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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aerobic bacteria microorganisms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Enteric bacteria in aerobically digested sludge.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Research Article Enteric bacteria in aerobically digested sludge. S R Farrah G Bitton Indicator bacteria, Salmonella...aerobic bacteria were determined in samples of undigested sludge and sludge that had been treated by one or two stages of aerobic...

S R Farrah; G Bitton

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Biodegradation of Triclosan by Aerobic Microorganisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and limited. To bridge this knowledge gap, this dissertation characterized cultivable triclosan-degrading microorganisms, identified uncultivable triclosan-utilizing bacteria, and elucidated triclosan biodegradation pathways. Furthermore, two treatment...

Lee, Do Gyun

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

3

Aerobic microorganism for the degradation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbon-degrading microorganism, having American Type Culture Collection accession numbers ATCC 53570 and 53571, in a biologically pure culture aseptically collected from a deep subsurface habitat and enhanced, mineralizes trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene to HCl, H.sub.2 O and Co.sub.2 under aerobic conditions stimulated by methane, acetate, methanol, tryptone-yeast extract, propane and propane-methane.

Fliermans, Carl B. (Augusta, GA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobic hydrogen-consuming bacteria Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sciences and Ecology 7 Origin of Life on Earth: The Biological Processes Summary: H2S + CO2 sugar + water + sulphur uses sunlight for energy 4. Aerobic photosynthesis - bacteria,...

5

Aerobic uranium (VI) bioprecipitation by metal-resistant bacteria isolated from radionuclide-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aerobic uranium (VI) bioprecipitation by metal-resistant bacteria isolated from radionuclide uranium [U(VI)] mediated by the intrinsic phosphatase acti- vities of naturally occurring bacteria leaks occur, these wastes come into contact with surrounding geologic media, allowing for migration

Skolnick, Jeff

6

Atmospheric cold plasma inactivation of aerobic microorganisms on blueberries and effects on quality attributes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Cold plasma (CP) is a novel nonthermal technology, potentially useful in food processing settings. Berries were treated with atmospheric CP for 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, or 120 s at a working distance of 7.5 cm with a mixture of 4 cubic feet/minute (cfm) of CP jet and 7 cfm of ambient air. Blueberries were sampled for total aerobic plate count (APC) and yeast/molds immediately after treatment and at 1, 2, and 7 days. Blueberries were also analyzed for compression firmness, surface color, and total anthocyanins immediately after each treatment. All treatments with CP significantly (P < 0.05) reduced APC after exposure, with reductions ranging from 0.8 to 1.6 log CFU/g and 1.5 to 2.0 log CFU/g compared to the control after 1 and 7 days, respectively. Treatments longer than 60 s resulted in significant reductions in firmness, although it was demonstrated that collisions between the berries and the container contributed significantly to softening. A significant reduction in anthocyanins was observed after 90 s. The surface color measurements were significantly impacted after 120 s for the L* and a* values and 45 s for the b* values. CP can inactivate microorganisms on blueberries and could be optimized to improve the safety and quality of produce.

Alison Lacombe; Brendan A. Niemira; Joshua B. Gurtler; Xuetong Fan; Joseph Sites; Glenn Boyd; Haiqiang Chen

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Anaerobic Ammonium-Oxidizing Bacteria: Unique Microorganisms with Exceptional Properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...compartmentalized cell plan and archaeon-like cell wall. Here we review our current knowledge...Bacteria. Here we review what is known about...compartmentalized cell plan of anammox bacteria...compartmentalized cell plan and archaeon-like cell wall. Here we review our current knowledge...

Laura van Niftrik; Mike S. M. Jetten

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Anaerobic Ammonium-Oxidizing Bacteria: Unique Microorganisms with Exceptional Properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...membrane to the outer membrane to drive a number of outer membrane receptors...nitrate reduction to dinitrogen gas via nitrite and ammonium. Environ...ammonium-oxidizing bacteria. ASM News 67 :456-463. 49. Kuypers...associated with global nitrogen gas production. Environ. Microbiol...

Laura van Niftrik; Mike S. M. Jetten

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Evaluation of the In Situ Aerobic Cometabolism of Chlorinated Ethenes by Toluene-Utilizing Microorganisms Using Push-Pull Tests  

SciTech Connect

Single-well-push-pull tests were used in a contaminated aquifer to evaluate the ability of toluene-oxidizing microorganisms to aerobically cometabolize chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) such as trichloroethene (TCE). Groundwater containing dissolved toluene was injected into the saturated zone in biostimulate indigenous toluene-utilizers. The test solution was injected into the aquifer using a standard monitoring well and then was transported under natural-gradient conditions. Transport tests demonstrated similar transport characteristics of the conservative tracer and the reactive solutes. Biostimulation tests were then performed by injecting a test solution containing dissolved toluene substrate, hydrogen peroxide, bromide and nitrate in order to increase the biomass of toluene-utilizing microorganisms. During the biostimulation tests, decreases in toluene concentration and the production of o-cresol as an intermediate oxidation product, indicated the simulation of toluene-utilizing microorganisms containing an ortho-monooxygenase enzyme. Transformation tests conducted after biostimulation demonstrated that indigenous microorganisms have the capability to transform the surrogate compounds (e.g. isobutene). Isobutene was transformed to isobutene oxide, indicating transformation by a toluene ortho-monooxygenase.

Azizian, Mohammad F.; Istok, Jonathan; Semprini, Lewis

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

10

Analyses of Spatial Distributions of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria and Their Activity in Aerobic Wastewater Biofilms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...aerobic wastewater treatment systems...their activity in wastewater biofilms is of...biofilms. Since mass balance of sulfide or...sulfur cycle in wastewater biofilm systems...municipal wastewater treatment plant in Sapporo...

Satoshi Okabe; Tsukasa Itoh; Hisashi Satoh; Yoshimasa Watanabe

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

High Abundances of Aerobic Anoxygenic Photosynthetic Bacteria in the South Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Photosynthetic Bacteria in the South Pacific Ocean Published ahead of print on 11...AAP bacteria across the South Pacific Ocean, including the center of the...distribution of AAP bacteria in the South Pacific Ocean and to assess their relative importance...

Raphaël Lami; Matthew T. Cottrell; Joséphine Ras; Osvaldo Ulloa; Ingrid Obernosterer; Hervé Claustre; David L. Kirchman; Philippe Lebaron

2007-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

12

Abundance and Genetic Diversity of Aerobic Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacteria of Coastal Regions of the Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Bacteria of Coastal Regions of the Pacific Ocean Anna E. Ritchie a * Zackary I...five disparate islands in the Pacific Ocean (Oahu, Molokai, Futuna, Aniwa...in the hyperoligotrophic South Pacific Ocean (29), suggesting that other...

Anna E. Ritchie; Zackary I. Johnson

2012-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

13

Mechanisms regulating the reduction of selenite by aerobic gram (+) and ({minus}) bacteria  

SciTech Connect

Toxic species of selenium are pollutants found in agricultural and oil refinery wastestreams. Selenium contamination is particularly problematic in areas that have seleniferous subsurface geology, such as the central valley of California. The authors are developed a bacterial treatment system to mitigate selenium-contaminated wastestreams using Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas fluorescens, respectively, as model gram (+) and ({minus}) soil bacteria. They have found that, during growth, both organisms reduce selenite, a major soluble toxic species, to red elemental selenium--an insoluble product generally regarded as nontoxic. In both cases, reduction depended on growth substrate and was effected by an inducible system that effectively removed selenite at concentrations typical of polluted sites--i.e., 50 to 300 {micro}g/L. The bacteria studied differed in one respect: when grown in medium supplemented with nitrate or sulfate, the ability of P. fluorescens to remediate selenite was enhanced, whereas that of B. subtilis was unchanged. Current efforts are being directed toward understanding the biochemical mechanism(s) of detoxification and determining whether bacteria occurring in polluted environments such as soils and sludge systems are capable of selenite remediation.

Garbisu, C.; Ishii, Takahisa; Yee, B.C.; Carlson, D.E.; Buchanan, B.B.; Leighton, T. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Smith, N.R. [California State Univ., Hayward, CA (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences; Yee, A. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Div. of Earth Sciences

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

14

Martian bacteria?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Martian bacteria? Martian bacteria? Name: clement Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: Is it possible for there to be life of anaerobic bacteria in the ice caps of the planet Mars? Replies: As far as I know, there is no evidence against such life on Mars, so the short answer is: yes. Jade Sure -- except that it would be pretty limited in its lifestyle - - no cable TV for this bug. Because the temperatures on Mars can reach to below -100 C at the poles, life would be extremely difficult, and the lack of nutrients anywhere except from inorganic chemical constituents in the soil or in the ice around the bacterial colonies would keep the menu fairly short. Oh, and do not rule out aerobes -- Mars has an atmosphere, though admittedly not much of one, and there are such organisms as microaerophiles and also microorganisms known as facultative anaerobes, which can grow in the presence of oxygen but which do not need it to survive

15

Aerobic Heterotrophic Bacteria Indigenous to pH 2.8 Acid Mine Water: Microscopic Examination of Acid Streamers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...streamers" found in acid coal mine drainage consist of bacteria...than one species. Acidic coal mine drainage is characterized...of 11 states that comprise Appalachia and includes numerous other coal mining areas ofthe world. The acidic...

Patrick R. Dugan; Carol B. MacMillan; Robert M. Pfister

1970-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Biodegradation of Triclosan by Aerobic Microorganisms.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Triclosan, a synthetic antimicrobial agent, is an emerging environmental contaminant. Due to incomplete removal of triclosan by wastewater treatment plants, treated wastewater is one major… (more)

Lee, Do Gyun

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

THE THERMOPHILIC AEROBIC SPOREFORMING BACTERIA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...oxygen was clearly shown by the behavior of this strain; its growth...similar during the logarithmic phase but deviated when growth became...fettsaurer Salze und Kohlen- hydrate durch thermophile Bakterien...127. NwsRA, T. 1897 On the behavior of yeast at a high temperature...

Mary Belle Allen

1953-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobic methanotrophic communities Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Sciences and Ecology 50 Abstract Soil microorganisms mediate many processes such as nitrification, denitrification, and Summary: , or aerobic processes such...

19

Engineered microorganisms capable of producing target compounds under anaerobic conditions  

SciTech Connect

The present invention is generally provides recombinant microorganisms comprising engineered metabolic pathways capable of producing C3-C5 alcohols under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The invention further provides ketol-acid reductoisomerase enzymes which have been mutated or modified to increase their NADH-dependent activity or to switch the cofactor preference from NADPH to NADH and are expressed in the modified microorganisms. In addition, the invention provides isobutyraldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes expressed in modified microorganisms. Also provided are methods of producing beneficial metabolites under aerobic and anaerobic conditions by contacting a suitable substrate with the modified microorganisms of the present invention.

Buelter, Thomas (Denver, CO); Meinhold, Peter (Denver, CO); Feldman, Reid M. Renny (San Francisco, CA); Hawkins, Andrew C. (Parker, CO); Urano, Jun (Irvine, CA); Bastian, Sabine (Pasadena, CA); Arnold, Frances (La Canada, CA)

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

20

Genomics of cellulolytic bacteria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The heterogeneous plant biomass is efficiently decomposed by the interplay of a great number of different enzymes. The enzyme systems in cellulolytic bacteria have been investigated by sequencing and bioinformatic analysis of genomes from plant biomass degrading microorganisms with valuable insights into the variety of the involved enzymes. This broadened our understanding of the biochemical mechanisms of plant polymer degradation and made the enzymes applicable for modern biotechnology. A list of the truly cellulolytic bacteria described and the available genomic information was examined for proteins with cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic capability. The importance of the isolation, characterization and genomic sequencing of cellulolytic microorganisms and their usage for sustainable energy production from biomass and other residues, is emphasized.

Daniela E Koeck; Alexander Pechtl; Vladimir V Zverlov; Wolfgang H Schwarz

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aerobic bacteria microorganisms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Aerobic landfill bioreactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention includes a method of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120.degree. F. and 140.degree. F. in steady state.

Hudgins, Mark P (Aiken, SC); Bessette, Bernard J (Aiken, SC); March, John (Winterville, GA); McComb, Scott T. (Andersonville, SC)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Aerobic landfill bioreactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention includes a system of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120.degree. F. and 140.degree. F. in steady state.

Hudgins, Mark P (Aiken, SC); Bessette, Bernard J (Aiken, SC); March, John C (Winterville, GA); McComb, Scott T. (Andersonville, SC)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Use of Disinfectants and Cleaners to Reduce Bacteria on Poultry Transportation Coops with a Compressed Air Foam System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and evaluated the treatments ability to reduce aerobic bacteria from the manure. The second study added a HPWR step to determine whether this technique would reduce bacteria. In the third study, Salmonella Typhimurium was added to the homogenized fecal slurry...

Hinojosa-Garza, Carolee A.

2013-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

24

Microorganisms for producing organic acids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Organic acid-producing microorganisms and methods of using same. The organic acid-producing microorganisms comprise modifications that reduce or ablate AcsA activity or AcsA homolog activity. The modifications increase tolerance of the microorganisms to such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, acrylic acid, propionic acid, lactic acid, and others. Further modifications to the microorganisms increase production of such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others. Methods of producing such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others with the modified microorganisms are provided. Methods of using acsA or homologs thereof as counter-selectable markers are also provided.

Pfleger, Brian Frederick; Begemann, Matthew Brett

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

25

Response of Prochlorococcus ecotypes to co-culture with diverse marine bacteria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interactions between microorganisms shape microbial ecosystems. Systematic studies of mixed microbes in co-culture have revealed widespread potential for growth inhibition among marine heterotrophic bacteria, but similar ...

Sher, Daniel

26

Spirulina, the edible microorganism.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...B-hydroxybutyrate, a reserve of carbon and energy in many bacteria, has been...external portion of a giant solar evapo- rator of spiral shape...external portion of the 900-ha solar evaporator (cara- col) built...ing factor was found to be solar irradiance, and peak productivity...

O Ciferri

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Uneven distribution of aerobic mesophilic bacteria on human skin.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Fig. 1) consists ofa clock electric motor, an electric impulse counter...60 times per min by the clock electric motor. After the first 1 ml was removed...7) on/offswitch; (8) electric motor; (9) support stand; (10...

W A Keith Jr; R J Smiljanic; W A Akers; L W Keith

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Expression of Genes Linked to NOx Detoxification in Aerobic Bacteria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

operons referred to as the nif cluster. This suite of genesgenes not found in the nif clusters of K. pneumoniae (i.e.is high conservation among nif gene organization based on

Cua, Lynnie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Anaerobic Ammonium-Oxidizing Bacteria: Unique Microorganisms with Exceptional Properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...review-article Reviews Anaerobic Ammonium-Oxidizing...compartmentalized cell plan and archaeon-like...wall. Here we review our current knowledge...resembles the standard cytoplasmic compartment...compartmentalized cell plan and archaeon-like...wall. Here we review our current knowledge...resembles the standard cytoplasmic compartment...

Laura van Niftrik; Mike S. M. Jetten

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Anaerobic Ammonium-Oxidizing Bacteria: Unique Microorganisms with Exceptional Properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...system, a protein complex that relays energy from the cytoplasmic membrane to the outer...force and thus lead to more efficient energy transduction. From an evolutionary perspective...living Escherichia coli cells by using green fluorescent protein. Proc. Natl. Acad...

Laura van Niftrik; Mike S. M. Jetten

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Sequential anaerobic-aerobic degradation of indigenous PCBs in a contaminated soil matrix  

SciTech Connect

Many industrial locations, including the US Department of Energy`s, have identified needs for treatment of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) wastes and remediation of PCB-contaminated sites. Biodegradation of PCBs is a potentially effective technology for the treatment of PCB-contaminated soils and sludges; however, a practicable remediation technology has not yet been demonstrated. A biological treatment technology is likely to consist of an anaerobic fermentation step in which PCB dechlorination takes place producing PCBs with fewer chlorines. These products are then more susceptible to aerobic mineralization. In laboratory experiments, soil slurry bioreactors inoculated with microorganisms extracted from PCB-contaminated sediments from the Hudson River and Woods Pond have been used to obtain anaerobic dechlorination of PCBs in soil slurry reactors. The anaerobic dechlorination was followed by qualitative estimation of the effect of aerobic fermentation of the dechlorination products based on literature data. The sequential anaerobic-(simulated) aerobic treatment constituted an improvement compared anaerobic treatment alone.

Klasson, K.T.; Reeves, M.E.; Evans, B.S.; Dudley, C.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

32

Basic Bacteria  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basic Bacteria Basic Bacteria Name: Valerie Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I'm doing a science project on bacteria. WHat I'm doing is washing forks with different dishwashing liquids, then wiping any remaining bacteria on to Agar petri dishes. Then incubating it and seeing which soap removed the most. My question is what kind of bacteria would be growing? and also do I just count the colonies to compare? and how long and at what temperature should I incubate this bacteria? Thank you very much for your time. I'll be looking forward to your response. Replies: The temperature is easy: 37 degrees C is optimal for many bacteria. The medium will determine which bacteria grow best. So if you don't see growth on one medium, but you see growth on another, it tells you that there is a difference in nutrients present in those media that is required for that bacteria. Look at your plates after 24 hr, then put them back in the incubator (keep them sterile) and look at them after 48 hrs--do you see the difference? any slow-growing bacteria visible or did the fast-growing take over the complete plate?

33

Bacteria eats radioactive waste  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bacteria eats radioactive waste Bacteria eats radioactive waste Name: deenaharper Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: In my studies, I have found that everything in this world is balanced. When something dies it is converted into life. Is there anything out there that could convert radioactive material into a harmless substance? Some sort of bacteria that consumes radiation? Replies: The reason why radiation is so harmful is that is produces free radicals in living tissue, that is, it de-stabilizes molecules by tearing off electrons due to intense energies. These free radicals start a chain reaction of destruction, de-stabilizing neighboring molecules. If this continues unchecked, cells die, genetic material are mutated, and tissue aging accelerates. It is somewhat like being burned. Fire oxidizes by a similar free radical reaction. (Hence the term "sun burn.") The natural defenses against free radical reactions in biological systems are antioxidants, which are enzymes, nutrients, and other chemicals, which quench free radical reactions. Without them, life would very quickly cease. To my knowledge, no microorganism has an antioxidant capacity great enough to withstand even minimal exposure to any type of radiation. Microorganisms are actually very susceptible to radiation, which is why heat and gamma irradiation are used to sterilize food, instruments, etc. However, you raise an interesting possibility in that perhaps one can be genetically engineered to have super- antioxidant capacity, but that may be beyond current technology. Plus, if any got loose, given the exponential rate of reproduction, they may become an uncontrollable health hazard, as it would be very difficult to destroy them!

34

Killing Bacteria  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Killing Bacteria Killing Bacteria Name: alli Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: What kills more bacteria for the recommended cooking time in a microwave and a conventional oven? Replies: I hope I understand your question. The time it takes to get your food done is sufficient to kill all bacteria--but not the spores of certain bacteria--both by microwave cooking and in a conventional oven. The spores are not a problem when the food is consumed directly but can be a health hazard when food is bottled and stored. See recommendations at http://www.cfia-acia.agr.ca/english/corpaffr/foodfacts/perfrine.shtml on Clostridium, one of the most dangerous causes of food poinsoning. Or visit the display on Food Safety in the Virtual Museum of Bacteria (www.bacteriamuseum.org) at www.bacteriamuseum.org/niches/foodsafety/foodsafety.shtml

35

Why Sequence Bacteria from Stromatolites?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bacteria from Stromatolites? Bacteria from Stromatolites? Marine stromatolites are formed by the interactions of several key bacterial groups, which precipitate repeating layers (laminae) of calcium carbonate (CaCO3). During 70% of the time life has occupied earth, stromatolites were a dominant biological community. Their associated microbial communities have played a significant role in carbon sequestration, preservation, and cycling during the evolution of life. Present-day marine stromatolite communities consist of cyanobacteria (both free-living filamentous cyanobacteria and coccoid endoliths), sulfate reducers (SRB), sulfur-oxidizers (SOB), and aerobic heterotrophs (including fermenters). The interactions of these key groups drive the organized precipitation of CaCO3. The marine stromatolite system, therefore, provides

36

Volatile fatty acid fermentation of AFEX-treated newspaper and bagasse by rumen microorganisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) of cellulolytic bacteria attack the cellulosic materials and hydrolyze them to simple sugars; (ii) the sugars are rapidly fermented largely to VFA's and carbon dioxide, and (iii) methane is formed by slow-growing methanogenic bacteria Anaerobic fermentation..., and on the different acid molar percents. AFEX-treated and non-treated bagasse and newspaper were ground and fermented by a mixed population of rumen microorganisms to produce VFA's and carbon dioxide. The fermentation process was similar to that which occurs...

Blasig, Jorge Dari?o

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Bacteria Catalog  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bacteria Catalog Bacteria Catalog Name: Robin Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I would just like to have a list brought up of gram neg. and gram pos. bacteria, names of bacteria and what category they fall under. Such as Staphylococcus aureus is gram positive. This would be very helpful in my MBIO LAB. Thank you, student at NSU, central Louisiana. Replies: Your best bet would be to start with looking in the backs of microbiology text books. Many of them have an index with this information. The internet may also be helpful. Saundra Sample Gram positive: Staphylococcus sp., Streptococcus sp., Bacillus sp., Cornyebacterium sp., Clostridium sp. Gram negative: E coli, Pseudomonas sp., Proteus sp., Enterobacter sp., Klebsiella sp., Serratia sp., Citrobacter sp.

38

Heavy metal removal and recovery using microorganisms  

SciTech Connect

Microorganisms -- bacteria, fungi, and microalgae -- can accumulate relatively large amounts of toxic heavy metals and radionuclides from the environment. These organisms often exhibit specificity for particular metals. The metal content of microbial biomass can be a substantial fraction of total dry weight with concentration factors (metal in dry biomass to metal in solution) exceeding one million in some cases. Both living and inert (dead) microbial biomass can be used to reduce heavy metal concentrations in contaminated waters to very low levels -- parts per billion and even lower. In many respects (e.g. specificity, residual metal concentrations, accumulation factors, and economics) microbial bioremoval processes can be superior to conventional processes, such as ion exchange and caustic (lime or hydroxide) precipitation for heavy metals removal from waste and contaminated waters. Thus, bioremoval could be developed to contribute to the clean-up of wastes at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and other DOE facilities. However, the potential advantages of bioremoval processes must still be developed into practical operating systems. A detailed review of the literature suggests that appropriate bioremoval processes could be developed for the SRS. There is great variability from one biomass source to another in bioremoval capabilities. Bioremoval is affected by pH, other ions, temperature, and many other factors. The biological (living vs. dead) and physical (immobilized vs. dispersed) characteristics of the biomass also greatly affect metal binding. Even subtle differences in the microbial biomass, such as the conditions under which it was cultivated, can have major effects on heavy metal binding.

Wilde, E.W. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Benemann, J.R. (Benemann (J.R.), Pinole, CA (United States))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Counting Bacteria  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Counting Bacteria Counting Bacteria Name: Tammy Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I am working with my daughter on her Science Fair Project. We are testing daily items that we come in contact with to see how many germs and bacteria it has. How can we differentiate between the types of bacteria? How can we decide which one has the most? We are using the growth medium Agar in petri dishes. Where can I find more scientific info as to why this happens so we can write up the project? Replies: These are complex questions. First, the agar medium is used as a solid phase so that one can see colonies formed. These are round mounds of growth because bacteria multiply in all directions, but they cannot normally move in or on a solid phase so they remain at the site of multiplication. Every bacterial cell can multiply into a colony. Thus, the number of colonies is a measure for the number of cells present, if you have taken quantitative samples. If you want to quantitate, you should try to standardize your samples (for example, use 1 ml liquid to wash surfaces, food particles, 1 ml of liquids, etc. and add of this one drop (with a micropipette would be more accurate) per agar plate and let the drop form a tear on the plate. The number of colonies that grow in this tear are a measure for the original number of bacteria present in the drop, because each colony is derived from a single bacterial cell.

40

Bacteria Strains  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bacteria Strains Bacteria Strains Name: Michael Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: In the medical setting, how prevalent are strains of Vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (bacterium)? Any statistical data would be helpful..... Replies: You can find a report on incidence at http://www.slackinc.com/general/iche/stor1096/thru.htm The Virtual Museum of bacteria, at http://www.bacteriamuseum.org contains general information about bacteria, including antibiotic resistance, and in the near future will contain specialized information on S. aureus Dr. Trudy Wassenaar I don't have those figures for you but you can probably find them at www.CDC.gov. this is the site for the Centers for Disease Control and their job is to keep track of these things. I bet if you go to a search engine (ie yahoo.com, etc.) and search under +"CDC" +"vancomycin resistant Staphylococcus aureus" you might even get to the right page.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aerobic bacteria microorganisms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Bacteria Types  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bacteria Types Bacteria Types Name: Evelyn Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: What is the significance of S. marcescens,M.luteus, S.epidermidis, and E. Coli? Which of these are gram-positive and gram-negative, and where can these be found? Also, what problems can they cause? When we culture these bacteria, we used four methods: plates, broth, slants, and pour plates. The media was made of TSB, TSA, NAP, and NAD. What is significant about these culturing methods? Replies: I could give you the answer to that question but it is more informative, and fun, to find out yourself. Start with the NCBI library online (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/) and do a query with the species name, and 'virulence' if you want to know what they're doing to us. Have a look at the taxonomy devision to see how they are related. To find out if they're gram-pos or neg you should do a gram stain if you can. Otherwise you'll find that information in any bacteriology determination guide. Your question about the media is not specific enough so I can't answer it.

42

Bacteria Odors  

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Bacteria Odors Bacteria Odors Name: Jason Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I am doing a science project on food decomposition. I would like to know why food -- especially meat--smells bad when it goes bad. Also Why does bread grow mold and why is it green and blue? Thank you. Replies: Jason, When food is being eaten by bacteria, they produce byproducts just like we do. The compounds they produce cause the smell of rotten meat. There is a reason we don't like that smell: it warns us that that food is probably unsafe to eat. So biology has built in a safety rule: you would not normally eat something that you don't like the smell of. The molds on bread are a special kind that like bread. Their spores are everywhere but only when we leave our bread long enough can they grow to sufficient numbers so that we can see them. Again, you can smell the bread is off, you can see it, and if you hadn't noticed you will taste it. However you should not eat bread with molds on: they produce toxic substances. I don't think there is a reason for them to be green and blue, at least I don't know it.

43

Stomach Bacteria  

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Stomach Bacteria Stomach Bacteria Name: pam Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: what kind of bacteria or parasite etc. can come from the water and looks like a hairlike is sticky and gets in your tetth causes stomach problems. and when it is just out of my mouth squishy and when it is dry it scrivals up and is hard. has made my newborn son sick ky daughters sick . why is it that you can litearly put hand soap or anti-bacterial on and within seconds you can see what i call blue hairs. or it seems to have gotten bigger and is is whit or half black white?they are in my snot and flem. in my kids bowel movement i think i have contamiated water but no one believes me. it reminds me of a worm .i have to black things attached to twwo of myteeth (looks like a littli tick) can you halp me or am t really crazy? if you could recommend some one or somplace to help me.

44

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Aerobic Treatment Unit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wastewater treatment systems use. They remove 85 to 98 percent of the organic matter and solids from the wastewater, producing effluent as clean as that from munici- pal wastewater treatment plants, and cleaner than that from conventional septic tanks.... Onsite wastewater treatment systems Single-compartment trash tank Chlorinator Aerobic treatment unit Spray heads Pump tank Bruce Lesikar Professor and Extension Agricultural Engineer The Texas A&M System Aerobic treatment units, which are certified...

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

45

Cofermentation with Cooperative Microorganisms for More Efficient...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Startup America Startup America Biomass and Biofuels Biomass and Biofuels Find More Like This Return to Search Cofermentation with Cooperative Microorganisms for More Efficient...

46

Oil Production by a Consortium of Oleaginous Microorganisms grown on primary effluent wastewater  

SciTech Connect

Municipal wastewater could be a potential growth medium that has not been considered for cultivating oleaginous microorganisms. This study is designed to determine if a consortium of oleaginous microorganism can successfully compete for carbon and other nutrients with the indigenous microorganisms contained in primary effluent wastewater. RESULTS: The oleaginous consortium inoculated with indigenous microorganisms reached stationary phase within 24 h, reaching a maximum cell concentration of 0.58 g L -1. Water quality post-oleaginous consortium growth reached a maximum chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction of approximately 81%, supporting the consumption of the glucose within 8 h. The oleaginous consortium increased the amount of oil produced per gram by 13% compared with indigenous microorganisms in raw wastewater. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) results show a substantial population increase in bacteria within the first 24 h when the consortium is inoculated into raw wastewater. This result, along with the fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) results, suggests that conditions tested were not sufficient for the oleaginous consortium to compete with the indigenous microorganisms.

Hall, Jacqueline; Hetrick, Mary; French, Todd; Hernandez, Rafael; Donaldson, Janet; Mondala, Andro; Holmes, William

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Destruction of microorganisms by high-energy pulsed focused ultrasound  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of high-energy ultrasound pulses to generate and excite clouds of microbubbles has shown great potential to mechanically destroy soft tissue in a wide range of clinical applications. In our work we have focused on extending the application of cavitation based histotripsy to the destruction of microorganisms such as bacteria biofilms and microalgae. Bacteria biofilms pose a significant problem when treating infections on medical implants while the fractionation of microalgae in an efficient manner could lower the production cost of biofuels. In the past we have shown a 4.4-log10 reduction of viable Escherichia coli bacteria capable of forming a colony in a biofilm following a high-energy pulsed focused ultrasound exposure. We have also shown complete removal of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms from a Pyrolytic graphite substrate based on fluorescence imaging following live/dead staining. We also showed minimal temperature increase when the appropriate ultrasound pulse parameters were utilized. Recently we have shown that high-energy pulsed ultrasound at 1.1 MHz can fractionate the microalgae model system Chlamydomonas reinhardtii for lipid extraction/biofuel production in both flow and stationary exposure systems with improved efficiency over traditional sonicators. In these studies the fractionation of the cells was quantified by protein and chlorophyll release following exposure.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Cellulase producing microorganism ATCC 55702  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Bacteria which produce large amounts of cellulase--containing cell-free fermentate have been identified. The original bacterium (ATCC 55703) was genetically altered using nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) treatment to produce the enhanced cellulase producing bacterium (ATCC 55702), which was identified through replicate plating. ATCC 55702 has improved characteristics and qualifies for the degradation of cellulosic waste materials for fuel production, food processing, textile processing, and other industrial applications. ATCC 55702 is an improved bacterial host for genetic manipulations using recombinant DNA techniques, and is less likely to destroy genetic manipulations using standard mutagenesis techniques.

Dees, H. Craig (Lenoir City, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Cellulase producing microorganism ATCC 55702  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Bacteria which produce large amounts of cellulase--containing cell-free fermentate have been identified. The original bacterium (ATCC 55703) was genetically altered using nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) treatment to produce the enhanced cellulase producing bacterium (ATCC 55702), which was identified through replicate plating. ATCC 55702 has improved characteristics and qualifies for the degradation of cellulosic waste materials for fuel production, food processing, textile processing, and other industrial applications. ATCC 55702 is an improved bacterial host for genetic manipulations using recombinant DNA techniques, and is less likely to destroy genetic manipulations using standard mutagenesis techniques. 5 figs.

Dees, H.C.

1997-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

50

New Sampling Methods for Airborne Microorganisms  

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New Sampling Methods for Airborne Microorganisms New Sampling Methods for Airborne Microorganisms Speaker(s): Klaus Willeke Date: February 27, 2001 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: David Faulkner Klaus Willeke and his international team of engineers, physicists, microbiologists, industrial hygienists and environmental scientists have worked for about 15 years on the development of new methods for sampling airborne microorganisms. The following topics will be highlighted: long-term bioaerosol sampling into liquid by swirling air motion ("Biosampler"); personal aerosol sampling with low wind sensitivity and highfilter deposit uniformity ("Button Aerosol Sampler"); collection of microorganisms by electrostatic means; source testing as a predictor for microorganism release from surfaces; particle concentrating from large air

51

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobic common ancestor Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: , phototrophs, etc.). Some anaerobic, some aerobic. Cyanobacteria ("blue-green algae") (Proterozoic... -Quaternary): aerobic phototrophs; major oxygen producers....

52

AEROBIC BIOTRANSFORMATION OF TOXIC ORGANICS IN WASTEWATER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;AEROBIC BIOTRANSFORMATION OF TOXIC ORGANICS IN WASTEWATER DOE FRAP 1997-15 Prepared for in both domestic and industrial wastewater. The release of these compounds during wastewater treatment to predict the mass of the VOCs in the wastewater treated by biotransformation and the mass stripped

53

Heart rate during aerobics classes in women with different previous experience of aerobics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study measured heart rate during floor and step aerobic classes at three intensity levels. A group of 20 female occasional exercisers [mean age 33?(SD?8) years, mean body mass index 21?(SD?2)?kg?·?m?2 volun...

Raija M. Laukkanen; Merja K. Kalaja…

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

The Utilization of Certain Hydrocarbons by Microorganisms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...UTILIZATION OF CERTAIN HYDROCARBONS BY MICROORGANISMS...1940 INTRODUCTION Hydrocarbons, as a class, represent...obtained by comparing the heat of combustion of some six carbon...biological utilization of hydrocarbons as sources of energy...

L. D. Bushnell; H. F. Haas

1941-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Emerging contaminants and microorganisms into the environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Workshop Emerging contaminants and microorganisms into the environment: contamination pathways Environmental Engineering Division Surname _____________________Name____________________ Job Environmental Engineering Division (SEED) Department of Civil Engineering University of Salerno Via Ponte don

Costagliola, Gennaro

56

A microfabricated dielectrophoretic micro-organism concentrator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This project focuses on the development of a micro-organism concentrator. Pathogen detection, particularly MEMS based detection, is often limited by sample concentration. The proposed concentrator will interface with a ...

Muller, Rikky, 1980-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Isolation of culturable microorganisms from free-ranging bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) from the southeastern United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reports of diseases in marine mammals are increasing worldwide, however our understanding of the microorganisms associated with marine mammals is still limited. In this study, we cultured bacteria and fungi isolated from the upper respiratory tract (blowhole), gastric fluid and anus of 180 wild bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) from two estuarine locations along the southeastern Atlantic Coast of the United States. A total of 339 and 491 isolates from Charleston, SC (CHS) and Indian River Lagoon, FL (IRL) dolphins, respectively, were cultured from gastric (70 CHS/82 IRL), fecal (141 CHS/184 IRL), and blowhole (128 CHS/225 IRL) swabs on selective media used for routine clinical microorganisms of human concern. The most frequently cultured Gram-negative bacteria from all sample and study types were Plesiomonas shigelloides, Aeromonas hydrophila, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas fluorescens. Among the Gram-positive bacteria, Clostridium perfringens, Bacillus sp., and Staphylococcus Coag. Neg were the predominant organisms. For fungi, the most abundant species were Candida glabrata, budding yeasts, and Candida tropicalis. Of concern, the MRSA strain of Staphylococcus aureus was detected in the blowhole and gastric swabs from CHS dolphins. In general, a greater prevalence of bacteria and fungi (four-fold increase) were cultured from IRL than CHS animals. Together, these culture-dependent studies, coupled to on-going culture-independent approaches, should help establish a baseline of microorganisms associated with bottlenose dolphins and aid in the identification of organisms responsible for infectious diseases(s) in these animals.

Pamela J. Morris; Wesley R. Johnson; John Pisani; Gregory D. Bossart; Jeff Adams; John S. Reif; Patricia A. Fair

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Bacteria: Good or Bad?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bacteria: Good or Bad? Bacteria: Good or Bad? Name: Talei Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Is bacteria good for you? Replies: both good and bad. Without bacteria we would die, but some bacteria could easily kill us: it all depends which ones they are. The good ones, those we need to survive, are there to digest our food (in our intestines) and to live on our skin and in our mouth. By doing so they provide a protection against bad bacteria, that make you sick, and these are called 'pathogenic bacteria'. Those bugs take their chance if your immune system is weakened, or if they manage to get into your body in large amounts, by contaminated food for instance. Anyway, the simple question has a complicated answer. If you're interested, read more about bacteria, both good and bad, at www.bacteriamuseum.org

59

Interaction of Plutonium with Bacteria in the Repository Environment  

SciTech Connect

Microorganisms in the nuclear waste repository environment may interact with plutonium through (1) sorption, (2) intracellular accumulation, and (3) transformation speciation. These interactions may retard or enhance the mobility of Pu by precipitation reactions, biocolloid formation, or production of more soluble species. Current and planned radioactive waste repository environments, such as deep subsurface halite and granite formations, are considered extreme relative to life processes in the near-surface terrestrial environment. There is a paucity of information on the biotransformation of radionuclides by microorganisms present in such extreme environments. In order to gain a better understanding of the interaction of plutonium with microorganisms present in the waste repository sites we investigated a pure culture (Halomonas sp.) and a mixed culture of bacteria (Haloarcula sinaiiensis, Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus, Altermonas sp., and a {gamma}-proteobacterium) isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site and an Acetobacterium sp. from alkaline groundwater at the Grimsel Test Site in Switzerland.

Gillow, J. B.; Francis, A. J.; Lucero, D. A.; Papenguth, H. W.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Degradation of Triclosan under Aerobic, Anoxic, and Anaerobic Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Triclosan (2, 4, 4?-trichloro-2? ... consumables. Aerobic and anaerobic enrichment cultures tolerating triclosan were developed and 77 bacterial strains tolerating triclosan at different levels were isolated from...

Prajeesh Gangadharan Puthiya Veetil…

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aerobic bacteria microorganisms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Punshon, Stephen, and Robert M. Moore. Aerobic hydrogen ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Aerobic hydrogen production and dinitrogen fixation in the marine cyanobacterium ... Methods—Culture conditions: Batch cultures of Tricho- desmium IMS101 ...

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

62

Formation of aerobic granular sludge biofilms for sustainable wastewater treatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENAC/ Formation of aerobic granular sludge biofilms for sustainable wastewater treatment David G Research, Microbiology of Interfaces, Magdeburg (Germany) EDCE 2011 / From activated sludge flocs

63

Recombinant microorganisms for increased production of organic acids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are recombinant microorganisms for producing organic acids. The recombinant microorganisms express a polypeptide that has the enzymatic activity of an enzyme that is utilized in the pentose phosphate cycle. The recombinant microorganism may include recombinant Actinobacillus succinogenes that has been transformed to express a Zwischenferment (Zwf) gene. The recombinant microorganisms may be useful in fermentation processes for producing organic acids such as succinic acid and lactic acid. Also disclosed are novel plasmids that are useful for transforming microorganisms to produce recombinant microorganisms that express enzymes such as Zwf.

Yi, Jian; Kleff, Susanne; Guettler, Michael V

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

64

Recombinant microorganisms for increased production of organic acids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are recombinant microorganisms for producing organic acids. The recombinant microorganisms express a polypeptide that has the enzymatic activity of an enzyme that is utilized in the pentose phosphate cycle. The recombinant microorganism may include recombinant Actinobacillus succinogenes that has been transformed to express a Zwischenferment (Zwf) gene. The recombinant microorganisms may be useful in fermentation processes for producing organic acids such as succinic acid and lactic acid. Also disclosed are novel plasmids that are useful for transforming microorganisms to produce recombinant microorganisms that express enzymes such as Zwf.

Yi, Jian (East Lansing, MI); Kleff, Susanne (East Lansing, MI); Guettler, Michael V. (Holt, MI)

2012-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

65

Hydrogen Based Bacteria  

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Hydrogen Based Bacteria Hydrogen Based Bacteria Name: Ellen Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: i was in my Biology class and a very respectable someone mentioned something about the discovery of a hydrogen based bacteria. my teacher wasnt aware of this study, and assigned me to find out about it. so i thought i would Email you and see if you people knew anything about it. Awaiting your repsonse Replies: I'm not quite sure what you mean by hydrogen based bacteria but I will take a stab that you mean bacteria that use hydrogen for energy. Some bacteria are chemolithotrophs which mean that they are autrophs but don't use the sun as their energy source; they get their energy from chemical sources. There are bacteria that use hydrogen as their energy source. They are diverse as a group and are all facultative. The overall chemical reaction looks like this:

66

Electric DNA chips for determination of pathogenic microorganisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric DNA chips for determination of pathogenic microorganisms Yanling Liu Doctoral thesis Liu (2008): Electric DNA chips for determination of pathogenic microorganisms. School of Biotechnology, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden Abstract Silicon-based electric DNA chip arrays

Enfors, Sven-Olof

67

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobic respiratory chain Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with the supe- rior mass-specific aerobic function of these muscles. aerobic metabolism; capillary; experimental... evolution; selective breed- ing; skeletal muscle THE MAXIMAL...

