emissions, followed by animal exposures incorporating a number of toxicological endpoints. The DOE-EPRI Cooperative Agreement (henceforth referred to as ''the Agreement'') for which this technical progress report has been prepared covers the analysis and interpretation of the field data collected at the first power plant (henceforth referred to as Plant 0, and located in the Upper Midwest), followed by the performance and analysis of similar field experiments at two additional coal-fired power plants (Plants 1 and 2) utilizing different coal types and with different plant configurations. Significant progress was made on the Project during this reporting period, with field work being initiated at Plant 0. Initial testing of the stack sampling system and reaction apparatus revealed that primary particle concentrations were lower than expected in the emissions entering the mobile chemical laboratory. Initial animal exposures to primary emissions were carried out (Scenario 1) to ensure successful implementation of all study methodologies and toxicological assessments. Results indicated no significant toxicological effects in response to primary emissions exposures. Exposures were then carried out to diluted, oxidized, neutralized emissions with the addition of secondary organic aerosol (Scenario 5), both during the day and also at night when primary particle concentrations in the sampled stack emissions tended to be slightly higher. Exposure concentrations were about 249 {micro}g/m{sup 3} PM, of which 87 {micro}g/m{sup 3} was sulfate and approximately 110 {micro}g/m{sup 3} was secondary organic material ({approx}44%). Results indicated subtle differences in breathing pattern between exposed and control (sham) animals, but no differences in other endpoints (in vivo chemiluminescence, blood cytology, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid analysis). It was suspected that primary particle losses may have been occurring in the venturi aspirator/orifice sampler; therefore, the stack sampling system was redesigned. The modified system resulted in no substantial increase in particle concentration in the emissions, leading us to conclude that the electrostatic precipitator at the power plant has high efficiency, and that the sampled emissions are representative of those exiting the stack into the atmosphere. This is important, since the objective of the Project is to carry out exposures to realistic coal combustion-derived secondary PM arising from power plants. During the next reporting period, we will document and describe the remainder of the fieldwork at Plant 0, which we expect to be complete by mid-November 2004. This report will include detailed Phase I toxicological findings for all scenarios run, and Phase II toxicological findings for one selected scenario. Depending upon the outcome of the ongoing fieldwork at Plant 0 (i.e. the biological effects observed), not all the proposed scenarios may be evaluated. The next report is also expected to include preliminary field data for Plant 1, located in the Southeast.

Annette Rohr

2004-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

369

TOXICOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF REALISTIC EMISSIONS OF SOURCE AEROSOLS (TERESA): APPLICATION TO POWER PLANT-DERIVED PM2.5  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents progress made on the subject project during the period of September 1, 2004 through February 28, 2005. The TERESA Study is designed to investigate the role played by specific emissions sources and components in the induction of adverse health effects by examining the relative toxicity of coal combustion and mobile source (gasoline and/or diesel engine) emissions and their oxidative products. The study involves on-site sampling, dilution, and aging of coal combustion emissions at three coal-fired power plants, as well as mobile source emissions, followed by animal exposures incorporating a number of toxicological endpoints. The DOE-EPRI Cooperative Agreement (henceforth referred to as ''the Agreement'') for which this technical progress report has been prepared covers the performance and analysis of field experiments at the first TERESA plant, located in the Upper Midwest and henceforth referred to as Plant 0, and at two additional coal-fired power plants (Plants 1 and 2) utilizing different coal types and with different plant configurations. During this reporting period, all fieldwork at Plant 0 was completed. Stack sampling was conducted in October to determine if there were significant differences between the in-stack PM concentrations and the diluted concentrations used for the animal exposures. Results indicated no significant differences and therefore confidence that the revised stack sampling methodology described in the previous semiannual report is appropriate for use in the Project. Animal exposures to three atmospheric scenarios were carried out. From October 4-7, we conducted exposures to oxidized emissions with the addition of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Later in October, exposures to the most complex scenario (oxidized, neutralized emissions plus SOA) were repeated to ensure comparability with the results of the June/July exposures where a different stack sampling setup was employed. In November, exposures to oxidized emissions were performed. Stage I toxicological assessments were carried out in Sprague-Dawley rats. Biological endpoints included breathing pattern/pulmonary function; in vivo chemiluminescence (an indicator of oxidative stress); blood cytology; bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid analysis; and histopathology. No significant differences between exposed animals and sham animals (exposed to filtered air) were observed for any of the endpoints; histopathological results are pending and will be reported in the next semiannual report. The scenarios evaluated during this reporting period were slightly modified from those originally proposed. We substituted a new scenario, secondary aerosol + SOA, to investigate the effects of a strongly acidic aerosol with a biogenic component. Since we did not observe any biological response to this scenario, the neutralized secondary aerosol scenario (i.e., oxidized emissions + ammonia) was deemed unnecessary. Moreover, in light of the lack of response observed in the Stage I assessment, it was decided that a Stage II assessment (evaluation of cardiac function in a compromised rat model) was unlikely to provide useful information. However, this model will be employed at Plant 1 and/or 2. During this reporting period, significant progress was made in planning for fieldwork at Plant 1. Stack sampling was carried out at the plant in mid-December to determine the concentration of primary particles. It was found that PM{sub 2.5} mass concentrations were approximately three times higher than those observed at Plant 0. In mid-February, installation and setup for the mobile laboratories began. Animal exposures are scheduled to begin at this plant on March 21, 2005. During the next reporting period, we will initiate fieldwork at Plant 1. At either or both Plants 1 and 2, a detailed Stage II assessment will be performed, even if no significant findings are observed in Stage I. The next semiannual report is expected to include a detailed description of the fieldwork at Plant 1, including toxicological findings and interpretation.

Annette Rohr

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

370

Stress analyses of flat plates with attached nozzles. Vol. 3. Experimental stress analyses of a flat plate with two closely spaced nozzles of equal diameter attached  

SciTech Connect

The complete test results for a flat plate with two closely spaced nozzles attached are presented. Test loadings were 1:1, 1:2, and 2:1 biaxial planar tension loadings on the plate, axial thrust loadings applied separately to the nozzles, and bending moment loadings applied to the nozzles both within and normal to the plane of symmetry containing the nozzle axes. The test plate was 36 x 36 x 0.375 in., and the attached nozzles had outer diameters of 2.625 in. and wall thicknesses of 0.250 in. The nozzles were located in the center of the plate with their centers 3.0 in. apart and were considered to be free of weld distortions and irregularities in the junction region. 6 references. (auth)

Bryson, J.W.; Swinson, W.F.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

The effects of channel diameter on flow pattern, void fraction and pressure drop of two-phase air-water flow in circular micro-channels  

SciTech Connect

Two-phase air-water flow characteristics are experimentally investigated in horizontal circular micro-channels. Test sections are made of fused silica. The experiments are conducted based on three different inner diameters of 0.53, 0.22 and 0.15 mm with the corresponding lengths of 320, 120 and 104 mm, respectively. The test runs are done at superficial velocities of gas and liquid ranging between 0.37-42.36 and 0.005-3.04 m/s, respectively. The flow visualisation is facilitated by systems mainly including stereozoom microscope and high-speed camera. The flow regime maps developed from the observed flow patterns are presented. The void fractions are determined based on image analysis. New correlation for two-phase frictional multiplier is also proposed for practical applications. (author)

Saisorn, Sira [Energy Division, The Joint Graduate School of Energy and Environment (JGSEE), King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi, Bangmod, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand); Wongwises, Somchai [Fluid Mechanics, Thermal Engineering and Multiphase Flow Research Lab. (FUTURE), Department of Mechanical Engineering, King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi, Bangmod, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

372

PM, Mercury, and Health Effects: A Workshop for Technical and Communications Staff: Proceedings of Air Quality Workshop Held on Octo ber 2, 2002, Atlanta, GA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An EPRI-sponsored workshop, entitled "PM, Mercury, and Health Effects: A Workshop for Technical and Communications Staff," was held in Atlanta, Georgia on October 2, 2002. Members of the Air Quality and Media Relations Groups conducted the workshop. Attendees were all utility-associated, although several attendees were from non-utility companies. In all, there were 69 attendees, of whom 39 had technical positions and 30 were involved with communications. The workshop was intended to serve as a primer for...

2002-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

373

COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF AMBIENT FINE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM2.5)DATA OBTAINED FROM URBAN AND RURAL MONITORING SITES ALONG THE UPPER OHIO RIVER VALLEY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS), with Desert Research Institute (DRI) and Ohio University as subcontractors, was contracted by the NETL in September 1998 to manage the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), with a goal of characterizing the ambient fine particulate in this region, including examination of urban/rural variations, correlations between PM{sub 2.5} and gaseous pollutants, and influences of artifacts on PM{sub 2.5} measurements in this region. Two urban and two rural monitoring sites were included in the UORVP. The four sites selected were all part of existing local and/or state air quality programs. One urban site was located in the Lawrenceville section of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania at an air quality monitoring station operated by the Allegheny County Health Department. A second urban site was collocated at a West Virginia Division of Environmental Protection (WVDEP) monitoring station at the airport in Morgantown, West Virginia. One rural site was collocated with the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP) at a former NARSTO-Northeast site near Holbrook, Greene County, Pennsylvania. The other rural site was collocated at a site operated by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OHEPA) and managed by the Ohio State Forestry Division in Gifford State Forest near Athens, Ohio. Analysis of data collected to date show that: (1) the median mass and composition of PM{sub 2.5} are similar for both Lawrenceville and Holbrook, suggesting that the sites are impacted more by the regional than by local effects; (2) there was no significant differences in the particulate trending and levels observed at both sites within seasons; (3) sulfate levels predominate at both sites, and (4) PM{sub 2.5} and PM{sub 10} mass concentration levels are consistently higher in summer than in winter, with intermediate levels being observed in the fall and spring. Data analysis focusing on relating the aerometric measurements to local and regional scale emissions of sources of primary and secondary fine particles using receptor-based air quality models will follow.

