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Sample records for advocate wanda reder

  1. Wanda

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29

    She may not be destined for Hollywood, but WANDA, one of the world's first nanomaterials synthesis robots, is making her mark by creating nanocrystals with unprecedented precision.

  2. Wanda Smith

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wanda lives near Rockwood and is the owner of a convenience store in Pine Orchard. She is a graduate of Harriman High School and is a former member of Head Start, the Morgan County Industrial Board...

  3. Wanda M. Austin

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wanda M. Austin is president and chief executive officer of The Aerospace Corporation, a leading architect for the nation’s national security space programs. The Aerospace Corporation has...

  4. Advocate Articles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Baton Rouge Advocate Articles regarding CAMD (pdf files) Letter: CAMD fund cuts harmful for LSU Our Views: CAMD is on life support Letter: Story disappoints ex-CAMD official CAMD at risk after cut CAMD receiving $1.26 million equipment grant LSU plans to lay off 24 LSU not bluffing on funding cuts, chancellor says Energy Frontier center arrives at LSU Board hires CAMD director Chancellors discuss impact of cuts

  5. Advocate Newsletters | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Advocate Newsletters Advocate Newsletters April 1, 2016 Advocate - Issue 62 - April 2016 Special topics include the FY 2018 budget, the April 2016 Spring Chairs Meeting in Oak Ridge, and recent updates on board member activities. December 23, 2015 Advocate - Issue 61 - Jan. 2016 Here are some of the topics in this issue: DOE Launches K-25 Virtual Museum, Manhattan Project National Park Established, ORSSAB Celebrates 20 Years. September 25, 2015 Advocate - Issue 60 - October 2015 Here are some of

  6. Beryllium Health Advocates - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Health Advocates About Us Beryllium Program Beryllium Program Points of Contact Beryllium Facilities & Areas Beryllium Program Information Hanford CBDPP Committee Beryllium FAQs...

  7. Efficiency Advocates' Ex Parte Communication | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficiency Advocates' Ex Parte Communication Efficiency Advocates' Ex Parte Communication The attendees identified in this memorandum met on June 11, 2013, to discuss DOE's ...

  8. June 16 & 17, 2014 Meeting of the Electricity Advisory Committee...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Doug Larson, WIEB Steve Beuning, Xcel Carrie Cullen Hitt, SEIA Tuesday, June 17, 2014 Panel - Distributed Energy Storage (DES) - Wanda Reder, S&C, moderator Willem Fadrhonc, STEM ...

  9. Electricity Advisory Committee Meeting Presentations June 2015...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Tuesday, June 30, 2015 Panel - Microgrids: Current and Future Development - Wanda Reder, ... EAC Energy Storage Subcommittee Activities and Plans - Merwin Brown PDF icon Panel - ...

  10. September 29 & 30, 2015 Meeting of the Electricity Advisory Committee...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EAC Energy Storage Subcommittee Activities and Plans - Merwin Brown Reactive Power and Load Transient - John Undrill EAC Smart Grid Subcommittee Activities and Plans - Wanda Reder ...

  11. The Appraisal Process: Be Your Own Advocate

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Appraisal Process: Be Your Own Advocate, a presentation of the U.S. Department of Energy's DOE Zero Energy Ready Home program.

  12. Advocate - Issue 60 - October 2015 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    0 - October 2015 Advocate - Issue 60 - October 2015 Here are the topics in this issue: ORSSAB Members Gather for Annual Meeting EM SSAB Representatives Meet in Santa Fe Board Member Attends EPA Community Involvement Training Conference ORSSAB Members Are More Proactive in FY 2015 Lack of Funding May Slow Historic Preservation at ETTP PDF icon October 2015 Advocate Newsletter More Documents & Publications ORSSAB FY 2015 Annual Report Advocate - Issue 58 - April 2015 Advocate - Issue 61 - Jan.

  13. Advocate - Issue 62 - April 2016 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2 - April 2016 Advocate - Issue 62 - April 2016 Framed Cover_Advocate April 2016.jpg In this issue: FY 2018 Budget Planning ORSSAB to Host National Conference Board Member Highlights News From the 2016 Waste Management Conference in Phoenix, Arizona PDF icon April 2016 Advocate More Documents & Publications ORSSAB Meeting - March 2016 ORSSAB FY 2013 Annual Report ORSSAB FY 2015 Annual Report

  14. Efficiency Advocates' Ex Parte Communication | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Communication Efficiency Advocates' Ex Parte Communication The attendees identified in this memorandum met on June 11, 2013, to discuss DOE's proposed rulemaking to allow waivers from energy conservation standards for large (>55 gallon) residential electric storage water heaters used in demand response and thermal energy storage programs (Docket No. EERE-2012-BT-STD-0022). PDF icon Advocates Ex Parte Memo GIWHs.pdf More Documents & Publications Efficiency Advocates' Ex Parte Communication

  15. Competition Advocates and Task-Order and Delivery Order Ombudsman...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home About Us Our Operations Acquisition and Project Management Acquisition Management Competition Advocates and ...

  16. Electricity Advisory Committee Meeting Presentations June 2014...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Tuesday, June 17, 2014 Panel - Distributed Energy Storage (DES) - Wanda Reder, S&C, moderator Willem Fadrhonc, STEM Tom Weaver, AEP Melicia Charles, CPUC Tom Bialek, SDG&E Panel - ...

  17. Advocate - Issue 50 - April 2013 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    0 - April 2013 Advocate - Issue 50 - April 2013 The stories from this issue include: Chair's Commentary Reservation Update Legacy Waste North Tower Demolished ATSDR Meets in Oak Ridge Profile: Dave Hemelright New Members PDF icon Advocate_April2013 More Documents & Publications ORSSAB FY 2013 Annual Report Cleanup Progress Report -

  18. Y-12 honors companies, advocates for small-business success ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    honors companies, ... Y-12 honors companies, advocates for small-business success Posted: July 18, 2012 - 3:48pm The Y-12 National Security Complex honored six small businesses for...

  19. Advocate - Issue 52 - October 2013 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2 - October 2013 Advocate - Issue 52 - October 2013 Topics In This Issue.... Agency Suggestions for FY 2014 Reservation Update Recent Recommendations Historic Preservation of K-25 EPA Conference Snapshot in History Member Profile - Jimmy Bell New ORSSAB Members Stewardship Update New Officers PDF icon Advocate - Issue 52 - October 2013 More Documents & Publications ORSSAB FY 2013 Annual Report ORSSAB Meeting - September 2013 ORSSAB Meeting - August 2013

  20. Advocate - Issue 58 - April 2015 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    8 - April 2015 Advocate - Issue 58 - April 2015 Here are the topics in this issue: DOE Provides Figures on FY 2015 Cleanup Budget Conceptual Designs for K-25 Historic Preservation Unveiled Board Member Reports on Environmental Justice Conference EM SSAB Leadership Will Meet in Augusta, Ga. DOE Appoints Four New Members to ORSSAB PDF icon April 2015 Advocate Newsletter More Documents & Publications ORSSAB FY 2013 Annual Report ORSSAB FY 2015 Annual Report ORSSAB Meeting - September 2013

  1. 2005 CHP Action Agenda: Innovating, Advocating, and Delivering Solutions,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    October 2005 | Department of Energy 5 CHP Action Agenda: Innovating, Advocating, and Delivering Solutions, October 2005 2005 CHP Action Agenda: Innovating, Advocating, and Delivering Solutions, October 2005 More than five years since the CHP Challenge and Industry Roadmap was released, this document is intended to provide the situational context in which the annual roadmap workshop will set its priorities for the upcoming year and complete its goals. PDF icon 2005_nyc.pdf More Documents

  2. AHRI/Advocate Ex Parte Memo 2.5.15 Meeting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AHRI/Advocate Ex Parte Memo 2.5.15 Meeting AHRI/Advocate Ex Parte Memo 2.5.15 Meeting On February 5, 2015, AHRI staff, Industry Representatives and Energy Efficiency Advocates met to discuss Department of Energy (DOE) rulemakings for commercial furnaces and unitary large equipment. PDF icon AHRIEfficiencyAdvocates Ex Parte MemoFINAL More Documents & Publications Ex Parte Communication on Central Air-Conditioner Test Procedure Ex Parte Communication on Central Air-Conditioner Test Procedure -

  3. Wanda Woods | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Scientific and Technical Information Walter L. Warnick, Ph.D., Former Director WorldWideScience Alliance Signing Ceremony, June 12, 2008 [Photograph by: Korean Institute of Science and Technology Information] The WorldWideScience Alliance was formalized on June 12, 2008, in Seoul, Korea, by officials from 11 organizations representing 38 countries. WorldWideScience.org is the online gateway to science information issued from nations around the world. The signing ceremony was the

  4. Electricity Advisory Committee Meeting Presentations June 2015 - Tuesday,

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    June 30, 2015 | Department of Energy Tuesday, June 30, 2015 Electricity Advisory Committee Meeting Presentations June 2015 - Tuesday, June 30, 2015 The Department of Energy's Electricity Advisory Committee held a meeting on Monday, June 29 and Tuesday, June 30, 2015, at the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, 4301 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, VA. Tuesday, June 30, 2015 Panel - Microgrids: Current and Future Development - Wanda Reder, moderator James Gallagher, New York State Smart

  5. Electricity Advisory Committee Meeting Presentations March 2015 - Friday,

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    March 27, 2015 | Department of Energy Friday, March 27, 2015 Electricity Advisory Committee Meeting Presentations March 2015 - Friday, March 27, 2015 The Department of Energy's Electricity Advisory Committee held a meeting on Thursday, March 26 and Friday, March 27, 2015, at the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, 4301 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, VA. Friday, March 27, 2015 EAC Smart Grid Subcommittee Activities and Plans - Wanda Reder, Subcommittee Chair Status of Distributed

  6. Issue a New Department of Energy Acquisition Guide Chapter 6.5 Competition Advocate Responsibilities and Revise Pages in Chapters 6.1 and 7.1.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is a new chapter of the DOE Acquisition Guide entitled Competition Advocate Responsibilities. It provides a comprehensive overview of the topic. The new chapter necessitates page changes to Chapters 6.1 and 7.1.

  7. Advocate newsletter - Ocotber 2015.indd

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... I learned this fi rst- hand during the 2015 Community Involvement Training Conference sponsored by the EPA in Atlanta, Ga., August 4-6. While community "outreach" primarily is ...

  8. Advocate- Issue 54- April 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here are some of the stories in this issue: DOE Encourages ORSSAB Input on Second Waste Disposal Facility, ORSSAB/Public Were Involved in Siting EMWMF, Board Member Reports on Waste Management Symposia, and Public Environmental Survey Gathers Input on Cleanup Strategy.

  9. Advocate- Issue 56- October 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here are some of the stories in this issue: ORSSAB held its annual meeting and learned about a number of decisions that will be made in 2015, EM SSAB Chairs meet in Idaho, DOE Responds to recommendations, ORSSAB is recruiting new members, ORSSAB elects officers for FY 2015.

  10. Advocate- Issue 55-July 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here are some of the stories in this issue: TWPC Continues Processing Transuranic Waste During Suspension of Repository Activities, DOE Develops a Mercury Remediation Strategic Plan for Y-12, EM SSAB Representatives Gather for Semiannual Meeting, Report on Environmental Justice Conference, New Students, ORSSAB Member Honored.

  11. Advocate- Issue 48- October 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here are some of the topics from this issue: K-25 Historic Preservation Agreement, the Board Says Farewell to Maggie Owen, and Groundwater Study Proposed.

  12. Advocate- Issue 57- January 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here are some of the topics in this issue: ORSSAB held a different kind of meeting in November, the EM & Stewardship Committee took a field trip to ETTP, DOE continues to work with TRU waste during WIPP shutdown, and the public has several ways to learn about EM successes.

  13. Advocate- Issue 59- July 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here are some of the topics in this issue: DOE Provides Update on Status of Groundwater Strategy, DOE Hosts Public Workshop on Near-term Priorities, ORSSAB Hears Views from Oak Ridge City Manager on EM Activities, EM SSAB Representatives Gather for Semiannual Meeting

  14. Advocate- Issue 49- January 2013

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here are some of the topics in this issue: Demolition of K-25 North TowerBegins at ETTP, Board Member Commentary, Member Profile: Bob Hatcher, and a Letter from the Chair.

  15. Advocate- Issue 51- July 2013

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here are the stories in this issue: EM SSAB Chairs’ Webinar, Tru Waste Processing Center tour, and a member profile on Fay Martin.

  16. Advocate- Issue 45- January 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here are some of the topics in this issue: Member Profile: Chuck Jensen, Chairs Videoconference, DOE/NNSA Appeal Y-12 Pollutant Discharge Permit.

  17. Advocate- Issue 46- April 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here are some of the stories from this issue: Members Devote 1,300 Hours to DOE in FY 2011, Member Profile: Ed Juarez, and ORSSAB Joins Two Social Media Sites.

  18. Advocate- Issue 44- October 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here are some of the topics in this issue: UCOR Starts on K-25, Annual Planning Meeting, Recovery Act Update, and Results of the PublicvEnvironmental Survey.

  19. Advocate- Issue 47- July 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here are some of the topics from this issue: Wild West Tour, EM SSAB Chairs’ Meeting, and Reservation Updates.

  20. Advocate newsletter - July 2015.indd

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... utilized the gun design; Fat Man, named for Winston Churchill, was an implosion device. ... be available by June 1945 and a uranium gun bomb would almost certainly be ready by ...

  1. Advocate- Issue 42- April 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here are some of the topics in this issue: Membership Drive, Member Profile: Betty Jones, Chuck Jenkins Recognized, DOE Rethinks U-233 Project, and Membership Changes.

  2. Advocate- Issue 41- January 2011

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Here are some of the topics in this issue: Long-term Stewardship Still an Open Question, Committee Studies Bear Creek Burial Grounds, and Member Profile: Kevin Westervelt.

  3. Advocate- Issue 43- July 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here are some of the topics in this issue: Retiring Members Honored, Member Profile: David Martin, EM SSAB Chairs Meeting, Board Member’s Company Assists with Japanese Nuclear Plant.

  4. Advocate- Issue 61- Jan. 2016

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here are some topics in this issue: DOE Launches K-25 Virtual Museum, Manhattan Project National Park Established, ORSSAB Celebrates 20 Years.

  5. Advocate- Issue 61- Jan. 2016

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here are some of the topics in this issue: DOE Launches K-25 Virtual Museum, Manhattan Project National Park Established, ORSSAB Celebrates 20 Years.

  6. Advocate- Issue 53- January 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here are some of the topics in this issue: DOE Works to Ease Restrictions on Recycling Scrap Metals, ORSSAB Committees Merge, Legacy of Stewardship, New Museum Display, and Public Environmental Survey.

  7. Western Resource Advocates | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Boulder, Colorado Zip: 80302 Region: Rockies Area Website: www.westernresourceadvocates.o Coordinates: 39.9998, -105.264094 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  8. Advocate newsletter - January 2016 revised.indd

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... DOE's preferred alternative is to build a water treatment plant at Outfall 200 with 3000 gallons per minute treatment capacity and 2 million gallons of stormwater storage to hold ...

  9. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Advocate Health Care

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Joined the Challenge: October 2014Headquarters: Downers Grove, ILCharging Locations: Normal, IL; Oak Lawn, IL; Park Ridge, IL; Downers Grove, IL; Elgin, ILDomestic Employees: 35,000

  10. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a sensitive mass spec allows better analysis of samples. Workstation for Automated Nanomaterial Discovery and Analysis (WANDA) WANDA is an automated robot for the synthesis of...

  11. Mission Support Alliance (MSA) (MSA) Beryllium Health Advocate...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mindy Demiter 376-7079 E-mail questions Travel Questions-WRPS Contact Carlson Wagonlit Travel 1-866-267-6130 www.wrpstoc.com P.O. Box 850 (MSIN H3-01) Richland, WA...

  12. Advocate newsletter - April 2015 for webpage.indd

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    very busy school schedules. At Oak Ridge High School, Aditya is an offi cer of the International Relations Club. He attended the North American Invitational Model United...

  13. 2005 CHP Action Agenda: Innovating, Advocating, and Delivering...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More than five years since the CHP Challenge and Industry Roadmap was released, this document is intended to provide the situational context in which the annual roadmap workshop ...

  14. EM Wins Award for Role as Strong Small Businesses Advocate

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – DOE on Wednesday honored EM as the inaugural recipient of a new award for extraordinary efforts to expand contract opportunities for small businesses.

  15. Savannah River Site Workers Share Knowledge with Students in...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Edwards Elementary School, Williston, S.C.; Allison Childers, A. Brian Merry Elementary ... North Augusta, S.C.; and Wanda Wates, W.E. Parker Elementary School, Edgefield ...

  16. BERAC Meeting February 18 - 19, 2009 North Bethesda, MD | U.S...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Wanda Ferrell .ppt file (16.9MB), Climate and Environmental Sciences Division Update Jeff Amthor, Report on the Climate Change Research Strategic Plan Sharlene Weatherwax .ppt file ...

  17. BERAC Meeting February 23-24, 2010 Gaithersburg, MD | U.S. DOE...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Wanda Ferrell .ppt file (5.1MB), Climate and Environmental Sciences Division Update ... Mike Kuperberg .ppt file (533KB), Climate Research Roadmap David Lesmes .ppt file ...

  18. Women in Engineering Program Advocates Network (WEPAN): Evaluation of the seventh annual conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brainard, S.G.

    1996-08-01

    The primary goals of the 1996 WEPAN Conference were to: (1) Conduct technical and programmatic seminars for institutions desiring to initiate, replicate, or expand women in engineering programs; (2) Provide assistance in fundraising and grant writing; (3) Profile women in engineering programs of excellence; (4) Sponsor inspiring, knowledgeable and motivational keynote speakers; and, (5) Offer a series of workshops focused on topics such as: establishing partnerships with industry, current research findings, retention strategies, issues affecting special populations, and early intervention techniques. In an effort to provide greater access for women to engineering careers, women in engineering program directors at Purdue University, Stevens Institute of Technology and the University of Washington joined together in 1990 to establish WEPAN, a national network of individuals interested in the recruitment, admission, retention, and graduation of women engineering students. This is the seventh year of operation. Success of this effort has been reflected in numerous ways: increased membership in the organization; increased number of women in engineering programs; increased number of women graduating in engineering; and grants from the U.S. Department of Energy, the National Science Foundation, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the AT&T Foundation, and many other corporations to carry out the goals of WEPAN. The Seventh Annual Women in Engineering Conference entitled, Capitalizing on Today`s Challenges, was held in Denver, Colorado on June 1-4, 1996 at the Hyatt Regency. The conference brought together representatives from academia, government, and industry and examined current issues and initiatives for women in technology, science, and education. Building on the successes of the previous conferences, the seventh conference offered a new variety of speakers and topics.

  19. 3 - 4 Turbulent combustion Princeton.key

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    real question The flame surface density is created by flameturbulence interactions. Writing an equation for it requires to rederive equations for an interface in turbulence...

  20. Evaluation of the 1997 Joint National Conference, Women in Engineering Program Advocates Network (WEPAN) and National Association of Minority Engineering Program Administrators (NAMEPA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brainard, Suzanne G.

    1997-07-01

    The primary goal of the 1997 Joint National Conference was to unite NAMEPA and WEPAN in a unique collaborative effort to further the cause of increasing the participation of women and minorities in science and engineering. The specific objectives were to: (1) conduct technical and programmatic seminars for institutions desiring to initiate, replicate, or expand women and minorities in engineering program; (2) provide assistance in fundraising and grant writing; (3) profile women in engineering programs of excellence; (4) sponsor inspiring knowledgeable and motivational keynote speakers; and (5) offer a series of workshops focused on a multitude of topics.