68

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobic bacterial consortium Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of fluorinated environmental pollutants under aerobic conditions Syed Adnan Hasan... aerobic conditions Proefschrift ter verkrijging van het doctoraat in de Wiskunde en...

69

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobic nonylphenol degradation Sample...  

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of nonyl- phenol monoethoxylate (NP1EO) and nonylphenol (NP) by aerobic microbes in sediment... samples collected at four sites along the Erren River in southern Taiwan. Aerobic...

70

Flesh Eating Bacteria  

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Flesh Eating Bacteria Flesh Eating Bacteria Name: Jennifer Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I was wondering what the inovations for treating the flesh eating bacteria are if there are any.... Replies: "Flesh eating bacteria" are Streptococci, the ones that cause throat infections but sometimes cause extremely severe subcutaneous (below the skin) infections.In order to do this they have to enter the body through a damaged skin: a cut would be enough The infection is treated with antibiotics and hospitalization is needed for this life-threatening infection. Find more info at http://www.acrylicbath.com/info.html If you want to know more about bacteria, take a look at http://www.bacteriamuseum.org In this site you can find general information about bacteria, both pathogenic and 'good'. Have fun!

71

The effect of agrochemicals on indicator bacteria densities in outdoor mesocosmsemi_2287 3150..3158  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of agrochemicals on indicator bacteria densities in outdoor mesocosmsemi_2287 3150, including patho- gens. Agrochemicals may influence the survival of these microorganisms in water bodies were used to investigate the response of Escherichia coli and enterococci to agrochemicals. Replicate

Rohr, Jason

72

Comparative ultrastructure of selected aerobic spore-forming bacteria: a freeze-etching study.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Note the mesosome (double arrows) in Fig. 23 at the end of one incomplete septum.] Bar represents 0.5 um. 356 f, - r i pppl- ... k .. # -"A -. . . . FIG. 24-27. Freeze-etch preparations of vegetative cells of B. cereus showing the various...

S C Holt; E R Leadbetter

1969-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobic hydrogenotroph bacteria Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

; Geosciences 2 5, 13191360, 2008 Pathways of Summary: and energy yields of acetoclas- tic and hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. Drought retarded methane production... budgets,...

74

Ampicillin and Bacteria  

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Ampicillin and Bacteria Ampicillin and Bacteria Name: sara Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: could you please explain fully how ampicillian destroys E.coli cells? Replies: Ampicillin is an antibiotic belonging to the group of beta-lactam antibiotics. These will kill Gram-negative bacteria to which E.coli and Salmonella belong. The antibiotic prevents the formation of peptidoglycan, an essential building block of the cell membrane. So the antibiotic prevents growth of cells. You can read more about antibiotics and how bacteria can become resistant against them at the Virtual Bacteria of Bacteria: http://www.bacteriamuseum.org Dr. Trudy wasenaar Unfortunately, I don't have my micro books with me, but I'll try. Bacteria have a unique compound in their cell walls called peptidoglycan. It is made of 2 types of sugar residues that are cross-linked (like a chain link fence) by tetrapeptides. Penicillin prevents the crosslinking of the sugars by breaking the tetrapeptides. These antibiotics are more effective against gram positive organisms (such as Staph.) than gram negative organisms (such as E coli) because gram pos. have more peptidoglycan in their cell walls. Some bacteria have adapted to this situation by having an enzyme called beta-lactamase that breaks the structure of the antibiotic open rendering it ineffective. I'm pretty sure ampicillin is a penicillin derivative and therefore has the same mode of action, but I would check to make sure if I were you.

75

Microwaves and Bacteria  

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Microwaves and Bacteria Microwaves and Bacteria Name: mike Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Do the microwaves in a microwave kill bacteria or is it the heat that kills the bacteria? I am wondering this because i have a science fair project and i am searching for a project dealing with bacteria. Replies: As far as I'm aware it is the heat that kill bacteria in a microwave, and they need quite some time to be dead. The spores that some kind of bacteria make to survive harsh conditions do not contain much water and they might survive microwaves. I'm not sure what bacteria do that can survive high dosis of radiation, like Deinococcus radiodurans. They can do this by a very efficient repair system for their DNA. My guess is that they would also be killed by the heat generated in a microwave but I haven't found any data on this.

76

Why Sequence Anammox Bacteria?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Anammox Bacteria? Anammox Bacteria? Micrograph courtesy Mike S. Jetten, Radboud Univ. The deep sediments and oxygen minimum zones of the world's oceans are assumed to be responsible for the majority of nitrogen loss on earth. The microbes responsible for the nitrogen loss were long unknown, but compelling evidence is now accumulating that marine anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (anammox) bacteria are responsible, making them very important players in the global nitrogen cycle. In marine ecosystems, the carbon and nitrogen cycles are closely connected. More knowledge of the regulation and mechanism of CO2 sequestration by anammox bacteria in the ocean will contribute to our understanding of the global biogeochemical cycles and their impact on climate change. Anammox bacteria are also able to synthesize the rocket fuel hydrazine from

77

Cat Dish Bacteria Determination  

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Dish Bacteria Determination Dish Bacteria Determination Name: Ashlyn Status: student Grade: 6-8 Location: FL Country: USA Date: Summer 2011 Question: Is there a simple way to measure bacteria in cat's water dishes without doing something with Agar? To measure bacteria in a water bowl, do I need to use a microscope? I am thinking of using different materials (metal, plastic, and glass) to see which of those has the grows the most bacteria. Replies: Hello Ashlyn, That is a very good idea for a science project. Usually the best way to do a quantitative analysis of bacteria content is to take a measured amount of a liquid, plate it out on some type of agar and do a colony count. This will give a basic indication of bacterial load, but not differentiate the types of bacteria. The most common type of bacteria that causes a pink film to form on water bowls and showers, etc. is Serratia marcescens. It is a fairly harmless organism that reacts with standing water. It may only adhere to the walls of the container and not be 'free floating' in the water. A microscope would not likely help unless you were able to do special stains to help see the bacteria. You might also want to add stoneware or ceramic to your list. Just so you know stoneware or ceramic make the best containers for cats to drink out of. It keeps the water fresher: Maybe less bacteria? You might just have to rely on a visual inspection of the containers to see which has more pink per surface area.

78

Effect of ethanol on BTEX biodegradation in aerobic aquifer systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ethanol can affect the biodegradation of gasoline hydrocarbons in groundwater. High concentrations of ethanol can be toxic to subsurface microorganisms that are otherwise capable of… (more)

Williams, Erika C.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Bacteria to the Rescue | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bacteria to the Rescue Bacteria to the Rescue High-performance computing adds speed, clarity to uranium bioremediation research Isosurfaces for aqueous U(VI) 40 days after...

80

Microorganisms to Speed Production of Biofuels - Energy Innovation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microorganisms to Speed Production of Biofuels Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ORNL About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryResearchers at ORNL developed...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aerobic bacteria microorganisms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Bacteria in shear flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bacteria are ubiquitous and play a critical role in many contexts. Their environment is nearly always dynamic due to the prevalence of fluid flow: creeping flow in soil, highly sheared flow in bodily conduits, and turbulent ...

Marcos, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Insulin and Bacteria  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Insulin and Bacteria Insulin and Bacteria Name: sid Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Can you explain Insulin production in bacteria and its regulation by IPTG. Replies: Information on expression of eukaryotic genes in bacteria can be found in any molecular biology textbook. See for instance 'Recombinant DNA by Watson, Gilman, Witkowski and Zoller, 2nd Ed., chapter 23 where the cloning of insulin is described. The use of an IPTG inducable promoter (the promoter of LacZ is only active when the inductor IPTG is present) is also explained in text books, and even in catalogs of the companies selling the plasmids that are used for such experiments. With a bit of reading you'll become an expert! Dr. Wassenaar I'm not sure what IPTG is. But are you referring to recombinant DNA technology? First a human gene for insulin was isolated and cut out of the human chromosome with restriction enzymes. These are enzymes that cut DNA at very specific spots in the DNA. They are like DNA scissors. Then a small piece of DNA called a plasmid is isolated from a bacteria. The same restriction enzyme is used to cut the plasmid. The insulin gene from the human is inserted into the bacterial DNA and they are sealed together with an enzyme called ligase. The plasmid is reinserted into the bacteria and the bacteria will treat the human insulin gene as its own. When it comes time to make protein it will make the insulin as well. Bacteria reproduce very rapidly and are easily maintained. We can get vats of human insulin by this method.

83

Apparatus and method for the desulfurization of petroleum by bacteria  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for treating petroleum with anaerobic microorganisms acting as biocatalysts that can remove sulfur atoms from hydrocarbon molecules, under anaerobic conditions, and then convert the sulfur atoms to hydrogen sulfide. The microorganisms utilized are from the family known as the ``Sulfate Reducing Bacteria``. These bacteria generate metabolic energy from the oxidation of organic compounds, but use oxidized forms of sulfur as an electron acceptor. Because the biocatalyst is present in the form of bacteria in an aqueous suspension, whereas the reacting substrate consists of hydrocarbon molecules in an organic phase, the actual desulfurization reaction takes place at the aqueous-organic interphase. To ensure adequate interfacial contacting and mass transfer, a biphasic electrostatic bioreactor system is utilized. The bioreactor is utilized to disperse and recoalesce a biocatalyst contained in the aqueous liquid phase into the organic liquid phase containing the sulfur. High-intensity electrical fields rupture the aqueous drops into a plurality of microdroplets and induce continuous coalescence and redispersion as the microdroplets travel through the organic phase, thus increasing surface area. As the aqueous microdroplets progress through the organic phase, the biocatalyst then reacts with the sulfur to produce hydrogen sulfide which is then removed from the bioreactor. The organic liquid, now free of the sulfur, is ready for immediate use or further processing. 5 figs.

Lizama, H.M.; Scott, T.C.; Scott, C.D.

1995-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

84

Arm Pit Bacteria  

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Arm Pit Bacteria Arm Pit Bacteria Name: Kayla Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I am doing a science fair project on deodorants and anti-perspirants- to see which one hinders bacterial growth more effectively. Here's my problem, I cannot find what kind of bacteria (mainly) flourishes in the axilla (armpit) region. I have been on many different search engines- medical pages- and microbiology pages, and unfortuantely cannot come up with any answers. My school's science fair is March 3rd- so I am in desperate need of an answer!!! I need to be able to order the type of bacteria soon. Thank you. Replies: Try Staphylococcus epidermidis-it is a common organism that grows on the skin. It is not pathogenic (disease-causing) and can be used by students. You could try culturing your own armpit-use a sterile q-tip. Spread the q-tip on the agar plate and then take some of your antiperspirant or deodorant and make a dot in the middle of the plate. Incubate the plate and see if the bacteria are repelled or are resistant. I would measure the size of the zone so you can compare each type of deodorant, etc. You could also check if different people's bacteria are more or less resistant, ie if the same deodorant works for everyone. Each person's bacterial population are a little different. This would require volunteers who would be willing to stick a q-tip in their armpit! If you decide to do this, I would sample the armpit when it is moist, before a shower (dry, clean skin won't have as much bacteria). Good luck.

85

Lactose intolerant bacteria  

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Lactose intolerant bacteria Lactose intolerant bacteria Name: Carolyn McPherson Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: A student scientist is looking for a method to induce lactose intolerance in E. coli bacteria. Is there a suggestion for a method? Thanks Replies: The prevailing wisdom among geneticists is that we cannot really "induce" lactose intolerance so much a we can "select" or "screen" for mutant bacteria that have become lactose intolerant. The idea is that mutations in particular genes do not occur as a response to some evolutionary or selective pressure; rather, mutations just happen randomly, and those that confer a growth advantage (in a particular situation) will help the bacterium grow faster than its siblings. In a previous session, I suggested one way to identify those bacteria; to induce mutations, any of several mutation-causing agents might be tried, including chemicals and UV light. In fact, one worthwhile experiment might be to see how various exposure to UV light might yield increasing numbers of lactose-intolerant mutants. For more details or discussion, you might write me directly (S. Triezenberg).

86

Fungus or bacteria?  

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Fungus or bacteria? Fungus or bacteria? Name: Gordon T Davis Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: My biology class is growing bacteria cultures taken from different areas on the school campus. How can we accurately classify bacteria from fungus in the petri dish? Replies: How advanced is your class? In general, fungi look like they are made of tiny threads, or they appear to have tiny dots on top of the colony. But this isn't fool-proof. There are lots of books out with good pictures of various bacteria and fungi; you need to be careful, though, since you could end up growing some things that you'd rather not have everyone exposed to - be sure to sterilize the culture dishes with bleach or in a pressure cooker (depending on the type of plate you are using!) before throwing them away. Also be sure that everyone uses sterile techniques, washes their hands thoroughly, doesn't get too close to the dishes with their faces, etc.

87

Testing for Bacteria  

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Testing for Bacteria Testing for Bacteria Name: Danielle Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I have to do a science fair project. What I need to compare the relative bacterial levels in milk samples with different expiration dates. What can I use to test the bacteria? Please help! Replies: You want to see if there are bacteria present in milk of different expiration dates, and if so, what they do to the milk. So buy milk of different dates. You could test what effect storage temperature has on bacterial growth in milk. Use those different milk samples in their original package (don't open it!) and keep them at 37 degrees C, at room temperature, and in the fridge (measure how cold that is) for say 48 hrs.Then open the bottle or pack and see what happened to the milk. Do you see differences? Can you explain them? If you open the milk before the experiment you may get bacteria into the milk that otherwise would not have been there. The experiment with the closed bottles will tell you what is better, storage of milk at room temperature, warm, or cold.

88

Ecovation Inc formerly AnAerobics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ecovation Inc formerly AnAerobics Ecovation Inc formerly AnAerobics Jump to: navigation, search Name Ecovation Inc (formerly AnAerobics) Place Victor, New York Zip 14564 Product The company build and operate organic waste management systems. Coordinates 38.15924°, -81.034233° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.15924,"lon":-81.034233,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

89

Evaluation of terrestrial microcosms for assessing the fate and effects of genetically engineered microorganisms on ecological processes  

SciTech Connect

This project evaluates and modifies the existing US Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Pesticides and Toxic Substances (EPA/OPTS) terrestrial microcosm test system and test protocols such that they can be used to determine the environmental fate and ecological hazards of genetically engineered microorganisms (GEMs). The intact soil-core microcosm represents terrestrial ecosystems, and when coupled with appropriate test protocols, such microcosms may be appropriate to define and limit risks associated with the intentional release of GEMs. The terrestrial microcosm test system was used to investigate the survival and transport of two model GEMs (Azospirillum lipoferum and Pseudomonas sp. Tn5 mutants) to various trophic levels and niches and through intact soil cores. Subsequent effects on nutrient cycling and displacement of indigenous microorganisms were evaluated. The model organisms were a diazotrophic root-colonizing bacterium (A. lipoferum) and a wheat root growth-inhibiting rhizobacterium (Pseudomonas sp.). The transposable element Tn5 was used as a genetic marker for both microorganisms in two separate experiments. The organisms were subjected to transposon mutagenesis using a broad host-range-mobilizable suicide plasmid. The transposon Tn5 conferred levels of kanamycin resistance up to 500 ..mu..g/ml (Pseudomonas sp.), which allowed for selection of the bacteria from environmental samples. The presence of Tn5 DNA in the genome of the model GEMs also allowed the use of Tn5 gene probes to confirm and enumerate the microorganisms in different samples from the microcosms. Two types of root growth-inhibiting Pseudomonas sp. Tn5 mutants were obtained and used in microcosm studies: those that lacked the ability to inhibit either wheat root growth or the growth of other microorganisms in vitro (tox/sup /minus//) and those which retained these properties (tox/sup +/). 53 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

Fredrickson, J.K.; Bentjen, S.A.; Bolton, H. Jr.; Li, S.W.; Ligotke, M.W.; McFadden, K.M.; Van Voris, P.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Self-actualization as it relates to aerobic physical fitness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

higher than the aerobic and archery group on the TC, Ex, and C scales. The archery group was significantly higher than the preaerobic and aerobic groups on the Fr and S scales. Females from the preaerobic group were significantly lower than archery... Inventory Sav Self-actualization values measures how well a person holds and lives by values of se 1f- ac tualizing people Ex Existentiality measures ability to flexibly apply self-actualizing values to one's own life Fr Feeling reactivity measures...

Russell, Kathryn Terese Vecchio

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

91

Complete Genome Sequence of the Aerobic Marine Methanotroph Methylomonas methanica MC09  

SciTech Connect

Methylomonas methanica MC09 is a mesophilic, halotolerant, aerobic, methanotrophic member of the Gammaproteobacteria, isolated from coastal seawater. Here we present the complete genome sequence of this strain, the first available from an aerobic marine methanotroph.

Boden, Rich [University of Warwick, UK; Cunliffe, Michael [University of Warwick, UK; Scanlan, Julie [University of Warwick, UK; Moussard, Helene [University of Warwick, UK; Kits, K. Dimitri [University of Alberta, Edmondton, Canada; Klotz, Martin G [University of Louisville, Louisville; Jetten, MSM [Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands; Vuilleumier, Stephane [University of Strasbourg; Han, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Peters, Lin [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Teshima, Hazuki [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Stein, Lisa Y. [University of Alberta, Edmondton, Canada; Murrell, Collin [University of Warwick, UK

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Selective microorganism concentration using a dielectrophoresis-based microfabricated device  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Detection of pathogenic microorganisms is a significant challenge in medicine, environmental protection and biological threat safety because samples are often contaminated. This work presents a method of separating bacterial ...

Pucha?a, Katarzyna Anna

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Engineering of microorganisms towards recovery of rare metal ions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The bioadsorption of metal ions using microorganisms is an attractive technology for the recovery of rare metal ions as well as removal of toxic heavy metal ions from aqueous solution. In initial attempts, microo...

Kouichi Kuroda; Mitsuyoshi Ueda

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Removal of Plant Nutrients by Means of Aerobic Stabilization of Sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Nutrients by Means of Aerobic Stabilization of Sludge Roar L. Irgens 1 H. Orin Halvorson Department...investigation, we found that, if the sludges were treated by an aerobic process, a...Nutrients by Means of Aerobic Stabilization of Sludge ROAR L. IRGENS' AND H. ORIN HALVORSON...

Roar L. Irgens; H. Orin Halvorson

1965-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Microorganisms having enhanced resistance to acetate and methods of use  

SciTech Connect

The present invention provides isolated or genetically modified strains of microorganisms that display enhanced resistance to acetate as a result of increased expression of a sodium proton antiporter. The present invention also provides methods for producing such microbial strains, as well as related promoter sequences and expression vectors. Further, the present invention provides methods of producing alcohol from biomass materials by using microorganisms with enhanced resistance to acetate.

Brown, Steven D; Yang, Shihui

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

96

Microorganisms having enhanced tolerance to inhibitors and stress  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides genetically modified strains of microorganisms that display enhanced tolerance to stress and/or inhibitors such as sodium acetate and vanillin. The enhanced tolerance can be achieved by increasing the expression of a protein of the Sm-like superfamily such as a bacterial Hfq protein and a fungal Sm or Lsm protein. Further, the present invention provides methods of producing alcohol from biomass materials by using the genetically modified microorganisms of the present invention.

Brown, Steven D.; Yang, Shihui

2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

97

Why sequence purple sulfur bacteria?  

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purple sulfur bacteria? purple sulfur bacteria? The process by which plants and some bacteria can convert light energy to sugar, or photosynthesis, is crucial to global food webs, and complicated. Very little is known about the photosynthetic bacteria in the purple sulfur bacteria group, which may represent one of the most primitive photosynthetic organisms and are capable of carbon fixation and sequestration in both light and dark conditions with the help of sulfur compounds. Purple sulfur bacteria are autotrophic and can synthesize organic compounds from inorganic sources. Researchers hope to learn more by sequencing nine type strains of purple sulfur bacteria that are found in freshwater, brackish and marine systems. The information would lead to a better understanding of the process of photosynthesis as well as the global

98

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobic phototrophic alphaproteobacterium...  

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Summary: phototrophs (unicellular cyanobacteria, Synecho- coccus spp.; filamentous green non-sulphur-like bacteria... of Bchl c-containing phototrophs in the mats, which...

99

Biofuels: Bacteria generate propane gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Genetically engineered bacteria could one day be harnessed to make renewable propane fuel. Patrik Jones at Imperial College London, Kalim Akhtar at University College London and ... different species of bacteria into Escherichia coli, so that the microbe could convert glucose into propane gas. With genetic tinkering and by increasing the levels of oxygen to which the ...

2014-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

100

Estimation of Radiation Resistance Values of Microorganisms in Food Products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Weibull 12D equivalent of a radiation process, or the minimal radiation dose (MRD), for cured ham...experimental sterilizing dose (ESD) and the Schmidt-Nank...9 Printed in U.S.A Estimation of Radiation Resistance Values of Microorganisms...

Abe Anellis; Stanley Werkowski

1968-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aerobic bacteria microorganisms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Investigation of Interfacial Chemistry of Microorganisms Jani C. Ingram,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Investigation of Interfacial Chemistry of Microorganisms Jani C. Ingram,1 David E. Cummings,1 Hoi Berkeley National Laboratory, CA 3 Shawnee High School, NJ INTRODUCTION Remediation of Department of Energy by Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Principal investigator: Jani C. Ingram, Idaho

102

Dialysis culture of microorganisms: design, theory, and results.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...decision is made as to how much substrate waste is feasible. Product Formation in Dialysis...separate and optimize the acid and the gasification stages of anaerobic digestion. Raw sewage...638-639. 150. Society of Chemical Industry. 1961. Continuous culture of micro-organisms...

J S Schultz; P Gerhardt

1969-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobic microbial cometabolism Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Medicine ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 32 Widespread use of chlorinated solvents in dry cleaning and metal degreasing operations over Summary: processes Aerobic...

104

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobic energy turnover Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

. This tendency reflects the interaction between diffusion distances and aerobic ATP turnover rates, since maximal... of ATP turnover rate, we examined contraction-recovery...

105

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobic fixed bed Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The objective... . The overall plant consists of MSW reception , separation and recycling, aerobic composting of the organic... the incinerator plant and especially the...

106

Anaerobic/aerobic conditions and biostimulation for enhanced chlorophenols degradation in biocathode microbial fuel cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Anaerobic/aerobic conditions affected bacterial community composition and the subsequent chlorophenols (CPs) degradation in biocathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Bacterial communities acclimated with either ......

Liping Huang; Yinghong Shi; Ning Wang; Yuesheng Dong

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobic fitness blood Sample Search Results  

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jogging, racewalking, aerobics (including water), swimming laps, or playing team... , or swimming). Being physically active helps you develop and main- tain a more durable heart,...

108

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobic biological processes Sample Search...  

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tanks m3 Daerobic : daily aerobic time hd-1 MLVSS : mixed... , LA COUR JANSEN J and ARVIN A (1996) Wastewater Treatment. Biological and Chemical Processes. Springer......

109

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobic exercise capacity Sample Search...  

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1 AEROBIC RESPIRATION ... Source: Prestwich, Ken - Biology Department, College of the Holy Cross Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Biology and Medicine 32 J....

110

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobic mitochondrial energy Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

aerobic. E) None of the above 9. Which of the following statements Source: Gage, Daniel J. - Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Connecticut Collection:...

111

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobic hypolimnia relative Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aerobic hypolimnia relative Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Biogeochemistry 38: 281301, 1997. c 1997 Kluwer Academic...

112

Prokaryotic microorganisms in uranium mining waste piles and their interactions with uranium and other heavy metals.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The influence of uranyl and sodium nitrate under aerobic and anaerobic conditions on the microbial community structure of a soil sample from the uranium mining… (more)

Geißler, Andrea

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Diversity and genomics of Antarctic marine micro-organisms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Clarke and N. Johnston Diversity and genomics of Antarctic marine micro-organisms...larger scale. Insights from initial genomics studies on both cultivated organisms...marine bacteria|marine microbial genomics|bacterioplankton diversity|Southern...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Importance of unattached bacteria and bacteria attached to sediment in determining potentials for degradation of xenobiotic organic contaminants in an aerobic aquifer.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Suspensions Toluene metabolism Water Microbiology Water Pollutants, Chemical metabolism...plumes experimental studies ground water hydrocarbons in situ naphthalene...polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons remediation thallophytes toluene water treatment...

P E Holm; P H Nielsen; H J Albrechtsen; T H Christensen

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

2004 Sensory Transduction in Microorganisms Gordon Research Conference-January 11-16, 2004  

SciTech Connect

Research into the mechanisms involved in the sensing and responses of microorganisms to changes in their environment is currently very active in a large number of laboratories in the US, Europe, Japan, and Israel. A wide range of eukaryotic and prokaryotic species are being studies with regard to their sensing of chemical changes, light and redox signal and intercellular signaling, leading either to changes in motile behavior, gene expression or development. It has become increasingly apparent that the mechanisms involved in development have application in higher organisms while the sensing systems in bacteria are involved in a very wide range of physiological traits, from pathogenicity, through to biofilm formation. This is an area where a wide range of state of the art tools have been used and developed over the past few decades. Approaches include behavioral studies, electro-physiology, genetics, molecular biology, structural biology, biophysics and single molecule microscopy, immunocytochemistry and molecular and mathematical modeling, all of this helped by the large number of bacterial and eukaryotic microbial genome sequences now available. The central goal of this meeting is to bring together investigators using this wide range of approaches and different systems to compare data, share ideas and approaches and seeks to understand the fundamental principles underlying these responses.

Judith Armitage Carlyle Storm

2005-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

116

Studies on the activities of rumen microorganisms in vitro  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the functional state of the rumen. The methods used by various investigators for measuring rumen microbial activity includei (a) cellulose digestion, (b) utilization of non-protein nitrogen, (c) production of volatile fatty acids, (d) production of carbon... EXTRACTS ON THE DIGESTION OF CELLULOSE BE RUMEN MICROORGANISMS INTRODUCTION Page Review of Literature Collection of Numen Samples Processing of Rumen Samples Measurement of the Activity of Rurren Yiicroorgan~ s'". s Procedure for ~vt-, c Incubation...

Johnson, Carl Edward

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Biodegradation of triclosan and formation of methyl-triclosan in activated sludge under aerobic conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biodegradation of triclosan and formation of methyl-triclosan in activated sludge under aerobic Keywords: Triclosan Triclosan methyl Waste water treatment Aerobic transformation a b s t r a c t Triclosan of this compound has led to the elevated concentrations of triclosan in wastewater, wastewater treatment plants

Kolaei, Alireza Rezania

118

Location and chemical composition of microbially induced phosphorus precipitates in anaerobic and aerobic granular sludge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and aerobic granular sludge A. Mañasa,b,c,e , M. Spérandioa,b,c , F. Deckerd and B. Biscanse aINSA, UPS, INP X-ray analysis (SEM-EDX) applied to granular sludge used for biological treatment of high sludge blanket (UASB) reactors and two aerobic granular sequenced batch reactors (GSBR) were evaluated

Boyer, Edmond

119

Effect of Aerobic and Anaerobic Conditions on Chlorophenol Sorption in Wetland Soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effect of Aerobic and Anaerobic Conditions on Chlorophenol Sorption in Wetland Soils Elisa D by the physical and chemicalSorption of four chlorophenols (CPs) was studied in ten wetland properties- Much research on organic pollutant sorption has dem-bated under aerobic or anaerobic conditions

Florida, University of

120

Anaerobic utilization of essential oils bydenitrifying bacteria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Plant volatile organic compounds are a major carbonsource in nature. We studied the degradability ofthese substances by anaerobic microorganisms inenrichment cultures with representative essential oilsas organ...

Jens Harder

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aerobic bacteria microorganisms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Capability of air filters to retain airborne bacteria and molds in heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The capability of air filters (filterclass: F6, F7) to retain airborne outdoor microorganisms was examined in field experiments in two heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. At the beginning of the 15-month investigation period, the first filter stages of both HVAC systems were equipped with new unused air filters. The number of airborne bacteria and molds before and behind the filters were determined simultaneously in 14 days-intervals using 6-stage Andersen cascade impactors. Under relatively dry ( 12 °C) outdoor air conditions air filters led to a marked reduction of airborne microorganism concentrations (bacteria by approximately 70 % and molds by > 80 %). However, during long periods of high relative humidity (> 80 % R. H.) a proliferation of bacteria on air filters with subsequent release into the filtered air occured. These microorganisms were mainly smaller than 1.1 ?m therefore being part of the respirable fraction. The results showed furthermore that one possibility to avoid microbial proliferation is to limit the relative humidity in the area of the air filters to 80 % R. H. (mean of 3 days), e. g. by using preheaters in front of air filters in HVAC-systems.

Martin Möritz; Hans Peters; Bettina Nipko; Hennin Rüden

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Mechanism of aerobic biological destabilisation of wool scour effluent emulsions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wool scouring effluent is a highly polluted industrial wastewater in which the main pollutant, wool wax, is held in a stable oil-in-water emulsion by non-ionic detergent. The use of microbial action to cause emulsion destabilisation has been proposed as a new treatment strategy for this effluent stream. This strategy aims at improving aerobic treatment performance by physically removing the high-COD, slowly bio-degradable wool wax from the system without bio-degradation. The mechanism by which an aerobic-mixed culture destabilises the wool scouring effluent emulsion was investigated. Our results show that destabilisation is due to partial bio-degradation of both the scouring detergent and the wool wax. Cleavage of the wool wax esters was the first stage in wax degradation, when 40–50% of wax was de-emulsified. Over the same period, detergent degradation was low, at 7–21%. With further incubation, detergent degradation increased, aiding further breakdown of the emulsion. The degradation of the detergent, a nonylphenol ethoxylate, resulted in both a reduction in molar concentration (of up to 82%) and a shortening of the ethoxylate chain length. The latter reduced the hydrophile–lipophile balance (HLB) from 12 to approximately 7, thereby reducing the ability of the residual detergent to stabilise the emulsion. Analysis of the emulsified and de-emulsified wax fractions could not identify a group of compounds that were preferentially de-emulsified based on molecular weight or polarity. These findings will assist in using a de-emulsification strategy in both existing and new treatment systems in order to save on aeration costs and treatment times for biological treatment of this highly polluted wastewater.

Andrew J. Poole; Ralf Cord-Ruwisch; F. William Jones

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Studies of Copper Nanoparticles Effects on Micro-organisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss about the antibacterial activities of copper nanoparticles on both Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria in this investigation. First time, we increase its antibacterial activities by using electrical power while on electrolysis synthesis and it is confirmed from its more antibacterial activities (For Escherichia coli bacteria). We investigate the changes of surface area to volume ratio of copper nanoparticles prepared in two different methods and its effects on antibacterial activities. We note that slight change of surface area to volume ratio results in the enhancement of its antibacterial activities.

T. Theivasanthi; M. Alagar

2011-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

124

DEVELOPMENT OF MICROORGANISMS WITH IMPROVED TRANSPORT AND BIOSURFACTANT ACTIVITY FOR ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY  

SciTech Connect

Biosurfactants enhance hydrocarbon biodegradation by increasing apparent aqueous solubility or affecting the association of the cell with poorly soluble hydrocarbon. Here, we show that a lipopeptide biosurfactant produced by Bacillus mojavensis strain JF-2 mobilized substantial amounts of residual hydrocarbon from sand-packed columns when a viscosifying agent and a low molecular weight alcohol were present. The amount of residual hydrocarbon mobilized depended on the biosurfactant concentration. One pore volume of cell-free culture fluid with 900 mg/l of the biosurfactant, 10 mM 2,3-butanediol and 1000 mg/l of partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide polymer mobilized 82% of the residual hydrocarbon. Consistent with the high residual oil recoveries, we found that the bio-surfactant lowered the interfacial tension (IFT) between oil and water by nearly 2 orders of magnitude compared to typical IFT values of 28-29 mN/m. Increasing the salinity increased the IFT with or without 2,3-butanediol present. The lowest interfacial tension observed was 0.1 mN/m. The lipopeptide biosurfactant system may be effective in removing hydrocarbon contamination sources in soils and aquifers and for the recovery of entrapped oil from low production oil reservoirs. Previously, we reported that Proteose peptone was necessary for anaerobic growth and biosurfactant production by B. mojavensis JF-2. The data gathered from crude purification of the growth-enhancing factor in Proteose peptone suggested that it consisted of nucleic acids; however, nucleic acid bases, nucleotides or nucleosides did not replace the requirement for Proteose Peptone. Further studies revealed that salmon sperm DNA, herring sperm DNA, Echerichia coli DNA and synthetic DNA replaced the requirement for Proteose peptone. In addition to DNA, amino acids and nitrate were required for anaerobic growth and vitamins further improved growth. We now have a defined medium that can be used to manipulate growth and biosurfactant production. As an initial step in the search for a better biosurfactant-producing microorganism, 157 bacterial strains were screened for biosurfactant production under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. A hundred and forty seven strains produced either equal or higher amounts of biosurfactant compared to B. mojavensis JF-2 and the 10 best strains were chosen for further study. In an attempt to increase biosurfactant production, a genetic recombination experiment was conducted by mixing germinating spores of four of the best strains with B. mojavensis JF-2. Biosurfactant production was higher with the mixed spore culture than in the cocultures containing B. mojavensis JF-2 and each of the other 4 strains or in a mixed culture containing all five strains that had not undergone genetic exchange. Four isolates were obtained from the mixed spores culture that gave higher biosurfactant production than any of the original strains. Repetitive sequence-based polymerase chain reaction analysis showed differences in the band pattern for these strains compared to the parent strains, suggesting the occurrence of genetic recombination. We have a large collection of biosurfactant-producing microorganisms and a natural mechanism to improve biosurfactant production in these organisms.

M.J. McInerney; R.M. Knapp; D.P. Nagle, Jr.; Kathleen Duncan; N. Youssef; M.J. Folmsbee; S. Maudgakya

2003-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

125

Why Sequence Biogeochemically Important Bacteria?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biogeochemically Important Bacteria? Biogeochemically Important Bacteria? DOE-JGI will be sequencing three biogeochemically important bacteria, Diaphorobacter sp. strain TPSY, Ferrutens nitratireducens strain 2002 and Azospira suillum strain PS. These organisms represent diverse genera capable of anaerobically oxidizing both iron(II) and humic acids by using nitrate as the electron acceptor. Two of these organisms, strain 2002 and strain TPSY, are also capable of the anaerobic nitrate-dependent oxidation of uranium(IV) to uranium(VI). Left to right, Azospira suillum PS, Ferrutens nitratireducens 2002, and Diaphorobacter TPSY. Nitrate-dependent microbial metal oxidation is of critical importance because of its potential effect on the fate and transport of radioactive contaminants. Nitrate-dependent Iron(II) oxidation by organisms such as

126

Complete genome sequence of the aerobic, heterotroph Marinithermus hydrothermalis type strain (T1T) from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent chimney  

SciTech Connect

Marinithermus hydrothermalis Sako et al. 2003 is the type species of the monotypic genus Marinithermus. M. hydrothermalis T1 T was the first isolate within the phylum ThermusDeinococcus to exhibit optimal growth under a salinity equivalent to that of sea water and to have an absolute requirement for NaCl for growth. M. hydrothermalis T1 T is of interest because it may provide a new insight into the ecological significance of the aerobic, thermophilic decomposers in the circulation of organic compounds in deep-sea hydrothermal vent ecosystems. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the genus Marinithermus and the seventh sequence from the family Thermaceae. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 2,269,167 bp long genome with its 2,251 protein-coding and 59 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Gu, Wei [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Yasawong, Montri [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Deshpande, Shweta [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Pan, Chongle [ORNL; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Tindall, Brian [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Sikorski, Johannes [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Effects of remediation amendments on vadose zone microorganisms  

SciTech Connect

Surfactant-based foam delivery technology has been studied to remediate Hanford 200 area deep vadose zone sediment. However, the surfactants and remediation amendments have an unknown effect on indigenous subsurface microorganisms. Microbial populations are important factors to consider in remediation efforts due to their potential to alter soil geochemistry. This project focuses on measuring microbial metabolic responses to remediation amendments in batch and column studies using Deep Vadose Zone Sediments. Initial studies of the microbes from Hanford 200 area deep vadose zone sediment showed surfactants sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and cocamidopropyl betaine (CAPB) and remediation amendment calcium polysulfide (CPS) had no affect on microbial growth using BiologTM Ecoplates. To move towards a more realistic field analog, soil columns were packed with Hanford 200 Area sediment. Once microbial growth in the column was verified by observing growth of the effluent solution on tryptic soy agar plates, remedial surfactants were injected into the columns, and the resulting metabolic diversity was measured. Results suggest surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) stimulates microbial growth. The soil columns were also visualized using X-ray microtomography to inspect soil packing and possibly probe for evidence of biofilms. Overall, BiologTM Ecoplates provide a rapid assay to predict effects of remediation amendments on Hanford 200 area deep vadose zone microorganisms.

Miller, Hannah M.; Tilton, Fred A.

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

128

Organic acid-tolerant microorganisms and uses thereof for producing organic acids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Organic acid-tolerant microorganisms and methods of using same. The organic acid-tolerant microorganisms comprise modifications that reduce or ablate AcsA activity or AcsA homolog activity. The modifications increase tolerance of the microorganisms to such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid (3HP), acrylic acid, and propionic acid. Further modifications to the microorganisms such as increasing expression of malonyl-CoA reductase and/or acetyl-CoA carboxylase provide or increase the ability of the microorganisms to produce 3HP. Methods of generating an organic acid with the modified microorganisms are provided. Methods of using acsA or homologs thereof as counter-selectable markers include replacing acsA or homologs thereof in cells with genes of interest and selecting for the cells comprising the genes of interest with amounts of organic acids effective to inhibit growth of cells harboring acsA or the homologs.

Pfleger, Brian Frederick; Begemann, Matthew Brett

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

129

The Effect of Slowly Biodegradable Carbon on the Morphology, Integrity and Performance of Aerobic Granular Sludge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the last two decades, a new biofilm process, aerobic granular sludge technology, has been applied by researchers for organic and nutrient removal from municipal wastewater. Most studies have been performed with high strength wastewater...

Faraj, Rasha Attwan

2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

130

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobic methane release Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aerobic methane release Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 I.Vigano1, T.Rckmann1, R.Holzinger1, A. van Dijk2, F.Keppler3,...

131

How Photosynthetic Bacteria Harvest Solar Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...MINIREVIEW How Photosynthetic Bacteria Harvest Solar Energy Richard J. Cogdell Neil W. Isaacs Tina...How photosynthetic bacteria harvest solar energy. | Division of Biochemistry and Molecular...metabolism Rhodobacter Rhodopseudomonas Solar Energy

Richard J. Cogdell; Neil W. Isaacs; Tina D. Howard; Karen McLuskey; Niall J. Fraser; Stephen M. Prince

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Re-engineering bacteria for ethanol production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides recombinant bacteria, which comprise a full complement of heterologous ethanol production genes. Expression of the full complement of heterologous ethanol production genes causes the recombinant bacteria to produce ethanol as the primary fermentation product when grown in mineral salts medium, without the addition of complex nutrients. Methods for producing the recombinant bacteria and methods for producing ethanol using the recombinant bacteria are also disclosed.

Yomano, Lorraine P; York, Sean W; Zhou, Shengde; Shanmugam, Keelnatham; Ingram, Lonnie O

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

133

E-Print Network 3.0 - airborne moisture-indicating microorganisms...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

surface. In order to investigate the microorganisms present... obtained on the Marine Agar plates indicating a possible marine source for some of these airborne Source: Rainey,...

134

E-Print Network 3.0 - acidophilic microorganisms isolated Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermo-acidophilic Cyanidiophyceae (Cyanidiales)" Summary: AND DEBASHISH BHATTACHARYA Johnson, D.B. (1998) Biodiversity and ecology of acidophilic microorganisms. FEMS... Biodata...