Robinson P. Khosah; John P. Shimshock

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

374

COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF AMBIENT FINE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM2.5) DATA OBTAINED FROM URBAN AND RURAL MONITORING SITES ALONG THE UPPER OHIO RIVER VALLEY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS), with Desert Research Institute (DRI) and Ohio University as subcontractors, was contracted by the NETL in September 1998 to manage the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), with a goal of characterizing the ambient fine particulate in this region, including examination of urban/rural variations, correlations between PM{sub 2.5} and gaseous pollutants, and influences of artifacts on PM{sub 2.5} measurements in this region. Two urban and two rural monitoring sites were included in the UORVP. The four sites selected were all part of existing local and/or state air quality programs. One urban site was located in the Lawrenceville section of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania at an air quality monitoring station operated by the Allegheny County Health Department. A second urban site was collocated at a West Virginia Division of Environmental Protection (WVDEP) monitoring station at the airport in Morgantown, West Virginia. One rural site was collocated with the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP) at a former NARSTO-Northeast site near Holbrook, Greene County, Pennsylvania. The other rural site was collocated at a site operated by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OHEPA) and managed by the Ohio State Forestry Division in Gifford State Forest near Athens, Ohio. Previous Semi-Annual Technical Progress Reports presented the following: (1) the median mass and composition of PM{sub 2.5} are similar for both Lawrenceville and Holbrook, suggesting that the sites are impacted more by the regional than by local effects; (2) there was no significant differences in the particulate trending and levels observed at both sites within seasons; (3) sulfate levels predominate at both sites and (4) PM{sub 2.5} and PM{sub 10} mass concentration levels are consistently higher in summer than in winter, with intermediate levels being observed in the fall and spring. Analyses of data conducted during the period from April 1, 2003 through September 30, 2003 are presented in this Semi-Annual Technical Progress Report. Report Revision No. 1 includes the additions or removals of text presented in the previous version of this report.

Robinson P. Khosah; John P. Shimshock

2004-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

375

TOXICOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF REALISTIC EMISSIONS OF SOURCE AEROSOLS (TERESA): APPLICATION TO POWDER PLANT-DERIVED PM 2.5  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents progress made on the subject project during the period of March 1, 2006 through August 31, 2006. The TERESA Study is designed to investigate the role played by specific emissions sources and components in the induction of adverse health effects by examining the relative toxicity of coal combustion and mobile source (gasoline and/or diesel engine) emissions and their oxidative products. The study involves on-site sampling, dilution, and aging of coal combustion emissions at three coal-fired power plants, as well as mobile source emissions, followed by animal exposures incorporating a number of toxicological endpoints. The DOE-EPRI Cooperative Agreement (henceforth referred to as ''the Agreement'') for which this technical progress report has been prepared covers the performance and analysis of field experiments at the first TERESA plant, located in the Upper Midwest and henceforth referred to as Plant 0, and at two additional coal-fired power plants (Plants 1 and 2) utilizing different coal types and with different plant configurations. During this reporting period, data processing and analyses were completed for exposure and toxicological data collected during the field campaign at Plant 1, located in the Southeast. Toxicological results indicate some pulmonary, oxidative stress, and cardiovascular responses to certain exposure scenarios. Fieldwork at Plant 2, located in the Midwest, began on July 19, 2006. The following scenarios were completed: July 19-22: POS (oxidized + SOA); July 25-28: PONS (oxidized + neutralized + SOA); August 8-13: P (primary); August 14-15: POS; August 16-17: POS (MI rats); August 28-31: OS (oxidized + SOA, without primary particles); September 1-4: O (oxidized, no primary particles); and September 6-9: S (SOA, no primary particles). During the next reporting period, we will report complete exposure and toxicological results for Plant 2. Planning will begin for the mobile source component of the research (funded through the Harvard-EPA Center for PM Health Effects), scheduled to take place in 2008. We will also hold our annual meeting of the TERESA Technical Advisory Committee, planned for early in 2007.

Annette Rohr

2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

376

Toxicological Evaluation of Realistic Emissions of Source Aerosols (TERESA): Application to Power Plant-Derived PM2.5  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents progress made on the subject project during the period of September 1, 2007 through February 28, 2007. The TERESA Study is designed to investigate the role played by specific emissions sources and components in the induction of adverse health effects by examining the relative toxicity of coal combustion and mobile source (gasoline and/or diesel engine) emissions and their oxidative products. The study involves on-site sampling, dilution, and aging of coal combustion emissions at three coal-fired power plants, as well as mobile source emissions, followed by animal exposures incorporating a number of toxicological endpoints. The DOE-EPRI Cooperative Agreement (henceforth referred to as ''the Agreement'') for which this technical progress report has been prepared covers the performance and analysis of field experiments at the first TERESA plant, located in the Upper Midwest and henceforth referred to as Plant 0, and at two additional coal-fired power plants (Plants 1 and 2) utilizing different coal types and with different plant configurations. During this reporting period, fieldwork was completed at Plant 2, located in the Midwest. The following scenarios were completed: (1) July 19-22: POS (oxidized + SOA); (2) July 25-28: PONS (oxidized + neutralized + SOA); (3) August 8-13: P (primary); (4) August 14-15: POS; (5) August 16-17: POS (MI rats); (6) August 28-31: OS (oxidized + SOA, without primary particles); (7) September 1-4: O (oxidized, no primary particles); (8) September 6-9: S (SOA, no primary particles); and (9) September 19-22: PO (oxidized). Results indicated some biological effects with some scenarios. Also during this reporting period, the annual meeting of the TERESA Technical Advisory Committee was held at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston. During the next reporting period, data analyses will continue for Plant 2 as well as for pooled data from all three plants. Manuscripts documenting the overall project findings will be prepared for submission to the peer literature. Preliminary planning will begin for the mobile source component of the research (funded through the Harvard-EPA Center for PM Health Effects), scheduled to take place in 2008.

Annette Rohr

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

377

Effect of a 90° Elbow on the Accuracy of an Insertion Flowmeter, Results and Comparisons for 4 and 6 in. Diameter PVC Pipe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal energy consumption in buildings with chilled or hot water distribution systems is often monitored through the use of some type of flow metering device. These flowmeters can be fixed types, such as venturis or orifices, or insertion flowmeters which can be more easily installed and removed. The easy removal and reinstallation of the insertion type flowmeters makes them good choices for use in existing buildings or in retrofit projects. Besides the installation benefits, insertion flowmeters can also be installed while the pipe is in service or ''hot tapped". With any type flowmeter however, location in the pipe is a critical problem and deserves special consideration. Ideally, the meter should be inserted in existing pipe with a minimum of 10 to 15 diameters of straight pipe upstream of the meter location. This is rarely the case in existing piping distribution systems. It is much more common to be faced with only one or two candidate metering locations and these often are very short straight runs or will have elbows upstream and downstream of the proposed metering location. This paper reports on flow measurement error resulting from an insertion flowmeter installed downstream of a 90° elbow. The measurement errors were compared for tests conducted in 4.0 and 6.0 inch (0.1 and 0.15 meter) diameter PVC pipe. The insertion flowmeter was a nonmagnetic, tangential paddle wheel type. The flowmeter was located from 2 to 10 pipe diameters downstream fiom a 90° elbow with fluid velocities ranging from 1.0 to 10.0 ft/s (0.3 to 3.0 m/s). At each flowmeter location, the meter was rotated in 45° increments around the circumference of the pipe to quantify the effect of circumferential location on flow error. The flowmeters were tested at the energy metering calibration facility at the Texas A&M University Energy Systems Laboratory Riverside campus. Flowmeter output was compared to mass flow measurements obtained 6om precision load cells mounted beneath a 1342 ft^3 (38 m^3 ) weigh tank. All output is given in terms of percent error relative to the load cells. Final results are presented as a bction of flowmeter downstream location, circumferential rotation angle, and fluid velocity. Circumferential meter location was found to be a very important factor. The percent difference for the tested flow meters ranged 6om -23% to -5% in the 4.0 in. (0.1 m) pipe and 6om -33% to 1% in the 6.0 in. (0.15 m) pipe. The ''best" location for these flowmeters was at zero degrees rotation angle, regardless of pipe size or meter location relative to the upstream 90° elbow.

