National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for aeo residential sector

  1. Price Responsiveness in the AEO2003 NEMS Residential and Commercial Buildings Sector Models

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the demand responses to changes in energy prices in the Annual Energy Outlook 2003 versions of the Residential and Commercial Demand Modules of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). It updates a similar paper completed for the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 version of the NEMS.

  2. Second AEO2014 Buildings Sector Working Group Meeting

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    25, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR: JOHN CONTI ASSISTANT ADMINISTRATOR FOR ENERGY ANALYSIS PAUL HOLTBERG TEAM LEADER ANALYSIS INTEGRATION TEAM JAMES TURNURE DIRECTOR OFFICE OF ENERGY CONSUMPTION AND EFFICIENCY ANALYSIS FROM: BUILDINGS CONSUMPTION & EFFICIENCY ANALYSIS TEAM SUBJECT: Second AEO2014 Buildings Sector Working Group Meeting Summary (presented on 09-26-2013) Attendees: James Berry (EIA OES) Stephanie Burns (IMT) Gwendolyn Bredehoeft (EIA OEA) Colin McMillan (NREL) Bill McNary (EIA OES)

  3. AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - Mountain ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 8, and contains only the reference...

  4. AEO2014 Preliminary Results

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    September 26, 2013 AEO2014 Preliminary Results For discussion purposes only Not for citation Overview 2 * Residential projects - RECS update - Housing stock formation and decay - Lighting model - ENERGY STAR homes benchmarking - Weather elasticities * Commercial projects - Major end-use capacity factors - Data center servers - ENERGY STAR buildings - Hurdle rate floor * Both sectors - Usual annual updates - Miscellaneous end-use technology assumptions updates - Distributed generation * Contract

  5. Industrial Sector Energy Demand: Revisions for Non-Energy-Intensive Manufacturing (released in AEO2007)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01

    For the industrial sector, the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) analysis and projection efforts generally have focused on the energy-intensive industriesfood, bulk chemicals, refining, glass, cement, steel, and aluminumwhere energy cost averages 4.8% of annual operating cost. Detailed process flows and energy intensity indicators have been developed for narrowly defined industry groups in the energy-intensive manufacturing sector. The non-energy-intensive manufacturing industries, where energy cost averages 1.9% of annual operating cost, previously have received somewhat less attention, however. In Annual Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO), energy demand projections were provided for two broadly aggregated industry groups in the non-energy-intensive manufacturing sector: metal-based durables and other non-energy-intensive. In the AEO2006 projections, the two groups accounted for more than 50% of the projected increase in industrial natural gas consumption from 2004 to 2030.

  6. Miscellaneous Electricity Services in the Buildings Sector (released in AEO2007)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01

    Residential and commercial electricity consumption for miscellaneous services has grown significantly in recent years and currently accounts for more electricity use than any single major end-use service in either sector (including space heating, space cooling, water heating, and lighting). In the residential sector, a proliferation of consumer electronics and information technology equipment has driven much of the growth. In the commercial sector, telecommunications and network equipment and new advances in medical imaging have contributed to recent growth in miscellaneous electricity use.

  7. EIA Energy Efficiency-Residential Sector Energy Intensities,...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Sector Energy Intensities RESIDENTIAL SECTOR ENERGY INTENSITIES: 1978-2005 Released Date: August 2004 Page Last Modified:June 2009 These tables provide estimates of...

  8. Residential Demand Sector Data, Commercial Demand Sector Data, Industrial Demand Sector Data - Annual Energy Outlook 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-01-18

    Tables describing consumption and prices by sector and census division for 2006 - includes residential demand, commercial demand, and industrial demand

  9. Solar Photovoltaic Financing: Residential Sector Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coughlin, J.; Cory, K.

    2009-03-01

    This report presents the information that homeowners and policy makers need to facilitate PV financing at the residential level. The full range of cash payments, bill savings, and tax incentives is covered, as well as potentially available solar attribute payments. Traditional financing is also compared to innovative solutions, many of which are borrowed from the commercial sector. Together, these mechanisms are critical for making the economic case for a residential PV installation, given its high upfront costs. Unfortunately, these programs are presently limited to select locations around the country. By calling attention to these innovative initiatives, this report aims to help policy makers consider greater adoption of these models to benefit homeowners interested installing a residential PV system.

  10. Solar Photovoltaic Financing: Residential Sector Deployment | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Photovoltaic Financing: Residential Sector Deployment Solar Photovoltaic Financing: Residential Sector Deployment This report presents the information that homeowners and policy makers need to facilitate PV financing at the residential level. The full range of cash payments, bill savings, and tax incentives is covered, as well as potentially available solar attribute payments. Traditional financing is also compared to innovative solutions, many of which are borrowed from the

  11. Electricity savings potentials in the residential sector of Bahrain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, H.; Morsy, M.G.; Al-Baharna, N.S.

    1996-08-01

    Electricity is the major fuel (over 99%) used in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors in Bahrain. In 1992, the total annual electricity consumption in Bahrain was 3.45 terawatt-hours (TWh), of which 1.95 TWh (56%) was used in the residential sector, 0.89 TWh (26%) in the commercial sector, and 0.59 TWh (17%) in the industrial sector. Agricultural energy consumption was 0.02 TWh (less than 1%) of the total energy use. In Bahrain, most residences are air conditioned with window units. The air-conditioning electricity use is at least 50% of total annual residential use. The contribution of residential AC to the peak power consumption is even more significant, approaching 80% of residential peak power demand. Air-conditioning electricity use in the commercial sector is also significant, about 45% of the annual use and over 60% of peak power demand. This paper presents a cost/benefit analysis of energy-efficient technologies in the residential sector. Technologies studied include: energy-efficient air conditioners, insulating houses, improved infiltration, increasing thermostat settings, efficient refrigerators and freezers, efficient water heaters, efficient clothes washers, and compact fluorescent lights. We conservatively estimate a 32% savings in residential electricity use at an average cost of about 4 fils per kWh. (The subsidized cost of residential electricity is about 12 fils per kWh. 1000 fils = 1 Bahrain Dinar = US$ 2.67). We also discuss major policy options needed for implementation of energy-efficiency technologies.

  12. AEO2014: Preliminary Industrial Output

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Elizabeth Sendich, Analyst, and Kay Smith, Team Leader Macroeconomic Analysis Team September 26, 2013 Preliminary AEO2014 Macroeconomic Industrial Results DO NOT CITE OR DISTRIBUTE Overview * Preliminary AEO2014 industrial macroeconomic results; runs as of Sept. 23, 2013. * Macroeconomic results are inputs for a variety of NEMS modules, and cover: - Overall economy (for example GDP, interest rates, exports, etc.) - Sectoral detail (for example output of goods and services, employment, etc.) *

  13. AEO2016 Electricity Working Group

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Office of Electricity, Coal, Nuclear, and Renewables Analysis December 8, 2015 | Washington, DC AEO2016 Electricity Working Group WORKING GROUP PRESENTATION FOR DISCUSSION PURPOSES DO NOT QUOTE OR CITE AS RESULTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE What to look for: Electricity sector in AEO2016 * Inclusion of EPA final Clean Power Plan in Reference Case * Updated cost estimates for new generating technologies * Major data update on existing coal plant status: MATS- compliant technology or retirement

  14. Assessing National Employment Impacts of Investment in Residential and Commercial Sector Energy Efficiency: Review and Example Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, David M.; Belzer, David B.; Livingston, Olga V.; Scott, Michael J.

    2014-06-18

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) modeled the employment impacts of a major national initiative to accelerate energy efficiency trends at one of two levels: • 15 percent savings by 2030. In this scenario, efficiency activities save about 15 percent of the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) Reference Case electricity consumption by 2030. It is assumed that additional energy savings in both the residential and commercial sectors begin in 2015 at zero, and then increase in an S-shaped market penetration curve, with the level of savings equal to about 7.0 percent of the AEO 2014 U.S. national residential and commercial electricity consumption saved by 2020, 14.8 percent by 2025, and 15 percent by 2030. • 10 percent savings by 2030. In this scenario, additional savings begin at zero in 2015, increase to 3.8 percent in 2020, 9.8 percent by 2025, and 10 percent of the AEO reference case value by 2030. The analysis of the 15 percent case indicates that by 2030 more than 300,000 new jobs would likely result from such policies, including an annual average of more than 60,000 jobs directly supporting the installation and maintenance of energy efficiency measures and practices. These are new jobs resulting initially from the investment associated with the construction of more energy-efficient new buildings or the retrofit of existing buildings and would be sustained for as long as the investment continues. Based on what is known about the current level of building-sector energy efficiency jobs, this would represent an increase of more than 10 percent from the current estimated level of over 450,000 such jobs. The more significant and longer-lasting effect comes from the redirection of energy bill savings toward the purchase of other goods and services in the general economy, with its attendant influence on increasing the total number of jobs. This example analysis utilized PNNL’s ImSET model, a modeling framework that PNNL has used over the past two decades to assess the economic impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) energy efficiency programs in the buildings sector.

  15. Biofuels in the U.S. Transportation Sector (released in AEO2007)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01

    Sustained high world oil prices and the passage of the Energy Policy Act 2005 (EPACT) have encouraged the use of agriculture-based ethanol and biodiesel in the transportation sector; however, both the continued growth of the biofuels industry and the long-term market potential for biofuels depend on the resolution of critical issues that influence the supply of and demand for biofuels. For each of the major biofuelscorn-based ethanol, cellulosic ethanol, and biodieselresolution of technical, economic, and regulatory issues remains critical to further development of biofuels in the United States.

  16. Buildings Sector Working Group

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    July 22, 2013 AEO2014 Model Development For discussion purposes only Not for citation Overview Builldings Working Group Forrestal 2E-069 / July 22, 2013 2 * Residential projects - RECS update - Lighting model - Equipment, shell subsidies - ENERGY STAR benchmarking - Housing stock formation and decay * Commercial projects - Major end-use capacity factors - Hurdle rates - ENERGY STAR buildings * Both sectors - Consumer behavior workshop - Comparisons to STEO - AER  MER - Usual annual updates -

  17. AEO2015 BWG

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Behjat Hojjati Kevin Jarzomski David Peterson Steve Wade Owen Comstock (currently on detail) August 7, 2014 AEO2015 Model Updates Discussion purposes only - do not cite or circulate Overview AEO2015 Builldings Working Group Washington, D.C., August 7, 2014 2 * Shorter AEO this year * Federal standards * End-use technology characterizations * Historical updates * Discussion Discussion purposes only - do not cite or circulate Federal standards AEO2015 Builldings Working Group Washington, D.C.,

  18. Modeling diffusion of electrical appliances in the residential sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNeil, Michael A.; Letschert, Virginie E.

    2009-11-22

    This paper presents a methodology for modeling residential appliance uptake as a function of root macroeconomic drivers. The analysis concentrates on four major energy end uses in the residential sector: refrigerators, washing machines, televisions and air conditioners. The model employs linear regression analysis to parameterize appliance ownership in terms of household income, urbanization and electrification rates according to a standard binary choice (logistic) function. The underlying household appliance ownership data are gathered from a variety of sources including energy consumption and more general standard of living surveys. These data span a wide range of countries, including many developing countries for which appliance ownership is currently low, but likely to grow significantly over the next decades as a result of economic development. The result is a 'global' parameterization of appliance ownership rates as a function of widely available macroeconomic variables for the four appliances studied, which provides a reliable basis for interpolation where data are not available, and forecasting of ownership rates on a global scale. The main value of this method is to form the foundation of bottom-up energy demand forecasts, project energy-related greenhouse gas emissions, and allow for the construction of detailed emissions mitigation scenarios.

  19. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    4 Cost of a Generic Quad Used in the Residential Sector ($2010 Billion) (1) Residential 1980 10.45 1981 11.20 1982 11.58 1983 11.85 1984 11.65 1985 11.43 1986 10.90 1987 10.55 1988 10.18 1989 9.98 1990 10.12 1991 9.94 1992 9.78 1993 9.77 1994 9.78 1995 9.44 1996 9.44 1997 9.59 1998 9.23 1999 8.97 2000 9.57 2001 10.24 2002 9.33 2003 10.00 2004 10.32 2005 11.10 2006 11.60 2007 11.61 2008 12.29 2009 11.65 2010 9.98 2011 9.99 2012 9.87 2013 9.77 2014 9.76 2015 9.88 2016 9.85 2017 9.83 2018 9.86 2019

  20. Residential Multi-Function Gas Heat Pump: Efficient Engine-Driven Heat Pump for the Residential Sector

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Engine-Driven Heat Pump for the Residential Sector Introduction Building on previous work on an 11-ton packaged natural gas heat pump, this project will develop hardware and software for engine and system controls for a residential gas heat pump system that will provide space cooling, heating, and hot water. Various electric heat pump systems are used to provide heating and cooling for a wide range of buildings, from commercial fa- cilities to single family homes. The market for heat pumps is

  1. World Oil Prices in AEO2007 (released in AEO2007)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01

    Over the long term, the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 (AEO) projection for world oil prices -- defined as the average price of imported low-sulfur, light crude oil to U.S. refiners -- is similar to the AEO2006 projection. In the near term, however, AEO2007 projects prices that are $8 to $10 higher than those in AEO2006.

  2. Behavioral Assumptions Underlying California Residential Sector Energy Efficiency Programs (2009 CIEE Report)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This paper examines the behavioral assumptions that underlie California’s residential sector energy efficiency programs and recommends improvements that will help to advance the state’s ambitious greenhouse gas reduction goals.

  3. Major models and data sources for residential and commercial sector energy conservation analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    Major models and data sources are reviewed that can be used for energy-conservation analysis in the residential and commercial sectors to provide an introduction to the information that can or is available to DOE in order to further its efforts in analyzing and quantifying their policy and program requirements. Models and data sources examined in the residential sector are: ORNL Residential Energy Model; BECOM; NEPOOL; MATH/CHRDS; NIECS; Energy Consumption Data Base: Household Sector; Patterns of Energy Use by Electrical Appliances Data Base; Annual Housing Survey; 1970 Census of Housing; AIA Research Corporation Data Base; RECS; Solar Market Development Model; and ORNL Buildings Energy Use Data Book. Models and data sources examined in the commercial sector are: ORNL Commercial Sector Model of Energy Demand; BECOM; NEPOOL; Energy Consumption Data Base: Commercial Sector; F.W. Dodge Data Base; NFIB Energy Report for Small Businesses; ADL Commercial Sector Energy Use Data Base; AIA Research Corporation Data Base; Nonresidential Buildings Surveys of Energy Consumption; General Electric Co: Commercial Sector Data Base; The BOMA Commercial Sector Data Base; The Tishman-Syska and Hennessy Data Base; The NEMA Commercial Sector Data Base; ORNL Buildings Energy Use Data Book; and Solar Market Development Model. Purpose; basis for model structure; policy variables and parameters; level of regional, sectoral, and fuels detail; outputs; input requirements; sources of data; computer accessibility and requirements; and a bibliography are provided for each model and data source.

  4. Energy Demand: Limits on the Response to Higher Energy Prices in the End-Use Sectors (released in AEO2007)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01

    Energy consumption in the end-use demand sectorsresidential, commercial, industrial, and transportationgenerally shows only limited change when energy prices increase. Several factors that limit the sensitivity of end-use energy demand to price signals are common across the end-use sectors. For example, because energy generally is consumed in long-lived capital equipment, short-run consumer responses to changes in energy prices are limited to reductions in the use of energy services or, in a few cases, fuel switching; and because energy services affect such critical lifestyle areas as personal comfort, medical services, and travel, end-use consumers often are willing to absorb price increases rather than cut back on energy use, especially when they are uncertain whether price increases will be long-lasting. Manufacturers, on the other hand, often are able to pass along higher energy costs, especially in cases where energy inputs are a relatively minor component of production costs. In economic terms, short-run energy demand typically is inelastic, and long-run energy demand is less inelastic or moderately elastic at best.

  5. Efficient Engine-Driven Heat Pump for the Residential Sector

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Building on previous work on an 11-ton packaged natural gas heat pump, this project will develop hardware and software for engine and system controls for a residential gas heat pump system that...

  6. Strategies for Low Carbon Growth In India: Industry and Non Residential Sectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye, Jayant; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Iyer, Maithili; McNeil, Michael; Kramer, Klaas Jan; Roy, Joyashree; Roy, Moumita; Chowdhury, Shreya Roy

    2011-04-15

    This report analyzed the potential for increasing energy efficiency and reducing greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs) in the non-residential building and the industrial sectors in India. The first two sections describe the research and analysis supporting the establishment of baseline energy consumption using a bottom up approach for the non residential sector and for the industry sector respectively. The third section covers the explanation of a modeling framework where GHG emissions are projected according to a baseline scenario and alternative scenarios that account for the implementation of cleaner technology.

  7. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.2 Residential Sector Characteristics

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    6 Residential Heated Floorspace, as of 2005 (Percent of Total Households) Floorspace (SF) Fewer than 500 6% 500 to 999 26% 1,000 to 1,499 24% 1,500 to 1,999 16% 2,000 to 2,499 9% 2,500 to 2,999 7% 3,000 or more 11% Total 100% Source(s): EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008, Table HC1-3.

  8. AEO2014 results and status updates for the AEO2015

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    For AEO Electricity Working Group July 31, 2014, 1:00 PM ... status updates for the AEO2015 Working group presentation ... * The U.S. Energy Information Administration is ...

  9. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    3 2005 Average Household Expenditures, by Census Region ($2010) Item Energy (1) Shelter (2) Food Telephone, water and other public services Household supplies, furnishings and equipment (3) Transportation (4) Healthcare Education Personal taxes (5) Other expenditures Average Annual Income Note(s): Source(s): 1) Average household energy expenditures are calculated from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), while average expenditures for other categories are calculated from the

  10. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    4 2005 Average Household Expenditures as Percent of Annual Income, by Census Region ($2010) Item Energy (1) Shelter (2) Food Telephone, water and other public services Household supplies, furnishings and equipment (3) Transportation (4) Healthcare Education Personal taxes (5) Average Annual Expenditures Average Annual Income Note(s): Source(s): 1) Average household energy expenditures are calculated from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), while average expenditures for other

  11. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    0 2005 Energy End-Use Expenditures for an Average Household, by Region ($2010) Northeast Midwest South West National Space Heating 1,050 721 371 352 575 Air-Conditioning 199 175 456 262 311 Water Heating 373 294 313 318 320 Refrigerators 194 145 146 154 157 Other Appliances and Lighting 827 665 715 716 725 Total (1) 2,554 1,975 1,970 1,655 2,003 Note(s): 1) Due to rounding, end-uses do not sum to totals. Source(s): EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008, Table US-15; EIA,

  12. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    1 2005 Energy Expenditures per Household, by Housing Type and Square Footage ($2010) Per Household Single-Family 1.16 Detached 1.16 Attached 1.20 Multi-Family 1.66 2 to 4 units 1.90 5 or more units 1.53 Mobile Home 1.76 All Homes 1.12 Note(s): Source(s): 1) Energy expenditures per square foot were calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was

  13. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    2 2005 Household Energy Expenditures, by Vintage ($2010) | Year | Prior to 1950 887 | 22% 1950 to 1969 771 | 22% 1970 to 1979 736 | 16% 1980 to 1989 741 | 16% 1990 to 1999 752 | 16% 2000 to 2005 777 | 9% | Average 780 | Total 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1.24 2,003 1) Energy expenditures per square foot were calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the

  14. Local Option- Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Loss Reserve Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Arkansas Energy Office (AEO) offers a loan loss reserve program that the utilities can participate in to subsidize their energy efficiency loans to its residential customers. Municipal utility...

  15. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.2 Residential Sector Characteristics

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    2 Share of Households, by Housing Type and Type of Ownership, as of 2005 (Percent) Housing Type Owned Rented Total Single-Family: 61.5% 10.3% 71.7% Detached 57.7% 7.2% 64.9% Attached 3.8% 3.1% 6.8% Multi-Family: 3.7% 18.3% 22.0% 2 to 4 units 1.6% 5.3% 6.9% 5 or more units 2.1% 13.0% 15.0% Mobile Homes 5.1% 1.1% 6.2% Total 70.3% 29.6% 100% Source(s): EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008, Table HC3-1 and HC4

  16. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.2 Residential Sector Characteristics

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    5 Characteristics of U.S. Housing by Vintage, as of 2005 Vintage Prior to 1950 20% | 2,677 1,021 775 1950 to 1969 23% | 2,433 927 775 1970 to 1979 17% | 2,666 869 948 1980 to 1989 17% | 2,853 909 1,008 1990 to 1999 16% | 3,366 940 1,245 2000 to 2005 8% | 3,680 1,047 1,425 111.1 2,838 941 1,062 Note(s): Source(s): Total U.S. Homes (millions) U.S. Average 1) Average home sizes include both heated and unheated floor space, including garages. EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct.

  17. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    3 Residential Aggregate Energy Expenditures, by Year and Major Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Electricity Total 1980 158.5 1981 164.0 1982 172.3 1983 176.1 1984 178.5 1985 176.8 1986 169.2 1987 167.1 1988 170.1 1989 172.8 1990 168.2 1991 169.9 1992 166.7 1993 175.6 1994 174.9 1995 172.7 1996 181.8 1997 180.0 1998 173.5 1999 174.0 2000 192.8 2001 203.3 2002 192.1 2003 208.8 2004 215.1 2005 236.7 2006 240.0 2007 246.1 2008 259.6 2009 241.6 2010 251.8 2011 251.3 2012 247.1 2013 240.3 2014 239.4 2015

  18. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    7 Range 10 4 48 Clothes Dryer 359 (2) 4 49 Water Heating Water Heater-Family of 4 40 64 (3) 26 294 Water Heater-Family of 2 40 32 (3) 12 140 Note(s): Source(s): 1) $1.139/therm. 2) Cycles/year. 3) Gallons/day. A.D. Little, EIA-Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Reference Case, Sept. 2, 1998, p. 30 for range and clothes dryer; LBNL, Energy Data Sourcebook for the U.S. Residential Sector, LBNL-40297, Sept. 1997, p. 62-67 for water heating; GAMA,

  19. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    Residential Energy Prices, by Year and Major Fuel Type ($2010 per Million Btu) Electricity Natural Gas Petroleum (1) Avg. 1980 36.40 8.35 16.77 17.64 1981 38.50 8.88 18.35 19.09 1982 40.15 10.08 17.28 19.98 1983 40.43 11.30 16.08 21.00 1984 38.80 11.02 15.61 20.20 1985 38.92 10.68 14.61 20.10 1986 38.24 9.98 11.88 19.38 1987 37.29 9.22 11.23 18.73 1988 36.22 8.80 10.83 18.02 1989 35.67 8.71 11.96 17.93 1990 35.19 8.63 13.27 18.64 1991 34.88 8.38 12.49 18.31 1992 34.79 8.28 11.23 17.76 1993

  20. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    2 Residential Energy Prices, by Year and Fuel Type ($2010) LPG ($/gal) 1980 2.24 1981 2.51 1982 2.30 1983 2.14 1984 2.10 1985 1.96 1986 1.54 1987 1.42 1988 1.39 1989 1.48 1990 1.69 1991 1.56 1992 1.40 1993 1.33 1994 1.27 1995 1.22 1996 1.37 1997 1.34 1998 1.15 1999 1.16 2000 1.70 2001 1.59 2002 1.42 2003 1.67 2004 1.84 2005 2.36 2006 2.64 2007 2.81 2008 3.41 2009 2.52 2010 2.92 2011 3.62 2012 3.65 2013 3.43 2014 3.60 2015 3.74 2016 3.79 2017 3.86 2018 3.89 2019 3.92 2020 3.96 2021 3.99 2022 4.02

  1. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    5 2010 Residential Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. LPG Kerosene Total Coal Electricity Total Percent Space Heating (2) 38.7 11.2 8.0 19.8 0.0 14.3 72.9 28.9% Space Cooling (3) 0.0 35.4 35.4 14.0% Water Heating (4) 14.3 2.1 2.0 4.0 14.2 32.6 12.9% Lighting 22.6 22.6 9.0% Refrigeration (5) 14.9 14.9 5.9% Electronics (6) 17.8 17.8 7.1% Cooking 2.4 0.8 0.8 6.0 9.2 3.7% Wet Cleaning (7) 0.6 10.7 11.3 4.5% Computers 5.6 5.6 2.2% Other

  2. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    6 2015 Residential Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. LPG Kerosene Total Coal Electricity Total Percent Space Heating (2) 35.0 13.0 8.1 21.6 0.0 14.0 70.6 29.2% Space Cooling (3) 0.0 33.8 33.8 14.0% Water Heating 13.5 1.9 1.5 3.4 15.8 32.7 13.5% Lighting 17.6 17.6 7.3% Refrigeration (4) 15.0 15.0 6.2% Electronics (5) 10.9 10.9 4.5% Wet Cleaning (6) 0.6 10.8 11.4 4.7% Cooking 2.2 0.9 0.9 3.8 6.8 2.8% Computers 6.3 6.3 2.6% Other (7)

  3. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    7 2025 Residential Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. LPG Kerosene Total Coal Electricity Total Percent Space Heating (2) 39.7 11.5 7.8 19.9 0.0 15.0 74.5 28.6% Space Cooling (3) 0.0 36.2 36.2 13.9% Water Heating 16.0 1.4 1.3 2.7 17.1 35.9 13.8% Lighting 15.2 15.2 5.8% Refrigeration (4) 15.5 15.5 6.0% Electronics (5) 12.0 12.0 4.6% Wet Cleaning (6) 0.8 9.8 10.5 4.1% Cooking 2.7 0.8 0.8 4.3 7.8 3.0% Computers 7.7 7.7 2.9% Other (7)

  4. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    8 2035 Residential Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. LPG Kerosene Total Coal Electricity Total Percent Space Heating (2) 44.3 10.3 7.7 18.6 0.0 16.0 79.0 27.4% Space Cooling (3) 0.0 40.6 40.6 14.1% Water Heating 17.6 1.2 1.2 2.3 17.7 37.6 13.0% Lighting 15.5 15.5 5.4% Refrigeration (4) 17.0 17.0 5.9% Electronics (5) 14.2 14.2 4.9% Wet Cleaning (6) 0.9 10.4 11.3 3.9% Cooking 3.2 0.8 0.8 4.8 8.9 3.1% Computers 8.7 8.7 3.0% Other (7)

  5. World Oil Prices in AEO2006 (released in AEO2006)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01

    World oil prices in the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO) reference case are substantially higher than those in the AEO2005 reference case. In the AEO2006 reference case, world crude oil prices, in terms of the average price of imported low-sulfur, light crude oil to U.S. refiners, decline from current levels to about $47 per barrel (2004 dollars) in 2014, then rise to $54 per barrel in 2025 and $57 per barrel in 2030. The price in 2025 is approximately $21 per barrel higher than the corresponding price projection in the AEO2005 reference case.