  1. Creating a global engineering community through partnerships [Evaluation of the 1998 Wepan National Conference: Women in Engineering Program Advocates Network (WEPAN) - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brainard, Suzanne G.

    1998-12-01

    The primary goal of the 1998 National WEPAN Conference was to further increase the participation of women and minorities and engineering.

  2. Doubly Heavy Baryons, Heavy Quark-DiQuark Symmetry and NRQCD...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    This method is used to rederive Lagrangians for the Qbar Q and QQ sectors of pNRQCD and give a correct derivation of the O(1mQ) prediction for the hyperfine splitting of doubly ...

  3. Acknowledgments

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2: Technical Chapters and Apprendices TJ Glauthier, co-chair Jared L. Cohon, co-chair Norman R. Augustine Wanda M. Austin Charles Elachi Paul A. Fleury Susan J. Hockfield Richard A. Meserve Cherry A. Murray October 28, 2015 iii Contents 1. Value of the Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories .................................... 1 A. DOE Laboratory System .............................................................................................. 1 B. DOE's Mission and Strategic Goals

  4. MazzoleniARMMeeting2008PosterMazzoleni.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Optical Property Measurements for ARM: The New 3-laser Photoacoustic Instrument for ISDAC and SGP Manvendra Dubey (dubey@lanl.gov), Claudio Mazzoleni (claudio@lanl.gov) Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM http://aerosols.lanl.gov/ The New 3 Wavelengths Instrument The 3-PAS (DMT Inc.) Inside Noise (Mm -1 , 0.5 Hz) (HEPA filtered air) Acknowledgments DOE Office of Science, ARM (Drs. Wanda Ferrell and Kiran Alapaty) and ASP (Drs. Ashley Williamson and Rick Petty) programs. The

  5. Many Voices Working for the Community

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2, 2014 Minutes The Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board (ORSSAB) held a work session on Wednesday, November 12, 2014, at Olive Garden Restaurant, 7206 Kingston Pike, Knoxville, Tenn., beginning at 6 p.m. Members Present Jimmy Bell Noel Berry Alfreda Cook Lisa Hagy, Secretary Bob Hatcher David Hemelright, Chair Jennifer Kasten Jan Lyons, Vice Chair Fay Martin Donald Mei Greg Paulus Belinda Price Mary Smalling Coralie Staley Scott Stout Members Absent Howard Holmes Wanda Smith Wanfang Zhou

  6. 2014MSMap

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OFFICE & LAB BLDG PHYSICS HALL WILHELM HALL FRILEY HALL HELSER HALL UNION DRIVE BISSELL ROAD U N I O N D R I V E BEYER COURT UNIO N DRIVE OSBORN DRIVE COMMUNICATIONS BUILDING MOLECULAR BIOLOGY BUILDING METALS DEVELOPMENT BUILDING GENETICS LAB INSECTARY SCIENCE HALL II SCIENCE HALL LAGOMARCINO HALL M E C H . M A IN T . B U IL D IN G P R IN T IN G A N D P U B L IC A T IO N S LIBRARY STORAGE FACILITY ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES BLDG WANDA DALEY DRIVE STANGE ROAD HORSE BARN RUMINANT NUTRITION LAB

  7. Temperature, Water Vapor, and Clouds"

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    on "Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Radiometric Studies of Temperature, Water Vapor, and Clouds" Project ID: 0011106 Program Managers: Kirankumar V. Alapaty Phone: 301-903-3175 Division: SC-23.3 and Wanda R. Ferrell Phone: 301-903-0043 Division: SC-23.3 PI: Edgeworth R. Westwater Award Register#: ER640150011106 Overview of Project The importance of accurate measurements of column amounts of water vapor and cloud liquid has been well documented by scientists within the Atmospheric

  8. AmesLab-ISUMap2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GILMAN HALL OFFICE & LAB BLDG PHYSICS HALL WILHELM HALL FRILEY HALL HELSER HALL UNION DRIVE BISSELL ROAD U N I O N D R I V E BEYER COURT UNIO N DRIVE OSBORN DRIVE COMMUNICATIONS BUILDING MOLECULAR BIOLOGY BUILDING METALS DEVELOPMENT BUILDING GENETICS LAB INSECTARY SCIENCE HALL II SCIENCE HALL LAGOMARCINO HALL M E C H . M A IN T . B U IL D IN G P R IN T IN G A N D P U B L IC A T IO N S LIBRARY STORAGE FACILITY ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES BLDG WANDA DALEY DRIVE STANGE ROAD HORSE BARN RUMINANT

  9. Collisional decoherence reexamined

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hornberger, Klaus; Sipe, John E.

    2003-07-01

    We rederive the quantum master equation for the decoherence of a massive Brownian particle due to collisions with lighter particles from a thermal environment. Our careful treatment avoids the occurrence of squares of Dirac {delta} functions. It leads to a decoherence rate that is smaller by a factor of 2{pi} compared to previous findings. This result, which is in agreement with recent experiments, is confirmed both by a physical analysis of the problem and by a perturbative calculation in the weak-coupling limit.

  10. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Evaluation for Drum Characterization and

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    News ORSSAB News Advocate Newsletters April 1, 2016 Advocate - Issue 62 - April 2016 Special topics include the FY 2018 budget, the April 2016 Spring Chairs Meeting in Oak Ridge, and recent updates on board member activities. December 23, 2015 Advocate - Issue 61 - Jan. 2016 Here are some of the topics in this issue: DOE Launches K-25 Virtual Museum, Manhattan Project National Park Established, ORSSAB Celebrates 20 Years. September 25, 2015 Advocate - Issue 60 - October 2015 Here are some of the

  11. ORSSAB News | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    News ORSSAB News Advocate Newsletters April 1, 2016 Advocate - Issue 62 - April 2016 Special topics include the FY 2018 budget, the April 2016 Spring Chairs Meeting in Oak Ridge, and recent updates on board member activities. December 23, 2015 Advocate - Issue 61 - Jan. 2016 Here are some of the topics in this issue: DOE Launches K-25 Virtual Museum, Manhattan Project National Park Established, ORSSAB Celebrates 20 Years. September 25, 2015 Advocate - Issue 60 - October 2015 Here are some of the

  12. Docket No. EERE–2010–BT–STD–0027 Energy Conservation Standards for Commercial and Industrial Electric Motors: Public Meeting and Availability of the Preliminary Technical Support Document 77 Fed. Reg. 43015 (July 23, 2012)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This memorandum memorializes a communication involving members of the Motor Coalition (industry and energy advocates) in connection with this proceeding.

  13. Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Hampshire Coalition Helps Devoted

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Alternative Fuel Advocate Leave Lasting Legacy New Hampshire Coalition Helps Devoted Alternative Fuel Advocate Leave Lasting Legacy to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Hampshire Coalition Helps Devoted Alternative Fuel Advocate Leave Lasting Legacy on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Hampshire Coalition Helps Devoted Alternative Fuel Advocate Leave Lasting Legacy on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Hampshire Coalition Helps

  14. Comments of the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), The...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Process (IIP) For Significant Onshore Transmission Projects Requiring Federal ... affected states Technology advocates (wind, solar, geothermal, etc.) Consumer ...

  15. RANDOM BALLISTIC INTERPRETATION OF NONLINEAR GUIDING CENTER THEORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruffolo, D.; Pianpanit, T.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Chuychai, P. E-mail: th_ee@hotmail.com E-mail: p.chuychai@sci.mfu.ac.th

    2012-03-10

    Nonlinear guiding center (NLGC) theory has been used to explain the asymptotic perpendicular diffusion coefficient {kappa} of energetic charged particles in a turbulent magnetic field, which can be applied to better understand cosmic ray transport. Here we re-derive NLGC, replacing the assumption of diffusive decorrelation with random ballistic decorrelation (RBD), which yields an explicit formula for {kappa} . We note that scattering processes can cause a reversal of the guiding center motion along the field line, i.e., 'backtracking', leading to partial cancellation of contributions to {kappa}, especially for low-wavenumber components of the magnetic turbulence. We therefore include a heuristic backtracking correction (BC) that can be used in combination with RBD. In comparison with computer simulation results for various cases, NLGC with RBD and BC provides a substantially improved characterization of the perpendicular diffusion coefficient for a fluctuation amplitude less than or equal to the large-scale magnetic field.

  16. Analytic derivation of the map of null rays passing near a naked singularity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, Takahiro; Singh, T. P.

    2001-06-15

    Recently the energy emission from a naked singularity forming in spherical dust collapse has been investigated. This radiation is due to particle creation in a curved spacetime. In this discussion, the central role is played by the mapping formula between the incoming and the outgoing null coordinates. For the self-similar model, this mapping formula has been derived analytically. But for the model with C{sup {infinity}} density profile, the mapping formula has been obtained only numerically. In the present paper, we argue that the singular nature of the mapping is determined by the local geometry around the point at which the singularity is first formed. If this is the case, it would be natural to expect that the mapping formula can be derived analytically. In the present paper, we analytically rederive the same mapping formula for the model with C{sup {infinity}} density profile that has been earlier derived using a numerical technique.

  17. Cosmological observables in multi-field inflation with a non-flat field space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Xin; Li, Tianjun; Shukla, Pramod E-mail: tli@itp.ac.cn

    2014-10-01

    Using δN formalism, in the context of a generic multi-field inflation driven on a non-flat field space background, we revisit the analytic expressions of the various cosmological observables such as scalar/tensor power spectra, scalar/tensor spectral tilts, non-Gaussianity parameters, tensor-to-scalar ratio, and the various runnings of these observables. In our backward formalism approach, the subsequent expressions of observables automatically include the terms beyond the leading order slow-roll expansion correcting many of the expression at subleading order. To connect our analysis properly with the earlier results, we rederive the (well) known (single field) expressions in the limiting cases of our generic formulae. Further, in the light of PLANCK results, we examine for the compatibility of the consistency relations within the slow-roll regime of a two-field roulette poly-instanton inflation realized in the context of large volume scenarios.

  18. Competition Requirements

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    --------------------------- Chapter 6.5 (January 2011) 1 Competition Advocate Responsibilities [Reference: FAR 6.5, FAR 7 and DEAR 906.501] Overview This section discusses the competition advocate requirements and provides a Federal Procurement Data System-New Generation (FPDS-NG) coding assistance sheet and screen shots for the FPDS-NG Competition Report. Background FAR Part 6.5, -Competition Advocates,‖ implements section 20 of the Office of Federal Procurement Policy Act, which requires

  19. The Business of Energy Development: Basics for Tribal Projects

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Appraisal Process: Be Your Own Advocate The Appraisal Process: Be Your Own Advocate The Appraisal Process: Be Your Own Advocate, a presentation of the U.S. Department of Energy's DOE Zero Energy Ready Home program. PDF icon ZERH Appraisal Process More Documents & Publications DOE ZERH Webinar: Technical Resources for Marketing and Selling Zero Energy Ready Homes Zero Energy Ready Home Training Presentation Collective Impact for Zero Net Energy Homes Energy

    Approach to Low-Cost

  20. Ex Parte Communication, July 18, 2012 Meeting | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Communication, July 18, 2012 Meeting Ex Parte Communication, July 18, 2012 Meeting On Wednesday July 18, 2012, three energy efficiency advocates met with representatives of the ...

  1. Ex Parte Communication Memorandum | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Parte Communication Memorandum Ex Parte Communication Memorandum On Monday March 3, 2014, a group of energy efficiency advocates had a conference call with representatives of the ...

  2. Boulder, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Institute Registered Networking Organizations in Boulder, Colorado American Solar Energy Society Boulder Innovation Center CleanTech Boulder Western Resource Advocates...

  3. New Mexico Small Business Assistance Program recognized by U...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NM Small Business assistance program recognized New Mexico Small Business Assistance Program recognized by U.S. Department of Commerce Receives the 2012 Manufacturing Advocate of...

  4. Natural Resources Defense Council Ex Parte Communication

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On Tuesday, October 28, 2014, several representatives of fan manufacturers and energy efficiency advocates met with the Department of Energy to discuss potential standards for commercial and...

  5. ORISE: ORAU receives DOE Small Business Award for work under...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rebecca Crowe, Small Business advocate; both with ORAU, receiving the Facility Management Contractor Small Business Achievement of the Year Award for fiscal year 2013...

  6. Topic A Awardee: Western Electricity Coordinating Council | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    energy developers, and consumer advocates and expects to begin the project in the first quarter of 2010 with the formation of a multi-stakeholder Scenario Planning ...

  7. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fire victim helped by area programs April 3, 2012 Beatrice Dubois, dedicated fundraiser, assisted after home fire Beatrice Dubois has always been a strong advocate for LANL...

  8. Club's Chairman Leading by Example | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and habitats by advocating clean energy use and encouraging Americans to live eco-friendly lifestyles. Sierra Club Oregon Chairman Wes Kempfer is doing his part to further...

  9. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 10 of 31 results. Article Energy Literacy in Action: Nevada Teachers Helping Students Learn About Energy Energy advocates launched an...

  10. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    energy-literacy-social-studies-guide-essential-principle-6 Article Energy Literacy in Action: Nevada Teachers Helping Students Learn About Energy Energy advocates launched an...

  11. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Students Learn About Energy Energy advocates launched an innovative energy literacy curriculum in a Nevada school district using resources from The Office of Energy...

  12. Los Alamos Postdoc Association

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the postdoctoral research staff; advocates for the postdoctoral community; and provides career development information to postdocs. To ensure that the future of each postdoc is a...

  13. Appliance Standards Awareness Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On January 14, representatives of energy efficiency advocates and fan manufacturers met to describe technical considerations related to fan efficiency with DOE.

  14. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Students Learn About Energy Energy advocates launched an innovative energy literacy curriculum in a Nevada school district using resources from The Office of Energy Efficiency and...

  15. 10th Annual Small Wind Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This conference is designed for small wind professionals, including installers, manufacturers, dealers, distributors, educators, and advocates. The conference features presentations, exhibits,...

  16. Small Business Award Winners - FY 2011 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Small Business Award Winners - FY 2011 Small Business Award Winners - FY 2011 Each year, the Energy Department celebrates small business advocates who have advanced the role of ...

  17. A Proposed Methodology to Determine the Leverage Impacts of Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... See: http:www.renewableenergyaccess.comreanewsstory?id46534. Consumer advocates sided with the utilities, because they feared that ratepayers were paying twice for the ...

  18. Interagency ADR Workplace Section Education Programs | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... consultant, personal life coach, creative social activist, and advocate for peace November 8, 2012 ADR Lunchtime Program: TAKING THE WAR OUT OF WORDS: LEARNING TO ...

  19. DOE/EIA-0202(88/1Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or necessarily reflecting any policy ... Richard Farmer Natural Gas: Linda Barber Coal: Linda ...

  20. Microsoft Word - master.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position ... Tancred Lidderdale (202-586-7321) Natural Gas......

  1. DOE/EIA-0202(87/3Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or necessarily reflecting any policy ... Supply: Paul Kondis Natural Gas: Linda Barber Coal: Linda ...

  2. Home Performance with ENERGY STAR -- 10 Years of Continued Growth...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... rebate programs * Stimulate the local economy and create jobs * Improve public perception by being an advocate for energy efficiency and renewable energy * Reduce air ...

  3. News Item

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and charge-phonon interactions, and slow energy relaxation due to mismatch between electronic energy gaps and phonon frequencies. The bulk view advocates that the kinetic...

  4. ORISE: Beryllium laboratory achieves accreditation from College...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and the public by fostering and advocating excellence in the practice of pathology and laboratory medicine worldwide. The CAP's Laboratory Improvement Programs...

  5. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Multi-Family and Low Income...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    requirements, forms and inter-program communication can affect program efficiency * ... and advocate appropriately. * Become familiar with the technical side of the work * ...

  6. MENTORING PROGRAM Purpose

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    commitments. * Assist with career development. * Be available as a resource to mentee (coach, advocate, counselor). * Share knowledge and abilities gained through experience. *...

  7. About the Subsurface Tech Team | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    leverage funding through multi-office collaborations. Functions of the DOE SubTER Tech Team include: Identify subsurface challenges and advocate solutions; Identify potential...

  8. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 - 10 of 23 results. Article Energy Literacy in Action: Nevada Teachers Helping Students Learn About Energy Energy advocates launched an innovative energy literacy curriculum...

  9. Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data and Workflow Solutions for Fusion using NERSC Alice Koniges, Shreyas Cholia, Prabhat, ... we advocate three elements; the NERSC data partition, a connection of workflow ...

  10. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 1 of 1 result. Article Energy Literacy in Action: Nevada Teachers Helping Students Learn About Energy Energy advocates launched an innovative...

  11. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 4 of 4 results. Article Energy Literacy in Action: Nevada Teachers Helping Students Learn About Energy Energy advocates launched an innovative...

  12. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 2 of 2 results. Article Energy Literacy in Action: Nevada Teachers Helping Students Learn About Energy Energy advocates launched an innovative...

  13. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 3 of 3 results. Article Energy Literacy in Action: Nevada Teachers Helping Students Learn About Energy Energy advocates launched an innovative...

  14. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    terms Search Showing 1 - 10 of 21 results. Article Energy Literacy in Action: Nevada Teachers Helping Students Learn About Energy Energy advocates launched an innovative...

  15. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 6 of 6 results. Article Energy Literacy in Action: Nevada Teachers Helping Students Learn About Energy Energy advocates launched an innovative...

  16. Search results | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Article Energy Literacy in Action: Nevada Teachers Helping Students Learn About Energy Energy advocates launched an innovative energy literacy curriculum in a Nevada school...

  17. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    -social-studies-guide-essential-principle-6 Article Energy Literacy in Action: Nevada Teachers Helping Students Learn About Energy Energy advocates launched an innovative energy...

  18. Microsoft Word - Document1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chancellors discuss impact of cuts By JORDAN BLUM Advocate Capitol News Bureau Published: Apr 17, 2009 - Page: 4A Chancellors throughout the LSU System discussed the "enormous...

  19. Microsoft Word - Document2

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    March 18, 2014, a group of energy efficiency advocates had a conference call with representatives of the Department of Energy to discuss coverage of computers and backup batteries. ...

  20. Earth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Take Monica Witt, for example. The Lab's sustainability program manager and a key advocate ... A volunteer on the county's sustainability board for eight years, Witt is committed to ...

  1. ARM - Events Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Outreach Program advocates developing basic science awareness and increasing critical thinking skills in environmental science and climate change for K-12 students in support of...

  2. FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE PROGRAM STATUS, 6/21/1999

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Since September, 1993, the Office of Field Management has served as the Department’s corporate advocate for the Facility Representative Program. The Facility Representative (FR) is a critical...

  3. Plug in America | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in America Jump to: navigation, search Name: Plug-in America Place: El Segundo, California Zip: 90245 Product: Plug In America advocates the use of plug-in cars, trucks and SUVs...

  4. A Guide to Community Solar: Utility, Private, and Non-profit Project Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-01-25

    This guide is designed as a resource for those who want to develop community solar projects, from community organizers or solar energy advocates to government officials or utility managers.

  5. Guide to Community Solar: Utility, Private, and Non-profit Project Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-01-01

    This guide is designed as a resource for those who want to develop community solar projects, from community organizers or solar energy advocates to government officials or utility managers.

  6. Safety Staff Contact Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it (Radiation Physicist) 6212 5597 75-103 80A-102 Ergo Advocates This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need...

  7. Microsoft Word - Document1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    grant Advocate business staff Published: Sep 1, 2009 LSU's Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices has won a 1.26 million National Science Foundation grant to buy and ...