Bryant, J. A.; O'Neal, D. L.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

The effect of jet velocity ratio on aerodynamics of a rectangular slot-burner in the presence of cross-flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a typical coal-fired power station boiler the ignition and the combustion of the fuel is largely controlled by burner aerodynamics. An experimental and numerical study of the rectangular slot-burners widely used on power stations in Victoria, Australia has been conducted to improve understanding of jet development within the boiler. The 1:15 scale model burner consisted of a central (primary) rectangular fuel nozzle with two (secondary) rectangular air jets positioned above and below it. The burner jets entered the measurement vessel at an angle of 60 deg to the wall. A cross-flow jet was attached to the wall of the vessel to simulate the recirculation prevalent in power station boilers. Experiments were conducted using a primary to cross-flow jet velocity ratio ({phi}) of 1.0 and secondary to primary jet velocity ratios ({phi}) of 1.0 and 3.0. Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) was used to measure mean and turbulent velocity components in the near field and downstream regions of the jets. Cross-flow significantly influenced the near field flow development from the slot-burner by deviating both primary and secondary jets from their geometric axes towards the wall. The degree of deviation was greater for {phi} = 1.0 since the higher velocity secondary jets increased the overall momentum of the primary jet for {phi} = 3.0. A numerical investigation of the rectangular slot-burner was also performed. First, the numerical results were validated against the experimental results and then visualization of the developing flow field was used to reveal the finer details of the cross-flow/burner jet interaction. Agreement between numerical and experimental jet features was good, although the numerical results predicted a primary jet that was marginally too narrow. Also the predicted downstream behaviour for {phi} = 3.0 deviated more significantly from experimental observation. Using the SST turbulence model, the numerical results suggested that a twin vortex was generated behind the initial region of the primary jet and this would aid in mixing of gas and fuel between primary and secondary jets. (author)

Ahmed, S. [CSIRO Manufacturing and Materials Technology, Highett VIC-3190 (Australia); Hart, J.; Naser, J. [School of Engineering and Industrial Sciences, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn VIC-3122 (Australia); Nikolov, J.; Solnordal, C.; Yang, W. [CSIRO Minerals, Clayton, VIC-3169 (Australia)

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

DOE/SEA-04  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

μm in aerodynamic μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM 10 ). As a result of the study, on August 19, 2005, the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (VDEQ) issued a letter to Mirant requesting that Mirant "undertake such action as is necessary to ensure protection of human health and the environment, in the area surrounding the Potomac River Generating Station, including the potential reduction of levels of operation, or potential shutdown of the facility." On August 24, 2005, in response to VDEQ's August 19, 2005, letter, Mirant decided to shut down all five generating units at the Plant. Figure S-1. The location of the Plant in relation to the central Washington, D.C. area. DOE/SEA-04 November 2006 S-3 DOE Action On August 24, 2005, the District of Columbia Public Service Commission (DCPSC) filed an

380

Condensation heat transfer characteristics of R410A-oil mixture in 5 mm and 4 mm outside diameter horizontal microfin tubes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Condensation heat transfer characteristics of R410A-oil mixture in 5 mm and 4 mm outside diameter horizontal microfin tubes were investigated experimentally. The experimental condensing temperature is 40 C, and nominal oil concentration range is from 0% to 5%. The test results indicate that the presence of oil deteriorates the heat transfer. The deterioration effect is negligible at nominal oil concentration of 1%, and becomes obvious with the increase of nominal oil concentration. At 5% nominal oil concentration, the heat transfer coefficient of R410A-oil mixture is found to have a maximum reduction of 25.1% and 23.8% for 5 mm and 4 mm tubes, respectively. The predictabilities of the existing condensation heat transfer correlations were verified with the experimental data, and Yu and Koyama correlation shows the best predictability. By replacing the pure refrigerant properties with the mixture's properties, Yu and Koyama correlation has a deviation of -15% to + 20% in predicting the local condensation heat transfer coefficient of R410A-oil mixture. (author)

Huang, Xiangchao; Ding, Guoliang; Hu, Haitao; Zhu, Yu. [Institute of Refrigeration and Cryogenics, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Gao, Yifeng [International Copper Association Shanghai Office, Shanghai 200020 (China); Deng, Bin [Institute of Heat Transfer Technology, Golden Dragon Precise Copper Tube Group Inc., Shanghai 200135 (China)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aerodynamic diameter pm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Aerodynamic Loads On Rotor Blades.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the last decade, we have heard more and more about the need of renewable clean energy, but not much has been done. Currently, the… (more)

Abedi, Hamidreza

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

TOXICOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF REALISTIC EMISSIONS OF SOURCE AEROSOLS (TERESA): APPLICATION TO POWER PLANT-DERIVED PM2.5  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents progress made on the subject project during the period of March 1, 2005 through August 31, 2005. The TERESA Study is designed to investigate the role played by specific emissions sources and components in the induction of adverse health effects by examining the relative toxicity of coal combustion and mobile source (gasoline and/or diesel engine) emissions and their oxidative products. The study involves on-site sampling, dilution, and aging of coal combustion emissions at three coal-fired power plants, as well as mobile source emissions, followed by animal exposures incorporating a number of toxicological endpoints. The DOE-EPRI Cooperative Agreement (henceforth referred to as ''the Agreement'') for which this technical progress report has been prepared covers the performance and analysis of field experiments at the first TERESA plant, located in the Upper Midwest and henceforth referred to as Plant 0, and at two additional coal-fired power plants (Plants 1 and 2) utilizing different coal types and with different plant configurations. During this reporting period, fieldwork was completed at Plant 1, located in the Southeast. Stage I toxicological assessments were carried out in normal Sprague-Dawley rats, and Stage II assessments were carried out in a compromised model (myocardial infarction-MI-model). Normal rats were exposed to the following atmospheric scenarios: (1) primary particles; (2) oxidized emissions; (3) oxidized emissions + secondary organic aerosol (SOA)--this scenario was repeated; and (4) oxidized emissions + ammonia + SOA. Compromised animals were exposed to oxidized emissions + SOA (this scenario was also conducted in replicate). Stage I assessment endpoints included breathing pattern/pulmonary function; in vivo chemiluminescence (an indicator of oxidative stress); blood cytology; bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid analysis; and histopathology. Stage II assessments included continuous ECG monitoring via implanted telemeters and blood chemistry (complete blood count, circulating cytokines (interleukins-1 and -6), C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-{alpha}), and endothelin-1). Only a subset of exposure data was available at the time of preparation of this report. Continuous PM{sub 2.5} mass (TEOM) results indicate a mass concentration of 14 {micro}g/m{sup 3} for the primary particle scenario, and a range of 151 to 385 {micro}g/m{sup 3} for the oxidized emissions scenarios. Toxicological results obtained to date from Plant 1 indicate subtle biological responses to some of the exposure scenarios. We observed statistically significant changes in several breathing pattern parameters, including tidal volume and frequency. For one scenario (oxidized emissions + SOA), we observed a significant increase in Enhanced Pause (Penh), a parameter that may reflect airflow restriction. However, the respiratory changes are very subtle and do not present a clear picture of a particular respiratory effect (e.g., airway restriction, sensory irritation, or pulmonary irritation). A significant increase in lung chemiluminescence (a marker of oxidative stress in lung tissue) in exposed animals (vs. air-exposed controls) was observed in animals exposed to oxidized emissions + SOA. No changes were observed in heart tissue, nor in any other scenario. Stage II assessments were conducted to the secondary + SOA scenario; ECG and blood analysis data are pending. Planning was initiated for Plant 2, located in the Midwest. Because of the requirement for both the FGD and the SCR to be concurrently operational for appropriate reaction conditions, fieldwork at Plant 2 is scheduled for Summer 2006. During the next reporting period, we will complete all remaining exposure and toxicological analyses for Plant 1, and the next semiannual report will include a detailed description of these data and their interpretation. We are also in the process of preparing a topical report for Plant 0.

Annette Rohr

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

383

A Five-Level Three-Phase Cascade Multilevel Inverter Using a Single DC Source for a PM Synchronous Motor Drive  

SciTech Connect

The interest here is in using a single DC power source to construct a 3-phase 5-level cascade multilevel inverter to be used as a drive for a PM traction motor. The 5-level inverter consists of a standard 3-leg inverter (one leg for each phase) and an H-bridge in series with each inverter leg, which use a capacitor as a DC source. It is shown that one can simultaneously maintain the regulation of the capacitor voltage while achieving an output voltage waveform which is 25% higher than that obtained using a standard 3-leg inverter by itself.

Ozpineci, Burak [ORNL; Chiasson, John N [ORNL; Tolbert, Leon M [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

On the structurization of coal dust precipitations and their influence on aerodynamic resistance by granulated mediums in air filters at nuclear power plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The processes of structurization of dust precipitations in granulated filtering mediums, formed by the monolithic glass spherical granules with the diameters of 2mm and 3mm, are re-searched. The distinctions between the distributions of filtered coal dust masses in the air filters with cylindrical granules and the air filters with spherical granules, are found. The influences by the filtered dust masses on the air resistance of both the air filters with the cylindrical granules and the air filters with the spherical granules are described. The conclusions on a possibility of the use of various chemical adsorbents with different geometric forms and volumetric dimensions to improve the filtering properties of granulated filtering mediums in air filters at nuclear power plants are formulated.

I. M. Neklyudov; O. P. Ledenyov; L. I. Fedorova; P. Ya. Poltinin

2012-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

385

On the structurization of coal dust precipitations and their influence on aerodynamic resistance by granulated mediums in air filters at nuclear power plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The processes of structurization of dust precipitations in granulated filtering mediums, formed by the monolithic glass spherical granules with the diameters of 2mm and 3mm, are re-searched. The distinctions between the distributions of filtered coal dust masses in the air filters with cylindrical granules and the air filters with spherical granules, are found. The influences by the filtered dust masses on the air resistance of both the air filters with the cylindrical granules and the air filters with the spherical granules are described. The conclusions on a possibility of the use of various chemical adsorbents with different geometric forms and volumetric dimensions to improve the filtering properties of granulated filtering mediums in air filters at nuclear power plants are formulated.