  6. AEO2016 Electricity Working Group

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Office of Electricity, Coal, Nuclear, and Renewables Analysis December 8, 2015 | Washington, DC AEO2016 ... U.S. Energy Information Administration change in capacity additions ...

  7. Residential

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Residential Residential Lighting Energy Star Appliances Consumer Electronics Heat Pump Water Heaters Electric Storage Water...

  8. AEO2015 BWG

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    of "other" electricity use (high, low, approach?) - referencesresearch on approaches to incorporating water heating interactions for residential clothes washers and dishwashers ...

  9. Model documentation report: Residential sector demand module of the National Energy Modeling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code. This document serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document that provides a detailed description for energy analysts, other users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports according to Public Law 93-275, section 57(b)(1). Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements.

  10. Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Residential Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    Residential Sector Energy Consumption March 2012 1.2.9 Implicit Price Deflators (2005 = 1.00) Year Year Year 1980 0.48 1990 0.72 2000 0.89 1981 0.52 1991 0.75 2001 0.91 1982 0.55 1992 0.77 2002 0.92 1983 0.58 1993 0.78 2003 0.94 1984 0.60 1994 0.80 2004 0.97 1985 0.62 1995 0.82 2005 1.00 1986 0.63 1996 0.83 2006 1.03 1987 0.65 1997 0.85 2007 1.06 1988 0.67 1998 0.86 2008 1.09 1989 0.70 1999 0.87 2009 1.10 2010 1.11 Source(s): EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, August 2011, Appendix D, p. 353.

  11. Development and Demonstration of the Open Automated Demand Response Standard for the Residential Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herter, Karen; Rasin, Josh; Perry, Tim

    2009-11-30

    The goal of this study was to demonstrate a demand response system that can signal nearly every customer in all sectors through the integration of two widely available and non- proprietary communications technologies--Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) over lnternet protocol and Utility Messaging Channel (UMC) over FM radio. The outcomes of this project were as follows: (1) a software bridge to allow translation of pricing signals from OpenADR to UMC; and (2) a portable demonstration unit with an lnternet-connected notebook computer, a portfolio of DR-enabling technologies, and a model home. The demonstration unit provides visitors the opportunity to send electricity-pricing information over the lnternet (through OpenADR and UMC) and then watch as the model appliances and lighting respond to the signals. The integration of OpenADR and UMC completed and demonstrated in this study enables utilities to send hourly or sub-hourly electricity pricing information simultaneously to the residential, commercial and industrial sectors.

  12. Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) 2006 - Supplemental Tables - All Tables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-01-18

    Tables describing regional energy consumption and prices by sector; residential, commercial, and industrial demand sector data; transportation demand sector; electricity and renewable fuel; and petroleum, natural gas, and coal data.

  13. AEO 2015 Electricity, Coal, Nuclear and Renewables Preliminary...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Results For Joint Electricity, Coal, Nuclear, and Renewables AEO2015 Working Group September 15, 2014 ... AEO2014 * The U.S. Energy Information Administration is revising ...

  14. Federal Fuels Taxes and Tax Credits (released in AEO2007)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01

    The Annual Energy Outlook 2007 (AEO) reference case and alternative cases generally assume compliance with current laws and regulations affecting the energy sector. Some provisions of the U.S. Tax Code are scheduled to expire, or may be subject to adjustment, before the end of the projection period. In general, scheduled expirations and adjustments provided in legislation or regulations are assumed to occur, unless there is significant historical evidence to support an alternative assumption. This section examines the AEO2007 treatment of three provisions that could have significant impacts on U.S. energy markets: the gasoline excise tax, biofuel (ethanol and biodiesel) tax credits, and the production tax credit for electricity generation from certain renewable resources.

  15. Industrial Team Plans for AEO2015

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    24, 2014 | Washington, DC WORKING GROUP PRESENTATION FOR DISCUSSION PURPOSES DO NOT QUOTE OR CITE AS RESULTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE Industrial team plans for AEO2015 AEO2015 lite year additions * Process flow status (complete AEO2016) * Data updates * Regulation changes * Ethane / propane price modeling 2 Industrial Team Washington DC, July 24, 2014 WORKING GROUP PRESENTATION FOR DISCUSSION PURPOSES DO NOT QUOTE OR CITE AS RESULTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE Process flow models * General: - Replace

  16. Changing Trends in the Bulk Chemicals and Pulp and Paper Industries (released in AEO2005)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01

    Compared with the experience of the 1990s, rising energy prices in recent years have led to questions about expectations of growth in industrial output, particularly in energy-intensive industries. Given the higher price trends, a review of expected growth trends in selected industries was undertaken as part of the production of Annual Energy Outlook 2005 (AEO). In addition, projections for the industrial value of shipments, which were based on the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system in AEO2004, are based on the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) in AEO2005. The change in industrial classification leads to lower historical growth rates for many industrial sectors. The impacts of these two changes are highlighted in this section for two of the largest energy-consuming industries in the U.S. industrial sector-bulk chemicals and pulp and paper.

  17. Potential Impact of Adopting Maximum Technologies as Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards in the U.S. Residential Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letschert, Virginie; Desroches, Louis-Benoit; McNeil, Michael; Saheb, Yamina

    2010-05-03

    The US Department of Energy (US DOE) has placed lighting and appliance standards at a very high priority of the U.S. energy policy. However, the maximum energy savings and CO2 emissions reduction achievable via minimum efficiency performance standards (MEPS) has not yet been fully characterized. The Bottom Up Energy Analysis System (BUENAS), first developed in 2007, is a global, generic, and modular tool designed to provide policy makers with estimates of potential impacts resulting from MEPS for a variety of products, at the international and/or regional level. Using the BUENAS framework, we estimated potential national energy savings and CO2 emissions mitigation in the US residential sector that would result from the most aggressive policy foreseeable: standards effective in 2014 set at the current maximum technology (Max Tech) available on the market. This represents the most likely characterization of what can be maximally achieved through MEPS in the US. The authors rely on the latest Technical Support Documents and Analytical Tools published by the U.S. Department of Energy as a source to determine appliance stock turnover and projected efficiency scenarios of what would occur in the absence of policy. In our analysis, national impacts are determined for the following end uses: lighting, television, refrigerator-freezers, central air conditioning, room air conditioning, residential furnaces, and water heating. The analyzed end uses cover approximately 65percent of site energy consumption in the residential sector (50percent of the electricity consumption and 80percent of the natural gas and LPG consumption). This paper uses this BUENAS methodology to calculate that energy savings from Max Tech for the U.S. residential sector products covered in this paper will reach an 18percent reduction in electricity demand compared to the base case and 11percent in Natural Gas and LPG consumption by 2030 The methodology results in reductions in CO2 emissions of a similar magnitude.

  18. Residential sector end-use forecasting with EPRI-Reeps 2.1: Summary input assumptions and results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koomey, J.G.; Brown, R.E.; Richey, R.

    1995-12-01

    This paper describes current and projected future energy use by end-use and fuel for the U.S. residential sector, and assesses which end-uses are growing most rapidly over time. The inputs to this forecast are based on a multi-year data compilation effort funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. We use the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) REEPS model, as reconfigured to reflect the latest end-use technology data. Residential primary energy use is expected to grow 0.3% per year between 1995 and 2010, while electricity demand is projected to grow at about 0.7% per year over this period. The number of households is expected to grow at about 0.8% per year, which implies that the overall primary energy intensity per household of the residential sector is declining, and the electricity intensity per household is remaining roughly constant over the forecast period. These relatively low growth rates are dependent on the assumed growth rate for miscellaneous electricity, which is the single largest contributor to demand growth in many recent forecasts.

  19. Models for residential- and commercial-sector energy-conservation analysis: applications, limitations, and future potential. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, Henry E.; Fullen, Robert E.

    1980-09-01

    This report reviews four of the major models used by the Department of Energy (DOE) for energy conservation analyses in the residential- and commercial-building sectors. The objective is to provide a critical analysis of how these models can serve as tools for DOE and its Conservation Policy Office in evaluating and quantifying their policy and program requirements. For this, the study brings together information on the models' analytical structure and their strengths and limitations in policy applications these are then employed to assess the most-effective role for each model in addressing future issues of buildings energy-conservation policy and analysis. The four models covered are: Oak Ridge Residential Energy Model; Micro Analysis of Transfers to Households/Comprehensive Human Resources Data System (MATH/CHRDS) Model; Oak Ridge Commercial Energy Model; and Brookhaven Buildings Energy Conservation Optimization Model (BECOM).

  20. Building-Integrated Photovoltaics (BIPV) in the Residential Sector: An Analysis of Installed Rooftop System Prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, T.; Goodrich, A.; Woodhouse, M.; Margolis, R.; Ong, S.

    2011-11-01

    For more than 30 years, there have been strong efforts to accelerate the deployment of solar-electric systems by developing photovoltaic (PV) products that are fully integrated with building materials. This report examines the status of building-integrated PV (BIPV), with a focus on the cost drivers of residential rooftop systems, and explores key opportunities and challenges in the marketplace.

  1. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    9 Total Residential Industry Electric Gen. Transportation Residential Industry Transportation (quads) 1980 24% 41% 19% 3% | 30% 49% 3% 20.22 1981 23% 42% 19% 3% | 30% 49% 3% 19.74 1982 26% 39% 18% 3% | 32% 45% 3% 18.36 1983 26% 39% 17% 3% | 32% 46% 3% 17.20 1984 25% 40% 17% 3% | 31% 47% 3% 18.38 1985 25% 40% 18% 3% | 32% 46% 3% 17.70 1986 26% 40% 16% 3% | 32% 46% 3% 16.59 1987 25% 41% 17% 3% | 31% 47% 3% 17.63 1988 26% 42% 15% 3% | 31% 47% 3% 18.44 1989 25% 41% 16% 3% | 30% 47% 3% 19.56 1990 23%

  2. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    20 Site Consumption Primary Consumption Total Residential Industry Electric Gen. Transportation Residential Industry Transportation (quads) 1980 5% 28% 8% 56% | 8% 31% 56% 34.2 1981 5% 26% 7% 59% | 7% 29% 59% 31.9 1982 5% 26% 5% 61% | 6% 28% 61% 30.2 1983 4% 25% 5% 62% | 6% 27% 62% 30.1 1984 5% 26% 4% 61% | 6% 27% 61% 31.1 1985 5% 25% 4% 63% | 6% 26% 63% 30.9 1986 5% 24% 5% 63% | 6% 26% 63% 32.2 1987 5% 25% 4% 63% | 6% 26% 63% 32.9 1988 5% 24% 5% 63% | 6% 26% 63% 34.2 1989 5% 24% 5% 63% | 7% 25%

  3. AEO2015 Coal Working Group Meeting Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AS AEO2015 MODELING ASSUMPTIONS AND INPUTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. 1 July 30, 2014 MEMORANDUM TO: John Conti Assistant Administrator for Energy Analysis Jim Diefenderfer Director, Office of Electricity, Coal, Nuclear, and Renewables Analysis FROM: Coal and Uranium Analysis Team SUBJECT: AEO2015 Coal Working Group Meeting I Summary Attendees (39) Name Affiliation Greg Adams (Moderator) US DOE: EIA Jim Diefenderfer Tyler Hodge Elias Johnson Ayaka Jones Eric Krall Laura Martin Mike Mellish Kate

  4. AEO2016 Preliminary Industrial Output Results

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1: Preliminary macroeconomic results For Macro-Industrial Working Group December 3, 2015 | Washington, DC By Kay Smith, Macro Team Leader, Elizabeth Sendich, Russ Tarver, and Vipin Arora DO NOT CITE OR DISTRIBUTE Macro Team's AEO2016 Briefing Plans * Review incorporation of completed AEO macroeconomic initiatives - Revised commercial floorspace model using indices rather than levels so that EIA customers won't have to incur extra data costs to compensate Dodge - Enhancements of the industrial

  5. Comparing Efficiency Projections (released in AEO2010)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01

    Realized improvements in energy efficiency generally rely on a combination of technology and economics. The figure below illustrates the role of technology assumptions in the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 projections for energy efficiency in the residential and commercial buildings sector. Projected energy consumption in the Reference case is compared with projections in the Best Available Technology, High Technology, and 2009 Technology cases and an estimate based on an assumption of no change in efficiency for building shells and equipment.

  6. File:AEO2012earlyrelease.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AEO2012earlyrelease.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:AEO2012earlyrelease.pdf Size of this preview: 463 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 600...

  7. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    4 Ownership (1) Owned 54.9 104.5 40.3 78% Rented 77.4 71.7 28.4 22% Public Housing 75.7 62.7 28.7 2% Not Public Housing 77.7 73.0 28.4 19% 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Energy consumption per square foot was calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average total floor space, which includes garages, attics and unfinished

  8. Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.2 Residential Sector Water Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    1 Residential Water Use by Source (Million Gallons per Day) Year 1980 3,400 1985 3,320 1990 3,390 1995 3,390 2000 (3) (3) 3,590 2005 3,830 Note(s): Source(s): 29,430 25,600 1) Public supply water use: water withdrawn by public and private water suppliers that furnish water to at least 25 people or have a minimum of 15 connections. 2) Self-supply water use: Water withdrawn from a groundwater or surface-water source by a user rather than being obtained from a public supply. 3) USGS did not provide

  9. Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.2 Residential Sector Water Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    6 Residential Water Billing Rate Structures for Community Water Systems Rate Structure Uniform Rates Declining Block Rate Increasing Block Rate Peak Period or Seasonal Rate Separate Flat Fee Annual Connection Fee Combined Flat Fee Other Rate Structures Note(s): Source(s): 3.0% 9.0% 1) Systems serving more than 10,000 users provide service to 82% of the population served by community water systems. Columns do not sum to 100% because some systems use more than one rate structure. 2) Uniform rates

  10. The Boom of Electricity Demand in the Residential Sector in the Developing World and the Potential for Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letschert, Virginie; McNeil, Michael A.

    2008-05-13

    With the emergence of China as the world's largest energy consumer, the awareness of developing country energy consumption has risen. According to common economic scenarios, the rest of the developing world will probably see an economic expansion as well. With this growth will surely come continued rapid growth in energy demand. This paper explores the dynamics of that demand growth for electricity in the residential sector and the realistic potential for coping with it through efficiency. In 2000, only 66% of developing world households had access to electricity. Appliance ownership rates remain low, but with better access to electricity and a higher income one can expect that households will see their electricity consumption rise significantly. This paper forecasts developing country appliance growth using econometric modeling. Products considered explicitly - refrigerators, air conditioners, lighting, washing machines, fans, televisions, stand-by power, water heating and space heating - represent the bulk of household electricity consumption in developing countries. The resulting diffusion model determines the trend and dynamics of demand growth at a level of detail not accessible by models of a more aggregate nature. In addition, the paper presents scenarios for reducing residential consumption through cost-effective and/or best practice efficiency measures defined at the product level. The research takes advantage of an analytical framework developed by LBNL (BUENAS) which integrates end use technology parameters into demand forecasting and stock accounting to produce detailed efficiency scenarios, which allows for a realistic assessment of efficiency opportunities at the national or regional level. The past decades have seen some of the developing world moving towards a standard of living previously reserved for industrialized countries. Rapid economic development, combined with large populations has led to first China and now India to emerging as 'energy giants', a phenomenon that is expected to continue, accelerate and spread to other countries. This paper explores the potential for slowing energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in the residential sector in developing countries and evaluates the potential of energy savings and emissions mitigation through market transformation programs such as, but not limited to Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling (EES&L). The bottom-up methodology used allows one to identify which end uses and regions have the greatest potential for savings.

  11. Is Efficiency Enough? Towards a New Framework for Carbon Savingsin the California Residential Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moezzi, Mithra; Diamond, Rick

    2005-10-01

    The overall implementation of energy efficiency in the United States is not adequately aligned with the environmental benefits claimed for efficiency, because it does not consider absolute levels of energy use, pollutant emissions, or consumption. In some ways, promoting energy efficiency may even encourage consumption. A more effective basis for environmental policy could be achieved by recognizing the degree and nature of the synchronization between environmental objectives and efficiency. This research seeks to motivate and initiate exploration of alternative ways of defining efficiency or otherwise moderating energy use toward reaching environmental objectives, as applicable to residential electricity use in California. The report offers three main recommendations: (1) produce definitions of efficiency that better integrate absolute consumption, (2) attend to the deeper social messages of energy efficiency communications, and (3) develop a more critical perspective on benefits and limitations of energy efficiency for delivering environmental benefits. In keeping with the exploratory nature of this project, the report also identifies ten questions for further investigation.

  12. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    1 Type (1) Single-Family: 55.4 106.6 39.4 80.5% Detached 55.0 108.4 39.8 73.9% Attached 60.5 89.3 36.1 6.6% Multi-Family: 78.3 64.1 29.7 14.9% 2 to 4 units 94.3 85.0 35.2 6.3% 5 or more units 69.8 54.4 26.7 8.6% Mobile Homes 74.6 70.4 28.5 4.6% All Housing Types 58.7 95.0 37.0 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Energy consumption per square foot was calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average

  13. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    2 Year Built (1) Prior to 1950 74.5 114.9 46.8 24% 1950 to 1969 66.0 96.6 38.1 23% 1970 to 1979 59.4 83.4 33.5 15% 1980 to 1989 51.9 81.4 32.3 14% 1990 to 1999 48.2 94.4 33.7 16% 2000 to 2005 44.7 94.7 34.3 8% Average 58.7 95.0 40.0 Note(s): Source(s): 1) Energy consumption per square foot was calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was

  14. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    5 Load (quads) and Percent of Total Load Component Heating Cooling Roof -0.65 12% 0.16 14% Walls -1.00 19% 0.11 10% Foundation -0.76 15% -0.07 - Infiltration -1.47 28% 0.19 16% Windows (conduction) -1.34 26% 0.01 1% Windows (solar gain) 0.43 - 0.37 32% Internal Gains 0.79 - 0.31 27% Net Load -3.99 100% 1.08 100% Note(s): Source(s): Aggregate Residential Building Component Loads as of 1998 (1) 1) "Load" represents the thermal energy losses/gains that when combined will be offset by a

  15. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    8 2009 Annual Natural Gas Consumption per Appliance by Census Division Census Division New England Middle Atlantic East North Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West South Central Mountain Pacific United States Average Total Source(s): 515,657 208,173 43,648 42,723 90,171 American Gas Association, Residential Natural Gas Market Survey, Jan. 2011, Table 10-1. 61,928 23,005 5,238 5,135 10,270 44,675 20,232 3,286 3,286 29,064 33,891 24,648 3,595 3,081 5,135 58,334 26,702

  16. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    9 Northeast Midwest South West National Space Heating 70.3 56.6 20.4 23.8 38.7 Space Cooling 3.6 5.6 13.9 4.0 7.9 Water Heating 21.1 20.4 15.8 21.2 19.0 Refrigerator 5.4 7.0 6.6 5.7 6.3 Other Appliances & Lighting 23.0 25.9 25.0 24.1 24.7 Total (1) 79.9 77.4 95.0 Note(s): Source(s): 2005 Delivered Energy End-Uses for an Average Household, by Region (Million Btu per Household) 122.2 113.5 1) Due to rounding, sums do not add up to totals. EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct.

  17. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    3 Building Type Pre-1995 1995-2005 Pre-1995 1995-2005 Pre-1995 1995-2005 Single-Family 38.4 44.9 102.7 106.2 38.5 35.5 Detached 37.9 44.7 104.5 107.8 38.8 35.4 Attached 43.8 55.5 86.9 85.1 34.2 37.6 Multi-Family 63.8 58.7 58.3 49.2 27.2 24.3 2 to 4 units 69.0 55.1 70.7 59.4 29.5 25.0 5 or more units 61.5 59.6 53.6 47.2 26.3 24.2 Mobile Homes 82.4 57.1 69.6 74.5 29.7 25.2 Note(s): Source(s): 2005 Residential Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Principal Building Type and Vintage Per

  18. Summary of First AEO2015 Electricity Working Group Meeting

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Team SUBJECT: Summary of First AEO 2015 Electricity Working Group Meeting held on July ... team would be happy to talk further about information of interest to the participant. ...

  19. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Host and Presentor Contact Information 1 March 2013 Workshop on Biofuels Projections in AEO Host and Presentor Contact Information Hosts: Mindi Farber-DeAnda Team Lead, Energy Information Administration, Biofuels and Emerging Technologies Mindi.Farber-DeAnda@eia.gov 202-586-6419 Vishakh Mantri, Ph.D, P.E. Chemical Engineer, Energy Information Administration, Biofuels and Emerging Technologies Team Vishakh.Mantri@eia.gov 202-586-4815 Presenters: Biofuels in the United States: Context and Outlook

  20. Residential Sector Demand Module

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Stoves Geothermal Heat Pump Natural Gas Heat Pump Variables: HSYSSHR 2002-5,eg,b,r Benchmarking Data from Short-Term Energy Outlook Definition: Household energy consumption by...

  1. Residential Geothermal Systems Credit | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Residential Low Income Residential Savings Category Geothermal Heat Pumps Geothermal Direct-Use Maximum Rebate 1,500 Program Info Sector Name State Administrator Montana...

  2. Impacts of Temperature Variation on Energy Demand in Buildings (released in AEO2005)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01

    In the residential and commercial sectors, heating and cooling account for more than 40% of end-use energy demand. As a result, energy consumption in those sectors can vary significantly from year to year, depending on yearly average temperatures.

  3. World Oil Prices and Production Trends in AEO2009 (released in AEO2009)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    The oil prices reported in Annual Energy Outlook 2009 (AEO) represent the price of light, low-sulfur crude oil in 2007 dollars. Projections of future supply and demand are made for "liquids," a term used to refer to those liquids that after processing and refining can be used interchangeably with petroleum products. In AEO2009, liquids include conventional petroleum liquids -- such as conventional crude oil and natural gas plant liquids -- in addition to unconventional liquids, such as biofuels, bitumen, coal-to-liquids (CTL), gas-to-liquids (GTL), extra-heavy oils, and shale oil.

  4. Energy Technologies on the Horizon (released in AEO2006)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01

    A key issue in mid-term forecasting is the representation of changing and developing technologies. How existing technologies will evolve, and what new technologies might emerge, cannot be known with certainty. The issue is of particular importance in Annual Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO), the first AEO with projections out to 2030.

  5. Table 11.2a Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Residential Sector, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide )

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Residential Sector, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide 1) Year Coal Natural Gas 3 Petroleum Retail Electricity 5 Total 2 Biomass 2 Distillate Fuel Oil 4 Kerosene Liquefied Petroleum Gases Total Wood 6 Total 6 1949 121 55 51 21 7 80 66 321 99 99 1950 120 66 61 25 9 95 69 350 94 94 1951 111 81 68 27 10 105 78 374 90 90 1952 103 89 70 27 10 108 85 385 84 84 1953 92 93 71 26 11 108 94 387 78 78 1954 82 104 79 27 12 118 99 404 75 75

  6. World Oil Prices and Production Trends in AEO2008 (released in AEO2008)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2008-01-01

    Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (AEO) defines the world oil price as the price of light, low-sulfur crude oil delivered in Cushing, Oklahoma. Since 2003, both "above ground" and "below ground" factors have contributed to a sustained rise in nominal world oil prices, from $31 per barrel in 2003 to $69 per barrel in 2007. The AEO2008 reference case outlook for world oil prices is higher than in the AEO2007 reference case. The main reasons for the adoption of a higher reference case price outlook include continued significant expansion of world demand for liquids, particularly in non-OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development) countries, which include China and India; the rising costs of conventional non-OPEC (Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries) supply and unconventional liquids production; limited growth in non-OPEC supplies despite higher oil prices; and the inability or unwillingness of OPEC member countries to increase conventional crude oil production to levels that would be required for maintaining price stability. The Energy Information Administration will continue to monitor world oil price trends and may need to make further adjustments in future AEOs.

  7. Sector-specific issues and reporting methodologies supporting the General Guidelines for the voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases under Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Volume 1: Part 1, Electricity supply sector; Part 2, Residential and commercial buildings sector; Part 3, Industrial sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    DOE encourages you to report your achievements in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and sequestering carbon under this program. Global climate change is increasingly being recognized as a threat that individuals and organizations can take action against. If you are among those taking action, reporting your projects may lead to recognition for you, motivation for others, and synergistic learning for the global community. This report discusses the reporting process for the voluntary detailed guidance in the sectoral supporting documents for electricity supply, residential and commercial buildings, industry, transportation, forestry, and agriculture. You may have reportable projects in several sectors; you may report them separately or capture and report the total effects on an entity-wide report.

  8. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.4 Residential Environmental Data

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    2 2005 End-Use Carbon Dioxide Emissions Splits for an Average Household, by Region (Pounds of CO2) Northeast Midwest South West National Space Heating Space Cooling Water Heating Refrigerator Other Appliances & Lighting Total Source(s): EIA, A Look at Residential Energy Consumption in 2005, Jul. 2008, Tables CE(2-5)-(9-12)c; EIA, Assumptions to the AEO 2011, July 2011, Table 2, p. 12 for coefficients; EIA, AEO 2012 Early Release, Jan. 2012, Tables 2 and 18. 8,673 10,421 10,722 9,219 9,945

  9. Residential Multi-Function Gas Heat Pump: Efficient Engine-Driven...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Residential Multi-Function Gas Heat Pump: Efficient Engine-Driven Heat Pump for the Residential Sector - Fact Sheet, 2013 Residential Multi-Function Gas Heat Pump: Efficient ...