  8. Technology Plan to Address the EM Mercury Challenge

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EM’s Technology Plan to Address the EM Mercury Challenge addresses mercury contamination, and advocates for research and technology development to resolve key technical uncertainties with the pollutant in environmental remediation, facility deactivation and decommissioning, and tank waste processing.

  9. Small Business Winners FY 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recognizes an individual who embodies the many facets of an energetic, forward-thinking, DOE small business program manager. Their efforts far exceed expectations in working with, advocating for,...

  10. Sandia Energy - Sandia Earns Federal Laboratory Consortium (FLC...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bianca closed the deal on the license agreement. The technology is being used in the Fukushima clean-up effort. "Dr. Hommert has been a strong advocate for the overarching...

  11. CX-000659: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Clean Energy Advocate ProjectCX(s) Applied: A9Date: 02/03/2010Location(s): Santa Rosa, CaliforniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  12. Lighting and Electrical Team Leadership and Project Delivery- 2014 BTO Peer Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The partners involved in the Lighting Energy Efficiency in Parking (LEEP) campaign, along with private and public entities, advocate for and install energy-efficient lighting in public parking lots to foster significant reductions in participants’ energy consumption.

  13. NARUC Winter Committee Meetings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Association of Regulatory Utilities Commissioners (NARUC) Winter Committee Meetings offers its members and attendees the latest information from U.S. federal policymakers, consumer advocates, industry officials, and other stakeholders.

  14. LED Frequently Asked Questions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-05-01

    Solid-state lighting program technology fact sheet that provides an overview of what retailers, energy efficiency advocates, and consumers need to know to make informed LED buying decisions.

  15. Supporting Small Businesses

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Welcome to the office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization. Our primary goal is to increase small business utilization at the Department of Energy by advocating for all small business...

  16. Microsoft Word - Ex Parte Memo re Walk-in Coolers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    March 4, 2014 Re Ex Parte Communication On Monday March 3, 2014, a group of energy efficiency advocates had a conference call with representatives of the Department of Energy to ...

  17. Extremism

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Citizens in the United States have a right to their beliefs and to express those beliefs even if they advocate creating a new nation within the boundaries of the United States. ...

  18. ORSSAB News | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    December 23, 2015 Advocate - Issue 61 - Jan. 2016 Here are some of the topics in this issue: DOE Launches K-25 Virtual Museum, Manhattan Project National Park Established, ORSSAB ...

  19. Microsoft Word - Ex Parte Memo re Manufactured Housing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    May 6, 2013 Re Ex Parte Communication On Wednesday May 1, 2013, a group of non-profit and state energy efficiency advocates met with representatives of the Department of Energy to ...

  20. Issue a New Department of Energy Acquisition Guide Chapter 6...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6.1 and 7.1. PDF icon PF2011-40 Issue a New AG 6.5 Competition Advocate Responsibilities ... Guide Chapter 6.1 - Competition Requirements Microsoft Word - AG Chapter 6 1 Nov 2010

  1. Jennifer Granholm (Energy All Stars Presentation)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Former Michigan Governor Jennifer Granholm delivered this presentation advocating for an energy Race to the Top competition between the states at the Energy All Stars event on January 19, 2013, at...

  2. Secretary Chu, Governor Patrick Announce $25 Million for Massachusetts...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Power Advocate, Inc. (Boston, MA) - Overcoming Supply Chain Challenges to Wind Power in the U.S. - 100,000 Sustainable Energy Advantage, LLC (Framingham, MA) - New England Wind ...

  3. About the Mickey Leland Energy Fellowship Program | Mickey Leland...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Leland was a prominent legislator in Congress for 10 years. He was an advocate on hunger, public health and cultural diversity issues. On August 8, 2000, then-Energy Secretary...

  4. June 21, 1999, FacRep Program Status, but NOT limited to jut 2Q, more general

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Since September, 1993, the Office of Field Management has served as the Department’s corporate advocate for the Facility Representative Program. The Facility Representative (FR) is a critical...

  5. BPA-2010-02068-FOIA Correspondence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    P.O. Box 3621 G 1 Portland, Oregon 97208-362 4TE5 Of PUBLIC AFFAIRS September 14, 2010 In reply refer to: DK-7 Richard Vill Conservation Legal Advocate Friends of f the Columbia...

  6. Office of Departmental Personnel Security

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Office of Departmental Personnel Security serves as the central leader and advocate vested with the authority to ensure consistent and effective implementation of personnel security programs Department-wide (including for the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA).

  7. Microsoft Word - Document1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to lay off 24 LSU System proposed job reductions Furloughs set, vacant jobs cut * By JORDAN BLUM * Advocate Capitol News Bureau * Published: Jul 16, 2009 - Page: 1A The...

  8. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Headquarters provides technical assistance and guidance on newly promulgated regulations, and coordinates the review and advocates Departmental interests regarding proposed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulatory initiatives applicable to DOE operations.

  9. Business Opportunity Session Materials- December 14, 2011, Chicago

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Our Business Opportunity Sessions bring small business owners and Departmental small business advocates together to talk about the best ways we can be partnering with the small business community....

  10. Enthusiastic employees: sustaining the Earth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy sustainability is a daunting task: How do we develop top-notch innovations with ... Take Monica Witt, for example. The Lab's sustainability program manager and a key advocate ...

  11. NREL wins first Governor's Award for Research Impact in Renewable...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    wins first Governor's Award for Research Impact in Renewable Energy February 18, 2009 A non-profit coalition advocating for federal research in Colorado has honored the U.S....

  12. Ex Parte Communication Memorandum re Computer and Battery Back Up System Coverage

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On Tuesday March 18, 2014, a group of energy efficiency advocates had a conference call with representatives of the Department of Energy to discuss coverage of computers and backup batteries.

  13. Oak_Ridge_Associated_Universities_Radiation_Emergency_Assistance_Center-Training_Site.pdf

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board April 2016 Advocate, Issue 62. Click to view! April 2016 Advocate, Issue 62. Click to view! The Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board (ORSSAB) is a federally appointed citizens' panel that provides independent advice and recommendations to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management. History The board, formed in 1995, is composed of up to 22 members. These members are selected to

  14. Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board April 2016 Advocate, Issue 62. Click to view! April 2016 Advocate, Issue 62. Click to view! The Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board (ORSSAB) is a federally appointed citizens' panel that provides independent advice and recommendations to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management. History The board, formed in 1995, is composed of up to 22 members. These members are selected to

  15. GridWise Alliance: Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Challenges | Department of Energy GridWise Alliance: Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges GridWise Alliance: Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges The GridWise Alliance is a coalition of over 150 companies, organizations, and academic institutions advocating for a smart grid for a more sustainable future. We are consensus-driven and technology neutral and do not advocate for specific platforms or technologies, but, rather, for policies that will

  16. CASA gives children a chance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CASA Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:May 2016 all issues All Issues » submit CASA gives children a chance Volunteer advocates lend their voice in and out of court September 1, 2015 CASA volunteer Doreen Sansom. CASA volunteer Doreen Sansom. Contact Community Programs Director Kathy Keith Email Editor Ute Haker Email The nonprofit Court Appointed Special Advocates for Children (CASA) organization is just one of many

  17. Groundwater Contamination

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Challenges | Department of Energy GridWise Alliance: Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges GridWise Alliance: Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges The GridWise Alliance is a coalition of over 150 companies, organizations, and academic institutions advocating for a smart grid for a more sustainable future. We are consensus-driven and technology neutral and do not advocate for specific platforms or technologies, but, rather, for policies that will

  18. ORSSAB FY 2013 Annual Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    3 Annual Report ORSSAB FY 2013 Annual Report Read about OREM's accomplishments and ORSSAB's recommendations during fiscal year 2013. This issue includes: The Year's Top EM News in Oak Ridge Key Issues Milestones & Special Events Board Meetings Committees Members and Liaisons Abbreviations PDF icon ORSSAB FY 2013 Annual Report More Documents & Publications ORSSAB FY 2014 Annual Report Advocate - Issue 53 - January 2014 Advocate - Issue 56 - October 2014

  19. Microsoft Word - Document2

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Program Review Meeting 2002 Program Review Meeting Project Reports for Standing Rock Sioux Tribe - 2012 Project

    From Benjamin Longstreth, Natural Resources Defense Council Date March 19, 2014 Re Ex Parte Communication On Tuesday March 18, 2014, a group of energy efficiency advocates had a conference call with representatives of the Department of Energy to discuss coverage of computers and backup batteries. The efficiency advocates presented information concerning the products that DOE might

  20. Microsoft Word - Ex Parte Memo re October 28, 2014 Meeting on Fans

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Council Date November 4, 2014 Re Ex Parte Communication On Tuesday, October 28, 2014, several representatives of fan manufacturers and energy efficiency advocates met with the Department of Energy to discuss potential standards for commercial and industrial fans. The fan manufacturers and energy efficiency advocates presented information concerning the fan market, fan energy-efficiency and the most promising means of designing federal efficiency standards for commercial and industrial fans. The

  1. Senior Technical Safety Manager Qualification Standard Reference Guide … October 2013

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    NATION SENECA NATION Energy Organizational Development Energy Organizational Development A A " " First Steps First Steps " " Grant Grant November 8, 2007 November 8, 2007 SENECA NATION SENECA NATION In appreciation & Acknowledgment: In appreciation & Acknowledgment: - - Seneca Nation Council Seneca Nation Council Arlene Arlene Bova Bova , Councilor & Energy , Councilor & Energy development advocate development advocate - - Dept. of Energy, Tribal Energy Dept.

  2. Building unbiased estimators from non-gaussian likelihoods with application to shear estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madhavacheril, Mathew S.; McDonald, Patrick; Sehgal, Neelima; Slosar, Anze

    2015-01-15

    We develop a general framework for generating estimators of a given quantity which are unbiased to a given order in the difference between the true value of the underlying quantity and the fiducial position in theory space around which we expand the likelihood. We apply this formalism to rederive the optimal quadratic estimator and show how the replacement of the second derivative matrix with the Fisher matrix is a generic way of creating an unbiased estimator (assuming choice of the fiducial model is independent of data). Next we apply the approach to estimation of shear lensing, closely following the work of Bernstein and Armstrong (2014). Our first order estimator reduces to their estimator in the limit of zero shear, but it also naturally allows for the case of non-constant shear and the easy calculation of correlation functions or power spectra using standard methods. Both our first-order estimator and Bernstein and Armstrongs estimator exhibit a bias which is quadratic in true shear. Our third-order estimator is, at least in the realm of the toy problem of Bernstein and Armstrong, unbiased to 0.1% in relative shear errors ?g/g for shears up to |g| = 0.2.

  3. Building unbiased estimators from non-gaussian likelihoods with application to shear estimation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Madhavacheril, Mathew S.; McDonald, Patrick; Sehgal, Neelima; Slosar, Anze

    2015-01-15

    We develop a general framework for generating estimators of a given quantity which are unbiased to a given order in the difference between the true value of the underlying quantity and the fiducial position in theory space around which we expand the likelihood. We apply this formalism to rederive the optimal quadratic estimator and show how the replacement of the second derivative matrix with the Fisher matrix is a generic way of creating an unbiased estimator (assuming choice of the fiducial model is independent of data). Next we apply the approach to estimation of shear lensing, closely following the workmore » of Bernstein and Armstrong (2014). Our first order estimator reduces to their estimator in the limit of zero shear, but it also naturally allows for the case of non-constant shear and the easy calculation of correlation functions or power spectra using standard methods. Both our first-order estimator and Bernstein and Armstrong’s estimator exhibit a bias which is quadratic in true shear. Our third-order estimator is, at least in the realm of the toy problem of Bernstein and Armstrong, unbiased to 0.1% in relative shear errors Δg/g for shears up to |g| = 0.2.« less

  4. Building unbiased estimators from non-Gaussian likelihoods with application to shear estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madhavacheril, Mathew S.; Sehgal, Neelima; McDonald, Patrick; Slosar, Ane E-mail: pvmcdonald@lbl.gov E-mail: anze@bnl.gov

    2015-01-01

    We develop a general framework for generating estimators of a given quantity which are unbiased to a given order in the difference between the true value of the underlying quantity and the fiducial position in theory space around which we expand the likelihood. We apply this formalism to rederive the optimal quadratic estimator and show how the replacement of the second derivative matrix with the Fisher matrix is a generic way of creating an unbiased estimator (assuming choice of the fiducial model is independent of data). Next we apply the approach to estimation of shear lensing, closely following the work of Bernstein and Armstrong (2014). Our first order estimator reduces to their estimator in the limit of zero shear, but it also naturally allows for the case of non-constant shear and the easy calculation of correlation functions or power spectra using standard methods. Both our first-order estimator and Bernstein and Armstrong's estimator exhibit a bias which is quadratic in true shear. Our third-order estimator is, at least in the realm of the toy problem of Bernstein and Armstrong, unbiased to 0.1% in relative shear errors ?g/g for shears up to |g|=0.2.

  5. Building unbiased estimators from non-gaussian likelihoods with application to shear estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madhavacheril, Mathew S.; Slosar, Anze; McDonald, Patrick; Sehgal, Neelima

    2015-01-01

    We develop a general framework for generating estimators of a given quantity which are unbiased to a given order in the difference between the true value of the underlying quantity and the fiducial position in theory space around which we expand the likelihood. We apply this formalism to rederive the optimal quadratic estimator and show how the replacement of the second derivative matrix with the Fisher matrix is a generic way of creating an unbiased estimator (assuming choice of the fiducial model is independent of data). Next we apply the approach to estimation of shear lensing, closely following the work of Bernstein and Armstrong (2014). Our first order estimator reduces to their estimator in the limit of zero shear, but it also naturally allows for the case of non-constant shear and the easy calculation of correlation functions or power spectra using standard methods. Both our first-order estimator and Bernstein and Armstrongs estimator exhibit a bias which is quadratic in true shear. Our third-order estimator is, at least in the realm of the toy problem of Bernstein and Armstrong, unbiased to 0.1% in relative shear errors ?g/g for shears up to |g| = 0.2.

  6. More on loops in reheating: non-gaussianities and tensor power spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katirci, Nihan; Kaya, Ali; Tarman, Merve E-mail: ali.kaya@boun.edu.tr

    2014-06-01

    We consider the single field chaotic m{sup 2}?{sup 2} inflationary model with a period of preheating, where the inflaton decays to another scalar field ? in the parametric resonance regime. In a recent work, one of us has shown that the ? modes circulating in the loops during preheating notably modify the (??) correlation function. We first rederive this result using a different gauge condition hence reconfirm that superhorizon ? modes are affected by the loops in preheating. Further, we examine how ? loops give rise to non-gaussianity and affect the tensor perturbations. For that, all cubic and some higher order interactions involving two ? fields are determined and their contribution to the non-gaussianity parameter f{sub NL} and the tensor power spectrum are calculated at one loop. Our estimates for these corrections show that while a large amount of non-gaussianity can be produced during reheating, the tensor power spectrum receive moderate corrections. We observe that the loop quantum effects increase with more ? fields circulating in the loops indicating that the perturbation theory might be broken down. These findings demonstrate that the loop corrections during reheating are significant and they must be taken into account for precision inflationary cosmology.

  7. Varying fine structure 'constant' and charged black holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bekenstein, Jacob D.; Schiffer, Marcelo

    2009-12-15

    Speculation that the fine-structure constant {alpha} varies in spacetime has a long history. We derive, in 4-D general relativity and in isotropic coordinates, the solution for a charged spherical black hole according to the framework for dynamical {alpha} J. D. Bekenstein, Phys. Rev. D 25, 1527 (1982).. This solution coincides with a previously known one-parameter extension of the dilatonic black hole family. Among the notable properties of varying-{alpha} charged black holes are adherence to a 'no hair' principle, the absence of the inner (Cauchy) horizon of the Reissner-Nordstroem black holes, the nonexistence of precisely extremal black holes, and the appearance of naked singularities in an analytic extension of the relevant metric. The exteriors of almost extremal electrically (magnetically) charged black holes have simple structures which makes their influence on applied magnetic (electric) fields transparent. We rederive the thermodynamic functions of the modified black holes; the otherwise difficult calculation of the electric potential is done by a shortcut. We confirm that variability of {alpha} in the wake of expansion of the universe does not threaten the generalized second law.

  8. BHR equations re-derived with immiscible particle effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwarzkopf, John Dennis; Horwitz, Jeremy A.

    2015-05-01

    Compressible and variable density turbulent flows with dispersed phase effects are found in many applications ranging from combustion to cloud formation. These types of flows are among the most challenging to simulate. While the exact equations governing a system of particles and fluid are known, computational resources limit the scale and detail that can be simulated in this type of problem. Therefore, a common method is to simulate averaged versions of the flow equations, which still capture salient physics and is relatively less computationally expensive. Besnard developed such a model for variable density miscible turbulence, where ensemble-averaging was applied to the flow equations to yield a set of filtered equations. Besnard further derived transport equations for the Reynolds stresses, the turbulent mass flux, and the density-specific volume covariance, to help close the filtered momentum and continuity equations. We re-derive the exact BHR closure equations which include integral terms owing to immiscible effects. Physical interpretations of the additional terms are proposed along with simple models. The goal of this work is to extend the BHR model to allow for the simulation of turbulent flows where an immiscible dispersed phase is non-trivially coupled with the carrier phase.

  9. More on loops in reheating: non-gaussianities and tensor power spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katırcı, Nihan; Kaya, Ali; Tarman, Merve

    2014-06-11

    We consider the single field chaotic m{sup 2}ϕ{sup 2} inflationary model with a period of preheating, where the inflaton decays to another scalar field χ in the parametric resonance regime. In a recent work, one of us has shown that the χ modes circulating in the loops during preheating notably modify the <ζζ> correlation function. We first rederive this result using a different gauge condition hence reconfirm that superhorizon ζ modes are affected by the loops in preheating. Further, we examine how χ loops give rise to non-gaussianity and affect the tensor perturbations. For that, all cubic and some higher order interactions involving two χ fields are determined and their contribution to the non-gaussianity parameter f{sub NL} and the tensor power spectrum are calculated at one loop. Our estimates for these corrections show that while a large amount of non-gaussianity can be produced during reheating, the tensor power spectrum receive moderate corrections. We observe that the loop quantum effects increase with more χ fields circulating in the loops indicating that the perturbation theory might be broken down. These findings demonstrate that the loop corrections during reheating are significant and they must be taken into account for precision inflationary cosmology.

  10. Homeowners Go Deeper in the Heart of Texas and Save With Austin Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For homeowners interested in saving energy and money over the long term, investing the time and resources into a whole home upgrade can reap big rewards. Austin Energy's Advanced Tier program has brought homeowners comfort and savings through a multistage process that involves energy advocates and emphasizes homeowner engagement.

  11. Increasing Community Access to Solar: Designing and Developing a Shared Solar Photovoltaic System (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-06-01

    This document introduces the Energy Department's new Guide to Community Shared Solar: Utility, Private, and Nonprofit Project Development. The guide is designed to help those who want to develop community shared solar projects - from community organizers and advocates to utility managers and government officials - navigate the process of developing shared systems, from early planning to implementation.

  12. Community Solar Program Comparison Chart

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chart is a supplement to the "Utility Community Solar Handbook: Understanding and Supporting Utility Program Development," provides the utility's perspective on community solar program development and is a resource for government officials, regulators, community organizers, solar energy advocates, non-profits, and interested citizens who want to support their local utilities in implementing projects.

  13. New EM Plan Calls for Research, Technology to Help Fight Mercury Contamination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – EM has released a new plan to address mercury contamination that advocates for research and technology development to resolve key technical uncertainties with the pollutant in environmental remediation, facility deactivation and decommissioning, and tank waste processing.