135

Typical College Student Diet Food Derived Microorganisms and Their Relation to the Human Gastrointestinal Microflora  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the food samples were plated on Tryptic Soy Agar media and Brucella Blood Agar to determine the aerobic and anaerobic bacterial loads respectively. The total microbioial communities were extracted from defined amounts of the different food samples...

Haselhorst, Alexandria J.

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

136

Sensory Transduction in Microorganisms 2008 Gordon Research Conference (January 2008)  

SciTech Connect

Research into the mechanisms involved in the sensing and responses of microorganisms to changes in their environments is currently very active in a large number of laboratories worldwide. An increasingly wide range of prokaryotic and eukaryotic species are being studied with regard to their sensing of diverse chemical and physical stimuli, including nutrients, toxins, intercellular signaling molecules, redox indicators, light, pressure, magnetic fields, and surface contact, leading to adaptive responses affecting motile behavior, gene expression and/or development. The ease of manipulation of microorganisms has facilitated application of a broad range of techniques that have provided comprehensive descriptions of cellular behavior and its underlying molecular mechanisms. Systems and their molecular components have been probed at levels ranging from the whole organism down to atomic resolution using behavioral analyses; electrophysiology; genetics; molecular biology; biochemical and biophysical characterization; structural biology; single molecule, fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy; computational modeling; bioinformatics and genomic analyses. Several model systems such as bacterial chemotaxis and motility, fruiting body formation in Myxococcus xanthus, and motility and development in Dictyostelium discoideum have traditionally been a focus of this meeting. By providing a basis for assessment of similarities and differences in mechanisms, understanding of these pathways has advanced the study of many other microbial sensing systems. This conference aims to bring together researchers investigating different prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbial systems using diverse approaches to compare data, share methodologies and ideas, and seek to understand the fundamental principles underlying sensory responses. Topic areas include: (1) Receptor Sensing and Signaling; (2) Intracellular Signaling (two-component, c-di-GMP, c-AMP, etc.); (3) Intracellular Localization and the Cytoskeleton; (4) Motors and Motility; (5) Differentiation and Development; (6) Host/Pathogen and Host/Symbiont Interactions; (7) Intercellular Communication; (8) Microbes and the Environment; and (9) Modeling Signaling Pathways.

Ann M. Stock

2009-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

137

Why Sequence Cellulose Degrading Bacteria?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cellulose Degrading Bacteria? Cellulose Degrading Bacteria? One of the major DOE missions is the production of renewable fuels to reduce our dependence on foreign oil, and also to take the place of petroleum-based fuels as these resources dwindle. Biologically produced ethanol is one possible replacement for fossil fuels. Currently, ethanol is produced from corn starch, but there is much research into using lignocellulosic materials (those containing cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin) as the raw material for ethanol production. Ethanol production from cellulose requires several steps: pretreatment with steam, acid, or ammonia; digestion of cellulose to sugars; and fermentation of sugars to ethanol. The slowest and most expensive step is the breakdown of cellulose, chemically accomplished by cellulases. The second and third

138

NEWTON: Bacteria Survival in the Stomach  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bacteria Survival in the Stomach Bacteria Survival in the Stomach Name: Lianne Status: other Grade: other Location: Outside U.S. Country: USA Date: Summer 2013 Question: Is H. Pylorii the only bacteria able to survive the acidic condition of the stomach, or are there others? Replies: Hi Lianne, Thanks for the question. Yes, other bacteria are able to survive the acidic conditions in the stomach. For instance, the bacteria that are present in acidopholus yougurt (and milk) are able to survive the stomach's acid and to repopulate the large intestine. These acidopholus bacteria are "good" bacteria and are useful in restoring bacterial colonies in the large intestine after a treatment of antibiotics. I hope this helps. Please let me know if you have more questions. Thanks Jeff I don't know, but I would be very surprised given the number of bacterial species, that H. Pylori is uniquely adapted to low pH environments.

139

Effect of Butylated Hydroxytoluene (BHT) on the Aerobic Biodegradation of a Model Vegetable Oil in Aquatic Media  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Becker, P.; Koster, D.; Popov, M. N.; Markossian, S.; Antranikian, G.; Markl, H.The biodegradation of olive oil and the treatment of lipid-rich wool scouring wastewater under aerobic thermophilic conditions Water Resour. ... The biodegradation of olive oil and the treatment of lipid-rich wool scouring wastewater under aerobic thermophilic conditions ... The biodegrdn. of olive oil and the treatment of the lipid-rich wool scouring wastewater were studied under aerobic thermophilic (65°) conditions using Bacillus thermoleovorans IHI-91. ...

Darine A. Salam; Makram T. Suidan; Albert D. Venosa

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Trapping of microorganism using cylindrical standing ultrasound waves and its application to water purification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In biological fields it is known that the ultrasound is useful for trapping of biological cells or microorganism. Recently several experimental results of micro-particle trapping by acoustic standing wave fields which are formed by plane waves have been reported. In this study we confirm that the standing waves by a cylindrical ultrasonic transducer can trap and aggregate the microorganism such as green algae chlorella etc. Those microorganism were trapped at specific positions determined by acoustic pressure distribution and the density of aggregation is increased according to the lapse time after the transducer operating. The dense colony of microorganism is easily filtered out by a sieve. A water purification system using this phenomenon was designed and the efficiency was verified by considering the density change of the microorganism after the ultrasonic treatment. Consequently it is shown that the standing wave in a cylindrical transducer can be applied to water purification.

Hae-Rang Hwang; Yonggang Cao; Jungsoon Kim; Moojoon Kim; Kang-Lyeol Ha

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aerobic bacteria microorganisms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Selective Aerobic Oxidation of 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural in Water Over Solid Ruthenium Hydroxide Catalysts with Magnesium-Based Supports  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solid catalyst systems comprised of ruthenium hydroxide supported on magnesium-based carrier materials (spinel, magnesium oxide and hydrotalcite) were investigated for the selective, aqueous aerobic oxidation of ...

Yury Y. Gorbanev; Søren Kegnæs; Anders Riisager

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Transformation of gram positive bacteria by sonoporation  

SciTech Connect

The present invention provides a sonoporation-based method that can be universally applied for delivery of compounds into Gram positive bacteria. Gram positive bacteria which can be transformed by sonoporation include, for example, Bacillus, Streptococcus, Acetobacterium, and Clostridium. Compounds which can be delivered into Gram positive bacteria via sonoporation include nucleic acids (DNA or RNA), proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, viruses, small organic and inorganic molecules, and nano-particles.

Yang, Yunfeng; Li, Yongchao

2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

143

Time to recognise that mitochondria are bacteria?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The scientific community is comfortable with recognising mitochondria as organelles that happen to be descendants of bacteria. Here, I playfully explore the arguments for and against a phylogenetic fundamentalism that states that mitochondria are bacteria and should be given their own taxonomic family, the Mitochondriaceae. I also explore the consequences of recognizing mitochondria as bacteria for our understanding of the systemic response to trauma and for the prospects of creating transgenic mitochondria.

Mark J. Pallen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Managing Bacteria Pollution in Texas Waters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Story by Kathy Wythe tx H2O | pg. 2 BACTERIA MANAGING tx H2O | pg. 3 IN TEXAS WATERS POLLUTION Managing Bacteria Pollution in Texas Waters tx H2O | pg. 4 W ith 310 water bodies in Texas failing to meetwater quality standards because... of bacteria,managing bacteria pollution is commanding the attention of water agencies, researchers and stake- holders across Texas. These water bodies are listed in the 2006 Texas Water Quality Inventory and 303(d) List for failing to meet the standards...

Wythe, Kathy

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Heavy metal removal and recovery using microorganisms. Volume 1, State-of-the-art and potential applications at the SRS  

SciTech Connect

Microorganisms -- bacteria, fungi, and microalgae -- can accumulate relatively large amounts of toxic heavy metals and radionuclides from the environment. These organisms often exhibit specificity for particular metals. The metal content of microbial biomass can be a substantial fraction of total dry weight with concentration factors (metal in dry biomass to metal in solution) exceeding one million in some cases. Both living and inert (dead) microbial biomass can be used to reduce heavy metal concentrations in contaminated waters to very low levels -- parts per billion and even lower. In many respects (e.g. specificity, residual metal concentrations, accumulation factors, and economics) microbial bioremoval processes can be superior to conventional processes, such as ion exchange and caustic (lime or hydroxide) precipitation for heavy metals removal from waste and contaminated waters. Thus, bioremoval could be developed to contribute to the clean-up of wastes at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and other DOE facilities. However, the potential advantages of bioremoval processes must still be developed into practical operating systems. A detailed review of the literature suggests that appropriate bioremoval processes could be developed for the SRS. There is great variability from one biomass source to another in bioremoval capabilities. Bioremoval is affected by pH, other ions, temperature, and many other factors. The biological (living vs. dead) and physical (immobilized vs. dispersed) characteristics of the biomass also greatly affect metal binding. Even subtle differences in the microbial biomass, such as the conditions under which it was cultivated, can have major effects on heavy metal binding.

Wilde, E.W. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Benemann, J.R. [Benemann (J.R.), Pinole, CA (United States)

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Primary Production of Benthic Micro-organisms in South West Arm, Port Hacking, New South Wales  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Net photosynthetic incorporation of dissolved inorganic carbon into the micro-organisms of shallow benthic areas of South West Arm, Port Hacking, New South Wales was measured in situ and in the laboratory. Method...

Max S. Giles

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Inactivation of Microorganisms in Model Biofilms by an Atmospheric Pressure Pulsed Non-thermal Plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Non-thermal plasma jet formed by self-running pulsed-periodical ... current spark generator (PPSG) was used for atmospheric pressure inactivation of microorganisms including biofilms. A ... the PPSG is a formatio...

Yuri Akishev; N. Trushkin; M. Grushin…

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Bioremediation of the organophosphate pesticide, coumaphos, using microorganisms immobilized in calcium-alginate gel beads  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and diethylthiophosphate (DETP), using Ca-alginate immobilized cells was the focus of this research. Consortia of indigenous microorganisms capable of degrading chlorferon and DETP were isolated separately. Since chlorferon inhibited both chlorferon-degrading and DETP-degrading...

Ha, Jiyeon

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

149

Dispersion of biased swimming micro-organisms in a fluid flowing through a tube  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Additionally, phototrophic algae are often phototactic (they swim...some relevance to photosynthetic algae (a Cheese-plant effect...in using micro-organisms for fuel production. For green algae, there are two main approaches...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic sediment microorganisms Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

microorganisms are also capable of transferring electrons to other metals and metalloids. Micro- bial reduction... of Fe(III) and other metals can influence the fate of metals in...

151

Chemotactic selection of pollutant degrading soil bacteria  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for identifying soil microbial strains which may be bacterial degraders of pollutants. This method includes: Placing a concentration of a pollutant in a substantially closed container; placing the container in a sample of soil for a period of time ranging from one minute to several hours; retrieving the container and collecting its contents; microscopically determining the identity of the bacteria present. Different concentrations of the pollutant can be used to determine which bacteria respond to each concentration. The method can be used for characterizing a polluted site or for looking for naturally occurring biological degraders of the pollutant. Then bacteria identified as degraders of the pollutant and as chemotactically attracted to the pollutant are used to innoculate contaminated soil. To enhance the effect of the bacteria on the pollutant, nutrients are cyclicly provided to the bacteria then withheld to alternately build up the size of the bacterial colony or community and then allow it to degrade the pollutant.

Hazen, T.C.

1991-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

152

Nucleic acid molecules conferring enhanced ethanol tolerance and microorganisms having enhanced tolerance to ethanol  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides isolated nucleic acid molecules which encode a mutant acetaldehyde-CoA/alcohol dehydrogenase or mutant alcohol dehydrogenase and confer enhanced tolerance to ethanol. The invention also provides related expression vectors, genetically engineered microorganisms having enhanced tolerance to ethanol, as well as methods of making and using such genetically modified microorganisms for production of biofuels based on fermentation of biomass materials.

Brown, Steven; Guss, Adam; Yang, Shihui; Karpinets, Tatiana; Lynd, Lee; Shao, Xiongjun

2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

153

Genome Sequence of "Pedosphaera parvula" Ellin514, an Aerobic Verrucomicrobial Isolate from Pasture Soil  

SciTech Connect

Pedosphaera parvula Ellin514 is an aerobically grown verrucomicrobial isolate from pasture soil. In contrast to the high abundance of members of Verrucomicrobia subdivision 3 based on molecular surveys in terrestrial environments, Ellin514 is one of the few cultured representatives of this group.

Kant, Ravi [University of Helsinki; Van Passel, Mark W.J. [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands; Palva, Airi [University of Helsinki; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Dalin, Eileen [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Larimer, Frank W [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Brettin, Thomas S [ORNL; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); De Vos, Willem M. [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands; Janssen, Peter H. [AgResearch Ltd, Grasslands Research Centre, Palmerston North, New Zealand; Smidt, Hauke [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Aerobic capacities in the heart, kidneys, and splanchnic organs of harbor seals: adaptations to diving hypoxia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of harbor seals was elevated over the dog and rat as well (2.3 and 1.4X in the heart, and 2.5 and 5X in the liver). These data suggest that organs such as the liver, kidneys, and stomach also possess a heightened ability for aerobic, fat-based metabolism...

Fuson, Amanda Lynn

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

155

Water Research 36 (2002) 37393746 Effect of ethanol on BTEX biodegradation kinetics: aerobic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Research 36 (2002) 3739­3746 Effect of ethanol on BTEX biodegradation kinetics: aerobic November 2001; received in revised form 1 February 2002 Abstract The use of ethanol as an automotive fuel oxygenate represents potential economic and air-quality benefits. However, little is known about how ethanol

Alvarez, Pedro J.

156

Perchlorate Reduction by Autotrophic Bacteria in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-limiting step with complete conversion to chloride (7). Perchlorate reducing microorganisms (PRMs) are ubiq as the result of growth of heterotrophic microbes in the aquifer, not just PRMs (9). Thus, an important factor). As an alternative, H2 gas has significant advantages as an electron donor; it minimizes biomass clogging and can

157

Some Functions of Bacteria in the Purification of Polluted Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...failed. 528 BACTERIA AND PURIFICATION OF WATER dilute media. This finding...unusual natural 530 BACTERIA AND PURIFICATION OF WATER environment or by artificial...concen- 532 BACTERIA AND PURIFICATION OF WATER 533 tration in liquid media...

C. T. Butterfield

1940-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Utilization of Vinegar for Isolation of Cellulose Producing Acetic Acid Bacteria  

SciTech Connect

Wastes of traditionally fermented Turkish vinegar were used in the isolation of cellulose producing acetic acid bacteria. Waste material was pre-enriched in Hestrin-Schramm medium and microorganisms were isolated by plating dilution series on HS agar plates The isolated strains were subjected to elaborate biochemical and physiological tests for identification. Test results were compared to those of reference strains Gluconacetobacter xylinus DSM 46604, Gluconacetobacter hansenii DSM 5602 and Gluconacetobacter liquefaciens DSM 5603. Seventeen strains, out of which only three were found to secrete the exopolysaccharide cellulose. The highest cellulose yield was recorded as 0.263+-0.02 g cellulose L{sup -1} for the strain AS14 which resembled Gluconacetobacter hansenii in terms of biochemical tests.

Aydin, Y. Andelib; Aksoy, Nuran Deveci [Chemical Engineering Department of Istanbul Technical University, Ayazaga, Maslak, Istanbul, 34469 (Turkey)

2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

159

Why sequence Bacteria from Lake Washington?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

bacteria from Lake Washington? bacteria from Lake Washington? Previous collaborations between the University of Washington team and the DOE JGI involving both single genome and metagenomic sequencing have greatly enhanced the community's ability to explore the diversity of bacteria functionally active in metabolism of single carbon compounds, known as methylotrophs, isolated from Lake Washington (Seattle, Washington) sediment. Sequencing genomes of 50 methylotroph isolates from the Lake Washington will further enhance the methylotroph community knowledge database providing a much higher level of resolution of global (meta)transcriptomic and (meta)proteomic analyses, as well as species interaction studies, informing a better understanding of biogeochemical cycling of carbon and nitrogen.

160

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobic wastewater biofilms Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Membrane... biofilm reactor Introduction One of the major challenges in wastewater treatment is achieving effective... et al. 2004). Nitrifying bacteria grow in the deep,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aerobic bacteria microorganisms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Why Sequence Sulfur-Oxidizing Bacteria?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sulfur-Oxidizing Bacteria? Sulfur-Oxidizing Bacteria? Several environmental problems, such as acid rain, biocorrosion, etc., are caused by sulfur compounds, such as sulfur dioxide (SO2) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S). A sustainable process to remove these sulfur compounds is the production of elemental sulfur from H2S-containing gas streams by the use of sulfide-oxidizing bacteria. In this process, H2S is absorbed into the alkaline solution in the scrubber unit, followed by the biological oxidation of H2S to elemental sulfur and the recycling of water. With this two-step process, a variety of gas streams (i.e., natural gas, synthesis gas, biogas, and refinery gas) can be treated. For the treatment of sulfate-containing waste streams, an extra step has to be introduced: the transformation of sulfate into H2S by sulfate-reducing bacteria. In

162

Reverse and flick: Hybrid locomotion in bacteria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many bacteria are motile. They use one or more helical flagella as propellers, rotating them like the corkscrew on a wine bottle opener. Despite the limited morphological repertoire of the propulsive system, radically ...

Stocker, Roman

163

BAROPHILIC BACTERIA IN SOME DEEP SEA SEDIMENTS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...The Williams Wilkins Company research-article Articles...The effect of these changes in climate on the deep sea bacteria...killed by the rigorous change in climate during transit from...1955), scientific leader of the Galathea Expedition...

Claude E. Zobell; Richard Y. Morita

1957-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Construction and Characterization of Two Recombinant Bacteria That Grow on ortho- and para-Substituted Chlorobiphenyls  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...aerobic phase of anaerobic-aerobic PCB remediation (, ). The predominant products of...Agency. Vendor Information System for Innovative Technology, version 5. 1996. U...at least some congeners important for remediation of PCBs. | Center for Microbial Ecology...

Yarek Hrywna; Tamara V. Tsoi; Olga V. Maltseva; John F. Quensen III; James M. Tiedje

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Dynamics of Microbial Community Structure of and Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal by Aerobic Granules Cultivated on Propionate or Acetate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...aerobic granular sludge from sequencing batch bubble column reactors...Granulation of activated sludge in a pilot-scale...treatment of low-strength municipal wastewater...replace floccular sludge for the treatment of wastewaters. In bubble-column sequencing...

Graciela Gonzalez-Gil; Christof Holliger

2011-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

166

Genetic engineering of bacteria from managed and natural habitats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of municipal and industrial wastewater treatment processes are understood...multi-ple genes (53). Many wastewater treatment processes require...ofbiomass for disposal or recycling purposes. The most common...floccula-tion in aerobic wastewater treatment facilities, Zoogloea...

SE Lindow; NJ Panopoulos; BL McFarland

1989-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

167

Bacteria Total Maximum Daily Load Task Force Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research and Development Needs 51 References 64 Appendix 1: Bacteria TMDL Task Force Members and Expert Advisors 71 Appendix 2: Models Used in Bacteria Projects 73 as Described in EPA Publications... Appendix 3: EPA Bacteria TMDL Guidelines 78 Appendix 4: State Approaches to Bacteria TMDL 88 Development Appendix 5: Comments from Expert Advisory Group 100 1 Executive Summary In September 2006, the Texas...

Jones, C. Allan; Wagner, Kevin; Di Giovanni, George; Hauck, Larry; Mott, Joanna; Rifai, Hanadi; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Ward, George; Wythe, Kathy

168

Mathematical modeling of the effects of aerobic and anaerobic chelate bioegradation on actinide speciation.  

SciTech Connect

Biodegradation of natural and anthropogenic chelating agents directly and indirectly affects the speciation, and, hence, the mobility of actinides in subsurface environments. We combined mathematical modeling with laboratory experimentation to investigate the effects of aerobic and anaerobic chelate biodegradation on actinide [Np(IV/V), Pu(IV)] speciation. Under aerobic conditions, nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) biodegradation rates were strongly influenced by the actinide concentration. Actinide-chelate complexation reduced the relative abundance of available growth substrate in solution and actinide species present or released during chelate degradation were toxic to the organisms. Aerobic bio-utilization of the chelates as electron-donor substrates directly affected actinide speciation by releasing the radionuclides from complexed form into solution, where their fate was controlled by inorganic ligands in the system. Actinide speciation was also indirectly affected by pH changes caused by organic biodegradation. The two concurrent processes of organic biodegradation and actinide aqueous chemistry were accurately linked and described using CCBATCH, a computer model developed at Northwestern University to investigate the dynamics of coupled biological and chemical reactions in mixed waste subsurface environments. CCBATCH was then used to simulate the fate of Np during anaerobic citrate biodegradation. The modeling studies suggested that, under some conditions, chelate degradation can increase Np(IV) solubility due to carbonate complexation in closed aqueous systems.

Banaszak, J.E.; VanBriesen, J.; Rittmann, B.E.; Reed, D.T.

1998-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

169

Biodegradation of monoaromatic hydrocarbons by aquifer microorganisms using oxygen, nitrate, or nitrous oxide as the terminal electron acceptor.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...I. Mayfield. 1986. Remediation of gasoline-contaminated...Aerobic denitrification as an innovative method for in-situ biological remediation of contaminated sub- surface...underground storage tanks: remediation with emphasis on in situ...

S R Hutchins

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Why Sequence Freshwater Iron-Oxidizing Bacteria?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Freshwater Iron-Oxidizing Bacteria? Freshwater Iron-Oxidizing Bacteria? The goal of this project is to obtain complete genome sequences for six different freshwater iron (Fe)-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB). Four of these are oxygen-dependent iron-oxidizing β-proteobacteria, and three of these, Sideroxydans lithotrophicus, Gallionella capsiferriformans, and strain TW-2, are capable of chemolithoautotrophic growth (that is, obtaining energy by the oxidation of inorganic compounds) using Fe(II) as sole energy source under microaerobic (low-oxygen) conditions. The fourth organism, Leptothrix cholodnii, is a sheath-forming heterotrophic (i.e., using complex organic compounds for nutrition) organism that oxidizes both Fe(II) and Mn(II) and deposits a ferromanganic coating on its sheath. In addition,

171

Study examines sulfate-reducing bacteria activity  

SciTech Connect

Low-sulfate seawater injection can reduce the potential of an oil reservoir turning sour because of sulfate-reducing bacteria. Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) convert sulfate ions in seawater used in waterflooding into sulfide with the concomitant oxidation of a carbon source. A recent study at Capcis investigated the efficiency of SRB under various conditions of sulfate limitation. This study was conducted in a flowing bioreactor at 2,000 psia with different temperature zones (mesophilic 35 C and thermophilic 60--80 C). The study mixed microfloral populations derived from real North Sea-produced fluids, and included an active population of marine methanogenic bacteria present to provide competition for the available carbon sources. In general, results showed that SRB continue to convert sulfate to sulfide in stoichiometric quantities without regard to absolute concentrations. The paper discusses the results and recommends nanofiltration of seawater for ``sweet`` reservoirs.

McElhiney, J.E.; Hardy, J.A. [Marathon Oil Co., Littleton, CO (United States); Rizk, T.Y.; Stott, J.F.D.; Eden, R.D. [UMIST, Manchester (United Kingdom)

1996-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

172

New method studies living bacteria cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New method studies living bacteria cells New method studies living bacteria cells Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory have found a new way to study individual living bacteria cells and analyze their chemistry. In research published today in Science, the scientists used high-energy X-ray fluorescence measurements for mapping and chemical analyses of single free-floating, or planktonic, and surface-adhered, or biofilm, cells of Pseudomonas fluorescens. The results showed differences between the planktonic and adhered cells in morphology, elemental composition and sensitivity to hexavalent chromium, a heavy-metal contaminant and a known carcinogen. The biofilm cells were more tolerant of the contaminant, while it damaged or killed the planktonic cells. Experimental data from sector 1

173

RexDalton,SanFrancisco Plans to use marine microorganisms as a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

weaken the argument that oceanic carbon sequestration can act as a significant component in controlling weather in a region chosen for its significant impact on natural sequestration of carbon dioxide fromRexDalton,SanFrancisco Plans to use marine microorganisms as a sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide

Cai, Long

174

Phylogenetic and Physiological Diversity of Microorganisms Isolated from a Deep Greenland Glacier Ice Core  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...size reduction, condensation of the cytoplasm...microorganisms from the atmospheric airflow into...enhanced the recovery of the high-GC...the presence of water channels and...2003. Bacterial recovery from ancient...Reeve. 2000. Recovery and identification...glacial ice and water in Canadas High...

V. I. Miteva; P. P. Sheridan; J. E. Brenchley

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Atmospheric Movement of Microorganisms in Clouds of Desert Dust and Implications for Human Health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...general, high-energy wind conditions in...western deserts of Egypt, 44 genera and 102...loss of recovery efficiency due to microorganisms...air-dust particles from Egypt. Mycopathologia...western desert of Egypt. Afr. J. Sci...S. Department of Energy, DOE/NV/10845-60...

Dale W. Griffin

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Atmospheric Movement of Microorganisms in Clouds of Desert Dust and Implications for Human Health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...In general, high-energy wind conditions in arid regions...studies of the potential for wind transport of plutonium-contaminated...U.S. Department of Energy, DOE/NV/10845-60...Collecting microorganisms from winds above the Caribbean Sea...

Dale W. Griffin

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Influence of the Gas-Water Interface on Transport of Microorganisms through Unsaturated Porous Media  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...conditions. This difference was interface. The sorption appears to...sorption at the gas-water interface increases with in- Fhese...pore throats. (ii) The standard hypothesis with other strains...for the A static gas-water interface sorbs and retains microorganisms...

Jiamin Wan; John L. Wilson; Thomas L. Kieft

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

(SEMI-) AUTOMATIC RECOGNITION OF MICROORGANISMS IN WATER Karsten Rodenacker, Peter Gais1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of biocenosis in natural waters or investiga- tions on biocenosis in artificial, selective affected waters(SEMI-) AUTOMATIC RECOGNITION OF MICROORGANISMS IN WATER Karsten Rodenacker, Peter Gais1 , Uta J The structure of biocenosis is a powerful indicator for the condition of and changes in quality of the ecosystem

Rodenacker, Karsten

179

BIODEGRADATION OF MACONDO OIL BY AEROBIC HYDROCARBON?DEGRADING BACTERIA IN THE WATER COLUMN AND DEEPSEA SEDIMENTS OF THE NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Previous studies have come to contrasting conclusions regarding nutrient limitation of hydrocarbon biodegradation in the Gulf of Mexico, and rate measurements are needed to support… (more)

Sun, Xiaoxu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Isolation of Aerobic Anoxygenic Photosynthetic Bacteria from Black Smoker Plume Waters of the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the Pacific Ocean Vladimir Yurkov J. Thomas Beatty...Atlantic, Indian, and other Pacific ocean sites. The initial reports of...Juan de Fuca Ridge (northeastern Pacific Ocean; ca. 47N, 129 2,000 m beneath...

Vladimir Yurkov; J. Thomas Beatty

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aerobic bacteria microorganisms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Multicenter Evaluation of the Vitek MS Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry System for Identification of Gram-Positive Aerobic Bacteria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Perman, and G Gilbert. 1995. The...WalkAway diagnostic microbiology system-an...the clinical microbiology laboratory...Perman M, Gilbert G. 1995. The...WalkAway diagnostic microbiology system--an...

Jenna Rychert; Carey-Ann D. Burnham; Maureen Bythrow; Omai B. Garner; Christine C. Ginocchio; Rebecca Jennemann; Michael A. Lewinski; Ryhana Manji; A. Brian Mochon; Gary W. Procop; Sandra S. Richter; Linda Sercia; Lars F. Westblade; Mary Jane Ferraro; John A. Branda

2013-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

182

Changes in Translational Efficiency is a Dominant Regulatory Mechanism in the Environmental Response of Bacteria  

SciTech Connect

To understand how cell physiological state affects mRNA translation, we used Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 grown under steady state conditions at either aerobic or suboxic conditions. Using a combination of quantitative proteomics and RNA-Seq, we generated high-confidence data on >1000 mRNA and protein pairs. By using a steady state model, we found that differences in protein-mRNA ratios were primarily caused by differences in the translational efficiency of specific genes. When oxygen levels were lowered, 28% of the proteins showed at least a 2-fold change in expression. Altered transcription levels appeared responsible for 26% of the protein changes, altered translational efficiency appeared responsible for 46% and a combination of both were responsible for the remaining 28%. Changes in translational efficiency were significantly correlated with the codon usage pattern of the genes and measurable tRNA pools changed in response to altered O2 levels. Our results suggest that changes in the translational efficiency of proteins, in part caused by altered tRNA pools, is a major determinant of regulated protein expression in bacteria.

Taylor, Ronald C.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Serres, Margrethe H.; Linggi, Bryan E.; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Hill, Eric A.; Romine, Margaret F.; Lipton, Mary S.; Wiley, H. S.

2013-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

183

Atmospheric Movement of Microorganisms in Clouds of Desert Dust and Implications for Human Health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...A. Centeno. 2005. Health effects of natural dust-role of trace elements and compounds...enumeration of heterotrophic bacteria in natural mineral water. World J. Microbiol...coccidioidomycosis following a severe natural dust storm. An outbreak at the Naval...

Dale W. Griffin

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Aerobic Metabolism 1 AEROBIC RESPIRATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: · Substrate-level phosphorylations and · Oxidation of long-term energy storage compounds by the coenzyme NAD). These reactions can be viewed as energetically wasteful. The electrons carry considerable potential energy

Prestwich, Ken

185

Rare Branched Fatty Acids Characterize the Lipid Composition of the Intra-Aerobic Methane Oxidizer “Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera”  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...mitigate greenhouse gas emissions and global warming. Methane is one of the least reactive...continue to have a major impact on the global nitrogen cycle. Industrial and agricultural...methanotrophic microorganisms in Coal Oil Point seep sediments. BMC Microbiol...

Dorien M. Kool; Baoli Zhu; W. Irene C. Rijpstra; Mike S. M. Jetten; Katharina F. Ettwig; Jaap S. Sinninghe Damsté

2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

186

Raman activity in synchronously dividing bacteria  

SciTech Connect

Using a spectrometer equipped with an optical-multichannel analyzer as the detector (OMA), we have observed the Stokes laser-Raman spectra of metabolically active Escherichia coli and Bacillus megaterium from 100 - 2100 cm/sup -1/. After lengthy investigation, no Raman lines attributable to the metabolic process nor the cells themselves were found. Previous Raman spectra of active bacteria cannot be used to support nonlinear theories in biology. 34 refs., 9 figs.

Layne, S.P.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Neptunium(V) adsorption to bacteria at low and high ionic strength  

SciTech Connect

Np(V) is expected to be the predominant oxidation state of neptunium in aerobic natural waters. Np(V), as the NpO{sub 2}{sup +} aquo and associated complexed species, is readily soluble, weakly interacting with geologic media, and has a high redox stability under a relatively wide range of subsurface conditions. These chemical properties, along with a long half-life make it a primary element of concern regarding long-term nuclear waste storage and subsurface contaminant. The fate and transport of neptunium in the environment may be influenced by adsorption onto bacterial surfaces. The adsorption of neptunium to bacterial surfaces ties the mobility of the contaminant to the mobility of the bacterium. In this study, the adsorption of the neptunyl (NpO{sub 2}{sup +}) ion was evaluated at low ionic strength on a common soil bacterium and at high ionic strength on a halophilic bacterium isolated from a briny groundwater near the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeast New Mexico. Adsorption experiments were performed in batch reactors as a function of pH, ionic strength, and bacterialNp mass ratio. Np(V) adsorption was modeled using a surface complexation approach with the mathematical program FITEQL to determine functional group specific binding constants. The data from acid and base titrations of the bacteria were also modeled to estimate the concentrations and deprotonation constants of discrete bacterial surface functional groups. Bacterial functional group characteristics and Np(V) adsorption behavior between the soil bacterium and the halophilic bacterium were compared. These results highlight the key similarities and differences in actinide adsorption behavior in environments of significantly different ionic strength. Similarities in adsorption behavior may be linked to similarities in the characteristics of the moieties between all bacterial cell walls. Differences in adsorption behavior may reflect differences in ionic strength effects, rather than differences in bacteria type, as the electronic double layer is compressed with increasing ionic strength. These results further highlight the importance of electrostatic interactions in the adsorption process between dissolved metals and bacterial surfaces. This work expands the understanding of actinide-bacteria adsorption phenomena to high ionic strength environmental conditions that are relevant as an aid to predicting Np(V) fate and transport behavior in areas such as the vicinity of salt-based nuclear waste repositories and high ionic-strength deep ground waters at DOE sites.

Ams, David A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swanson, Juliet S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reed, Donald T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fein, Jeremy B [UNIV OF NOTRE DAME

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

188

Biochemistry and physiology of anaerobic bacteria  

SciTech Connect

We welcome you to The Power of Anaerobes. This conference serves two purposes. One is to celebrate the life of Harry D. Peck, Jr.,who was born May 18, 1927 and would have celebrated his 73rd birthday at this conference. He died November 20, 1998. The second is to gather investigators to exchange views within the realm of anaerobic microbiology, an area in which tremendous progress has been seen during recent years. It is sufficient to mention discoveries of a new form of life (the archaea), hyper or extreme thermophiles, thermophilic alkaliphiles and anaerobic fungi. With these discoveries has come a new realization about physiological and metabolic properties of microorganisms, and this in turn has demonstrated their importance for the development, maintenance and sustenance of life on Earth.

NONE

2000-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

189

Biofilter for removal of nitrogen oxides from contaminated gases under aerobic conditions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A biofilter for reducing concentrations of gaseous nitrogen oxides in a polluted gas comprises a porous organic filter bed medium disposed in a housing, the filter bed medium including a mixed culture of naturally occurring denitrifying bacteria for converting the nitrogen oxides to nitrogen gas, carbon dioxide, and water. A method of reducing concentrations of nitrogen oxides in polluted gas comprises conducting the polluted gas through the biofilter so that the denitrifying bacteria can degrade the nitrogen oxides. A preferred filter medium is wood compost, however composts of other organic materials are functional. Regulation of pH, moisture content, exogenous carbon sources, and temperature are described.

Apel, William A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Ecology of the Microbial Community Removing Phosphate from Wastewater under Continuously Aerobic Conditions in a Sequencing Batch Reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Community Removing Phosphate from Wastewater under Continuously Aerobic...chemical oxygen demand. One wastewater was synthetic, and the other...operation. Only after repeated recycling are poly(P)-accumulating...reactors (SBRs) fed synthetic wastewater with acetate as the sole carbon...

Johwan Ahn; Sarah Schroeder; Michael Beer; Simon McIlroy; Ronald C. Bayly; John W. May; George Vasiliadis; Robert J. Seviour

2007-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

191

Impact of ArcA loss in Shewanella oneidensis revealed by comparative proteomics under aerobic and anaerobic conditions  

SciTech Connect

Shewanella inhabit a wide variety of niches in nature and can utilize a broad spectrum of electron acceptors under anaerobic conditions. How they modulate their gene expression to adapt is poorly understood. ArcA, homologue of a global regulator controlling hundreds of genes involved in aerobic and anaerobic respiration in E. coli, was shown to be important in aerobiosis/anaerobiosis of S. oneidensis as well. Loss of ArcA, in addition to altering transcription of many genes, resulted in impaired growth under aerobic condition, which was not observed in E. coli. To further characterize the impact of ArcA loss on gene expression on the level of proteome under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, liquid-chromatography-mass-spectrometry (LC-MS) based proteomic approach was employed. Results show that ArcA loss led to globally altered gene expression, generally consistent with that observed with transcripts. Comparison of transcriptomic and proteomic data permitted identification of 17 high-confidence ArcA targets. Moreover, our data indicate that ArcA is required for regulation of cytochrome c proteins, and the menaquinone level may play a role in regulating ArcA as in E. coli. Proteomic-data-guided growth assay revealed that the aerobic growth defect of ArcA mutant is presumably due to impaired peptide utilization.

Yuan, Jie; Wei, Buyun; Lipton, Mary S.; Gao, Haichun

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Advanced Biofuels: How Scientists are Engineering Bacteria to Help Drive  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Biofuels: How Scientists are Engineering Bacteria to Help Advanced Biofuels: How Scientists are Engineering Bacteria to Help Drive America Advanced Biofuels: How Scientists are Engineering Bacteria to Help Drive America December 6, 2011 - 2:12pm Addthis Strains of E. coli bacteria were engineered to digest switchgrass biomass and synthesize its sugars into gasoline, diesel and jet fuel. | Image courtesy of Berkeley Lab. Strains of E. coli bacteria were engineered to digest switchgrass biomass and synthesize its sugars into gasoline, diesel and jet fuel. | Image courtesy of Berkeley Lab. Liisa O'Neill Liisa O'Neill Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Who knew Escherichia coli (E. coli) could help America reduce its dependence on foreign oil? A breakthrough with the bacteria could make it cheaper to produce fuel from switchgrass -- an advanced biofuel with the

193

Advanced Biofuels: How Scientists are Engineering Bacteria to Help Drive  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Biofuels: How Scientists are Engineering Bacteria to Help Advanced Biofuels: How Scientists are Engineering Bacteria to Help Drive America Advanced Biofuels: How Scientists are Engineering Bacteria to Help Drive America December 6, 2011 - 2:12pm Addthis Strains of E. coli bacteria were engineered to digest switchgrass biomass and synthesize its sugars into gasoline, diesel and jet fuel. | Image courtesy of Berkeley Lab. Strains of E. coli bacteria were engineered to digest switchgrass biomass and synthesize its sugars into gasoline, diesel and jet fuel. | Image courtesy of Berkeley Lab. Liisa O'Neill Liisa O'Neill Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Who knew Escherichia coli (E. coli) could help America reduce its dependence on foreign oil? A breakthrough with the bacteria could make it cheaper to produce fuel from switchgrass -- an advanced biofuel with the

194

Enhanced Biomass Digestion with Wood Wasp Bacteria - Energy Innovation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enhanced Biomass Digestion with Wood Wasp Bacteria Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center Contact GLBRC About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary Plant biomass represents a...

195

Leachability of salmonella and fecal pollution indicator bacteria through soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

24 6. Percentage of bacteria adsorbed onto soil particles greater than 1 um in diameter 25 7. lhe proportion of bacteria at a given depth that leached thro gh an Arenosa loamy sand 31 8. The proportion of bacteria at a given depth that leached... of the physical regime permitting bacterial movement in soils. They were: bacteria depend on a continuous water pathway where the water filled pores have a greater pore neck diameter than 2 to 3 um, and the lense of water in very large pores must...

Fehrmann, Robert Clinton

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

196

Microorganisms found in salt flats could offer new path to green hydrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"Proton pumps" are proteins that typically straddle a cellular membrane and transfer protons from inside the cell to the extracellular space. To view a larger version of the image, click on it. "Proton pumps" are proteins that typically straddle a cellular membrane and transfer protons from inside the cell to the extracellular space. To view a larger version of the image, click on it. "Proton pumps" are proteins that typically straddle a cellular membrane and transfer protons from inside the cell to the extracellular space. To view a larger version of the image, click on it. Microorganisms found in salt flats could offer new path to green hydrogen fuel July 16, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint ARGONNE, Ill. - A protein found in the membranes of ancient microorganisms that live in desert salt flats could offer a new way of using sunlight to generate environmentally friendly hydrogen fuel, according to a new study by researchers at the U.S. Department of

197

Energy conversion in Purple Bacteria Photosynthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The study of how photosynthetic organisms convert light offers insight not only into nature's evolutionary process, but may also give clues as to how best to design and manipulate artificial photosynthetic systems -- and also how far we can drive natural photosynthetic systems beyond normal operating conditions, so that they can harvest energy for us under otherwise extreme conditions. In addition to its interest from a basic scientific perspective, therefore, the goal to develop a deep quantitative understanding of photosynthesis offers the potential payoff of enhancing our current arsenal of alternative energy sources for the future. In the following Chapter, we consider the trade-off between dynamics, structure and function of light harvesting membranes in Rps. Photometricum purple bacteria, as a model to highlight the priorities that arise when photosynthetic organisms adapt to deal with the ever-changing natural environment conditions.