  10. First AEO2014 Buildings Sector Working Group Meeting Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Further information on the DG modeling methodology was requested and was sent after the ... Skip (Economic and Human Dimensions Research Associates) Larsen, John (DOE PI) ...

  11. Clean Air Interstate Rule: Changes and Modeling in AEO2010 (released in AEO2010)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01

    On December 23, 2008, the D.C. Circuit Court remanded but did not vacate the Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR), overriding its previous decision on February 8, 2008, to remand and vacate CAIR. The December decision, which is reflected in Annual Energy Outlook 2010 (AEO) , allows CAIR to remain in effect, providing time for the Environmental Protection Agency to modify the rule in order to address objections raised by the Court in its earlier decision. A similar rule, referred to as the Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR), which was to set up a cap-and-trade system for reducing mercury emissions by approximately 70%, is not represented in the AEO2010 projections, because it was vacated by the D.C. Circuit Court in February 2008.

  12. AEO2011:Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    case. The dataset uses quadrillion Btu and the U.S. Dollar. The data is broken down into production, imports, exports, consumption and price. Data and Resources AEO2011:Total...

  13. Summary of Second AEO 2014 Electricity Working Group Meeting

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Staff said that the capital costs are the same as those used in AEO2013, based on the SAIC study. EIA will be updating the levelized cost report, sometime after the early release, ...

  14. Renewable Electricity in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    and status updates for the AEO2015 Agenda Renewable Electricity Analysis Team July 24, 2014 2 * ... next few years, the U.S. Energy Information Administration is revising the ...

  15. Summary of AEO2015 Renewable Electricity Working Group Meeting

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    and reduced content reports will be produced in alternate years. Because of the shortened development cycle for AEO2015, EIA is planning minimal updates to the model this year. ...

  16. Second AEO2014 Liquids Fuels Markets Working Group Meeting Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... As a result, currently there are minimal impacts on E85 growth. AEO2014 emerging technology parameters (slide 10) - Biobutanol is represented in the LFMM, and will be added to the ...

  17. EPACT2005: Status of Provisions (Update) (released in AEO2007)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01

    The Energy Policy Act 2005 (EPACT) was signed into law by President Bush on August 8, 2005, and became Public Law 109-058. A number of provisions from EPACT2005 were included in the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO) projections. Many others were not considered in AEO2006particularly, those that require funding appropriations or further specification by federal agencies or Congress before implementation.

  18. Distributed Generation in Buildings (released in AEO2005)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2008-01-01

    Currently, distributed generation provides a very small share of residential and commercial electricity requirements in the United States. The Annual Energy Outlook 2005 reference case projects a significant increase in electricity generation in the buildings sector, but distributed generation is expected to remain a small contributor to the sectors energy needs. Although the advent of higher energy prices or more rapid improvement in technology could increase the use of distributed generation relative to the reference case projection, the vast majority of electricity used in buildings is projected to continue to be purchased from the grid.

  19. Residential | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    used 19.6 quadrillion Btu of delivered energy, or 21 percent of total U.S. energy consumption. The residential sector accounted for 57 percent of that energy use and the...

  20. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) End-Use Models FAQs 1 February 2013 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) End-Use Models FAQs What is an end-use model? An end-use model is a set of equations designed to disaggregate a RECS sample household's total annual fuel consumption into end uses such as space heating, air conditioning, water heating, refrigeration, and so on. These disaggregated values are then weighted up to produce population estimates of total and average energy end

  1. About Residential | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Residential Buildings » About Residential About Residential The Building Technologies Office (BTO) collaborates with home builders, energy professionals, state and local governments, utilities, product manufacturers, educators, and researchers to improve the energy efficiency of both new and existing homes. Residential Sector Activities Include: Demonstrating to builders and remodelers how to build and renovate for high performance through best practice guides and case studies and continuing to

  2. California's Move Toward E10 (released in AEO2009)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    In Annual Energy Outlook 2009, (AEO) E10a gasoline blend containing 10% ethanolis assumed to be the maximum ethanol blend allowed in California erformulated gasoline (RFG), as opposed to the 5.7% blend assumed in earlier AEOs. The 5.7% blend had reflected decisions made when California decided to phase out use of the additive methyl tertiary butyl ether in its RFG program in 2003, opting instead to use ethanol in the minimum amount that would meet the requirement for 2.0% oxygen content under the Clean Air Act provisions in effect at that time.

  3. Table 7a. Natural Gas Price, Electric Power Sector, Actual vs. Projected

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    a. Natural Gas Price, Electric Power Sector, Actual vs. Projected Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars per million Btu in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO $ Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 AEO 1994 1992 2.44 2.48 2.57 2.66 2.70 2.79 2.84 2.92 3.04 3.16 3.25 3.36 3.51 3.60 3.77 3.91 3.97 4.08 AEO 1995 1993 2.39 2.48 2.42 2.45 2.45 2.53 2.59 2.78 2.91 3.10 3.24 3.38 3.47 3.53 3.61 3.68

  4. "Table 7a. Natural Gas Price, Electric Power Sector, Actual vs. Projected"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a. Natural Gas Price, Electric Power Sector, Actual vs. Projected" "Projected Price in Constant Dollars" " (constant dollars per million Btu in ""dollar year"" specific to each AEO)" ,"AEO $ Year",1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013 "AEO 1994",1992,2.44,2.48,2.57,2.66,2.7,2.79,2.84,2.92,3.04,3.16,3.25,3.36,3.51,3.6,3.77,3.91,3.97,4.08 "AEO

  5. Cross-sector Demand Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Events Skip navigation links Smart Grid Demand Response Agricultural Residential Demand Response Commercial & Industrial Demand Response Cross-sector Demand Response...

  6. "Table 17. Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013 "AEO 1994",10.31,10.36,10.36,10.37,10.38,10.4,10.4,10.41,10.43,10.43,10.44,10.45,10.46,10.49,10.51,10.53,10.56,10.6 "AEO 1995",,10.96,10.8,10.81,10.81,10.79,10.77,10.75,10.73,10.72,10.7,10.7,10.69,10.7,10.72,10.75,10.8,10.85 "AEO

  7. State Appliance Standards (released in AEO2009)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    State appliance standards have existed for decades, starting with Californias enforcement of minimum efficiency requirements for refrigerators and several other products in 1979. In 1987, recognizing that different efficiency standards for the same products in different states could create problems for manufacturers, Congress enacted the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act (NAECA), which initially covered 12 products. The Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT92), EPACT2005, and EISA2007 added additional residential and commercial products to the 12 products originally specified under NAECA.

  8. Annual Energy Outlook Report | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Report Jump to: navigation, search Topics in AEO 2011 Energy Sources OilLiquids Natural Gas Coal Electricity RenewableAlternative Nuclear Sectors Residential Commercial...

  9. Tampa Electric- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tampa Electric provides a variety of financial incentives to promote energy efficiency in the residential sector. The Ductwork Rebate Program gives Tampa Electric customers the opportunity to have...

  10. South Alabama Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Geothermal Heat Pumps Heat Pumps Building Insulation Windows Doors Program Info Sector Name Utility Administrator South Alabama...

  11. Longmont Power & Communications - Residential and Commercial...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    50 per appliance Residential: 1 clothes washer and 1 dishwasher per year Commercial: 3 clothes washers and 3 dishwashers per year Program Info Sector Name Utility...

  12. State Renewable Energy Requirements and Goals: Update Through 2007 (Update) (released in AEO2008)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) has tracked the growing number of states that have adopted requirements or goals for renewable energy. While there is no federal renewable generation mandate, the states have been adopting such standards for some time. AEO2005 provided a summary of all existing programs in effect at that time, and subsequent AEOs have examined new policies or changes to existing ones. Since the publication of AEO2007, four states have enacted new renewable portfolio standards (RPS) legislation, and five others have strengthened their existing RPS programs. In total, 25 states and the District of Columbia.

  13. Microsoft Word - AEO2012 SENR final markup 1 31 12 _2_.docx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    nonpetroleum liquids, net petroleum imports make up a smaller share of total liquids consumption: U.S. dependence on imported petroleum liquids declines in the AEO2012 Reference...

  14. Residential Lighting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Residential Residential Lighting Energy Star Appliances Consumer Electronics Heat Pump Water Heaters Electric Storage Water...

  15. Residential Weatherization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Residential Residential Lighting Energy Star Appliances Consumer Electronics Heat Pump Water Heaters Electric Storage Water...

  16. First AEO2014 Transportation Working Group Meeting Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR: JOHN CONTI ASSISTANT ADMINISTRATOR FOR ENERGY ANALYSIS PAUL HOLTBERG TEAM LEADER ANALYSIS INTEGRATION TEAM JIM TURNURE DIRECTOR OFFICE OF ENERGY CONSUMPTION AND EFFICIENCY ANALYSIS FROM: TRANSPORTATION CONSUMPTION & EFFICIENCY ANALYSIS TEAM SUBJECT: First AEO2014 Transportation Working Group Meeting Summary (presented on 07-23-2013) Attendees: Shirley Neff (EIA/AO) Jim Turnure (EIA/OECEA) Jade Jenkins (EIA/OECEA) Ken Katz (DOT/NHTSA) Pete Whitman (DOE/PI) Tien Nguyen

  17. First AEO2015 Liquid Fuels Markets Working Group Meeting

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    July 21, 2014 MEMORANDUM FOR: JOHN CONTI ASSISTANT ADMINISTRATOR FOR ENERGY ANALYSYS JOHN POWELL TEAM LEADER, LIQUID FUELS MARKET TEAM MICHAEL SCHAAL DIRECTOR, OFFICE OF ENERGY ANALYSIS FROM: LIQUID FUELS MARKET TEAM SUBJECT: First AEO2015 Liquid Fuels Markets Working Group Meeting Summary (presented on 07-17-2014) Attendees: (EIA) John Powell, Mindi Farber-DeAnda, Mike Cole, Adrian Geagla, Arup Mallik, David Manowitz, Vishakh Mantri, Beth May, Terry Yen, John Conti, Michael Schaal Bryan Just

  18. First AEO2015 Macro-Industrial Working Group Meeting Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4 MEMORANDUM FOR: JOHN CONTI ASSISTANT ADMINISTRATOR FOR ENERGY ANALYSIS PAUL HOLTBERG TEAM LEADER ANALYSIS INTEGRATION TEAM JAMES TURNURE DIRECTOR OFFICE OF ENERGY CONSUMPTION & EFFICIENCY ANALYSIS LYNN WESTFALL DIRECTOR OFFICE OF ENERGY MARKETS & FINANCIAL ANALYSIS FROM: MACROECONOMIC & INDUSTRIAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION & EFFICIENCY ANALYSIS TEAMS SUBJECT: First AEO2015 Macro-Industrial Working Group Meeting Summary, presented on 07-24-2014 Attendees: Bob Adler (EIA) Gary Ambach

  19. First AEO2015 Oil and Gas Working Group Meeting Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 August 8, 2014 MEMORANDUM FOR: JOHN CONTI ASSISTANT ADMINISTRATOR FOR ENERGY ANALYSIS FROM: ANGELINA LAROSE TEAM LEAD NATURAL GAS MARKETS TEAM JOHN STAUB TEAM LEAD EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION ANALYSIS TEAM EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION and NATURAL GAS MARKETS TEAMS SUBJECT: First AEO2015 Oil and Gas Working Group Meeting Summary (presented on August 7, 2014) Attendees: Tien Nguyen (DOE) Joseph Benneche (EIA) Dana Van Wagener (EIA)* Troy Cook (EIA)* Angelina LaRose (EIA) Laura Singer (EIA) Michael

  20. AEO 2013 Liquid Fuels Markets Working Group 2

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2 October 4, 2012 Attendance (In Person) Beth May, Mike Cole, Arup Mallik, Vish Mantri, Irene Olson, Julie Harris, Michael Schaal, Andy Kydes, Tom White, Adrian Geagla, Jennifer Li. Attendance (WebEx) Mac Statton, Dave Schmalzer, Jarrod Brown, John Prydol, Russ Smith, Rodney Geisbrecht, Dallas Burkholder, Kristen King Notes by Slide Slide 2 The reference case in 2013 has a lower oil price compared to last year's AEO out to 2040. Slide 10 - Includes modeling of pyrolysis oils Slide 11 - This

  1. AEO 2014 Renewable Electricity Working Group Meeting Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    DATE: September 30, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR: John Conti Assistant Administrator for Energy Analysis Office of Energy Analysis Alan Beamon Office Director Office of Electricity, Coal, Nuclear, and Renewables Analysis FROM: Renewable Electricity Analysis Team SUBJECT: AEO 2014 Renewable Electricity Working Group Meeting Summary ATTENDEES: In person John Conti Alan Beamon Bob Eynon Chris Namovicz Danielle Lowenthal-Savy Erin Boedecker Gwen Bredehoeft Jim Diefenderfer Marie Rinkoski Spangler Michael

  2. AEO2014 Coal Working Group Meeting I Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    July 22, 2013 MEMORANDUM TO: John Conti Assistant Administrator for Energy Analysis Alan Beamon Director, Office of Electricity, Coal, Nuclear, and Renewables Analysis FROM: Coal and Uranium Analysis Team SUBJECT: AEO2014 Coal Working Group Meeting I Summary Attendees (41) Name Affiliation Greg Adams (Moderator) US DOE: EIA Vlad Dorjets Bob Eynon Karen Freedman Tyler Hodge Paul Holtberg Elias Johnson Ayaka Jones Diane Kearney Mike Leff Mike Mellish Carrie Milton Nick Paduano Margaret Cook US

  3. AEO2014 Liquid Fuels Markets Working Group Meeting 1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AEO2014 Liquid Fuels Markets Working Group Meeting 1 July 24, 2013 Attendance (In Person) (EIA) John Powell, Mindi Farber-DeAnda, Mike Cole, Beth May, Adrian Geagla, Vish Mantri, Tony Radich, Irene Olson, Julie Harris (non-EIA) Jeff Meyer (HIS CERA, Oil Market Analyst), Adam Christensen (Johns Hopkin) Attendance (WebEx) Dave Schmalzer, Seth Snyder (Argonne National Laboratory), Donald Hanson (Argonne National Laboratory), Wyatt Thompson (FAPRI, University of Missouri), Jarrett Whistance (FAPRI,

  4. AEO2014 Oil and Gas Working Group Meeting Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9 August 12, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR: JOHN CONTI ASSISTANT ADMINISTRATOR FOR ENERGY ANALYSIS FROM: ANGELINA LAROSE TEAM LEAD NATURAL GAS MARKETS TEAM JOHN STAUB TEAM LEAD EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION ANALYSIS TEAM EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION and NATURAL GAS MARKETS TEAMS SUBJECT: First AEO2014 Oil and Gas Working Group Meeting Summary (presented on July 25, 2013) Attendees: Anas Alhajji (NGP)* Samuel Andrus (IHS)* Emil Attanasi (USGS)* Andre Barbe (Rice University) David J. Barden (self) Joseph

  5. AEO2015 Liquid Fuels Markets Working Group Presentation

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Assumptions for Annual Energy Outlook 2015: Liquid Fuels Markets Working Group AEO2015 Liquid Fuels Markets Working Group Meeting Office of Petroleum, Natural Gas & Biofuels Analysis July 17, 2014 | Washington, DC WORKING GROUP PRESENTATION FOR DISCUSSION PURPOSES DO NOT QUOTE OR CITE AS RESULTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE Discussion topics Office of Petroleum, Natural Gas, & Biofuels Analysis Working Group Presentation for Discussion Purposes Washington DC, July 17, 2014 DO NOT QUOTE OR CITE

  6. Workshop on Biofuels Projections in AEO Attendance List

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Attendance List 1 March 2013 Workshop on Biofuels Projections in AEO Attendee list In person attendees Mia Adelberg Abengoa Bioenergy Michael Bredehoeft EIA Tom Capehart USDA Terry Carter Biofuels Center of North Carolina Adam Christensen Johns Hopkins University Michael Cole EIA John Conti EIA Lauren Cooper Center for Climate and Energy Solutions Mindi Farber-DeAnda EIA Denise Gerber Fiberight Steve Gerber Fiberight Ryan Graf Policy Navigation Group David L. Greene Oak Ridge National Laboratory

  7. Workshop on Biofuels Projections in AEO Presenters Biographies

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Presenters' Biographies 1 March 2013 Workshop on Biofuels Projections in AEO Presenters' Biographies (by presentation order) John Conti John J. Conti is the Assistant Administrator for Energy Analysis at EIA. Mr. Conti analyzes energy supply, demand, and prices including the impact of financial markets on energy markets; prepares reports on current and future energy use; analyzes the impact of energy policies; and develops advanced techniques for conducting energy information analyses. He also

  8. Second AEO2014 Macro-Industrial Working Group Meeting Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR: JOHN CONTI ASSISTANT ADMINISTRATOR FOR ENERGY ANALYSIS PAUL HOLTBERG TEAM LEADER ANALYSIS INTEGRATION TEAM JAMES TURNURE DIRECTOR OFFICE OF ENERGY CONSUMPTION & EFFICIENCY ANALYSIS LYNN WESTFALL DIRECTOR OFFICE OF ENERGY MARKETS & FINANCIAL ANALYSIS FROM: MACROECONOMIC & INDUSTRIAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION & EFFICIENCY ANALYSIS TEAMS SUBJECT: Second AEO2014 Macro-Industrial Working Group Meeting Summary (presented on 09-26-2013) Attendees: Bob Adler (EIA) Robert

  9. Second AEO2014 Oil and Gas Working Group Meeting Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 November 12, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR: JOHN CONTI ASSISTANT ADMINISTRATOR FOR ENERGY ANALYSIS FROM: ANGELINA LAROSE TEAM LEAD NATURAL GAS MARKETS TEAM JOHN STAUB TEAM LEAD EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION ANALYSIS TEAM EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION and NATURAL GAS MARKETS TEAMS SUBJECT: Second AEO2014 Oil and Gas Working Group Meeting Summary (presented September 26, 2013) Attendees: Robert Anderson (DOE) Peter Balash (NETL)* David Bardin (self) Joe Benneche (EIA) Philip Budzik (EIA) Kara Callahan

  10. Second AEO2015 Macro-Industrial Workiing Group Meeting Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6, 2014 MEMORANDUM FOR: JOHN CONTI ASSISTANT ADMINISTRATOR FOR ENERGY ANALYSIS PAUL HOLTBERG TEAM LEADER ANALYSIS INTEGRATION TEAM JAMES TURNURE DIRECTOR OFFICE OF ENERGY CONSUMPTION & EFFICIENCY ANALYSIS LYNN WESTFALL DIRECTOR OFFICE OF ENERGY MARKETS & FINANCIAL ANALYSIS FROM: MACROECONOMIC & INDUSTRIAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION & EFFICIENCY ANALYSIS TEAMS SUBJECT: Second AEO2015 Macro-Industrial Working Group Meeting Summary, presented on 09-29-2014 Attendees: Gary Ambach (Michaels

  11. Summary of First AEO2014 Electricity Working Group Meeting

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR: John Conti Assistant Administrator for Energy Analysis Alan Beamon Office Director Office of Electricity, Coal, Nuclear, and Renewables Analysis Paul Holtberg Team Leader Analysis Integration Team FROM: Electricity Analysis Team SUBJECT: Summary of First AEO 2014 Electricity Working Group Meeting held on July 24, 2013 ATTENDEES: Diefenderfer, Jim Aniti, Lori Milton, Carrie Jones, Jeff Martin, Laura Bredehoeft, Gwendolyn Eynon, Bob Leff, Mike Mellish, Mike Kearney, Diane

  12. Summary of Second AEO 2014 Electricity Working Group Meeting

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR: John Conti Assistant Administrator for Energy Analysis Alan Beamon Office Director Office of Electricity, Coal, Nuclear, and Renewables Analysis Paul Holtberg Team Leader Analysis Integration Team FROM: Electricity Analysis Team SUBJECT: Summary of Second AEO 2014 Electricity Working Group Meeting held on September 25, 2013 ATTENDEES: Adams, Greg (EIA OEA) Aniti, Lori (EIA OEA) Bredehoeft, Gwendolyn (EIA OEA) Crozat, Matthew P. (US DOE: Office of Nuclear Energy)

  13. NEMS Buildings Sector Working Group Meeting

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    NEMS Buildings Sector Working Group Meeting Erin Boedecker Owen Comstock Behjat Hojjati Kevin Jarzomski David Peterson Steve Wade October 4, 2012 | Washington, D.C. AEO2013 Preliminary Results WORKING GROUP PRESENTATION FOR DISCUSSION PURPOSES DO NOT QUOTE OR CITE AS RESULTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WORKING GROUP PRESENTATION FOR DISCUSSION PURPOSES DO NOT QUOTE OR CITE AS RESULTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE Overview Buildings Working Group Forrestal 2E-069 | October 4, 2012 2 * Recap of project list

  14. Residential Demand Module - NEMS Documentation

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2014-01-01

    Model Documentation - Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

  15. Energy Demand (released in AEO2010)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01

    Growth in U.S. energy use is linked to population growth through increases in demand for housing, commercial floorspace, transportation, manufacturing, and services. This affects not only the level of energy use, but also the mix of fuels and consumption by sector.

  16. Federal Fuels Taxes and Tax Credits (Update) (released in AEO2008)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2008-01-01

    The Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (AEO) reference case incorporates current regulations that pertain to the energy industry. This section describes the handling of federal taxes and tax credits in AEO2008, focusing primarily on areas where regulations have changed or the handling of taxes or tax credits has been updated.

  17. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    RenewableAlternative Nuclear Sector Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Energy Demand Other Emissions Prices Macroeconomic International Efficiency Publication...

  18. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    February 23, 2012 Form EIA-861 and the New Form EIA-861S Proposal: Modify the frame of the Form EIA-861, "Annual Electric Power Industry Report," from a census to a sample, and use sampling methods to estimate the sales revenues and customer counts by sector and state for the remaining industry. Use random sampling, if needed, to estimate for changes in advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) and time-based tariff programs. Proposal: Create a new Form EIA-861S, "Annual Electric

  19. Utility Sector Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coughlin, Katie

    2014-12-01

    This report presents a new approach to estimating the marginal utility sector impacts associated with electricity demand reductions. The method uses publicly available data and provides results in the form of time series of impact factors. The input data are taken from the Energy Information Agency's Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) projections of how the electric system might evolve in the reference case, and in a number of side cases that incorporate different effciency and other policy assumptions. The data published with the AEO are used to define quantitative relationships between demand-side electricity reductions by end use and supply-side changes to capacity by plant type, generation by fuel type and emissions of CO2, Hg, NOx and SO2. The impact factors define the change in each of these quantities per unit reduction in site electricity demand. We find that the relative variation in these impacts by end use is small, but the time variation can be significant.