  14. U.S DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer N e p o t i s m & M i s u s e o f P o s i t i o n Background: It is not appropriate for a Federal employee to advocate to other Federal ...

  15. Performance Evaluation of a Hot-Humid Climate Community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osser, R.; Kerrigan, P.

    2012-02-01

    This report describes the Project Home Again community in New Orleans, a new development for high-performance, affordable homes for residents who lost their homes to Hurricane Katrina. Building Science Corporation acted as a consultant for the project, advocating design strategies for durability, flood resistance, occupant comfort, and low energy use while maintaining cost effectiveness.

  16. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Verification | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Verification DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Verification DOE Zero Energy Ready Homes Verification, a publication of the U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Homes program. PDF icon DOE Zero Energy Ready Home - Verification Report.pdf More Documents & Publications The Appraisal Process: Be Your Own Advocate Prescriptive Path compliance form ZERO ENERGY READY HOME UPDATE NEWSLETTER AUGUST 2014

  17. Beryllium Program Points of Contact - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program Points of Contact About Us Beryllium Program Beryllium Program Points of Contact Beryllium Facilities & Areas Beryllium Program Information Hanford CBDPP Committee Beryllium FAQs Beryllium Related Links Hanford Beryllium Awareness Group (BAG) Program Performance Assessments Beryllium Program Feedback Beryllium Health Advocates Primary Contractors/Employers Medical Testing and Surveillance Facilities General Resources Beryllium Program Points of Contact Email Email Page | Print Print

  18. NREL Response to the Report Study of the Effects on Employment of Public Aid to Renewable Energy Sources from King Juan Carlos University (Spain)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Job generation has been a part of the national dialogue surrounding energy policy and renewable energy (RE) for many years. RE advocates tout the ability of renewable energy to support new job opportunities in rural locations and the manufacturing sector. Others argue that spending on renewable energy is an inefficient allocation of resources and can result in job losses in the broader economy.

  19. Hanford Beryllium Awareness Group (BAG) - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hanford Site Wide Programs Beryllium Program Hanford Beryllium Awareness Group (BAG) About Us Beryllium Program Beryllium Program Points of Contact Beryllium Facilities & Areas Beryllium Program Information Hanford CBDPP Committee Beryllium FAQs Beryllium Related Links Hanford Beryllium Awareness Group (BAG) Program Performance Assessments Beryllium Program Feedback Beryllium Health Advocates Primary Contractors/Employers Medical Testing and Surveillance Facilities General Resources Hanford

  20. Utility Community Solar Handbook- Understanding and Supporting Utility Program Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The "Utility Community Solar Handbook: Understanding and Supporting Utility Program Development" provides the utility's perspective on community solar program development and is a resource for government officials, regulators, community organizers, solar energy advocates, non-profits, and interested citizens who want to support their local utilities in implementing projects.

  1. Increasing Community Access to Solar: Designing and Developing a Shared Solar Photovoltaic System (Fact Sheet), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document introduces the Energy Department’s new Guide to Community Shared Solar: Utility, Private, and Nonprofit Project Development. The guide is designed to help those who want to develop community shared solar projects—from community organizers and advocates to utility managers and government officials—navigate the process of developing shared systems, from early planning to implementation.

  2. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center for Atmospheric Trace Gases Fiscal Year 2001 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushman, R.M.

    2002-10-15

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), which includes the World Data Center (WDC) for Atmospheric Trace Gases, is the primary global change data and information analysis center of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). More than just an archive of data sets and publications, CDIAC has, since its inception in 1982, enhanced the value of its holdings through intensive quality assurance, documentation, and integration. Whereas many traditional data centers are discipline-based (for example, meteorology or oceanography), CDIAC's scope includes potentially anything and everything that would be of value to users concerned with the greenhouse effect and global climate change, including concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and other radiatively active gases in the atmosphere; the role of the terrestrial biosphere and the oceans in the biogeochemical cycles of greenhouse gases; emissions of CO{sub 2} and other trace gases to the atmosphere; long-term climate trends; the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on vegetation; and the vulnerability of coastal areas to rising sea levels. CDIAC is located within the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. CDIAC is co-located with ESD researchers investigating global-change topics, such as the global carbon cycle and the effects of carbon dioxide on climate and vegetation. CDIAC staff are also connected with current ORNL research on related topics, such as renewable energy and supercomputing technologies. CDIAC is supported by the Environmental Sciences Division (Jerry Elwood, Director) of DOE's Office of Biological and Environmental Research. CDIAC represents DOE in the multi-agency Global Change Data and Information System (GCDIS). Wanda Ferrell is DOE's Program Manager with overall responsibility for CDIAC. Roger Dahlman is responsible for CDIAC's AmeriFlux tasks, and Anna Palmisano for CDIAC's Ocean Data tasks. CDIAC is made up of three groups: Data Systems, Information Services, and Computer Systems, with nineteen full-time or part-time staff. The following section provides details on CDIAC's staff and organization. The Data Systems Group identifies and obtains databases important to global-change research; analyzes data; compiles needed databases; provides data management and support to specific programs [e.g., NARSTO, Free-Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment (FACE), AmeriFlux, Oceans]; and prepares documentation to ensure the long-term utility of CDIAC's data holdings. The Information Services Group responds to data and information requests; maintains records of all request activities; analyzes user statistics; assists in Web development and maintenance; and produces CDIAC's newsletter (CDIAC Communications), the fiscal year annual reports, and various information materials. The Computer Systems Group provides computer system support for all CDIAC and WDC activities; designs and maintains CDIAC's computing system network; ensures compliance with ORNL/DOE computing security regulations; ensures long-term preservation of CDIAC data holdings through systematic backups; evaluates, develops, and implements software; ensures standards compliance; generates user statistics; provides Web design, development, and oversight; and provides systems analysis and programming assistance for scientific data projects.

  3. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center for Atmospheric Trace Gases Fiscal Year 1999 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushman, R.M.

    2000-03-31

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), which includes the World Data Center (WDC) for Atmospheric Trace Gases, is the primary global-change data and information analysis center of the Department of Energy (DOE). More than just an archive of data sets and publications, CDIAC has--since its inception in 1982--enhanced the value of its holdings through intensive quality assurance, documentation, and integration. Whereas many traditional data centers are discipline-based (for example, meteorology or oceanography), CDIAC's scope includes potentially anything and everything that would be of value to users concerned with the greenhouse effect and global climate change, including concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and other radiatively active gases in the atmosphere; the role of the terrestrial biosphere and the oceans in the biogeochemical cycles of greenhouse gases; emissions of CO{sub 2} and other trace gases to the atmosphere; long-term climate trends; the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on vegetation; and the vulnerability of coastal areas to rising sea level. CDIAC is located within the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. CDIAC is co-located with ESD researchers investigating global-change topics, such as the global carbon cycle and the effects of carbon dioxide on vegetation. CDIAC staff are also connected with current ORNL research on related topics, such as renewable energy and supercomputing technologies. CDIAC is supported by the Environmental Sciences Division (Jerry Elwood, Acting Director) of DOE's Office of Biological and Environmental Research. CDIAC's FY 1999 budget was 2.2M dollars. CDIAC represents the DOE in the multi-agency Global Change Data and Information System. Bobbi Parra, and Wanda Ferrell on an interim basis, is DOE's Program Manager with responsibility for CDIAC. CDIAC comprises three groups, Global Change Data, Computer Systems, and Information Services, with seventeen full-time and part-time staff. The Global Change Data group is responsible for identifying and obtaining databases important to global-change research, analyzing data, compiling needed databases, providing data management support to specific programs (e.g., NARSTO), and preparing documentation to ensure the long-term utility of CDIAC's data holdings. The Computer Systems group provides computer system support for all CDIAC and WDC activities, including designing and maintaining CDIAC's computing system network; ensuring compliance with ORNL/DOE computing security regulations; ensuring long-term preservation of CDIAC data holdings through systematic backups; evaluating, developing, and implementing software; ensuring standards compliance; generating user statistics; providing Web design, development, and oversight; and providing systems analysis and programming assistance for scientific data projects. The Information Services group responds to data and information requests; maintains records of all request activities; assists in Web development and maintenance; and produces CDIAC's newsletter, CDIAC Communications, catalog, glossary, and educational materials. The following section provides further details on CDIAC's organization.

  4. Non-perturbative effects for the Quark-Gluon Plasma equation of state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Begun, V. V. Gorenstein, M. I. Mogilevsky, O. A.

    2012-07-15

    The non-perturbative effects for the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) equation of state (EoS) are considered. The modifications of the bag model EoS are constructed to satisfy the main qualitative features observed for the QGP EoS in the lattice QCD calculations. A quantitative comparison with the lattice results is done for the SU(3) gluon plasma and for the QGP with dynamical quarks. Our analysis advocates a negative value of the bag constant B.

  5. About Us | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    About Us About Us Learn more about our staff by reading their bios, below. View an organizational chart of our office. Download our office's informational tri-fold. Leadership John H. Hale III Director, Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization John Hale III is the Director of the Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization at the Department of Energy, reporting directly to the Office of the Secretary. In this role, Hale advocates for small businesses including small

  6. NREL: Technology Deployment - Models and Tools

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Community Solar Scenario Tool Help Make Our Beta Version Better Do you have suggestions for improving this tool? Please send us an email with your thoughts. The Community Solar Scenario Tool (CSST) provides a "first cut" analysis of different community or shared solar program options. The tool has been created primarily with smaller municipal utilities, electric cooperatives, and state and local advocates in mind. This model allows users to see how various inputs, such as system size,

  7. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fire victim helped by area programs April 3, 2012 Beatrice Dubois, dedicated fundraiser, assisted after home fire Beatrice Dubois has always been a strong advocate for LANL employee giving programs. Every year, she organizes a bake sale in support of the annual employee giving campaign and musters support with her coworkers for the Lab's annual holiday drive. A perennial helper, she didn't realize that she might someday need help herself. On February 21, 2011, a devastating fire broke out at

  8. Lighting the Way for Big Energy Savings in Los Angeles | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Peer Review | Department of Energy Lighting and Electrical Team Leadership and Project Delivery - 2014 BTO Peer Review Lighting and Electrical Team Leadership and Project Delivery - 2014 BTO Peer Review Project Objective The partners involved in the Lighting Energy Efficiency in Parking (LEEP) campaign, along with private and public entities, advocate for and install energy-efficient lighting in public parking lots to foster significant reductions in participants' energy consumption. The

  9. MEMORANDUM

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Timothy Ballo, Earthjustice DATE: June 18, 2013 RE: Efficiency Advocates' Ex Parte Communication with DOE on June 11, 2013 Meeting/Teleconference summary Attendees: Timothy Ballo - Earthjustice Dan Cohen - DOE John Cymbalsky - DOE Ben Longstreth - Natural Resources Defense Council Steve Nadel - American Council for an Energy Efficiency Economy Roland Risser - DOE Robin Roy - Natural Resources Defense Council Harvey Sachs - American Council for an Energy Efficiency Economy Charlie Stephens -

  10. MEMORANDUM

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Seth Johnson, Earthjustice DATE: June 23, 2014 RE: Efficiency Advocates' Ex Parte Communication with DOE on June 20, 2014 Meeting/Teleconference summary Attendees: Timothy Ballo - Earthjustice Seth Johnson - Earthjustice Dan Taylor - Ohio Valley Environmental Coalition Kathleen Hogan - DOE Dan Cohen - DOE John Cymbalsky - DOE Issues Discussed: The attendees identified above met on June 20, 2014, to discuss DOE's efforts on setting energy efficiency standards for manufactured housing. (Docket No.

  11. MEMORANDUM RE: Ex Parte Communications in Connection with Docket No. EERE-2010-BT-STD-0027

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    May 21, 2013 Encl: Motor Coalition Presentation This memorandum memorializes a communication involving members of the Motor Coalition (industry and energy advocates) in connection with this proceeding. The Motor Coalition thanks the DOE for permitting us to meet with you on May 13 th , 2013 to discuss the Motor Coalition Petition for Direct Final Rule and the related Rulemaking for Electric Motor performance standards, which is the subject of the above docket number. Attendees of the May 13 th

  12. Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Small Business Advocate Sandia National Laboratories 24 th Annual Briefing for Industry 2010 August 18, 2010 Small Business Utilization Department Small Business Program Don Devoti, Manager Small Business Utilization Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation,

  13. John Lippert | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Jim J. Green About Us Jim J. Green - Lead Small Business Specialist Jim J. Green Jim is the Lead Small Business Specialist, at the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business. Jim is a military veteran, and served as an Acquisition Officer. In addition, he was an experienced buyer and small business advocate at a DOE laboratory site. Jim earned his Masters of Science in Business Administration with emphasis in Hospital Administration from the University of Northern

  14. The Value of Independence: an ORISE white paper

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mission of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is the cleanup or closure of the Department's facilities.... The radiological release of property must be conducted in a manner that is technically defensible and which meets the applicable Departmental requirements." (Mark Gilbertson, July 2008). DOE/EM has stood up as an industry leader to advocate independent verification (IV) as the essential quality assurance step that ensures cleanup goals have been

  15. cqa

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 1994 July 1995 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the

  16. test02

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6 Tables May 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts The annual publication Cost

  17. Overview of Variable Renewable Energy Regulatory Issues: A Clean Energy Regulators Initiative Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Presented to the EIA Energy Conference June 17, 2013 Chris Namovicz Assessing the Economic Value of New Utility-Scale Renewable Generation Projects Overview * Levelized cost of energy (LCOE) has been used by planners, analysts, policymakers, advocates and others to assess the economic competitiveness of technology options in the electric power sector * While of limited usefulness in the analysis of "conventional" utility systems, this approach is not generally appropriate when

  18. Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Progress

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Progress Hanford Advisory Board requested action:  Based on progress discussions, the Hanford Advisory Board will develop and advocate an effective public communication strategy for use by the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Assistant Manager/Federal Project Director Progress discussions on the following:  High-level waste (HLW) authorization to proceed with full production engineering:  HLW Safety Design Strategy approval and

  19. Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Waste Diversion.png Mission The team supports efforts that promote a more sustainable environment and implements pollution prevention activities, as deemed appropriate for LM operations and approved by LM, as defined in: Executive Order (EO) 13693, Planning for Federal Sustainability in the Next Decade, and DOE Order 436.1, Departmental Sustainability The team advocates environmentally sound waste

  20. Water Conservation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Water Conservation Water Conservation Mission The team facilitates the reduction of water consumption intensity at LM sites, as deemed appropriate for LM operations and approved by LM, as defined in: Executive Order (EO) 13693, Planning for Federal Sustainability in the Next Decade, and DOE Order 436.1, Departmental Sustainability The team advocates natural resource sustainability by continually improving water use efficiencies. Scope LM and the contractor evaluate, make recommendations, and

  1. Ex Parte Memorandum - Natural Resources Defense Council | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy - Natural Resources Defense Council Ex Parte Memorandum - Natural Resources Defense Council On Friday, October 21, 2011, a group of non-profit and state energy efficiency advocates met with representatives of the Department of Energy to discuss the Direct Final Rule for Residential Furnaces, Heat Pumps and Central Air Conditioners (Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Furnaces and Residential Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps, Direct Final

  2. Ex Parte Memorandum | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wednesday, May 5, 2010, representatives from various signatories to the consensus agreement met with representatives from the Department of Energy. Advocates for the consensus agreement urged the Department of Energy to adopt the entire agreement, except provisions relating to building codes which require congressional action. The parties also discussed the need to develop effective enforcement mechanisms in general, and in particular if the Department of Energy decides to adopt regional

  3. WHAT THE SMART GRID MEANS TO YOU AND THE PEOPLE YOU REPRESENT.

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    REPRESENT. regulators consumer advocates environmental groups technology providers policymakers ONE of SIX SMART GRID STAKEHOLDER BOOKS A smarter grid can work harder and more efficiently to respond to the needs of all consumers, contain costs and enable clean-energy solutions at scale. regulators utilities 2 DISCLAIMER PRINTED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States

  4. WHAT THE SMART GRID MEANS TO YOU AND THE PEOPLE YOU SERVE.

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    SERVE. regulators consumer advocates environmental groups technology providers policymakers ONE of SIX SMART GRID STAKEHOLDER BOOKS utilities A smarter grid works harder and more efficiently to deliver better performance and bottom-line results to your utility. 2 DISCLAIMER PRINTED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor Litos Strategic

  5. Technical approaches for reducing cost of power support

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-03-01

    Methods for reducing the cost of Chinese-made power supports are discussed. A reasonable selection of functions is proposed, including protection from side collapse, anti-sliding and anti-toppling, prop extension, loading capacity and hydraulic pressure. Material costs constitute 34-44% of the total cost, and so optimisation of design and materials is required. Standardisation of hydraulic components is recommended; and the use of appropriate and effective technological and managerial techniques is advocated. (In Chinese)

  6. New Mexico Small Business Assistance Program recognized by U.S. Department

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Commerce NM Small Business assistance program recognized New Mexico Small Business Assistance Program recognized by U.S. Department of Commerce Receives the 2012 Manufacturing Advocate of the Year award from the Manufacturing Extension Partnership under the U.S. Department of Commerce. May 31, 2012 Aerial view of Los Alamos National Laboratory Aerial view of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Contact Steve Sandoval Communications Office (505) 665-9206 Email Program of Los Alamos, Sandia

  7. ORISE: ORAU receives DOE Small Business Award for work under ORISE contract

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ORAU receives DOE Small Business Award for work under ORISE contract Pictured above (L-R) are Heidi Timmerman, director of Procurement and Contracts Administration; Rebecca Crowe, Small Business advocate; both with ORAU, receiving the Facility Management Contractor Small Business Achievement of the Year Award for fiscal year 2013 from John Hale, III, Director of the Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization for DOE. Award recognizes ORAU's achievements with small business suppliers

  8. 2012-2013 EAC Membership Roster

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    August 3, 2012 Electricity Advisory Committee 2012/2013 Membership Roster Richard Cowart Regulatory Assistance Project CHAIR Irwin Popowsky Pennsylvania Consumer Advocate VICE CHAIR William Ball Southern Company Linda Blair ITC Holdings Corporation Rick Bowen Alcoa Merwin Brown California Institute for Energy and Environment Ralph Cavanagh Natural Resources Defense Council The Honorable Paul Centolella Public Utilities Commission of Ohio David Crane NRG Energy, Inc. The Honorable Robert Curry

  9. To: Department of Energy From: Andrew deLaski, Appliance Standards Awareness Project

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy From: Andrew deLaski, Appliance Standards Awareness Project Date: February 12, 2015 RE: ex parte communication On January 14, representatives of energy efficiency advocates and fan manufacturers met to describe technical considerations related to fan efficiency with DOE. The meeting participants described how fan efficiency varies with flow and pressure and reiterated support for an approach that takes into account these considerations. The meeting participants explained the

  10. To: John Cymbalsky, United States Department of Energy From: Amy Shepherd, General Counsel, AHRI

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    25, 2015 To: John Cymbalsky, United States Department of Energy From: Amy Shepherd, General Counsel, AHRI Re: Ex Parte Communication on Commercial Unitary Equipment Rulemaking On February 5, 2015, AHRI staff, Industry Representatives and Energy Efficiency Advocates met to discuss Department of Energy (DOE) rulemakings for commercial furnaces and unitary large equipment. The meeting was held at AHRI offices in Arlington, Virginia. A list of attendees is provided below. At the meeting, the group