Felipe Caycedo-Soler; Ferney J. Rodriguez; Luis Quiroga; Guannan Zhao; Neil F. Johnson

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Energy conversion in Purple Bacteria Photosynthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The study of how photosynthetic organisms convert light offers insight not only into nature's evolutionary process, but may also give clues as to how best to design and manipulate artificial photosynthetic systems -- and also how far we can drive natural photosynthetic systems beyond normal operating conditions, so that they can harvest energy for us under otherwise extreme conditions. In addition to its interest from a basic scientific perspective, therefore, the goal to develop a deep quantitative understanding of photosynthesis offers the potential payoff of enhancing our current arsenal of alternative energy sources for the future. In the following Chapter, we consider the trade-off between dynamics, structure and function of light harvesting membranes in Rps. Photometricum purple bacteria, as a model to highlight the priorities that arise when photosynthetic organisms adapt to deal with the ever-changing natural environment conditions.

Caycedo-Soler, Felipe; Quiroga, Luis; Zhao, Guannan; Johnson, Neil F

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Oxygen Consumption Rates of Bacteria under Nutrient-Limited Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Environmental Microbiology Oxygen Consumption Rates of Bacteria under Nutrient-Limited...heterotrophic bacteria was measured. The oxygen consumption and population density of batch cultures...tracked for up to 200 days. The oxygen consumption per CFU (QO2) declined by more than...

Timothy E. Riedel; William M. Berelson; Kenneth H. Nealson; Steven E. Finkel

2013-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

200

RELATION OF BACTERIA TO VITAMINS AND OTHER GROWTH FACTORS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...H. PETERSON AND MARY S. PETERSON Starch has been emphasized by several investigators...and 76 RELATION OF BACTERIA TO VITAMINS metabolism of all bacteria. The limited information...D. E. 1942 Riboflavin analysis of cereals. Ind. Eng. Chem. Anal. Ed., 14...

W. H. Peterson; Mary S. Peterson

1945-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aerobic bacteria microorganisms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Detection of Bacteria Using Inkjet-Printed Enzymatic Test Strips  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Detection of Bacteria Using Inkjet-Printed Enzymatic Test Strips ... We report the use of inkjet printing to co-pattern an enzyme-nanoparticle sensor complex and enzymatic substrate on a paper-based test strip for rapid detection of bacteria. ...

Brian Creran; Xiaoning Li; Bradley Duncan; Chang Soo Kim; Daniel F. Moyano; Vincent M. Rotello

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

202

Flagellation as a criterion for the classification of bacteria.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...bacteria. Eighteen isolates of marine agar-digesting bacteria were...needed. Serological relation- ships suggesting shared antigenic...studies of both freshwater and marine vibrios, pseudomonads and related...the G + C values of the DNA of marine and nonmarine vibrios, which...

M E Rhodes

1965-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Use of thermophilic bacteria for bioremediation of petroleum contaminants  

SciTech Connect

Several strains of thermophilic bacteria were isolated from the environment of the United Arab Emirates. These bacteria show extraordinary resistance to heat and have their maximum growth rate around 60--80 C. This article investigates the potential of using these facultative bacteria for both in situ and ex situ bioremediation of petroleum contaminants. In a series of batch experiments, bacterial growth was observed using a computer image analyzer following a recently developed technique. These experiments showed clearly that the growth rate is enhanced in the presence of crude oil. This is coupled with a rapid degradation of the crude oil. These bacteria were found to be ideal for breaking down long-chain organic molecules at a temperature of 40 C, which is the typical ambient temperature of the Persian Gulf region. The same strains of bacteria are also capable of surviving in the presence of the saline environment that can prevail in both sea water and reservoir connate water. This observation prompted further investigation into the applicability of the bacteria in microbial enhanced oil recovery. In the United Arab Emirates, the reservoirs are typically at a temperature of around 85 C. Finally, the performance of the bacteria is tested in a newly developed bioreactor that uses continuous aeration through a transverse slotted pipe. This reactor also uses mixing without damaging the filamentous bacteria. In this process, the mechanisms of bioremediation are identified.

Al-Maghrabi, I.M.A.; Bin Aqil, A.O.; Chaalal, O. [United Arab Emirates Univ., Al-Ain (United Arab Emirates); Islam, M.R. [Univ. of Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada). Faculty of Engineering

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Effect of electrical stimulation on bacteria of meats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of ground beef and steaks from beef carcasses. Preparation of model system. Microbiological Procedures. Preparation of inocula Inoculation and/or enumeration procedures. Rabbit muscles inoculated with a Pseudomonas or Lactobacillus sp. Aerobic plate... and control samples. The electrically stimulated samples showed a less well oefined I-band and Z-line through the contracture bands, and sarcomeres on either side of the contracture bands seemed to be stretched or broken. Gilbert and Davey (1976) applied...

Mrigadat, Boosya

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

205

Farm-scale anaerobic storage and aerobic stability of high dry matter sorghum as a biomass feedstock  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Research was conducted to determine the feasibility of using a chopped harvest and anerobic storage system to conserve mature, high dry matter (DM) sorghum intended as a cellulosic biomass feedstock for production of biofuels or bioproducts. Forage and sweet sorghum were anaerobically stored in farm-scale silo bags for over 200 days. Sorghum DM content was between 385 and 579 g kg?1. The DM lost during storage averaged 24 g kg?1 DM (range 3–48 g kg?1 DM). The additional DM lost after two- and seven-day aerobic exposure was 7 and 11 g kg?1 DM, respectively. On-harvester inoculation with a combination of homofermentative (Pediococcus pentosaceus) and heterofermentative (Lactobacillus buchneri) bacterium increased the production of both lactic and acetic acid during storage, produced lower yeast and mold populations during aerobic exposure and improved aerobic stability as quantified by temperature. Total fermentation products were less than 50 g kg?1 with an overall average of 34.9 g kg?1. Average recovery of cellulose and hemicellulose was 98% of initial mass. Anaerobic storage of chopped, inoculated, high DM, mature sorghum was shown to be a viable cellulosic biomass feedstock system.

Shane D. Williams; Kevin J. Shinners

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Argonne cleans contaminated Kansas site by feeding bacteria | Argonne  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne cleans contaminated Kansas site by feeding bacteria Argonne cleans contaminated Kansas site by feeding bacteria By Jared Sagoff * October 8, 2010 Tweet EmailPrint When cleaning the bathroom, we usually consider bacteria the enemy. However, a new study conducted by environmental scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory has demonstrated a way to enlist bacteria in the fight to cleanse some of the country's most intractably polluted locations. Last year, a team of Argonne scientists led by Lorraine LaFreniere injected iron microparticles underneath fields long-polluted with carbon tetrachloride near Centralia, Kansas. The researchers coated the microparticles with organic material, which served as bait for bacteria that created the conditions necessary to safely convert the toxic chemical

207

Development and Evaluation of Methods to Infer Biosynthesis and Substrate Consumption in Cultures of Cellulolytic Microorganisms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and and Evaluation of Methods to Infer Biosynthesis and Substrate Consumption in Cultures of Cellulolytic Microorganisms Evert K. Holwerda, Lucas D. Ellis, Lee R. Lynd Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth College, 14 Engineering Drive, Hanover, New Hampshire, 03755; telephone: 1-6036462231; fax: 1-6036462277; e-mail: lee.r.lynd@dartmouth.edu ABSTRACT: Concentrations of biosynthate (microbial bio- mass plus extracellular proteins) and residual substrate were inferred using elemental analysis for batch cultures of Clostridium thermocellum. Inferring residual substrate based on elemental analysis for a cellulose (Avicel)-grown culture shows similar results to residual substrate determined by quantitative saccharification using acid hydrolysis. Inference based on elemental analysis is also compared to different on- line measurements: base addition, CO

208

Process for producing modified microorganisms for oil treatment at high temperatures, pressures and salinity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to the preparation of new, modified organisms, through challenge growth processes, that are viable in the extreme temperature, pressure and pH conditions and salt concentrations of an oil reservoir and that are suitable for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The modified microorganisms of the present invention are used to enhance oil recovery and remove sulfur compounds and metals from the crude oil. The processes are comprised of steps which successively limit the carbon sources and increase the temperature, pressure and salinity of the media. This is done until microbial strains are obtained that are capable of growing in essentially crude oil as a carbon source and at a temperature range from about 70 C to 90 C, at a pressure range from about 2,000 to 2,500 psi and at a salinity range from about 1.3 to 35%. 68 figs.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.

1996-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

209

Evaluation of sulfur-reducing microorganisms for organic desulfurization. [Pyrococcus furiosus  

SciTech Connect

Because of substantial portion of the sulfur in Illinois coal is organic, microbial desulfurization of sulfidic and thiophenic functionalities could hold great potential for completing pyritic sulfur removal. We are testing the hypothesis that organic sulfur can be reductively removed as H{sub 2}S through the activities of anaerobic microorganisms. Our objectives for this year include the following: (1) To obtain cultures that will reductively desulfurize thiophenic model compounds. In addition to crude oil enrichments begun last year, we sampled municipal sewage sludge. (2) To continue to work toward optimizing the activity of the DBDS-reducing cultures obtained during the previous year. (3) To expand coal desulfurization work to include other coals including Illinois Basin Coal 101 and a North Dakota lignite, which might be more susceptible to the dibenzyldisulfide reducing cultures due to its lower rank. (4) To address the problem of sulfide sorption, by investigating the sorption capacity of coals in addition to Illinois Basin Coal 108.

Miller, K.W.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

E-Print Network 3.0 - aeruginosa biofilm bacteria Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of bacteria that are held... and secretion of EPSs, but although some bacteria switch on EPS production at high cell densities in biofilms... , other bacteria switch it off. Nadell...

211

Systematic characterization of protein glycosylation of bacteria cell surface proteins  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bacteria cell Bacteria cell Insoluble fraction Glycoprotein Enrichment Integrated top-down and bottom-up Glycoprotein & Glycopeptide Step 1: Glycoproteome profile Glycans HILIC-FTICR-MS/MS (Sequencing ) Step 2: Glycan profile NMR (structure recognization) Data Interpretation Databases De Novo and other algorithms Step 3: Glycoinformatics Glycan database Glycoprotein database Hydrolysis graphitized carbon cloumn Schematic Representation of Proposed Platform for Bacterial Glycoproteome Characterization EMSL Research and Capability Development Proposals Systematic characterization of protein glycosylation of bacteria cell surface proteins Project start date: July 2011 Principal Investigator: Si Wu Mass Spectrometry and Magnet Resonance Group, EMSL, PNNL Co-investigators:

212

Reduction of viscosity in suspension of swimming bacteria.  

SciTech Connect

Measurements of the shear viscosity in suspensions of swimming Bacillus subtilis in free-standing liquid films have revealed that the viscosity can decrease by up to a factor of 7 compared to the viscosity of the same liquid without bacteria or with nonmotile bacteria. The reduction in viscosity is observed in two complementary experiments: one studying the decay of a large vortex induced by a moving probe and another measuring the viscous torque on a rotating magnetic particle immersed in the film. The viscosity depends on the concentration and swimming speed of the bacteria.

Aranson, I. S.; Sokolov, A.; Chen, L.; Jin, Q.; Materials Science Division

2009-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

213

Reduction of viscosity in suspension of swimming bacteria.  

SciTech Connect

Measurements of the shear viscosity in suspensions of swimming Bacillus subtilis in free-standing liquid films have revealed that the viscosity can decrease by up to a factor of 7 compared to the viscosity of the same liquid without bacteria or with nonmotile bacteria. The reduction in viscosity is observed in two complementary experiments: one studying the decay of a large vortex induced by a moving probe and another measuring the viscous torque on a rotating magnetic particle immersed in the film. The viscosity depends on the concentration and swimming speed of the bacteria.

Sokolov, A.; Aranson, I. S.; Materials Science Division; Illinois Inst. of Tech.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Nutrient leaching following land application of aerobically digested municipal sewage sludge in a northern hardwood forest  

SciTech Connect

Concentrations of selected cations and anions were determined in soil solutions from a forested site in southern New Hampshire during the first growing season after surface application of an aerobically digested, limed, liquid municipal sludge. Sludge was applied in June 1989 at 0, 3.3, 6.9, and 14.5 Mg ha{sup -1}, which corresponded to 199, 396, and 740 kg N ha{sup -1} as total Kjeldahl N (TKN). Porous, suction-cup lysimeters were used to sample soil solutions below the rooting zone ({approximately}60 cm) within subplots designed to include (untrenched) or exclude (trenched) uptake by vegetation. Following sludge application, measured solute concentrations remained low until September 1989, when NO{sub 3}, Cl, Ca, Mg, Na, and K in trenched subplots increased simultaneously to maximum values in October or November 1989, just before the soil froze for the winter. Nitrate was the dominant anion in soil solutions from trenched subplots and averaged in excess of 0.71 mmol L{sup -1} (10 mg L{sup -1} NO{sub 3}-N) at all loading rates. Highest concentrations of NO{sub 3} occurred on subplots with the highest sludge application rates. In the entrenched areas, NO{sub 3} concentrations rarely exceeded 0.001 mmol L{sup -1}; Cl increased in treated areas and was the dominant anion by the end of the season. Soil solution NH{sub 4}, PO{sub 4}, SO{sub 4} K, and pH did not change significantly for any sludge application rate. Comparison of results from trenched and untrenched areas suggests that, at application rates of up to 14.5 Mg ha{sup -1 }(799 kg TKN ha{sup -1}), a combination of physical, chemical, and biological factors (most likely plant uptake) limited the movement of sludge or sludge-derived constituents from the sites of application. 37 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

Medalie, L.; Bowden, W.B.; Smith, C.T. [Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Method of producing a cellulase-containing cell-free fermentate produced from microorganism ATCC 55702  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Bacteria which produce large amounts of cellulose-containing cell-free fermentate have been identified. The original bacterium (ATCC 55703) was genetically altered using nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) treatment to produce the enhanced cellulase producing bacterium (ATCC 55702), which was identified through replicate plating. ATCC 55702 has improved characteristics and qualities for the degradation of cellulosic waste materials for fuel production, food processing, textile processing, and other industrial applications. ATCC 55702 is an improved bacterial host for genetic manipulations using recombinant DNA techniques, and is less likely to destroy genetic manipulations using standard mutagenesis techniques. 5 figs.

Dees, H.C.

1998-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

216

Cellulase-containing cell-free fermentate produced from microorganism ATCC 55702  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Bacteria which produce large amounts of cellulase-containing cell-free fermentate have been identified. The original bacterium (ATCC 55703) was genetically altered using nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) treatment to produce the enhanced cellulase producing bacterium (ATCC 55702), which was identified through replicate plating. ATCC 55702 has improved characteristics and qualities for the degradation of cellulosic waste materials for fuel production, food processing, textile processing, and other industrial applications. ATCC 55702 is an improved bacterial host for genetic manipulations using recombinant DNA techniques, and is less likely to destroy genetic manipulations using standard mutagenesis techniques. 5 figs.

Dees, H.C.

1997-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

217

Why sequence Alkaliphilic sulfur oxidizing bacteria for sulfur pollution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alkaliphilic sulfur oxidizing Alkaliphilic sulfur oxidizing bacteria for sulfur pollution remediation? Burning sulfur-containing fuels, such as coal, oil, and natural gas, contributes significantly to global environmental problems, such as air pollution and acid rain, besides contributing to the loss of the ozone layer. One method of managing sulfur compounds released as byproducts from industrial processes is to scrub them out using chemical treatments and activated charcoal beds. A lower-cost solution relies on incorporating alkaliphic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria into biofilters to convert the volatile and toxic compounds into insoluble sulfur for easier removal. Discovered in the last decade, these bacteria have been found to thrive in habitats that span the full pH range. The bacteria could have applications

218

Foodborne Sources of Bacteria Associated With Human Obesity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and anaerobic bacterial loads and to isolate bacteria. The total microbial community was extracted from these food samples and the 16S rRNA gene sequences of the microbiome were PCR amplified. The PCR amplicons were sequenced using pyrosequencing...

McElhany, Katherine Grace

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

219

Chloroxylenol- and triclosan-tolerant bacteria from industrial sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Potential development of bacterial tolerance to biocides in the industrial environment is examined in this study. Bacteria tolerant to the phenolic-type agent para-chloro-meta...-xylenol (PCMX) and the bis-phenol...

J C Lear; J-Y Maillard; P W Dettmar…

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Simple Method for Killing Halophilic Bacteria in Contaminated Solar Salt  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...growth and also to sterilize solar salt. Two samples of solar salt, contaminated with red...it had a much lower buffering capacity than the used salt, presumably...economical method of freeing solar salt from halophilic bacteria...

D. J. Kushner; G. Masson; N. E. Gibbons

1965-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aerobic bacteria microorganisms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

How Do Bacteria Repair Damage from the Sun? | Advanced Photon...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

| Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed How Do Bacteria Repair Damage from the Sun? JANUARY 22, 2014 Bookmark and Share Modeling of UvrAUvrB SAXS data. Panel A shows the...

222

Dissolved Organic Matter Kinetically Controls Mercury Bioavailability to Bacteria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Predicting the bioavailability of inorganic mercury (Hg) to bacteria that produce the potent bioaccumulative neurotoxin monomethylmercury remains one of the greatest challenges in predicting the environmental fate and transport of Hg. Dissolved organic ...

Sophie A. Chiasson-Gould; Jules M. Blais; Alexandre J. Poulain

2014-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

223

Petroleum hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in the Galveston Bay system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PETROLEUM HYDRQCARBOiV-DEGRADING BACTERIA IN THE GALVESTON BAY SYSTEM A Thesis by STEVEN JAMES SCHROPP Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIFNCE... December 1979 Major Subject: Biology PETROLEUM HYDROCARBON-DEGRADING BACTERIA IN THE GALVESTON BAY SYSTEM A Thesis by STEVEN JAMES SCHROPP Approved as to style and content by: (Co-Chairman of Committee) '( ~CA. ( -Chairman of Committee) (Head...

Schropp, Steven James

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Rapid identification of bacteria using an umbelliferone fluorescent assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RAPID IDENTIFICATION OF BACTERIA USING AN UMBELLIFERONE FLUORESCENT ASSAY A Thesis by RICHARD THOMAS CHAMBLIN, JR, Submitted to the Graduate College of' Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1983 Major Subject: Veterinary Microbiology RAPID IDENTIFICATION OF BACTERIA USING AN UMBELLIFERONE FLUORESCENT ASSAY A Thesis by RICHARD THOMAS CHAMBLIN, JR ~ Approved as to style and content by ( -Chairman of Committee) John M...

Chamblin, Richard Thomas

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Fouling of carbon steel heat exchanger caused by iron bacteria  

SciTech Connect

A carbon steel heat exchanger installed in a reverse osmosis unit failed after 1 1/2 years from start-up as a result of tubes, lids, tube sheets, and connection pipes clogging from rust deposits. Chemical analysis of cooling water and scraped precipitates, as well laboratory screening of the deposits for bacteria, revealed that activity of iron-oxidizing bacteria present in cooling water could lead to heat exchanger blockage.

Starosvetsky, J.; Armon, R.; Starosvetsky, D. (Technion-Israel Inst. of Tech. (Israel)); Groysman, A.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Lagooning microbial fuel cells: A first approach by coupling electricity-producing microorganisms and algae  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The paper focused on the start-up and performance characterisation of a new type of microbial fuel cell (MFC), in which an algae culture was seeded in the cathodic chamber to produce the oxygen required to complete the electrochemical reactions of the MFC, thus circumventing the need for a mechanical aerator. The system did not use mediators or high cost catalysts and it can be started-up easily using a straightforward three-stage procedure. The start-up consists of the separate production of the electricity-producing microorganisms and the algae cultures (stage I), replacement of the mechanical aeration system by the algae culture (stage II) and a change in the light dosage from a continuous input to a dynamic day/night profile. The MFC was operated under a regime of 12 h light and 12 h dark and was also operated in batch and continuous substrate-feeding modes. The same cell voltage was achieved when the cathode compartment was operated with air supplied by aerators, which means that this configuration can perform as well as the traditional one. The results also show the influence of both the organic load and light irradiation on electricity production and demonstrate that this type MFC is a robust and promising technology that can be considered as a first approach to perform a lagooning wastewater treatment with microbial fuel cells.

Justo Lobato; Araceli González del Campo; Francisco J. Fernández; Pablo Cañizares; Manuel A. Rodrigo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

A study of the localized humoral immune response to implicated microorganisms in juvenile periodontitis  

SciTech Connect

A study was undertaken using an in vitro explant culture system to determine the presence of immunoglobulins (IgG, IgA, and IgM) in the supernatant fluids (SF) of disease gingival tissue explant cultures. Studies were also undertaken to determine if the de novo biosynthesis of {sup 14}C-immunoglobulins could be observed in the explant cultures of diseased tissues from juvenile periodontitis (JP) patients. Radiolabeled proteins were detected in the SF and immunodiffusion studies using goat antihuman gamma, alpha or mu chain serum revealed the presence of IgG and IgA but no IgM present in the SF of the JP gingival tissue explant cultures. Immunodiffusion studies using goat anti-human gamma chain serum with Staph protein A isolated IgG fractions of the SF, followed by autoradiography of the IgG precipitation lines demonstrated the biosynthesis of IgG by the JP gingival tissue explant cultures. The serological studies suggested that local immune response in JP was to a polymicrobic infection. The SF of JP showed significantly higher levels of antibody reactivity to B. intermedius, C. ochracea, E. nodatum and P. micros as compared to healthy tissues. The local antibody response to the microorganisms tested differed from that observed in the sera of the patients.

Hall, E.R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Metatranscriptomic and functional metagenomic analysis of methylphosphonate utilization by marine bacteria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aerobic degradation of methylphosphonate (MPn) by marine bacterioplankton has been hypothesized to contribute significantly to the ocean's methane supersaturation, yet little is known about MPn utilization by marine microbes. ...

Ventouras, Laure-Anne

229

An Approach for Assessing the Signature Quality of Various Chemical Assays when Predicting the Culture Media Used to Grow Microorganisms  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate an approach for assessing the quality of a signature system designed to predict the culture medium used to grow a microorganism. The system was comprised of four chemical assays designed to identify various ingredients that could be used to produce the culture medium. The analytical measurements resulting from any combination of these four assays can be used in a Bayesian network to predict the probabilities that the microorganism was grown using one of eleven culture media. We evaluated combinations of the signature system by removing one or more of the assays from the Bayes network. We measured and compared the quality of the various Bayes nets in terms of fidelity, cost, risk, and utility, a method we refer to as Signature Quality Metrics

Holmes, Aimee E.; Sego, Landon H.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Anderson, Richard M.; Unwin, Stephen D.; Weimar, Mark R.; Tardiff, Mark F.; Corley, Courtney D.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Influence of microorganisms on the oxidation state distribution of multivalent actinides under anoxic conditions  

SciTech Connect

The fate and potential mobility of multivalent actinides in the subsurface is receiving increased attention as the DOE looks to cleanup the many legacy nuclear waste sites and associated subsurface contamination. Plutonium, uranium and neptunium are the near-surface multivalent contaminants of concern and are also key contaminants for the deep geologic disposal of nuclear waste. Their mobility is highly dependent on their redox distribution at their contamination source as well as along their potential migration pathways. This redox distribution is often controlled, especially in the near-surface where organic/inorganic contaminants often coexist, by the direct and indirect effects of microbial activity. Under anoxic conditions, indirect and direct bioreduction mechanisms exist that promote the prevalence of lower-valent species for multivalent actinides. Oxidation-state-specific biosorption is also an important consideration for long-term migration and can influence oxidation state distribution. Results of ongoing studies to explore and establish the oxidation-state specific interactions of soil bacteria (metal reducers and sulfate reducers) as well as halo-tolerant bacteria and Archaea for uranium, neptunium and plutonium will be presented. Enzymatic reduction is a key process in the bioreduction of plutonium and uranium, but co-enzymatic processes predominate in neptunium systems. Strong sorptive interactions can occur for most actinide oxidation states but are likely a factor in the stabilization of lower-valent species when more than one oxidation state can persist under anaerobic microbiologically-active conditions. These results for microbiologically active systems are interpreted in the context of their overall importance in defining the potential migration of multivalent actinides in the subsurface.

Reed, Donald Timothy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Borkowski, Marian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lucchini, Jean - Francois [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ams, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Richmann, M. K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Khaing, H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swanson, J. S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

231

Aqueous-phase selective aerobic oxidation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural on Ru/C in the presence of base  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The aerobic oxidation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) was performed on an activated carbon-supported ruthenium (Ru/C) catalyst in water. The presence of Mg-Al hydrotalcite (HT, Mg/Al molar ratio = 3/1) as a base afforded higher selective oxidation of HMF to 5-formyl-2-furancarboxylic acid (FFCA) and 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid (FDCA) than with the bases MgO, Ca(OH)2 and NaOH owing to its appropriate strength of basicity. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterization confirmed that metallic Ru0 species were the active sites for HMF oxidation. Isotopic tracer experiments conducted with 18O2 and 16O2 indicated that H2O rather than O2 provided the oxygen atom for the oxidation of HMF to FFCA and FDCA via hydration of the formyl group. These results and kinetic studies of the oxidation of HMF and 2,5-diformylfuran (DFF) led to the proposition that the aerobic oxidation of HMF to FFCA follows a Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism. The oxidation involved dissociative adsorption of HMF and O2 to form adsorbed alcoholate and atomic oxygen species followed by kinetically relevant abstraction of ?-H from the alcoholate species via the atomic oxygen species to adsorbed DFF species on the Ru surface, which then underwent hydration and oxidation to FFCA under basic conditions.

Jiahan Xie; Junfang Nie; Haichao Liu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Comparison of Identification Systems for Classification of Bacteria Isolated from Water and Endolithic Habitats within the Deep Subsurface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...U12n, in Rainier Mesa at the Nevada Test Site. Endolithic microorganisms were...U12n, in Rainier Mesa at the Nevada Test Site. Endolithic microorganisms were...U12n, in Rainier Mesa at the Nevada Test Site. Endolithic microorganisms were...

P. S. Amy; D. L. Haldeman; D. Ringelberg; D. H. Hall; C. Russell

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Vertical and Horizontal Variations in the Physiological Diversity of the Aerobic Chemoheterotrophic Bacterial Microflora in Deep Southeast Coastal Plain Subsurface Sediments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...isolates included a large number of unrelated...sediment samples with drilling muds, but it cannot...microorganisms arising from drilling-mud intrusion. Drilling fluids were recirculated through the entire borehole and most probably contained...

D. L. Balkwill; J. K. Fredrickson; J. M. Thomas

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Portsmouth Site Feeds Bacteria to Render Hazardous Groundwater Waste  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portsmouth Site Feeds Bacteria to Render Hazardous Groundwater Portsmouth Site Feeds Bacteria to Render Hazardous Groundwater Waste Harmless Portsmouth Site Feeds Bacteria to Render Hazardous Groundwater Waste Harmless April 2, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Neil Smith puts a trained eye on the pressure and flow of a food-grade com¬pound being injected into an under¬ground plume of hazardous waste near the X-720 Maintenance Facility at the DOE Piketon Site. The sodium lactate compound promotes bacterial growth in the groundwater that turns hazardous waste into harmless end-products. Neil Smith puts a trained eye on the pressure and flow of a food-grade com¬pound being injected into an under¬ground plume of hazardous waste near the X-720 Maintenance Facility at the DOE Piketon Site. The sodium lactate compound promotes bacterial growth in the groundwater that turns

235

Evolution of the Kdo2-lipid A Biosynthesis in Bacteria  

SciTech Connect

BACKGROUND: Lipid A is the highly immunoreactive endotoxic center of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). It anchors the LPS into the outer membrane of most Gram-negative bacteria. Lipid A can be recognized by animal cells, triggers defense-related responses, and causes Gram-negative sepsis. The biosynthesis of Kdo2-lipid A, the LPS substructure, involves with nine enzymatic steps. RESULTS: In order to elucidate the evolutionary pathway of Kdo2-lipid A biosynthesis, we examined the distribution of genes encoding the nine enzymes across bacteria. We found that not all Gram-negative bacteria have all nine enzymes. Some Gram-negative bacteria have no genes encoding these enzymes and others have genes only for the first four enzymes (LpxA, LpxC, LpxD, and LpxB). Among the nine enzymes, five appeared to have arisen from three independent gene duplication events. Two of such events happened within the Proteobacteria lineage, followed by functional specialization of the duplicated genes and pathway optimization in these bacteria. CONCLUSIONS: The nine-enzyme pathway, which was established based on the studies mainly in Escherichia coli K12, appears to be the most derived and optimized form. It is found only in E. coli and related Proteobacteria. Simpler and probably less efficient pathways are found in other bacterial groups, with Kdo2-lipid A variants as the likely end products. The Kdo2-lipid A biosynthetic pathway exemplifies extremely plastic evolution of bacterial genomes, especially those of Proteobacteria, and how these mainly pathogenic bacteria have adapted to their environment.

S Opiyo; R Pardy; H Moriyama; E Moriyama

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

236

Ecology of the Microbial Community Removing Phosphate from Wastewater under Continuously Aerobic Conditions in a Sequencing Batch Reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...is degraded to provide energy, and phosphate is released...bacteria containing carbon/energy reserves of PHA can grow and assimilate...that glycogen provides energy and reducing power for...existing systems around the world do not employ EBPR...

Johwan Ahn; Sarah Schroeder; Michael Beer; Simon McIlroy; Ronald C. Bayly; John W. May; George Vasiliadis; Robert J. Seviour

2007-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

237

Magnetic Torque of Microfabricated Elements and Magnetotactic Bacteria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a thorough theoretical analysis of the magnetic torque on microfabricated elements with dimensions in the range of 100 to 500 {\\mu}m and magneto-somes of magnetotactic bacteria of a few {\\mu}m length. We derive simple equations for field dependent torque and magnetic shape anisotropy that can be readily used to replace the crude approximations commonly used. We illustrate and verify the theory on microfabricated elements and magnetotactic bacteria, by field depedent torque magnetometry and by observing their rotation in water under application of a rotating magnetic field. The maximum rotation frequency of the largest microfabricated elements agrees within error boundaries with theory. For smaller, and especially thinner, elements the measured frequencies are a factor of three to four too low. We suspect this is caused by incomplete saturation of the magnetisation in the elements, which is not incorporated in our model. The maximum rotation frequency of magnetotactic bacteria agrees with our model within error margins, which are however quite big due to the large spread in bacteria morphology. The model presented provides a solid basis for the analysis of experiments with magnetic objects in liquid, which is for instance the case in the field of medical microrobotics.

Lars Zondervan; Özlem Sardan Sukas; Islam S. M. Khalil; Marc P. Pichel; Sarthak Misra; Leon Abelmann

2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

238

CARD-FISH and Microautoradiography Protocol for Bacteria and Archaea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 CARD-FISH and Microautoradiography Protocol for Bacteria and Archaea by Gerhard Herndl Lab @ www FISH Hybridization www.microbial-oceanography.eu 2007 2 Sample Fixation 1. Fix samples in Ethanol 95% 7. Dry and mount in DAPI mix #12;CARD FISH Buffers and Chemicals www

Herndl, Gerhard

239

Methods for targetted mutagenesis in gram-positive bacteria  

SciTech Connect

The present invention provides a method of targeted mutagenesis in Gram-positive bacteria. In particular, the present invention provides a method that effectively integrates a suicide integrative vector into a target gene in the chromosome of a Gram-positive bacterium, resulting in inactivation of the target gene.

Yang, Yunfeng

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

240

Characterization of Bioluminescent Derivatives of Assimilable Organic Carbon Test Bacteria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Jersey 08043 The assimilable organic carbon (AOC) test is a standardized measure of the bacterial...describe the design and initial development of an AOC assay that uses bioluminescent derivatives of AOC test bacteria. Our assay is based on the observation...

Pryce L. Haddix; Nancy J. Shaw; Mark W. LeChevallier

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aerobic bacteria microorganisms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Protein signaling via type III secretion pathways in phytopathogenic bacteria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-5274 Abbreviations HR hypersensitive response Pv pathovar NLS nuclear localization signals Introduction Plants secretion pathway has revealed new mechanisms by which phytopathogenic bacteria infect plants. The suggestion that bacterial gene products are `delivered to' and `perceived by' plants cells has fundamentally

Mudgettt, Mary Beth

242

Characterization of Bacteria by Particle Beam Mass Spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of complex biological material is that of Meuzelaar...instrument, bulk samples of material (>10 Kg) are pyrolyzed...with minimal sample handling, from a naturally occurring...naires Disease (10). MATERIALS AND METHODS Bacteria...FIG. 1. Schematic diagram of particle beam MS...

Mahadeva P. Sinha; Robert M. Platz; Sheldon K. Friedlander; Vincent L. Vilker

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Cellulolytic and non-cellulolytic bacteria in rat gastrointestinal tracts.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...that the addi- tion of bran or corn bean to a diet increased activities...The PMC was prepared by pebble milling 20 g of Whatman no. 1 filter...stick, approximately 1 g (wet weight) of material was transferred...bacteria per gram of contents (wet weight) was approximately five...

J M Macy; J R Farrand; L Montgomery

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Microscale Nutrient Patches in Planktonic Habitats Shown by Chemotactic Bacteria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Reports of different swimming behavior displayed...this, we studied swimming behavior of bacteria...important to chemotactic efficiency in this example...20 individuals, swimming in the estimated...free amino-acid pool in a cell of 10...of nutrients and energy in aquatic ecosystems...

Nicholas Blackburn; Tom Fenchel; Jim Mitchell

1998-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

245

Monika Weber, Yale University Screen fast and cheap bacteria detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-borne bacteria cause thousands of infections in humans and animals. Outbreaks of E.Coli and Salmonella commonly occur in meat, vegetables and processed food products. The most recent and the deadliest recorded E.Coli to long incubation times and a high operation cost associated with conventional methods, an effective

Reed, Mark

246

Switching behaviour of two-phenotype bacteria in varying environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Switching behaviour of two-phenotype bacteria in varying environment G Friedman1, P Gurevich2, S McCarthy3 and D Rachinskii3 1 Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Drexel University phenotype to the other in response to variations in environmental conditions. We model a population

Fiedler, Bernold

247

Plasmid Incidence in Bacteria from Deep Subsurface Sediments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...bacteria by individual borehole. APPL. ENVIRON...The fre- quency of large plasmids in deep...hypothesis is that large plasmids associated...were consider- ably larger than most R-factor...drill muds from this borehole, possibly reflecting...inherent problems with drilling to obtain core samples...

J. K. Fredrickson; R. J. Hicks; S. W. Li; F. J. Brockman

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Aerial Dispersal of Epiphytic Bacteria over Bean Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...positively correlated with wind speed in 1980 and 1982 (Table...occurred when mean canopy-level wind speeds were less than 1 m...bacteria from leaves is an energy-requiring process, which is thus dependent on wind speed, there was a large...

Julianne Lindemann; C. D. Upper

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Response of Free-Living Nitrogen-Fixing Microorganisms to Land Use Change in the Amazon Rainforest  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...three different land use systems in the Amazon. Each...important implications for restoration of degraded areas since...The prokaryotes. A handbook on the biology of bacteria...Does disturbance and restoration of alpine grassland...in temperate cropping systems: influence of nitrogen...

Babur S. Mirza; Chotima Potisap; Klaus Nüsslein; Brendan J. M. Bohannan; Jorge L. M. Rodrigues

2013-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

250

SURVIVAL OF BACTERIA AFTER TWENTY-ONE YEARS IN THE DRIED STATE  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...YEARS IN THE DRIED STATE Ruth E. Miller Loraine A. Simons Department of Microbiology...College of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia) and Loraine A. Simons. Survival of bacteria after...College of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia) and Loraine A. Simons. Survival of bacteria after...

Ruth E. Miller; Loraine A. Simons

1962-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Biofilms as sources of fecal bacteria contamination in the stormwater drainage system in Singapore  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study was performed to examine a possible source of fecal bacteria contamination originating from within the stormwater drainage system in Singapore. The extent of fecal bacteria presence in storm drain biofilms was ...

Burkhart, Tsung Hwa (Tsung Hwa Sophia)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Iron-reducing bacteria accumulate ferric oxyhydroxide nanoparticle aggregates that may support planktonic growth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Super 8 experiment. Nanoparticle aggregates are attachedgroundwater bacteria with nanoparticle aggregates attachedferric oxyhydroxide nanoparticle aggregates that may support

Luef, B.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Isolation, Characterization, and Polyaromatic Hydrocarbon Degradation Potential of Aerobic Bacteria from Marine Macrofaunal Burrow Sediments and Description of Lutibacterium anuloederans gen. nov., sp. nov., and Cycloclasticus spirillensus sp. nov.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...However, PAH pollution is not constrained...impacted by fuel spills or...levels of fossil fuel use...phenanthrene stock solution was prepared...slurry3 from a solution of 2 phenanthrene...facilitate air exchange...acute PAH pollution and perhaps...

W. K. Chung; G. M. King

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

JGI - A Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Genomic Encyclopedia A Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea (GEBA) The GEBA project is aimed at systematically filling in the gaps in sequencing along the bacterial and archaeal branches of the tree of life. Though the wide variety of microbial sequencing projects undertaken throughout the world has created a rich, diverse collection of microbial genomes, strong biases in what has been sequenced thus far are evident. This project represents the first systematic attempt to use the tree of life itself as a guide to sequencing target selection. JGI is beginning by collaborating on a pilot project with DSMZ. Why GEBA? The GEBA Pilot Project GEBA Sequencing Plans Interpret a Genome for Education Home > User Programs > A Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea (GEBA)

255

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid-tolerant thermophilic bacteria Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and other micro-organisms 12;Implications Life formed very early... of Life The LCA may be a Thermophile 12;The Tree of Life 12;The Archaea Archaea often ... Source:...

256

Reduction of trichloroethylene in a model aquifer with methanotrophic bacteria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REDUCTION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE IN A MODEL AQUIFER WITH METHANOTROPHIC BACTERIA A Thesis by Duane Dee Hicks Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fullfillment of the requirements for thc degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1990 Major Subject: Civil Engineering REDUCTION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE IN A MODEL AQUIFER WITH METHANOTROPHIC BACTEPslA A Thesis by Duane Dec Hicks Approved as to style and content by Bill Batchclor (Chair of Committee...

Hicks, Duane Dee

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Intervention to Reduce Transmission of Resistant Bacteria in Intensive Care  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...less than required (Figure 2), particularly with respect to contacts with the environment only, and may have been overestimated because monitoring was not surreptitious and was performed only during daytime and evening hours. However, we found no evidence of an inverse relationship between providers' use... Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococcus (VRE) are major causes of health care–associated infection.1 Infections caused by these bacteria are usually preceded by colonization of mucous membranes, skin, ...

Huskins W.C.; Huckabee C.M.; O'Grady N.P.

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

258

Treatment of Streptococcus mutans bacteria by a plasma needle  

SciTech Connect

A dielectric barrier discharge plasma needle was realized at atmospheric pressure with a funnel-shaped nozzle. The preliminary characteristics of the plasma plume and its applications in the inactivation of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans), the most important microorganism causing dental caries, were presented in this paper. The temperature of the plasma plume does not reach higher than 315 K when the power is below 28 W. Oxygen was injected downstream in the plasma afterglow region through the powered steel tube. Its effect was studied via optical-emission spectroscopy, both in air and in agar. Results show that addition of 26 SCCM O{sub 2} does not affect the plume length significantly (SCCM denotes cubic centimeter per minute at STP). The inactivation of S. mutans is primarily attributed to ultraviolet light emission, O, OH, and He radicals.