  20. CONTINATION HEETIREFERENCE NO. OF DOCUMENT BEING CONTINUED AEO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOCUMENT BEING CONTINUED AEO COTIUTINSHE DE-AC27-08RV14800/044 2AG OF NAME OF OFFEROR OR CONTRACTOR WASHINGTON RIVER PROTECTION SOLUTIONS LLC ITEM NO. SUPPLIES/SERVICES QUANTITY UNIT UNIT PRICE AMOUNT (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) (F) Account code: ARRA Appr Year 2009 Allottee 3 Reporting Entity 421301 Object Class 31003 Program 11113 70 Project 2002110 WFO 0000000 Local Use 0420660 TAS Agency Code 89 TAS Account Code 0253 TAS Subaccount Code Amount: -$100,000.00 Delivery Location Code: 010601 Richland

  1. CONTINATION HEETIREFERENCE NO. OF DOCUMENT BEING CONTINUED AEO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOCUMENT BEING CONTINUED AEO COTIUAIN IET DE-AC27--08RV14800/046 2G OF NAME OF OFFEROR OR CONTRACTOR WASHINGTON RIVER PROTECTION SOLUTIONS LLC ITEM NO. SUPPLIES/SERVICES QUANTITY UNIT UNIT PRICE AMOUNT (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) (F) ORP-00014 TOO Funds Fund 01250 Appr Year 2010 Allottee 34 Reportng Enity 4231.11 Object Class 25200 Program 1111412 Project 0004262 WFO 0000000 Local Use 0000000 Amount: $1,200,000.00 ORP 0014 TOO Fund 01250 AppL Ye~ir 2010 Reporting Entity 421301 Object Class 25200

  2. CONTINATION HEETIREFERENCE NO. OF DOCUMENT BEING CONTINUED AEO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NO. OF DOCUMENT BEING CONTINUED AEO COTIUAIN HETDE-AC27-08RV14800/052 2A OF NAME OF OFFEROR OR CONTRACTOR WASHINGTON RIVER PROTECTION SOLUTIONS LLC ITEM NO. SUPPLIES/SERVICES QUANTITY UNITI UNIT PRICE AMOUNT (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) (F) Fund 01250 Appr Year 2010 Allottee 34 Reporting Entity 421301 Object Class 25200 Program 1110462 Project 0001539 WFO 0000000 Local Use 0420149 Amount: $10,214.00 Delivery Location Code: 00601 RichandOperations Office U.S Dep~artment of Energy Richland Operations

  3. CONTINUATION S EFIIERENCE NO OF DOCUMENT BEING CONTINUED AEO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CONTINUATION S EFIIERENCE NO OF DOCUMENT BEING CONTINUED AEO CONINUTIO SHETDE-AC27-08RV148OO/095 rG NAME OF OFFEROR OR CONTRACTOR WASH-INGTON RIVER PROTECTION SOLUTIONS LLC- ITEM NO SUPPLIES/SERVICES QUANTITY UNIT UNIT PRICE AMOUNT (A) (B) (C) (D) )/F New Total Amount for this Award: $7,094,451,000.00 Obligated Amount for this Modification: $30, 952, 500.00 New Total Obligated Amount for this Award: $1, 353,766,560.39 Incremental Funded Amount changed: from $1,293,125,180.69 to $1,323,766,560.39

  4. CONTINUATON SHEETREFERENCE NO. OF DOCUMENT BEING CONTINUED AEO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CONTINUATON SHEETREFERENCE NO. OF DOCUMENT BEING CONTINUED AEO COTNUTO SETDE-AC27-08RV14800/070 2AG OF NAME OF OFFEROR OR CONTRACTOR WASHINGTON RIVER PROTECTION SOLUTIONS LLC ITEM NO. SUPPLIES/SERVICES QUANTITY UNIT UNIT PRICE AMOUNT (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) (F) De-obligating WEPS TDD funds for ATL Aluminum Solubility Sample Analysis Fund 01250 Appr Year 2009 Allottee 34 Reporting Entity 421301 Object Class 25200 Program 1110676 Project 0004022 WFO 0000000 Local Use 0000000 Amount: -$3,155.93

  5. CONTIUATIN SHET IREFERENCE NO. OF DOCUMENT BEING CONTINUED AEO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CONTIUATIN SHET IREFERENCE NO. OF DOCUMENT BEING CONTINUED AEO COTNUTO SETDE-AC27-08RVI4800/055 2AG OF NAME OF OFFEROR OR CONTRACTOR WASHINGTON RIVER PROTECTION SOLUTIONS LLC ITEM NO. SUPPLIESISERVICES QUANTITY NIT UNIT PRICE AMOUNT (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) (F) Total Amount changed from $7,066,503,000.00 to $7,066,500,000.00 Obligated Amount for this modification: $140, 000.00 Incremental Funded Amount changed from $1,102, 822,315.05 to $1,102,962,315.05 NEW ACCOUNTING CODE ADDED: Account code: WTP

  6. Residential Multi-Function Gas Heat Pump: Efficient Engine-Driven Heat Pump

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for the Residential Sector - Fact Sheet, 2013 | Department of Energy Residential Multi-Function Gas Heat Pump: Efficient Engine-Driven Heat Pump for the Residential Sector - Fact Sheet, 2013 Residential Multi-Function Gas Heat Pump: Efficient Engine-Driven Heat Pump for the Residential Sector - Fact Sheet, 2013 Southwest Gas Corporation, in collaboration with IntelliChoice Energy and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, will develop hardware and software for engine and system controls for a

  7. Table 17. Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 AEO 1994 10.3 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.6 10.6 AEO 1995 11.0 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.9 AEO 1996 10.4 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.9 10.9 11.0 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 12.0 12.1

  8. "Table 7b. Natural Gas Price, Electric Power Sector, Actual vs. Projected"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b. Natural Gas Price, Electric Power Sector, Actual vs. Projected" "Projected Price in Nominal Dollars" " (nominal dollars per million Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013 "AEO

  9. Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007: Summary of Provisions (released in AEO2008)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2008-01-01

    The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 was signed into law on December 19, 2007, and became Public Law 110-140. Provisions in EISA2007 that require funding appropriations to be implemented, whose impact is highly uncertain, or that require further specification by federal agencies or Congress are not included in Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (AEO). For example, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) does not try to anticipate policy responses to the many studies required by EISA2007, nor to predict the impact of research and development (R&D) funding authorizations included in the bill. Moreover, AEO2008 does not include any provision that addresses a level of detail beyond that modeled in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS), which was used to develop the AEO2008 projections. AEO2008 addresses only those provisions in EISA2007 that establish specific tax credits, incentives, or standards.

  10. AEO2014 - Issues in Focus articles - U.S. Energy Information...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Past AEO analyses that remain relevant 2013 2012 2011 U.S. reliance on imported liquid fuels in alternative scenarios Competition between coal and natural gas in the electric...

  11. Future Air Conditioning Energy Consumption in Developing Countriesand what can be done about it: The Potential of Efficiency in theResidential Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNeil, Michael A.; Letschert, Virginie E.

    2007-05-01

    The dynamics of air conditioning are of particular interestto energy analysts, both because of the high energy consumption of thisproduct, but also its disproportionate impact on peak load. This paperaddresses the special role of this end use as a driver of residentialelectricity consumption in rapidly developing economies. Recent historyhas shown that air conditioner ownership can grow grows more rapidly thaneconomic growth in warm-climate countries. In 1990, less than a percentof urban Chinese households owned an air conditioner; by 2003 this numberrose to 62 percent. The evidence suggests a similar explosion of airconditioner use in many other countries is not far behind. Room airconditioner purchases in India are currently growing at 20 percent peryear, with about half of these purchases attributed to the residentialsector. This paper draws on two distinct methodological elements toassess future residential air conditioner 'business as usual' electricityconsumption by country/region and to consider specific alternative 'highefficiency' scenarios. The first component is an econometric ownershipand use model based on household income, climate and demographicparameters. The second combines ownership forecasts and stock accountingwith geographically specific efficiency scenarios within a uniqueanalysis framework (BUENAS) developed by LBNL. The efficiency scenariomodule considers current efficiency baselines, available technologies,and achievable timelines for development of market transformationprograms, such as minimum efficiency performance standards (MEPS) andlabeling programs. The result is a detailed set of consumption andemissions scenarios for residential air conditioning.

  12. Marblehead Municipal Light Department- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Marblehead Municipal Light Department encourages conservation within the residential sector through the Energy Efficiency Rebate Program. Rebates are available for energy efficient appliances,...

  13. Otter Tail Power Company - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Residential Savings Category Geothermal Heat Pumps Water Heaters Heat Pumps Energy Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls Motors Other EE Program Info Sector Name Utility Administrator...

  14. Ashland Electric Utility- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ashland Conservation District also encourages energy efficiency within the residential sector through the Energy Conservation Programs. Among the services offered through these programs, reside...

  15. Inspiring and Building the Next Generation of Residential Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Zero energy ready home concepts will be introduced to students, teachers, and consumers in ... In the residential sector, industry is trending toward a need to construct more zero ...

  16. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Modeling updates in the Transportation sector

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    For AEO2015 Working Group July 30, 2014 | Washington, DC By Nicholas Chase, Trisha Hutchins, John Maples Office of Energy Consumption and Efficiency Analysis Modeling updates in the transportation sector Data updates 2 * Update historical fuel consumption data to latest state energy data (2011), annual national data from Monthly Energy Review (2012), and most recent Short-Term Energy Outlook * Update historical light-duty vehicle attribute data through 2013 (pending) * Update historical

  17. Hawaii demand-side management resource assessment. Final report, Reference Volume 3 -- Residential and commercial sector DSM analyses: Detailed results from the DBEDT DSM assessment model; Part 1, Technical potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-01

    The Hawaii Demand-Side Management Resource Assessment was the fourth of seven projects in the Hawaii Energy Strategy (HES) program. HES was designed by the Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism (DBEDT) to produce an integrated energy strategy for the State of Hawaii. The purpose of Project 4 was to develop a comprehensive assessment of Hawaii`s demand-side management (DSM) resources. To meet this objective, the project was divided into two phases. The first phase included development of a DSM technology database and the identification of Hawaii commercial building characteristics through on-site audits. These Phase 1 products were then used in Phase 2 to identify expected energy impacts from DSM measures in typical residential and commercial buildings in Hawaii. The building energy simulation model DOE-2.1E was utilized to identify the DSM energy impacts. More detailed information on the typical buildings and the DOE-2.1E modeling effort is available in Reference Volume 1, ``Building Prototype Analysis``. In addition to the DOE-2.1E analysis, estimates of residential and commercial sector gas and electric DSM potential for the four counties of Honolulu, Hawaii, Maui, and Kauai through 2014 were forecasted by the new DBEDT DSM Assessment Model. Results from DBEDTs energy forecasting model, ENERGY 2020, were linked with results from DOE-2.1E building energy simulation runs and estimates of DSM measure impacts, costs, lifetime, and anticipated market penetration rates in the DBEDT DSM Model. Through its algorithms, estimates of DSM potential for each forecast year were developed. Using the load shape information from the DOE-2.1E simulation runs, estimates of electric peak demand impacts were developed. Numerous tables and figures illustrating the technical potential for demand-side management are included.

  18. Residential Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5, 2009 10:18 AM http:www.eia.govconsumptioncommercialdataarchivecbecspba99residential.html If you are having any technical problems with this site, please contact the EIA...

  19. Better Buildings Summit Residential Sessions Engage Energy Pros |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Better Buildings Summit Residential Sessions Engage Energy Pros Better Buildings Summit Residential Sessions Engage Energy Pros This year's DOE Better Buildings Summit, taking place May 27 to 29, 2015, will be the first to engage the residential sector with targeted sessions for home performance professionals. Join us in Washington, D.C., to network with other Better Buildings Residential Network members and discuss a vision for the coming year, including how to overcome

  20. Natural Gas Prices Forecast Comparison--AEO vs. Natural Gas Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Lekov, Alex; Dale, Larry

    2005-02-09

    This paper evaluates the accuracy of two methods to forecast natural gas prices: using the Energy Information Administration's ''Annual Energy Outlook'' forecasted price (AEO) and the ''Henry Hub'' compared to U.S. Wellhead futures price. A statistical analysis is performed to determine the relative accuracy of the two measures in the recent past. A statistical analysis suggests that the Henry Hub futures price provides a more accurate average forecast of natural gas prices than the AEO. For example, the Henry Hub futures price underestimated the natural gas price by 35 cents per thousand cubic feet (11.5 percent) between 1996 and 2003 and the AEO underestimated by 71 cents per thousand cubic feet (23.4 percent). Upon closer inspection, a liner regression analysis reveals that two distinct time periods exist, the period between 1996 to 1999 and the period between 2000 to 2003. For the time period between 1996 to 1999, AEO showed a weak negative correlation (R-square = 0.19) between forecast price by actual U.S. Wellhead natural gas price versus the Henry Hub with a weak positive correlation (R-square = 0.20) between forecasted price and U.S. Wellhead natural gas price. During the time period between 2000 to 2003, AEO shows a moderate positive correlation (R-square = 0.37) between forecasted natural gas price and U.S. Wellhead natural gas price versus the Henry Hub that show a moderate positive correlation (R-square = 0.36) between forecast price and U.S. Wellhead natural gas price. These results suggest that agencies forecasting natural gas prices should consider incorporating the Henry Hub natural gas futures price into their forecasting models along with the AEO forecast. Our analysis is very preliminary and is based on a very small data set. Naturally the results of the analysis may change, as more data is made available.

  1. Comparison of AEO 2010 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark A.; Wiser, Ryan H.

    2010-01-04

    On December 14, 2009, the reference-case projections from Annual Energy Outlook 2010 were posted on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) web site. We at LBNL have, in the past, compared the EIA's reference-case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market, with the goal of better understanding fuel price risk and the role that renewables can play in itigating such risk. As such, we were curious to see how the latest AEO reference-case gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX natural gas futures strip. This brief memo presents our findings.

  2. State Renewable Energy Requirements and Goals: Update through 2009 (Update) (released in AEO2010)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01

    To the extent possible,Annual Energy Outlook 2010 (AEO) incorporates the impacts of state laws requiring the addition of renewable generation or capacity by utilities doing business in the states. Currently, 30 states and the District of Columbia have enforceable renewable portfolio standards (RPS) or similar laws). Under such standards, each state determines its own levels of generation, eligible technologies, and noncompliance penalties. AEO2010 includes the impacts of all laws in effect as of September 2009 (with the exception of Hawaii, because the National Energy Modeling System provides electricity market projections for the continental United States only).

  3. Trends in Heating and Cooling Degree Days: Implications for Energy Demand Issues (released in AEO2008)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2008-01-01

    Weather-related energy use, in the form of heating, cooling, and ventilation, accounted for more than 40% of all delivered energy use in residential and commercial buildings in 2006. Given the relatively large amount of energy affected by ambient temperature in the buildings sector, the Energy Information Administration has reevaluated what it considers normal weather for purposes of projecting future energy use for heating, cooling, and ventilation. The Annual Energy Outlook 2008, estimates of normal heating and cooling degree-days are based on the population-weighted average for the 10-year period from 1997 through 2006.

  4. Data: Better Buildings Residential Network Members

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Residential Network members come from all sectors of the energy efficiency industry to leverage one another's experiences and expertise in an effort to accelerate the pace of energy upgrades in existing homes. Members include state and local governments, nonprofit organizations, utilities, financial institutions, and private-sector companies involved in energy efficiency programs in their locality.

  5. Comparison of AEO 2006 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX FuturesPrices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2005-12-19

    On December 12, 2005, the reference case projections from ''Annual Energy Outlook 2006'' (AEO 2006) were posted on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) web site. We at LBNL have in the past compared the EIA's reference case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market, with the goal of better understanding fuel price risk and the role that renewables play in mitigating such risk (see, for example, http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf). As such, we were curious to see how the latest AEO gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX natural gas futures strip. This brief memo presents our findings. As a refresher, our past work in this area has found that over the past five years, forward natural gas contracts (with prices that can be locked in--e.g., gas futures, swaps, and physical supply) have traded at a premium relative to contemporaneous long-term reference case gas price forecasts from the EIA. As such, we have concluded that, over the past five years at least, levelized cost comparisons of fixed-price renewable generation with variable price gas-fired generation that have been based on AEO natural gas price forecasts (rather than forward prices) have yielded results that are ''biased'' in favor of gas-fired generation, presuming that long-term price stability is valued. In this memo we simply update our past analysis to include the latest long-term gas price forecast from the EIA, as contained in AEO 2006. For the sake of brevity, we do not rehash information (on methodology, potential explanations for the premiums, etc.) contained in our earlier reports on this topic; readers interested in such information are encouraged to download that work from http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf. As was the case in the past five AEO releases (AEO 2001-AEO 2005), we once again find that the AEO 2006 reference case gas price forecast falls well below where NYMEX natural gas futures contracts were trading at the time the EIA finalized its gas price forecast. In fact, the NYMEX-AEO 2006 reference case comparison yields by far the largest premium--$2.3/MMBtu levelized over five years--that we have seen over the last six years. In other words, on average, one would have had to pay $2.3/MMBtu more than the AEO 2006 reference case natural gas price forecast in order to lock in natural gas prices over the coming five years and thereby replicate the price stability provided intrinsically by fixed-price renewable generation (or other forms of generation whose costs are not tied to the price of natural gas). Fixed-price generation (like certain forms of renewable generation) obviously need not bear this added cost, and moreover can provide price stability for terms well in excess of five years.

  6. Comparison of AEO 2007 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX FuturesPrices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-12-06

    On December 5, 2006, the reference case projections from 'Annual Energy Outlook 2007' (AEO 2007) were posted on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) web site. We at LBNL have, in the past, compared the EIA's reference case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market, with the goal of better understanding fuel price risk and the role that renewables play in mitigating such risk (see, for example, http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf). As such, we were curious to see how the latest AEO gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX natural gas futures strip. This brief memo presents our findings. As a refresher, our past work in this area has found that over the past six years, forward natural gas contracts (with prices that can be locked in--e.g., gas futures, swaps, and physical supply) have traded at a premium relative to contemporaneous long-term reference case gas price forecasts from the EIA. As such, we have concluded that, over the past six years at least, levelized cost comparisons of fixed-price renewable generation with variable-price gas-fired generation that have been based on AEO natural gas price forecasts (rather than forward prices) have yielded results that are 'biased' in favor of gas-fired generation, presuming that long-term price stability is valued. In this memo we simply update our past analysis to include the latest long-term gas price forecast from the EIA, as contained in AEO 2007. For the sake of brevity, we do not rehash information (on methodology, potential explanations for the premiums, etc.) contained in our earlier reports on this topic; readers interested in such information are encouraged to download that work from http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf. As was the case in the past six AEO releases (AEO 2001-AEO 2006), we once again find that the AEO 2007 reference case gas price forecast falls well below where NYMEX natural gas futures contracts were trading at the time the EIA finalized its gas price forecast. Specifically, the NYMEX-AEO 2007 premium is $0.73/MMBtu levelized over five years. In other words, on average, one would have had to pay $0.73/MMBtu more than the AEO 2007 reference case natural gas price forecast in order to lock in natural gas prices over the coming five years and thereby replicate the price stability provided intrinsically by fixed-price renewable generation (or other forms of generation whose costs are not tied to the price of natural gas). Fixed-price generation (like certain forms of renewable generation) obviously need not bear this added cost, and moreover can provide price stability for terms well in excess of five years.

  7. Greenhouse Gas Concerns and Power Sector Planning (released in AEO2009)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    Concerns about potential climate change driven by rising atmospheric concentrations of Greenhouse Gases (GHG) have grown over the past two decades, both domestically and abroad. In the United States, potential policies to limit or reduce GHG emissions are in various stages of development at the state, regional, and federal levels. In addition to ongoing uncertainty with respect to future growth in energy demand and the costs of fuel, labor, and new plant construction, U.S. electric power companies must consider the effects of potential policy changes to limit or reduce GHG emissions that would significantly alter their planning and operating decisions. The possibility of such changes may already be affecting planning decisions for new generating capacity.

  8. Microsoft Word - Final AEO2007 Commercial Doc.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    the State Energy Data System (SEDS) historical commercial sector consumption, applying an additive correction term to ensure that simulated model results correspond to published...

  9. Model Documentation Report: Residential Sector Demand Module...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Stoves Geothermal Heat Pump Natural Gas Heat Pump Variables: HSYSSHR 2006,eg,b,r Benchmarking Data from Short-Term Energy Outlook Definition: Household energy consumption by...

  10. Model Documentation Report: Residential Sector Demand Module...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Stoves Geothermal Heat Pump Natural Gas Heat Pump Variables: HSYSSHR 2001,eg,b,r Benchmarking Data from Short-Term Energy Outlook Definition: Household energy consumption by...

  11. Behavioral Assumptions Underlying California Residential Sector...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Behavioral Change and Building Performance: Strategies for Significant, Persistent, and Measurable Institutional Change Market Segmentation and Energy Efficiency Program Design ...

  12. Model Documentation Report: Residential Sector Demand Module...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    The penetration rate for central air-conditioning is estimated by means of time series analysis of RECS survey data. Water Heating: Solar Water Heaters Market shares for solar...

  13. Behavioral Assumptions Underlying California Residential Sector...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Paris, Fr.: Organization for Economic Development ... About Energy Use." Journal of Policy Analysis and Management 5:200-227. Strang, ... San Francisco, Calif.: Freeman, Sullivan & Co. ...

  14. Comparison of AEO 2005 natural gas price forecast to NYMEX futures prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2004-12-13

    On December 9, the reference case projections from ''Annual Energy Outlook 2005 (AEO 2005)'' were posted on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) web site. As some of you may be aware, we at LBNL have in the past compared the EIA's reference case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market, with the goal of better understanding fuel price risk and the role that renewables play in mitigating such risk. As such, we were curious to see how the latest AEO gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX natural gas futures strip. This brief memo presents our findings. As a refresher, our past work in this area has found that over the past four years, forward natural gas contracts (e.g., gas futures, swaps, and physical supply) have traded at a premium relative to contemporaneous long-term reference case gas price forecasts from the EIA. As such, we have concluded that, over the past four years at least, levelized cost comparisons of fixed-price renewable generation with variable price gas-fired generation that have been based on AEO natural gas price forecasts (rather than forward prices) have yielded results that are ''biased'' in favor of gas-fired generation (presuming that long-term price stability is valued). In this memo we simply update our past analysis to include the latest long-term gas price forecast from the EIA, as contained in AEO 2005. For the sake of brevity, we do not rehash information (on methodology, potential explanations for the premiums, etc.) contained in our earlier reports on this topic; readers interested in such information are encouraged to download that work from http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or, more recently (and briefly), http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf. As was the case in the past four AEO releases (AEO 2001-AE0 2004), we once again find that the AEO 2005 reference case gas price forecast falls well below where NYMEX natural gas futures contracts were trading at the time the EIA finalized its gas price forecast. In fact, the NYMEXAEO 2005 reference case comparison yields by far the largest premium--$1.11/MMBtu levelized over six years--that we have seen over the last five years. In other words, on average, one would have to pay $1.11/MMBtu more than the AEO 2005 reference case natural gas price forecast in order to lock in natural gas prices over the coming six years and thereby replicate the price stability provided intrinsically by fixed-price renewable generation. Fixed-price renewables obviously need not bear this added cost, and moreover can provide price stability for terms well in excess of six years.

  15. Pearl River Valley Electric Power Association- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pearl River Valley Electric Power Association provides incentives through its Comfort Advantage Program to encourage energy efficiency within the residential sector. Rebates are available for heat...

  16. Residential Marketing Toolkit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Residential Residential Lighting Energy Star Appliances Consumer Electronics Heat Pump Water Heaters Electric Storage Water...

  17. Residential Absorption Water Heater

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Residential Absorption Water Heater 2014 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Kyle ... Target MarketAudience: Residential gas water heating Key Partners: GE CRADA partner SRA ...

  18. residential-lighting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Efficiency Progress Report Evaluation Utility Toolkit Residential Lighting Market Research The Residential Lighting Market Research Project will estimate market savings from...

  19. Second AEO2-015 Liquid Fuels Markets Working Group Meeting Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    September 24, 2014 MEMORANDUM FOR: JOHN CONTI ASSISTANT ADMINISTRATOR FOR ENERGY ANALYSYS MICHAEL SCHAAL DIRECTOR, OFFICE OF ENERGY ANALYSIS JOHN POWELL TEAM LEADER, LIQUID FUELS MARKET TEAM FROM: LIQUID FUELS MARKET TEAM SUBJECT: Second AEO2015 Liquid Fuels Markets Working Group Meeting Summary (presented on 09-24-2014) Attendees: (EIA) John Powell, Mindi Farber-DeAnda, Mike Cole, Adrian Geagla, David Manowitz, Beth May Seth Meyer (USDA) Austin Brown (NREL) Robert Smith (US DOE) Ben Salisbury

  20. Summary of AEO2016 Electricity Working Group Meeting held on December 8, 2015

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    January7, 2016 MEMORANDUM FOR: John Conti Assistant Administrator for Energy Analysis Jim Diefenderfer Director, Office of Electricity, Coal, Nuclear, and Renewables Analysis Paul Holtberg Team Leader Analysis Integration Team Office of Integrated and International Energy Analysis FROM: Chris Namovicz Team Leader for Electricity Analysis (acting) And Thad Huetteman, Electricity Analysis Team SUBJECT: Summary of AEO2016 Electricity Working Group Meeting held on December 8, 2015 Presenters: Chris

  1. WORKING GROUP PRESENTATION FOR DISCUSSION PURPOSES. DO NOT QUOTE OR CITE AS AEO2016

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    February 1, 2016 MEMORANDUM TO: John Conti Assistant Administrator for Energy Analysis Jim Diefenderfer Director, Office of Electricity, Coal, Nuclear, and Renewables Analysis FROM: Coal and Uranium Analysis Team SUBJECT: Notes from the First AEO2016 Coal Working Group Meeting workshop held on December 1, 2015 Attendees (47) Name Affiliation Ross, Joey Alliance Resource Partners, L.P. Alfaro, Jose L. Alpha Natural Resources Blumenfeld, Andy Arch Coal, Inc. Lewandowski, David Clean Energy James,

  2. Estimated United States Residential Energy Use in 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, C A; Johnson, D M; Simon, A J; Belles, R D

    2011-12-12

    A flow chart depicting energy flow in the residential sector of the United States economy in 2005 has been constructed from publicly available data and estimates of national energy use patterns. Approximately 11,000 trillion British Thermal Units (trBTUs) of electricity and fuels were used throughout the United States residential sector in lighting, electronics, air conditioning, space heating, water heating, washing appliances, cooking appliances, refrigerators, and other appliances. The residential sector is powered mainly by electricity and natural gas. Other fuels used include petroleum products (fuel oil, liquefied petroleum gas and kerosene), biomass (wood), and on-premises solar, wind, and geothermal energy. The flow patterns represent a comprehensive systems view of energy used within the residential sector.

  3. Federal Sector

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News & Events Skip navigation links Residential Commercial Industrial Federal Agriculture About five percent of BPA's total electric supply goes to power facilities around...

  4. Energy Intensity Indicators: Indicators for Major Sectors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This system of energy intensity indicators for total energy covers the economy as a whole and each of the major end-use sectors—transportation, industry, commercial, and residential, as well as the electric power sector. These sectors are shown in Figure 1.

  5. Residential Buildings Integration Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Residential Buildings Integration Program Presentation for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review

  6. Analysis & Projections - Pub - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Residential/Commercial Buildings AEO2016 Meetings First AEO2016 Meeting (December 8, 2015) Summary of meeting Presentation AEO2015 Meetings First AEO2015 Meeting (August 7, 2014) Summary of meeting Presentation AEO2014 Meetings First AEO2014 Meeting (July 22, 2013) Summary of meeting Presentation Second AEO2014 Meeting (September 26, 2013) Summary of meeting Presentation AEO2013 Meetings First AEO2013 Assumptions Meeting (July 23, 2012) Summary of meeting Presentation Second AEO2013 Preliminary

  7. Overview of Levelized Cost of Energy in the AEO

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Presented to the EIA Energy Conference June 17, 2013 Chris Namovicz Assessing the Economic Value of New Utility-Scale Renewable Generation Projects Overview * Levelized cost of energy (LCOE) has been used by planners, analysts, policymakers, advocates and others to assess the economic competitiveness of technology options in the electric power sector * While of limited usefulness in the analysis of "conventional" utility systems, this approach is not generally appropriate when

  8. EIA - Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) 2013 Data Tables

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Release Date: April 14, 2015 | Next Release Date: June 2016 | correction | full report Overview Data Reference Case Side Cases Interactive Table Viewer By Section Executive summary Economic growth Prices Delivered energy consumption by sector Energy consumption by primary fuel Energy intensity Energy production, imports, and exports Electricity generation Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions Appendices View All Filter By Source Oil Natural Gas Coal Electricity

  9. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maine" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"NextEra Energy Power Marketing","Investor-owned",19844...