Neklyudov, I M; Fedorova, L I; Poltinin, P Ya

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Performance testing and Bayesian Reliability Analysis of small diameter, high power electric heaters for the simulation of nuclear fuel rod temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The conversion of plutonium from a nuclear weapon to nuclear reactor fuel requires an evaluation of the residual gallium as a potential corrosive material within an operating nuclear fuel element. Homogeneous trace levels of gallium may remain following conversion and have the potential to migrate along the thermal gradient within the fuel and concentrate at the cladding-fuel contact zone. A system to investigate this material transport phenomenon was constructed using small diameter (0.18 inch), indirect electric heaters to simulate the centerline temperatures of operating nuclear fuel in a pressurized water reactor. The heater was inserted into annular surrogate fuel pellets containing depleted uranium, cerium oxide and trace quantities (10 ppm) of gallium to perform an initial study of the gallium migration using non-plutonium fuels and evaluate the performance of the simulation system. Heat was removed from the operating heaters by using an innovative liquid metal heat exchanger. The heaters were of a new design and were required to operate at a nominal temperature of 1000?C and for a minimum of 5000 hours. An evaluation of the expected heater lifetime and the thermal simulation system was needed in order to justify the high expense of a proposed full test using prototypic mixed-oxide fuel (MOX) containing plutonium from converted nuclear weapons. Bayesian reliability analysis methods were used to determine the expected heater failure rate because of the expected short test duration and the small sample size. Results from the operation of the simulation system and lifetime data indicate the current heater design is capable of producing the required temperatures and thermal gradients normally found in operating nuclear fuels. However, a design weakness in the heaters resulted in an unacceptably high failure rate of the heaters. The heaters were determined to have a reliability of 0.83 % at 5000 hours of operation with a Mean Time to Failure (MTTF) of 485 hours. The current heater design would require some modification and further testing prior to beginning a full scale test using prototypic MOX fuel pellets.

O'Kelly, David Sean

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

DEVELOPMENT OF FINE PARTICULATE EMISSION FACTORS AND SPECIATION PROFILES FOR OIL AND GAS-FIRED COMBUSTION SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

This report provides results from the first year of this three-year project to develop dilution measurement technology for characterizing PM2.5 (particles with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 2.5 micrometers) and precursor emissions from stationary combustion sources used in oil, gas and power generation operations. Detailed emission rate and chemical speciation test results for a refinery gas-fired process heater and plans for cogeneration gas turbine tests and pilot-scale tests are presented. Tests were performed using a research dilution sampling apparatus and traditional EPA methods to compare PM2.5 mass and chemical speciation. Test plans are presented for a gas turbine facility that will be tested in the fourth quarter of 2002. A preliminary approach for pilot-scale tests is presented that will help define design constraints for a new dilution sampler design that is smaller, lighter, and less costly to use.

Glenn C. England; Stephanie Wien; Mingchih O. Chang

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Filter loading corrections for real-time aethalometer measurements of fresh  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Filter loading corrections for real-time aethalometer measurements of fresh Filter loading corrections for real-time aethalometer measurements of fresh diesel soot. (2007) Title Filter loading corrections for real-time aethalometer measurements of fresh diesel soot. (2007) Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2007 Authors Jimenez, Jorge, Candis S. Claiborn, Timothy Larson, Thomas W. Kirchstetter, and Lara A. Gundel Journal Journal of Air and Waste Management Association Volume 57 Issue 7 Pagination 868-873 Abstract In this study, a correction was developed for the aethalometer to measure real-time black carbon (BC) concentrations in an environment dominated by fresh diesel soot. The relationship between the actual mass-specific absorption coefficient for BC and the BC-dependent attenuation coefficients was determined from experiments conducted in a diesel exposure chamber that provided constant concentrations of fine particulate matter (PM; PM(2.5); PM < 2.5 microm in aerodynamic diameter) from diesel exhaust. The aethalometer reported BC concentrations decreasing with time from 48.1 to 31.5 microg m(-3) when exposed to constant PM(2.5) concentrations of 55 +/- 1 microg m(-3) and b(scat) = 95 +/- 3 Mm(-1) from diesel exhaust. This apparent decrease in reported light-absorbing PM concentration was used to derive a correction K(ATN) for loading of strong light-absorbing particles onto or into the aethalometer filter tape, which was a function of attenuation of light at 880 nm by the embedded particles

389

PARTICULATE CHARACTERIZATION AND ULTRA LOW-NOx BURNER FOR THE CONTROL OF NO{sub x} AND PM{sub 2.5} FOR COAL FIRED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect

In response to the serious challenge facing coal-fired electric utilities with regards to curbing their NO{sub x} and fine particulate emissions, Babcock and Wilcox and McDermott Technology, Inc. conducted a project entitled, ''Particulate Characterization and Ultra Low-NO{sub x} Burner for the Control of NO{sub x} and PM{sub 2.5} for Coal Fired Boilers.'' The project included pilot-scale demonstration and characterization of technologies for removal of NO{sub x} and primary PM{sub 2.5} emissions. Burner development and PM{sub 2.5} characterization efforts were based on utilizing innovative concepts in combination with sound scientific and fundamental engineering principles and a state-of-the-art test facility. Approximately 1540 metric tonnes (1700 tons) of high-volatile Ohio bituminous coal were fired. Particulate sampling for PM{sub 2.5} emissions characterization was conducted in conjunction with burner testing. Based on modeling recommendations, a prototype ultra low-NO{sub x} burner was fabricated and tested at 100 million Btu/hr in the Babcock and Wilcox Clean Environment Development Facility. Firing the unstaged burner with a high-volatile bituminous Pittsburgh 8 coal at 100 million Btu/hr and 17% excess air achieved a NO{sub x} goal of 0.20 lb NO{sub 2}/million Btu with a fly ash loss on ignition (LOI) of 3.19% and burner pressure drop of 4.7 in H{sub 2}O for staged combustion. With the burner stoichiometry set at 0.88 and the overall combustion stoichiometry at 1.17, average NO{sub x} and LOI values were 0.14 lb NO{sub 2}/million Btu and 4.64% respectively. The burner was also tested with a high-volatile Mahoning 7 coal. Based on the results of this work, commercial demonstration is being pursued. Size classified fly ash samples representative of commercial low-NO{sub x} and ultra low-NO{sub x} combustion of Pittsburgh 8 coal were collected at the inlet and outlet of an ESP. The mass of size classified fly ash at the ESP outlet was sufficient to evaluate the particle size distribution, but was of insufficient size to permit reliable chemical analysis. The size classified fly ash from the inlet of the ESP was used for detailed chemical analyses. Chemical analyses of the fly ash samples from the ESP outlet using a high volume sampler were performed for comparison to the size classified results at the inlet. For all test conditions the particulate removal efficiency of the ESP exceeded 99.3% and emissions were less than the NSPS limits of {approx}48 mg/dscm. With constant combustion conditions, the removal efficiency of the ESP increased as the ESP voltage and Specific Collection Area (SCA) increased. The associated decrease in particle emissions occurred in size fractions both larger and smaller than 2.5 microns. For constant ESP voltage and SCA, the removal efficiency for the ultra low-NO{sub x} combustion ash (99.4-99.6%) was only slightly less than for the low-NO{sub x} combustion ash (99.7%). The decrease in removal efficiency was accompanied by a decrease in ESP current. The emission of PM{sub 2.5} from the ESP did not change significantly as a result of the change in combustion conditions. Most of the increase in emissions was in the size fraction greater than 2.5 microns, indicating particle re-entrainment. These results may be specific to the coal tested in this program. In general, the concentration of inorganic elements and trace species in the fly ash at the ESP inlet was dependent on the particle size fraction. The smallest particles tended to have higher concentrations of inorganic elements/trace species than larger particles. The concentration of most elements by particle size range was independent of combustion condition and the concentration of soluble ions in the fly ash showed little change with combustion condition when evaluated on a carbon free basis.

Ralph Bailey; Hamid Sarv; Jim Warchol; Debi Yurchison

2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

390

Texas Tech University to participate in Gulf project -KCBD, NewsChannel 11 Lubbock | http://www.kcbd.com/Global/story.asp?s=12766962&clienttype=printable[7/7/2010 1:57:22 PM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Tech University to participate in Gulf project - KCBD, NewsChannel 11 Lubbock | http://www.kcbd.com/Global/story.asp?s=12766962&clienttype=printable[7/7/2010 1:57:22 PM] Texas Tech University to participate in Gulf project Posted: Jul 07, 2010 10:22 AM CDT LUBBOCK, TX (KCBD) - PRESS RELEASE: Texas Tech

Rock, Chris

391

Texas agricultural drought losses reach record $5.2 billion http://agrilife.org/today/2011/08/17/texas-agricultural-drought-losses-reach-record-5-2-billion/[8/18/2011 4:33:03 PM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas agricultural drought losses reach record $5.2 billion http://agrilife.org/today/2011/08/17/texas-agricultural-drought-losses-reach-record-5-2-billion/[8/18/2011 4:33:03 PM] CATEGORY WE'RE SOCIAL Science & Tech World Ag Twitter Facebook Texas agricultural drought losses reach record $5.2 billion

Wilkins, Neal

392

New Battery Resembles Paper --Raymond 2007 (813): 2 --ScienceNOW http://sciencenow.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/2007/813/2 1 of 2 9/28/2007 12:10 PM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New Battery Resembles Paper -- Raymond 2007 (813): 2 -- ScienceNOW http://sciencenow.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/2007/813/2 1 of 2 9/28/2007 12:10 PM Paper power. A new type of battery resembles a small sheet of paper. Credit: Victor Pushparaj New Battery Resembles Paper By Veronica Raymond ScienceNOW Daily News 13

Ajayan, Pulickel M.