  11. Tribal Energy Program - Technical Assistance - Sandia National Laboratories

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Tribal Energy Program - Technical Assistance Sandra Begay-Campbell Sandia National Laboratories Tribal Energy Program skbegay@sandia.gov November 17, 2009 SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES 2 | Tribal Energy Program eere.energy.gov/tribalenergy Sandra Begay-Campbell * Navajo engineer * Principal Member of the Technical Staff * Education advocate 3 | Tribal Energy Program eere.energy.gov/tribalenergy DOE-HQ DOE-GO SNL NREL DOE TEP Organization Thomas Sacco DOE Program Director Sandra Begay- Campbell

  12. U

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    FY 2011 SMALL BUSINESS AWARDS PROGRAM - AWARD RECIPIENTS Name of Award Recipient of Award Award Description Federal Small Business Program Manager of the Year Gary Bridges Southwestern Power Administration Tulsa, OK Recognizes an individual who embodies the many facets of an energetic, forward-thinking, DOE small business program manager. Their efforts far exceed expectations in working with, advocating for, and assisting in the increase utilization of small businesses. Federal Small Business

  13. WHAT A SMART GRID MEANS TO OUR NATION'S FUTURE.

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    WHAT A SMART GRID MEANS TO OUR NATION'S FUTURE. regulators consumer advocates environmental groups technology providers ONE of SIX SMART GRID STAKEHOLDER BOOKS A smarter electric grid works to strengthen our nation's economy, environment, security and independence. policymakers utilities 2 DISCLAIMER PRINTED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency

  14. WHAT THE SMART GRID MEANS TO AMERICA'S FUTURE.

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AMERICA'S FUTURE. regulators consumer advocates environmental groups policymakers ONE of SIX SMART GRID STAKEHOLDER BOOKS A smarter grid requires the participation of those who can deliver technology solutions to assist utilities and engage consumers. technology providers utilities 2 DISCLAIMER PRINTED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof,

  15. Jimmy O'Dea > Congressional Fellow - MRS/OSA Science & Engineering > Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jim J. Green About Us Jim J. Green - Lead Small Business Specialist Jim J. Green Jim is the Lead Small Business Specialist, at the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business. Jim is a military veteran, and served as an Acquisition Officer. In addition, he was an experienced buyer and small business advocate at a DOE laboratory site. Jim earned his Masters of Science in Business Administration with emphasis in Hospital Administration from the University of Northern

  16. DOE Seeks Comment on Regional Standards Enforcement Plan | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Comment on Regional Standards Enforcement Plan DOE Seeks Comment on Regional Standards Enforcement Plan November 12, 2015 - 4:50pm Addthis DOE has proposed regulations setting forth how the Department would enforce the regional standards for central air conditioners and is seeking comment from the public about the enforcement plan. The proposed rule was developed by a working group of efficiency advocates, manufacturers, utility representatives, contractors, and distributors. Addthis

  17. Sandia National Laboratories and Internships

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    November 17, 2008 DOE-HQ DOE-GO SNL NREL DOE's Tribal Energy Program Organization Thomas Sacco DOE, Program Manager Sandra Begay-Campbell SNL Roger Taylor NREL Lizana Pierce DOE, Project Manager Victoria DeHerrera Navarro, Sr. Project Analyst Scott Haase NREL Sandra Begay-Campbell *Navajo engineer *Principal Member of the Technical Staff *Education advocate New Mexico Site - Albuquerque, New Mexico  Support Tribal Energy Program Activities  Support Tribal technical assistance requests 

  18. Solicitations | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Solarize Guidebook Solarize Guidebook This guidebook is intended to be a roadmap for project planners and solar advocates who want to create their own successful Solarize campaigns, a collective purchasing program to spur solar energy deployment in local communities. The guide describes the key elements of the Solarize Portland campaign and variations from projects across the country, along with lessons learned and planning templates. Partner Agency: U.S. Department of Energy Resource Type:

  19. DOE's Office of Nuclear Energy Honored

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE's Office of Nuclear Energy Honored The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy was among those honored by the Partnership for Science and Technology (PST) as winners in the fourth annual PST Energy Advocate Awards. The awards are presented to individuals or organizations that were central to a noteworthy achievement in energy, nuclear energy or an environmental field that is of interest to PST members. The awards were presented at the annual PST Awards Luncheon on February 21,

  20. EEO is the Law Poster Supplement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Annual Training OCR's mission: Promote and advocate Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action (EEO/AA) for all NNSA employees. Create an environment that embraces and values all of our employees and is free of discrimination. Plan, coordinate, and implement the EEO/AA Program objectives and policies in accordance with DOE Headquarters; Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC); and the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) guidelines. Provide quality customer service to NNSA management

  1. A Guide to Community Solar | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Guide to Community Solar A Guide to Community Solar This guide is designed as a resource for those who want to develop community solar projects, from community organizers or solar energy advocates to government officials or utility managers. By exploring the range of incentives and policies while providing examples of operational community solar projects, this guide helps communities to plan and implement successful local energy projects. This guide also highlights some policy best practices

  2. EERE Success Story-Helping Policymakers Evaluate Distributed Wind Options

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Helping Policymakers Evaluate Distributed Wind Options EERE Success Story-Helping Policymakers Evaluate Distributed Wind Options April 18, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis With EERE support, eFormative Options is helping policymakers, utilities, advocates, and consumers evaluate the effectiveness of policies that promote distributed wind-wind turbines installed at homes, farms, and busi-nesses. Distributed wind allows Americans to generate their own clean electricity and cut

  3. Janice Bryant Howroyd | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Janice Bryant Howroyd About Us Janice Bryant Howroyd - Founder, ACT-1 Janice Bryant Howroyd Janice Bryant Howroyd is the Founder and CEO of the ACT*1 Group, a global leader in deploying talent and resource management solutions. A North Carolina native, Janice left her hometown in 1976 armed with $900. Since then, she has dedicated her efforts to building an organization that is committed to keeping the humanity in human resources. She is a strong advocate for balance of education and

  4. Jim J. Green | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Jim J. Green About Us Jim J. Green - Lead Small Business Specialist Jim J. Green Jim is the Lead Small Business Specialist, at the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business. Jim is a military veteran, and served as an Acquisition Officer. In addition, he was an experienced buyer and small business advocate at a DOE laboratory site. Jim earned his Masters of Science in Business Administration with emphasis in Hospital Administration from the University of Northern

  5. master.PDF

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Short-Term Energy Outlook April 1999 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any

  6. Assessing the Economic Value of New Utility-Scale Generation Projects

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    LCOE/LACE Workshop July 25, 2013 Chris Namovicz Assessing the Economic Value of New Utility-Scale Generation Projects Overview * Levelized cost of energy (LCOE) has been used by planners, analysts, policymakers, advocates and others to assess the economic competitiveness of technology options in the electric power sector * While of limited usefulness in the analysis of "conventional" utility systems, this approach is not generally appropriate when considering "unconventional"

  7. Performance Evaluation of a Hot-Humid Climate Community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osser, R.; Kerrigan, P.

    2012-02-01

    Project Home Again is a development in New Orleans, LA created to provide new homes to victims of Hurricane Katrina. Building Science Corporation acted as a consultant for the project, advocating design strategies for durability, flood resistance, occupant comfort, and low energy use while maintaining cost effectiveness. These techniques include the use of high density spray foam insulation, LoE3 glazing, and supplemental dehumidification to maintain comfortable humidity levels without unnecessary cooling.

  8. ONE of SIX SMART GRID STAKEHOLDER BOOKS

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ONE of SIX SMART GRID STAKEHOLDER BOOKS utilities consumer advocates regulators environmental groups technology providers policymakers WHAT THE SMART GRID MEANS TO AMERICANS. A smarter electrical grid can save us energy, protect consumers, safeguard our environment and ultimately save money for all Americans. 2 DISCLAIMER PRINTED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States

  9. ORSSAB FY 2014 Annual Report | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    4 Annual Report ORSSAB FY 2014 Annual Report Read about OREM's accomplishments and ORSSAB's recommendations during fiscal year 2014. This issue includes: *The Year's Top EM News in Oak Ridge *Key Issues *Milestones & Special Events *Board Meetings *Committees *Members and Liaisons PDF icon ORSSAB FY 2014 Annual Report More Documents & Publications Advocate - Issue 56 - October 2014 ORSSAB FY 2013 Annual Report ORSSAB Meeting - August 2013

  10. ORSSAB FY 2015 Annual Report | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    5 Annual Report ORSSAB FY 2015 Annual Report Read about OREM's accomplishments and ORSSAB's recommendations during fiscal year 2015. This issue includes: Introduction The Year's Top News Key Issues Board Meetings Committees Other Activities Members and Liaisons Service Area & Abbreviations PDF icon ORSSAB FY 2015 Annual Report More Documents & Publications ORSSAB FY 2014 Annual Report ORSSAB FY 2013 Annual Report Advocate - Issue 58 - April 2015

  11. NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Models - About JEDI

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Conventional Hydro Model Conventional Hydro Model The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Conventional Hydro model was developed to demonstrate the economic benefits associated with conventional hydro power plants in the United States. The primary goal in developing the state level model was to provide a tool for developers, renewable energy advocates, government officials, decision makers and other potential users, to easily identify the local economic impacts associated with

  12. Overview of Levelized Cost of Energy in the AEO

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Presented to the EIA Energy Conference June 17, 2013 Chris Namovicz Assessing the Economic Value of New Utility-Scale Renewable Generation Projects Overview * Levelized cost of energy (LCOE) has been used by planners, analysts, policymakers, advocates and others to assess the economic competitiveness of technology options in the electric power sector * While of limited usefulness in the analysis of "conventional" utility systems, this approach is not generally appropriate when

  13. Process for Transition of Responsibilities | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Process Rule Process Rule The Department of Energy (DOE) conducted a formal effort between 1995 and 1996 to improve the process it used to develop appliance efficiency standards. This effort involved many different stakeholders, including manufacturers, energy-efficiency advocates, trade associations, state agencies, utilities, and other interested parties. The result was the publication of the Process Rule: 61 FR 36974 (July 15, 1996). Found in the Code of Federal Regulations at 10 CFR 430

  14. Nonproliferation Uncertainties, a Major Barrier to Used Nuclear Fuel

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Recycle in the United States (Conference) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Conference: Nonproliferation Uncertainties, a Major Barrier to Used Nuclear Fuel Recycle in the United States Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nonproliferation Uncertainties, a Major Barrier to Used Nuclear Fuel Recycle in the United States A study and comparison of the goals and understandings of nonproliferation authorities with those of used nuclear fuel (UNF) recycle advocates have

  15. Program Assignments | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Services » Procurement Services » Program Assignments Program Assignments Office of Headquarters Procurement Services (MA-64) Program Assignments Mark C. Brady, Director,(202) 287-1389 Patricia Davies, Deputy Director, (202) 586-8975 CORPORATE SERVICES OFFICE - Anthony E. Cicala, Director, MA-64.1, (202) 586-7637 Strategic Initiatives Coordinator Competition Advocate Contracting Activity Task/Delivery Order Ombudsman Policy Flashes Independent Review Deborah Black - (202) 287-1416 Balanced

  16. The Next Generation of Photo-Detectors for Particle Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Robert G.; Byrum, Karen L.; Sanchez, Mayly; Vaniachine, Alexandre V.; Siegmund, Oswald; Otte, Nepomuk A.; Ramberg, Erik; Hall, Jeter; Buckley, James

    2009-04-01

    We advocate support of research aimed at developing alternatives to the photomultiplier tube for photon detection in large astroparticle experiments such as gamma-ray and neutrino astronomy, and direct dark matter detectors. Specifically, we discuss the development of large area photocathode microchannel plate photomultipliers and silicon photomultipliers. Both technologies have the potential to exhibit improved photon detection efficiency compared to existing glass vacuum photomultiplier tubes.

  17. The next generation of photo-detector for particle astrophysics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, R. G.; Byrum, K. L.; Sanchez, M.; Vaniachine, A. V.; Siegmund, O.; Otte, N.A.; Ramberg, E.; Hall, J.; Buckley, J.; High Energy Physics; Univ. of California at Berkeley; FNAL; Washington Univ.

    2009-06-02

    We advocate support of research aimed at developing alternatives to the photomultiplier tube for photon detection in large astroparticle experiments such as gamma-ray and neutrino astronomy, and direct dark matter detectors. Specifically, we discuss the development of large area photocathode microchannel plate photomultipliers and silicon photomultipliers. Both technologies have the potential to exhibit improved photon detection efficiency compared to existing glass vacuum photomultiplier tubes.

  18. Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 2001 March 2004 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the

  19. Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 1997

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 Tables May 1998 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/Cost

  20. Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 2000 Tables

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 2000 Tables August 2001 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position

  1. DOE/EIA-0191(99) Distribution Category UC-950

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 1999 Tables June 2000 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of

  2. FBP-DOE PPPO 17Aug2012

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    FBP Update Impacts Of DOE Uranium Barter Program On U.S. Domestic Industry Fluor-B&W Portsmouth LLC April 1, 2014 Frank Hahne FBP advocates full appropriation funding for Portsmouth D&D; but continued DOE UF6 uranium barter sales if appropriations are not forthcoming - In FBP's analysis based on objective measures to date conclude that the U.S. uranium mining, conversion and enrichment industries have not experienced an adverse material impact from DOE's Uranium Barter Program...... *

  3. Supplemental Comments by The Office of the Ohio Consumers Counsel ("OCC") |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy by The Office of the Ohio Consumers Counsel ("OCC") Supplemental Comments by The Office of the Ohio Consumers Counsel ("OCC") The Office of the Ohio Consumers' Counsel is Ohio's statutory residential utility consumer advocate, empowered under Chapter 4911 of the Ohio Revised Code to represent the interests of Ohio residential utility consumers in proceedings before state and federal administrative agencies and courts. PDF icon Supplemental Comments by

  4. Solarize Guidebook: A Community Guide to Collective Purchasing of Residential PV Systems (Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-05-01

    This guidebook is intended as a road map for project planners and solar advocates who want to convert 'interest' into 'action,' to break through market barriers and permanently transform the market for residential solar installations in their communities. It describes the key elements of the Solarize campaigns in Portland, and offers several program refinements from projects beyond Portland. The guidebook provides lessons, considerations, and step-by-step plans for project organizers to replicate the success of Solarize Portland.

  5. ORSSAB Meeting - April 2014 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    4 Annual Report ORSSAB FY 2014 Annual Report Read about OREM's accomplishments and ORSSAB's recommendations during fiscal year 2014. This issue includes: *The Year's Top EM News in Oak Ridge *Key Issues *Milestones & Special Events *Board Meetings *Committees *Members and Liaisons PDF icon ORSSAB FY 2014 Annual Report More Documents & Publications Advocate - Issue 56 - October 2014 ORSSAB FY 2013 Annual Report ORSSAB Meeting - August 2013

    5 Annual Report ORSSAB FY 2015 Annual Report

  6. May

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    May /newsroom/_assets/images/newsroom-icon.jpg May We are your source for reliable, up-to-date news and information; our scientists and engineers can provide technical insights on our innovations for a secure nation. Aerial view of Los Alamos National Laboratory New Mexico Small Business Assistance Program recognized by U.S. Department of Commerce Receives the 2012 Manufacturing Advocate of the Year award from the Manufacturing Extension Partnership under the U.S. Department of Commerce. -

  7. Iconic author Edward Abbey focus of Earth Day lecture April 22

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Edward Abbey focus of Earth Day lecture Iconic author Edward Abbey focus of Earth Day lecture April 22 Jack Loeffler, a bioregional aural historian, will talk about the author and environmental advocate at the Bradbury Science Museum. April 17, 2014 Bradbury Science Museum Bradbury Science Museum Contact Steve Sandoval Communications Office (505) 665-9206 Email "He was a great writer, but in my opinion, his greatest contribution was his meld of environmentalism and anarchism that resulted

  8. Instrumentation upgrades for the Macromolecular Crystallography beamlines

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Administration Institutional Research & Development Functions The Office of Advanced Simulation and Computing and Institutional R&D, a program office part of the NNSA Office of Defense Programs, advocates for and manages NNSA's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) and Site Directed Research and Development (SDRD) Programs, with SDRD work performed at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). This includes providing strategic R&D guidance and support, working

  9. maneuvering and seakeeping (MASK) basin

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    management No Fear Act The NNSA Office of Civil Rights is committed to upholding anti-discrimination and civil rights laws. This is the NNSA reporting page for the Notification and Federal Employee Anti-discrimination and Retaliation Act of 2002 (No Fear Act), Public Law 207-174. Signed by President... EEO Annual Training OCR's mission: Promote and advocate Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action (EEO/AA) for all NNSA employees. Create an environment that embraces and values all of our

  10. Smart Grid Primer (Smart Grid Books) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Educational Resources » Smart Grid Primer (Smart Grid Books) Smart Grid Primer (Smart Grid Books) Smart Grid Primer (Smart Grid Books) The Smart Grid: An Introduction, prepared 2008, is a publication sponsored by DOE's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability that explores - in layman's terms - the nature, challenges, opportunities and necessity of Smart Grid implementation. Additional books, released in 2009, target the interests of specific stakeholder groups: Consumer Advocates,

  11. Solarize Guidebook | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solarize Guidebook Solarize Guidebook This guidebook is intended to be a roadmap for project planners and solar advocates who want to create their own successful Solarize campaigns, a collective purchasing program to spur solar energy deployment in local communities. The guide describes the key elements of the Solarize Portland campaign and variations from projects across the country, along with lessons learned and planning templates. Partner Agency: U.S. Department of Energy Resource Type:

  12. Daniel Cohen Assistant General Counsel for Legislation and Regulatory Law

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Daniel Cohen Assistant General Counsel for Legislation and Regulatory Law Office of the General Counsel Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585-0121 Re: Ex Parte Memorandum Dear Mr. Cohen: On Tuesday, May 4, 2010, Kit Kennedy and Kate Houren of the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) initiated a telephone call with Daniel Cohen and Bryan Miller of the Department of Energy's Office of the General Council. During the call, NRDC advocated for the adoption of the

  13. Small Business Innovation Research / Small Business Technology Transfer |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Small Business Award Winners - FY 2011 Small Business Award Winners - FY 2011 Each year, the Energy Department celebrates small business advocates who have advanced the role of small businesses in our contracting. The Fiscal Year 2011 Small Business Awards recognize small businesses, program managers, and other partners who have gone above and beyond expectations, demonstrating exceptional performance and creativity towards helping the Department achieve its goals. Download the full list of

  14. Smart Grid Technology Interactive Model | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Educational Resources » Smart Grid Primer (Smart Grid Books) Smart Grid Primer (Smart Grid Books) Smart Grid Primer (Smart Grid Books) The Smart Grid: An Introduction, prepared 2008, is a publication sponsored by DOE's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability that explores - in layman's terms - the nature, challenges, opportunities and necessity of Smart Grid implementation. Additional books, released in 2009, target the interests of specific stakeholder groups: Consumer Advocates,

  15. Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile … Exterior Rigid Insulation Best Practices

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Exterior Rigid Insulation Best Practices TOP INNOVATOR: BSC, PHI, NorthernSTAR Field studies by Building America's research teams show the most effective ways to take advantage of the thermal, air, and vapor resistance properties of rigid foam insulation on walls, roofs, and foundations. Building America has been advocating the use of rigid foam sheathing insulation for years as a means to improve the home's thermal envelope by increasing R-value while minimizing thermal bridging in wood-framed

  16. Recommendation 216: FY 2015 DOE Oak Ridge EM Budget Request | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy 6: FY 2015 DOE Oak Ridge EM Budget Request Recommendation 216: FY 2015 DOE Oak Ridge EM Budget Request At the May 8, 2013, meeting, the Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board approved the enclosed recommendations regarding the FY 2015 DOE Oak Ridge Environmental Management Program budget request. PDF icon Recommendation 216 PDF icon DOE response to Recommondation 216 More Documents & Publications ORSSAB Meeting - May 2016 Advocate - Issue 51 - July 2013 Recommendation 224:

  17. Electricity Advisory Committee

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    June 5, 2012 Electricity Advisory Committee 2012 Membership Roster Richard Cowart Regulatory Assistance Project CHAIR Irwin Popowsky Pennsylvania Consumer Advocate VICE CHAIR William Ball Southern Company Guido Bartels IBM Rick Bowen Alcoa Merwin Brown California Institute for Energy and Environment Ralph Cavanagh Natural Resources Defense Council The Honorable Paul Centolella Public Utilities Commission of Ohio David Crane NRG Energy, Inc. The Honorable Robert Curry New York State Public

  18. Microsoft Word - Ex Parte Memo.docx

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    October 24, 2011 Re Ex Parte Communication On Friday, October 21, 2011, a group of non-profit and state energy efficiency advocates met with representatives of the Department of Energy to discuss the Direct Final Rule for Residential Furnaces, Heat Pumps and Central Air Conditioners (Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Furnaces and Residential Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps, Direct Final Rule, 76 Fed. Reg. 37,408 (June 27, 2011); Energy

  19. EEO Annual Training | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Annual Training OCR's mission: Promote and advocate Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action (EEO/AA) for all NNSA employees. Create an environment that embraces and values all of our employees and is free of discrimination. Plan, coordinate, and implement the EEO/AA Program objectives and policies in accordance with DOE Headquarters; Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC); and the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) guidelines. Provide quality customer service to NNSA management

  20. EEO Counselors | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Counselors The Role of the EEO Counselor The EEO Counselor serves as liaison between the employee and management in the informal complaint processing stage. The counselor is neither an advocate of management nor of the employee. Advises employees of EEO rights and responsibilities under the law. Meets with complainant and records the informal complaints of discrimination (must contact counselor within 45 calendar days of the alleged incident or personnel action.) Seeks out facts relevant to

  1. Institutional Research & Development | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration Institutional Research & Development Functions The Office of Advanced Simulation and Computing and Institutional R&D, a program office part of the NNSA Office of Defense Programs, advocates for and manages NNSA's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) and Site Directed Research and Development (SDRD) Programs, with SDRD work performed at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). This includes providing strategic R&D guidance and support, working

  2. Solarize Guidebook: A Community Guide to Collective Purchasing of Residential PV Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Irvine, L.; Sawyer, A.; Grove, J.