  10. End-Use Sector Flowcharts, Energy Intensity Indicators

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Economy Transportation Sector Commercial Sector Residential Sector Electric Power Sector Industrial Sector Manufacturing NAICS 311-339 Food, Beverages, & Tobacco NAICS 311/312 Textile Mills and Products NAICS 313/314 Apparel & Leather Products NAICS 315/316 Wood Products NAICS 321 Paper NAICS 322 Printing & Related Support NAICS 323 Petroleum & Coal Products NAICS 324 Chemicals NAICS 325 Plastics & Rubber Products NAICS 326 Nonmetallic Mineral Products NAICS 327 Primary

  11. A sensitivity analysis of the treatment of wind energy in the AEO99 version of NEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osborn, Julie G; Wood, Frances; Richey, Cooper; Sanders, Sandy; Short, Walter; Koomey, Jonathan

    2001-01-01

    Each year, the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (EIA) publishes a forecast of the domestic energy economy in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO). During the forecast period of the AEO (currently through 2020), renewable energy technologies have typically not achieved significant growth. The contribution of renewable technologies as electric generators becomes more important, however, in scenarios analyzing greenhouse gas emissions reductions or significant technological advancements. We examined the economic assumptions about wind power used for producing forecasts with the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) to determine their influence on the projected capacity expansion of this technology. This analysis should help illustrate to policymakers what types of issues may affect wind development, and improve the general understanding of the NEMS model itself. Figure 1 illustrates the model structure and factors relevant to wind deployment. We found that NEMS uses various cost multipliers and constraints to represent potential physical and economic limitations to growth in wind capacity, such as resource depletion, costs associated with rapid manufacturing expansion, and grid stability with high levels of capacity from intermittent resources. The model's flexibility allows the user to make alternative assumptions about the magnitude of these factors. While these assumptions have little effect on the Reference Case forecast for the 1999 edition of the AEO, they can make a dramatic difference when wind is more attractive, such as under a carbon permit trading system. With $100/ton carbon permits, the wind capacity projection for 2020 ranges from 15 GW in the unaltered model (AEO99 Reference Case) to 168 GW in the extreme case when all the multipliers and constraints examined in this study are removed. Furthermore, if modifications are made to the model allowing inter-regional transmission of electricity, wind capacity is forecast to reach 214 GW when all limitations are removed. The figures in the upper end of these ranges are not intended to be viewed as reasonable projections, but their magnitude illustrates the importance of the parameters governing the growth of wind capacity and resource availability in forecasts using NEMS. In addition, many uncertainties exist regarding these assumptions that potentially affect the growth of wind power. We suggest several areas in which to focus future research in order to better model the potential development of this resource. Because many of the assumptions related to wind in the model are also used for other renewable technologies, these suggestions could be applied to other renewable resources as well.

  12. Mercury Emissions Control Technologies (released in AEO2006)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01

    The Annual Energy Outlook 2006 reference case assumes that states will comply with the requirements of the Environmental Protection Agency's new Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) regulation. CAMR is a two-phase program, with a Phase I cap of 38 tons of mercury emitted from all U.S. power plants in 2010 and a Phase II cap of 15 tons in 2018. Mercury emissions in the electricity generation sector in 2003 are estimated at around 50 tons. Generators have a variety of options to meet the mercury limits, such as: switching to coal with a lower mercury content, relying on flue gas desulfurization or selective catalytic reduction equipment to reduce mercury emissions, or installing conventional activated carbon injection (ACI) technology.

  13. Residential Solar Investment Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In March 2012, the CT Green Bank* unveiled its solar photovoltaic residential investment program with the ultimate goal to support 30 megawatts of residential solar photovoltaics (PV). HB 6838...

  14. Leasing Residential PV Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutberg, Michael; Bouza, Antonio

    2013-11-01

    The article discusses the adoption, consequences and current market status of the leasing of residential photovoltaic systems. It addresses attributed energy savings and market potential of residential system leasing.

  15. Residential Energy Consumption Survey:

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... ...*...,,.<,<,...,,.,,.,,. 97 Table 6. Residential Fuel Oil and Kerosene Consumption and Expenditures April 1979 Through March 1980 Northeast...

  16. Residential Buildings Integration (RBI)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy eere.energy.gov David Lee Program Manager Residential Buildings Integration (RBI) April 22, 2014 Residential Buildings Integration (RBI) Mission/Vision The Residential Buildings Integration (RBI) program's mission: To accelerate energy performance improvements in residential buildings by developing, demonstrating, and deploying a suite of cost-effective technologies, tools, and solutions to achieve peak performance in new and existing homes. RBI Vision,

  17. Better Buildings Residential

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Residential 2014 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Danielle Sass Byrnett danielle.byrnett@ee.doe.gov U.S. Department of Energy 2 Project Summary: Better Buildings Residential (BBR) Timeline: Start date: FY11 Planned end date: ongoing Key Milestones 1. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program, Fall 2010 2. Home Energy Score, 2011 3. Home Performance with ENERGY STAR to DOE, Oct. 2011 4. Better Buildings Residential Network, April 2013 5. Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center

  18. Table 7b. Natural Gas Price, Electric Power Sector, Actual vs. Projected

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    b. Natural Gas Price, Electric Power Sector, Actual vs. Projected Projected Price in Nominal Dollars (nominal dollars per million Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 AEO 1994 2.49 2.60 2.76 2.93 3.05 3.24 3.39 3.60 3.86 4.15 4.40 4.70 5.08 5.39 5.85 6.27 6.59 7.01 AEO 1995 2.44 2.61 2.61 2.70 2.78 2.95 3.11 3.44 3.72 4.10 4.43 4.78 5.07 5.33 5.64 5.95 6.23 AEO 1996 2.08 2.19 2.20 2.39 2.47 2.54 2.64 2.74 2.84 2.95 3.09

  19. National Residential Efficiency Measures Database Aimed at Reducing Risk for Residential Retrofit Industry (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-01-01

    This technical highlight describes NREL research to develop a publicly available database of energy retrofit measures containing performance characteristics and cost estimates for nearly 3,000 measures. Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have developed the National Residential Efficiency Measures Database, a public database that characterizes the performance and costs of common residential energy efficiency measures. The data are available for use in software programs that evaluate cost-effective retrofit measures to improve the energy efficiency of residential buildings. The database provides a single, consistent source of current data for DOE and private-sector energy audit and simulation software tools and the retrofit industry. The database will reduce risk for residential retrofit industry stakeholders by providing a central, publicly vetted source of up-to-date information.

  20. Benefits of Better Buildings Residential Network Reporting |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Publications Better Buildings Residential Network Orientation Better Buildings Residential Network Orientation Webinar Nothing But Networking for Residential Network Members...

  1. National Grid (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    < Back Eligibility Residential InstallersContractors Multifamily Residential Low Income Residential Savings Category RefrigeratorsFreezers Equipment Insulation Water Heaters...

  2. National Grid (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Incentive...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Construction Residential Multifamily Residential Low Income Residential Savings Category RefrigeratorsFreezers Dehumidifiers Water Heaters Lighting Heat Pumps Air conditioners...

  3. Optional Residential Program Benchmarking | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Optional Residential Program Benchmarking Optional Residential Program Benchmarking Better Buildings Residential Network Data and Evaluation Peer Exchange Call Series: Optional ...

  4. Comparison of AEO 2009 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2009-01-28

    On December 17, 2008, the reference-case projections from Annual Energy Outlook 2009 (AEO 2009) were posted on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) web site. We at LBNL have, in the past, compared the EIA's reference-case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market, with the goal of better understanding fuel price risk and the role that renewables can play in mitigating such risk. As such, we were curious to see how the latest AEO reference-case gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX natural gas futures strip. This brief memo presents our findings. Note that this memo pertains only to natural gas fuel price risk (i.e., the risk that natural gas prices might differ over the life of a gas-fired generation asset from what was expected when the decision to build the gas-fired unit was made). We do not take into consideration any of the other distinct attributes of gas-fired and renewable generation, such as dispatchability (or lack thereof), differences in capital costs and O&M expenses, or environmental externalities. A comprehensive comparison of different resource types--which is well beyond the scope of this memo--would need to account for differences in all such attributes, including fuel price risk. Furthermore, our analysis focuses solely on natural-gas-fired generation (as opposed to coal-fired or nuclear generation, for example), for several reasons: (1) price volatility has been more of a concern for natural gas than for other fuels used to generate power; (2) for environmental and other reasons, natural gas has, in recent years, been the fuel of choice among power plant developers; and (3) natural gas-fired generators often set the market clearing price in competitive wholesale power markets throughout the United States. That said, a more-complete analysis of how renewables mitigate fuel price risk would also need to consider coal, uranium, and other fuel prices. Finally, we caution readers about drawing inferences or conclusions based solely on this memo in isolation: to place the information contained herein within its proper context, we strongly encourage readers interested in this issue to read through our previous, more-detailed studies, available at http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf.

  5. Comparison of AEO 2008 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark A; Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2008-01-07

    On December 12, 2007, the reference-case projections from Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (AEO 2008) were posted on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) web site. We at LBNL have, in the past, compared the EIA's reference-case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market, with the goal of better understanding fuel price risk and the role that renewables can play in mitigating such risk. As such, we were curious to see how the latest AEO reference-case gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX natural gas futures strip. This brief memo presents our findings. Note that this memo pertains only to natural gas fuel price risk (i.e., the risk that natural gas prices might differ over the life of a gas-fired generation asset from what was expected when the decision to build the gas-fired unit was made). We do not take into consideration any of the other distinct attributes of gas-fired and renewable generation, such as dispatchability (or lack thereof) or environmental externalities. A comprehensive comparison of different resource types--which is well beyond the scope of this memo--would need to account for differences in all such attributes, including fuel price risk. Furthermore, our analysis focuses solely on natural-gas-fired generation (as opposed to coal-fired generation, for example), for several reasons: (1) price volatility has been more of a concern for natural gas than for other fuels used to generate power; (2) for environmental and other reasons, natural gas has, in recent years, been the fuel of choice among power plant developers (though its appeal has diminished somewhat as prices have increased); and (3) natural gas-fired generators often set the market clearing price in competitive wholesale power markets throughout the United States. That said, a more-complete analysis of how renewables mitigate fuel price risk would also need to consider coal and other fuel prices. Finally, we caution readers about drawing inferences or conclusions based solely on this memo in isolation: to place the information contained herein within its proper context, we strongly encourage readers interested in this issue to read through our previous, more-detailed studies, available at http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf.

  6. Sector 9

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sector 9 About Science and Research Beamlines Operations and Schedule Safety Search APS ... Search Argonne Home > Advanced Photon Source > Contacts Advisory Committee Beamlines...

  7. Kenergy- Residential Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kenergy is an electric cooperative that serves 51,000 households and commercial customers in 14 western Kentucky counties. Currently, Kenergy offers three rebate programs for residential customers...

  8. Residential Building Activities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is leading several different activities to develop, demonstrate, and deploy cost-effective solutions to reduce energy consumption across the residential building...

  9. Residential Building Audits and Retrofits

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation covers local, regional, and national efforts to promote energy efficiency in residential buildings, programmatic elements of residential building audit and retrofit programs, and resources that you can access to address residential retrofit issues.

  10. End-Use Sector Flowchart | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    End-Use Sector Flowchart End-Use Sector Flowchart This system of energy intensity indicators for total energy covers the economy as a whole and each of the major end-use sectors-transportation, industry, commercial and residential-identified in Figure 1. By clicking on any of the boxes with the word "Sector" in the title will reveal the more detailed structure within that sector. PDF icon End-Use Sector Flowchart More Documents & Publications Barriers to Industrial Energy

  11. Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide focuses on the key elements and design characteristics of building and maintaining a successful residential retrofit program.

  12. Residential propane prices available

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8, 2015 Residential propane price increases The average retail price for propane is $1.91 per gallon, up 1.4 cents from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.39 per gallon, up 1 cent from last week, and down 55.3

  13. Update to industrial drivers in the AEO2015 as a result of new input-output data

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Update to industrial drivers in the AEO2015 as a result of new input-output data Elizabeth Sendich May 4, 2015 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Energy Information Administration Washington, DC 20585 This paper is released to encourage discussion and critical comment. The analysis and conclusions expressed here are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the U.S. Energy Information Administration. WORKING PAPER SERIES April 2015 Elizabeth Sendich | U.S. Energy

  14. Identifying Cost-Effective Residential Energy Efficiency Opportunities for the Kauai Island Utility Cooperative

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This analysis is an update to the Energy Efficiency Potential report completed by KEMA for the Kauai Island Utility Cooperative (KIUC) and identifies potential energy efficiency opportunities in the residential sector on Kaua‘i (KEMA 2005).

  15. Residential Energy Tax Credit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: ODOE filed new permanent rules for the Residential Energy Tax Credit program. The rule changes include a 50 percent incentive cap for all category one eligible devices (as specified under HB...

  16. Residential New Construction Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Residential New Construction Program includes two levels that can be achieved by completing various energy efficiency measures: Base Level and High Performance Level. Projects meeting the req...

  17. TES for Residential Settings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutberg, Michael; Hastbacka, Mildred; Bouza, Antonio

    2013-07-31

    The article discusses thermal energy storage approaches for residential buildings. This article addresses both brick bank storage and phase change material technologies. The energy savings and market potential of these thermal energy storage methods are reviewed as well.

  18. Residential heating oil price

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil fell 4.1 cents from a week ago to 2.89 per gallon, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the...

  19. Residential propane price decreases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8, 2015 Residential propane price decreases The average retail price for propane is $2.34 per gallon, down 1.7 cents from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.85 per gallon, down 1.2 cents from last week, and down 63.2

  20. Residential propane price decreases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6, 2014 Residential propane price decreases The average retail price for propane fell to $3.48 per gallon, down 15.9 cents from a week ago, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged 3.06 a gallon, down 24.8 cents from last week, but up $1.28 from a year ago. This is Marcela Rourk, with EIA, in Washington.

  1. Residential propane price decreases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    05, 2014 Residential propane price decreases The average retail price for propane fell to $2.40 per gallon, down 1.2 cents from a week ago, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.95 per gallon, up 8-tenths of a cent from last week, and down 1.9

  2. Residential propane price increases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Residential propane price virtually unchanged The average retail price for propane is $2.03 per gallon, up 1-tenth of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.48 per gallon, down 1-tenths of a cent from last week, and down 39.8

  3. Residential propane price increases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Residential propane price decreases The average retail price for propane is $2.03 per gallon, down 6-tenths of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.48 per gallon, down 6-tenths of a cent from last week, and down 40 cents

  4. Residential propane price increases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Residential propane price decreases The average retail price for propane is $2.03 per gallon, down 2-tenths of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.47 per gallon, down 6-tenths of a cent from last week, and down 41 cents

  5. Residential propane price increases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4, 2015 Residential propane price increases The average retail price for propane is $2.36 per gallon, up half of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.88 per gallon, down 1-tenth of a cent from last week, and down 90.5

  6. Residential propane price increases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Residential propane price decreases The average retail price for propane is $2.02 per gallon, down 5-tenths of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.46 per gallon, down 7-tenths of a cent from last week, and down 40 cents

  7. Residential propane price increases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Residential propane virtually unchanged The average retail price for propane is $2.02 per gallon, up 1-tenth of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.46 per gallon, up 1-tenth of a cent from last week, and down 38.8

  8. Residential propane prices available

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Residential propane price decreases The average retail price for propane is $1.91 per gallon, down 6.7 cents from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.40 per gallon, down 1.6 cents from last week, and down 49.5 cents from a year ago. This is Marcela Rourk, with EIA, in Washington.

  9. Residential propane prices available

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1, 2015 Residential propane price increases The average retail price for propane is $1.90 per gallon, up 2-tenths of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.38 per gallon, up 1.1 cents from last week, and down 53 cents from a year ago. This is Marcela Rourk

  10. Residential propane prices available

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4, 2015 Residential propane price increases The average retail price for propane is $1.92 per gallon, up 1.4 cents from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.42 per gallon, up 2.6 cents from last week, and down 53.2

  11. Residential propane prices available

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Residential propane price decreases The average retail price for propane is $1.92 per gallon, down 6-tenths of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.40 per gallon, down 1.2 cents from last week, and down 54.8 cents from a year ago. This is Marcela Rourk, with EIA, in Washington.

  12. Residential propane prices available

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8, 2015 Residential propane price increases The average retail price for propane is $1.94 per gallon, up 2 cents from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.42 per gallon, up 1 cent from last week, and down 52.8 cents from a year ago.

  13. Residential propane prices decreases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5, 2014 Residential propane prices decreases The average retail price for propane fell to $3.89 per gallon, that's down 11.9 cents from a week ago, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged 3.83 a gallon, down 36.8 cents from last week, but up $2.05 from a year ago. This is Amerine Woodyard

  14. Residential propane prices surges

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5, 2014 Residential propane price decreases The average retail price for propane fell to $3.30 per gallon, down 17.5 cents from a week ago, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged 2.78 a gallon, down 27.9 cents from last week, but up 99.3

  15. Residential propane prices surges

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2, 2014 Residential propane price decreases The average retail price for propane fell to $3.17 per gallon, down 13.1 cents from a week ago, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged 2.60 a gallon, down 18.5 cents from last week, but up 88.1

  16. Residential propane prices surges

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9, 2014 Residential propane price decreases The average retail price for propane fell to $3.08 per gallon, down 8.6 cents from a week ago, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged 2.48 a gallon, down 10.7 cents from last week, but up 69.7

  17. Residential Solar Valuation Rates

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Residential Solar Valuation Rates Karl R. Rábago Rábago Energy LLC 1 The Ideal Residential Solar Tariff ‣ Fair to the utility and non-solar customers ‣ Fair compensation to the solar customer ‣ Decouple compensation from incentives ‣ Align public policy goals (decouple compensation from consumption) ‣ Intuitively sound and administratively simple 2 Historical Antecedents ‣ Externalities ‣ Price ≠ Cost ‣ Green Power ‣ Small Is Profitable (http://www.smallisprofitable.org/)

  18. Fact Sheet: Better Buildings Residential Network | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Fact Sheet: Better Buildings Residential Network Fact Sheet: Better Buildings Residential Network Fact Sheet: Better Buildings Residential Network, increasing the number of...

  19. Salem Electric - Residential, Commercial, and Industrial Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Industrial Local Government Nonprofit Residential State Government Federal Government Multifamily Residential Savings Category Clothes Washers RefrigeratorsFreezers Equipment...

  20. Stronger Manufacturers' Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential Air Conditioners Go Into Effect Today Stronger Manufacturers' Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential Air Conditioners...

  1. Building America Webinar: National Residential Efficiency Measures...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Residential Efficiency Measures Database Unveiled Building America Webinar: National Residential Efficiency Measures Database Unveiled This webinar presented an overview...

  2. Covered Product Category: Residential Electric Resistance Water...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Covered Product Category: Residential Electric Resistance Water Heaters Covered Product Category: Residential Electric Resistance Water Heaters The Federal Energy Management ...

  3. Better Buildings Residential Network Orientation Webinar | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    11, 2014. Call Slides and Discussion Summary More Documents & Publications Better Buildings Residential Network Orientation Better Buildings Residential Network Orientation...

  4. Residential Wood Heating Fuel Exemption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The New York Department of Taxation and Finance publishes a variety of sales tax reports detailing local tax rates and exemptions, including those for residential energy services. The residential...

  5. Residential heating oil prices decline

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2, 2014 Residential heating oil prices decline The average retail price for home heating oil is 3.48 per gallon. That's down 4.5 cents from a week ago, based on the residential...

  6. Residential Retrofit Design Guide Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar covered the Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide and its elements, including assess, plan, implement, and evaluate.

  7. Residential and commercial buildings data book: Third edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amols, G.R.; Howard, K.B.; Nicholls, A.K.; Guerra, T.D.

    1988-02-01

    This Data Book updates and expands the previous Data Book originally published by the Department of Energy in September, 1986 (DOE/RL/01830/16). Energy-related information is provided under the following headings: Characteristics of Residential Buildings in the US; Characteristics of New Single Family Construction in the US; Characteristics of New Multi-Family Construction in the US; Household Appliances; Residential Sector Energy Consumption, Prices, and Expenditures; Characteristics of US Commercial Buildings; Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption, Prices, and Expenditures; and Additional Buildings and Community Systems Information. 12 refs., 59 figs., 118 tabs.

  8. Residential Mechanical Precooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    German, a.; Hoeschele, M.

    2014-12-01

    This research conducted by the Alliance for Residential Building Innovation team evaluated mechanical air conditioner pre-cooling strategies in homes throughout the United States. EnergyPlus modeling evaluated two homes with different performance characteristics in seven climates. Results are applicable to new construction homes and most existing homes built in the last 10 years, as well as fairly efficient retrofitted homes.

  9. Residential propane price

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    propane price decreases The average retail price for propane is $2.36 per gallon, down 1 cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.92 per gallon, down 8-tenths of a cent from last week, and down 44.4 cents

  10. Residential propane price

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    propane price increases The average retail price for propane is $2.29 per gallon, down 3.1 cents from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.80 per gallon, down 2.4 cents from last week

  11. Residential propane price decreases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    propane price decreases The average retail price for propane is $2.32 per gallon, down 2 cents from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.82 per gallon, down 2.4 cents from last week. This is Marcela Rourk,

  12. Residential propane price increases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    propane price increases The average retail price for propane is $2.01 per gallon, up 1.2 cents from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.47 per gallon, up 9-tenths of a cent from last week, and down 44.8

  13. Residential propane price increases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    propane price increases The average retail price for propane is $2.02 per gallon, up 4-tenths of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.48 per gallon, down 1-tenth of a cent from last week, and down 43

  14. Residential propane price increases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    propane price increases The average retail price for propane is $2.03 per gallon, up 1 cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.48 per gallon, up 9-tenths of a cent from last week, and down 40.7

  15. Residential propane price increases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    propane price increases The average retail price for propane is $1.96 per gallon, up 7-tenths of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.43 per gallon, up 1.3 cents from last week, and down 51.7

  16. Residential propane price increases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    propane price increases The average retail price for propane is $1.97 per gallon, up 6-tenths of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.44 per gallon, up 7-tenths of a cent from last week, and down 50.

  17. Residential propane price increases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    propane price increases The average retail price for propane is $1.98 per gallon, up 1.1 cents from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.44 per gallon, up 4-tenths of a cent from last week, and down 49.7

  18. Residential propane prices available

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    propane prices available The average retail price for propane is $1.94 per gallon, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.40 per gallon. This is Marcela Rourk, with EIA, in Washington.

  19. Analysis of institutional mechanisms affecting residential and commercial buildings retrofit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    Barriers to energy conservation in the residential and commercial sectors influence (1) the willingness of building occupants to modify their energy usage habits, and (2) the willingness of building owners/occupants to upgrade the thermal characteristics of the structures within which they live or work and the appliances which they use. The barriers that influence the willingness of building owners/occupants to modify the thermal efficiency characteristics of building structures and heating/cooling systems are discussed. This focus is further narrowed to include only those barriers that impede modifications to existing buildings, i.e., energy conservation retrofit activity. Eight barriers selected for their suitability for Federal action in the residential and commercial sectors and examined are: fuel pricing policies that in the short term do not provide enough incentive to invest in energy conservation; high finance cost; inability to evaluate contractor performance; inability to evaluate retrofit products; lack of well-integrated or one-stop marketing systems (referred to as lack of delivery systems); lack of precise or customized information; lack of sociological/psychological incentives; and use of the first-cost decision criterion (expanded to include short-term payback criterion for the commercial sector). The impacts of these barriers on energy conservation are separately assessed for the residential and commercial sectors.

  20. Questions Asked during the Financing Residential Energy Efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Residential Energy Efficiency with Carbon Offsets Transcript Financing Residential Energy Efficiency with Carbon Offsets SERC Photovoltaics for Residential Buildings Webinar...

  1. Residential Sector Demand Module of the National Energy Modeling...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Stoves Geothermal Heat Pump Natural Gas Heat Pump Variables: HSYSSHR 2001,eg,b,r Benchmarking Data from Short-Term Energy Outlook Definition: Household energy consumption by...

  2. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.2 Residential Sector Characteristics

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    1 Total Number of Households and Buildings, Floorspace, and Household Size, by Year 1980 80 N.A. 227 2.9 1981 83 N.A. 229 2.8 1982 84 N.A. 232 2.8 1983 85 N.A. 234 2.8 1984 86 N.A. 236 2.7 1985 88 N.A. 238 2.7 1986 89 N.A. 240 2.7 1987 91 N.A. 242 2.7 1988 92 N.A. 244 2.7 1989 93 N.A. 247 2.6 1990 94 N.A. 250 2.6 1991 95 N.A. 253 2.7 1992 96 N.A. 257 2.7 1993 98 N.A. 260 2.7 1994 99 N.A. 263 2.7 1995 100 N.A. 266 2.7 1996 101 N.A. 269 2.7 1997 102 N.A. 273 2.7 1998 104 N.A. 276 2.7 1999 105 N.A.