393

AME 514 -Applications of Combustion -Spring 2013 Homework #3 Due Friday 4/5/13, 4:30 pm in the drop box in OHE 430N (Xerox room). If you're off  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AME 514 - Applications of Combustion - Spring 2013 ­ Homework #3 Due Friday 4/5/13, 4:30 pm · Joulin, G., Sivashinsky, G. I. (1994). Combust. Sci. Technol. 98, 11-23. Theoretical description of flames in Hele-Shaw cells. · Yoshida, A. (1988). Proc. Combust. Inst. 22, 1471-1478. Very good

394

12/31/11 Motor and Inductor Ripple Current Losses Page 1 of 6 Created 12/13/10 by Jason Cortell Modified 12/13/10 10:02 PM by Jason Cortell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

12/31/11 Motor and Inductor Ripple Current Losses Page 1 of 6 Created 12/13/10 by Jason Cortell Modified 12/13/10 10:02 PM by Jason Cortell Cornell University Cortell_Jason_Motor_and_Inductor_Ripple_Current_Losses_2010.do Introduction: Digital motor controllers based on pulse width modulation (PWM) generally rely

Ruina, Andy L.

395

Times Higher Education -Top 10 researchers in chemistry based on total citations http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/story.asp?storyCode=403915[4/19/2009 6:13:57 PM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Search Jobs Search Archive Advanced Search All roles All locations Top 10 researchers in chemistry based COMMENT CAREER LEGAL BOOKS STATS ADVERTISE JOBS EVENTS MAGAZINE SUBSCRIBE Enter your keyword All roles All://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/story.asp?storyCode=403915[4/19/2009 6:13:57 PM] © 2007 TSL Education Ltd. Contact us Feedback Terms & conditions Privacy

Yaghi, Omar M.

396

VOA News -Paperthin Batteries Offer New Options, Applications http://www.voanews.com/english/2007-11-07-voa26.cfm?renderforprint=1 1 of 1 11/8/2007 4:16 PM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is ideal for medical devices like pacemakers. At present, the battery costs considerably more thanVOA News - Paperthin Batteries Offer New Options, Applications http://www.voanews.com/english/2007-11-07-voa26.cfm?renderforprint=1 1 of 1 11/8/2007 4:16 PM Pulickel Ajayan holds the paper thin battery

Ajayan, Pulickel M.

397

9/18/09 2:17 PM'Big Wave' Theory Offers Alternative to Dark Energy Page 1 of 20http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/2319699/posts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

9/18/09 2:17 PM'Big Wave' Theory Offers Alternative to Dark Energy Page 1 of 20http' Theory Offers Alternative to Dark Energy Space.com ^ | 8/18/09 | Clara Moskowitz Posted on August 19 for the accelerating expansion of the universe that does not rely on the mystifying idea of dark energy. According

Temple, Blake

398

9/18/09 2:09 PM'Big Wave' Theory Offers Alternative to Dark Energy -Physical Science Page 1 of 3http://scienceblips.dailyradar.com/story/big_wave_theory_offers_alternative_to_dark_energy/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

9/18/09 2:09 PM'Big Wave' Theory Offers Alternative to Dark Energy - Physical Science Page 1 of 3http://scienceblips.dailyradar.com/story/big_wave_theory_offers_alternative_to_dark_energy/ Gadget working my way through a preprint of a paper arguing that dark energy is not what many scientists think

Temple, Blake

399

9/18/09 2:12 PM'Big Wave' Theory Offers Alternative to Dark Energy Page 1 of 4http://digg.com/general_sciences/Big_Wave_Theory_Offers_Alternative_to_Dark_Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

9/18/09 2:12 PM'Big Wave' Theory Offers Alternative to Dark Energy Page 1 of 4http://digg.com/general_sciences/Big_Wave_Theory_Offers_Alternative_to_Dark_Energy show profanity settings Digg is a place Offers Alternative to Dark Energy space.com -- Mathematicians have proposed an alternative explanation

Temple, Blake

400

Nuclear power and climate change | The Bulletin Online http://www.thebulletin.org/roundtable/nuclear-power-climate-change/ 1 of 11 9/25/07 2:14 PM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear power and climate change | The Bulletin Online http://www.thebulletin.org/roundtable/nuclear-power-climate-change/ 1 of 11 9/25/07 2:14 PM ROUNDTABLE Roundtable > Nuclear power and climate change Nuclear power, experts argue that all options should be considered--including nuclear power. But with nuclear power comes

Berry, R. Stephen

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401

EERE News: EERE Progress Alerts http://www1.eere.energy.gov/news/progress_alerts/progress_alert.asp... 1 of 1 4/3/07 12:29 PM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EERE News: EERE Progress Alerts http://www1.eere.energy.gov/news/progress_alerts/progress_alert.asp... 1 of 1 4/3/07 12:29 PM Search Help More Search Options EERE Information Center Printable Version New Industrial Technologies Program within EERE, are run by 26 universities and provide no-cost energy

Washington at Seattle, University of

402

9/18/09 2:49 PM`Dark Energy' reminds us: consensus has no place in real science -Telegraph Blogs Page 1 of 42http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/news/jamesdelingpole/100006809/dark-energy-reminds-us-consensus-has-no-place-in-real-science/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

9/18/09 2:49 PM`Dark Energy' reminds us: consensus has no place in real science - Telegraph Blogs Page 1 of 42http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/news/jamesdelingpole/100006809/dark-energy Lifestyle Comment Travel Culture Technology Fashion #12;9/18/09 2:49 PM`Dark Energy' reminds us: consensus

Temple, Blake

403

Pilot Demonstration of Technology for the Production of High Value Materials from the Ultra-Fine (PM 2.5) Fraction of Coal Combustion Ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Work on the project focused on the determination of the hydraulic classification characteristics of the Coleman and Mill Creek ashes. The work utilized the hydraulic classifier developed earlier in the project. Testing included total yield, recovery of ash diameter particles and LOI partitioning as functions of dispersant dosage and type, retention time and superficial velocity. Yields as high as 21% with recoveries of up to 2/3 of the ash fractions were achieved. Mean particle size (D{sub 50}) of varied from 3.7 to 10 {micro}m. The ashes were tested for there pozzolanic activity in mortars as measured by strength activity index using ASTM criteria. Additional testing included air entrainment reagent demand and water requirements. The classified products all performed well, demonstrating excellent early strength development in the mortars. Some increased air entrainment demand was noted. The conceptual design of a process demonstration unit PDU was also completed. A flexible, trailer-mounted field unit is envisioned.

T.L. Robl; J.G. Groppo; Robert Rathebone

2005-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

404

PM2.5 Designations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pollution from Power Pollution from Power Plants Gina McCarthy Assistant Administrator US EPA Office of Air and Radiation October 29, 2010 2 GDP Up; Pollution Down 3 Key Power Plant Rules Overdue * The American public has suffered avoidable deaths and illnesses as important Clean Air Act-required power plant controls have been delayed more than a decade. * The Act required states by 2000 to adopt rules as needed to control interstate pollution to help meet health-based air quality standards issued in 1997 - NOX SIP Call Rule (1998) partially addressed ozone transport by 2004, but did not address fine particles. - Previous administration finalized Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) in 2005 but court found legal flaws and ordered EPA to replace it. CAIR remains in place in the interim.

405

Casimir force learns to swim (June 2007) -News -PhysicsWeb http://physicsweb.org/articles/news/11/6/4/1 1 of 2 6/6/07 3:39 PM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

these fields exert a radiation pressure on the surfaces that is, on average, stronger on the outer than micromachined devices, and theorists have even considered exploiting it to test the validity of Newton's laws://physicsweb.org/articles/news/11/6/4/1 2 of 2 6/6/07 3:39 PM About the author Jon Cartwright is a reporter for Physics Web E

Munday, Jeremy

406

9/18/09 2:43 PM'Big Wave' Theory Offers Alternative to Dark Energy // Current Page 1 of 11http://current.com/items/90718274_big-wave-theory-offers-alternative-to-dark-energy.htm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

9/18/09 2:43 PM'Big Wave' Theory Offers Alternative to Dark Energy // Current Page 1 of 11http://current.com/items/90718274_big-wave-theory-offers-alternative-to-dark-energy.htm login | register |home tv shows schedule to Dark Energy // Current Page 2 of 11http://current.com/items/90718274_big-wave-theory-offers-alternative-to-dark-energy

Temple, Blake

407

Large Diameter Lasing Tube Cooling Arrangement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cooling structure (16) for use inside a ceramic cylindrical tube (11) of a metal vapor laser (10) to cool the plasma in the tube (11), the cooling structure (16) comprising a plurality of circular metal members (17,31) and mounting members (18, 34) that position the metal members (17,31) coaxially in the tube (11) to form an annular lasing volume, with the metal members (17, 31) being axially spaced from each other along the length of the tube (11) to prevent the metal members from shorting out the current flow through the plasma in the tube (11) and to provide spaces through which the heat from localized hot spots in the plasma may radiate to the other side of the tube (11).

Hall, Jerome P.; Alger, Terry W.; Anderson, Andrew T.; Arnold, Philip A.

2004-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

408

Tribological and microstructural investigation of the PM200 series of self-lubricating composites. [NiCo-Cr[sub 3]C[sub 2]-Ag(Au)-BaF[sub 2]-CaF[sub 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This master's thesis describes an investigation of the effects of processing and compositional variations on the tribological, microstructural, and compressive strength characteristics of PM212. PM212 is a self-lubricating composite, comprised of a wear-resistant metal bonded (NiCo) chromium carbide matrix, containing the solid lubricants barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic and silver. Several alternate composites were formulated which had lubricant and matrix variations. Processing variations included sintering and hot isostatic pressing (HIPping). Pin-on-disk tests were used to screen the alternates for friction and wear properties. Several of the chromium carbide-based self-lubricating composites exhibited low friction and wear in sliding against a nickel-based superalloy. One specific composition contained gold in place of silver to minimize the potential reactivity of the composite with possible environmental contaminants such as sulfur. This formulation also resulted in a composite with good tribological properties. Results indicate that several of these composites have potential use as sliding bearing and seal materials in operation from 25[degrees]C to temperatures as high as 900[degrees]C. The good tribological performance by several different composites showed that the composition of PM212 can be altered without dramatically affecting performance.