Zhang Xianhui [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, 100080 Beijing (China); School of Science, Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun, Jilin 130022 (China); Fujian Key Lab of Plasma and Magnetic Resonance, Department of Aeronautics School of Physics and Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Huang Jun; Lv Guohua [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, 100080 Beijing (China); Liu Xiaodi; Peng Lei; Guo Lihong [Department of Oral Biology, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, 100080 Beijing (China); Chen Wei; Feng Kecheng [School of Science, Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun, Jilin 130022 (China); Yang Size [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, 100080 Beijing (China); Fujian Key Lab of Plasma and Magnetic Resonance, Department of Aeronautics School of Physics and Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China)

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

259

In Situ Detection, Isolation, and Physiological Properties of a Thin Filamentous Microorganism Abundant in Methanogenic Granular Sludges: a Novel Isolate Affiliated with a Clone Cluster, the Green Non-Sulfur Bacteria, Subdivision I  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...cloning-based analysis revealed that the...other thermophilic reactor that had been treating...16S rDNA-cloning analysis combined with fluorescent...difficulty or lower reliability in accomplishing...sludge in a UASB reactor treating an artificial...community structure analysis was that unidentifiable...

Yuji Sekiguchi; Hiroki Takahashi; Yoichi Kamagata; Akiyoshi Ohashi; Hideki Harada

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Interactions between nitrifying bacteria and hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria during detoxification of oil sands process affected water  

SciTech Connect

Large quantities of process water are produced during the extraction of bitumen from oil sands by the Syncrude and Suncor operations in northern Alberta. Freshly produced tailings water is acutely toxic, but it has been shown to slowly detoxify over time. As detoxification proceeds, there is also a precipitous decrease in ammonia concentrations. The present study examines these two microbially-mediated processes in relation to levels of bacteria and toxicants in mixtures of fresh and aged (detoxified) tailings water. Detoxification of tailings water was greatly accelerated when equal volumes of fresh and detoxified (natural aging for one year) tailings water were mixed. Addition of phosphorus further stimulated detoxification, causing levels of ammonia and naphthenic acids (toxic organic acids leached during bitumen extraction) to decrease to those of detoxified water within two months. Such changes were not observed when phosphorus was not added, or when it was added to less diluted (10-.1 or 3-.1) fresh tailings water. Populations of nitrifying bacteria and naphthenic acid degraders increased markedly in the phosphorus-amended mixtures, but not in its absence. Addition of CS{sub 2} (a specific inhibitor of nitrification) to these mixtures prevented ammonia oxidation. Surprisingly, it also prevented the increase in naphthenic acid-degraders and retarded the loss of naphthenic acids. These results suggest the existence of interactions in fresh tailings water between nitrifying bacteria, naphthenic acid degraders and toxicants. The activity of naphthenic acid-degraders apparently remains low until ammonia is oxidized, whereas that of nitrifying bacteria remains low until concentrations of naphthenic acids or other toxicants decrease below some threshold level. Understanding these interactions may lead to more efficient and effective processes to detoxify oil sands process water.

Sobolewski, A. [Microbial Technologies, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); MacKinnon, M. [Syncrude Research, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aerobic bacteria microorganisms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

The first combinatorially prepared and evaluated inorganic catalysts. Polyoxometalates for the aerobic oxidation of the mustard analog tetrahydrothiophene (THT)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The combinatorial synthesis and evaluation of inorganic catalysts is described. The catalysts are an array of early-transition-metal-oxygen-anion clusters (polyoxometalates) and the reaction is the aerobic oxidation of a mustard thioether analog, tetrahydrothiophene (THT). Selective oxidation of THT to the desired sulfoxide, THTO, was achieved in high selectivity (?; 99%) and under relatively mild conditions (95°C, 1.52 atm). Solutions with a molar ratio of 1:2 (phosphorus:vanadium) had the highest catalytic activity. 51V NMR and IR were used not only to identify the self assembling polyoxometalates in several representative precursor combinations (columns in the combinatorial gallery of Fig. 1) but also to assess the stability of one representative polyoxometalate catalyst, 1P:2V:10W, under catalytic conditions (no decomposition after 50 turnovers). Gas chromatography was sufficient to rapidly quantify the product (THTO) yields and selectivities of representative reactions. Combinatorial methodology should be applicable to and provide the same advantages for discovery and optimization of catalysts as it has for pharmaceuticals.

Craig L Hill; Robin Damico Gall

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Evaluation of sulfur-reducing microorganisms for organic desulfurization. Final technical report, September 1, 1990--August 31, 1991  

SciTech Connect

Because of substantial portion of the sulfur in Illinois coal is organic, microbial desulfurization of sulfidic and thiophenic functionalities could hold great potential for completing pyritic sulfur removal. We are testing the hypothesis that organic sulfur can be reductively removed as H{sub 2}S through the activities of anaerobic microorganisms. Our objectives for this year include the following: (1) To obtain cultures that will reductively desulfurize thiophenic model compounds. In addition to crude oil enrichments begun last year, we sampled municipal sewage sludge. (2) To continue to work toward optimizing the activity of the DBDS-reducing cultures obtained during the previous year. (3) To expand coal desulfurization work to include other coals including Illinois Basin Coal 101 and a North Dakota lignite, which might be more susceptible to the dibenzyldisulfide reducing cultures due to its lower rank. (4) To address the problem of sulfide sorption, by investigating the sorption capacity of coals in addition to Illinois Basin Coal 108.

Miller, K.W.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

263

Biology, ecology, and biotechnological applications of anaerobic bacteria adapted to environmental stresses in temperature, pH, salinity, or substrates.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...substrate toxicity, or available free energy. The first evolved archaebacterial and...aerobes, appear to have evolved more energy-conserving mechanisms for physiological...are potent thermodynamic inhibitors of energy conservation mechanisms, and they require...

S E Lowe; M K Jain; J G Zeikus

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Biofuels from Bacteria, Electricity, and CO2: Biofuels from CO2 Using Ammonia or Iron-Oxidizing Bacteria in Reverse Microbial Fuel Cells  

SciTech Connect

Electrofuels Project: Electrofuels Project: Columbia University is using carbon dioxide (CO2) from ambient air, ammonia—an abundant and affordable chemical, and a bacteria called N. europaea to produce liquid fuel. The Columbia University team is feeding the ammonia and CO2 into an engineered tank where the bacteria live. The bacteria capture the energy from ammonia and then use that energy to convert CO2 into a liquid fuel. When the bacteria use up all the ammonia, renewable electricity can regenerate it and pump it back into the system—creating a continuous fuel-creation cycle. In addition, Columbia University is also working with the bacteria A. ferrooxidans to capture and use energy from ferrous iron to produce liquid fuels from CO2.

None

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A2. Glossary A2. Glossary Acid stabilization: A circumstance where the pH of the waste mixture in an animal manure management system is maintained near 7.0, optimal conditions for methane production. Aerobic bacteria: Microorganisms living, active, or occurring only in the presence of oxygen. Aerobic decomposition: The breakdown of a molecule into simpler molecules or atoms by microorganisms under favorable conditions of oxygenation. Aerosols: Airborne particles. Afforestation: Planting of new forests on lands that have not been recently forested. Agglomeration: The clustering of disparate elements. Airshed: An area or region defined by settlement patterns or geology that results in discrete atmospheric conditions. Albedo: The fraction of incident light or electromagnetic radiation that is

266

Ultrasound as a method for reducing bacteria on poultry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ml. In general, the rod- shaped bacteria were the most sensitive while the caecal forms were most resistant. Experiments in food research applying ultrasound are very limited. Heath et al. (1980) used a 240 watt ultrasonic cleaner to evaluate.... The researchers found that exposure of liquid egg yolk to ultrasonic energy at a frequency of 10 KHz/sec for 5 or 10 minutes, resulted in the formation of 2 new electrophoretic bands in the same region as that of a diffuse lipoprotein band present in fresh...

Feria, Rebeca

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

267

Removal of Sediment and Bacteria from Water Using Green Chemistry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This natural material not only displays water purification abilities, but it is also affordable, renewable and readily available. ... The bacteria were washed once in PBS using a mini vortexer and a cell pellet collected using a centripetal force of 2522 ×g for 5 min. ... Transition Electron Microscope (TEM) images were obtained using a Morgagni 268D TEM with Formvar/Carbon 150 Mesh Copper grids from Electron Microscopy Sciences (FCF150-Cu-50) and were used to study mucilage structure, kaolin particle size, and flocs observed in kaolin columns. ...

Audrey L. Buttice; Joyce M. Stroot; Daniel V. Lim; Peter G. Stroot; Norma A. Alcantar

2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

268

Nitrogen availability and indirect measurements of greenhouse gas emissions from aerobic and anaerobic biowaste digestates applied to agricultural soils  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: • Nitrogen release in digestate-amended soil depends on the digestate type. • Overall N release is modulated by digestate mineral and mineralisable N contents. • Microbial immobilisation does not influence overall release of digestate N in soil. • Digestate physical properties and soil type interact to affect overall N recovery. • High labile C inputs in digestate may promote denitrification in fine-textured soil. - Abstract: Recycling biowaste digestates on agricultural land diverts biodegradable waste from landfill disposal and represents a sustainable source of nutrients and organic matter (OM) to improve soil for crop production. However, the dynamics of nitrogen (N) release from these organic N sources must be determined to optimise their fertiliser value and management. This laboratory incubation experiment examined the effects of digestate type (aerobic and anaerobic), waste type (industrial, agricultural and municipal solid waste or sewage sludge) and soil type (sandy loam, sandy silt loam and silty clay) on N availability in digestate-amended soils and also quantified the extent and significance of the immobilisation of N within the soil microbial biomass, as a possible regulatory mechanism of N release. The digestate types examined included: dewatered, anaerobically digested biosolids (DMAD); dewatered, anaerobic mesophilic digestate from the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (DMADMSW); liquid, anaerobic co-digestate of food and animal slurry (LcoMAD) and liquid, thermophilic aerobic digestate of food waste (LTAD). Ammonium chloride (NH{sub 4}Cl) was included as a reference treatment for mineral N. After 48 days, the final, maximum net recoveries of mineral N relative to the total N (TN) addition in the different digestates and unamended control treatments were in the decreasing order: LcoMAD, 68%; LTAD, 37%, DMAD, 20%; and DMADMSW, 11%. A transient increase in microbial biomass N (MBN) was observed with LTAD application, indicating greater microbial activity in amended soil and reflecting the lower stability of this OM source, compared to the other, anaerobic digestate types, which showed no consistent effects on MBN compared to the control. Thus, the overall net release of digestate N in different soil types was not regulated by N transfer into the soil microbial biomass, but was determined primarily by digestate properties and the capacity of the soil type to process and turnover digestate N. In contrast to the sandy soil types, where nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}) concentrations increased during incubation, there was an absence of NO{sub 3}{sup -} accumulation in the silty clay soil amended with LTAD and DMADMSW. This provided indirect evidence for denitrification activity and the gaseous loss of N, and the associated increased risk of greenhouse gas emissions under certain conditions of labile C supply and/or digestate physical structure in fine-textured soil types. The significance and influence of the interaction between soil type and digestate stability and physical properties on denitrification processes in digestate-amended soils require urgent investigation to ensure management practices are appropriate to minimise greenhouse gas emissions from land applied biowastes.

Rigby, H.; Smith, S.R., E-mail: s.r.smith@imperial.ac.uk

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

269

The biodegradation of olive oil and the treatment of lipid-rich wool scouring wastewater under aerobic thermophilic conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The biodegradation of olive oil and the treatment of the lipid-rich wool scouring wastewater were studied under aerobic thermophilic (65°C) conditions using the newly isolated strain Bacillus thermoleovorans IHI-91. In a continuously operated laboratory-scale stirred-tank reactor olive oil was degraded to more than 90% at a residence time of 2 h with a maximum volumetric degradation rate of 900 mg l?1 h?1. A relatively high maximum biomass yield of 1.05 g dry cell weight per g olive oil consumed was measured and a maintenance coefficient of 0.04 g olive oil (g DCW)?1 h?1 was calculated from steady-state data. A severe growth inhibition was observed when the feed olive oil concentration was increased to more than 4 g l?1. Lipid removal from the highly loaded wool scouring wastewater (COD of 77000 mg l?1) was 20–30% at a residence time of 10–20 h while the COD removal was 15–20%. GC-MS analysis revealed that longchain fatty acids up to C18 were efficiently degraded while degradation of the predominant sterol-fraction of the wool grease was not detected. The high concentrations of volatile fatty acids (60 mM acetic acid, 13 mM propionic acid) present in the wastewater were completely removed even at residence times of 2 h. Compared with data from mesophilic processes the lipid degradation rates obtained under thermophilic conditions are extremely high.

P Becker; D Köster; M.N Popov; S Markossian; G Antranikian; H Märkl

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Sequential extraction of metals from mixed and digested sludge from aerobic WWTPs sited in the south of Spain  

SciTech Connect

The content of heavy metals is the major limitation to the application of sewage sludge in soil. However, assessment of the pollution by total metal determination does not reveal the true environmental impact. It is necessary to apply sequential extraction techniques to obtain suitable information about their bioavailability or toxicity. In this paper, sequential extraction of metals from sludge before and after aerobic digestion was applied to sludge from five WWTPs in southern Spain to obtain information about the influence of the digestion treatment in the concentration of the metals. The percentage of each metal as residual, oxidizable, reducible and exchangeable form was calculated. For this purpose, sludge samples were collected from two different points of the plants, namely, sludge from the mixture (primary and secondary sludge) tank (mixed sludge, MS) and the digested-dewatered sludge (final sludge, FS). Heavy metals, Al, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Ti and Zn, were extracted following the sequential extraction scheme proposed by the Standards, Measurements and Testing Programme of the European Commission and determined by inductively-coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. The total concentration of heavy metals in the measured sludge samples did not exceed the limits set out by European legislation and were mainly associated with the two less-available fractions (27-28% as oxidizable metal and 44-50% as residual metal). However, metals as Co (64% in MS and 52% in FS samples), Mn (82% in MS and 79% in FS), Ni (32% in MS and 26% in FS) and Zn (79% in MS and 62% in FS) were present at important percentages as available forms. In addition, results showed a clear increase of the concentration of metals after sludge treatment in the proportion of two less-available fractions (oxidizable and residual metal)

Alonso, E. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Industrial Engineering School, University of Seville, c/Virgen de Africa 7, 41011, Sevilla (Spain)], E-mail: ealonso@us.es; Aparicio, I.; Santos, J.L.; Villar, P.; Santos, A. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Industrial Engineering School, University of Seville, c/Virgen de Africa 7, 41011, Sevilla (Spain)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

271

Removal of Heavy Metals from Industrial Effluent Using Bacteria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial development results in the generation of industrial effluents, and if untreated results in water, sediment and soil pollution. (Fakayode and Onianwa, 2002 ? Fakayode, 2005). Industrial wastes and emission contain toxic and hazardous substances, most of which are detrimental to human health (Jimena et al.,2008 ? Ogunfowokan et al.,2005 ? Rajaram et al.,2008). The key pollutants include heavy metals, chemical wastes and oil spills etc. Heavy metal resistant bacteria have significant role in bioremediation of heavy metals in wastewater. The objective of this work is to study the role of bacteria in removing the heavy metals present in the industrial effluent.Five effluent samples out of nine were selected for this study due to high content of heavy metals. The heavy metals Hg and Cu were removed by Bacillus sp. The average Hg reduction was 45 % and Cu reduction was recorded as 62%. The heavy metals Cd, As and Co were removed by Pseudomonas sp. The average Cd reduction was 56%, average As reduction was 34 % and average Co reduction was recorded as 53%. The heavy metals Cd and Cu were removed by Staphylococcus sp. The average Cd reduction was 44 % and average Cu reduction was recorded as 34 %.

Manisha N; Dinesh Sharma; Arun Kumar

272

Detergent composition comprising a cellulase containing cell-free fermentate produced from microorganism ATCC 55702 or mutant thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Bacteria which produce large amounts of a cellulase-containing cell-free fermentate have been identified. The original bacterium (ATCC 55703) was genetically altered using nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) treatment to produce the enhanced cellulase producing bacterium (ATCC 55702), which was identified through replicate plating. ATCC 55702 has improved characteristics and qualities for the degradation of cellulosic waste materials for fuel production, food processing, textile processing, and other industrial applications. ATCC 55702 is an improved bacterial host for genetic manipulations using recombinant DNA techniques, and is less likely to destroy genetic manipulations using standard mutagenesis techniques. 5 figs.

Dees, H.C.

1998-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

273

Process for Generation of Hydrogen Gas from Various Feedstocks Using Thermophilic Bacteria  

SciTech Connect

A method for producing hydrogen gas is provided comprising selecting a bacteria from the Order Thermotogales, subjecting the bacteria to a feedstock and to a suitable growth environment having an oxygen concentration below the oxygen concentration of water in equilibrium with air; and maintaining the environment at a predetermined pH and at a temperature of at least approximately 45 degrees C. for a time sufficient to allow the bacteria to metabolize the feedstock.

Ooteghem Van, Suellen

2005-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

274

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic bacteria regulation Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

regu-lationcontributestothetranscriptionalregula- Summary: , 35043 Marburg, Germany. E-mail: thauer@ mpi-marburg.mpg.de Gram-positive bacteria 3 In strict...

275

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

organic waste, converting... of anaerobic bacteria, these compounds decompose to yield a biogas that comprises of methane (CH.) and carbon... not processed anaerobically. The...

276

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic bacteria thermoanaerobacter Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

organic waste, converting... of anaerobic bacteria, these compounds decompose to yield a biogas that comprises of methane (CH.) and carbon... not processed anaerobically. The...

277

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic selenate-respiring bacteria Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

organic waste, converting... of anaerobic bacteria, these compounds decompose to yield a biogas that comprises of methane (CH.) and carbon... not processed anaerobically. The...

278

E-Print Network 3.0 - animal-associated bacteria warfare Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

pheromones by bacteria in the female's gut. Attraction pheromones dissipate from Source: Colorado at Boulder, University of - CIRES, Center for Science and Technology Policy...

279

Contribution of Iron-Reducing Bacteria to Mercury Methylation in Marine Sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in continental margin sediments off central Chile. Limnologyof microbial iron reduction in sediments of the Baltic-Northreducing bacteria from sediments of an acid stressed lake.

Fleming, Emily J.; Nelson, D C

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

E-Print Network 3.0 - atypical bacteria accompanying Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Swine Flu and Common Infections to Prepare For Summary: Other common causes - Whooping cough (pertussis) - Atypical bacteria Symptoms - Severe cough - Runny... :...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aerobic bacteria microorganisms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Regional distributions of nitrogen-fixing bacteria in the Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: We evaluated the regional distributions of six nitrogen (N2)-fixing bacteria in the North Pacific Ocean using quantitative polymerase chain reaction

282

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic bacteria isolated Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(White) isolate. The signicance of bacteria for development... by Pearson cor- relation test (Minitab 1997). Results Isolation ... Source: Schal, Coby - Department of Entomology,...

283

E-Print Network 3.0 - abundant culturable bacteria Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sample search results for: abundant culturable bacteria Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 ria and Virus Like Particles (VLPs) abundance were monitored in enriched seawater batch...

284

E-Print Network 3.0 - agricultural soil bacteria Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ies from... for reducing bacteria runoff. With almost 400 water bodies impaired by bacte- ria, a variety of resources... is providing a coordinated and comprehen- sive education...

285

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid bacteria inhibiting Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

while the activity of isolate C0593... those concentrations that enhance or inhibit the test bacteria or consortium. Conclusions The use... .V. All rights reserved 0167 - 7012...

286

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacteria Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

USA EVGENYA S. SHELOBOLINA Summary: .J.P. and Woodward, J.C. (1993) Enzymatic iron and uranium reduction by sulfate- reducing bacteria. Marine Geology... . These results suggest...

287

Biofabrication of a three-dimensional liver micro-organ as an in vitro drug metabolism model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In their normal in vivo matrix milieu, tissues assume complex well-organized three-dimensional architectures. Therefore, the primary aim in the tissue engineering design process is to fabricate an optimal analog of the in vivo scenario. This challenge can be addressed by applying emerging layered biofabrication approaches in which the precise configuration and composition of cells and bioactive matrix components can recapitulate the well-defined three-dimensional biomimetic microenvironments that promote cell–cell and cell–matrix interactions. Furthermore, the advent of and refinements in microfabricated systems can present physical and chemical cues to cells in a controllable and reproducible fashion unmatched with conventional cultures, resulting in the precise construction of engineered biomimetic microenvironments on the cellular length scale in geometries that are readily parallelized for high throughput in vitro models. As such, the convergence of layered solid freeform fabrication (SFF) technologies along with microfabrication techniques enables the creation of a three-dimensional micro-organ device to serve as an in vitro platform for cell culture, drug screening or to elicit further biological insights, particularly for NASA's interest in a flight-suitable high-fidelity microscale platform to study drug metabolism in space and planetary environments. The proposed model in this paper involves the combinatorial setup of an automated syringe-based, layered direct cell writing bioprinting process with micro-patterning techniques to fabricate a microscale in vitro device housing a chamber of bioprinted three-dimensional liver cell-encapsulated hydrogel-based tissue constructs in defined design patterns that biomimic the cell's natural microenvironment for enhanced biological functionality. In order to assess the structural formability and biological feasibility of such a micro-organ, reproducibly fabricated tissue constructs were biologically characterized for liver cell-specific function. Another key facet of the in vivo microenvironment that was recapitulated with the in vitro system included the necessary dynamic perfusion of the three-dimensional microscale liver analog with cells probed for their collective drug metabolic function and suitability as a drug metabolism model. This paper details the principles and methods that undergird the direct cell writing biofabrication process development and adaptation of microfluidic devices for the creation of a drug screening model, thereby establishing a novel drug metabolism study platform for NASA's interest to adopt a microfluidic microanalytical device with an embedded three-dimensional microscale liver tissue analog to assess drug pharmacokinetic profiles in planetary environments.

Robert Chang; Kamal Emami; Honglu Wu; Wei Sun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Correlation of injury occurrence data with estimated maximal aerobic capacity and body composition in a high frequency manual materials handling task  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as follows (Nieman, 1986): 1. Low - V 0, ?( 36 ml/min/kg. 2. Medium ? VO, & 36 ml/min/kg and ( 46 ml/min/kg. 3. High - VO, & 46 ml/min/kg. The descriptive statistics of the 222 data points (9 missing data points) for the relative aerobic capacity... shows the trend of decreased injury occurrences with respect to higher step test estimated relative VO, ?(measured in ml/min/kg). The relative VO, appears to have a highly significant correlation to injury occurrence (p=0. 002). More specifically...

Craig, Brian Nichols

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

289

DOE Joint Genome Institute: Biofuel-Producing Bacteria, Insect Gut  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

June 29, 2009 June 29, 2009 Biofuel-Producing Bacteria, Insect Gut Microbes, ~ 70 other Projects Fill DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Pipeline WALNUT CREEK, CA-The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI) has selected 71 new genomic sequencing projects for its 2010 Community Sequencing Program (CSP)-a targeted sampling of the planet's biodiversity-to be characterized for bioenergy, climate, and environmental applications. JGI's Community Sequencing Program is the largest genomic sequencing effort in the world focused on nonmedical organisms, enabling scientists from universities and national laboratories to probe the hidden world of microbes and plants to tap nature's ingenuity for innovative solutions to the nation's major challenges in energy, climate, and environment. The

290

Enumeration of Particle-Bound and Unattached Respiring Bacteria in the Salt Marsh Environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Respiring Bacteria in the Salt Marsh Environment R. W. Harvey L. Y. Young...Respiring Bacteria in the Salt Marsh Environment R. W. HARVEY AND L. Y...and particulates in salt marsh surface water. Appl...6. Hobbie, J. E., R. J. Daley, and S...

R. W. Harvey; L. Y. Young

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Enrichment and Association of Bacteria and Particulates in Salt Marsh Surface Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Bacteria and Particulates in Salt Marsh Surface Water R. W. Harvey L. Y. Young Environmental...Bacteria and Particulates in Salt Marsh Surface Water R. W. HARVEY AND L. Y. YOUNG...surface. (A) Sippewissett marsh, n = 23, r = 0.91. (B) Palo Alto marsh...

R. W. Harvey; L. Y. Young

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Novel Methane, Ethane, and Propane Oxidizing Bacteria at Marine Hydrocarbon Seeps Identified by Stable Isotope Probing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Novel Methane, Ethane, and Propane Oxidizing Bacteria at Marine Hydrocarbon Seeps Identified by Stable Isotope Probing Running Title: Novel Methane, Ethane, and Propane Oxidizing Bacteria Section hydrocarbons in surface sediment from the Coal Oil Point seep field, offshore Santa4 Barbara, California. After

Sessions, Alex L.

293

THE CULTURE, GENERAL PHYSIOLOGY, MORPHOLOGY, AND CLASSIFICATION OF THE NON-SULFUR PURPLE AND BROWN BACTERIA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...bacteria on the one hand and the green plant chlorophylls and the green bacteria pigment on the other...bact6ries pourpres, est intimement liMe aux substances albuminoides du...spectra of chlorophylls a and b in green plants and in alcoholic solutions...

C. B. van Niel

1944-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Nano scale devices for plasmonic nanolithography and rapid sensing of bacteria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NANO SCALE DEVICES FOR PLASMONIC NANOLITHOGRAPHY AND RAPID SENSING OF BACTERIA A Dissertation by SUNGKYU SEO Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY December 2007 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering NANO SCALE DEVICES FOR PLASMONIC NANOLITHOGRAPHY AND RAPID SENSING OF BACTERIA A Dissertation by SUNGKYU SEO...

Seo, Sungkyu

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

295

Floating mucus aggregates derived from benthic microorganisms on rocky intertidal reefs: Potential as food sources for benthic animals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mucus films, flocs or foams consisting of fine sand, algae and detritus frequently occur in the surface waters of rocky intertidal reef flats during incoming tide. These masses are referred to as mucus aggregates. We examined the developmental process of mucus aggregates and their abundance, distribution, migration and trophic composition. The trophic composition of mucus aggregates was then compared to those of sediments to evaluate their potential nutritional value for benthic animals. The organic matter content, chlorophyll a concentration, microalgal density and bacteria-derived fatty acid contents of mucus aggregates were higher than those observed in sediment, suggesting that mucus aggregates contain not only high levels of organic matter but also dense concentrations of microalgae and bacteria; therefore, mucus aggregates may serve as a qualitatively more energetic food source for benthic fauna compared to sediments. Benthic diatoms were the most abundant organisms in mucus aggregates. Large numbers of diatoms were trapped in fine mineral particles and mucilage-like strings, suggesting that a portion of the mucus is secreted by these benthic microalgae. Mucus aggregate accounted for only 0.01–3.9% of the daily feeding requirements of the dominant detritivore, Ophiocoma scolopendrina (Echinodermata: Ophiuroidea) over the entire sampling area. In contrast, for the species population on the back reef, where mucus aggregates ultimately accumulate, mucus aggregates provided from 0.4 to 113.3% of food for this species. These results suggest that mucus aggregate availability varies spatiotemporally and that they do not always provide adequate food sources for O. scolopendrina populations.

Y. Tamura; M. Tsuchiya

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

in-house windrow composting Many of the water bodies that are impaired by bacteria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

these fields. Cost-effective best management practices (BMPs) are needed to reduce the environmental impacts composting is a cost-effective best management practice that reduces the amount of micro-organisms in poultry. The Environmental Effects of In-House Windrow Composting of Poultry Litter project is demonstrating

297

Hydroxycinnamic Acids Used as External Acceptors of Electrons: an Energetic Advantage for Strictly Heterofermentative Lactic Acid Bacteria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...investigated as a potential alternative energy route. Lactobacillus curvatus PE5 was...the reduced cofactor NADH, providing an energy advantage through NAD+ regeneration...lactic acid bacteria, which have lower energy yields than bacteria with a homofermentative...

Pasquale Filannino; Marco Gobbetti; Maria De Angelis; Raffaella Di Cagno

2014-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

298

Hydrogen (H2) Production by Anoxygenic Purple Nonsulfur Bacteria  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

produc8on by anoxygenic purple nonsulfur bacteria James 'Jake' McKinlay Assistant Professor, Biology Indiana University, Bloomington 4 N 2 + + 2NH 3 Purple n on---sulfur b acteria produce H 2 via n itrogenase biosynthe8c precursors and CO 2 central organic 'waste' metabolism compounds H + e --- Nitrogenase H 2 ATP Light (cyclic) energy photophosphoryla/on N 2 + 8H + + 8e - + 16ATP à H 2 + 2NH 4 + 8H + + 8e - + 16ATP à 4H 2 This is mode of photosynthesis does not produce oxygen Current state of the technology * H 2 yields - Growing : 10 - 25% of theoreIcal maximum - Non---growing: 40 - 91% of theoreIcal maximum * H 2 producIon rates L ---1 h --- - 10 - 82.5 ml H 2 L ---1 h ---1 over - 67 ml H 2 4000 h * Immobilized in 70 μm---thick latex film. Gosse et al. 2010. Biotechnol. P rog. 26: 907 - 18 * PhotosyntheIc efficiency: 1 - 2% - 6% Barbosa et al. 2001. J. Biotechnol. 8 5: 25---33 Reviewed

299

Geek-Up[09.24.10] -- Magical BEANs, Combating Bacteria's Resistance to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9.24.10] -- Magical BEANs, Combating Bacteria's Resistance 9.24.10] -- Magical BEANs, Combating Bacteria's Resistance to Antibiotics and the ChemCam's Journey to Mars Geek-Up[09.24.10] -- Magical BEANs, Combating Bacteria's Resistance to Antibiotics and the ChemCam's Journey to Mars September 24, 2010 - 5:19pm Addthis Check out the ChemCam close-up, which will reveal which elements are present in Mars' rocks and soils. Elizabeth Meckes Elizabeth Meckes Director of User Experience & Digital Technologies, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? BEANs -- phase-change materials -- have the ability to readily and swiftly transition between different phases, making them a valuable low-power source of flash memory and data storage. Scientists are studying E. coli bacteria's efflux pump to help them make inhibitors that will stop the heavy-metal pump and the antibiotic

300

Laboratory Measurements of Contact Freezing by Dust and Bacteria at Temperatures of Mixed-Phase Clouds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Laboratory measurements of freezing by aerosol particles in contact mode are presented. The fraction of particles catalyzing freezing is quantified for three mineral dusts and three strains of bacteria. This is the most comprehensive such dataset ...

Joseph Niehaus; Jennifer G. Becker; Alexander Kostinski; Will Cantrell

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aerobic bacteria microorganisms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Cargo delivery into gram-negative bacteria via enterobactin uptake machinery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 1. Introduction to Iron Homeostasis and Siderophores Iron is an essential nutrient for almost all living organisms. This Chapter presents an overview of iron homeostasis in human and bacteria, as well as the biology ...

Zheng, Tengfei

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Structure of the DUF2233 Domain in Bacteria and the Stuttering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the DUF2233 Domain in Bacteria and the Stuttering-associated UCE Glycoprotein Wednesday, July 31, 2013 UCE figure DUF2233, a Domain of Unknown Function (DUF), is present in 1200...

303

Geek-Up[12.03.2010]: Halomonadaceae Bacteria and the Return of Quark Gluon Plasma  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The toxic element arsenic sustains growth of a bacteria instead of phosphorus and CERN's Collider gives researchers a look into the matter that may have existed in the very first moments of the universe.

304

Relationship between Triclosan and Susceptibilities of Bacteria Isolated from Hands in the Community  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ARTICLE SUSCEPTIBILITY Relationship between Triclosan and Susceptibilities of Bacteria Isolated...10032 The possible association between triclosan and bacterial susceptibility to antibiotic...including a hand soap containing 0.2% triclosan) or nonantibacterial cleaning and hygiene...

Allison E. Aiello; Bonnie Marshall; Stuart B. Levy; Phyllis Della-Latta; Elaine Larson

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Sensing of Nitrogen Limitation by Bacillus subtilis: Comparison to Enteric Bacteria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Sensing of Nitrogen Limitation by Bacillus subtilis: Comparison to Enteric Bacteria...studied this correlation in Bacillus subtilis, a gram-positive, sporulating...we assessed this response in Bacillus subtilis. B. subtilis, a low-GC...

Ping Hu; Terrance Leighton; Galina Ishkhanova; Sydney Kustu

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Biotransformation and detoxification of T-2 toxin by soil and freshwater bacteria.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...negative rod previously isolated from swimming pools (18). Both communities, when...as a sole source of carbon and energy and that this activity was associated...budding bacteria isolated from a swimming pool. J. Appl. Bact. 56:479...

S Beeton; A T Bull

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

An investigation of intrinsically disordered proteins in Gram-negative bacteria.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Sporulation in Gram-positive bacteria results in the production of small acid-soluble proteins (SASPs) to coat the spore DNA and shield it from UV radiation. While… (more)

Fordice, Daniel Jeffrey

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Caenorhabditis elegans NPR-1–mediated behaviors are suppressed in the presence of mucoid bacteria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Caenorhabditis elegans exhibits a diverse range of behaviors in response to bacteria. The presence of bacterial food influences C. elegans aerotaxis, aggregation, locomotion, and pathogen avoidance behaviors through the ...

Reddy, Kirthi C.

309

Bioremediation of polychlorinated biphenyl-contaminated soil using carvone and surfactant-grown bacteria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Partial bioremediation of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated soil was achieved by repeated applications of PCB-degrading bacteria and a surfactant applied 34 times over an 18-week period. Two bacteri...

A. C. Singer; E. S. Gilbert; E. Luepromchai…

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

The battle of bacteria: Agencies, stakeholders focusing on restoring water quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to watershed stakeholders, who will determine the next steps in managing water quality in the tributaries. The TMDL task force was also charged with developing a roadmap for scientific research on how bacteria behave under different conditions. Tailored...

Foust, Margaret

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

The battle of bacteria: Agencies, stakeholders focusing on restoring water quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to watershed stakeholders, who will determine the next steps in managing water quality in the tributaries. The TMDL task force was also charged with developing a roadmap for scientific research on how bacteria behave under different conditions. Tailored...

Foust, Margaret

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Nano scale devices for plasmonic nanolithography and rapid sensing of bacteria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation contains two different research topics. One is a ‘Nano Scale Device for Plasmonic Nanolithography – Optical Antenna’ and the other is a ‘Nano Scale Device for Rapid Sensing of Bacteria – SEPTIC’. Since these two different research...

Seo, Sungkyu

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

313

Lack of Direct Effects of Agrochemicals on Zoonotic Pathogens and Fecal Indicator Bacteria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Microbiology Lack of Direct Effects of Agrochemicals on Zoonotic Pathogens and Fecal Indicator...South Florida, Tampa, Florida, USA Agrochemicals, fecal indicator bacteria (FIB...that previously observed effects of agrochemicals on FIB were indirect. TEXT Many endemic...

Zachery R. Staley; Jacob K. Senkbeil; Jason R. Rohr; Valerie J. Harwood

2012-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

314

Deep-sea bacteria enriched by oil and dispersant from the Deepwater Horizon spill  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Deep-sea bacteria enriched by oil and dispersant from the510- Running title: Enrichment of oil degraders from Gulf ofThe Deepwater Horizon oil spill resulted in a massive influx

Baelum, J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Biological treatment of chemically flocculated agro-industrial waste from the wool scouring industry by an aerobic process without sludge recycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new agro-industrial effluent known as Sirolan CF effluent is the aqueous phase remaining after the chemical flocculation of wool scouring effluent by the Sirolan CF process. This effluent has been characterized, and shown to be effectively treated by biological degradation. It has a high concentration of organic material (5750 mg/L COD), with a low BOD5/COD ratio (0.29). Aerobic biological treatment was tested using laboratory and pilot scale reactors, and shown to remove essentially all BOD5, solvent extractable material and detergent activity. Maximum removal of the COD was 65% leaving a 2000 mg/L residual component of nonbiodegradable organic material. The combined processes of Sirolan CF and biological treatment removed over 90% of the COD and all solvent extractable material from raw wool scouring effluent. This compares favourably to existing treatment systems, and represents a viable and attractive alternative to treat this extremely polluted wastewater.

Andrew J Poole; Ralf Cord-Ruwisch; F.William Jones

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Identification of Bacteria in Biofilm and Bulk Water Samples from a Nonchlorinated Model Drinking Water Distribution System: Detection of a Large Nitrite-Oxidizing Population Associated with Nitrospira spp.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Identification of Bacteria in Biofilm and Bulk Water SamplesNo. 12 Identification of Bacteria in Biofilm and Bulk Water

Martiny, A. C; Albrechtsen, H.-J.; Arvin, E.; Molin, S.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

The incidence and significance of anaerobic bacteria in the equine uterus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that anaerobic bacteria may participate in inflammatory processes of the equine uterus (Kenney 1978a, Reynolds 1978, Ricketts 1981, Brook 1984). Elliott et al. (1971) conducted a study to obtain uterine cultures under anaerobic conditions but failed to obtain... not definitively been proven whether the normal equine uterine environment is sterile (Peterson et al. 1969, Hughes 1978) or if bacteria may normally be present in the non-inflamed uterus (Farrelly and Mullaney 1964, Kenney 1978a, Samuel et al. 1979). Knudsen...

Bolinger, Dean Roger

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

318

Effects of UV Light Disinfection on Tetracycline Resistant Bacteria in Wastewater Effluents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EFFECTS OF UV LIGHT DISINFECTION ON TETRACYCLINE RESISTANT BACTERIA IN WASTEWATER EFFLUENTS A Thesis by HANNAH CHILDRESS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2010 Major Subject: Biological and Agricultural Engineering EFFECTS OF UV LIGHT DISINFECTION ON TETRACYCLINE RESISTANT BACTERIA IN WASTEWATER EFFLUENTS A Thesis by HANNAH...

Childress, Hannah

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

319

Understanding the Role of the Bacteria, Isolated from the Hanford Site Soil, on the Fate and Transport of Uranium.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Bacteria are known for their abilities to influence the geochemical processes and affect the mobility of contaminants in the subsurface. Arthrobacter strain G975 was… (more)

Carvajal, Denny A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

The calcification of staphylococcus aureus bacteria by the mineralization by inhibitor exclusion mechanism : a potential defense mechanism against bacterial infections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to all life forms and phosphorous is a necessary componentof calcium and phosphorous suggests that calcificationpeaks for carbon and phosphorous in the calcified bacteria

Truong, Linh Y.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aerobic bacteria microorganisms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Purple Bacteria Develops Its Own Form of Sunscreen | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Purple Bacteria Develops Its Own Form Purple Bacteria Develops Its Own Form of "Sunscreen" Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) EFRCs Home Centers Research Science Highlights Highlight Archives News & Events Publications Contact BES Home 05.03.12 Purple Bacteria Develops Its Own Form of "Sunscreen" Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Scientific Achievement Found that specific pigments in the light harvesting complex of a photosynthetic bacterium act primarily to protect the cell from damage by excess sunlight Significance and Impact May aid the design of both natural and artificial light harvesting systems to minimize deleterious effects of exposure to too much light energy Research Details In photosynthetic organisms, carotenoids typically act as supplementary

322

Scientists Discover how Bacteria Convert Mercury to Toxic Form | U.S. DOE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scientists Discover how Bacteria Convert Mercury to Toxic Form Scientists Discover how Bacteria Convert Mercury to Toxic Form Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) News & Resources Contact Information Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-23/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3251 F: (301) 903-5051 E: sc.ber@science.doe.gov More Information » April 2013 Scientists Discover how Bacteria Convert Mercury to Toxic Form Two genes responsible for mercury methylation identified. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo

323

Genetically Modified Bacteria for Fuel Production: Development of Rhodobacteria as a Versatile Platform for Fuels Production  

SciTech Connect

Electrofuels Project: Penn State is genetically engineering bacteria called Rhodobacter to use electricity or electrically generated hydrogen to convert carbon dioxide into liquid fuels. Penn State is taking genes from oil-producing algae called Botryococcus braunii and putting them into Rhodobacter to produce hydrocarbon molecules, which closely resemble gasoline. Penn State is developing engineered tanks to support microbial fuel production and determining the most economical way to feed the electricity or hydrogen to the bacteria, including using renewable sources of power like solar energy.

None

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Transformations of 14C lignin cell walls of wheat by a fungus and by bacteria from the rumen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transformations of 14C lignin cell walls of wheat by a fungus and by bacteria from the rumen MA but little is known about the fate of lignins. The aim of this work was to study the transformation of 14C lignins of wheat straw by ruminal bacteria and fungi. Cell walls of wheat straw apical internodes

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

325

Localization of Burkholderia cepacia Complex Bacteria in Cystic Fibrosis Lungs and Interactions with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Hypoxic Mucus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...rather than anaerobic respiration to gain energy, consistent with the identification of...33 - 37). However, the literature on energy production by Bcc bacteria in hypoxic...medium to study how Bcc bacteria gain energy under O2-deprived conditions and the...