  3. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.2 Residential Sector Characteristics

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    3 Share of Total U.S. Households, by Census Region, Division, and Vintage, as of 2005 Prior to 1950 to 1970 to 1980 to 1990 to 2000 to Region 1950 1969 1979 1989 1999 2005 Northeast 6.7% 5.2% 2.4% 2.1% 1.3% 0.8% 18.5% New England 2.1% 1.2% 0.5% 0.5% 0.3% 0.3% 4.9% Middle Atlantic 4.6% 4.0% 1.9% 1.6% 1.0% 0.5% 13.6% Midwest 5.7% 5.8% 3.6% 2.5% 3.7% 1.7% 23.0% East North Central 4.3% 3.9% 2.7% 1.8% 2.1% 1.1% 16.0% West North Central 1.4% 1.9% 0.9% 0.7% 1.6% 0.6% 7.1% South 4.0% 6.9% 6.4% 7.5% 7.5%

  4. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.2 Residential Sector Characteristics

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    4 Characteristics of U.S. Housing by Census Division and Region, as of 2005 Census Division Northeast 19% 2,423 1,664 New England 5% 2,552 1,680 Middle Atlantic 14% 2,376 1,658 Midwest 23% 2,566 1,927 East North Central 16% 2,628 1,926 West North Central 7% 2,424 1,930 South 37% 2,295 1,551 South Atlantic 20% 2,370 1,607 East South Central 6% 2,254 1,544 West South Central 11% 2,184 1,455 West 22% 1,963 1,366 Mountain 7% 2,149 1,649 Pacific 15% 1,878 1,238 Total 100% 2,309 1,618 Note(s):

  5. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.2 Residential Sector Characteristics

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    7 Characteristics of a Typical Single-Family Home (1) Year Built | Building Equipment Fuel Age (5) Occupants 3 | Space Heating Natural Gas 12 Floorspace | Water Heating Natural Gas 8 Heated Floorspace (SF) 1,934 | Space Cooling 8 Cooled Floorspace (SF) 1,495 | Garage 2-Car | Stories 1 | Appliances Size Age (5) Foundation Concrete Slab | Refrigerator 19 Cubic Feet 8 Total Rooms (2) 6 | Clothes Dryer Bedrooms 3 | Clothes Washer Other Rooms 3 | Range/Oven Full Bathroom 2 | Microwave Oven Half

  6. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.2 Residential Sector Characteristics

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    8 Presence of Air-Conditioning and Type of Heating System in New Single-Family Homes Type of Primary Heating System Warm-Air Hot Water Other or | Furnace Heat Pump or Steam (1) None (2) | 1980 57% 24% 4% 15% | 62% 1981 56% 25% 3% 16% | 65% 1982 53% 26% 4% 17% | 66% 1983 56% 29% 4% 12% | 69% 1984 55% 30% 4% 11% | 71% 1985 54% 30% 5% 11% | 70% 1986 54% 29% 7% 10% | 69% 1987 57% 27% 7% 9% | 71% 1988 60% 26% 7% 8% | 75% 1989 63% 24% 6% 7% | 77% 1990 64% 23% 6% 6% | 76% 1991 65% 22% 6% 7% | 75% 1992

  7. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    5 2005 Households and Energy Expenditures, by Income Level ($2010) Energy Expenditures by Household Income Households (millions) Household Less than $10,000 9.9 9% $10,000 to $14,999 8.5 8% $15,000 to $19,999 8.4 8% $20,000 to $29,999 15.1 14% $30,000 to $39,999 13.6 12% $40,000 to $49,999 11.0 10% $50,000 to $74,999 19.8 18% $75,000 to $99,999 10.6 10% $100,000 or more 14.2 13% Total 111.1 100% Note(s): Source(s): 7% 1) See Table 2.3.15 for more on energy burdens. 2) A household is defined as a

  8. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    9 Average Annual Energy Expenditures per Household, by Year ($2010) Year 1980 1,991 1981 1,981 1982 2,058 1983 2,082 1984 2,067 1985 2,012 1986 1,898 1987 1,846 1988 1,849 1989 1,848 1990 1,785 1991 1,784 1992 1,729 1993 1,797 1994 1,772 1995 1,727 1996 1,800 1997 1,761 1998 1,676 1999 1,659 2000 1,824 2001 1,900 2002 1,830 2003 1,978 2004 2,018 2005 2,175 2006 2,184 2007 2,230 2008 2,347 2009 2,173 2010 2,201 2011 2,185 2012 2,123 2013 2,056 2014 2,032 2015 2,030 2016 2,007 2017 1,992 2018

  9. Evaluation of advanced technologies for residential appliances and residential and commercial lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turiel, I.; Atkinson, B.; Boghosian, S.; Chan, P.; Jennings, J.; Lutz, J.; McMahon, J.; Rosenquist, G.

    1995-01-01

    Section 127 of the Energy Policy Act requires that the Department of Energy (DOE) prepare a report to Congress on the potential for the development and commercialization of appliances that substantially exceed the present federal or state efficiency standards. Candidate high-efficiency appliances must meet several criteria including: the potential exists for substantial improvement (beyond the minimum established in law) of the appliance`s energy efficiency; electric, water, or gas utilities are prepared to support and promote the commercialization of such appliances; manufacturers are unlikely to undertake development and commercialization of such appliances on their own, or development and production would be substantially accelerated by support to manufacturers. This report describes options to improve the efficiency of residential appliances, including water heaters, clothes washers and dryers, refrigerator/freezers, dishwashers, space heating and cooling devices, as well as residential and commercial lighting products. Data from this report (particularly Appendix 1)were used to prepare the report to Congress mentioned previously. For the residential sector, national energy savings are calculated using the LBL Residential Energy Model. This model projects the number of households and appliance saturations over time. First, end-use consumption is calculated for a base case where models that only meet the standard replace existing models as these reach the end of their lifetime. Second, models with efficiencies equal to the technology under consideration replace existing models that reach the end of their lifetime. For the commercial sector, the COMMEND model was utilized to project national energy savings from new technologies. In this report, energy savings are shown for the period 1988 to 2015.

  10. Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide. PDF icon Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide...

  11. Average Residential Price

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From

  12. Average Residential Price

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground

  13. Residential propane price

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    propane price decreases The average retail price for propane is $2.35 per gallon, down 1.1 cents from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.92 per gallon, down 3-tenths of a cent from last week, and down 47.9 cents

  14. Residential propane price

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    propane price increases The average retail price for propane is $2.39 per gallon, up 3.9 cents from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.91 per gallon, down 8-tenths of a cent from last week, and down 63.1 cents

  15. Residential propane price

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    propane price decrease The average retail price for propane is $2.37 per gallon, down 1.3 cents from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.93 per gallon, down 3-tenths of a cent from last week, and down 39.6 cents

  16. Residential propane price decreases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    propane price decreases The average retail price for propane is $2.38 per gallon, down 1.1 cents from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.91 per gallon, down 4-tenths of a cent from last week, and down $2.29 cents

  17. Residential propane price decreases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    propane price decreases The average retail price for propane is $2.37 per gallon, down 9-tenths of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.89 per gallon, down 1.4 cents from last week, and down $1.93 cents

  18. Residential propane price decreases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    propane price decreases The average retail price for propane is $2.36 per gallon, down 6-tenths of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.89 per gallon, down 4-tenths of a cent from last week, and down $1.67 cents from a year ago. This is Marcela Rourk, with EIA, in Washington.

  19. Residential propane price decreases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    propane price decreases The average retail price for propane is $2.36 per gallon, down 7-tenths of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.89 per gallon, down 1.1 cents from last week, and down $1.43 cents from a year ago. This is Marcela Rourk, with EIA, in Washington.

  20. Residential propane price decreases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    propane price decreases The average retail price for propane is $2.35 per gallon, down 3-tenths of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.88 per gallon, down 3-tenths of a cent from last week, and down $1.18 from a year ago. This is Marcela Rourk, with EIA, in Washington.

  1. Residential propane price decreases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    propane price decreases The average retail price for propane is $2.36 per gallon, down 1.1 cents from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.86 per gallon, down 1.6 cents from last week, and down 72.7 cents from a year ago. This is Marcela Rourk,

  2. Residential propane price decreases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    propane price decreases The average retail price for propane is $2.39 per gallon, down 2.2 cents from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.94 per gallon, down 1.3 cents from last week, and down 17.5 cents from a year ago. This is Marcela Rourk, with EIA, in Washington.

  3. Residential propane price increases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    propane price increases The average retail price for propane is $2.00 per gallon, up 7-tenths of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.46 per gallon, up 4-tenths of a cent from last week, and down 46.2

  4. Residential propane price increases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    propane price increases The average retail price for propane is $2.02 per gallon, up 5-tenths of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.48 per gallon, up 7-tenths of a cent from last week, and down 43.3

  5. Residential propane price increases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    propane price increases The average retail price for propane is $2.02 per gallon, up 4-tenths of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.47 per gallon, down 2-tenths of a cent from last week, and down 41.9

  6. Residential propane price increases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    propane price increases The average retail price for propane is $1.96 per gallon, up 1.8 cents from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.42 per gallon, up 6-tenths of a cent from last week, and down 52.9 cents

  7. Residential propane price increases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    propane price increases The average retail price for propane is $2.41 per gallon, up 6-tenths of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.95 per gallon, up 2-tenths of a cent from last week, and down 12.7 cents from a year ago. This is Marcela Rourk, with EIA, in Washington.

  8. Residential propane price increases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    propane price increases The average retail price for propane is $1.98 per gallon, up 5-tenths of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.45 per gallon, up 6-tenths of a cent from last week, and down 48.2

  9. Residential propane price increases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    propane price increases The average retail price for propane is $1.99 per gallon, up 3-tenths of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.45 per gallon, up 2-tenths of a cent from last week, and down 47.6

  10. Residential propane prices increase

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    propane prices increase The average retail price for propane rose 3.9 cents from a week ago to $2.80 per gallon. That's up 53.7 cents from a year ago, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged 2.32 a gallon, up 3.8 cents from last week, and up 59

  11. Residential propane prices increase

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    propane prices increase The average retail price for propane rose 2.5 cents from a week ago to $2.83 per gallon. That's up 56 cents from a year ago, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged 2.36 a gallon, up 3.9 cents from last week, and up 62.3

  12. Residential propane prices increase

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    propane prices increase The average retail price for propane rose to $2.40 per gallon, up 1.1 cents from a week ago, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.94 a gallon, up 2.9 cents from last week, and up 2.6 cents from a year ago. This is Marcela Rourk, with EIA, in Washington.

  13. Residential propane prices increase

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    propane prices increase The average retail price for propane rose 5.5 cents per gallon from last week to $2.62 per gallon; up 37.4 cents from a year ago, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. The retail price for propane in the Midwest region averaged 2.11 per gallon, up 3.4 cents per gallon from last week, and up 39.6

  14. Residential propane prices increase

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    propane prices increase The average retail price for propane rose 9.1 cents from a week ago to $2.71 per gallon. That's up 46.9 cents from a year ago, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged 2.22 a gallon, up 11 cents from last week, and up 50.8 cents from a year ago

  15. Residential propane prices increase

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    propane prices increase The average retail price for propane rose 4.8 cents from a week ago to $2.76 per gallon. That's up 51.2 cents from a year ago, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged 2.28 a gallon, up 6.3 cents from last week, and up 56.4

  16. Residential propane prices stable

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    propane prices stable The average retail price for propane is $2.37 per gallon. That's down 4-tenths of a penny from a week ago, based on the U.S. Energy Information Administration's weekly residential heating fuel survey. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.89 a gallon. Down 2-tenths of a cent from last week. This is Amerine Woodyard, with EIA, in Washington.

  17. Residential propane prices stable

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    propane price decreases The average retail price for propane is $2.40 per gallon, down 9-tenths of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.94 per gallon, down 7-tenths of a cent from . last week, and down 8.7 cents from a year ago This is Marcela Rourk, with EIA, in Washington.

  18. Guidelines for residential commissioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wray, Craig P.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2003-01-31

    Currently, houses do not perform optimally or even as many codes and forecasts predict, largely because they are field assembled and there is no consistent process to identify problems or to correct them. Residential commissioning is a solution to this problem. This guide is the culmination of a 30-month project that began in September 1999. The ultimate objective of the project is to increase the number of houses that undergo commissioning, which will improve the quality, comfort, and safety of homes for California citizens. The project goal is to lay the groundwork for a residential commissioning industry in California focused on end-use energy and non-energy issues. As such, we intend this guide to be a beginning and not an end. Our intent is that the guide will lead to the programmatic integration of commissioning with other building industry processes, which in turn will provide more value to a single site visit for people such as home energy auditors and raters, home inspectors, and building performance contractors. Project work to support the development of this guide includes: a literature review and annotated bibliography, which facilitates access to 469 documents related to residential commissioning published over the past 20 years (Wray et al. 2000), an analysis of the potential benefits one can realistically expect from commissioning new and existing California houses (Matson et al. 2002), and an assessment of 107 diagnostic tools for evaluating residential commissioning metrics (Wray et al. 2002). In this guide, we describe the issues that non-experts should consider in developing a commissioning program to achieve the benefits we have identified. We do this by providing specific recommendations about: how to structure the commissioning process, which diagnostics to use, and how to use them to commission new and existing houses. Using examples, we also demonstrate the potential benefits of applying the recommended whole-house commissioning approach to such houses.

  19. Optional Residential Program Benchmarking | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Optional Residential Program Benchmarking Optional Residential Program Benchmarking Better Buildings Residential Network Data and Evaluation Peer Exchange Call Series: Optional Residential Program Benchmarking, Call Slides and Discussion Summary, January 23, 2014. PDF icon Call Slides and Discussion Summary More Documents & Publications Guide to Benchmarking Residential Program Progress Webcast Slides Lessons Learned: Measuring Program Outcomes and Using Benchmarks Guide for Benchmarking

  20. Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration from the U.S. Department of Energy. PDF icon Solution Center Demo More Documents & Publications Building Science Solutions … Faster and Better Presentation: Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Presentation: Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center

  1. Better Buildings Residential | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Better Buildings Residential Better Buildings Residential Solution Center Shares Energy Efficiency Program Strategies Solution Center Shares Energy Efficiency Program Strategies Explore the Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center, a robust collection of nearly 1,000 examples, strategies, and resources for program administrators and home energy upgrade professionals. Read more Residential Network Connects More Than 240 Organizations Residential Network Connects More Than 240

  2. Energy Savings Potential and Opportunities for High-Efficiency Electric Motors in Residential and Commercial Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goetzler, William; Sutherland, Timothy; Reis, Callie

    2013-12-04

    This report describes the current state of motor technology and estimates opportunities for energy savings through application of more advanced technologies in a variety of residential and commercial end uses. The objectives of this report were to characterize the state and type of motor technologies used in residential and commercial appliances and equipment and to identify opportunities to reduce the energy consumption of electric motor-driven systems in the residential and commercial sectors through the use of advanced motor technologies. After analyzing the technical savings potential offered by motor upgrades and variable speed technologies, recommended actions are presented.

  3. Variable-Speed, Low-Cost Motor for Residential HVAC Systems | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Variable-Speed, Low-Cost Motor for Residential HVAC Systems Variable-Speed, Low-Cost Motor for Residential HVAC Systems Lower-Cost, Variable-Speed Electric Motor Improves Energy Efficiency In 2011, the U.S. industrial, commercial, and residential sectors consumed ~13.5 quad of electricity, of which an estimated 7.8 quad (58%) was consumed by applications using electric motors in machinery; process cooling; and refrigeration, space heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning. As energy

  4. State Air Emission Regulations That Affect Electric Power Producers (Update) (released in AEO2006)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01

    Several states have recently enacted air emission regulations that will affect the electricity generation sector. The regulations govern emissions of NOx, SO2, CO2, and mercury from power plants.

  5. National Residential Efficiency Measures Database

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Residential Efficiency Measures Database Development Document, v3.0 Final Draft, June 2012 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado i Executive Summary The National Residential Efficiency Measures Database is a publicly available, centralized resource of residential building retrofit measures and costs for the U.S. building industry. With support from the U.S. Department of Energy, NREL developed this tool to help users determine the most

  6. UES (Electric)- Residential Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    UniSource Energy Services (UES) offers rebates to its residential customers who have certain energy efficient equipment installed by participating contractors. The rebate is provided directly to...

  7. Cleco- Residential Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cleco energy efficiency program provides a number of incentives to its residential customers for energy efficiency upgrades. Rebates and cash incentives are available for qualifying Air...

  8. NREL: Buildings Research - Residential Capabilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a row of homes in the distance. The NREL Residential Buildings group is an innovative, multidisciplinary team focused on accelerating the adoption of cost-effective energy...

  9. Residential Clean Energy Grant Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Maryland's Residential Clean Energy Grant Program, administered by the Maryland Energy Administration (MEA), provides financial incentives to homeowners that install solar water-heating, solar...

  10. Pacific Power- Residential wattsmart Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pacific Power offers incentives for residential customers to improve the energy efficiency of homes through the Home Energy Savings Program. Full details are available on the program website.

  11. Financing Non-Residential Photovoltaic Projects: Options and Implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark

    2009-01-09

    Installations of grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems in the United States have increased dramatically in recent years, growing from less than 20 MW in 2000 to nearly 500 MW at the end of 2007, a compound average annual growth rate of 59%. Of particular note is the increasing contribution of 'non-residential' grid-connected PV systems--defined here as those systems installed on the customer (rather than utility) side of the meter at commercial, institutional, non-profit, or governmental properties--to the overall growth trend. Although there is some uncertainty in the numbers, non-residential PV capacity grew from less than half of aggregate annual capacity installations in 2000-2002 to nearly two-thirds in 2007. This relative growth trend is expected to have continued through 2008. The non-residential sector's commanding lead in terms of installed capacity in recent years primarily reflects two important differences between the non-residential and residential markets: (1) the greater federal 'Tax Benefits'--including the 30% investment tax credit (ITC) and accelerated tax depreciation--provided to commercial (relative to residential) PV systems, at least historically (this relative tax advantage has largely disappeared starting in 2009) and (2) larger non-residential project size. These two attributes have attracted to the market a number of institutional investors (referred to in this report as 'Tax Investors') seeking to invest in PV projects primarily to capture their Tax Benefits. The presence of these Tax Investors, in turn, has fostered a variety of innovative approaches to financing non-residential PV systems. This financial innovation--which is the topic of this report--has helped to overcome some of the largest barriers to the adoption of non-residential PV, and is therefore partly responsible (along with the policy changes that have driven this innovation) for the rapid growth in the market seen in recent years.ii Specifically, due to financial innovation, non-residential entities interested in PV no longer face prohibitively high up-front costs, no longer need to be able to absorb Tax Benefits in order to make the economics pencil out, no longer need to be able to operate and maintain the system, and no longer need to accept the risk that the system does not perform as expected.

  12. Better Buildings Residential Network | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Residential Buildings » Better Buildings Residential Network Better Buildings Residential Network Better Buildings Residential Network EXPLORE PEER EXCHANGE CALL LESSONS LEARNED To make collaboration with a utility easier, show how energy efficiency can solve a financial, public relations, or customer service problem for the utility. Read the "Collaborating With Utilities on Residential Energy Efficiency" Peer Exchange Call summary to learn more, and see other member tips. Residential

  13. Guide for Benchmarking Residential Program Progress with Examples

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Residential Network: Guide for Benchmarking Residential Program Progress with Examples.

  14. Making PACE Work for Residential (201) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Making PACE Work for Residential (201) Making PACE Work for Residential (201) February 25

  15. Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.1 Buildings Sector Water Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    1 Total Use of Water by Buildings (Million Gallons per Day) (1) Year 1985 1990 1995 2000 (2) 2005 (3) Note(s): Source(s): 1) Includes water from the public supply and self-supplied sources (e.g., wells) for residential and commercial sectors. 2) USGS did not estimate water use in the commercial and residential sectors for 2000. Estimates are based on available data and 1995 splits between domestic and commercial use. 3) USGS did not estimate commercial sector use for 2005. Estimated based on

  16. Residential propane prices available

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    propane prices available The average retail price for propane is $2.30 per gallon, based on the U.S. Energy Information Administration's weekly residential heating fuel survey. Propane prices in the Midwest region, which has the most households that use propane, averaged $1.89 a gallon. This is Marcela Rourk, with EIA, in Washington. The EIA has expanded its propane price survey to include 14 more states located mostly in the South and the West. The survey now looks at propane prices in 38

  17. Residential propane prices increase

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    propane prices increase The average retail price for propane rose 3.2 cents from a week ago to $2.86 per gallon. That's up 59.3 cents from a year ago, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged 2.40 a gallon, up 3.2 cents from last week, and up 65.8 cents from a year ago. This is Marcela Rourk, with EIA, in Washington.

  18. Residential propane prices increase

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    propane prices increase The average retail price for propane rose 10.3 cents from a week ago to $2.96 per gallon. That's up 68.1 cents from a year ago, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. This is the largest single week increase since the heating season started in October. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged 2.55 a gallon, up 14.9 cents from last week, and up 79.1 cents from a year ago. This is Marcela Rourk, with EIA, in

  19. Residential propane prices increase

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    propane prices increase The average retail price for propane rose 2.3 cents per gallon from last week to $2.57 per gallon; up 32.2 cents from a year ago, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. The retail price for propane in the Midwest region averaged 2.08 per gallon, up 2.4 cents per gallon from last week, and up 36.9 cents from a year earlier. This is Marlana Anderson, with EIA, in Washington.

  20. Residential propane prices surges

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    propane prices surges The average retail price for propane rose to an all-time high of $4.01 a gallon, that's up $1.05 from a week ago, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. This is the largest weekly increase since the survey began in 1990. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged 4.20 a gallon, up $1.66 from last week, and up $2.43 from a

  1. Residential propane prices surges

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Midwest and Northeast propane prices much higher this winter than last year Households that heat with propane will pay for that propane at prices averaging 39 percent higher in the Midwest and 14 percent higher in the Northeast this winter compared with last winter.....as much colder temperatures this winter boosts heating fuel demand. Midwest residential propane is expected to average $2.41 per gallon over the winter, while propane in the Northeast will average $3.43 per gallon, according to

  2. Residential Building Industry Consulting Services | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Residential Building Industry Consulting Services Jump to: navigation, search Name: Residential Building Industry Consulting Services Place: New York, NY Information About...

  3. Entergy Mississippi- Residential Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Entergy Mississippi offers residential energy efficiency programs to help residential customers save energy by providing rebates for lighting, heating and cooling equipment, A/C tune ups, and...

  4. Building America Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting: July 2010 Building America Residential Buildings ... More Documents & Publications Summary of Gaps and Barriers for Implementing Residential ...

  5. Better Buildings Residential Network Case Study: Partnerships...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Network Case Study: Partnerships Better Buildings Residential Network Case Study: Partnerships Better Buildings Residential Network Case Study: Partnerships, from the U.S. ...

  6. SMECO- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Southern Maryland Electric Cooperative's (SMECO) Residential Energy Efficiency Program helps residential customers save energy by providing rebates for home weatherization and the installation of...

  7. SRP- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    SRP's Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program is designed to encourage residential SRP customers to utilize energy efficient appliances and measures at home. See program web site for a...

  8. Residential Energy Services Network (RESNET) Conference | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Residential Energy Services Network (RESNET) Conference Residential Energy Services Network (RESNET) Conference February 29, 2016 9:00AM EST to March 2, 2016 5:0

  9. Guide for Benchmarking Residential Energy Efficiency Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Efficiency Program Progress Guide for Benchmarking Residential Energy Efficiency Program Progress Guide for Benchmarking Residential Energy Efficiency Program Progress as ...

  10. Better Buildings Residential Network | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and see other member tips. Residential Network Members Residential Resources Download the Social Media Toolkit. New Materials Download the November issue of the Better Buildings...

  11. Residential Solar Energy Property Tax Exemption | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Property Tax Exemption Residential Solar Energy Property Tax Exemption < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Solar Water Heat Solar Space Heat Solar Photovoltaics...

  12. Laboratory Performance Testing of Residential Window Mounted...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Laboratory Performance Testing of Residential Window Mounted Air Conditioners Laboratory Performance Testing of Residential Window Mounted Air Conditioners This presentation was...

  13. National Residential Efficiency Measures Database Webinar Slides...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Webinar Slides National Residential Efficiency Measures Database Webinar Slides Presentation slides for the Building Technologies Program Webinar on the National Residential...

  14. Steven Winter Associates (Consortium for Advanced Residential...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Steven Winter Associates (Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Steven Winter Associates (Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings)...

  15. El Paso Electric Company- Residential Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EPE offers incentives to residential customers in its New Mexico service territory that purchase and install high efficiency equipment for residential use. Some incentives, including insulation,...

  16. Better Buildings Residential Network Orientation Webinar | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    May 14, 2015. Call Slides and Discussion Summary More Documents & Publications Better Buildings Residential Network Orientation Webinar Better Buildings Residential Network...

  17. Better Buildings Residential Network Orientation | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Summary, March 27, 2014. Call Slides and Summary More Documents & Publications Better Buildings Residential Network Orientation Webinar Better Buildings Residential Network...

  18. Idaho Power- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Idaho Power offers a variety of incentives for residential customers in Idaho and Oregon. The Heating and Cooling Program offers incentives for residential customers who purchase and have...

  19. Better Buildings Residential Network | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Residential Network Members Residential Resources Download the Social Media Toolkit. New ... Successful Quality Assurance and Quality Control Programs (101) January 28, 2016 Einstein ...

  20. Sharyland Utilities- Residential Standard Offer Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sharyland Utilities offers the Residential and "Hard-to-Reach" Standard Offer Programs, which encourage residential customers to pursue energy saving measures and equipment upgrades in their homes....

  1. Nothing But Networking for Residential Network Members

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call: Nothing But Networking for Residential Network Members, Call Slides and Discussion Summary, March 12, 2015.

  2. Better Buildings Residential Network Lessons Learned

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 BETTER BUILDINGS RESIDENTIAL NETWORK Learn more at betterbuildings.energy.govbbrn MARKETING AND OUTREACH The Better Buildings Residential Network hosts a series of Peer Exchange ...

  3. National Residential Efficiency Measures Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The National Residential Efficiency Measures Database is a publicly available, centralized resource of residential building retrofit measures and costs for the U.S. building industry. With support from the U.S. Department of Energy, NREL developed this tool to help users determine the most cost-effective retrofit measures for improving energy efficiency of existing homes. Software developers who require residential retrofit performance and cost data for applications that evaluate residential efficiency measures are the primary audience for this database. In addition, home performance contractors and manufacturers of residential materials and equipment may find this information useful. The database offers the following types of retrofit measures: 1) Appliances, 2) Domestic Hot Water, 3) Enclosure, 4) Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning (HVAC), 5) Lighting, 6) Miscellaneous.

  4. Noble REMC- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Incentives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Through Wabash Valley Power Association, POWER MOVES program, Noble REMC offers residential rebates.

  5. Residential Water Heaters Webinar | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Residential Water Heaters Webinar Residential Water Heaters Webinar PDF icon 20110224_residential_water_heater_webinar.pdf More Documents & Publications Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - On-Demand Tankless Water Heaters 2014-10-14 Issuance: Test Procedures and Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Solar Water Heaters; Request for Information Webinar: ENERGY STAR Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes

  6. Better Buildings Residential Network Orientation Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Residential Network Orientation Webinar, call slides and discussion summary, September 11, 2014.