    2011-02-01

    This handbook is intended as a road map for project planners and solar advocates who want to convert interest into action, to break through market barriers and permanently transform the market for residential solar installations in their communities. It describes the key elements of the Solarize campaigns in Portland, and offers several program refinements from projects beyond Portland. The handbook provides lessons, considerations, and step-by-step plans for project organizers to replicate the success of Solarize Portland.

  3. Community Connections: September 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    September 2015 Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:May 2016 all issues All Issues » submit IN THIS ISSUE Value-added agriculture offers small agribusinesses additional income potential Closing the gap between raw product and end user Students gain valuable supercomputing skills while getting paid Laboratory summer institute provides unique internship experience CASA gives children a chance Volunteer advocates lend their

  4. Amy Jiron | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Amy Jiron About Us Amy Jiron - Technology Manager, Building Technologies Office Amy Jiron Amy Jiron manages technology deployment with the Commercial Buildings Integration team at the Department of Energy. Prior to her work with DOE, she served as the executive director of the U.S. Green Building Council Colorado Chapter, advocated for low-impact development with the National Resources Defense Council, and evaluated, commissioned and verified high-performance building design and retrofit

  5. Backstage Footage from the ARPA-E Summit | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Backstage Footage from the ARPA-E Summit Backstage Footage from the ARPA-E Summit March 2, 2011 - 6:00am Addthis John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Yesterday morning, Secretary Chu and Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger decided to drop in on a gathering of graduate students at the ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit. Hailing from 30 different campuses, these students have been strong advocates for the sciences at their respective schools and represent the

  6. Building America Update - February 6, 2014 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    February 6, 2014 Building America Update - February 6, 2014 February 6, 2014 - 3:11pm Addthis Top Innovation Spotlight: Exterior Rigid Insulation Best Practices For years, Building America research teams have advocated using the thermal, air, and vapor properties of rigid foam sheathing insulation to improve walls, This photos shows a rigid exterior insulation installed on the roof of a house. roofs, and foundations of homes. In 2013, these research efforts earned a Top Innovation award,

  7. Business Models Guide: Real Estate Agent | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Models Guide: Real Estate Agent Business Models Guide: Real Estate Agent With excellent marketing skills, a keen understanding of financing options, and a broad knowledge of the industry, real estate agents are natural advocates for smart energy efficiency upgrades. PDF icon Business Models Guide: Real Estate Agent More Documents & Publications Working with the Real Estate Sector Business Models and Case Examples for Working with the Real Estate Sector Trends in Real Estate and Energy

  8. Biosecurity Risk Assessment Methodology (BioRAM) v. 2.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-06-08

    Sandia National Laboratories International Biological Threat Reduction Dept (SNL/IBTR) has an ongoing mission to enhance biosecurity assessment methodologies, tools, and guise. These will aid labs seeking to implement biosecurity as advocated in the recently released WHO's Biorisk Management: Lab Biosecurity Guidance. BioRAM 2.0 is the software tool developed initially using the SNL LDRD process and designed to complement the "Laboratory Biosecurity Risk Handbook" written by Ren Salerno and Jennifer Gaudioso defining biosecurity risk assessment methodologies.

  9. Fungal Genome Sequencing and Bioenergy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schadt, Christopher Warren; Baker, Scott; Thykaer, Jette; Adney, William S; Brettin, Tom; Brockman, Fred; Dhaeseleer, Patrick; Martinez, A diego; Miller, R michael; Rokhsar, Daniel; Torok, Tamas; Tuskan, Gerald A; Bennett, Joan; Berka, Randy; Briggs, Steven; Heitman, Joseph; Rizvi, L; Taylor, John; Turgeon, Gillian; Werner-Washburne, Maggie; Himmel, Michael

    2008-01-01

    To date, the number of ongoing filamentous fungal genome sequencing projects is almost tenfold fewer than those of bacterial and archaeal genome projects. The fungi chosen for sequencing represent narrow kingdom diversity; most are pathogens or models. We advocate an ambitious, forward-looking phylogenetic-based genome sequencing program, designed to capture metabolic diversity within the fungal kingdom, thereby enhancing research into alternative bioenergy sources, bioremediation, and fungal-environment interactions.

  10. Fungal Genome Sequencing and Bioenergy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, Scott; Thykaer, Jette; Adney, William S; Brettin, Tom; Brockman, Fred; Dhaeseleer, Patrick; Martinez, A diego; Miller, R michael; Rokhsar, Daniel; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Torok, Tamas; Tuskan, Gerald A; Bennett, Joan; Berka, Randy; Briggs, Steven; Heitman, Joseph; Taylor, John; Turgeon, Gillian; Werner-Washburne, Maggie; Himmel, Michael E

    2008-01-01

    To date, the number of ongoing filamentous fungal genome sequencing projects is almost tenfold fewer than those of bacterial and archaeal genome projects. The fungi chosen for sequencing represent narrow kingdom diversity; most are pathogens or models. We advocate an ambitious, forward-looking phylogenetic-based genome sequencing program, designed to capture metabolic diversity within the fungal kingdom, thereby enhancing research into alternative bioenergy sources, bioremediation, and fungal-environment interactions. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of The British Mycological Society.

  11. Customer Aggregation: An Opportunity for Green Power?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holt, E.; Bird, L.

    2001-02-26

    We undertook research into the experience of aggregation groups to determine whether customer aggregation offers an opportunity to bring green power choices to more customers. The objectives of this report, therefore, are to (1) identify the different types of aggregation that are occurring today, (2) learn whether aggregation offers an opportunity to advance sales of green power, and (3) share these concepts and approaches with potential aggregators and green power advocates.

  12. Energy storage for the electricity grid : benefits and market potential assessment guide : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eyer, James M.; Corey, Garth P.

    2010-02-01

    This guide describes a high-level, technology-neutral framework for assessing potential benefits from and economic market potential for energy storage used for electric-utility-related applications. The overarching theme addressed is the concept of combining applications/benefits into attractive value propositions that include use of energy storage, possibly including distributed and/or modular systems. Other topics addressed include: high-level estimates of application-specific lifecycle benefit (10 years) in $/kW and maximum market potential (10 years) in MW. Combined, these criteria indicate the economic potential (in $Millions) for a given energy storage application/benefit. The benefits and value propositions characterized provide an important indication of storage system cost targets for system and subsystem developers, vendors, and prospective users. Maximum market potential estimates provide developers, vendors, and energy policymakers with an indication of the upper bound of the potential demand for storage. The combination of the value of an individual benefit (in $/kW) and the corresponding maximum market potential estimate (in MW) indicates the possible impact that storage could have on the U.S. economy. The intended audience for this document includes persons or organizations needing a framework for making first-cut or high-level estimates of benefits for a specific storage project and/or those seeking a high-level estimate of viable price points and/or maximum market potential for their products. Thus, the intended audience includes: electric utility planners, electricity end users, non-utility electric energy and electric services providers, electric utility regulators and policymakers, intermittent renewables advocates and developers, Smart Grid advocates and developers, storage technology and project developers, and energy storage advocates.

  13. Regional Transmission Projects: Finding Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    The Keystone Center

    2005-06-15

    The Keystone Center convened and facilitated a year-long Dialogue on "Regional Transmission Projects: Finding Solutions" to develop recommendations that will help address the difficult and contentious issues related to expansions of regional electric transmission systems that are needed for reliable and economic transmission of power within and across regions. This effort brought together a cross-section of affected stakeholders and thought leaders to address the problem with the collective wisdom of their experience and interests. Transmission owners sat at the table with consumer advocates and environmental organizations. Representatives from regional transmission organizations exchanged ideas with state and federal regulators. Generation developers explored common interests with public power suppliers. Together, the Dialogue participants developed consensus solutions about how to begin unraveling some of the more intractable issues surrounding identification of need, allocation of costs, and reaching consensus on siting issues that can frustrate the development of regional transmission infrastructure. The recommendations fall into three broad categories: 1. Recommendations on appropriate institutional arrangements and processes for achieving regional consensus on the need for new or expanded transmission infrastructure 2. Recommendations on the process for siting of transmission lines 3. Recommendations on the tools needed to support regional planning, cost allocation, and siting efforts. List of Dialogue participants: List of Dialogue Participants: American Electric Power American Transmission Company American Wind Energy Association California ISO Calpine Corporation Cinergy Edison Electric Institute Environmental Defense Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Great River Energy International Transmission Company ISO-New England Iowa Public Utility Board Kanner & Associates Midwest ISO National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners National Association of State Utility Consumer Advocates National Grid Northeast Utilities PA Office of Consumer Advocates Pacific Gas & Electric Corporation Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission PJM Interconnection The Electricity Consumers Resource Council U.S. Department of Energy US Department of the Interior Van Ness Feldman Western Interstate Energy Board Wind on the Wires Wisconsin Public Service Commission Xcel Energy

  14. Blog | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    About Us » Blog Blog RSS May 6, 2016 Blog Top 5 Tips from Clean Energy Moms for Mother's Day With Mother's Day approaching, the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) polled 20 clean energy moms on their top five tips to help raise the next generation of clean energy advocates. May 4, 2016 Plugging in an electric car is so easy that my 3-year-old can do it. I Love What My Electric Car Does-and Does Not Do Energy Saver blogger Alexis Powers answers common questions about how her

  15. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iconic author Edward Abbey focus of Earth Day lecture April 22 April 17, 2014 LOS ALAMOS, N.M., April 17, 2014-Jack Loeffler, a bioregional aural historian, will talk about the author and environmental advocate Edward Abbey and his legacy at 5:30 p.m. April 22 at the Bradbury Science Museum. The talk is free and open to the public. "Ed Abbey's message to the world is even more profound today than it was when he first spoke his piece in 'Desert Solitaire' in 1968," Loeffler said.

  16. States Celebrate National Weatherization Day

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With winter approaching, our office recently joined states and the District of Columbia in recognizing National Weatherization Day on October 30. It’s a day set aside to honor government, private, and nonprofit advocates responsible for upgrading energy efficiency in thousands of American homes. We’re proud to recognize weatherization professionals working to ensure that every American has a safe, efficient structure that’s comfortable in every season. Weatherization saves money for families, improves health and safety for home occupants, supports thousands of jobs, and reduces carbon pollution.

  17. Top 5 Tips from Clean Energy Moms for Mother's Day | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Top 5 Tips from Clean Energy Moms for Mother's Day Top 5 Tips from Clean Energy Moms for Mother's Day May 6, 2016 - 2:34pm Addthis Top 5 Tips from Clean Energy Moms for Mother’s Day Forget to get mom a Mother's Day gift? It's not too late. Surprise her by actually following the house rules! We polled 20 moms across the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) and asked for tips they're using at home to help raise the next generation of clean energy advocates (i.e. you). It's

  18. Gina McCarthy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Gina McCarthy About Us Gina McCarthy - Administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Gina McCarthy Gina McCarthy is the Administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Appointed by President Obama in 2009 as Assistant Administrator for EPA's Office of Air and Radiation, Gina McCarthy has been a leading advocate for common-sense strategies to protect public health and the environment. Most Recent Leading by Example on Climate Change: Our New Federal Sustainability Plan

  19. Give Me My Tax Credit! (Or, How I Almost Bought the Wrong Patio Door) |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Gina McCarthy About Us Gina McCarthy - Administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Gina McCarthy Gina McCarthy is the Administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Appointed by President Obama in 2009 as Assistant Administrator for EPA's Office of Air and Radiation, Gina McCarthy has been a leading advocate for common-sense strategies to protect public health and the environment. Most Recent Leading by Example on Climate Change: Our New Federal Sustainability Plan

  20. Hon. Daniel B. Poneman Deputy Secretary U.S. Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Homeowners Go Deeper in the Heart of Texas and Save With Austin Energy Homeowners Go Deeper in the Heart of Texas and Save With Austin Energy Photo of the front of a house. For homeowners interested in saving energy and money over the long term, investing the time and resources into a whole home upgrade can reap big rewards. Austin Energy's Advanced Tier program has brought homeowners comfort and savings through a multistage process that involves energy advocates and

  1. U.S DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer N e p o t i s m & M i s u s e o f P o s i t i o n Background: It is not appropriate for a Federal employee to advocate to other Federal employees or contractors with regard to employment of a relative, including a child's summer internship. In addition, a federal employee should not contact any individual in his or her office or any other office of DOE with regard to vacancies for employment for the benefit of a relative, including, dropping off a

  2. Seneca Nation - Energy Organization Development

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    NATION Energy Organizational Development A "First Steps" Grant 11/1/08 - 12/31/08 SENECA NATION  In appreciation & Acknowledgment: - Seneca Nation Council  Arlene Bova, Llona LeRoy, Councilors & energy development Advocates - Dept. of Energy, Tribal Energy Program  First Steps Grant for Strategic Energy Planning  NREL - Anemometer Loan Program  First Steps Grant for Energy Organizational Planning - Dept. of Interior, Div. of Energy Resource & Mineral

  3. Three multimedia models used at hazardous and radioactive waste sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-01-01

    The report provides an approach for evaluating and critically reviewing the capabilities of multimedia models. The study focused on three specific models: MEPAS version 3.0, MMSOILS Version 2.2, and PRESTO-EPA-CPG Version 2.0. The approach to model review advocated in the study is directed to technical staff responsible for identifying, selecting and applying multimedia models for use at sites containing radioactive and hazardous materials. In the report, restrictions associated with the selection and application of multimedia models for sites contaminated with radioactive and mixed wastes are highlighted.

  4. Viscous gravitational aether and the cosmological constant problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuang, Xiaomei; Ling, Yi E-mail: yling@ncu.edu.cn

    2009-10-01

    Recently a notion of gravitational aether is advocated to solve the cosmological constant problem. Through the modification of the source of gravity one finds that the effective Newton's constant is source dependent so as to provide a simple but consistent way to decouple gravity from the vacuum energy. However, in the original paper the ratio of the effective Newton's constants for pressureless dust and radiation has an upper bound which is 0.75. In this paper we propose a scheme to loose this bound by introducing a bulk viscosity for the gravitational aether, and expect this improvement will provide more space for matching predictions from this theoretical programm with observational constraints.

  5. Report to Congress on the feasibility of establishing a heating oil component to the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-06-01

    In the Autumn of 1996, consumers and Members of Congress from the Northeast expressed concern about high prices for heating oil and historically low levels of inventories. Some Members of Congress advocated building a Federal inventory of heating oil as part of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). Regional reserves are authorized as part of the SPR for import dependent regions by the Energy Policy and Conservation Act. In response, the Department of Energy (DOE) proposed a series of studies related to heating fuels, including a study of the desirability, feasibility, and cost of creating a Federal reserve containing distillate fuel. This report documents that study.

  6. Systems approach to project risk management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kindinger, J. P.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the need for better performance in the planning and execution of projects and examines the capabilities of two different project risk analysis methods for improving project performance. A quantitative approach based on concepts and tools adopted from the disciplines of systems analysis, probabilistic risk analysis, and other fields is advocated for managing risk in large and complex research & development projects. This paper also provides an overview of how this system analysis approach for project risk management is being used at Los Alamos National Laboratory along with examples of quantitative risk analysis results and their application to improve project performance.

  7. The Solarize Guidebook: A community guide to collective purchasing of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    residential PV systems (Book), SunShot, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) | Department of Energy The Solarize Guidebook: A community guide to collective purchasing of residential PV systems (Book), SunShot, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) The Solarize Guidebook: A community guide to collective purchasing of residential PV systems (Book), SunShot, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) This guidebook is intended as a road map for project planners and solar advocates who want to convert

  8. Celebrating Women's Equality Day 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Etched into the history of our Nation are the stories of women who fought for the America they knew was possible — a country where all are truly treated equally and have access to the ballot box, regardless of gender. It took generations of fearless women who organized and advocated to secure women’s right to vote, and on Women’s Equality Day, we honor these courageous heroes, celebrate how far we have come in the decades since, and acknowledge the work still left to be done.

  9. Now that we have smart meters, what do we do with them?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-01-15

    For years, electric utilities have been dreaming about the day when they would have smart meters on customers' premises. However, there have always been lingering doubts among some consumer advocates and critics of the smart metering schemes about their cost-effectiveness. An issue that is beginning to become noticed is that installing smart meters and introducing variable pricing will accomplish very little unless the price signals are communicated to consumers and -- more important -- to energy-using devices beyond the meter. Since consumers are unlikely to sit around watching variable prices and adjusting consumption or thermostat settings, ways must be found for the price signals to automatically and directly communicate with devices,.

  10. Oil companies and photovoltaics: a potential monopoly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, R.L.

    1981-11-01

    Oil companies are rapidly acquiring a huge share of the photovoltaics (PV) industry, causing concern by some solar advocates that PV ultimately might be controlled by large companies with no immediate incentive to develop the technology. A review of antitrust laws reveals they are only minimally applicable to a new field such as PV. Federal legislation preventing further oil company investments is not necessarily the best approach to keeping the PV industry healthy, financially as well as competitively. Instead, the government should encourage competition by providing financial assistance for small PV businesses.

  11. Battery energy storage market feasibility study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kraft, S.; Akhil, A.