Ute Schwab; Lubna H. Abdullah; Olivia S. Perlmutt; Daniel Albert; C. William Davis; Roland R. Arnold; James R. Yankaskas; Peter Gilligan; Heiner Neubauer; Scott H. Randell; Richard C. Boucher

2014-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

326

Growth Temperature and Genome Size in Bacteria Are Negatively Correlated, Suggesting Genomic Streamlining  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Growth Temperature and Genome Size in Bacteria Are Negatively Correlated, Suggesting Genomic.wagner@ieu.uzh.ch; nsabath@gmail.com. Accepted: March 25, 2013 Abstract Prokaryotic genomes are small and compact. Either this feature is caused by neutral evolution or by natural selection favoring small genomes--genome streamlining

Wagner, Andreas

327

Pathogenesis of Human Enterovirulent Bacteria: Lessons from Cultured, Fully Differentiated Human Colon Cancer Cell Lines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...therapies. We have seen in this review that human enterovirulent bacteria...a monolayer. Only a recent report describes the extrusion of cells...established. In a recent and complete review, Fang et al. (838) have...in this paper, because our review does not purport to be exhaustive...

Vanessa Liévin-Le Moal; Alain L. Servin

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Methylation of Mercury by Bacteria Exposed to Dissolved, Nanoparticulate, and Microparticulate Mercuric Sulfides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methylation of Mercury by Bacteria Exposed to Dissolved, Nanoparticulate, and Microparticulate in the environment is partly controlled by the bioavailability of inorganic divalent mercury (Hg(II)) to anaerobic matter to form chemical species that include organic-coated mercury sulfide nanoparticles as reaction

329

Hydrolysis of aromatic ?-glucosides by non-pathogenic bacteria confers a chemical weapon against predators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Research articles 1001 200 70 60 Hydrolysis of aromatic beta-glucosides by non-pathogenic bacteria confers a chemical weapon against predators Robert Sonowal 1 Krithi Nandimath 1 Sucheta S. Kulkarni 2 Sandhya P. Koushika 2 3 Vidyanand Nanjundiah 1...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

A QUANTITATIVE METHOD OF DETERMINING THE LETHAL EFFECT OF ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT ON BACTERIA SUSPENDED IN AIR  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and the Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham...and the Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham...and the Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham...bacteria at constant rate through a test chamber...control valve shown and passes at high speed through...

D. Gordon Sharp

1938-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

The Role of Fish as Sources and Vectors of Bacteria and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Role of Fish as Sources and Vectors of Bacteria and Influence of Bat Colonies on Indicator) #12;Acknowledgments Dr. Robin Brinkmeyer ­ Bat colony studies Jenny Wrast ­ Fish and Bat study & sediments #12;But what about fish???? #12;But what about bats???? #12;Outline Fish Study Bat Study #12

332

Mechanism for the Water-to-Air Transfer and Concentration of Bacteria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Mechanism for the Water-to-Air Transfer...Lawrence Syzdek Atmospheric Sciences Research...breaking at the air-water interface can remove...A.H., GIANT CONDENSATION NUCLEI FROM BURSTING...bubbling through water that contained several...The ratios of the recoveries of some of the bacteria...

Duncan C. Blanchard; Lawrence Syzdek

1970-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

333

Physicochemical and structural investigation of the surfaces of some anaerobic subgingival bacteria.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...which were grown in atmospheric air (37 C) supplemented...were washed two times in water and resuspended in demineral...angles by using water, water-n-propanol mixtures...Bacteria suspended in water were frozen in stainless...inserted in a Vacuum Generators ESCA 3 Mk II instrument...

M M Cowan; H C van der Mei; P G Rouxhet; H J Busscher

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

ADENOSINE TRIPHOSPHATE (ATP) AND DEOXYRIBONUCLEIC ACID (DNA) CONTENT OF MARINE MICROALGAE AND BACTERIA WITH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ADENOSINE TRIPHOSPHATE (ATP) AND DEOXYRIBONUCLEIC ACID (DNA) CONTENT OF MARINE MICROALGAE the relationship between DNA and ATP content of marine bacteria and microalgae. This relationship was used. Laboratory-derived DNA:ATP ratios ranged from 8.5 to 33 (wt:wt) for cultures of marine microalgae, and from

Luther, Douglas S.

335

Comparison of Correspondence Analysis Methods for Synonymous Codon Usage in Bacteria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparison of Correspondence Analysis Methods for Synonymous Codon Usage in Bacteria Haruo SUZUKI 21 June 2008; accepted 24 September 2008) Abstract Synonymous codon usage varies both between sources of variation in synonymous codon usage among genes and provides a way to identify horizontally

Forney, Larry J.

336

Ethanol production by thermophilic bacteria: metabolic control of end product formation in Thermoanaerobium brockii.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...effects of exogenous hydrogen on glucose fermentation...direct consequence of hydrogen consumption by the methanogen...phosphoroclastic activity of cell extracts in that H2...presence of exogenous hydrogen was associated with inhibition...bacteria for chemical and fuel production neces- sitates...

A Ben-Bassat; R Lamed; J G Zeikus

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Structure-based Inhibitor Discovery against Adenylyl Cyclase Toxins from Pathogenic Bacteria That Cause Anthrax and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

That Cause Anthrax and Whooping Cough* Received for publication, February 4, 2003, and in revised form, March bacteria that cause anthrax and whooping cough, respectively. Using the structure of the catalytic site pathogenesis and to fight against anthrax and whooping cough. The 2001 anthrax attacks in the United States

Mrksich, Milan

338

Reduction of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Present in Food Animal Manures by Composting and Anaerobic Digestion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reduction of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Present in Food Animal Manures by Composting in conventional, on-farm lagoons does not result in any significant reduction of antimicrobial resistance. Animal digestion and composting at mesophilic or moderate temperature significantly reduced the antimicrobial

Jones, Michelle

339

Removal of indicator bacteria from municipal wastewater in an experimental two-stage vertical flow constructed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Removal of indicator bacteria from municipal wastewater in an experimental two-stage vertical flow, but no measurements were done during summer. Recycling of treated effluent back to the sedimentation tank did reasons for wastewater treatment. Constructed wetland systems remove pathogens by factors such as natural

Brix, Hans

340

Exciton Hamiltonian for the Bacteriochlorophyll System in the LH2 Antenna Complex of Purple Bacteria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the reaction center (RC). Solar light is absorbed by the LH network, and the excitation energy is very Bacteria Sergei Tretiak* Theoretical DiVision, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 electronic couplings. Fo¨rster energy-transfer hopping time scales within B800 and from the B800 to the B850

Tretiak, Sergei

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aerobic bacteria microorganisms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Identification of Soil Bacteria Susceptible to TiO2 and ZnO Nanoparticles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...DL Kirchman. 2011. Activity of abundant and rare bacteria in a coastal ocean. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 108 :12776-12781. 7. Caporaso, JG , et al. 2010. QIIME allows analysis of high-throughput community sequencing data. Nat. Methods...

Yuan Ge; Joshua P. Schimel; Patricia A. Holden

2012-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

342

Inhibition of peptidoglycan biosynthesis in gram-positive bacteria by LY146032.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide precursor in the cytoplasm of intact bacteria (12, 14). Surprisingly, however, inhibition by LY146032 in intact S. aureus as well as B. megaterium...Cambridge. 19. Ringrose, P. S. 1985. Warhead delivery and suicide substrates as...

N E Allen; J N Hobbs; W E Alborn Jr

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Bloom of resident antibiotic-resistant bacteria in soil following manure fertilization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...331 27 Jacoby GA Munoz-Price LS ( 2005 ) The new beta-lactamases . N Engl J Med 352...thank Ashley Ferguson and Nicole Price for technical assistance...mass no longer decreased on heating. CFU of solid media were determined...in this study from cultured oil bacteria at 52 d after manure...

Nikolina Udikovic-Kolic; Fabienne Wichmann; Nichole A. Broderick; Jo Handelsman

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria and Their Activities in Cyanobacterial Mats of Solar Lake (Sinai, Egypt)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...104 to 106 cells ml1. A Desulfonema-related...adaptations of Solar Lake sulfate-reducing...In organic-carbon-depleted...by primary production and sedimentation...sulfide production from sulfate...bacteria (108 cells ml1) occurred...the highest organic matter content...cyanobacterial mats of Solar Lake (Sinai...a maximal cell density of...photosynthetic production in situ...

Andreas Teske; Niels B. Ramsing; Kirsten Habicht; Manabu Fukui; Jan Küver; Bo Barker Jørgensen; Yehuda Cohen

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

GROWTH OF A POPULATION OF BACTERIA IN A DYNAMICAL HOSTILE ENVIRONMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

´EGINE MARCHAND Abstract. We study the growth of a population of bacteria in a dynami- cal hostile environment´EGINE MARCHAND · We put an oriented edge from (z1, n1) to (z2, n2) if and only if n2 = n1 + 1 and z2 - z1 1 1

346

Bloom of resident antibiotic-resistant bacteria in soil following manure fertilization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Jacoby GA Munoz-Price LS ( 2005 ) The new...University of Connecticut) for coordinating...Ferguson and Nicole Price for technical assistance...University of Connecticut) that uses -lactam...longer decreased on heating. CFU of solid media...study from cultured oil bacteria at 52 d...

Nikolina Udikovic-Kolic; Fabienne Wichmann; Nichole A. Broderick; Jo Handelsman

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Amyloid-Like Adhesins Produced by Floc-Forming and Filamentous Bacteria in Activated Sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and Filamentous Bacteria in Activated Sludge Published ahead of print on 11 January...importance to the floc properties in activated sludge wastewater treatment plants (WWTP...abundance of amyloid adhesins in activated sludge flocs from different WWTP and the identity...

Poul Larsen; Jeppe Lund Nielsen; Daniel Otzen; Per Halkjær Nielsen

2008-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

348

STANDARDISING CLINICAL MEASUREMENTS OF BACTERIA AND VIRUSES USING NUCLEIC ACID TESTS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...CLINICAL MEASUREMENTS OF BACTERIA AND VIRUSES USING NUCLEIC ACID TESTS Jernej Pavsic a b Alison S. Devonshire c * Helen Parkes c Heinz...Institute of Virology, Berlin, Germany f . Nucleic acid based tests for infectious diseases currently used in the clinical laboratory...

Jernej Pavši?; Alison S. Devonshire; Helen Parkes; Heinz Schimmel; Carole A. Foy; Maria Karczmarczyk; Ion Gutiérrez-Aguirre; Isobella Honeyborne; Jim F. Huggett; Timothy D. McHugh; Mojca Milavec; Heinz Zeichhardt; Jana Žel

2014-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

349

Impact of carbon nanotubes on the ingestion and digestion of bacteria by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impact of carbon nanotubes on the ingestion and digestion of bacteria by ciliated protozoa PARNIAN on the toxicity of carbon nanotubes has focused on human health risks1 , and little is known about their impact effluent quality8 . Here we show that single- walled carbon nanotubes are internalized by T. thermophila

Le Roy, Robert J.

350

Effect of Divalent Metals on Hg(II) Uptake and Methylation by Bacteria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The production of methylmercury by some bacteria is a key first step in the accumulation and biomagnification of this toxic substance in aquatic food webs, a major human health concern. By direct measurement of cellular Hg(II) uptake in model iron and ...

Jeffra K. Schaefer; Aleksandra Szczuka; François M. M. Morel

2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

351

Microfluidic capture and release of bacteria in a conical nanopore array Peng Guo,ab  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microfluidic capture and release of bacteria in a conical nanopore array Peng Guo,ab Eric W. Hall a microfluidic device. As an example, we demonstrate that cyanobacteria can be captured, one bacterium per pore, in a conical nanoporous membrane (CNM) integrated into a microfluidic chip. This study, to our knowledge

Zare, Richard N.

352

Bacteria can help convert waste to power IANS 7 September 2009, 02:59pm IST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

they called KN400 that grew prolifically on the graphite anodes of fuel cells. The bacteria formed a thick bio that generate power could be used in microbial fuel cells to convert waste into electricity, according projections called pili which transfer electrons to generate power in fuel cells, more efficiently than

Lovley, Derek

353

Winery waste makes fuel Electricity, bacteria break organics in wastewater into hydrogen gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MSNBC.com Winery waste makes fuel Electricity, bacteria break organics in wastewater into hydrogen method for generating hydrogen fuel from wastewater is now operating at a California winery material in the wastewater into hydrogen gas. There is a lot more energy locked in the wastewater than

354

Dynamic estimation of specific growth rates of bacteria for a wastewater treatment process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynamic estimation of specific growth rates of bacteria for a wastewater treatment process S. Diop1 for specific growth rates for a wastewater treatment process. A 2-stage model of 6 dynamic states is assumed. Steyer, Dynamic model develop- ment and parameter identification for an anaerobic wastewater treatment

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

355

A dynamic estimation scheme of specific growth rates of bacteria for an anaerobic wastewater treatment process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A dynamic estimation scheme of specific growth rates of bacteria for an anaerobic wastewater anal- ysis and estimation schemes for specific growth rates for an anaerobic wastewater treatment the organic and inorganic materials) of municipal or industrial wastewater often needs to be highly reduced

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

356

Methanobactin: a copper binding compound having antibiotic and antioxidant activity isolated from methanotrophic bacteria  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A means and method for treating bacterial infection, providing antioxidant activity, and chelating copper using a copper binding compound produced by methanotrophic bacteria is described. The compound, known as methanobactin, is the first of a new class of antibiotics having gram-positive activity. Methanobactin has been sequenced, and its structural formula determined.

DiSpirito, Alan A. (Ames, IA); Zahn, James A. (Harbor Beach, MI); Graham, David W. (Lawrence, KS); Kim, Hyung J. (St. Paul, MN); Alterman, Michail (Lawrence, KS); Larive, Cynthia (Lawrence, KS)

2007-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

357

Linking bacteria-metal interactions to mineral attachment: A role for outer sphere complexation of cations?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, we tested whether alteration of bacterial cell wall electrical field via outer sphere complexation mineral phases, protection from predation via biofilm formation, and communalism among various microbial in groundwater systems and the role of bacteria in weathering and diagenetic proc- esses we must first quantify

Roberts, Jennifer A.

358

Evaluation of nitrogen fixation by bacteria in association with roots of tropical grasses.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the bacteria in the soil away from its natural niche, and the fate of specific strains...Ruschel. 1979. Use of '"N enriched gas to determine N2 fixation by undisturbed...brighter future for agriculture? Chem. Eng. News 55:22-35. 178. Sloger, C., D...

P van Berkum; B B Bohlool

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Soil bacteria augment Arabidopsis photosynthesis by decreasing glucose sensing and abscisic acid levels in planta  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil bacteria augment Arabidopsis photosynthesis by decreasing glucose sensing and abscisic acid as belowground microflora, whether and how soil symbionts regulate photosynthesis has yet to be reported. Here photosynthesis through the modulation of endogenous sugar/ ABA signaling, and establish a regulatory role

Paré, Paul W.

360

From Nanowires to Biofilms: An Exploration of Novel Mechanisms of Uranium Transformation Mediated by Geobacter Bacteria  

SciTech Connect

One promising strategy for the in situ bioremediation of radioactive groundwater contaminants that has been identified by the SBR Program is to stimulate the activity of dissimilatory metal-reducing microorganisms to reductively precipitate uranium and other soluble toxic metals. The reduction of U(VI) and other soluble contaminants by Geobacteraceae is directly dependent on the reduction of Fe(III) oxides, their natural electron acceptor, a process that requires the expression of Geobacter’s conductive pili (pilus nanowires). Expression of conductive pili by Geobacter cells leads to biofilm development on surfaces and to the formation of suspended biogranules, which may be physiological closer to biofilms than to planktonic cells. Biofilm development is often assumed in the subsurface, particularly at the matrix-well screen interface, but evidence of biofilms in the bulk aquifer matrix is scarce. Our preliminary results suggest, however, that biofilms develop in the subsurface and contribute to uranium transformations via sorption and reductive mechanisms. In this project we elucidated the mechanism(s) for uranium immobilization mediated by Geobacter biofilms and identified molecular markers to investigate if biofilm development is happening in the contaminated subsurface. The results provided novel insights needed in order to understand the metabolic potential and physiology of microorganisms with a known role in contaminant transformation in situ, thus having a significant positive impact in the SBR Program and providing novel concept to monitor, model, and predict biological behavior during in situ treatments.

REGUERA, GEMMA [Michigan State University

2014-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aerobic bacteria microorganisms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Biology, ecology, and biotechnological applications of anaerobic bacteria adapted to environmental stresses in temperature, pH, salinity, or substrates.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...pathogens which would otherwise reduce the usefulness of the resulting...Soil, wastewater, subsurface water Acetobacterium woodii, Butyribacterium...Soil, wastewater, subsurface water Desulfomonile tiedjei, Methanosarcina...with extremes in pH. Anaerobes make up about half of the microorganisms...

S E Lowe; M K Jain; J G Zeikus

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Sunlight Inactivation of Fecal Indicator Bacteria and Bacteriophages from Waste Stabilization Pond Effluent in Fresh and Saline Waters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Calkins (ed.), The role of solar ultraviolet radiation in marine...Escherichia coli in a South Africa river using membrane diffusion...Switzerland. 19 Jagger, J. 1985. Solar-UV actions on living cells...McMeekin. 1981. Effect of solar radiation and predacious micro-organisms...

Lester W. Sinton; Carollyn H. Hall; Philippa A. Lynch; Robert J. Davies-Colley

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

A trade-off between oxidative stress resistance and DNA repair plays a role in the evolution of elevated mutation rates in bacteria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...mutators alleles. For example, recent study suggests that defective DNA oxidative repair (GO), or MMR systems in bacteria make...I , M Sjolund, E Torell, M Johannesson, L Engstrand, O Cars, and DI Andersson. 2003 Bacteria with increased mutation...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Scientists Launch the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea | U.S.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scientists Scientists Launch the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea News Featured Articles 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Science Headlines Presentations & Testimony News Archives Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 12.28.09 Scientists Launch the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea Unlocking the diversity of microbial communities may benefit biofuel production, global carbon storage, and bioremediation. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Scientists estimate that there are approximately 4 × 10^30 microbes living on the planet. To put this number into perspective, there are 4,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 microbes living on the planet

365

Data Gathering in Networks of Bacteria Colonies: Collective Sensing and Relaying Using Molecular Communication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The prospect of new biological and industrial applications that require communication in micro-scale, encourages research on the design of bio-compatible communication networks using networking primitives already available in nature. One of the most promising candidates for constructing such networks is to adapt and engineer specific types of bacteria that are capable of sensing, actuation, and above all, communication with each other. In this paper, we describe a new architecture for networks of bacteria to form a data collecting network, as in traditional sensor networks. The key to this architecture is the fact that the node in the network itself is a bacterial colony; as an individual bacterium (biological agent) is a tiny unreliable element with limited capabilities. We describe such a network under two different scenarios. We study the data gathering (sensing and multihop communication) scenario as in sensor networks followed by the consensus problem in a multi-node network. We will explain as to how th...

Einolghozati, Arash; Beirami, Ahmad; Fekri, Faramarz

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Modeling the role of bacteria in leaching of low-grade ores  

SciTech Connect

A robustious structural model is developed to describe the role of bacteria in the leaching process of low-grade ores under conditions controlled by intraparticle diffusion. The main impetus behind developing this model is to provide an insight into such systems, together with a suitable framework for interpreting experimental data. The model is derived in detail with respect to reaction chemistry and the role of bacteria in catalyzing these reactions, specifically the synergism of chemistry, physics and biology in determining the overall behavior of the system. The model is used to simulate the atmospheric oxidation of iron disulfide contained in porous solids in the presence of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans (T. ferrooxidans). The experimental data are predicted well by the model, which demonstrates its applicability and supports the view that the rate of intraparticle diffusion is the controlling mechanism for this system.

Batarseh, K.I.; Stiller, A.H. (West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Turning Bacteria into Fuel: Cyanobacteria Designed for Solar-Powered Highly Efficient Production of Biofuels  

SciTech Connect

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: ASU is engineering a type of photosynthetic bacteria that efficiently produce fatty acids—a fuel precursor for biofuels. This type of bacteria, called Synechocystis, is already good at converting solar energy and carbon dioxide (CO2) into a type of fatty acid called lauric acid. ASU has modified the organism so it continuously converts sunlight and CO2 into fatty acids—overriding its natural tendency to use solar energy solely for cell growth and maximizing the solar-to-fuel conversion process. ASU’s approach is different because most biofuels research focuses on increasing cellular biomass and not on excreting fatty acids. The project has also identified a unique way to convert the harvested lauric acid into a fuel that can be easily blended with existing transportation fuels.

None

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Conversion of biomass to organic acid using the rumen bacteria Bacteroides succinogenes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1992 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering CONVERSION OF BIOMASS TO ORGANIC ACID USING THE RUMEN BACTERIA Bacreroi des succi nogenes A thesis by TSUEY-ER LO Approved as to style and content by: lbert G ta I (Chair... concentration (A) glucose analyzer phenol-sulfuric acid method glucose concentration (B) total sugar concentration cellobiose concentration (B-A) xylose concentration (T-B) Fig. 8: Sugar analysis scheme for sorghum samples. 33 0, 6, 24, and 48...

Lo, Tsuey-er

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

369

Isolation of indole-producing bacteria from white shrimp (Penaeus setiferus)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ISOLATION OF INDOLE-PRODUCING BACTERIA FROM WHITE SHRIMP (PENAEUS SETIFERUS) A Thesis by RODNEY LEE SMITH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 19B1 Major Subject: Food Science and Technology ISOLATION OF INDOLE-PRODUCING EACTERIA FROM WHITE SHRIMP (PENAEUS SETIFERUS) A Thesis by RODNEY LEE SMITH Approved as to style and content by: (Chaxrman of Committee) (Member) , s , 1...

Smith, Rodney Lee

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

370

Experimental Test Of Whether Electrostatically Charged Micro-organisms And Their Spores Contribute To The Onset Of Arcs Across Vacuum Gaps  

SciTech Connect

Recently it was proposed [L.R. Grisham, A. vonHalle, A.F. Carpe, Guy Rossi, K.R. Gilton, E.D. McBride, E.P. Gilson, A. Stepanov, T.N. Stevenson, Physics of Plasma 19 023107 (2012)] that one of the initiators of vacuum voltage breakdown between condu cting electrodes might be micro-organisms and their spores, previously deposited during exposure to air, which tnen become electrostatically charged when an electric potential is applied across the vacuum gap. The note describes a simple experiment to compare the number of voltage-conditioning pulses required to reach the nominal maxium operating voltage across a gap between two metallic conductors in a vacuum, comparing cases in which biological cleaning was done just prior to pump-down with cases where this was not done, with each preceded by exposure to ambient air for three days. Based upon these results, it does not appear that air-deposited microbes and their spores constitute a major pathway for arc initiation, at least for exposure periods of a few days, and for vacuum gaps of a few millimeters, in the regime where voltage holding is usually observed to vary linearly with gap distance

none,; Grisham, Larry R.

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

371

Novel microorganism for selective separation of coal from ash and pyrite. Second quarterly technical progress report, 1 December 1993--28 February 1994  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to study the effectiveness of a novel hydrophobic microorganism, Mycobacterium phlei (M. phlei), for the selective flocculation of coal from pyrite and ash forming minerals. During the reporting period, the hydrophobicity of different coal samples was studied both in the presence and absence of M. phlei cells. In the absence of M. Phlei, Illinois No. 6 and Pennsylvania No. 8 exhibited higher contact angles as compared to Kentucky No. 9 coal. All the coal samples exhibited a maximum in contact angle around pH 5--7, which roughly coincides with the iso-electric point (iep) of different coals studied in this investigation. In the presence of M. phlei, maximum contact angle shifted to lower pH range of 2--3 which coincides with the iep of the M. phlei. These measurements reinforce the notion that good flocculation of coal with M. phlei can be achieved around pH 2--3. The amount of soluble fraction released during rupturing of M. phlei cells was studied as a function of sonication time. The rupturing experiments showed that the whole cells (unruptured cells) contain nearly 40% by weight of soluble fractions. Also, during the reporting period, the fabrication of the counter-current flocculation device was completed.

Misra, M.; Smith, R.W.; Raichur, A.M.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Environmental diagnostic analysis of ground water bacteria and their involvement in utilization of aromatic compounds  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to examine the hypothesis that select functional groups of bacteria from pristine sites have an innate ability to degrade synthetic aromatics that often contaminate groundwater environments,due to exposure to naturally occurring recalcitrant aromatics in their environment. This study demonstrates that subsurface microbial communities are capable of utilizing lignin and humic acid breakdown products. Utilizers of these compounds were found to be present in most all the wells tested. Even the deepest aquifer tested had utilizers present for all six of the aromatics tested. Highest counts for the aromatics tested were observed with the naturally occurring breakdown products of either lignin or humic acid. Carboxylic acids were found to be an important sole carbon source for groundwater bacteria possibly explained by the fact that they are produced by the oxidative cleavage of aromatic ring structures. The carbohydrate sole carbon sources that demonstrated the greatest densities were ones commonly associated with humics. This study indicates that utilization of naturally occurring aromatic compounds in the subsurface is an important nutritional source for groundwater bacteria. In addition, it suggests that adaptation to naturally occurring recalcitrant substrates is the origin of degradative pathways for xenobiotic compounds with analogous structure. This work has important implications for in situ bioremediation as a method of environmental cleanup.

Wear, J.E. Jr.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Histo-Blood Group Antigen-Like Substances of Human Enteric Bacteria as Specific Adsorbents for Human Noroviruses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Antigen-Like Substances of Human Enteric Bacteria as Specific Adsorbents for Human Noroviruses Takayuki Miura a Daisuke Sano a Atsushi...The interactions between enteric viruses and environmental adsorbents were previously shown to have no binding specificity (41...

Takayuki Miura; Daisuke Sano; Atsushi Suenaga; Takeshi Yoshimura; Miyu Fuzawa; Toyoko Nakagomi; Osamu Nakagomi; Satoshi Okabe

2013-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

374

Spatial Distribution of Total, Ammonia-Oxidizing, and Denitrifying Bacteria in Biological Wastewater Treatment Reactors for Bioregenerative Life Support  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...bacteria perform recycling of various elements...fixed-film biological wastewater treatment reactors...The high recycling rate provided...distribution of wastewater throughout the...treating and recycling wastewater for consumption...

Yuko Sakano; Karen D. Pickering; Peter F. Strom; Lee J. Kerkhof

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Consumption of Tropospheric Levels of Methyl Bromide by C1 Compound-Utilizing Bacteria and Comparison to Saturation Kinetics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ARTICLE GEOMICROBIOLOGY Consumption of Tropospheric Levels of Methyl...bacteria showed no significant consumption of 12 pptv MeBr; thus, the ability...experiments supplied with pptv MeBr. Consumption of MeBr was measured on duplicate...

Kelly D. Goodwin; Ruth K. Varner; Patrick M. Crill; Ronald S. Oremland

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Genetic Diversity of Attached Bacteria in the Hindgut of the Deposit-Feeding Shrimp Neotrypaea (formerly Callianassa)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

belonged to three main groups of bacteria: Cytophaga±Flavobacteria±Bacteroides (CFB), proteobacteria- proteobacteria, and ³20% each to the gram-positive and CFB groups. All except one sequence are novel with £95

Jumars, Pete

377

Photons and particles emitted from cold atmospheric-pressure plasma inactivate bacteria and biomolecules independently and synergistically  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...particles emitted from cold atmospheric-pressure plasma inactivate bacteria and...Bochum, Germany Cold atmospheric-pressure plasmas are currently in use...bactericidal properties of cold atmospheric-pressure plasma. plasma medicine|atmospheric-pressure...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Changes in Community Structure of Sediment Bacteria Along the Florida Coastal Everglades Marsh–Mangrove–Seagrass Salinity Gradient  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Community structure of sediment bacteria in the Everglades freshwater marsh, fringing mangrove forest, and Florida Bay seagrass meadows were described based on polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel el...

Makoto Ikenaga; Rafael Guevara; Amanda L. Dean; Cristina Pisani…

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Prebiotic Content of Bread Prepared with Flour from Immature Wheat Grain and Selected Dextran-Producing Lactic Acid Bacteria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...during cake baking. Cereal Chem. 81 :177-181...bacteria and yeast: metabolism of carbohydrates. Appl...and HW Modler. 1989. Metabolism of fructooligosaccharides...functional properties. Cereal Chem. 54 :25-41...colonic fermentation metabolism in healthy humans...

Olimpia Pepe; Valeria Ventorino; Silvana Cavella; Massimo Fagnano; Rachele Brugno

2013-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

380

Biology, ecology, and biotechnological applications of anaerobic bacteria adapted to environmental stresses in temperature, pH, salinity, or substrates.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...liquors from the pulp and paper industry and oil shale rock refining wastes from the synfuel industry. Effective biodegradation of these wastes may require salt-tolerant...anaerobic bacteria. Coal gasification and waste treatment. The...

S E Lowe; M K Jain; J G Zeikus

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aerobic bacteria microorganisms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

MOLECULAR APPROACHES FOR IN SITU IDENTIFCIATION OF NITRATE UTILIZATION BY MARINE BACTERIA AND PHYTOPLANKTON  

SciTech Connect

Traditionally, the importance of inorganic nitrogen (N) for the nutrition and growth of marine phytoplankton has been recognized, while inorganic N utilization by bacteria has received less attention. Likewise, organic N has been thought to be important for heterotrophic organisms but not for phytoplankton. However, accumulating evidence suggests that bacteria compete with phytoplankton for nitrate (NO3-) and other N species. The consequences of this competition may have a profound effect on the flux of N, and therefore carbon (C), in ocean margins. Because it has been difficult to differentiate between N uptake by heterotrophic bacterioplankton versus autotrophic phytoplankton, the processes that control N utilization, and the consequences of these competitive interactions, have traditionally been difficult to study. Significant bacterial utilization of DIN may have a profound effect on the flux of N and C in the water column because sinks for dissolved N that do not incorporate inorganic C represent mechanisms that reduce the atmospheric CO2 drawdown via the ?biological pump? and limit the flux of POC from the euphotic zone. This project was active over the period of 1998-2007 with support from the DOE Biotechnology Investigations ? Ocean Margins Program (BI-OMP). Over this period we developed a tool kit of molecular methods (PCR, RT-PCR, Q-PCR, QRT-PCR, and TRFLP) and combined isotope mass spectrometry and flow-cytometric approaches that allow selective isolation, characterization, and study of the diversity and genetic expression (mRNA) of the structural gene responsible for the assimilation of NO3- by heterotrophic bacteria (nasA). As a result of these studies we discovered that bacteria capable of assimilating NO3- are ubiquitous in marine waters, that the nasA gene is expressed in these environments, that heterotrophic bacteria can account for a significant fraction of total DIN uptake in different ocean margin systems, that the expression of nasA is differentially regulated in genetically distinct NO3- assimilating bacteria, and that the best predictors of nasA gene expression are either NO3- concentration or NO3- uptake rates. These studies provide convincing evidence of the importance of bacterial utilization of NO3-, insight into controlling processes, and provide a rich dataset that are being used to develop linked C and N modeling components necessary to evaluate the significance of bacterial DIN utilization to global C cycling. Furthermore, as a result of BI-OMP funding we made exciting strides towards institutionalizing a research and education based collaboration between the Skidaway Institute of Oceanography (SkIO) and Savannah State University (SSU), an historically black university within the University System of Georgia with undergraduate and now graduate programs in marine science. The BI-OMP program, in addition to supporting undergraduate (24) graduate (10) and postdoctoral (2) students, contributed to the development of a new graduate program in Marine Sciences at SSU that remains an important legacy of this project. The long-term goals of these collaborations are to increase the capacity for marine biotechnology research and to increase representation of minorities in marine, environmental and biotechnological sciences.

Frischer, Marc E. [Skidaway Institute of Oceanography; Verity, Peter G.; Gilligan, Mathew R.; Bronk, Deborah A.; Zehr, Jonathan P.; Booth, Melissa G.

2013-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

382

Laser Ablation of Organic Materials for discrimination of bacteria in an  

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Laser Ablation of Organic Materials for discrimination of bacteria in an Laser Ablation of Organic Materials for discrimination of bacteria in an organic background Title Laser Ablation of Organic Materials for discrimination of bacteria in an organic background Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2009 Authors Baudelet, Matthieu, Myriam Boueri, Jin Yu, Xianglei Mao, Samuel S. Mao, and Richard E. Russo Conference Name Ultrafast Phenomena in Semiconductors and Nanostructure Materials XIII Series Title Proceedings SPIE Volume 7214 Pagination 72140J Date Published 02/2009 Abstract We demonstrate in this paper that laser ablation allows efficient analysis of organic and biological materials. Such analysis is based on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) which consists in the detection of the optical emission from the plasma induced by a high intensity laser pulse focused on the sample surface. The optimization of the ablation regime in terms of laser parameters (pulse duration, wavelength, fluence) is important to generate a plasma suitable for the analysis. We first present the results of a study of laser ablation of organic samples with different laser parameters using time-resolved shadowgraph. We correlate the early stage expansion of the plasma to its optical emission properties, which allows us to choose suitable laser parameters for an efficient analysis of organic or biological samples by LIBS. As an illustration of the analytical ability of LIBS for biological materials, we show that the emission from CN molecules can be used to distinguish between biological and inorganic samples. Native CN molecular fragment directly ablated from a biological sample are identified using time-resolved LIBS. Those due to recombination with nitrogen contained in atmospheric air can be distinguished with their specific time evolution behavior.

383

Exploration of Simple Analytical Approaches for Rapid Detection of Pathogenic Bacteria  

SciTech Connect

Many of the current methods for pathogenic bacterial detection require long sample-preparation and analysis time, as well as complex instrumentation. This dissertation explores simple analytical approaches (e.g., flow cytometry and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy) that may be applied towards ideal requirements of a microbial detection system, through method and instrumentation development, and by the creation and characterization of immunosensing platforms. This dissertation is organized into six sections. In the general Introduction section a literature review on several of the key aspects of this work is presented. First, different approaches for detection of pathogenic bacteria will be reviewed, with a comparison of the relative strengths and weaknesses of each approach, A general overview regarding diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is then presented. Next, the structure and function of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) formed from organosulfur molecules at gold and micrometer and sub-micrometer patterning of biomolecules using SAMs will be discussed. This section is followed by four research chapters, presented as separate manuscripts. Chapter 1 describes the efforts and challenges towards the creation of imunosensing platforms that exploit the flexibility and structural stability of SAMs of thiols at gold. 1H, 1H, 2H, 2H-perfluorodecyl-1-thiol SAM (PFDT) and dithio-bis(succinimidyl propionate)-(DSP)-derived SAMs were used to construct the platform. Chapter 2 describes the characterization of the PFDT- and DSP-derived SAMs, and the architectures formed when it is coupled to antibodies as well as target bacteria. These studies used infrared reflection spectroscopy (IRS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM), Chapter 3 presents a new sensitive, and portable diffuse reflection based technique for the rapid identification and quantification of pathogenic bacteria. Chapter 4 reports research efforts in the construction and evaluation of a prototype flow cytometry based cell detector and enumerator. This final research chapter is followed by a general summation and future prospectus section that concludes this dissertation.

Salma Rahman

2005-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

384

A technique for quantitative and qualitative viewing of aquatic bacteria using scanning electron microscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

microscopic enumeration techniques. Water samples are concentrated on pre-wetted (Triton X-100) Nuclepore filters (0. 2 um pore size) to prov1de a uniform distri- bution of bacteria on the filter surface and vacuum filtered (660 Torr). The filter... is transferred to a petri dish containing filter paper soaked 1n 2% glutaraldehyde and the bacter1a are fixed for one hour. Dehydration 1s performed by transferr1ng the filters through a series of petri dishes conta1ning filter paper saturated with 25, 50, 75...

Dreier, Thomas Michael

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

385

The Mannitol Operon Repressor MTIR belongs to a new class of transcription regulators in bacteria.  

SciTech Connect

Many bacteria express phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase systems (PTS). The mannitol-specific PTS catalyze the uptake and phosphorylation of d-mannitol. The uptake system comprises several genes encoded in the single operon. The expression of the mannitol operon is regulated by a proposed transcriptional factor, mannitol operon repressor (MtlR) that was first studied in Escherichia coli. Here we report the first crystal structures of MtlR from Vibrio parahemeolyticus (Vp-MtlR) and its homolog YggD protein from Shigella flexneri (Sf-YggD). MtlR and YggD belong to the same protein family (Pfam05068). Although Vp-MtlR and Sf-YggD share low sequence identity (22%), their overall structures are very similar, representing a novel all {alpha}-helical fold, and indicate similar function. However, their lack of any known DNA-binding structural motifs and their unfavorable electrostatic properties imply that MtlR/YggD are unlikely to bind a specific DNA operator directly as proposed earlier. This structural observation is further corroborated by in vitro DNA-binding studies of E. coli MtlR (Ec-MtlR), which detected no interaction of Ec-MtlR with the well characterized mannitol operator/promoter region. Therefore, MtlR/YggD belongs to a new class of transcription factors in bacteria that may regulate gene expression indirectly as a part of a larger transcriptional complex.

Tan, K.; Borovilos, M.; Zhou, M; Horer, S; Clancy, S; Moy, S; Volkart, LL; Sassoon, J; Baumann, U; Joachimiak, A (Biosciences Division); (Univ. of Berne)

2009-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

386

Final technical report: The effect of physical and chemical heterogeneities in a porous medium on the transport of bacteria  

SciTech Connect

Among the demonstrated processes influencing the transport of bacteria through aquifers, the deposition of cells on mineral surfaces is one of the most important. Heterogeneous distribution of aquifer properties such as mineral-grain oxide coatings and preferred flow paths can control the numbers of microbes arriving a point down gradient from their injection, and these properties can also affect the distribution of the organisms remaining in the sedimentary matrix. The distribution of metal oxide coatings affects the final location of retained cells within the matrix but had no effect on total breakthrough of applied bacteria. We were able to demonstrate transverse mixing of both conservative tracers and bacteria between regions of differing hydraulic conductivity; the conservative tracer could be used to model the transverse mixing of the bacteria. We were able to show that the presence of metal oxide coatings on aquifer surfaces retarded a reactive tracer (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) that simulated bacterial retardation in the laboratory. When metal oxide coatings were absent (due to bacterial establishment of a reducing environment) the tracer and bacteria were not retarded. The effect was reproduced in a tracer experiment done in the field. The results suggest that bacterial transport in the subsurface is controlled by a number of interrelated and confounding factors that prevent accurate prediction of transport given the present state of knowledge.

Hornberger, George M.; Mills, Aaron L.; Herman, Janet S.

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Triclosan causes toxic effects to algae in marine biofilms, but does not inhibit the metabolic activity of marine biofilm bacteria  

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Abstract Effects of the antimicrobial agent triclosan to natural periphyton communities (biofilms, comprising primarily microalgae and bacteria) were assessed in two independent experiments during spring and summer. For that purpose a semi-static test system was used in which periphyton was exposed to a concentration range of 5–9054 nmol/L triclosan. Effects on algae were analyzed as content and composition of photosynthetic pigments. The corresponding EC50 values were 39.25 and 302.45 nmol/L for the spring and summer experiment, respectively. Effects on periphytic bacteria were assessed as effects on carbon utilization patterns, using Biolog Ecoplates. No inhibition of either total carbon utilization or functional diversity was observed, indicating a pronounced triclosan tolerance of the marine bacteria. In contrast, a small stimulation of the total carbon utilization was observed at triclosan concentrations exceeding 100 nmol/L.

C. Henrik Johansson; Lisa Janmar; Thomas Backhaus

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Effects of pretreatment method of natural bacteria source on microbial community and bio-hydrogen production by dark fermentation  

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The effects of pretreatment method of cow dung compost, which was employed as natural hydrogen bacteria source, on the microbial community, population distribution of microbes and hydrogen production potential were investigated in the batch tests. The maximum hydrogen yield of 290.8 mL/L-culture appeared in the pretreated method A (infrared drying) by dark fermentation. The pretreated method of compost significantly affected microbial succession, population distribution of microbes. Both Clostridium sp. and Enterobacter sp. were found to be two species of preponderant hydrogen-producing bacteria, the next best was Bacteroides sp. and Veillonella sp., the last was Lactobacillus sp. and Streptococcus sp., which were also essential. The results showed that the mutualism and symbiosis relations of the mixed bacteria played a critical role in hydrogen fermentation process.