  7. Better Buildings Residential Network Orientation Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Residential Network Orientation Webinar, call slides and discussion summary, May 14, 2015.

  8. Economics of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles (released in AEO2009)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    Plug-In hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) have gained significant attention in recent years, as concerns about energy, environmental, and economic securityincluding rising gasoline prices have prompted efforts to improve vehicle fuel economy and reduce petroleum consumption in the transportation sector. PHEVs are particularly well suited to meet these objectives, because they have the potential to reduce petroleum consumption both through fuel economy gains and by substituting electric power for gasoline use.

  9. Residential Energy Efficiency Messaging | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Residential Energy Efficiency Messaging Residential Energy Efficiency Messaging Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Residential Energy Efficiency Messaging, call slides and discussion summary, April 9, 2015. PDF icon Call Slides and Discussion Summary More Documents & Publications Nothing But Networking for Residential Network Members Social Media and Messages that Matter - Top Tips and Tools Generating Energy Efficiency Project Leads and Allocating Leads to

  10. Modeling Distributed Electricity Generation in the NEMS Buildings Models

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the modeling methodology, projected market penetration, and impact of distributed generation with respect to offsetting future electricity needs and carbon dioxide emissions in the residential and commercial buildings sector in the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 (AEO2000) reference case.

  11. Identifying Cost-Effective Residential Energy Efficiency Opportunities for the Kauai Island Utility Cooperative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busche, S.; Hockett, S.

    2010-06-01

    This analysis is an update to the 2005 Energy Efficiency Potential Study completed by KEMA for the Kauai Island Utility Cooperative (KIUC) and identifies potential energy efficiency opportunities in the residential sector on Kauai (KEMA 2005). The Total Resource Cost (TRC) test is used to determine which of the energy efficiency measures analyzed in the KEMA report are cost effective for KIUC to include in a residential energy efficiency program. This report finds that there remains potential energy efficiency savings that could be cost-effectively incentivized through a utility residential demand-side management program on Kauai if implemented in such a way that the program costs per measure are consistent with the current residential program costs.

  12. Washington Gas- Residential Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Washington Gas as a part of the Maryland EmPOWER program offers incentives to its residential customer for making energy efficiency improvements. Rebates are available for qualifying water heaters,...

  13. Portland's Residential Solar Permitting Guide

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This program guide outlines the application and review procedures for obtaining the necessary permit(s) to install a solar energy system for a new or existing residential building. The guide also...

  14. Residential heating oil price decreases

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil fell 10.5 cents from a week ago to 2.93 per gallon, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the...

  15. Residential heating oil price increases

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5, 2015 Residential heating oil price increases The average retail price for home heating oil rose 14.7 cents from a week ago to 3.19 per gallon. That's down 1.06 from a year...

  16. Residential heating oil prices increase

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5, 2014 Residential heating oil prices increase The average retail price for home heating oil rose 6.5 cents from a week ago to 4.24 per gallon. That's up 14.9 cents from a year...

  17. Residential heating oil price increases

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9, 2015 Residential heating oil price increases The average retail price for home heating oil rose 11.7 cents from a week ago to 3.03 per gallon. That's down 1.20 from a year...

  18. Residential heating oil prices available

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    heating oil prices available The average retail price for home heating oil is 2.41 per gallon, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information...

  19. Residential heating oil price decreases

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7, 2014 Residential heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil fell 7.8 cents from a week ago to 3.14 per gallon. That's down 81.1 cents from a year...

  20. Residential heating oil price decreases

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6, 2014 Residential heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil rose 1.6 cents from a week ago to 4.24 per gallon. That's up 8.9 cents from a year...

  1. Residential heating oil prices increase

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3, 2014 Residential heating oil prices increase The average retail price for home heating oil rose 4.4 cents from a week ago to 4.06 per gallon. That's up 4.1 cents from a year...

  2. Residential heating oil prices decrease

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9, 2014 Residential heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil fell 2.9 cents from a week ago to 3.45 per gallon. That's down 36.6 cents from a year...

  3. Residential heating oil price decreases

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 Residential heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil fell 1.6 cents from a week ago to 3.42 per gallon. That's down 39.5 cents from a year ago,...

  4. Residential heating oil prices decline

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9, 2014 Residential heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil fell 3.3 cents from a week ago to 3.38 per gallon. That's down 43.9 cents from a year...

  5. Residential heating oil prices decrease

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5, 2014 Residential heating oil prices decrease The average retail price for home heating oil fell 1.8 cents from a week ago to 4.00 per gallon. That's down 2-tenths of a cent...

  6. Residential heating oil price decreases

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5, 2014 Residential heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil fell 1.9 cents from a week ago to 3.43 per gallon. That's down 39 cents from a year...

  7. Residential heating oil price decreases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Residential heating oil price increases The average retail price for home heating oil rose 1.1 cents from a week ago to $2.10 per gallon. That's down 94 cents from a year ago, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Heating oil prices in the New England region are at $2.04 per gallon, up 2.3 cents from last week, and down 95

  8. Residential heating oil price decreases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Residential heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil fell 9-tenths of a cent from a week ago to $2.09 per gallon. That's down $1.09 from a year ago, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Heating oil prices in the New England region are at $2.04 per gallon, down 1-tenth of a cent from last week, and down $1.11

  9. Residential heating oil price decreases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Residential heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil fell 5-tenths of a cent from a week ago to $2.09 per gallon. That's down $1.20 from a year ago, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Heating oil prices in the New England region are at $2.03 per gallon, down 9-tenths of a cent from last week, and down $1.22

  10. Residential heating oil price decreases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Residential heating oil price increases The average retail price for home heating oil rose 6-tenths of a cent from a week ago to $2.10 per gallon. That's down $1.11 from a year ago, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Heating oil prices in the New England region are at $2.04 per gallon, up 5-tenths of a cent from last week, and down $1.14

  11. Residential heating oil price decreases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Residential heating oil price increases The average retail price for home heating oil rose 2.6 cents from a week ago to $2.12 per gallon. That's down 91 cents from a year ago, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Heating oil prices in the New England region are at $2.06 per gallon, up 2.1 cents from last week, and down 94

  12. Residential propane price is unchanged

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    13, 2014 Residential propane price is unchanged The average retail price for propane is $2.40 per gallon, down one-tenth of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.94 per gallon, down 7-tenths of a cent from last week, and down 6

  13. Residential Dishwashers | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Dishwashers Residential Dishwashers The Department of Energy (DOE) develops standardized data templates for reporting the results of tests conducted in accordance with current DOE test procedures. Templates may be used by third-party laboratories under contract with DOE that conduct testing in support of ENERGY STAR® verification, DOE rulemakings, and enforcement of the federal energy conservation standards. File Residential Dishwashers -- v3.0 More Documents & Publications Dehumidifiers

  14. Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide This Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide focuses on the key elements and design...

  15. Focus Series: Maine - Residential Direct Install Program | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Maine - Residential Direct Install Program Focus Series: Maine - Residential Direct Install Program Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Focus Series: Maine - Residential Direct...

  16. About the Better Buildings Residential Network | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    About the Better Buildings Residential Network About the Better Buildings Residential Network The Better Buildings Residential Network connects energy efficiency programs and ...

  17. Nothing But Networking for Residential Network Members | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nothing But Networking for Residential Network Members Nothing But Networking for Residential Network Members Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call: Nothing But...

  18. Guide to Benchmarking Residential Program Progress Webcast Slides...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Guide to Benchmarking Residential Program Progress Webcast Slides Guide to Benchmarking Residential Program Progress Webcast Slides Slides from "Guide to Benchmarking Residential ...

  19. Guide for Benchmarking Residential Program Progress with Examples...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program Progress with Examples Guide for Benchmarking Residential Program Progress with Examples Better Buildings Residential Network: Guide for Benchmarking Residential Program ...

  20. Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Information Resources Publications Market Studies Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption The U.S. DOE Residential Lighting ...

  1. New York Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pages: Average Residential Price New York Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential and Commercial Consumers by Local Distribution and Market Average Residential...

  2. Staged Upgrades as a Strategy for Residential Energy Efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    as a Strategy for Residential Energy Efficiency Staged Upgrades as a Strategy for Residential Energy Efficiency Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series:...

  3. Residential and commercial buildings data book. Second edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crumb, L.W.; Bohn, A.A.

    1986-09-01

    This Data Book updates and expands the previous Data Book originally published by the Department of Energy in October, 1984 (DOE/RL/01830/16). Energy-related information is provided under the following headings: Characteristics of Residential Buildings in the US; Characteristics of New Single Family Construction in the US; Characteristics of New Multi-Family Construction in the US; Household Appliances; Residential Sector Energy Consumption, Prices, and Expenditures; Characteristics of US Commercial Buildings; Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption, Prices, and Expenditures; Additional Buildings and Community Systems Information. This Data Book complements another Department of Energy document entitled ''Overview of Building Energy Use and Report of Analysis-1985'' October, 1985 (DOE/CE-0140). The Data Book provides supporting data and documentation to the report.

  4. Residential and Transport Energy Use in India: Past Trend and Future Outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Letschert, Virginie; McNeil, Michael; Zhou, Nan; Sathaye, Jayant

    2009-03-31

    The main contribution of this report is to characterize the underlying residential and transport sector end use energy consumption in India. Each sector was analyzed in detail. End-use sector-level information regarding adoption of particular technologies was used as a key input in a bottom-up modeling approach. The report looks at energy used over the period 1990 to 2005 and develops a baseline scenario to 2020. Moreover, the intent of this report is also to highlight available sources of data in India for the residential and transport sectors. The analysis as performed in this way reveals several interesting features of energy use in India. In the residential sector, an analysis of patterns of energy use and particular end uses shows that biomass (wood), which has traditionally been the main source of primary energy used in households, will stabilize in absolute terms. Meanwhile, due to the forces of urbanization and increased use of commercial fuels, the relative significance of biomass will be greatly diminished by 2020. At the same time, per household residential electricity consumption will likely quadruple in the 20 years between 2000 and 2020. In fact, primary electricity use will increase more rapidly than any other major fuel -- even more than oil, in spite of the fact that transport is the most rapidly growing sector. The growth in electricity demand implies that chronic outages are to be expected unless drastic improvements are made both to the efficiency of the power infrastructure and to electric end uses and industrial processes. In the transport sector, the rapid growth in personal vehicle sales indicates strong energy growth in that area. Energy use by cars is expected to grow at an annual growth rate of 11percent, increasing demand for oil considerably. In addition, oil consumption used for freight transport will also continue to increase .

  5. Update on State Air Emission Regulations That Affect Electric Power Producers (released in AEO2005)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01

    Several states have recently enacted air emission regulations that will affect the electricity generation sector. The regulations are intended to improve air quality in the states and assist them in complying with the revised 1997 National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ground-level ozone and fine particulates. The affected states include Connecticut, Massachusetts, Maine, Missouri, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Texas, and Washington. The regulations govern emissions of NOx, SO2, CO2, and mercury from power plants.

  6. Residential Transactive Control Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widergren, Steven E.; Fuller, Jason C.; Marinovici, Maria C.; Somani, Abhishek

    2014-02-19

    Arguably the most exciting aspect of the smart grid vision is the full participation of end-use resources with all forms of generation and energy storage in the reliable and efficient operation of an electric power system. Engaging all of these resources in a collaborative manner that respects the objectives of each resource, is sensitive to the system and local constraints of electricity flow, and scales to the large number of devices and systems participating is a grand challenge. Distributed decision-making system approaches have been presented and experimentation is underway. This paper reports on the preliminary findings of a residential demand response demonstration that uses the bidding transactions of supply and end-use air conditioning resources communicating with a real-time, 5 minute market to balance the various needs of the participants on a distribution feeder. The nature of the demonstration, the value streams being explored, and the operational scenarios implemented to characterize the system response are summarized along with preliminary findings.

  7. Energy Simulator Residential Buildings

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-02-24

    SERI-RES performs thermal energy analysis of residential or small commercial buildings and has the capability of modeling passive solar equipment such as rock beds, trombe walls, and phase change material. The analysis is accomplished by simulation. A thermal model of the building is created by the user and translated into mathematical form by the program. The mathematical equations are solved repeatedly at time intervals of one hour or less for the period of simulation. Themore » mathematical representation of the building is a thermal network with nonlinear, temperature-dependent controls. A combination of forward finite differences, Jacobian iteration, and constrained optimization techniques is used to obtain a solution. An auxiliary interactive editing program, EDITOR, is included for creating building descriptions. EDITOR checks the validity of the input data and also provides facilities for storing and referencing several types of building description files. Some of the data files used by SERI-RES need to be implemented as direct-access files. Programs are included to convert sequential files to direct-access files and vice versa.« less

  8. Key Residential Building Equipment Technologies for Control and Grid Support PART I (Residential)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Starke, Michael R; Onar, Omer C; DeVault, Robert C

    2011-09-01

    Electrical energy consumption of the residential sector is a crucial area of research that has in the past primarily focused on increasing the efficiency of household devices such as water heaters, dishwashers, air conditioners, and clothes washer and dryer units. However, the focus of this research is shifting as objectives such as developing the smart grid and ensuring that the power system remains reliable come to the fore, along with the increasing need to reduce energy use and costs. Load research has started to focus on mechanisms to support the power system through demand reduction and/or reliability services. The power system relies on matching generation and load, and day-ahead and real-time energy markets capture most of this need. However, a separate set of grid services exist to address the discrepancies in load and generation arising from contingencies and operational mismatches, and to ensure that the transmission system is available for delivery of power from generation to load. Currently, these grid services are mostly provided by generation resources. The addition of renewable resources with their inherent variability can complicate the issue of power system reliability and lead to the increased need for grid services. Using load as a resource, through demand response programs, can fill the additional need for flexible resources and even reduce costly energy peaks. Loads have been shown to have response that is equal to or better than generation in some cases. Furthermore, price-incentivized demand response programs have been shown to reduce the peak energy requirements, thereby affecting the wholesale market efficiency and overall energy prices. The residential sector is not only the largest consumer of electrical energy in the United States, but also has the highest potential to provide demand reduction and power system support, as technological advancements in load control, sensor technologies, and communication are made. The prevailing loads based on the largest electrical energy consumers in the residential sector are space heating and cooling, washer and dryer, water heating, lighting, computers and electronics, dishwasher and range, and refrigeration. As the largest loads, these loads provide the highest potential for delivering demand response and reliability services. Many residential loads have inherent flexibility that is related to the purpose of the load. Depending on the load type, electric power consumption levels can either be ramped, changed in a step-change fashion, or completely removed. Loads with only on-off capability (such as clothes washers and dryers) provide less flexibility than resources that can be ramped or step-changed. Add-on devices may be able to provide extra demand response capabilities. Still, operating residential loads effectively requires awareness of the delicate balance of occupants health and comfort and electrical energy consumption. This report is Phase I of a series of reports aimed at identifying gaps in automated home energy management systems for incorporation of building appliances, vehicles, and renewable adoption into a smart grid, specifically with the intent of examining demand response and load factor control for power system support. The objective is to capture existing gaps in load control, energy management systems, and sensor technology with consideration of PHEV and renewable technologies to establish areas of research for the Department of Energy. In this report, (1) data is collected and examined from state of the art homes to characterize the primary residential loads as well as PHEVs and photovoltaic for potential adoption into energy management control strategies; and (2) demand response rules and requirements across the various demand response programs are examined for potential participation of residential loads. This report will be followed by a Phase II report aimed at identifying the current state of technology of energy management systems, sensors, and communication technologies for demand response and load factor control applications for the residential sector. The purpose is to cover the gaps that exist in the information captured by the sensors for energy management system to be able to provide demand response and load factor control. The vision is the development of an energy management system or other controlling enterprise hardware and software that is not only able to control loads, PHEVs, and renewable generation for demand response and load factor control, but also to do so with consumer comforts in mind and in an optimal fashion.

  9. RESIDENTIAL CLOTHES WASHERS (APPENDIX J2) | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    RESIDENTIAL CLOTHES WASHERS (APPENDIX J2) RESIDENTIAL CLOTHES WASHERS (APPENDIX J2) File Residential Clothes Washers Appendix J2 -- v2.1 More Documents & Publications Residential Clothes Washers (Appendix

  10. Number of Customers by State by Sector, 1990-2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Number of Customers by State by Sector, 1990-2014" "Year","State","Industry Sector Category","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation","Other","Total" 2014,"AK","Total Electric Industry",281438,51017,1287,0,"NA",333742 2014,"AL","Total Electric Industry",2169790,360901,7236,0,"NA",2537927 2014,"AR","Total Electric

  11. REFERENCE NO. OF DOCUMENT BEING CONTINUED AEO CONTINUATION SHEET DE-AC27-08RV14800/039 2AG O2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OTHER REFERENCE NO. OF DOCUMENT BEING CONTINUED AEO CONTINUATION SHEET DE-AC27-08RV14800/039 2AG O2 NAME OF OFFEROR OR CONTRACTOR WASHINGTON RIVER PROTECTION SOLUTIONS LLC QATT I NTPIEAON ITEM NO. SUPPLIESISERVICESQUNIYNT UITPCEAOT (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) (F) Fund 01050 Appr Year 2010 Allottee 34 Reporting Entity 421301 Amount: $43,752,060.00 Account code: P&B Rocky Flats Post Retirement Benefits Fund 01050 Appr Year 2010 Allottee 34 Reporting Entity 421301 Amount: $51,480,000.00 Account,_code:

  12. Shark Tank: Residential Energy Efficiency Edition – Episode #2 (301)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Shark Tank: Residential Energy Efficiency Edition, December 3, 2015.

  13. What's Working in Residential Energy Efficiency Upgrade Programs...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Working in Residential Energy Efficiency Upgrade Programs - Promising Approaches and Lessons Learned What's Working in Residential Energy Efficiency Upgrade Programs -...

  14. Better Buildings Residential Network Reporting and Benefits Template

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Residential Network Reporting and Benefits Template, from the U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Residential Network.

  15. Better Buildings Residential Network Reporting and Benefits FAQ

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Residential Network Reporting and Benefits FAQ, from the U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Residential Network.

  16. Fact #561: March 9, 2009 All Sectors' Petroleum Gap | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1: March 9, 2009 All Sectors' Petroleum Gap Fact #561: March 9, 2009 All Sectors' Petroleum Gap Before 1989 the U.S. produced enough petroleum to meet the needs of the transportation sector, but was still short of meeting the petroleum needs of all the sectors, including industrial, residential and commercial, and electric utilities. In 1973 the gap between what the U.S. produced and what was consumed was 5.6 million barrels per day. By 2030, the gap is expected to be at least 9.2 million

  17. Fact #610: February 15, 2010 All Sectors' Petroleum Gap | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 10: February 15, 2010 All Sectors' Petroleum Gap Fact #610: February 15, 2010 All Sectors' Petroleum Gap Before 1989 the U.S. produced enough petroleum to meet the needs of the transportation sector, but was still short of meeting the petroleum needs of all the sectors, including industrial, residential and commercial, and electric utilities. In 1973 the gap between what the U.S. produced and what was consumed was 5.6 million barrels per day. By 2035, the gap is expected to be at

  18. Fact #688: August 15, 2011 All Sectors' Petroleum Gap | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 688: August 15, 2011 All Sectors' Petroleum Gap Fact #688: August 15, 2011 All Sectors' Petroleum Gap Before 1989 the U.S. produced enough petroleum to meet the needs of the transportation sector, but was still short of meeting the petroleum needs of all the sectors, including industrial, residential and commercial, and electric utilities. In 1973 the gap between what the U.S. produced and what was consumed was 5.6 million barrels per day. By 2035, the gap is expected to be at least

  19. Piedmont Natural Gas- Residential Equipment Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Piedmont Natural Gas offers rebates on high-efficiency natural gas tankless water heaters, tank water heaters and furnaces. Customers on the 201-Residential Service Rate or 221-Residential Service...

  20. Edmond Electric- Residential Heat Pump Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Edmond Electric offers rebates to residential customers who install energy-efficient heat pumps. This program applies to installations in both new and existing residential homes and complexes. Air...

  1. Low-rise Residential New Construction Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

     NYSERDA’s Low-rise Residential New Construction Programs are designed to encourage more industry involvement in the building of single-family homes and low-rise residential units that are more...

  2. Unitil (Gas)- Residential Energy Efficiency Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Until also offers rebates for residential new construction through the Natural Gas Energy Star Homes/Residential New Construction Program. To receive rebates, new homes must meet certain energy...

  3. Residential Renewable Energy Income Tax Credit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The credit is available to any owner or tenant of residential property. For a newly constructed home, the credit is available to the original owner/occupant. Joint owners of a residential property...

  4. Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide. PDF icon Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide More Documents & Publications residential_retrofit_program_design_guide.pdf Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide Home Performance with ENERGY STAR -- 10 Years of Continued Growth!

  5. residential_retrofit_program_design_guide.pdf | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    residential_retrofit_program_design_guide.pdf residential_retrofit_program_design_guide.pdf residential_retrofit_program_design_guide.pdf PDF icon residential_retrofit_program_design_guide.pdf More Documents & Publications Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide Home Performance with ENERGY STAR -- 10 Years of Continued Growth!

  6. Peer Exchange Call Series: Guide for Benchmarking Residential Program

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Progress with Examples | Department of Energy Peer Exchange Call Series: Guide for Benchmarking Residential Program Progress with Examples Peer Exchange Call Series: Guide for Benchmarking Residential Program Progress with Examples Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Guide for Benchmarking Residential Program Progress with Examples. PDF icon Guide for Benchmarking Residential Program Progress with Examples More Documents & Publications Optional Residential

  7. Fact Sheet: Better Buildings Residential Network | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Fact Sheet: Better Buildings Residential Network Fact Sheet: Better Buildings Residential Network Fact Sheet: Better Buildings Residential Network, increasing the number of American Homes that are energy efficient. PDF icon BBRN Fact Sheet More Documents & Publications Fact Sheet - Better Buildings Residential Membership Criteria: Better Buildings Residential Network Better Buildings Residential Network Orientation

  8. Guide for Benchmarking Residential Energy Efficiency Program Progress |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy for Benchmarking Residential Energy Efficiency Program Progress Guide for Benchmarking Residential Energy Efficiency Program Progress Guide for Benchmarking Residential Energy Efficiency Program Progress as part of the DOE Better Buildings Program. PDF icon Guide for Benchmarking Residential Energy Efficiency Program Progress More Documents & Publications Optional Residential Program Benchmarking Guide to Benchmarking Residential Program Progress Webcast Slides

  9. Energy Efficiency Program for Residential Products: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Dishwashers, Reopening of the Comment Period

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Efficiency Program for Residential Products: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Dishwashers, Reopening of the Comment Period

  10. Gas Technology Institute (Partnership for Advanced Residential...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technology Institute (Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Gas Technology Institute Place: Des Plaines, IL Website:...

  11. Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting - Spring 2012 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Residential Buildings » Building America » Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting - Spring 2012 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting - Spring 2012 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building America program held the second annual Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting on February 29-March 2, 2012, in Austin, Texas. At this meeting, hundreds of building industry professionals came together to share their perspective on the most

  12. Shark Tank: Residential Energy Efficiency Edition

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Peer Exchange Call Series: Shark Tank: Residential Energy Efficiency Edition Call Slides and Discussion Summary June 11, 2015 Agenda  Introduction and Better Buildings Residential Network Overview  Call Format  Get to Know the Sharks  Kerry O'Neill, Managing Director, Residential Programs, CT Green Bank (formerly with Connecticut Neighbor to Neighbor Energy Challenge)  Dana Fischer, Residential Program Manager, Efficiency Maine  Denee Evans, CEO, Council of Multiple Listing

  13. Distillate Fuel Oil Sales for Residential Use

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    End Use/ Product: Residential - Distillate Fuel Oil Residential - No. 1 Residential - No. 2 Residential - Kerosene Commercial - Distillate Fuel Oil Commercial - No. 1 Distillate Commercial - No. 2 Distillate Commercial - No. 2 Fuel Oil Commercial - Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel Commercial - Low Sulfur Diesel Commercial - High Sulfur Diesel Commercial - No. 4 Fuel Oil Commercial - Residual Fuel Oil Commercial - Kerosene Industrial - Distillate Fuel Oil Industrial - No. 1 Distillate Industrial - No. 2

  14. Designing Incentives Toolkit Better Buildings Residential Network

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Designing Incentives Toolkit BETTER BUILDINGS RESIDENTIAL NETWORK Learn more at betterbuildings.energy.gov/bbrn T his Better Buildings Residential Network toolkit addresses the challenges and opportunities of using incentives to increase the volume of home energy upgrades. The topic was chosen as a priority by Residential Network members, who also served on a working group that reviewed this toolkit. Residential energy efficiency programs offer incentives as a way to encourage action from

  15. National Residential Efficiency Measures Database Webinar Slides |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Residential Efficiency Measures Database Webinar Slides National Residential Efficiency Measures Database Webinar Slides Presentation slides for the Building Technologies Program Webinar on the National Residential Efficiency Measures Database on January 18, 2011. PDF icon webinar_residential_efficiencydb_20110118.pdf More Documents & Publications tap_webinar_20100324_openpv_quniby.pdf Solar Energy - Capturing and Using Power and Heat from the Sun Building America

  16. Better Buildings Residential Network Social Media Toolkit

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Social Media Toolkit BETTER BUILDINGS RESIDENTIAL NETWORK Learn more at betterbuildings.energy.gov/bbrn 1 T his Better Buildings Residential Network toolkit can be used to help residential energy efficiency programs learn to engage potential customers through social media. Social media can build brand awareness concerning home energy upgrades and the entities working on them, which can lead to more energy upgrade projects taking place in the long run. Residential Network members provided input

  17. Presentation: Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation: Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center, from the U.S. Department of Energy, Better Buildings Neighborhood Program.