Bogdanski, M.S.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Pilot Demonstration of Technology for the Production of High Value Materials from the Ultra-Fine (PM 2.5) Fraction of Coal Combustion Ash  

SciTech Connect

Work on the project focused on the determination of the hydraulic classification characteristics of the Coleman and Mill Creek ashes. The work utilized the hydraulic classifier developed earlier in the project. Testing included total yield, recovery of <5 {micro}m ash diameter particles and LOI partitioning as functions of dispersant dosage and type, retention time and superficial velocity. Yields as high as 21% with recoveries of up to 2/3 of the <5 {micro}m ash fractions were achieved. Mean particle size (D{sub 50}) of varied from 3.7 to 10 {micro}m. The ashes were tested for there pozzolanic activity in mortars as measured by strength activity index using ASTM criteria. Additional testing included air entrainment reagent demand and water requirements. The classified products all performed well, demonstrating excellent early strength development in the mortars. Some increased air entrainment demand was noted. The conceptual design of a process demonstration unit PDU was also completed. A flexible, trailer-mounted field unit is envisioned.

T.L. Robl; J.G. Groppo; Robert Rathebone

2005-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

410

Development of methods of producing large areas of silicon sheet by the slicing of silicon ingots using inside-diameter (I. D. ) saws. Final report, May 1979-April 1980  

SciTech Connect

I.D. wafering equipment, blades and processes were used to develop methods for producing large areas of silicon sheet. Modifications to a 16 inch STC automated saw included programmable feed system; crystal rotating system; and STC dyna-track blade monitoring and control system. By controlling the plating operation and by grinding of the cutting edge, we were able to produce 16 inch I.D. blades with a cutting edge thickness of .22 mm. Crystal rotation mechanism was used to slice 100 mm diameter crystals with a 16 inch blade down to a thickness of .20 mm. Cutting rates with crystal rotation were generally slower than with standard plunge I.D. slicing techniques. Using programmed feeds and programmed rotation, maximum cutting rates were from 0.3 to 1.0 inches per minute.

Aharonyan, P.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Final Report on Control Algorithm to Improve the Partial-Load Efficiency of Surface PM Machines with Fractional-Slot Concentrated Windings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Surface permanent magnet (SPM) synchronous machines using fractional-slot concentrated windings are being investigated as candidates for high-performance traction machines for automotive electric propulsion systems. It has been shown analytically and experimentally that such designs can achieve very wide constant-power speed ratios (CPSR) [1,2]. This work has shown that machines of this type are capable of achieving very low cogging torque amplitudes as well as significantly increasing the machine power density [3-5] compared to SPM machines using conventional distributed windings. High efficiency can be achieved in this class of SPM machine by making special efforts to suppress the eddy-current losses in the magnets [6-8], accompanied by efforts to minimize the iron losses in the rotor and stator cores. Considerable attention has traditionally been devoted to maximizing the full-load efficiency of traction machines at their rated operating points and along their maximum-power vs. speed envelopes for higher speeds [9,10]. For example, on-line control approaches have been presented for maximizing the full-load efficiency of PM synchronous machines, including the use of negative d-axis stator current to reduce the core losses [11,12]. However, another important performance specification for electric traction applications is the machine's efficiency at partial loads. Partial-load efficiency is particularly important if the target traction application requires long periods of cruising operation at light loads that are significantly lower than the maximum drive capabilities. While the design of the machine itself is clearly important, investigation has shown that this is a case where the choice of the control algorithm plays a critical role in determining the maximum partial-load efficiency that the machine actually achieves in the traction drive system. There is no evidence that this important topic has been addressed for this type of SPM machine by any other authors. This topic takes on even greater significance for fractional-slot concentrated-winding SPM machine designs. In particular, maximizing the torque/power density of this class of SPM machines typically leads to machine designs with high numbers of poles. The resulting high electrical frequencies can easily result in high stator core losses unless special care is taken during the machine design process. The purpose of this report is to discuss a modified vector control algorithm for a fractional-slot concentrated winding SPM machine that has been developed to maximize the machine's partial-load efficiency over a wide range of operating conditions. For purposes of this discussion, a 55 kW (peak) SPM machine designed to meet requirements established in the US FreedomCar program [13] is used as the basis for demonstrating the proposed technique. A combination of closed-form analysis [14] and finite element analysis (FEA) is used during this investigation.

McKeever, John W [ORNL; Reddy, Patel [University of Wisconsin; Jahns, Thomas M [ORNL

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

FINAL REPORT ON CONTROL ALGORITHM TO IMPROVE THE PARTIAL-LOAD EFFICIENCY OFSURFACE PM MACHINES WITH FRACTIONAL-SLOT CONCENTRATED WINDINGS  

SciTech Connect

Surface permanent magnet (SPM) synchronous machines using fractional-slot concentrated windings are being investigated as candidates for high-performance traction machines for automotive electric propulsion systems. It has been shown analytically and experimentally that such designs can achieve very wide constant-power speed ratios (CPSR) [1,2]. This work has shown that machines of this type are capable of achieving very low cogging torque amplitudes as well as significantly increasing the machine power density [3-5] compared to SPM machines using conventional distributed windings. High efficiency can be achieved in this class of SPM machine by making special efforts to suppress the eddy-current losses in the magnets [6-8], accompanied by efforts to minimize the iron losses in the rotor and stator cores. Considerable attention has traditionally been devoted to maximizing the full-load efficiency of traction machines at their rated operating points and along their maximum-power vs. speed envelopes for higher speeds [9,10]. For example, on-line control approaches have been presented for maximizing the full-load efficiency of PM synchronous machines, including the use of negative d-axis stator current to reduce the core losses [11,12]. However, another important performance specification for electric traction applications is the machine's efficiency at partial loads. Partial-load efficiency is particularly important if the target traction application requires long periods of cruising operation at light loads that are significantly lower than the maximum drive capabilities. While the design of the machine itself is clearly important, investigation has shown that this is a case where the choice of the control algorithm plays a critical role in determining the maximum partial-load efficiency that the machine actually achieves in the traction drive system. There is no evidence that this important topic has been addressed for this type of SPM machine by any other authors. This topic takes on even greater significance for fractional-slot concentrated-winding SPM machine designs. In particular, maximizing the torque/power density of this class of SPM machines typically leads to machine designs with high numbers of poles. The resulting high electrical frequencies can easily result in high stator core losses unless special care is taken during the machine design process. The purpose of this report is to discuss a modified vector control algorithm for a fractional-slot concentrated winding SPM machine that has been developed to maximize the machine's partial-load efficiency over a wide range of operating conditions. For purposes of this discussion, a 55 kW (peak) SPM machine designed to meet requirements established in the US FreedomCar program [13] is used as the basis for demonstrating the proposed technique. A combination of closed-form analysis [14] and finite element analysis (FEA) is used during this investigation.

Reddy, P.B.; Jahns, T.M.

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

413

Einar Strømmen: Theory of bridge aerodynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... BOOK REVIEW ... In addition to bridges, the book also covers chimneys susceptible to vortex-shedding and aeroelas- tic response. ...

2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

414

New Aerodynamics Simulations Provide Better Understanding of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lates the region within and immediately surrounding the wind plant, with a mesoscale weather forecasting tool that simulates the weather on a scale of a few hundred kilometers...

415

Journal of Wind Engineering and Industrial Aerodynamics ] (  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of hyperbolic cooling towers indicated that wind-induced peak tensile stresses can be more than twice their steady or mean values. This was an important finding for cooling tower designers, who at that time were reeling from the disastrous collapse of a group of cooling towers at Ferrybridge in the UK. Alan's close

Kareem, Ahsan

416

Low mass vehicle and its aerodynamic study.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Nowadays the fuel economy has become more and more important to both manufacturers and individual users. The main approach to achieve better fuel economy is… (more)

Feng, Huayi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Microsoft Word - doe_mirant_order_sierraclub.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 20 February 20 th , 2006 Mr. Lawrence Mansueti Permitting, Siting, and Analysis Division Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585-0119 Dear Mr. Mansueti, This letter is in response to the Department of Energy Emergency Order to Resume Limited Operation at the Potomac River Generating Station, Alexandria, VA, in Response to Electricity Reliability Concerns in Washington, DC. For over 50 years, and as indicated by Mirant's own recent modeling analysis, citizens in the city of Alexandria have been exposed to significant health risks, including concentrations of nitrogen oxides (NO x ), sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ), and particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than 10 microns (PM

418

DOE/SEA-04  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM 10 ). As a result of the study, on August 19, 2005, the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (VDEQ) issued a letter to Mirant requesting that Mirant "undertake such action as is necessary to ensure protection of human health and the environment, in the area surrounding the Potomac River Generating Station, including the potential reduction of levels of operation, or potential shutdown of the facility." On August 24, 2005, in response to VDEQ's August 19, 2005, letter, Mirant decided to shut down all five generating units at the Plant. Figure S-1. The location of the Plant in relation to the central Washington, D.C. area. DOE/SEA-04 November 2006 S-3 DOE Action On August 24, 2005, the District of Columbia Public Service Commission (DCPSC) filed an

419

Acronyms  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 2001 May 2001 Supplement to the Draft Environmental Impact Statement U.S. Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management DOE/EIS-0250D-S Next Section ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS To ensure a more reader-friendly document, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) limited the use of acronyms and abbreviations in this Supplement. Acronyms and abbreviations are defined the first time they are used in each chapter. Acronyms and abbreviations used in tables and figures because of space limitations are listed in footnotes to the tables and figures. CFR Code of Federal Regulations DOE U.S. Department of Energy EIS environmental impact statement FR Federal Register MTHM metric tons of heavy metal NEPA National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, as amended PM 10 particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of 10 micrometers or less

420

DEVELOPMENT OF FINE PARTICULATE EMISSION FACTORS AND SPECIATION PROFILES FOR OIL AND GAS FIRED COMBUSTION SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

This report provides results from the second year of this three-year project to develop dilution measurement technology for characterizing PM2.5 (particles with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 2.5 micrometers) and precursor emissions from stationary combustion sources used in oil, gas and power generation operation. Detailed emission rate and chemical speciation tests results for a gas turbine, a process heater, and a commercial oil/gas fired boiler are presented. Tests were performed using a research dilution sampling apparatus and traditional EPA methods. A series of pilot tests were conducted to identify the constraints to reduce the size of current research dilution sampler for future stack emission tests. Based on the test results, a bench prototype compact dilution sampler developed and characterized in GE EER in August 2002.