Zhao-Xia Song; Yang Dai; Qi-Long Fan; Xiao-Hu Li; Yao-Ting Fan; Hong-Wei Hou

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Bacterias patógenas con alta resistencia a antibióticos: estudio sobre reservorios bacterianos en animales cautivos en el zoológico de Barranquilla  

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AbstractObjective The objective is to determine respiratory and enteric bacterial pathogens and antimicrobial susceptibility in captive animals at Barranquilla Zoo. Materials and methods Samples were taken from rectus and glottis in 30 birds and nasal and rectal swabs from 29 mammals, which were restricted mechanically and then anesthetized. Bacteria were identified by using biochemical tests such as: Urea, SIM, TSI, LIA and Citrate, some bacteria isolates were confirmed with API 20E (Biomerieux SA, Marcy I’Etoile, France) or Micro scan® Neg combo panel type 32 (Dade Behring, CA, USA). Antimicrobial susceptibility was assessed using the Bauer and Kirby method and taking into account CLSI regulation. Results Eighty-nine strains were obtained, 45 from birds and 44 from mammals. The most frequent bacteria were: E. coli (n = 31), Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 20), Enterobacter cloacae (n = 10), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 5), Staphylococcus aureus (n = 5) and Pseudomonas stuzeri (n = 4). Gram negative bacteria and Staphylococci were respectively resistant to the following antibiotics: tetracycline (28% and 57.1%), chloramphenicol (14.6% and 57.1%) and ?-lactam (54.2% and 42.8); Gram-negative was (6.1%) resistant to Fluorquinolones and (2.4%) resistant to aminoglycosides; and Staphylococci were (64.2%) resistant to macrolides. Twentyfour (27%) were multi-resistant: 16 (36%) in birds and 8 (18%) in mammals. Conclusion Resistance to one or more antibiotics in bacteria isolated from captive animals Barranquilla Zoo, is a risk factor for health for the animals themselves. The zoo animals are potential reservoirs for bacteria and resistance genes clinically important in the spread of these resistance factors. The resistance similarities found in animal and human strains suggest clone mobility between the sapiens species and the animals.

Julio Vargas; Salim Máttar; Santiago Monsalve

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Download  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

and J. Cook is greatly appreciated. Materials and naethods. AIthough mats in .... the agar would drive off most of the oxygen and the facultatively aerobic bacteria

2000-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

391

Vertical distribution of sulfur species in benthic algal mats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

and J. Cook is greatly appreciated. Materials and naethods. AIthough mats in .... the agar would drive off most of the oxygen and the facultatively aerobic bacteria

2000-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

392

Fabrication of Biomimetically Patterned Surfaces and Their Application to Probing Plant–Bacteria Interactions  

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Fabrication of Biomimetically Patterned Surfaces and Their Application to Probing Plant–Bacteria Interactions ... All chemicals and buffers were purchased from Sigma-Aldrich (St. Louis, MO, USA), except for: SU-8 2050 photoresist and developer (MicroChem, Newton, MA, USA); Sylgard 184 elastomer kit (PDMS) (Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI, USA); and agarose gel-digesting enzyme GELase (Epicenter Biotechnologies, Madison, WI, USA). ... (34, 36, 37) An additional advantage of the present approach is that it allows for a relatively “clean” separation of the effects of surface microstructure from those of surface chemistry and nanoscale texturing, since one can independently control the chemical composition and properties of the polymeric surface, while maintaining identical microstructures in the replica molding process. ...

Boce Zhang; Yaguang Luo; Arne J. Pearlstein; Jesse Aplin; Yi Liu; Gary R. Bauchan; Gregory F. Payne; Qin Wang; Xiangwu Nou; Patricia D. Millner

2014-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

393

Stuttering Min oscillations within E. coli bacteria: a stochastic polymerization model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have developed a 3D off-lattice stochastic polymerization model to study subcellular oscillation of Min proteins in the bacteria Escherichia coli, and used it to investigate the experimental phenomenon of Min oscillation stuttering. Stuttering was affected by the rate of immediate rebinding of MinE released from depolymerizing filament tips (processivity), protection of depolymerizing filament tips from MinD binding, and fragmentation of MinD filaments due to MinE. Each of processivity, protection, and fragmentation reduces stuttering, speeds oscillations, and reduces MinD filament lengths. Neither processivity or tip-protection were, on their own, sufficient to produce fast stutter-free oscillations. While filament fragmentation could, on its own, lead to fast oscillations with infrequent stuttering; high levels of fragmentation degraded oscillations. The infrequent stuttering observed in standard Min oscillations are consistent with short filaments of MinD, while we expect that mutants that exhibit highe...

Sengupta, Supratim; Sain, Anirban; Rutenberg, Andrew D

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

This grant provided the basic funding that enabled me to carry out a detailed characterization of the proteins used by the aerobic soil bacterium, Thermobifida fusca, to degrade cellulose and to study the mechanisms used by T. fusca to regulate cellulase synthesis. This work resulted in 53 publications and led to the decision by The DOE Joint Genome Institute to sequence the T. fusca genome. T. fusca is now recognized as one of the best studied cellulolytic microorganisms and our work led to the discovery of a novel class of cellulases, processive endoglucanases, which are found in many cellulolytic bacteria including both aerobes and anaerobes. In addition, we were able to determine the mechanism by which Cel9A caused processive hydrolysis of cellulose. This research also helped to explain why many cellulolytic microorganisms produce two different exocellulases, as we showed that these enzymes have different specificities, with one attacking the reducing end of a cellulose chain and the other attacking the nonreducing end. Our work also provided additional evidence for the importance of a cellulose binding domain (carbohydrate binding module) [CBM] in the hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose.

David B. Wilson

2008-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

395

Seasonal changes in the relative abundance of uncultivated sulfate-reducing bacteria in a salt marsh sediment and in the rhizosphere of Spartina alterniflora.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...reducing bacteria in a salt marsh sediment and in the rhizosphere...alterniflora JN Rooney-Varga R Devereux RS Evans ME Hines Institute...sulfate-reducing bacteria in a salt marsh sediment and in the rhizosphere...from DNA extracted from salt marsh rhizosphere samples. Two novel...

J N Rooney-Varga; R Devereux; R S Evans; M E Hines

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Bugs boost Cold War clean-up: Bacteria could scrub uranium from sites contaminated decades ago. updated at midnight GMTtoday is friday, november 14  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the study was contaminated by low levels of uranium from mining residue. The team hopes that the techniqueBugs boost Cold War clean-up: Bacteria could scrub uranium from sites contaminated decades ago boost Cold War clean-up Bacteria could scrub uranium from sites contaminated decades ago. 13 October

Lovley, Derek

397

How do microbial fuel cells (MFCs) work? Bacteria need energy to survive, in the same way that humans need food to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

water. These types of MFCs can produce enough electricity to power ocean monitoring devices. How soon that humans need food to live. Bacteria get this energy in a two-step process. The first step requires, scientists in England published one of the first papers on electricity generation by bacteria. Today MFCs

Lee, Dongwon

398

Isolation and Characterization of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacteria Associated with the Rhizosphere of Salt Marsh Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...relationship to salt marsh oxygen balance...analysis of rRNAs R. Kadlec R. L. Knight...mineral and sandy salt marsh sediments. . G. R. Lotufo Bioaccumulation...bacteria . A. L. Wright R. W. Weaver J. W...bioremediation in salt marsh mesocosms as influenced...

L. L. Daane; I. Harjono; G. J. Zylstra; M. M. Häggblom

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Formyltetrahydrofolate Synthetase Sequences from Salt Marsh Plant Roots Reveal a Diversity of Acetogenic Bacteria and Other Bacterial Functional Groups  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and DEB-9903623 to C.R.L. REFERENCES 1 Anderson...several North Carolina salt marsh plants, p. 307-344. In R. J. Reimold and W. H...sulfate-reducing bacteria in a salt marsh sediment and in the rhizosphere...3895-3901. 28 Schauder, R., B. Eikmanns, R...

A. B. Leaphart; M. J. Friez; C. R. Lovell

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Corrosion Protection due to Bacteria /Metal Interactions E. Kus1, K. H. Nealson2 and F. Mansfeld1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corrosion Protection due to Bacteria /Metal Interactions E. Kus1, K. H. Nealson2 and F. Mansfeld1 1. Corrosion and Environmental Effects Laboratory (CEEL) The Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) refers to the increase of the corrosion rate of metals due to microbial

Southern California, University of

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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Adjustment of Host Cells for Accommodation of Symbiotic Bacteria: Vacuole Defunctionalization, HOPS Suppression, and TIP1g Retargeting in Medicago  

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...software to image transgenic roots expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged SYP22...Symbiosomes were counterstained by Sytox Green. inf, infected cells; R, bacteria release...were contrasted by staining with SYTO 16 (green). 3D Reconstruction and Volume-Surface...

Aleksandr Gavrin; Brent N. Kaiser; Dietmar Geiger; Stephen D. Tyerman; Zhengyu Wen; Ton Bisseling; Elena E. Fedorova

2014-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

402

When fish die, bacteria or the enzymes they produce invade the flesh of fish. This process produces toxic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT When fish die, bacteria or the enzymes they produce invade the flesh of fish. This process produces toxic compounds in the fish and the fish becomes spoiled. Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy neural network (ANN) for the development of an ANN based FT-IR Screening System for fish

Michel, Howard E.

403

Evaluating the role of sediment-bacteria interactions on Escherichia coli concentrations at beaches in southern Lake Michigan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's ability to describe the multiple short-duration, low-intensity resuspension events at our sampling sites. A major resuspension event was noted during the simulation period but the sampling frequency during]. Resuspension of sediment- bound bacteria under favorable conditions can increase the levels of bacterial

404

Blue-Green Algae: Isolation of Bacteria-free Cultures from Hormogone-producing Blue-Green Algae  

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... THE difficulties associated with obtaining bacteria -free cultures of blue-green algae are well known. Various techniques, involving the use of toxic physical or chemical agents ... of others, based on the assumption that an agent might be found to which the algae alone would be insusceptible, gave equally disappointing results. The possibility of using antibiotics has ...

J. S. BUNT

1961-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

405

Molecular Phylogenetic and Biogeochemical Studies of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria in the Rhizosphere ofSpartina alterniflora  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...characterization of natural communities of sulfate-reducing...Photosynthate distribution in natural stands of salt water...Sharak Genthner B. R. Price W. A. Pritchard P...Solar Lake (Sinai, Egypt). . Trimmer M. Purdy...sulfate-reducing bacteria with natural media and a radiotracer...

Mark E. Hines; Robert S. Evans; Barbara R. Sharak Genthner; Stephanie G. Willis; Stephanie Friedman; Juliette N. Rooney-Varga; Richard Devereux

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Effect of restriction endonucleases on assessment of biodiversity of cultivable polar marine planktonic bacteria by amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we report the effect of restriction endonucleases on assessment of biodiversity of marine planktonic bacteria isolated from polar region by...HinfI, HaeIII and a combination of AfaI and MspI, AluI g...

Yinxin Zeng; Wenqi Liu; Huirong Li; Yong Yu; Bo Chen

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Antibacterial Activity of Sphingoid Bases and Fatty Acids against Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria  

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...Gram-positive bacteria. Exact Kruskal-Wallis tests of these values showed...Statistical analyses. The exact Kruskal-Wallis test was employed to detect differences...associated with the nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis test of the null hypothesis that...

Carol L. Fischer; David R. Drake; Deborah V. Dawson; Derek R. Blanchette; Kim A. Brogden; Philip W. Wertz

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

408

Control filamentous bulking caused by chlorine-resistant Type 021N bacteria through adding a biocide CTAB  

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Filamentous bulking sludge due to excessive growth of filamentous bacteria is a serious operational problem in activated sludge plants. The addition of chemicals is one of widespread ways to control filamentous bulking. In this study, filamentous bulking in a continuous activated sludge system was found to be mainly caused by Eikelboom Type 021N filamentous bacteria likely due to low substrate concentration gradients. These Type 021N bacteria were found to be resistant to chlorination, maintaining cell integrity at a dosage of up to 80 mg Cl/gSS. An alternative biocidal agent, cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB), exhibited a much stronger biocidal effect on these filaments, which significantly improved sludge settleability. Type 021N with filamentous index of 5 was selectively killed, but floc-formers recovery their activity after CTAB termination. The study implied that CTAB might have more penetration capacity to cell wall of chlorine-resistant Type 021N bacteria. We therefore suggest the penetration property of filament cell wall should be considered or tested before the selection of biocide type in practice.

Jianhua Guo; Yongzhen Peng; Zhongwei Wang; Zhiguo Yuan; Xiong Yang; Shuying Wang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Urea Uptake and Carbon Fixation by Marine Pelagic Bacteria and Archaea during the Arctic Summer and Winter Seasons  

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...but greater maximum uptake rates (59). A more recent study...implication is that urea may fuel nitrification and autotrophic...a more reliable source of energy for ammonium oxidizers...bacteria to generate energy to fuel dark carbon fixation. Studies...

Tara L. Connelly; Steven E. Baer; Joshua T. Cooper; Deborah A. Bronk; Boris Wawrik

2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

410

Raman Spectroscopy—An Innovative and Versatile Tool To Follow the Respirational Activity and Carbonate Biomineralization of Important Cave Bacteria  

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Raman Spectroscopy—An Innovative and Versatile Tool To Follow the Respirational Activity and Carbonate Biomineralization of Important Cave Bacteria ... (11) Bacterial calcium carbonate formation is applied in contaminated soil and groundwater remediation,(12) the protection and repair of concrete and cement structures,(13) and the conservation of building stone and statuary. ...

Robert Keiner; Torsten Frosch; Stefan Hanf; Anna Rusznyak; Denise M. Akob; Kirsten Küsel; Jürgen Popp

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

411

Localization of Burkholderia cepacia Complex Bacteria in Cystic Fibrosis Lungs and Interactions with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Hypoxic Mucus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...sections were counterstained with ethyl green, dehydrated in ethanol, and coverslipped...known to utilize arginine as the sole energy source for growth when neither oxygen...arginine was not utilized by Bcc bacteria for energy production and which is consistent with...

Ute Schwab; Lubna H. Abdullah; Olivia S. Perlmutt; Daniel Albert; C. William Davis; Roland R. Arnold; James R. Yankaskas; Peter Gilligan; Heiner Neubauer; Scott H. Randell; Richard C. Boucher

2014-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

412

Bacteria in the Leaf Ecosystem with Emphasis onPseudomonas syringae—a Pathogen, Ice Nucleus, and Epiphyte  

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...field experiments renders restoration in trans (i.e., wild-type...translucens. . Bacteria in the leaf ecosystem with emphasis on Pseudomonas...produced by terrestrial and aquatic plants provide habitats for...that participates in leaf ecosystems as a pathogen, ice nucleus...

Susan S. Hirano; Christen D. Upper

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Anaerobic Respiration on Tellurate and Other Metalloids in Bacteria from Hydrothermal Vent Fields in the Eastern Pacific Ocean  

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...tellurate, we noted first a drop in colony...source of reducing power for bioreduction...respiration at deep ocean hydrothermal vents...ER-V-6 is the first metavanadate-respiring...isolated from deep ocean hydrothermal vents...vent worms. The first evidence for selenite...bacteria from deep ocean hydrothermal vents...

Julius T. Csotonyi; Erko Stackebrandt; Vladimir Yurkov

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

28. Using Synchroton infrared microspectroscopy to better understand the freezing-resistance of lactic acid bacteria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Freezing is commonly applied to preserve the functionalities of concentrates of lactic acid bacteria (LAB). However, it is still a critical step in the production of LAB concentrates, as it affects both the viability and acidifying activity upon thawing. Several environmental factors influence the resistance to freezing of LAB (strain, medium composition, temperature, etc.) but the mechanisms of cell injury during freezing need to be elucidated. Cell dehydration taking place during freezing is an important event responsible for alterations of the physical state of membrane lipids and proteins, which, in turn, affect lipid organization and membrane fluidity. FTIR (Fourier Transformed InfraRed) spectroscopy and imaging technology appear to be powerful tools for investigating the biophysical response of LAB and for identifying some key issues in the understanding of the main mechanisms of bacteria degradation during freezing and thawing. In situ and in conditions close to industrial ones, FTIR spectroscopy has recently made it possible to investigate the modifications of the physical state of bacterial lipids of whole cell populations of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CFL1 (freezing sensitive strain) during freezing and thawing for two different physiological states, corresponding to different behaviours in terms of resistance to freezing and thawing processes. Fresh cells presenting the better resistance to freezing exhibited the lower lipid phase transition temperature, thus remaining in a liquid crystalline state for a longer time during the freezing process (Gautier et al. 2012). This study performed on bacterial suspensions and in real time during freeze–thaw processes, highlighted the difficulties for identifying and quantifying protein conformational changes because of the overlapping of the water band with the protein band. The objective of the present work was to investigate the changes in the secondary structure of proteins of some individual cells of Lb. bulgaricus CFL1 for these two extreme conditions, by using the brilliant Synchrotron infrared beamline SMIS (SOLEIL proposal number 20100789). High reflective index hemispheres (ZnSe) were used in order to get high spatial resolution (2–3 ?m2) making possible the quantification of the population heterogeneity and mapping of biophysical and chemical responses of small groups of cells. Concentrated suspensions of Lb. bulgaricus CFL1 were produced using standard procedure of fermentation in MRS broth or mild whey medium at 42 °C in the biology laboratory of SOLEIL Synchrotron. The bacteria were harvested at the beginning of the stationary phase growth, formulated (addition of protective medium), frozen by immersion in liquid nitrogen and stored at ?20 and ?80 °C. After thawing and washing, cells were dried onto ZnSe hemispheres. ATR (attenuated total reflectance) analysis on the amide I region of dehydrated bacterial suspensions was carried out to examine changes in the protein secondary structures. The impact of the physiological state (viability and acidifying activity) on cell biophysical behaviour and freezing-resistance was investigated by analysing samples before and after each storage conditions. Better resistance to freezing, characterized by a higher acidifying activity and cell survival, was observed for cells presenting a higher proportion of proteins in ?-helix conformation. Furthermore, a study of the impact of freezing on the protein secondary structures is in progress.

J. Gautier; S. Passot; F. Jamme; S. Cenard; F. Fonseca

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Dissimilatory Metabolism of Nitrogen Oxides in Bacteria:Comparative Reconstruction of Transcriptional Networks  

SciTech Connect

Bacterial response to nitric oxide (NO) is of major importance since NO is an obligatory intermediate of the nitrogen cycle. Transcriptional regulation of the dissimilatory nitric oxides metabolism in bacteria is diverse and involves FNR-like transcription factors HcpR, DNR and NnrR, two-component systems NarXL and NarQP, NO-responsive activator NorR, and nitrite sensitive repressor NsrR. Using comparative genomics approaches we predict DNA-binding signals for these transcriptional factors and describe corresponding regulons in available bacterial genomes. Within the FNR family of regulators, we observed a correlation of two specificity-determining amino acids and contacting bases in corresponding DNA signal. Highly conserved regulon HcpR for the hybrid cluster protein and some other redox enzymes is present in diverse anaerobic bacteria including Clostridia, Thermotogales and delta-proteobacteria. NnrR and DNR control denitrification in alpha- and beta-proteobacteria, respectively. Sigma-54-dependent NorR regulon found in some gamma- and beta-proteobacteria contains various enzymes involved in the NO detoxification. Repressor NsrR, which was previously known to control only nitrite reductase operon in Nitrosomonas spp., appears to be the master regulator of the nitric oxides metabolism not only in most gamma- and beta-proteobacteria (including well-studied species like Escherichia coli), but also in Gram-positive Bacillus and Streptomyces species. Positional analysis and comparison of regulatory regions of NO detoxification genes allows us to propose the candidate NsrR-binding signal. The most conserved member of the predicted NsrR regulon is the NO-detoxifying flavohemoglobin Hmp. In enterobacteria, the regulon includes also two nitrite-responsive loci, nipAB (hcp-hcr) and nipC(dnrN), thus confirming the identity of the effector, i.e., nitrite. The proposed NsrR regulons in Neisseria and some other species are extended to include denitrification genes. As the result, we demonstrate considerable interconnection between various nitrogen-oxides-responsive regulatory systems for the denitrification and NO detoxification genes and evolutionary plasticity of this transcriptional network.

Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Dubchak, Inna L.; Arkin, Adam P.; Alm, EricJ.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Stuttering Min oscillations within E. coli bacteria: A stochastic polymerization model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have developed a 3D off-lattice stochastic polymerization model to study subcellular oscillation of Min proteins in the bacteria Escherichia coli, and used it to investigate the experimental phenomenon of Min oscillation stuttering. Stuttering was affected by the rate of immediate rebinding of MinE released from depolymerizing filament tips (processivity), protection of depolymerizing filament tips from MinD binding, and fragmentation of MinD filaments due to MinE. Each of processivity, protection, and fragmentation reduces stuttering, speeds oscillations, and reduces MinD filament lengths. Neither processivity or tip-protection were, on their own, sufficient to produce fast stutter-free oscillations. While filament fragmentation could, on its own, lead to fast oscillations with infrequent stuttering; high levels of fragmentation degraded oscillations. The infrequent stuttering observed in standard Min oscillations are consistent with short filaments of MinD, while we expect that mutants that exhibit higher stuttering frequencies will exhibit longer MinD filaments. Increased stuttering rate may be a useful diagnostic to find observable MinD polymerization in experimental conditions.

Supratim Sengupta; Julien Derr; Anirban Sain; Andrew D. Rutenberg

2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

417

Bacteria-mediated in vivo delivery of quantum dots into solid tumor  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New approach using the probiotic Bifidobacterium bifidum as a vehicle to deliver QDs into the deep tissue of solid tumors in vivo was achieved. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bifidobacterium bifidum delivery system has intrinsic biocompatibility. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The targeting efficacy was improved by folic acids. -- Abstract: Semiconductor nanocrystals, so-called quantum dots (QDs), promise potential application in bioimaging and diagnosis in vitro and in vivo owing to their high-quality photoluminescence and excellent photostability as well as size-tunable spectra. Here, we describe a biocompatible, comparatively safe bacteria-based system that can deliver QDs specifically into solid tumor of living animals. In our strategy, anaerobic bacterium Bifidobacterium bifidum (B. bifidum) that colonizes selectively in hypoxic regions of animal body was successfully used as a vehicle to load with QDs and transported into the deep tissue of solid tumors. The internalization of lipid-encapsuled QDs into B. bifidum was conveniently carried by electroporation. To improve the efficacy and specificity of tumor targeting, the QDs-carrying bacterium surface was further conjugated with folic acids (FAs) that can bind to the folic acid receptor overexpressed tumor cells. This new approach opens a pathway for delivering different types of functional cargos such as nanoparticles and drugs into solid tumor of live animals for imaging, diagnosis and therapy.

Liu, Ying [Single-molecule and Nanobiology Lab., Dept. of Biophysics, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, No. 38 Xue Yuan Road, Beijing 100091 (China)] [Single-molecule and Nanobiology Lab., Dept. of Biophysics, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, No. 38 Xue Yuan Road, Beijing 100091 (China); Zhou, Mei [Dept. of Radiation Medicine, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, No. 38 Xue Yuan Road, Beijing 100091 (China)] [Dept. of Radiation Medicine, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, No. 38 Xue Yuan Road, Beijing 100091 (China); Luo, Dan; Wang, Lijun; Hong, Yuankai [Single-molecule and Nanobiology Lab., Dept. of Biophysics, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, No. 38 Xue Yuan Road, Beijing 100091 (China)] [Single-molecule and Nanobiology Lab., Dept. of Biophysics, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, No. 38 Xue Yuan Road, Beijing 100091 (China); Yang, Yepeng, E-mail: yangyepeng@bjmu.edu.cn [Dept. of Radiation Medicine, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, No. 38 Xue Yuan Road, Beijing 100091 (China)] [Dept. of Radiation Medicine, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, No. 38 Xue Yuan Road, Beijing 100091 (China); Sha, Yinlin, E-mail: shyl@hsc.pku.edu.cn [Single-molecule and Nanobiology Lab., Dept. of Biophysics, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, No. 38 Xue Yuan Road, Beijing 100091 (China) [Single-molecule and Nanobiology Lab., Dept. of Biophysics, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, No. 38 Xue Yuan Road, Beijing 100091 (China); Biomed-X Center, Peking University, Peking University, No. 38 Xue Yuan Road, Beijing 100091 (China)

2012-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

418

Comparison of Optimal Thermodynamic Models of the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle from Heterotrophs, Cyanobacteria, and Green Sulfur Bacteria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Comparison of Optimal Thermodynamic Models of the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle from Heterotrophs, Cyanobacteria, and Green Sulfur Bacteria ... The ability to evaluate the thermodynamics of metabolic pathways allows one to understand the relationship between coupling of energy and material gradients in the environment and the self-organization of stable biological systems, and it is shown that each cycle operates in the direction expected due to its environmental niche. ...

Dennis G. Thomas; Sebastian Jaramillo-Riveri; Douglas J. Baxter; William R. Cannon

2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

419

Human health risk implications of multiple sources of faecal indicator bacteria in a recreational waterbody  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We simulate the influence of multiple sources of enterococci (ENT) as faecal indicator bacteria (FIB) in recreational water bodies on potential human health risk by considering waters impacted by human and animal sources, human and non-pathogenic sources, and animal and non-pathogenic sources. We illustrate that risks vary with the proportion of culturable ENT in water bodies derived from these sources and estimate corresponding ENT densities that yield the same level of health protection that the recreational water quality criteria in the United States seeks (benchmark risk). The benchmark risk is based on epidemiological studies conducted in water bodies predominantly impacted by human faecal sources. The key result is that the risks from mixed sources are driven predominantly by the proportion of the contamination source with the greatest ability to cause human infection (potency), not necessarily the greatest source(s) of FIB. Predicted risks from exposures to mixtures comprised of approximately 30% ENT from human sources were up to 50% lower than the risks expected from purely human sources when contamination is recent and ENT levels are at the current water quality criteria levels (35 CFU 100 mL-1). For human/non-pathogenic, human/gull, human/pig, and human/chicken faecal mixtures with relatively low human contribution, the predicted culturable enterococci densities that correspond to the benchmark risk are substantially greater than the current water quality criteria values. These findings are important because they highlight the potential applicability of site specific water quality criteria for waters that are predominantly un-impacted by human sources.

Jeffrey A. Soller; Mary E. Schoen; Arun Varghese; Audrey M. Ichida; Alexandria B. Boehm; Sorina Eftim; Nicholas J. Ashbolt; John E. Ravenscroft

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Comparing the effect of digestate and chemical fertiliser on soil bacteria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Different fertilisation regimes, i.e. the use of inorganic or organic fertilisers used in agriculture, are thought to cause differential effects on soil bacteria. In this study, glasshouse experiments were used to test the effects caused by addition of inorganic fertiliser or digestate from sewage sludge on soil bacterial community structure and diversity assessed by pyrosequencing of the V1–V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene. Spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L., cultivar Paragon) was used as model crop and its growth (measured by total dry weight) was monitored as well as changes in soil nitrogen and phosphorous at three time points over 128 days. Overall, 40 different bacterial phyla were detected with Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria and Actinobacteria dominating the communities. Additionally, members of the Bacteroidetes, Gemmatimonadetes, Chloroflexi and WS3 were found in all samples. Members of the Planctomycetes, Firmicutes, Nitrospirae, candidate division SPAM and Armatimonadetes were found in all samples but at lower abundances. Within the phylum Proteobacteria the classes Alpha- and Betaproteobacteria were most prevalent. Over the course of the experiment, the major differences between treatments were observed for the Actino-, Proteo- and the Acidobacteria. Sequences related to the Planctomycetes, implicated in nitrogen cycling, decreased in all treatments during the course of the experiment. Statistical analyses revealed that mainly nutrient addition and plant growth influenced the bacterial community structure. The effects of the treatment itself could be attributed to different gain in wheat growth especially when the communities were compared at the end of the trial. Our results indicate that the usage of different fertilisers will not only affect the bacterial community by direct addition of nutrients, but also indirectly.

Melanie Sapp; Mark Harrison; Ummey Hany; Adrian Charlton; Richard Thwaites

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aerobic bacteria microorganisms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Lithotrophic iron-oxidizing bacteria produce organic stalks to control mineral growth: implications for biosignature formation  

SciTech Connect

Neutrophilic Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) are often identified by their distinctive morphologies, such as the extracellular twisted ribbon-like stalks formed by Gallionella ferruginea or Mariprofundus ferrooxydans. Similar filaments preserved in silica are often identified as FeOB fossils in rocks. Although it is assumed that twisted iron stalks are indicative of FeOB, the stalk's metabolic role has not been established. To this end, we studied the marine FeOB M. ferrooxydans by light, X-ray and electron microscopy. Using time-lapse light microscopy, we observed cells excreting stalks during growth (averaging 2.2 {micro}m h(-1)). Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy show that stalks are Fe(III)-rich, whereas cells are low in Fe. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that stalks are composed of several fibrils, which contain few-nanometer-sized iron oxyhydroxide crystals. Lepidocrocite crystals that nucleated on the fibril surface are much larger ({approx}100 nm), suggesting that mineral growth within fibrils is retarded, relative to sites surrounding fibrils. C and N 1s NEXAFS spectroscopy and fluorescence probing show that stalks primarily contain carboxyl-rich polysaccharides. On the basis of these results, we suggest a physiological model for Fe oxidation in which cells excrete oxidized Fe bound to organic polymers. These organic molecules retard mineral growth, preventing cell encrustation. This model describes an essential role for stalk formation in FeOB growth. We suggest that stalk-like morphologies observed in modern and ancient samples may be correlated confidently with the Fe-oxidizing metabolism as a robust biosignature.

Chan, Clara S; Fakra, Sirine C; Emerson, David; Fleming, Emily J; Edwards, Katrina J

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Abundance and activity of the bacteria-destructors of organic matter in Saline-and-Soda Lake Khilganta (South Transbaikalia) in the pH-salinity gradient  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is established that the microbial community of the bacteria-destructors in bottom sediments and crust of the soda Lake Khilganta is able to develop in a wide range of pH and mineralization. The community of...

A. G. Zakharyuk; L. P. Kozyreva; B. B. Namsaraev

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Impact of Manure Fertilization on the Abundance of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria and Frequency of Detection of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Soil and on Vegetables at Harvest  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...from domestic animals, humans, and wildlife will contain bacteria that are resistant...environmental factors: sun, rain, and wind. In order to evaluate the potential...domesticated mammals and birds, and wildlife. Can. J. Microbiol. 56 :715-729...

Romain Marti; Andrew Scott; Yuan-Ching Tien; Roger Murray; Lyne Sabourin; Yun Zhang; Edward Topp

2013-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

424

Overcoming the anaerobic hurdle in phenotypic microarrays: Generation andvisualization of growth curve data for Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough  

SciTech Connect

Growing anaerobic microorganisms in phenotypic microarrays (PM) and 96-well microtiter plates is an emerging technology that allows high throughput survey of the growth and physiology and/or phenotype of cultivable microorganisms. For non-model bacteria, a method for phenotypic analysis is invaluable, not only to serve as a starting point for further evaluation, but also to provide a broad understanding of the physiology of an uncharacterized wild-type organism or the physiology/phenotype of a newly created mutant of that organism. Given recent advances in genetic characterization and targeted mutations to elucidate genetic networks and metabolic pathways, high-throughput methods for determining phenotypic differences are essential. Here we outline challenges presented in studying the physiology and phenotype of a sulfate reducing anaerobic delta proteobacterium, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough. Modifications of the commercially available OmniLog(TM) system (Hayward, CA) for experimental setup, and configuration, as well as considerations in PM data analysis are presented. Also highlighted here is data viewing software that enables users to view and compare multiple PM data sets. The PM method promises to be a valuable strategy in our systems biology approach to D. vulgaris studies and is readily applicable to other anaerobic and aerobic bacteria.

Borglin, Sharon E; Joyner, Dominique; Jacobsen, Janet; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Hazen, Terry C.

2008-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

425

The effects of petroleum residues and the associated degrading bacteria on the development and survival of the larvae of Penaeus aztecus ives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE EFFECTS OF PETROLEUM RESIDUES AND THE ASSOCIATED DEGRADING BACTERIA ON THE DEVELOPMENT AND SURVIVAL OF THE LARVAE OF PENAEUS AZTECUS IVES A Thesis by JOHN CURTIS GLARY III Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1983 Major Subject: Biology THE EFFECTS OF PETROLEUM RESIDUES AND THE ASSOCIATED DEGRADING BACTERIA ON THE DEVELOPMENT AND SURVIVAL OF THE LARVAE OF PENAEUS AZTECUS...

Clary, John Curtis

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Effect of low po? on growth of bacteria and on loss of soluble carbon from maize roots under hydroponic conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to air (20. 9 kPa 02) and to either 0 or 2 kPa 02 as separate treatments for 48 h. Root systems and nutrient solution samples were collected at 12 hour intervals (commencing with the onset of the oxygen treatment) for enumeration of the bacterial... vs. 20. 9 kPa 02). . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Effect of p02 on hexose carbon (HC) in roots and solution (2 kpa vs- 20 F 9 kpa 02) ~ 36 Effect of p02 on bacteria associated with roots and in solution (2 kPa vs. 20. 9 kPa 02) . 46 Effect of p02...

Coker, Dennis Lee

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

427

Use of bromodeoxyuridine immunocapture to identify psychrotolerant phenanthrene-degrading bacteria in phenanthrene-enriched polluted Baltic Sea sediments  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this study was to enrich and identify psychrotolerant phenanthrenedegrading bacteria from polluted Baltic Sea sediments. Polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated sediments were spiked with phenanthrene and incubated for 2 months in the presence of bromodeoxyuridine that is incorporated into the DNA of replicating cells. The bromodeoxyuridine-incorporated DNA was extracted by immunocapture and analyzed by terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism and 16S rRNA gene cloning and sequencing to identify bacterial populations that were growing. In addition, degradation genes were quantified in the bromodeoxyuridine-incorporated DNA by real-time PCR. Phenanthrene concentrations decreased after 2 months of incubation in the phenanthrene-enriched sediments and this reduction correlated to increases in copy numbers of xylE and phnAc dioxygenase genes. Representatives of Exiguobacterium, Schewanella,Methylomonas, Pseudomonas, Bacteroides and an uncultured Deltaproteobacterium and a Gammaproteobacterium dominated the growing community in the phenanthrene spiked sediments. Isolates that were closely related to three of these bacteria (two pseudomonads and an Exiguobacterium sp.) could reduce phenanthrene concentrations in pure cultures and they all harbored phnAc dioxygenase genes. These results confirm that this combination of culture-based and molecular approaches was useful for identification of actively growing bacterial species with a high potential for phenanthrene degradation.

Edlund, A.; Jansson, J.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Bisulfite reductase and nitrogenase genes retrieved from biocorrosive bacteria in saline produced waters of offshore oil recovery facilities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water-flooding is a common strategy to enhance oil recovery in reservoirs. Maintaining quality and standards of produced water avoids oil biodegradation, biogenic souring and biocorrosion during operations, which are influenced by sulfate-reducing (SRB) and Fe (III) reducing bacteria. The aim of this work was to increase our knowledge of corrosive bacterial communities inhabiting saline produced waters of offshore oil exploitation facilities through retrieving sequences of functional genes, for instance, dsrAB and nifD of Desulfovibrionales, Desulfobacterales and Desulfuromonadales taxonomical orders. Five clone libraries were generated with retrieved sequences acquired from different saline produced waters, with and without biocide dosing. The dsrAB phylogenetic analyses showed Desulfomicrobium, Desulfovibrio, and Desulfohalobium as well as Desulfococcus, Desulfosarcina, Desulfobacter, Desulfobacterium and Desulfobulbus. The retrieved nifD genes displayed the Fe (III) reducing bacteria (Desulfuromonadales) such as Desulfuromusa, Pelobacter, Malonomonas, and Desulfuromonas. The relative abundance in all waters was: the Desulfovibrionales were represented by 55.28% of analyzed clones; the Desulfobacterales by 26.83% and 17.89% for the Desulfuromonadales. Diversity measures were calculated by the Shannon index (H?), which showed that there was a high degree of diversity between all produced waters; however, dominance in produced water with biocide was detected by a Desulfovibrio taxon.

I. Zapata-Peñasco; L. Salazar-Coria; M. Saucedo-García; L. Villa-Tanaka; C. Hernández-Rodríguez

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Genetic adaptation to elevated carbon dioxide atmospheres by Pseudomonas-like bacteria isolated from rock cod (Sebastes spp. )  

SciTech Connect

The microorganisms on rock cod fillets stored in a modified atmosphere (MA; 80% CO/sub 2/ - 20% air) at 4/sup 0/C for 21 days were isolated. Only Lactobacillus sp. (71 to 87%) and tan-colored Pseudomonas sp.-like isolates (TAN isolates) were found. The TAN isolates grew more slowly in MA than in air at 8/sup 0/C. When TAN isolates were grown in air at 8/sup 0/C, there was an initial decline in viable counts for 10 to 30 h followed by exponential growth. During this exponential growth phase in MA, the growth rates of the TAN isolates from MA-stored fish were significantly greater than those of the TAN isolates from fresh fish. When a TAN isolate from fresh fish was grown under MA for 21 days, it then grew as rapidly under MA as isolates from MA-stored fish. These results suggest that the TAN isolates genetically adapt to high levels of CO/sub 2/. 17 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

Johnson, A.R.; Ogrydziak, D.M.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Aerobic Biodegradation of N-Nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DHS, 2002; US EPA, 2001). Its presence in the environment has been linked to aerospace facilities generally to the discharge of water and wastewater disinfected with chlorine (Cal DHS, 2002; Mitch et al

Wood, Thomas K.

431

Increasing Antioxidant Activity of Procyanidin Extracts from the Pericarp of Litchi chinensis Processing Waste by Two Probiotic Bacteria Bioconversions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The total antioxidant capability (T-AOC) of LPOPCs before and after microbial incubation was estimated, and the results suggested that probiotic bacteria bioconversion is a feasible and efficient method to convert litchi pericarp procyanidins to a more effective antioxidant agent. ... However, the pericarp of litchi, which accounts for 15% of the fresh weight of the fruit, becomes desiccated and turns brown at ambient temperature within 2 or 3 days pastharvest and is often thrown away as waste. ... Elution conditions were as follows: a linear gradient from 5 to 35% B in 40 min, from 35 to 50% B in 5 min, from 50 to 80% B in 5 min, and from 80 to 5% B in 5 min, at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. ...

Shuyi Li; Lu Chen; Ting Yang; Qian Wu; Zhejuan Lv; Bijun Xie; Zhida Sun

2013-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

432

Inactivation of Microorganisms by Electrohydraulic Shock  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...time varied from an instantaneous ionization to a time of greater than 500 ,usec. In most cases, the time required to ionize the gap was in the range of 0 to 300 ,usec. The electrohydraulic shock treatments of bac- terial suspensions were done...

S. E. Gilliland; M. L. Speck

1967-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Colonial organization and intercellular communication in microorganisms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This review covers the modern concepts and recent data demonstrating the integrity and coherence of microbial populations (colonies, biofilms, etc.) as peculiar “superorganisms.” Special attention is given to ...

A. V. Oleskin; 1. V. Botvinko; E. A. Tsavkelova

434

Microorganisms Resistant to Free-Living Amoebae  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Ares, and M. L. Casro Casa. 1989. Marine amoeba from waters of northwest Spain...W. Ajello, A. F. Kaufmann, D. J. Wear, and J. D. Wenger. 1991. Proposal...of human enteroviruses in estuarine and marine waters. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 32...

Gilbert Greub; Didier Raoult

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Biosynthesis of Unsaturated Fatty Acids in Microorganisms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...The behavior of Astasia longa is anomalous. This naturally occurring phytoflagellate...Large amounts of a-linole-nate are produced by the blue-green alga Anabena variabilis...deviates from the pattern, he becomes a maverick, or a person who has tossed aside the...