    1997-07-01

    Under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy`s Office of Utility Technologies, the Energy Storage Systems Analysis and Development Department at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) contracted Frost and Sullivan to conduct a market feasibility study of energy storage systems. The study was designed specifically to quantify the energy storage market for utility applications. This study was based on the SNL Opportunities Analysis performed earlier. Many of the groups surveyed, which included electricity providers, battery energy storage vendors, regulators, consultants, and technology advocates, viewed energy storage as an important enabling technology to enable increased use of renewable energy and as a means to solve power quality and asset utilization issues. There are two versions of the document available, an expanded version (approximately 200 pages, SAND97-1275/2) and a short version (approximately 25 pages, SAND97-1275/1).

  12. Battery energy storage market feasibility study -- Expanded report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kraft, S.; Akhil, A.

    1997-09-01

    Under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy`s Office of Utility Technologies, the Energy Storage Systems Analysis and Development Department at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) contracted Frost and Sullivan to conduct a market feasibility study of energy storage systems. The study was designed specifically to quantify the battery energy storage market for utility applications. This study was based on the SNL Opportunities Analysis performed earlier. Many of the groups surveyed, which included electricity providers, battery energy storage vendors, regulators, consultants, and technology advocates, viewed battery storage as an important technology to enable increased use of renewable energy and as a means to solve power quality and asset utilization issues. There are two versions of the document available, an expanded version (approximately 200 pages, SAND97-1275/2) and a short version (approximately 25 pages, SAND97-1275/1).

  13. U.S. Solar Market Insight®: 2014 Year In Review (Executive Summary)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Solar Market Insight is a quarterly publication of the Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA)® and GTM Research. Each quarter, they survey nearly 200 installers, manufacturers, utilities, and state agencies to collect granular data on photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar. These data provide the backbone of the Solar Market Insight report, in which they identify and analyze trends in U.S. solar demand, manufacturing, and pricing by state and market segment. This analysis also forecasts demand over the next five years. As the U.S. solar market expands, it is the hope that Solar Market Insight will provide an invaluable decision-making tool for installers, suppliers, investors, policymakers, and advocates alike.

  14. Empirical kinetics and their role in elucidating the utility of transition-state theory to mineral–water reactions. A comment upon, ''Evidence and Potential Implications of Exponential Tails to Concentration Versus Time Plots for the Batch Dissolution of Calcite'' by V. W. Truesdale

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Icenhower, Jonathan P.

    2015-06-23

    Transition-state theory (TST) is a successful theory for understanding many different types of reactions, but its application to mineral-water systems has not been successful, especially as the system approaches saturation with respect to a rate-limiting phase. A number of investigators have proposed alternate frameworks for using the kinetic rate data to construct models of dissolution, including Truesdale (Aquat Geochem, 2015; this issue). This alternate approach has been resisted, in spite of self-evident discrepancies between TST expectations and the data. The failure of TST under certain circumstances is a result of the presence of metastable intermediaries or reaction layers that formmore » on the surface of reacting solids, and these phenomena are not anticipated by the current theory. Furthermore, alternate approaches, such as the shrinking object model advocated by Truesdale, represent a potentially important avenue for advancing the science of dissolution kinetics.« less

  15. International District Energy Association

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Since its formation in 1909, the International District Energy Association (IDEA) has served as a principal industry advocate and management resource for owners, operators, developers, and suppliers of district heating and cooling systems in cities, campuses, bases, and healthcare facilities. Today, with over 1,400 members in 26 countries, IDEA continues to organize high-quality technical conferences that inform, connect, and advance the industry toward higher energy efficiency and lower carbon emissions through innovation and investment in scalable sustainable solutions. With the support of DOE, IDEA performs industry research and market analysis to foster high impact projects and help transform the U.S. energy industry. IDEA was an active participant in the original Vision and Roadmap process and has continued to partner with DOE on combined heat and power (CHP) efforts across the country.

  16. IMPROVING THE PHYSICS IMPACT OF NEXT-GENERATION 76GE NEUTRINOLESS DOUBLE-BETA DECAY EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hossbach, Todd W.

    2009-06-01

    Summary and Conclusions - It was shown that segmentation and pulse-shape discrimination can improve the discovery sensitivity of a next-gen 0vBB-decay experiment by 90%. - However, when practical aspects are considered (such as instrumenting each segment with front-end electronics), the discovery sensitivity is decreased by 19%. - This has extremely important consequences to proposed next-gen experiments since the two active collaborations have strongly advocated the use of segmented detectors for all or part of the experiment. - New germanium detector technology, currently under development, has demonstrated excellent multi-site background rejection capabilities without the complexity of segmentation or complicated PSD algorithms. - The physically-segmented p-type germanium detector technology has proven to be a useful and practical tool in modern nuclear physics. The PSEG technology deserves further development as it has the potential for use in a variety of applications.

  17. Probing the Interiors of the Ice Giants: Shock Compression of Water to 700 GPa and 3.8 g/cm³

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Knudson, M. D.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Lemke, R. W.; Mattsson, T. R.; French, M.; Nettelmann, N.; Redmer, R.

    2012-02-27

    Recently, there has been a tremendous increase in the number of identified extrasolar planetary systems. Our understanding of their formation is tied to exoplanet internal structure models, which rely upon equations of state of light elements and compounds such as water. Here, we present shock compression data for water with unprecedented accuracy that show that water equations of state commonly used in planetary modeling significantly overestimate the compressibility at conditions relevant to planetary interiors. Furthermore, we show that its behavior at these conditions, including reflectivity and isentropic response, is well-described by a recent first-principles based equation of state. These findingsmore » advocate that this water model be used as the standard for modeling Neptune, Uranus, and “hot Neptune” exoplanets and should improve our understanding of these types of planets.« less

  18. Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE funded "Best Practices for Cost-Effective Distributed Wind" to identify distributed wind technology policy best practices and to help policymakers, utilities, advocates, and consumers examine their effectiveness using a pro forma model. Incorporating a customized feed from the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE), the Web-based Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool is designed to assist state, local, and utility officials in understanding the financial impacts of different policy options to help reduce the cost of distributed wind technologies. The Tool can be used to evaluate the ways that a variety of federal and state policies and incentives impact the economics of distributed wind (and subsequently its expected market growth).

  19. Fight over fuel additive rekindled

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stringer, J.

    1996-03-20

    Ethyl and EPA are trading punches over EPA`s doubts about the safety of Ethyl`s gasoline additive methylcyclopentadienyl manganese (MMT). Late last week, EPA released a statement reaffirming its position that there has not been enough research on health effects of MMT and asking gas stations to label pumps that contain the additive so consumers will be aware they are using it. Responding to that statement, Ethyl has written Administrator Carol Browner asking why she appears to be supporting the Environmental Defense Fund`s (EDF; Washington) campaign against MMT and advocating the delay of the additive use in light of its known emission-reducing characteristics. The tension began in the early `90s, when the EPA refused to allow Ethyl to market MMT and required it to perform more long-term health studies. Last October a court ordered the agency to grant Ethyl approval to use MMT in nonreformulated gasoline.

  20. We can fight smog without breaking the bank

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carey, J.

    1994-10-03

    Despite increased regulation and public interest, effective air pollution control remains ellusive. One of the primary air pollution problems is ozone-based smog, which afflicts an increasing number of metropolitan areas. At present, ozone levels in 93 cities violate existing federal regulations for safe air. These problems come at a time when there is a growing amount of evidence suggesting that these federal standards need to be revised downward. In the northeastern US, advocates of smog reduction are calling for the forced introduction of cleaner vehicles, including electric cars. However, these measures aimed at reducing VOC emissions may prove too costly to implement effectively. Emphasis should, instead, be placed on reducing the emission of nitrogen oxides.

  1. Least-cost utility planning consumer participation manual. [Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, C.; Wellinghoff, J.; Goldberg, F.

    1989-12-31

    This manual is designed to provide guidance to state consumer advocates and other state consumer groups interested in either initiating and/or participating in an Least-Cost Utility Planning (LCUP) process in their state. Least cost utility planning examined primarily as a regulatory framework to be implemented by an appropriate state authority -- usually the public utility commission -- for the benefit of the state`s citizens and electric utility customers. LCUP is also a planning process to be used by investor owned and public utilities to select, support and justify future expenditures in resource additions. This manual is designed as a ``How-To`` manual for implementing and participating in a statewide LCUP process. Its goal is to guide the reader through the LCUP maze so that meaningful, forward-looking, and cost minimizing electric utility planning can be initiated and sustained in your state.

  2. Least-cost utility planning consumer participation manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, C.; Wellinghoff, J.; Goldberg, F.

    1989-01-01

    This manual is designed to provide guidance to state consumer advocates and other state consumer groups interested in either initiating and/or participating in an Least-Cost Utility Planning (LCUP) process in their state. Least cost utility planning examined primarily as a regulatory framework to be implemented by an appropriate state authority -- usually the public utility commission -- for the benefit of the state's citizens and electric utility customers. LCUP is also a planning process to be used by investor owned and public utilities to select, support and justify future expenditures in resource additions. This manual is designed as a How-To'' manual for implementing and participating in a statewide LCUP process. Its goal is to guide the reader through the LCUP maze so that meaningful, forward-looking, and cost minimizing electric utility planning can be initiated and sustained in your state.

  3. U.S.-EC Fuel Cycle Study: Background Document to the Approach and Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, R.

    1992-11-01

    Introducing social costs into utility decision making is not the first best policy for internalizing damages associated with energy use. If this approach is applied to electric utilities only, energy markets could become distorted. It introduces possible anti-new source bias if applied to only new sources. It requires that other policies, such as potentially inefficient environmental laws, be taken as a given. It offers an inappropriate jurisdictional control for many issues, such as global warming or foreign policy, which will be a source of frustration for many advocates. And it could even result in increases in pollution. It would be preferable for federal and state laws to be set and designed efficiently affecting all sectors of the economy. Nonetheless, application and investment of the concept of social costing of electricity can lead to more efficient electricity generation choices. While the piecemeal problem is potentially significant, so are the benefits of social costing.

  4. Correlated, precision measurements of θ23 and δ using only the electron neutrino appearance experiments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Minakata, Hisakazu; Parke, Stephen J.

    2013-06-04

    Precision measurement of the leptonic CP violating phase δ will suffer from the, then surviving, large uncertainty of sin2θ23 of 10–20% in the experimentally interesting region near maximal mixing of θ23. We advocate a new method for determination of both θ23 and δ at the same time using only the νe and ν̄e appearance channels and show that sin2θ23 can be determined automatically with much higher accuracy, approximately a factor of six, than sinδ. In this method, we identify a new degeneracy for the simultaneous determination of θ23 and δ, the θ23 intrinsic degeneracy, which must be resolved in ordermore » to achieve precision measurement of these two parameters. Spectral information around the vacuum oscillation maxima is shown to be the best way to resolve this degeneracy.« less

  5. Evaluation of the 2010 Toyota Prius Hybrid Synergy Drive System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burress, Timothy A; Campbell, Steven L; Coomer, Chester; Ayers, Curtis William; Wereszczak, Andrew A; Cunningham, Joseph Philip; Marlino, Laura D; Seiber, Larry Eugene; Lin, Hua-Tay

    2011-03-01

    Subsystems of the 2010 Toyota Prius hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) were studied and tested as part of an intensive benchmarking effort carried out to produce detailed information concerning the current state of nondomestic alternative vehicle technologies. Feedback provided by benchmarking efforts is particularly useful to partners of the Vehicle Technologies collaborative research program as it is essential in establishing reasonable yet challenging programmatic goals which facilitate development of competitive technologies. The competitive nature set forth by the Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP) not only promotes energy independence and economic stability, it also advocates the advancement of alternative vehicle technologies in an overall global perspective. These technologies greatly facilitate the potential to reduce dependency on depleting natural resources and mitigate harmful impacts of transportation upon the environment.

  6. Effective field theory: A modern approach to anomalous couplings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Degrande, Cline; Centre for Particle Physics and Phenomenology , Universit Catholique de Louvain, Chemin du Cyclotron 2, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve ; Greiner, Nicolas; Max-Planck-Institut fr Physik, Fhringer Ring 6, 80805 Mnchen ; Kilian, Wolfgang; University of Siegen, Fachbereich Physik, D-57068 Siegen ; Mattelaer, Olivier; Mebane, Harrison; Stelzer, Tim; Willenbrock, Scott; Zhang, Cen; Centre for Particle Physics and Phenomenology , Universit Catholique de Louvain, Chemin du Cyclotron 2, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve

    2013-08-15

    We advocate an effective field theory approach to anomalous couplings. The effective field theory approach is the natural way to extend the standard model such that the gauge symmetries are respected. It is general enough to capture any physics beyond the standard model, yet also provides guidance as to the most likely place to see the effects of new physics. The effective field theory approach also clarifies that one need not be concerned with the violation of unitarity in scattering processes at high energy. We apply these ideas to pair production of electroweak vector bosons. -- Highlights: We discuss the advantages of effective field theories compared to anomalous couplings. We show that one need not be concerned with unitarity violation at high energy. We discuss the application of effective field theory to weak boson physics.

  7. Challenging the Mean Time to Failure: Measuring Dependability as a Mean Failure Cost

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheldon, Frederick T; Mili, Ali

    2009-01-01

    many fronts: it ignores the variance in stakes among stakeholders; it fails to recognize the structure of complex specifications as the aggregate of overlapping requirements; it fails to recognize that different components of the specification carry different stakes, even for the same stakeholder; it fails to recognize that V&V actions have different impacts with respect to the different components of the specification. Similar metrics of security, such as MTTD (Mean Time to Detection) and MTTE (Mean Time to Exploitation) suffer from the same shortcomings. In this paper we advocate a measure of dependability that acknowledges the aggregate structureof complex system specifications, and takes into account variations by stakeholder, by specification components, and by V&V impact.

  8. Emergent cosmological constant from colliding electromagnetic waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halilsoy, M.; Mazharimousavi, S. Habib; Gurtug, O. E-mail: habib.mazhari@emu.edu.tr

    2014-11-01

    In this study we advocate the view that the cosmological constant is of electromagnetic (em) origin, which can be generated from the collision of em shock waves coupled with gravitational shock waves. The wave profiles that participate in the collision have different amplitudes. It is shown that, circular polarization with equal amplitude waves does not generate cosmological constant. We also prove that the generation of the cosmological constant is related to the linear polarization. The addition of cross polarization generates no cosmological constant. Depending on the value of the wave amplitudes, the generated cosmological constant can be positive or negative. We show additionally that, the collision of nonlinear em waves in a particular class of Born-Infeld theory also yields a cosmological constant.

  9. Empirical kinetics and their role in elucidating the utility of transition-state theory to mineral-water reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Icenhower, Jonathan P.

    2015-06-23

    Transition-state theory (TST) is a successful theory for understanding many different types of reactions, but its application to mineralwater systems has not been successful, especially as the system approaches saturation with respect to a rate-limiting phase. A number of investigators have proposed alternate frameworks for using the kinetic rate data to construct models of dissolution, including Truesdale (Aquat Geochem, 2015; this issue). This alternate approach has been resisted, in spite of self-evident discrepancies between TST expectations and the data. The failure of TST under certain circumstances is a result of the presence of metastable intermediaries or reaction layers that form on the surface of reacting solids, and these phenomena are not anticipated by the current theory. Furthermore, alternate approaches, such as the shrinking object model advocated by Truesdale, represent a potentially important avenue for advancing the science of dissolution kinetics.

  10. Special lecture in memory of Glenn Theodore Seaborg (19 April 1912 - 25 February 1999) Glenn T. Seaborg's multi-faceted career

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, Darleane C.

    2001-11-01

    Glenn Theodore Seaborg (1912-1999) was a world-renowned nuclear chemist, a Nobel Laureate in chemistry in 1951, co-discoverer of plutonium and nine other transuranium elements, Chairman of the US Atomic Energy Commission from 1961-71, scientific advisor to ten US presidents, active in national and international professional societies, an advocate for nuclear power as well as for a comprehensive nuclear test ban treaty, a prolific writer, an avid hiker, environmentalist, and sports enthusiast. He was known and esteemed not only by chemists and other scientists throughout the world, but also by lay people, politicians, statesmen, and students of all ages. This memorial includes a brief glimpse of Glenn Seaborg's early life and education, describes some of his major contributions to nuclear science over his long and fruitful career, and highlights his profound influence on nuclear science, both in the US and in the international community.

  11. Oil and economic performance in industrial countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nordhaus, W.D.

    1980-01-01

    The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries have experienced slower economic growth and periods of discontinuity in the energy market since the 1973-74 oil embargo. A review of this phenomenon examines changes in the market during the 1960s and 70s, linkages between oil prices and economic performance, and appropriate policy responses. When price elasticities are calculated over time, recent US economic behavior appears to have both historical and cross-sountry consistency. Little flexibility is seen in the available energy-using technologies for producing goods and services, while energy-using capital has been sluggish. Dr. Nordhaus advocates high oil price and high tax policies as the best way to limit demand without slowing economic growth. (DCK)

  12. Probing the Interiors of the Ice Giants: Shock Compression of Water to 700 GPa and 3.8 g/cm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knudson, M. D.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Lemke, R. W.; Mattsson, T. R.; French, M.; Nettelmann, N.; Redmer, R.

    2012-02-27

    Recently, there has been a tremendous increase in the number of identified extrasolar planetary systems. Our understanding of their formation is tied to exoplanet internal structure models, which rely upon equations of state of light elements and compounds such as water. Here, we present shock compression data for water with unprecedented accuracy that show that water equations of state commonly used in planetary modeling significantly overestimate the compressibility at conditions relevant to planetary interiors. Furthermore, we show that its behavior at these conditions, including reflectivity and isentropic response, is well-described by a recent first-principles based equation of state. These findings advocate that this water model be used as the standard for modeling Neptune, Uranus, and hot Neptune exoplanets and should improve our understanding of these types of planets.

  13. Empirical kinetics and their role in elucidating the utility of transition-state theory to mineral-water reactions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Icenhower, Jonathan P.

    2015-06-23

    Transition-state theory (TST) is a successful theory for understanding many different types of reactions, but its application to mineralwater systems has not been successful, especially as the system approaches saturation with respect to a rate-limiting phase. A number of investigators have proposed alternate frameworks for using the kinetic rate data to construct models of dissolution, including Truesdale (Aquat Geochem, 2015; this issue). This alternate approach has been resisted, in spite of self-evident discrepancies between TST expectations and the data. The failure of TST under certain circumstances is a result of the presence of metastable intermediaries or reaction layers that formmoreon the surface of reacting solids, and these phenomena are not anticipated by the current theory. Furthermore, alternate approaches, such as the shrinking object model advocated by Truesdale, represent a potentially important avenue for advancing the science of dissolution kinetics.less

  14. A brief history of geospatial science in the Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhaduri, Budhendra L

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has a rich history of significant contributions to geospatial science spanning the past four decades. In the early years, work focused on basic research, such as development of algorithms for processing geographic data and early use of LANDSAT imagery. The emphasis shifted in the mid-1970s to development of geographic information system (GIS) applications to support programs such as the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE), and later to issue-oriented GIS applications supporting programs such as environmental restoration and management (mid-1980s through present). Throughout this period, the DOE national laboratories represented a strong chorus of voices advocating the importance of geospatial science and technology in the decades to come. The establishment of a Geospatial Science Program by the DOE Office of the Chief Information Officer in 2005 reflects the continued potential of geospatial science to enhance DOE's science, projects, and operations, as is well demonstrated by historical analysis.

  15. Caterpillar`s advanced reciprocating engine for distributed generation markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, G.; Brandes, D.; Reinhart, M.; Nagel, G.; Wong, E.