  18. Residential heating oil prices increase

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4, 2013 Residential heating oil prices increase The average retail price for home heating oil rose 2.9 cents from last week to $3.92 per gallon. That's down 11 cents from a year ago, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. The price for heating oil in the New England region averaged 3.87 per gallon, up 2.5 cents from last week, but down 7.1 cents from a year earlier. This is Marlana Anderson

  19. Public goods and private interests: Understanding non-residential demand for green power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, Ryan H.; Fowlie, Meredith; Holt, Edward A.

    2001-01-01

    This article presents the results of the first large-scale mail survey of non-residential green power customers in the United States. The survey explored the motivations, attitudes, and experiences of 464 business, non-profit, and public-sector customers that have voluntarily opted to purchase - and frequently pay a premium for - renewable electricity. Results of this study should be of value to marketers interested in targeting these customer segments, to policy makers interested in fostering and understanding non-residential demand for green power, and to academics pondering the motivations for firms to engage in such voluntary environmental initiatives.

  20. Residential Solar Valuation Rates | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Residential Solar Valuation Rates Residential Solar Valuation Rates This presentation summarizes the information discussed by Rabago Energy during the Best Practices in the Design of Utility Solar Programs Webinar on Sept. 27, 2012. PDF icon utility_design_rabago_energy.pdf More Documents & Publications Austin Energy's Residential Solar Rate QER - Comment of Energy Innovation 1 QER - Comment of Energy Innovation 8

  1. Commercial Sector Demand Module

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    the State Energy Data System (SEDS) historical commercial sector consumption, applying an additive correction term to ensure that simulated model results correspond to published...

  2. Residential propane price decreases slightly

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    propane price decreases slightly The average retail price for propane is $2.38 per gallon, down 3-tenths of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.93 per gallon, down one cent from last week, and down 35.5

  3. Sales to Ultimate Customers (Megawatthours) by State by Sector by Provider, 1990

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Sales to Ultimate Customers (Megawatthours) by State by Sector by Provider, 1990-2014" "Year","State","Industry Sector Category","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation","Other","Total" 2014,"AK","Total Electric Industry",2043614,2761518,1359680,0,"NA",6164812 2014,"AL","Total Electric

  4. Impact of Rate Design Alternatives on Residential Solar Customer Bills. Increased Fixed Charges, Minimum Bills and Demand-based Rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, Lori; Davidson, Carolyn; McLaren, Joyce; Miller, John

    2015-09-01

    With rapid growth in energy efficiency and distributed generation, electric utilities are anticipating stagnant or decreasing electricity sales, particularly in the residential sector. Utilities are increasingly considering alternative rates structures that are designed to recover fixed costs from residential solar photovoltaic (PV) customers with low net electricity consumption. Proposed structures have included fixed charge increases, minimum bills, and increasingly, demand rates - for net metered customers and all customers. This study examines the electricity bill implications of various residential rate alternatives for multiple locations within the United States. For the locations analyzed, the results suggest that residential PV customers offset, on average, between 60% and 99% of their annual load. However, roughly 65% of a typical customer's electricity demand is non-coincidental with PV generation, so the typical PV customer is generally highly reliant on the grid for pooling services.

  5. Residential applliance data, assumptions and methodology for end-use forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, R.J,; Johnson, F.X.; Brown, R.E.; Hanford, J.W.; Kommey, J.G.

    1994-05-01

    This report details the data, assumptions and methodology for end-use forecasting of appliance energy use in the US residential sector. Our analysis uses the modeling framework provided by the Appliance Model in the Residential End-Use Energy Planning System (REEPS), which was developed by the Electric Power Research Institute. In this modeling framework, appliances include essentially all residential end-uses other than space conditioning end-uses. We have defined a distinct appliance model for each end-use based on a common modeling framework provided in the REEPS software. This report details our development of the following appliance models: refrigerator, freezer, dryer, water heater, clothes washer, dishwasher, lighting, cooking and miscellaneous. Taken together, appliances account for approximately 70% of electricity consumption and 30% of natural gas consumption in the US residential sector. Appliances are thus important to those residential sector policies or programs aimed at improving the efficiency of electricity and natural gas consumption. This report is primarily methodological in nature, taking the reader through the entire process of developing the baseline for residential appliance end-uses. Analysis steps documented in this report include: gathering technology and market data for each appliance end-use and specific technologies within those end-uses, developing cost data for the various technologies, and specifying decision models to forecast future purchase decisions by households. Our implementation of the REEPS 2.1 modeling framework draws on the extensive technology, cost and market data assembled by LBL for the purpose of analyzing federal energy conservation standards. The resulting residential appliance forecasting model offers a flexible and accurate tool for analyzing the effect of policies at the national level.

  6. U.S. Building-Sector Energy Efficiency Potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Rich; Borgeson, Sam; Koomey, Jon; Biermayer, Peter

    2008-09-30

    This paper presents an estimate of the potential for energy efficiency improvements in the U.S. building sector by 2030. The analysis uses the Energy Information Administration's AEO 2007 Reference Case as a business-as-usual (BAU) scenario, and applies percentage savings estimates by end use drawn from several prior efficiency potential studies. These prior studies include the U.S. Department of Energy's Scenarios for a Clean Energy Future (CEF) study and a recent study of natural gas savings potential in New York state. For a few end uses for which savings estimates are not readily available, the LBNL study team compiled technical data to estimate savings percentages and costs of conserved energy. The analysis shows that for electricity use in buildings, approximately one-third of the BAU consumption can be saved at a cost of conserved energy of 2.7 cents/kWh (all values in 2007 dollars), while for natural gas approximately the same percentage savings is possible at a cost of between 2.5 and 6.9 $/million Btu. This cost-effective level of savings results in national annual energy bill savings in 2030 of nearly $170 billion. To achieve these savings, the cumulative capital investment needed between 2010 and 2030 is about $440 billion, which translates to a 2-1/2 year simple payback period, or savings over the life of the measures that are nearly 3.5 times larger than the investment required (i.e., a benefit-cost ratio of 3.5).

  7. Residential Conservation Service: a retrospective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Praul, C.G.; Gunther, A.; Maier, G.

    1981-08-01

    A background of the Residential Conservation Service (RCS) program is presented and outstanding program design issues which include effectiveness, audit effectiveness, equity concerns, anticompetitive and antitrust considerations, and general concerns in state plan development are discussed. The purpose of the review is to provide background information to legislators and other decision makers who, though not immediately involved in program administration, will be evaluating the mandate and implementation progress over the next year. (MCW)

  8. Residential heating oil price decreases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    heating oil price increases The average retail price for home heating oil rose 1 cent from a week ago to $2.09 per gallon. That's down 82 cents from a year ago, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Heating oil prices in the New England region are at $2.02 per gallon, up 8-tenths of a cent from last week, and down 85

  9. Residential heating oil prices decline

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    propane price increase slightly The average retail price for propane is $2.41 per gallon, up 1-tenth of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.95 per gallon, up 5-tenths of a cent from last week, and down 10.4

  10. Residential heating oil prices increase

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    heating oil prices increase The average retail price for home heating oil rose 3.9 cents last week to $3.96 per gallon. That's down 2.6 cents from a year ago, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. The price for heating oil in the New England region averaged 3.92 per gallon, up 5.2 cents from last week, and 1.7

  11. Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technical Assistance Program Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide May 2011 This work has been performed by the Vermont Energy Investment Corporation (VEIC) and Energy Futures Group (EFG), under the Contract No. 4200000341 with Oak Ridge National Laboratory which is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC under Contract with the US Department of Energy No. DE-AC05-00OR22725. This document was prepared in collaboration with a partnership of companies under this contract. The partnership is led by the

  12. 120 years of U.S. residential housing stock and floor space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moura, Maria Cecilia P.; Smith, Steven J.; Belzer, David B.; Zhou, Wei -Xing

    2015-08-11

    Residential buildings are a key driver of energy consumption and also impact transportation and land-use. Energy consumption in the residential sector accounts for one-fifth of total U.S. energy consumption and energy-related CO₂ emissions, with floor space a major driver of building energy demands. In this work a consistent, vintage-disaggregated, annual long-term series of U.S. housing stock and residential floor space for 1891–2010 is presented. An attempt was made to minimize the effects of the incompleteness and inconsistencies present in the national housing survey data. Over the 1891–2010 period, floor space increased almost tenfold, from approximately 24,700 to 235,150 million square feet, corresponding to a doubling of floor space per capita from approximately 400 to 800 square feet. While population increased five times over the period, a 50% decrease in household size contributed towards a tenfold increase in the number of housing units and floor space, while average floor space per unit remains surprisingly constant, as a result of housing retirement dynamics. In the last 30 years, however, these trends appear to be changing, as household size shows signs of leveling off, or even increasing again, while average floor space per unit has been increasing. GDP and total floor space show a remarkably constant growth trend over the period and total residential sector primary energy consumption and floor space show a similar growth trend over the last 60 years, decoupling only within the last decade.

  13. 120 Years of U.S. Residential Housing Stock and Floor Space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinto de Moura, Maria C.; Smith, Steven J.; Belzer, David B.

    2015-08-11

    Energy consumption in the residential sector accounts for one-fifth of total U.S. energy consumption and energy-related CO2 emissions. Floor space is a major driver of building energy demand. This paper develops a historical time series of total residential floor space for 1891-2010 and examines the role of socio-economic drivers GDP, population and household size on floor space. Using primarily data from the U.S. Census Bureau, we develop new construction and vintage-disaggregated housing stock for three building types, and address various data inconsistency issues. An examination of the long-term relationship of GDP and total residential floor space shows a remarkably constant trend over the period. While population increases five times over the period, a 50% decrease in household size contributes towards a tenfold increase in the number of housing units and floor space, while average floor space per unit remains surprisingly constant, as a result of housing retirement dynamics. In the last 30 years, however, these trends appear to be changing, as household size shows signs of leveling off, or even increasing again, while average floor space per unit has been increasing. Total residential sector primary energy consumption and floor space show a similar growth trend over the last 60 years.

  14. Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards"Top-Runner Approach"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lacommare, Kristina S H; Komiyama, Ryoichi; Marnay, Chris

    2008-05-15

    As one of the measures to achieve the reduction in greenhouse gas emissions agreed to in the"Kyoto Protocol," an institutional scheme for determining energy efficiency standards for energy-consuming appliances, called the"Top-Runner Approach," was developed by the Japanese government. Its goal is to strengthen the legal underpinnings of various energy conservation measures. Particularly in Japan's residential sector, where energy demand has grown vigorously so far, this efficiency standard is expected to play a key role in mitigating both energy demand growth and the associated CO2 emissions. This paper presents an outlook of Japan's residential energy demand, developed by a stochastic econometric model for the purpose of analyzing the impacts of the Japan's energy efficiency standards, as well as the future stochastic behavior of income growth, demography, energy prices, and climate on the future energy demand growth to 2030. In this analysis, we attempt to explicitly take into consideration more than 30 kinds of electricity uses, heating, cooling and hot water appliances in order to comprehensively capture the progress of energy efficiency in residential energy end-use equipment. Since electricity demand, is projected to exhibit astonishing growth in Japan's residential sector due to universal increasing ownership of electric and other appliances, it is important to implement an elaborate efficiency standards policy for these appliances.

  15. Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide Overview Transcript.doc |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide Overview Transcript.doc Microsoft Office document icon Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide Overview Transcript.doc More Documents & Publications Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide Overview Transcript.doc Residential Retrofit Design Guide Overview Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Webinar on Residential Geothermal Heat Pump Retrofit Transcript

  16. Better Buildings Residential Network Membership Form | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Network Membership Form Better Buildings Residential Network Membership Form Membership form from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network. File BBRN Membership Form More Documents & Publications Better Buildings Residential Network Orientation Fact Sheet: Better Buildings Residential Network Membership Criteria: Better Buildings Residential Network

  17. Building America Webinar: National Residential Efficiency Measures Database

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Unveiled | Department of Energy National Residential Efficiency Measures Database Unveiled Building America Webinar: National Residential Efficiency Measures Database Unveiled This webinar presented an overview of this database of residential building retrofit measures and associated estimated costs, and progress to date. File webinar_residential_efficiencydb_20110118.wmv More Documents & Publications National Residential Efficiency Measures Database Webinar Slides Building America

  18. Chemical Sector Analysis | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NISACChemical Sector Analysis content top Chemical Supply Chain Analysis Posted by Admin on Mar 1, 2012 in | Comments 0 comments Chemical Supply Chain Analysis NISAC has developed a range of capabilities for analyzing the consequences of disruptions to the chemical manufacturing industry. Each capability provides a different but complementary perspective on the questions of interest-questions like Given an event, will the entire chemical sector be impacted or just parts? Which chemicals, plants,

  19. Residential energy use and conservation in Venezuela: Results and implications of a household survey in Caracas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Figueroa, M.J.; Ketoff, A.; Masera, O.

    1992-10-01

    This document presents the final report of a study of residential energy use in Caracas, the capital of Venezuela. It contains the findings of a household energy-use survey held in Caracas in 1988 and examines options for introducing energy conservation measures in the Venezuelan residential sector. Oil exports form the backbone of the Venezuelan economy. Improving energy efficiency in Venezuela will help free domestic oil resources that can be sold to the rest of the world. Energy conservation will also contribute to a faster recovery of the economy by reducing the need for major investments in new energy facilities, allowing the Venezuelan government to direct its financial investments towards other areas of development. Local environmental benefits will constitute an important additional by-product of implementing energy-efficiency policies in Venezuela. Caracas`s residential sector shows great potential for energy conservation. The sector is characterized by high saturation levels of major appliances, inefficiency of appliances available in the market, and by careless patterns of energy use. Household energy use per capita average 6.5 GJ/per year which is higher than most cities in developing countries; most of this energy is used for cooking. Electricity accounts for 41% of all energy use, while LPG and natural gas constitute the remainder. Specific options for inducing energy conservation and energy efficiency in Caracas`s residential sector include energy-pricing policies, fuel switching, particularly from electricity to gas, improving the energy performance of new appliances and customer information. To ensure the accomplishment of an energy-efficiency strategy, a concerted effort by energy users, manufacturers, utility companies, government agencies, and research institutions will be needed.

  20. Evaluation of evolving residential electricity tariffs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai, Judy; DeForest, Nicholas; Kiliccote, Sila; Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Donadee, Jon

    2011-05-15

    Residential customers in California's Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) territory have seen several electricity rate structure changes in the past decade. This poster: examines the history of the residential pricing structure and key milestones; summarizes and analyzes the usage between 2006 and 2009 for different baseline/climate areas; discusses the residential electricity Smart Meter roll out; and compares sample bills for customers in two climates under the current pricing structure and also the future time of use (TOU) structure.

  1. NREL: National Residential Efficiency Measures Database - Application

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Developer Tools Application Developer Tools Here you will find tools intended to help software application developers access the data in the National Residential Efficiency Measures Database. This database of retrofit measures and associated costs can be used by software applications that evaluate residential efficiency measures. Read more about the database and information about the cost data. Developer Tools Change log-View a list of changes to the National Residential Efficiency Measures

  2. Energy Intensity Indicators: Residential Source Energy Consumption |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Residential Source Energy Consumption Energy Intensity Indicators: Residential Source Energy Consumption Figure R1 below reports as index numbers over the period 1970 through 2011: 1) the number of U.S. households, 2) the average size of those housing units, 3) residential source energy consumption, 4) energy intensity, and 5) an overall structural component that represents "other explanatory factors." Activity: Since 1970, the number of household (occupied

  3. Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Webinar Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration Amanda Chiu: My name is Amanda Chiu, and I'm with Energetics, Incorporated, on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Better Buildings Residential Program. Thank you for joining us today, and welcome to a demonstration of the Better Buildings Residential Program's Solution Center. We have with us today Danielle Byrnett with the U.S. Department of Energy. Danielle is the supervisor for the Better Buildings

  4. Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Partnership for Improved Residential Construction Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction In addition to occupied test homes, research will be conducted in highly instrumented laboratories with simulated occupancy. Shown here are the two identical, side-by-side test homes that comprise FSEC's Flexible Residential Test Facility. Photo courtesy of Florida Solar Energy Center. In addition to occupied test homes, research will be conducted in

  5. Stochastic Optimal Scheduling of Residential Appliances with...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Return to Search Stochastic Optimal Scheduling of Residential Appliances with Renewable Energy Sources National Renewable Energy Laboratory Contact NREL About This Technology ...

  6. Florida Public Utilities- Residential HVAC Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Florida Public Utilities offers rebates to electric residential customers who improve the efficiency of homes. Central air conditioners and heat pumps which meet program requirements are eligible...

  7. Mass Save (Electric)- Residential Energy Efficiency Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mass Save organizes residential energy conservation services for programs administered by Massachusetts electric companies, gas companies, and municipal aggregators. Rebates for various energy...

  8. Mass Save (Gas)- Residential Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mass Save, through Gas Networks, organizes residential conservation services for programs administered by Massachusetts gas companies. These gas providers include Columbia Gas of Massachusetts,...

  9. Duke Energy - Residential Efficiency Rebate Program | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Pool Pumps: 300 HVACs: up to 200 Ductwork: 175 Attic Insulation: 250 Summary The Smart aver program offers incentives for residential customers to increase the energy...

  10. Chelan County PUD- Residential Weatherization Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Chelan County PUD offers cash rebates to residential customers who make energy efficient weatherization improvements to eligible homes. Eligible measures include efficient windows doors as well as...

  11. TEP- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tucson Electric Power (TEP) offers rebates to its residential customers who have certain energy efficient equipment installed by participating contractors. The rebate is provided directly to the...

  12. EWEB- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Eugene Water and Electric Board (EWEB) provides cash incentives to help residential customers increase the energy efficiency of homes through several different rebate programs. Rebates are provided...

  13. Midstate Electric Cooperative- Residential Conservation Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Midstate Electric Cooperative offers its residential customers a variety of cash rebates for energy efficient improvements and new energy efficient homes. Rebates are awarded for the installation...

  14. Questar Gas- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Questar Gas provides rebates for residential customers who make their homes more energy efficient by installing certain energy saving appliances, efficient heating equipment, and certain...

  15. Empire District Electric- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Empire District Electric Company offers rebates for customers who construct highly efficient homes and purchase efficient central air conditioners. Eligible customers include residential...

  16. MassSAVE (Gas)- Residential Rebate Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    MassSAVE, through Gas Networks, organizes residential conservation services for programs administered by Massachusetts electric companies, gas companies and municipal aggregators. These utilities...

  17. Lane Electric Cooperative - Residential and Commercial Weatherization...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Washer: 75 Solar Water Heater: 500 Summary Lane Electric Cooperative offers energy efficient Weatherization Grant Programs to Lane Electric residential and commercial members: a...

  18. Austin Energy- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Austin Energy offers incentives to its residential customers to encourage the use of energy efficient equipment and measures. Rebates are available for qualified HVAC equipment and weatherization...

  19. Selecting Solar: Insights into Residential Photovoltaic (PV)...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Selecting Solar: Insights into Residential Photovoltaic (PV) Quote Variation Carolyn Davidson and Robert Margolis National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL...

  20. Charlottesville Gas- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Charlottesville Gas offers rebates to residential customers for purchasing and installing specified energy efficient equipment. Rebates and utility bill credits of up to $100 are available for...

  1. Clallam County PUD- Residential Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Clallam County PUD offers a variety of rebates for residential customers for energy efficiency improvements. Eligible measures and incentives include window upgrades, insulation, air and duct...

  2. Better Buildings Residential Network Program Sustainability Series...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Residential Energy Efficiency Featuring Host: Rich Dooley, Arlington County, VA Call ... Moderator: Jonathan Cohen, DOE Host: Rich Dooley, Arlington County, VA ...

  3. Oklahoma Natural Gas - Residential Efficiency Rebates | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    250 Clothes Dryer: up to 500 Summary To encourage customers to install high-efficiency natural gas equipment in homes, Oklahoma Natural Gas offers rebates to residential...

  4. Sawnee EMC- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sawnee EMC provides a variety of rebates for residential customers building new energy efficient homes or making energy efficiency improvements to existing homes.

  5. SCE- Non-Residential Energy Efficiency Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Southern California Edison (SCE) offers incentives for non-residential customers, regardless of size and energy usage. Express Efficiency rebates for lighting, refrigeration, food service,...

  6. (Electric and Gas) Residential New Construction Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energize CT offers a program designed to encourage the construction of energy efficient homes. The Residential New Construction Program offers incentives targeted at increasing energy...

  7. Meade County RECC- Residential Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Meade County RECC offers rebates to residential members who install energy-efficient systems and equipment. New homebuilders can also access rebates for installing energy-efficient equipment...

  8. PSNH - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    collaboration with nhsaves, provides incentives for residential customers to increase the energy efficiency of participating homes. Prescriptive rebates are available for the...

  9. Xcel Energy (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Residential Savings Category Geothermal Heat Pumps RefrigeratorsFreezers Lighting Lighting ControlsSensors Furnaces Heat Pumps Air conditioners Programmable Thermostats DuctAir...

  10. SMUD- Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sacramento Municipal Utility District offers financing to help residential customers finance energy efficient home improvements. Applicant for a loan must be the vested owner of the property where...

  11. Minnesota Power - Residential New Construction Rebate Program...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Construction Residential Savings Category Solar Photovoltaics Geothermal Heat Pumps Clothes Washers RefrigeratorsFreezers Dehumidifiers Water Heaters Heat Pumps Air conditioners...

  12. Consumers Energy (Gas)- Residential Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Residential Income Qualified Energy Efficiency Program is working with existing Michigan Weatherization Assistance Program delivery to support weatherization providers with more funding for...

  13. Consumers Energy (Electric)- Residential Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Residential Income Qualified Energy Efficiency Program is working with existing Michigan Weatherization Assistance Program delivery to support weatherization providers with more funding for...

  14. Arkansas Oklahoma Gas (AOG) Residential Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Arkansas Oklahoma Gas (AOG) provides financial incentives to its residential and small commercial customers for both existing and new construction homes and small business whose primary fuel for...

  15. Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transcript The Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center is a robust online collection of nearly 1,000 examples, strategies, and resources from Better Buildings...

  16. Emerald PUD- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Emerald People's Utility District (EPUD) offers several incentives for its residential customers to increase the energy efficiency of homes. Emerald PUD offers rebates for ENERGY STAR rated...

  17. Entergy New Orleans- Residential Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Program provides ENO residential customers with home energy assessments, recommendations for energy savings and incentives towards the cost of those upgrades...

  18. Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholders Meeting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stakeholders Meeting: March 2011 Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholders Meeting: March 2011 On this page, you may link to the summary report and presentations ...

  19. Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Technical Update...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technical Update Meeting: August 2011 Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Technical Update Meeting: August 2011 On this page, you may link to the summary report and ...

  20. Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Research Planning...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Research Planning Meeting: October 2011 Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Research Planning Meeting: October 2011 On this page, you may link to the summary report and ...

  1. Lumbee River EMC- Residential Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lumbee River EMC (LREMC) offers rebates to its residential customers who purchase and install qualified energy efficient products or services. Rebates are available for:

  2. Residential Transportation Historical Publications reports, data...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    May 2008 The Energy Information Administration conducts several core consumption surveys. Among them was the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS)....

  3. Energy Preview: Residential Transportation Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    t 7 Energy Preview: Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey, Preliminary Estimates, 1991 (See Page 1) This publication and other Energy Information Administration...

  4. East Central Electric Cooperative- Residential Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    East Central Electric Cooperative offers rebates to residential customers to install energy-efficient ground source heat pumps, electric water heaters, and air conditioners. To qualify for the...

  5. West Virginia Residential Energy Code Field Study

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lead Performer: Appalachian Residential Consortium for Energy Efficiency (ARCEE), WV Partner: Marshall University’s Center for Business and Energy Research—Huntington, WV

  6. Waseca Utilities- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Develops innovative products and services to help them deliver value to customers. With help from SMMPA, Waseca Utilities provides incentives for residential and commercial customers to improve t...

  7. Emerald PUD- Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Emerald People's Utility District (EPUD) has a loan program through First Tech Credit Union to help residential customers improve the energy efficiency of their homes. Through the Weatherization...

  8. National Residential Efficiency Measures Database - Building...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Residential Efficiency Measures Database - Building America Top Innovation Image of a man insulating the ceiling of a home. Robust cost data for energy-efficiency measures ...

  9. Duquesne Light Company- Residential Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Duquesne Light provides rebates to its residential customers for purchasing and installing energy-saving equipment. Eligible equipment includes dehumidifiers, freezers, refrigerators, air conditi...

  10. Residential Energy Efficiency Messaging | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Nothing But Networking for Residential Network Members Social Media and Messages that Matter - Top Tips and Tools Generating Energy Efficiency...

  11. Baltimore Gas & Electric Company (Electric) - Residential Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AC: 30 Recycling RefrigeratorFreezer: 50 ACDehumidifier: 25 Summary The Baltimore Gas & Electric Company (BGE) offers rebates for residential customers to improve the...

  12. NIPSCO (Gas & Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Air Sealing: 40% of total cost up to 450 Lighting: Varies Summary Northern Indiana Public Service Corporation (NIPSCO) offers rebates to residential customers that install...

  13. Farmers RECC- Residential Insulation Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Farmers Rural Electric Cooperative (RECC) Button-Up Program provides free energy audits and rebates for insulation upgrades to its residential customers. Farmers RECC's energy advisor will...

  14. Benefits of Better Buildings Residential Network Reporting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Residential Network All-Member Peer Exchange Call: Member Reporting and Benefits, Call Slides and Discussion Summary, May 22, 2014.

  15. El Paso Electric Company- Residential Solutions Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The El Paso Electric Residential Solutions Program offers El Paso Electric customers and participating contractors cash and non-cash incentives for implementing energy efficiency improvements in...

  16. AEP SWEPCO- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    SWEPCO Arkansas offers a variety of rebates to residential customers in its service territory. Eligible equipment includes central ac units, heat pumps, insulation, air sealing, duct sealing,...

  17. Residential Buildings Integration | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the Latest in Energy Efficient Building Technology. Learn More The Building Technologies Office (BTO) collaborates with the residential building industry to improve the...

  18. OTEC- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Oregon Trail Electric Cooperative (OTEC) assists residential members in reducing electric consumption by providing rebates for energy efficient equipment. Rebates are for appliances, heat pumps,...

  19. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    0 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

  20. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...