Joseph Erwin; Konrad Bloch

1964-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

436

Microorganisms Resistant to Free-Living Amoebae  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...such as those found on contact lenses and dental unit water lines can support the growth...the number of free-living amoebae in dental unit waterlines. Res. Microbiol. 152...differentiation from AIDS related Kaposi sarcoma. Radiology 177: 77-81. 21 Bass, P., and P...

Gilbert Greub; Didier Raoult

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Search for ancient microorganisms in Lake Baikal  

SciTech Connect

Lake Baikal in Russia, the world's oldest and deepest continental lake lies in south central Siberia, near the border to Mongolia. The lake is 1,643 m deep and has an area of about 46,000 km2. It holds one-fifth of all the terrestrial fresh water on Earth. Lake Baikal occupies the deepest portion of the Baikal Rift Zone. It was formed some 30-45 million years ago. The isolated Lake Baikal ecosystem represents a unique niche in nature based on its historical formation. The microbial diversity present in this environment has not yet been fully harvested or examined for products and processes of commercial interest and value. Thus, the collection of water, soil, and sub-bottom sediment samples was decided to characterize the microbial diversity of the isolated strains and to screen the isolates for their biotechnological value.

Hunter-Cevera, Jennie C.; Repin, Vladimir E.; Torok, Tamas

2000-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

438

Degradation of purines and pyrimidines by microorganisms.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in soil and was named for its fastidious demand for uric acid or allantoin as carbon and...184), but perhaps part of a person's daily uric acid excretion is normally recycled...catabolism in Penicillium chrysogenum. Egypt. J. Chem. 16:329-335. 154. Ferguson...

G D Vogels; C Van der Drift

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

A soil microscale study to reveal the heterogeneity of Hg(II) impact on indigenous bacteria by quantication of adapted phenotypes and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

toxicants. Heavy metals in soil are known to have a deleterious e¡ect on the num- bers of bacteria; RISA; Indirect enumeration 1. Introduction Bacterial response to heavy metal contamination in soil,2]). Several studies reported an impact of heavy metals at the community level using phenotypic or genetic

Thioulouse, Jean

440

Accelerated Biodegradation of Cement by Sulfur-Oxidizing Bacteria as a Bioassay for Evaluating Immobilization of Low-Level Radioactive Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. Sand (19), for example...same apparatus, Sand and his coworkers...concrete cubes used by Sand et al. (21) in...that the Ca(OH)2 phase played a major role...calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H), which...Furthermore, this leaching behavior was not affected...

Orli Aviam; Gabi Bar-Nes; Yehuda Zeiri; Alex Sivan

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aerobic bacteria microorganisms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Processing of cellulosic material by a cellulase-containing cell-free fermentate produced from cellulase-producing bacteria, ATCC 55702  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Bacteria which produce large amounts of a cellulase-containing cell-free fermentate, have been identified. The original bacterium (ATCC 55703) was genetically altered using nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) treatment to produce the enhanced cellulase degrading bacterium ATCC 55702, which was identified through replicate plating. ATCC 55702 has improved characteristics and qualities for the degradation of cellulosic materials. 5 figs.

Dees, H.C.

1998-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

442

Rapid Quantification of Viable Campylobacter Bacteria on Chicken Carcasses, Using Real-Time PCR and Propidium Monoazide Treatment, as a Tool for Quantitative Risk Assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...bacteria are applicable as tools for risk assessment and assurance of food...rapid detection and as a tool for quantitative risk assessment of food-borne thermotolerant...monoazide treatment, as a tool for quantitative risk assessment. | A number of intervention...

M. H. Josefsen; C. Löfström; T. B. Hansen; L. S. Christensen; J. E. Olsen; J. Hoorfar

2010-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

443

Development of a Fatty Acid and RNA Stable Isotope Probing-Based Method for Tracking Protist Grazing on Bacteria in Wastewater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...which enables mass balances of the carbon...Treated wastewater will be of...wastewater treatment in such systems...municipal sewage plant (for details...bacteria in wastewater. | Removal...during wastewater treatment, is effected...which enables mass balances of the carbon...

Steffen Kuppardt; Antonis Chatzinotas; Matthias Kästner

2010-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

444

R E S E A R C H A R T I C L E Lineage-dependent ecological coherence in bacteria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

R E S E A R C H A R T I C L E Lineage-dependent ecological coherence in bacteria Alexander F.1111/j.1574-6941.2012.01387.x Editor: Julian Marchesi Keywords ecological coherence; human microbiota coherence of these high-level taxonomic units is uncertain. Using human microbiota from the skin and gut

Brodie III, Edmund D.

445

Linking Ultrastructure and Function in Four Genera of Anaerobic Ammonium-Oxidizing Bacteria: Cell Plan, Glycogen Storage, and Localization of Cytochrome c Proteins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...often been detected in natural habitats, especially...oxidized to dinitrogen gas by hydrazine/hydroxylamine...that could be used to drive ATP synthesis. The immunogold...ammonium to dinitrogen gas all contain heme-c groups...ammonium-oxidizing bacteria. ASM News 67: 456-463. 20 Kuypers...

Laura van Niftrik; Willie J. C. Geerts; Elly G. van Donselaar; Bruno M. Humbel; Richard I. Webb; John A. Fuerst; Arie J. Verkleij; Mike S. M. Jetten; Marc Strous

2007-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

446

Assessing the yield, microstructure, and texture properties of miniature Chihuahua-type cheese manufactured with a phospholipase A1 and exopolysaccharide-producing bacteria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Chihuahua cheese or Mennonite cheese is one of the most popular and consumed cheeses in Mexico and by the Hispanic community in the United States. According to local producers the yield of Chihuahua cheese ranges from 9 to 9.5 kg of cheese from 100 kg of milk. Cheese yield is a crucial determinant of profitability in cheese-manufacturing plants; therefore, different methods have been developed to increase it. In this work, a miniature Chihuahua-type cheese model was used to assess the effect of a phospholipase A1 (PL-A1) and exopolysaccharide (EPS)-producing bacteria (separately and in combination) on the yield, microstructure, and texture of cheese. Four different cheeses were manufactured: cheese made with PL-A1, cheese made with EPS-producing bacteria, cheese with both PL-A1 and EPS-producing bacteria, and a cheese control without PL-A1 or EPS-producing bacteria. The compositional analysis of cheese was carried out using methods of AOAC International (Washington, DC). The actual yield and moisture-adjusted yield were calculated for all cheese treatments. Texture profile analyses of cheeses were performed using a texture analyzer. Micrographs were obtained by electron scanning microscopy. Fifty panelists carried out sensorial analysis using ranking tests. Incorporation of EPS-producing bacteria in the manufacture of cheese increased the moisture content and water activity. In contrast, the addition of PL-A1 did not increase fat retention or cheese yield. The use of EPS alone improved the cheese yield by increasing water and fat retention, but also caused a negative effect on the texture and flavor of Chihuahua cheese. The use of EPS-producing bacteria in combination with PL-A1 improved the cheese yield and increased the moisture and fat content. The cheeses with the best flavor and texture were those manufactured with PL-A1 and the cheeses manufactured with the combination of PL-A1 and EPS-producing culture.

N. Trancoso-Reyes; N. Gutiérrez-Méndez; D.R. Sepulveda; L.R. Hernández-Ochoa

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Single-cell analysis of growth in budding yeast and bacteria reveals a common size regulation strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unicellular organism from various kingdoms of life face the challenge of regulating their size. Despite decades of research, we still do not have a good understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in this regulation, and how cells coordinate the different events of the cell cycle, such as growth, division and DNA replication is still unclear. Here, we report on experimental results for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the bacterium Escherichia coli, showing that, remarkably, they share a common strategy for cell size control. We collected data on single-cell growth and cell cycle progression in S. cerevisiae in several growth media and estimated the distributions of size at birth and interdivision time as well as their correlations throughout cell lineages. We also performed the same analysis on previously collected data on single-cell growth and division in E. coli. The results are in quantitative agreement with the predictions of the incremental model, which leads to the addition of a constant volume (up to fluctuations), independent of size at birth, between birth and division; we show that in both organisms size at birth and size at division exhibit a linear relationship with slope one. This result, together with extended additional analysis supporting the incremental model, argues against the existing "critical size" paradigm for cell size control in bacteria and yeast.

Ilya Soifer; Lydia Robert; Naama Barkai; Ariel Amir

2014-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

448

Quantification of the Filterability of Freshwater Bacteria through 0.45, 0.22, and 0.1 ?m Pore Size Filters and Shape-Dependent Enrichment of Filterable Bacterial Communities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The filtered bacteria were subsequently able to grow on natural assimilable organic carbon (AOC) with specific growth rates up to 0.47 h-1. ... Most of these studies focused on the existence of such bacteria, whereas data on their quantifica tion, growth ability and filtration efficiency remains rather limited (14, 15). ... On average, 50% filterability was recorded and the microbial communities from Zürich Lake represented an extreme example (87%) (Table 1). ...

Yingying Wang; Frederik Hammes; Nico Boon; Thomas Egli

2007-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

449

Bacteria mediated heat sinks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many applications, such as laser diode technology, utilize components (eg. resistors) which have performance characteristics heavily dependent on temperature, and therefore, maintaining constant temperature is essential ...

Hong, Vu Anh

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Acyltransferases in Bacteria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...their utility for biodiesel production. Biotechnol...Kolattukudy. 2004. Introduction of a novel class...Mehrotra. 2010. Biodiesel production through...1999. Metabolic engineering of poly(3-hydroxyalkanoates...traditional and advanced engineering towards biotechnological...acyltransferase-based production of biodiesel-like compounds...

Annika Röttig; Alexander Steinbüchel

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

CORROSION SCIENCE SECTION CORROSION--Vol. 58, No. 5 417  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CORROSION SCIENCE SECTION CORROSION--Vol. 58, No. 5 417 0010-9312/02/000095/$5.00+$0.50/0 © 2002 of California­Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-2575. Corrosion Control of Mild Steel by Aerobic Bacteria Under.J. Arps, and J.C. Earthman****** ABSTRACT Corrosion of mild steel under aerobic conditions in the pres

Wood, Thomas K.

452

Carotenoid biosynthesis in bacteria: In vitro studies of a crt/bch transcription factor from Rhodobacter capsulatus and carotenoid enzymes from Erwinia herbicola  

SciTech Connect

A putative transcription factor in Rhodobactor capsulatus which binds upstream of the crt and bch pigment biosynthesis operons and appears to play a role in the adaptation of the organism from the aerobic to the anaerobic-photosynthetic growth mode was characterized. Chapter 2 describes the identification of this factor through an in vitro mobility shift assay, as well as the determination of its binding properties and sequence specificity. Chapter 3 focuses on the isolation of this factor. Biochemistry of later carotenoid biosynthesis enzymes derived from the non-photosynthetic bacterium, Erwinia herbicola. Chapter 4 describes the separate overexpression and in vitro analysis of two enzymes involved in the main sequence of the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway, lycopene cyclase and 5-carotene hydroxylase. Chapter 5 examines the overexpression and enzymology of functionally active zeaxanthin glucosyltransferase, an enzyme which carries out a more unusual transformation, converting a carotenoid into its more hydrophilic mono- and diglucoside derivatives. In addition, amino acid homology with other glucosyltransferases suggests a putative binding site for the UDP-activated glucose substrate.

O'Brien, D.A.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Microbiological quality and safety of fresh cultivated and wild mushrooms commercialized in Spain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

402 samples of 22 species of cultivated and wild fresh mushrooms sold in retail markets and supermarkets in Zaragoza (Spain) were studied to quantify their microbial load (mesophilic aerobic microorganisms, Pseudomonas genus, Enterobacteriaceae, lactic acid bacteria, total and thermotolerant coliform bacteria, Escherichia coli, yeasts and moulds) and to investigate the presence of E. coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella spp., Staphylococcus aureus and Yersinia enterocolitica. The total microbial counts ranged from 4.4 to 9.4 log cfu/g, the genus Pseudomonas being the most prevalent with counts from 3.7 to 9.3 log cfu/g and Auricularia auricula-judae the species with the highest microbial load (9.4 log cfu/g). No significant differences (p > 0.05) were detected between mean counts of wild and cultivated species in all the microbial groups studied. The microbiological safety level of the cultivated mushrooms was excellent since no pathogens were isolated, and the microbial counts of indicator microorganisms were low, being detected in only half of the species. Salmonella spp, E. coli O157:H7 and S. aureus were not isolated from any sample, Y. enterocolitica was detected in only four samples of wild mushrooms whereas twenty-six (6.5%) were positive for L. monocytogenes, their occurrence being relatively high in Calocybe gambosa (40%), Hygrophorus limacinus (40%) and Tuber indicum (100%). These results suggest that a strategy to reduce bacterial populations, and to improve the microbiological safety of some species of fresh mushrooms, should be investigated.

María E. Venturini; Juan E. Reyes; Carmen S. Rivera; Rosa Oria; Domingo Blanco

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

The mathematical modelling of biomethane production and the growth of methanogenic bacteria in batch reactor systems fed with organic municipal solid waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A mathematical model was developed and validated for an anaerobic digestion system of the Organic Fraction of Municipal Solid Wastes (OFMSWs) by using a laboratory-scale system of two Packed Bed Reactors (PBRs). The equations were obtained by the mass balances of methanogenic bacteria of affluent and effluent lixiviated, as well as the interior in each reactor. The methane rate was obtained by multiplying the methanogenic activity. A differential equation was fitted with experimental results to obtain the parameters that best describe methanogenic behaviour. These kinetic parameters were used with the modified logistic equation with the special case n = 1.

Liliana Alzate-Gaviria; Antonino Perez-Hernandez; Hector M. Poggi-Varaldo; P.J. Sebastian

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Bacterial stress response to environmental radiation relating to the Fukushima radiation discharge event, Japan: Will environmental bacteria alter their antibiotic susceptibility profile?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Antibiotic resistance in clinical pathogens in humans may be traced back to resistance mechanisms in environmental bacteria and any factors, which are likely to alter (upregulate) resistance in environmental organisms, is of potential and eventual consequence to human pathogens. Furthermore, sublethal doses of gamma radiation to environmental organisms may cause sublethal stress and a selective pressure, which may lead to mutational events that alter the bacterium's susceptibility profile. A gamma (?) radiation simulation experiment was performed to emulate the exposure of four environmental bacteria, including Listeria innocua, Bacillus subtilis, E. coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, to levels of radiation in and around Fukushima, Japan, equating to 1, 10 and 100 years equivalence exposure. Alteration to susceptibility to 14 antibiotics was measured as the primary endpoint. There was no significant alteration in the susceptibility of the Gram-positive organisms, whereas both Gram-negative organisms became slightly more susceptible to the antibiotics tested over time. These data indicate that such radiation exposure will not increase the antibiotic resistance profile of these organisms and hence not add to the global public health burden of increased antibiotic resistance in human bacterial pathogens.

Shigeyuki Nakanishi; John E. Moore; Motoo Matsuda; Colin E. Goldsmith; Wilson A. Coulter; Juluri R. Rao

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Chromium(VI) bioremoval by pseudomonas bacteria: role of microbial exudates for natural attenuation and biotreatment of Cr(VI) contamination  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate the role of microbial exudates, e.g., exopolymeric substance (EPS) and alginic acid, on microbial Cr(VI) reduction by two different Pseudomonas strains (P. putida P18 and P. aeuroginosa P16) as a method for treating subsurface environment contaminated with Cr(VI). Our results indicate that microbial exudates significantly enhanced microbial Cr(VI) reduction rates by forming less toxic and highly soluble organo-Cr(III) complexes despite the fact Cr(III) has a very low solubility under the experimental conditions studied (e.g., pH 7). The formation of soluble organo-Cr(III) complexes led to the protection of the cells and chromate reductases from inactivation. In systems with no organic ligands, soluble organo-Cr(III) end products were formed between Cr(III) and the EPS directly released by bacteria due to cell lysis. Our results also provide evidence that cell lysis played an important role in microbial Cr(VI) reduction by Pseudomonas bacteria due to the release of constitutive reductases that intracellularly and/or extracellularly catalyzed the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). The overall results highlight the need for incorporation of the release and formation of organo-Cr(III) complexes into reactive transport models to more accurately design and monitor in situ microbial remediation techniques for the treatment of subsurface systems contaminated with Cr(VI).

Dogan, N.M.; Dodge, C.; Kantar, C.; Gulcan, S.; Yilmaz, B.C.; Mazmanci, M.A.

2011-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

457

Chromium(VI) Bioremoval by Pseudomonas Bacteria: Role of Microbial Exudates for Natural Attenuation and Biotreatment of Cr(VI) Contamination  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate the role of microbial exudates, e.g., exopolymeric substance (EPS) and alginic acid, on microbial Cr(VI) reduction by two different Pseudomonas strains (P. putida P18 and P. aeuroginosa P16) as a method for treating subsurface environment contaminated with Cr(VI). Our results indicate that microbial exudates significantly enhanced microbial Cr(VI) reduction rates by forming less toxic and highly soluble organo-Cr(III) complexes despite the fact Cr(III) has a very low solubility under the experimental conditions studied (e.g., pH 7). The formation of soluble organo-Cr(III) complexes led to the protection of the cells and chromate reductases from inactivation. In systems with no organic ligands, soluble organo-Cr(III) end products were formed between Cr(III) and the EPS directly released by bacteria due to cell lysis. Our results also provide evidence that cell lysis played an important role in microbial Cr(VI) reduction by Pseudomonas bacteria due to the release of constitutive reductases that intracellularly and/or extracellularly catalyzed the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). The overall results highlight the need for incorporation of the release and formation of organo-Cr(III) complexes into reactive transport models to more accurately design and monitor in situ microbial remediation techniques for the treatment of subsurface systems contaminated with Cr(VI).

N Mercan Dogan; C Kantar; S Gulcan; C Dodge; B Coskun Yilmaz; M Ali Mazmanci

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

458

Biodegradation of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) in Jordanian petroleum sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bioremediation, or the use of micro-organisms to decontaminate soil or groundwater, is being increasingly seen as an effective, environment-friendly treatment for oil-contaminated sites. In this study, the results are presented concerning a laboratory screening of several natural bacterial consortia and laboratory tests to establish the performance in degradation of hydrocarbons contained in oily sludge from the Jordan Oil Refinery Plant. As a result of the laboratory screening, 18 isolates were selected and grouped into two main clusters; cluster 1 containing 12 isolates grown at 43°C, and cluster 2 containing six isolates grown at 37°C. Three natural bacterial consortia with ability to degrade total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) were prepared from these isolates. Experiments were conducted in Erlenmeyer flasks under aerobic conditions, with TPH removal percentage varying from 5.9% to 25.1%, depending upon consortia type and concentration. Consortia 7B and 13B exhibited the highest TPH removal percentages of 25% and 23%, respectively before nutrient addition. TPH removal rate was enhanced after addition of nutrients to incubated flasks. The highest TPH reduction (37%) was estimated after addition of a combination of nitrogen, phosphorus and sulphur to consortia 7B. This is the first report concerning biological treatment of total petroleum hydrocarbon by bacteria isolated from the oil refinery plant, where it lay the ground for full integrated studies recommended for hydrocarbon degradation that assist in solving sludge problems.

Bassam Mrayyan; Mohammad Battikhi

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Assessment of microbial processes on radionuclide mobility in shallow land burial. [West Valley, NY; Beatty, Nevada; Maxey Flats, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect

The impact of microbial metabolism of the organic substituents of low level radioactive wastes on radionuclide mobility in disposal sites, the nature of the microbial transformations involved in this metabolism and the effect of the prevailing environmental parameters on the quantities and types of metabolic intermediates accumulated were examined. Since both aerobic and anaerobic periods can occur during trench ecosystem development, oxidation capacities of the microbial community in the presence and absence of oxygen were analyzed. Results of gas studies performed at three commercial low level radioactive waste disposal sites were reviewed. Several deficiencies in available data were determined. Further research needs are suggested. This assessment has demonstrated that the biochemical capabilities expressed within the low level radioactive waste disposal site are common to a wide variety of soil bacteria. Hence, assuming trenches would not be placed in sites with such extreme abiotic conditions that all microbial activity is precluded, the microbial populations needed for colonization and decomposition of the organic waste substances are readily provided from the waste itself and from the soil of existing and any proposed disposal sites. Indeed, considering the ubiquity of occurrence of the microorganisms responsible for waste decomposition and the chemical nature of the organic waste material, long-term prevention of biodecomposition is difficult, if not impossible.

Colombo, P.; Tate, R.L. III; Weiss, A.J.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

An adaptive neuro-fuzzy identification model for the detection of meat spoilage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In food industry, safety and quality are considered important issues worldwide that are directly related to health and social progress. To address the rapid and non-destructive detection of meat spoilage microorganisms during aerobic storage at chill ... Keywords: Adaptive fuzzy logic system, Meat spoilage, Neural networks, Neurofuzzy systems, Partial least squares regression, Principal components analysis

Vassilis S. Kodogiannis, Abeer Alshejari

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aerobic bacteria microorganisms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

A hydrothermal seep on the Costa Rica margin: middle ground in a continuum of reducing ecosystems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...fuelled by sulphide oxidation is the most widespread...sulphide-oxidizing micro-organisms, aerobic...carry out anaerobic oxidation of methane at seeps...other fore-arc seamounts where extensional...capable of sulphur-oxidation. Figure-4...vents: Marianas Back Arc (12) [56]; Hanging...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Test of electron beam technology on Savannah River Laboratory low-activity aqueous waste for destruction of benzene, benzene derivatives, and bacteria  

SciTech Connect

High energy radiation was studied as a means for destroying hazardous organic chemical wastes. Tests were conducted at bench scale with a {sup 60}Co source, and at full scale (387 l/min) with a 1.5 MV electron beam source. Bench scale tests for both benzene and phenol included 32 permutations of water quality factors. For some water qualities, as much as 99.99% of benzene or 90% of phenol were removed by 775 krads of {sup 60}Co irradiation. Full scale testing for destruction of benzene in a simulated waste-water mix showed loss of 97% of benzene following an 800 krad dose and 88% following a 500 krad dose. At these loss rates, approximately 5 Mrad of electron beam irradiation is required to reduce concentrations from 100 g/l to drinking water quality (5 {mu}g/l). Since many waste streams are also inhabited by bacterial populations which may affect filtering operations, the effect of irradiation on those populations was also studied. {sup 60}Co and electron beam irradiation were both lethal to the bacteria studied at irradiation levels far lower than were necessary to remove organic contaminants.

Dougal, R.A. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Assessment of ocean waste disposal. Task 5. Human-health impacts of waste constituents. 2. Pathogens and antibiotic- and heavy-metal-resistant bacteria. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Disposal of wastes in the ocean has been practiced by coastal nations for many decades. All areas of the ocean have been subject to disposal use, including estuaries, nearshore, open shelf, and deep ocean sites. Until recently, it was believed that pathogenic bacteria did not survive for any significant period of time in estuarine and marine environments. Scientists and public-health workers never bothered to ask the question could viable, virulent pathogens be present in water samples even though they could not be detected by conventional plating methods. This laboratory answered this question in the affirmative for several bacterial pathogens, and this is discussed in detail. What follows in the report is a description of potentially harmful constituents of wastes, ways in which those constituents could reach humans, known incidents of human disease contracted from wastes, detection of waste-borne disease agents, management technologies, and monitoring and predictive technologies. Since the report is not just a review of the literature, not all known literature has been discussed. However, every attempt is made to include very relevant material, regardless of its age. What follows then is both a literature review and a position paper.

Grimes, D.J.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Monitoring single-cell bioenergetics via the coarsening of emulsion droplets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Microorganisms, including bacteria, yeast, fungi, and algae, have the potential to safely produce valuable molecules...Nat Biotechnol 8 : 135 – 139 . 3 Scott SA ( 2010 ) Biodiesel algae: Challenges and prospects . Curr Op Biotechnol 21...

L. Boitard; D. Cottinet; C. Kleinschmitt; N. Bremond; J. Baudry; G. Yvert; J. Bibette

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

GENETIC OPTIMIZATION FOR ALKALINE pH OF A CYANIDE DIHYDRATASE FROM PSEUDOMONAS STUTZERI  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the respiratory pathway. Surprisingly, several microorganisms can degrade and even survive cyanide’s presence. These microbes, fungi and bacteria, count on a variety of cyanide degrading enzymes that break cyanide into less toxic compounds. An example...

Rodriguez Mendoza, Alvaro

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

466

Myricetin blocks lipoteichoic acid-induced COX-2 expression in human gingival fibroblasts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Periodontitis is an infectious disease caused by microorganisms present in dental bacterial plaque. Lipoteichoic acid (LTA) is a component of the external membrane of Gram-positive bacteria. It causes septic s...

Gloria Gutiérrez-Venegas; Oscar Alonso Luna…

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Bioenergy Derived from Electrochemically Active Biofilms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Microorganisms (bacteria) naturally form biofilms on solid surfaces. Biofilms can be found in a variety of natural sites, such as sea water sediments, soils, and a range of wastewaters, such as municipal, dye, ag...

Mohammad Mansoob Khan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

High-throughput experimental and computational tools for exploring immunity and the microbiome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Humans live in association with trillions of microbes and yet we know remarkably little about their symbiotic relationship. The role these microorganisms have in humans has been characterized only in the case of few bacteria ...

Papa, Eliseo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

The medically important aerobic actinomycetes: epidemiology and microbiology.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...mechanisms that have been reported to have resulted in ocular nocardial infections have included improper sterilization of extended-wear soft contact lenses (158) and postoperative N. asteroides infection in a patient following an ophthalmologic (scleral buckling...

M M McNeil; J M Brown

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

EFFECT OF AEROBIC EXERCISE INTERVENTION ON PAINFUL DIABETIC NEUROPATHY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.50±2.48pre/2.56±2.01post, P=0.0267). However, there was no change in pain intensity scores. VO2max showed a significant increase post-intervention, while BMI, HbA1c, and blood pressure remained unchanged. Conclusion: These preliminary results show reductions...

Yoo, Min

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

471

Anaerobic-Aerobic Process for Microbial Degradation of Tetrabromobisphenol A  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...is a flame retardant that is used as an additive during manufacturing of plastic polymers and electronic circuit...is a flame retardant that is used as an additive during manufacturing of plastic polymers and electronic circuit...

Zeev Ronen; Aharon Abeliovich

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

aerobic sludge digestion: Topics by E-print Network  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of organic wastes) and digestion (anaerobic treatment of organic wastes combined with biogas production) are important waste management strategies with increasing significance...

473

The medically important aerobic actinomycetes: epidemiology and microbiology.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...acid analysis by gas chromatography...found evidence that natural resistance may also...modification of the natural history of the disease...is determined by gas-liquid chromatography...215). Ecology The natural reservoir for D...reduced. Acid but no gas is produced in fermentative...

M M McNeil; J M Brown

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Factors derived from studies of aerobic growth in minimal media.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...approximation of enthalpy of combustion (AH) for a large...microbial cells on hydrocarbons. Science 155:1515-1519...Kharasch, M. S. 1929. Heats of combustion of organic compounds...conception of valence and heats of combustion of organic compounds...

W R Mayberry; G J Prochazka; W J Payne

1968-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobic gammaproteobacterium congregibacter...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the inner membrane. A high Source: Prestwich, Ken - Biology Department, College of the Holy Cross Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Biology and Medicine 57 J....

476

Siderophore Production by Pseudomonas stutzeri under Aerobic and Anaerobic Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...bentonite clay to be used as backfill and buffer (27). A larger variety...acetonitrile in formiate buffer (pH 4.0), 11 mM...Winkelmann (ed.), Handbook of microbial iron chelates...Winkelmann (ed.), Handbook of microbial iron chelates...

Sofia A. Essén; Anna Johnsson; Dan Bylund; Karsten Pedersen; Ulla S. Lundström

2007-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

477

Bacterial Diversity in a Nonsaline Alkaline Environment: Heterotrophic Aerobic Populations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...5 CV 93a Transparent cream Large rod Variable 9.5 43.6 CV 93b Cream Large rod 9.5 41.8 AC 7 Yellow...Variable 8.5 68.8 AC 84 Yellow Large cocci 11 66.5 CV 21 Yellow...problem: a perspective from drilling in the Western Pacific...

Igor Tiago; Ana Paula Chung; António Veríssimo

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Selective aerobic oxidation of hydrocarbons over supported gold catalysts.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The selective oxidation of hydrocarbons is of vital importance for the production of valuable chemicals from crude oil and natural gas resources. Unfortunately, when using… (more)

Hereijgers, B.P.C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Aerobic Treatment Unit (Spanish)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Las personas que hagan la instalaci?n deben excavar un s?lo pozo con fondo nivelado, lo que reduce el tiempo de preparaci?n para la instalaci?n. El tanque de fibra de vidrio es lo suficientemente liviano como para que lo cargue una excavadora al lugar...

Lesikar, Bruce J.; Enciso, Juan

2000-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

480

The effects of aerobic exercise timing on sleep architecture.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??It is well known that the quality of sleep has direct effects on the manifestations of disease. Further, exercise has been shown to enhance the… (more)

Fairbrother, Kimberly Rose

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aerobic bacteria microorganisms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 11, 15811592, 2007 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/11/1581/2007/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for bathing and rowing activ- ities, as they were in the past. A model, appended to the hydro Polluted river waters can contain a large variety of pathogenic micro-organisms: viruses, bacteria and protozoa. The main origin of these micro-organisms is the direct and indirect release of men and warm

482

Bioremediation of nanomaterials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a method comprising the use of microorganisms for nanotoxicity study and bioremediation. In some embodiment, the microorganisms are bacterial organisms such as Gram negative bacteria, which are used as model organisms to study the nanotoxicity of the fullerene compounds: E. coli W3110, a human related enterobacterium and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, an environmentally important bacterium with versatile metabolism.

Chen, Frank Fanqing; Keasling, Jay D; Tang, Yinjie J

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

483

Sulfur accumulation in pinewood (Pinus sylvestris) induced by bacteria in a simulated seabed environment: Implications for marine archaeological wood and fossil fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fresh pinewood blocks were submerged in sulfate and iron(II) containing media, inoculated with bacterial consortia isolated from seawater, aiming to simulate the seabed conditions of the Vasa shipwreck (1628). The consortia contained erosion (EB) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and scanning X-ray spectromicroscopy images showed that organic sulfur, mainly thiols (R-SH), had accumulated in the lignin-rich middle lamella in EB-degraded parts of the wood. The sulfur content in the wood increased more than 10 times in 2 years. In another series with active inoculums from marine archaeological wood, the sulfur XANES spectra showed, after 4 years of anaerobic treatment, considerable amounts also of inorganic iron sulfides, Fe1?xS, which oxidized at atmospheric exposure. A sediment sample from the Vasa's seabed was also rich in iron sulfides, including pyrite, FeS2. X-ray fluorescence mappings of sulfur and phosphorous distributions indicate that scavenging SRB penetration, producing hydrogen sulfide in situ, is restricted to EB-degraded parts of the wood structure. The sulfur isotope depletion of 34S from ?34S = 21‰ in marine sulfate to ?34S = 6‰ and 1.8‰ for fractions of reduced sulfur and sulfate separated from a Vasa wood sample, respectively, suggests bacterial transformation. A fuller understanding of the routes of sulfur accumulation, as reactive iron sulfides and as organic sulfur, has important implications for improving conservation methods of marine archaeological wood. Moreover, the biogenic accumulation of organically bound sulfur, specifically in lignin-rich parts of waterlogged wood, has wider geochemical significance for fossil fuels of marine origin, as lignin-rich humic matter is important for the diagenetic formation of kerogens from anoxic marine sediments.

Yvonne Fors; Thomas Nilsson; Emiliana Damian Risberg; Magnus Sandström; Peter Torssander

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Production of choriogonadotropin-like factor by a microorganism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...weight of immature female rats as described by Diczfalusy and Loraine (13). Wistar rats, weighing 36-44 g and 20-22 days...Biol. Chem. 244, 4406- 4412. 13. Diczfalusy, E. & Loraine, J. A. (1955) J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab. 15,424-434...

T Maruo; H Cohen; S J Segal; S S Koide

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Interactions among Plant Species and Microorganisms in Salt Marsh Sediments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...a New England salt marsh. Ecology 72: 138-148...L. Melville, and R. L. Peterson. 1994...Broome, and S. R. Shafer. 1993...mycorrhizae in salt marshes in North Carolina...a New England salt marsh. J. Ecol. 86: 285-292. 30 Linderman, R. G. 1988. Mycorrhizal...

David J. Burke; Erik P. Hamerlynck; Dittmar Hahn

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Adaptation and Acclimation of Photosynthetic Microorganisms to Permanently Cold Environments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...complex sandwich between the plasma membrane and the thylakoid...of calcium channels over the plasma membrane, which in turn induce...Huner. 2002. Differential thermal effects on the energy distribution...2003. Break-up of the largest Arctic ice shelf and associated...

Rachael M. Morgan-Kiss; John C. Priscu; Tessa Pocock; Loreta Gudynaite-Savitch; Norman P. A. Huner

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Deciphering Active Estrogen-Degrading Microorganisms in Bioreactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in biological wastewater treatment processes. This dissertation investigated factors affecting estrogen biodegradation in bioreactors. Specifically, research efforts were placed on characterization of several bacterial estrogen degraders (model strains...

Roh, Hyung Keun

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

488

Symposium on bioelectrochemistry of microorganisms. IV. Biochemical fuel cells.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...photosynthesis of algae. A possible ad...a few of the bio-fuel cells will be considered...hydrogen- oxygen fuel cell. Pt electrodes...coated with marine algae developed more cathodic...Similarly, the algae yield oxygen which...with conventional fuel cells or solar cells...

K Lewis

1966-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Symposium on bioelectrochemistry of microorganisms. IV. Biochemical fuel cells.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...between the fuel and oxidant...electrochemical cell is di- rectly...serve as a fuel. In Table...Aside from hydrogen, which has...interest in these car- bonaceous fuels is due to...compared with hydrogen as a standard...ics in fuel cells. The kinetics...

K Lewis

1966-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

EXPERIMENTS WITH SOME MICROORGANISMS WHICH UTILIZE ETHANE AND HYDROGEN  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Bakterien in die Gruppe der Wasserstoff aktivierenden Katalysatoren...Kohlenwasserstoffen gebundenen Wasserstoff mobil. In dem einen Falle...GROHMANN, H. 1924 Zur Kenntnis wasserstoff- oxydierender Bakterien...1915 Zur Physiologie der Methan- bakterien. Thesis, Friedrichs...

Martin Dworkin; J. W. Foster

1958-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Beta Particle Dose Rates to Micro-Organisms in Soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Copyright 1977 Japan Radiation Research Society May 1977 research-article Articles Beta Particle...soil are constantly exposed to betaradiations arising from the naturally occuring radionuclides in soil as in this case no overlying tissue shields......

M. Kabir; F.W. Spiers; T.A Iinuma

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Symposium on bioelectrochemistry of microorganisms. IV. Biochemical fuel cells.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ess, one employs a heat engine, the efficiency...the electrochemical "combustion" of a fuel results...intermediate production of heat which, as noted above...leading to the complete combustion of the fuel. The theo...the materials are hydrocarbons or partially oxidized...

K Lewis

1966-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

INTERRELATIONS BETWEEN MICROORGANISMS AND PLANT ROOTS IN THE RHIZOSPHERE  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...112) found that extracts of cereal stubble fields seeds seemed to be sterile, others yielded bac- or of soil to which cereal straw had been added teria...356-357. biotic fungi of cereal seeds and their rela- 70. LINFORD...

Robert L. Starkey

1958-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Symposium on bioelectrochemistry of microorganisms. IV. Biochemical fuel cells.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...food materials just as energy is obtained from a fuel...wastes. The high-energy, electron-rich substances...There is an obvious advantage of the direct fuel cell, but there are disadvantages also, because the best...organism derives no energy from the oxidations...

K Lewis

1966-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Method for Detection of Microorganisms That Produce Gaseous Nitrogen Oxides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...with 02-free nitrogen; the tubes were...dishes to reduce water evaporation...Detection of gas producers. Culture...conductivity detector; nitrogen was used as the...Low-pressure solubility of gases in liquid water. Chem. Rev...

Gary E. Jenneman; Anne D. Montgomery; Michael J. McInerney

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Adaptation and Acclimation of Photosynthetic Microorganisms to Permanently Cold Environments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...redox state of the PQ pool regulates a thylakoid...antenna polypeptides and energy transfer between PSII...The regulation of energy transfer by the redox state of the thylakoid PQ pool reflects a short-term...maximum photosynthetic efficiency. Thus, the state transition...

Rachael M. Morgan-Kiss; John C. Priscu; Tessa Pocock; Loreta Gudynaite-Savitch; Norman P. A. Huner

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Adaptation and Acclimation of Photosynthetic Microorganisms to Permanently Cold Environments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...near-freezing water column, and anoxic...intersystem PQ pool (94). This...that is, to reduce the functional...cold ecosystems make up one of the largest...electron transport pool (excitation pressure...rates of energy consumption by downstream...and the liquid water beneath the ice...

Rachael M. Morgan-Kiss; John C. Priscu; Tessa Pocock; Loreta Gudynaite-Savitch; Norman P. A. Huner

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Adaptation and Acclimation of Photosynthetic Microorganisms to Permanently Cold Environments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...photoautrophic production of organic carbon and energy...base of autotrophic production in low-temperature...autotrophic energy production, which allow food...by providing new organic carbon and nutrient...darkness between solar light cycles (196...molecular to whole cell to ecosystem levels...

Rachael M. Morgan-Kiss; John C. Priscu; Tessa Pocock; Loreta Gudynaite-Savitch; Norman P. A. Huner

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

PHYTOTOXIC SUBSTANCES FROM SOIL MICROORGANISMS AND CROP RESIDUES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...thiamin, biotin, mineral salts, enzymes...acid Transpiration Green wt ppm 20 75 87...overcome by adequate mineral fertilization of...materials such as lime, soil, kaolin...of soil to which lime and complete mineral fertilization had...

T. M. McCalla; F. A. Haskins

1964-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Genomic and Expression Analyses of Cold-Adapted Microorganisms.  

SciTech Connect

Contents 7.1 Introduction 7.2 Ecological evidence of bacterial adaptation to cold 7.2.1 Characteristics of cold environments and implications for microbial ecology 7.2.2 Ecological adaptation in Exiguobacterium spp. and Psychrobacter spp. 7.3 Gene Expression Responses to the Cold 7.3.1 Fundamentals of Gene Expression Responses to Cold 7.3.2 Acclimation for Life in Cold Habitats 7.3.2.1 Translation and Chaperone Proteins: Safeguarding the functional units of cellular physiology 7.3.2.2 Carbon and Energy metabolism: resource efficiency over long generation times 7.3.2.3 Amino Acid Biosynthesis: Species-specific responses to species-specific deficiencies 7.3.2.4 Compatible solutes: a concomitant response in cryoenvironments 7.3.2.5 Membrane fluidity: A major role in the overall metabolic rate at temperature 7.3.2.6 The cell wall at low temperature: A poorly understood growth rate determinant 7.3.2.7 Transporters: The balance between local nutrient uptake and depletion 7.3.2.8 Genome plasticity. The potential role of transposases and repeated sequences. 7.4 Protein adaptations to cold 7.4.1 The low temperature challenge 7.4.2 The stability activity relationship 7.4.3 Structural features of cold adapted enzymes. 7.4.4 Hydrophobic interactions 7.4.5 Electrostatic interactions 7.4.5.1 Arginine 7.4.5.2 Acidic residues 7.4.6 Structural elements 7.4.6.1 -helices and -sheets 7.4.6.2 Proline and Glycine 7.4.6.3 Disordered regions 7.5 Comparison of cold- and warm-adapted Exiguobacterium strains 7.5.1 Phylogeny reflects adaptations to environmental conditions 7.5.2 Genomic comparison of two strains 7.6 Summary and future directions

Bakermans, Corien [Pennsylvania State University; Bergholz, Peter W. [Cornell University; Rodrigues, Debora F. [University of Houston, Houston; Vishnivetskaya, T. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Ayala-del-Río, Hector L. [University of Puerto Rico; Tiedje, James M. [Michigan State University, East Lansing

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z