Glenn England; Oliver Chang; Stephanie Wien

2002-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aerodynamic diameter pm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Pilot Demonstration of Technology for the Production of High Value Materials from the Ultra-Fine (PM2.5) Fraction of Coal Combustion Ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this research was to determine the feasibility of recovering a very fine fraction of fly ash, that is 5 microns in diameter or less and examining the characteristics of these materials in new or at least less traditional applications. These applications included as a polymer filler or as a 'super' pozzolanic concrete additive. As part of the effort the ash from 6 power plants was investigated and characterized. This work included collection from ESP Hoppers and ponds. The ash was thoroughly characterized chemically and physically. Froth flotation was used to reduce the carbon and testing showed that flotation could effectively reduce carbon to acceptable levels (i.e. 0.5% LOI) for most of the substrates tested. in order to enable eventual use as fillers. Hydraulic classification was used in the separation of the fine ash from the coarse ash. Hydraulic classification requires the ash to be dispersed to be effective and a range of dispersants were tested for adsorption as well as sedimentation rate. A wide range of dosages were required (0.3 to 10 g/kg). In general the ponded ash required less dispersant. A model was developed for hydraulic classification. A pilot-scale hydraulic classifier was also designed and operated for the project. Product yields of up to 21% of feed solids were achieved with recoveries of <5 {micro}m particles as high as 64%. Mean particle sizes (D{sub 50}) of the ultra fine ash (UFA) products varied from 3.7 to 10 {micro}m. A patent was filed on the classifier design. A conceptual design of a Process Demonstration Unit (PDU) with a feed rate of 2 tons of raw ash feed per hour was also completed. Pozzolanic activity was determined for the UFA ashes in mortars. In general the overall strength index was excellent with values of 90% achieved in 3 days and {approx}100% in 7 days. Three types of thermoplastic polymers were evaluated with the UFA as a filler: high density polyethylene, thermoplastic elastomer and polyethylene terphthalate filled polymers were prepared and subjected to SEM analysis to verify that the UFA was well dispersed. The addition of fillers increased the modulus of the HDPE composite, but decreased both the offset yield stress and offset yield strain, showing that the fillers essentially made the composite stiffer but the transition to plastic deformation occurred earlier in filled HDPE as stress was applied. Similar results were obtained with TPE, however, the decrease in either stress or strain at offset yield were not as significant. Dynamic mechanical analyses (DMA) were also completed and showed that although there were some alterations in the properties of the HDPE and TPE, the alterations are small, and more importantly, transition temperatures are not altered. The UFA materials were also tested in expanded urethanes, were improvements were made in the composites strength and stiffness, particularly for lighter weight materials. The results of limited flammability and fire safety testing were encouraging. A flowsheet was developed to produce an Ultra-Fine Ash (UFA) product from reclaimed coal-fired utility pond ash. The flowsheet is for an entry level product development scenario and additional production can be accommodated by increasing operating hours and/or installing replicate circuits. Unit process design was based on experimental results obtained throughout the project and cost estimates were derived from single vendor quotes. The installation cost of this plant is estimated to be $2.1M.

T. L. Robl; J. G. Groppo; R. Rathbone; B. Marrs; R. Jewell

2008-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

422

Loading Effect Correction for Real-Time Aethalometer Measurements of Fresh  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Loading Effect Correction for Real-Time Aethalometer Measurements of Fresh Loading Effect Correction for Real-Time Aethalometer Measurements of Fresh Diesel Soot Title Loading Effect Correction for Real-Time Aethalometer Measurements of Fresh Diesel Soot Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2007 Authors Jimenez, Jorge, Candis S. Claiborn, Timothy Larson, Timothy Gould, Thomas W. Kirchstetter, and Lara A. Gundel Journal Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association Volume 57 Issue 7 Pagination 868-873 Abstract In this study, a correction was developed for the aethalometer to measure real-time black carbon (BC) concentrations in an environment dominated by fresh diesel soot. The relationship between the actual mass-specific absorption co-efficient for BC and the BC-dependent attenuation coefficients was determined from experiments conducted in a diesel exposure chamber that provided constant concentrations of fine particulate matter (PM; PM2.5; PM <2.5 μm aerodynamic diameter) from diesel exhaust. The aethalometer reported BC concentrations decreasing with time from 48.1 to 31.5 μg m-3 when exposed to constant PM2.5 concentrations of 55 ± 1 μg m-3 and bscat 95 ± 3Mm-1 from diesel exhaust. This apparent decrease in reported light-absorbing PM concentration was used to derive a correction K (ATN) for loading of strong light-absorbing particles onto or into the aethalometer filter tape, which was a function of attenuation of light at 880 nm by the embedded particles.

423

COE Reductions through Active Aerodynamic Control of Rotor Aerodynamics and Geometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates potential cost of energy reductions that might be achieved by designing active systems to mitigate loads throughout the wind turbine system.

Griffin, D. A.; McCoy, T. J.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Texas Tech Toxicologists Use Duck Eggs to Study Effects of Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill http://texas-oil-spill-classaction.org/texas-tech-toxicologists-use-duck-eggs-to-study-effects-of-deepwater-horizon-oil-spill/[8/2/2011 1:44:16 PM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Tech Toxicologists Use Duck Eggs to Study Effects of Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill http://texas-oil-spill-classaction.org/texas-tech-toxicologists-use-duck-eggs-to-study-effects-of-deepwater-horizon-oil-spill/[8/2/2011 1:44:16 PM] « US Approves First Deep-Water Oil Well in Gulf Since BP Spill Texas Tech

Rock, Chris

425

File: {Books}4353-Iyengar&Brooks/Pageproofs/3d/4353-Chapter-20.3d Creator: ARUL/cipl-u1-3b2-5.unit1.cepha.net Date/Time: 6.7.2004/7:20pm Page: 381/398  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Western Ontario A JOINT PRESENTATION of the Departments of Physics & Astronomy and Chemical and Biochemical Engineering Date: FRIDAY, 16th July 2010 Time: 2:30 p.m. Location: Physics & Astronomy Room 36 Mu-Ping Nieh Canadian Neutron Beam Centre, NRC Canada "Small Angle Neutron Scattering

Ray, Asok

426

Emission factors for ammonia and particulate matter from broiler Houses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Total suspended particulate (TSP) concentrations, ammonia (NH?) concentrations, and ventilation rates were measured in four commercial, tunnel ventilated broiler houses in June through December of 2000 in Brazos County, Texas. Particle size distributions were developed from TSP samplers collected and used to determine the mass fraction of PM?? in the TSP samples collected. Concentrations of TSP and ammonia measured were multiplied by the ventilation rates measured to obtain emission factors for PM?? and ammonia from tunnel ventilated commercial broiler houses. TSP and NH? concentrations ranged from 7,387 to 11,387 []g/m³ and 2.02 to 45 ppm, respectively. Ammonia concentration exhibited a correlation with the age of the birds. Mass median diameters (MMD) found using particle size analysis with a Coulter Counter Multisizer were between 24.0 and 26.7 mm aerodynamic equivalent diameter. MMD increased with bird age. The mass fraction of PM?? in the TSP samples was between 2.72% and 8.40% with a mean of 5.94%. Ventilation rates were measured between 0.58 and 89 m³/s. Ammonia emission rates varied from 38 to 2105 g/hr. TSP emission rates and PM?? emission rates ranged from 7.0 to 1673 g/hr 0.58 to 99 g/hr respectively. Emission rates for ammonia and particulate matter increased with the age of the birds. Error and sensitivity analysis was conducted using Monte Carlo simulation for the calculation of emission rates. Error for ammonia emission rates was 99 g/hr during tunnel ventilation and 6 g/hr during sidewall ventilation. Error for TSP emission rates was 79 g/hr and 11 g/hr for tunnel and sidewall ventilation respectively. Sensitivity analysis showed that ventilation rate measurements and measurement of ammonia concentration had the most effect on the emission rates. Emission factors of NH? and PM?? estimated for these buildings were 1.32 ± 0.472 g/bird and 22.8 ± 9.28 g/bird, respectively. These emission factors take into account the variation of PM?? and NH? concentrations and ventilation rates with the age of the birds.

Redwine, Jarah Suzanne

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Friedman-FES-NERSC-pm.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program ! Program ! and ! Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory! Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences! An FES / ASCR / NERSC Workshop! Rockville, MD, August 3-4, 2010 * This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, by LBNL under Contract DE-AC02-05CH11231, and by PPPL under Contract DE-AC02-76CH03073. The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory HEDLP / Inertial Fusion Energy Simulation of intense beams for heavy-ion-fusion science! Ion beam in the NDCX-II accelerator Slide 2 The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory Contributors to this work (computational aspects)

428

Investigation of Nitrogen Atomized PM Alloy 625  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

951 (138.0) 456 (66.2). 50.5. 50.7. 649 (1200). ” 1093 (158.6) 638 (92.5). 36.0. 40.0. ” H. 315 ( 600). 2000. 947 (137.4) 450 (65.3). 53.0. 54.5. 427 ( 800).

429

Materials Week '97: Tuesday PM Session - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DRHF is a continuous gas-solid reactor which can maintain an extremely tight control on the constituents of the gas atmosphere at high temperature. With a ...

430

layout FAR onsite.pm7 copy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with the Ten- nessee Valley Authority (TVA) that will eventually convert highly enriched uranium into a form that TVA can use as fuel in its reactors and initiated...

431

Materials Week '97: Tuesday PM Session  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Worth, J.R. Jira, D.C. Maxwell, Materials Directorate, Wright Laboratory (WL/ MLLN), ... Technology Div., Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375.

432

Microstructural Characterization of PM 625-Type Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the past ten years, companies working in the Oil and Gas Industry have been looking for good corrosion resistant alloys for a wide variety of applications.

433

Materials Week '97: Tuesday PM Session - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... STAINLESS STEELS: J. Ivan Dickson, Ecole Polytechnique, Département de ... ON CLEAVAGE FRACTURE IN SIMULATED HAZs: L.P. Zhang, C.L. Davis, ...

434

Materials Week '97: Monday PM Session - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ALLOY MODELING AND DESIGN: Session II: Short-Range Order and Phase ... CORRELATIONS IN METAL ALLOYS: Gene E. Ice, Cullie Sparks, Xiaogang ...

435

Materials Week '97: Monday PM Session - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the chlorination of titania ores to produce titanium tetrachloride, all minerals ... Currently, none of the chlorine in this waste is recycled, less than 10% is ...

436

Materials Week '97: Monday PM Session  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Electric Power Research Institute, 3412 Hillview Ave, Palo Alto, CA 94303 ... design and safety analyses for operation exceeding 100,000 hours is discussed.

437

NETL: IEP - PM Emissions Control: Control Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

considerable cost to the utility, solely to reduce the flue gas flow rate such that the ESP can perform efficiently enough to meet opacity requirements. Although some plants have...

438

General P/M Design Considerations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Condition Density range, g/cm 3 1997 selling price (a) , $/lb Pressed and sintered 6.0â??7.1 2.45â??2.70 Pressed, sintered, sized 6.0â??7.1 2.90â??3.20 Copper infiltrated 7.3â??7.5 3.50â??3.55 Warm formed 7.2â??7.4 3.10â??3.30 Double pressed and sintered 7.2â??7.4 4.00â??4.10 Metal injection molded 7.5â??7.6 45.0â??70.0...

439

Materials Week '97: Wednesday PM Session - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

RAILROAD RAILS AND FROGS: APPLICATIONS FOR HYPEREUTECTOID STEELS: Roger K. Steele, Metallurgical Consulting Services Inc., Vernon, CT 06066.

440

Materials Week '97: Wednesday PM Session - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sponsored by: EPD/MDMD Synthesis, Control, and Analysis in Materials ... under a wide variety of production scenarios and annual production volumes.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aerodynamic diameter pm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Materials Week '97: Tuesday PM Session Abstracts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Materials Science & Technology, P.O. Box 395, Pretoria 0001, South Africa ..... Fernand Marquis, Department of Metallurgical Engineering, South Dakota ...

442

Addendum to a proposal to NSF to sponsor a vertical-axis wind turbine research program  

SciTech Connect

Information is presented concerning the performance evaluation of a 15 foot-diameter test bed Darrieus rotor, Darrieus rotor wind tunnel tests, Savonius rotor wind tunnel tests, blade manufacturing techniques for 15 foot-diameter and 35 foot-diameter wind turbines, static and dynamic structural analysis, production prototype design of a 15 foot-diameter turbine, production prototype design of 35 foot-diameter turbine, and aerodynamic performance studies.

Blackwell, B.F.; Feltz, L.V.; Rightley, E.C.

1974-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Large Diameter 718 Ingots for Land-Based Gas Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

h'ew high efficiency land based gas turbines made by General Electric ... Materials used for turbine rotors in land-based gas turbines have typically been CrMoV ...

444

The Vacuum Arc Remelting of Large Diameter Alloy 706  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

mands on the world's electrical power generation capability. In the United States for example, present electrical power demands are causing surplus power ...

445

Prospects for 2 mm Diameter NIF Polymer Capsules (A22732)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proc. Of The 17th IEEE/NPSS Symp. On Fusion Engineering, San Diego, California (Institute Of Electrical And Electronics Engineers, Inc., Piscataway, New Jersey) To Be Published.17th IEEE/NPSS Symposium on Fusion Engineering San Diego California, US, 1997932759869

Stephens, R.B.

1997-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

446

Modelling Hop-Constrained and Diameter-Constrained Minimum ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mance constraints such as availability and reliability (see [39]). Availability is the probability that all the transmission lines in the path from the root node.

447

P-9: Evaluation of Banana Fibers Density with Different Diameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biosorption Characteristics of Pb(II) from Aqueous Solution onto Poplar Cotton · Characterization of Aluminum Cathode Sheets Used for Zinc Electrowinning.

448

An Evaluation Of Large Diameter Steel Water Pipelines.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Najafi, Mohammad Steel water pipelines, as a part of America's underground infrastructure, play a key role in maintaining the quality of life and well-being of… (more)

Joshi, Tushar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Correlation between the Density and the Diameter of Buriti Fibers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mercury Oxidation and Capture over SCR Catalysts in Simulated Coal Combustion Flue Gas · Microstructural Characterization of Fe-Mn-C Ternary Alloy under ...

450

Elastic Modulus Variation with Diameter for Ramie Fibers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mercury Oxidation and Capture over SCR Catalysts in Simulated Coal Combustion Flue Gas · Microstructural Characterization of Fe-Mn-C Ternary Alloy under ...

451

Electrolytic transport through a synthetic nanometer-diameter pore  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Berneche, S. & Roux, B. (2003) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 100, 8644­8648. 36. Paces, M., Kosek, J., Marek

Aluru, Narayana R.

452

Thermal Cracking of Large-Diameter 706 Ingots  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

responsible for the cracking. The most plausible scenario is that residual stresses generated by ... Analysis of Heat Up for Homogenization. Finite Element Model.

453

Effective Diameter in Radiation Transfer: General Definition, Applications, and Limitations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although the use of an effective radius for radiation transfer calculations in water clouds has been common for many years, the export of this concept to ice clouds has been fraught with uncertainty, due to the nonspherical shapes of ice ...

David L. Mitchell

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

September 30, 2010 5:30 p.m. 8:30 p.m.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with quasi-isotropic layup were exposed to controlled radiant heat fluxes on one face for specified time

McQuade, D. Tyler

455

Photoacoustic optical properties at UV, VIS, and near IR wavelengths for laboratory generated and winter time ambient urban aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the laboratory and ambient photoacoustic (PA) measurement of aerosol light absorption coefficients at ultraviolet wavelength (i.e., 355 nm) and compare with measurements at 405, 532, 870, and 1047 nm. Simultaneous measurements of aerosol light scattering coefficients were achieved by the integrating reciprocal nephelometer within the PA's acoustic resonator. Absorption and scattering measurements were carried out for various laboratory generated aerosols, including salt, incense, and kerosene soot to evaluate the instrument calibration and gain insight on the spectral dependence of aerosol light absorption and scattering. Ambient measurements were obtained in Reno, Nevada, between 18 December 2009 and 18 January 2010. The measurement period included days with and without strong ground level temperature inversions, corresponding to highly polluted (freshly emitted aerosols) and relatively clean (aged aerosols) conditions. Particulate matter (PM) concentrations were measured and analyzed with other tracers of traffic emissions. The temperature inversion episodes caused very high concentration of PM{sub 2.5} and PM{sub 10} (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 {mu}m and 10 {mu}m, respectively) and gaseous pollutants: carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), and nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}). The diurnal change of absorption and scattering coefficients during the polluted (inversion) days increased approximately by a factor of two for all wavelengths compared to the clean days. The spectral variation in aerosol absorption coefficients indicated a significant amount of absorbing aerosol from traffic emissions and residential wood burning. The analysis of single scattering albedo (SSA), Angstrom exponent of absorption (AEA), and Angstrom exponent of scattering (AES) for clean and polluted days provides evidences that the aerosol aging and coating process is suppressed by strong temperature inversion under cloudy conditions. In general, measured UV absorption coefficients were found to be much larger for biomass burning aerosol than for typical ambient aerosols.

Gyawali, Madhu S.; Arnott, W. Patrick; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Song, Chen; Moosmuller, H.; Liu, Li; Mishchenko, M.; Chen, L-W A.; Green, M.; Watson, J. G.; Chow, J. C.

2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

456

Spanwise aerodynamic loads on a rotating wind turbine blade  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind turbine performance and load predictions depend on accurate airfoil performance data. Wind tunnel test data are typically used which accurately describe two-dimensional airfoil performance characteristics. Usually these data are only available for a range of angles of attack from 0 to 15 deg, which excludes the stall characteristics. Airfoils on stall-controlled wind turbines operate in deep stall in medium to high winds. Therefore it is very important to know how the airfoil will perform in these high load conditions. Butterfield et al. have shown that three-dimensional effec