    1999-11-01

    Competition in energy markets and federal and state policy advocating clean, advanced technologies as means to achieve environmental and global climate change goals are clear drivers to original equipment manufacturers of prime movers. Underpinning competition are the principle of consumer choice to facilitate retail competition, and the desire to improve system and grid reliability. Caterpillar`s Gas Engine Division is responding to the market`s demand for a more efficient, lower lifecycle cost engine with reduced emissions. Cat`s first generation TARGET engine will be positioned to effectively serve distributed generation and combined heat and power (CHP) applications. TARGET (The Advanced Reciprocating Gas Engine Technology) will embody Cat`s product attributes: durability, reliability, and competitively priced life cycle cost products. Further, Caterpillar`s nationwide, fully established dealer sales and service ensure continued product support subsequent to the sale and installation of the product.

  16. Low Income Consumer Utility Issues: A National Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisenberg, J

    2001-03-26

    This report has been prepared to provide low-income advocates and other stakeholders information on the energy burden faced by low-income customers and programs designed to alleviate that burden in various states. The report describes programs designed to lower payments, manage arrearages, weatherize and provide other energy efficiency measures, educate consumers, increase outreach to the target It discusses the costs and benefits of the population, and evaluate the programs. various options--to the degree this information is available--and describes attempts to quantify benefits that have heretofore not been quantified. The purpose of this report is to enable the low-income advocates and others to assess the options and design program most suitable for the citizens of their states or jurisdictions. It is not the authors' intent to recommend a particular course of action but, based on our broad experience in the field, to provide the information necessary for others to do so. We would be happy to answer any questions or provide further documentation on any of the material presented herein. The original edition of this report was prepared for the Utah Committee on Consumer Services, pursuant to a contract with the National Consumer Law Center (NCLC), to provide information to the Utah Low-Income Task Force established by the Utah Public Service, Commission. Attachment 1 is drawn from NCLC's 1998 Supplement to its Access to Utility Services; NCLC plans to update this list in 2001, and it will be available then from NCLC. This report has been updated by the authors for this edition.

  17. A municipal guide to least cost utility planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The recent track record of traditional'' electricity planning, which entails selection of supply side resources to meet forecasted demand, has not been good. There are numerous examples of utilities incorrectly forecasting demand and over-building generating capacity while others underestimated growth and have had to cut demand and find alternate power sources to avoid outages. A potential solution to this problem is the continuing development of Least Cost Utility Plannning (LCUP). Regulatory commissions, consumer advocates and utilities are increasingly relying an LCUP as the most responsible way to avoid construction of new capacity and alleviate anticipated shortages caused by cancellation of construction projects, load growth, or natural replacement of aging capacity. The purpose of this report is to provide municipalities a starting point for evaluating their servicing utilities or states' least cost plan. This was accomplished by: Identifying key issues in LCUP; reviewing examples of the collaborative and classic approaches to LCUP in Illinois, California, New York State and Michigan; cataloging municipal authorities and strategies which can influence or support LCUP activities. Results of the project indicate that through a basic understanding of LCUP processes and issues, municipalities will be in a better position to influence plans or, if necessary, intervene in regulatory proceedings where plans are adopted. Constraints to municipal involvement in LCUP include statutory limitations, resource constraints, and a lack of knowledge of indirect authorities that support the LCUP process.

  18. A municipal guide to least cost utility planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The recent track record of ``traditional`` electricity planning, which entails selection of supply side resources to meet forecasted demand, has not been good. There are numerous examples of utilities incorrectly forecasting demand and over-building generating capacity while others underestimated growth and have had to cut demand and find alternate power sources to avoid outages. A potential solution to this problem is the continuing development of Least Cost Utility Plannning (LCUP). Regulatory commissions, consumer advocates and utilities are increasingly relying an LCUP as the most responsible way to avoid construction of new capacity and alleviate anticipated shortages caused by cancellation of construction projects, load growth, or natural replacement of aging capacity. The purpose of this report is to provide municipalities a starting point for evaluating their servicing utilities or states` least cost plan. This was accomplished by: Identifying key issues in LCUP; reviewing examples of the collaborative and classic approaches to LCUP in Illinois, California, New York State and Michigan; cataloging municipal authorities and strategies which can influence or support LCUP activities. Results of the project indicate that through a basic understanding of LCUP processes and issues, municipalities will be in a better position to influence plans or, if necessary, intervene in regulatory proceedings where plans are adopted. Constraints to municipal involvement in LCUP include statutory limitations, resource constraints, and a lack of knowledge of indirect authorities that support the LCUP process.

  19. Not in the want ads: Finding the emerging environmental occupations within economic and social change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palumbo, M.J.

    1995-12-01

    The transition of America`s work force is an evolving process. Environmental issues, in general, and environment occupational dynamics, in specific, are complex and involve a wide variety of private and public organizations. The paper advocates a federal government role in directly supporting sustainable development oriented environmental programs to assist in the transition of today`s labor into the skilled and growing occupations of tomorrow. The American economy and the industrial organizations which define it are changing drastically. Much of this change has been influenced by compliance to strict environmental regulation and enforcement, protective labor laws, and the increased adoption of pollution prevention processes and principles. Additional factors include: increased international competition and free trade, a global recession, and increasingly flexible capital transfer and monetary markets. As the world approaches the turn of the century, technological change dominates the economic landscape. There is no clearly drawn map or model on how American labor will integrate, prepare, and train for the new jobs created from the practice of sustainable development. The policies and commitments necessary to drive the transition of our occupational work force are clearly in their infancy. Consequently, the study will collect and synthesize existing information related to environmental occupations, job growth, and sustainable development oriented programs. The study will conclude with a discussion of common themes and policies for business and labor leaders, and environmental lists which maximize economic efficiency, protect the environment, and ensure that job creation is achieved.

  20. An examination of the role of risk assessment in superfund program management, implementation, and evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bala, S.

    1995-12-01

    Human health risk assessment is playing an increasing role in the characterization of the nature and extent of human health threats posed by Superfund hazardous waste sites, and the prioritization of these sites for remediation activities. Risk assessment also plays a central role in initiatives to measure and evaluate the program`s progress in remediating these sites, and in efforts to communicate that progress to a diverse audience. This paper examines the current role of risk assessment in Superfund`s program management, implementation, and evaluation activities, and advocates the need for a comprehensive plan to enhance and systematically apply risk assessment information across all of these activities. Specifically, this paper examines the role of risk assessment at three levels: (1) the current role of risk information in Superfund`s program management activities; (2) the current role of risk information in the implementation of site cleanup; (3) profile of Superfund`s approach to measuring, evaluating, and communicating site remediation progress via Environmental Indicators (EIs). Building on this three-level examination, this paper calls for the development of a comprehensive plan for the enhanced and systematic application of risk assessment information in Superfund`s program management, implementation, and evaluation activities. This paper also draws upon the current literature on risk assessment and measurement, risk-based planning and decision-making, and risk communication.

  1. The institutional role of NGOs in protecting Indonesia's treasurehouse of natural resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrich, C.H. )

    1993-01-01

    As the world's fourth most populous nation, Indonesia faces enormous development pressures on its limited--but plentiful--resource base. Nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) are playing an important role in protecting Indonesia's environmental bounty through a unique institutional status. Indonesia's decade-old environmental protection legislation lays out specific responsibilities for NGOs, but the government also keeps an extremely tight watch over their activities, their funding sources, and their overseas strategizing with other NGOs. They are not permitted to participate in political or commercial activities. Indonesian NGOs enjoy a unique funding relationship with the private business community wherein they may even eventually campaign against a particular donor's environmental management practices. All this occurs within the political context of highly centralized, hierarchical government control coupled with anti-North/West leanings. That NGOs have survived to the point of even having standing in court is not unique globally, but certainly noteworthy in this near-fledgling democracy. In this paper, the author recalls his experience working on environmental management issues with Indonesian government officials, power utility staff, NGOs, and private environmental practitioners, and Western environmental consultants and advocates to analyze the short history of, prospects for, and mechanisms of NGO influence over Indonesian environmental policy making and implementation.

  2. Phase diagram and transformations of iron pentacarbonyl to nm layered hematite and carbon-oxygen polymer under pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryu, Young Jay; Kim, Minseob; Yoo, Choong -Shik

    2015-10-12

    In this study, we present the phase diagram of Fe(CO)5, consisting of three molecular polymorphs (phase I, II and III) and an extended polymeric phase that can be recovered at ambient condition. The phase diagram indicates a limited stability of Fe(CO)5 within a pressure-temperature dome formed below the liquid- phase II- polymer triple point at 4.2 GPa and 580 K. The limited stability, in turn, signifies the temperature-induced weakening of Fe-CO back bonds, which eventually leads to the dissociation of Fe-CO at the onset of the polymerization of CO. The recovered polymer is a composite of novel nm-lamellar layers of crystalline hematite Fe2O3 and amorphous carbon-oxygen polymers. These results, therefore, demonstrate the synthesis of carbon-oxygen polymer by compressing Fe(CO)5, which advocates a novel synthetic route to develop atomistic composite materials by compressing organometallic compounds.

  3. Quantifying the value that wind power provides as a hedge against volatile natural gas prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

    2002-05-31

    Advocates of renewable energy have long argued that wind power and other renewable technologies can mitigate fuel price risk within a resource portfolio. Such arguments--made with renewed vigor in the wake of unprecedented natural gas price volatility during the winter of 2000/2001--have mostly been qualitative in nature, however, with few attempts to actually quantify the price stability benefit that wind and other renewables provide. This paper attempts to quantify this benefit by equating it with the cost of achieving price stability through other means, particularly gas-based financial derivatives (futures and swaps). We find that over the past two years, natural gas consumers have had to pay a premium of roughly 0.50 cents/kWh over expected spot prices to lock in natural gas prices for the next 10 years. This incremental cost is potentially large enough to tip the scales away from new investments in natural gasfired generation and in favor of investments in wind power and other renewable technologies.

  4. Synchronization in Complex Oscillator Networks and Smart Grids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorfler, Florian; Chertkov, Michael; Bullo, Francesco

    2012-07-24

    The emergence of synchronization in a network of coupled oscillators is a fascinating topic in various scientific disciplines. A coupled oscillator network is characterized by a population of heterogeneous oscillators and a graph describing the interaction among them. It is known that a strongly coupled and sufficiently homogeneous network synchronizes, but the exact threshold from incoherence to synchrony is unknown. Here we present a novel, concise, and closed-form condition for synchronization of the fully nonlinear, non-equilibrium, and dynamic network. Our synchronization condition can be stated elegantly in terms of the network topology and parameters, or equivalently in terms of an intuitive, linear, and static auxiliary system. Our results significantly improve upon the existing conditions advocated thus far, they are provably exact for various interesting network topologies and parameters, they are statistically correct for almost all networks, and they can be applied equally to synchronization phenomena arising in physics and biology as well as in engineered oscillator networks such as electric power networks. We illustrate the validity, the accuracy, and the practical applicability of our results in complex networks scenarios and in smart grid applications.

  5. Understanding the large-distance behavior of transverse-momentum-dependent parton densities and the Collins-Soper evolution kernel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, John; Rogers, Ted

    2015-04-01

    There is considerable controversy about the size and importance of non-perturbative contributions to the evolution of transverse momentum dependent (TMD) parton distribution functions. Standard fits to relatively high-energy Drell-Yan data give evolution that when taken to lower Q is too rapid to be consistent with recent data in semi-inclusive deeply inelastic scattering. Some authors provide very different forms for TMD evolution, even arguing that non-perturbative contributions at large transverse distance bT are not needed or are irrelevant. Here, we systematically analyze the issues, both perturbative and non-perturbative. We make a motivated proposal for the parameterization of the non-perturbative part of the TMD evolution kernel that could give consistency: with the variety of apparently conflicting data, with theoretical perturbative calculations where they are applicable, and with general theoretical non-perturbative constraints on correlation functions at large distances. We propose and use a scheme- and scale-independent function A(bT) that gives a tool to compare and diagnose different proposals for TMD evolution. We also advocate for phenomenological studies of A(bT) as a probe of TMD evolution. The results are important generally for applications of TMD factorization. In particular, they are important to making predictions for proposed polarized Drell- Yan experiments to measure the Sivers function.

  6. Selecting a plutonium vitrification process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jouan, A. [Centre d`Etudes de la Vallee du Rhone, Bagnols sur Ceze (France)

    1996-05-01

    Vitrification of plutonium is one means of mitigating its potential danger. This option is technically feasible, even if it is not the solution advocated in France. Two situations are possible, depending on whether or not the glass matrix also contains fission products; concentrations of up to 15% should be achievable for plutonium alone, whereas the upper limit is 3% in the presence of fission products. The French continuous vitrification process appears to be particularly suitable for plutonium vitrification: its capacity is compatible with the required throughout, and the compact dimensions of the process equipment prevent a criticality hazard. Preprocessing of plutonium metal, to convert it to PuO{sub 2} or to a nitric acid solution, may prove advantageous or even necessary depending on whether a dry or wet process is adopted. The process may involve a single step (vitrification of Pu or PuO{sub 2} mixed with glass frit) or may include a prior calcination step - notably if the plutonium is to be incorporated into a fission product glass. It is important to weigh the advantages and drawbacks of all the possible options in terms of feasibility, safety and cost-effectiveness.

  7. Progress in the Use of Isotopes: The Atomic Triad - Reactors, Radioisotopes and Radiation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Libby, W. F.

    1958-08-04

    Recent years have seen a substantial growth in the use of isotopes in medicine, agriculture, and industry: up to the minute information on the production and use of isotopes in the U.S. is presented. The application of radioisotopes to industrial processes and manufacturing operations has expanded more rapidly than any one except its most ardent advocates expected. New uses and new users are numerous. The adoption by industry of low level counting techniques which make possible the use of carbon-14 and tritium in the control of industrial processes and in certain exploratory and research problems is perhaps most promising of current developments. The latest information on savings to industry will be presented. The medical application of isotopes has continued to develop at a rapid pace. The current trend appears to be in the direction of improvements in technique and the substitution of more effective isotopes for those presently in use. Potential and actual benefits accruing from the use of isotopes in agriculture are reviewed. The various methods of production of radioisotopes are discussed. Not only the present methods but also interesting new possibilities are covered. Although isotopes are but one of the many peaceful uses of the atom, it is the first to pay its way. (auth)

  8. Understanding the large-distance behavior of transverse-momentum-dependent parton densities and the Collins-Soper evolution kernel

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Collins, John; Rogers, Ted

    2015-04-01

    There is considerable controversy about the size and importance of non-perturbative contributions to the evolution of transverse momentum dependent (TMD) parton distribution functions. Standard fits to relatively high-energy Drell-Yan data give evolution that when taken to lower Q is too rapid to be consistent with recent data in semi-inclusive deeply inelastic scattering. Some authors provide very different forms for TMD evolution, even arguing that non-perturbative contributions at large transverse distance bT are not needed or are irrelevant. Here, we systematically analyze the issues, both perturbative and non-perturbative. We make a motivated proposal for the parameterization of the non-perturbative part ofmore » the TMD evolution kernel that could give consistency: with the variety of apparently conflicting data, with theoretical perturbative calculations where they are applicable, and with general theoretical non-perturbative constraints on correlation functions at large distances. We propose and use a scheme- and scale-independent function A(bT) that gives a tool to compare and diagnose different proposals for TMD evolution. We also advocate for phenomenological studies of A(bT) as a probe of TMD evolution. The results are important generally for applications of TMD factorization. In particular, they are important to making predictions for proposed polarized Drell- Yan experiments to measure the Sivers function.« less

  9. Radionuclide scintigraphy of bacterial nephritis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conway, J.J.; Weiss, S.C.; Shkolnik, A.; Yogev, R.; Firlit, C.; Traisman, E.S.

    1984-01-01

    Pyelonephritis is a leading cause of renal failure and is expected to cost as much as three billion dollars in 1984. The diagnosis of urinary tract infection is usually not difficult. However, localization of the infection within the renal parenchyma as opposed to the collecting system is much more difficult. Flank pain, fever, bacteiuria and evidence of parenchymal involvement by intravenous urography may be absent or unrecognized particularly in the infant. Ultrasound and Nuclear Medicine are advocated as better methods to define parenchymal involvement. Such definition is important in the consideration of treatment since parenchymal involvement of the kidney carries a much more ominous potential outcome than infection restricted to within the collecting system. 38 children with a clinical diagnosis of urinary tract infection were studied. 26 of the patients demonstrated abnormal renal parenchymal findings with Gallium-67 Citrate or Tc-99m Glucoheptonate scintigraphy. Intravenous urography was notably ineffective with only 5 of the 20 interpreted as abnormal due to parenchymal disease or decreased function. 11 were entirely normal while only 5 demonstrated scars or hydronephrosis. Only 10 of 17 patients demonstrated intranvesicoureteral reflux on x-ray or nuclear cystography. Ultrasound depicted 6 of 20 patients as having parenchymal abnormalities. Seven were normal. Nonspecific findings such as dilitation of the renal pelvis or renal enlargement was noted in 11 of the 20 patients. Radionuclide Scintigraphy is the most efficacious modality to detect since acute bacterial nephritis.

  10. Co-collection: Back to the past

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, C.

    1995-10-01

    In the early `70s, when haulers began collecting newspapers for recycling at the curbside, they collected them at the same time and with the same truck as garbage. A rack underneath the compactor truck or a trailer behind the truck held the newspaper. These early rack and trailer programs had several advantages. Racks and trailers were easy to install and maintain. In addition, they allowed the hauler to combine garbage and recyclables collection. However, both racks and trailers had limited capacity.time-consuming, off-route unloading was common. They were also unsuited for multi-material recycling. As haulers began collecting glass and metals at the curbside, co-collection was displaced by separate collection of recyclables. Today, curbside recycling is firmly established in communities throughout the US. In an attempt to lower costs, haulers are starting to use co-collection trucks to combine recyclables and garbage collection. While co-collection of recyclables and garbage is still uncommon, its advocates argue it is the wave of the future.

  11. Anarchy and hierarchy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haba, Naoyuki; Murayama, Hitoshi

    2000-09-14

    We advocate a new approach to study models of fermion massesand mixings, namely anarchy proposed in hep-ph/9911341. In this approach,we scan the O(1) coefficients randomly. We argue that this is the correctapproach when the fundamental theory is sufficiently complicated.Assuming there is no physical distinction among three generations ofneutrinos, the probability distributions in MNS mixing angles can bepredicted independent of the choice of the measure. This is because themixing angles are distributed according to the Haar measure of the Liegroups whose elements diagonalize the mass matrices. The near-maximalmixings, as observed in the atmospheric neutrino data and as required inthe LMA solution to the solar neutrino problem, are highly probable. Asmall hierarchy between the Delta m2 for the atmospheric and the solarneutrinos is obtained very easily; the complex seesaw case gives ahierarchy of a factor of 20 as the most probable one, even though thisconclusion is more measure-dependent. U_e3 has to be just below thecurrent limit from the CHOOZ experiment. The CP-violating parameter sindelta is preferred to be maximal. We present a simple SU(5)-likeextension of anarchy to the charged-lepton and quark sectors which workswell phenomenologically.

  12. VERY LATE PHOTOMETRY OF SN 2011fe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerzendorf, W. E. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 Saint George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Taubenberger, S.; Seitenzahl, I. R.; Ruiter, A. J., E-mail: wkerzendorf@gmail.com [Max-Planck-Institut fr Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strae 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2014-12-01

    The Type Ia supernova SN 2011fe is one of the closest supernovae of the past decades. Due to its proximity and low dust extinction, this object provides a very rare opportunity to study the extremely late time evolution (>900 days) of thermonuclear supernovae. In this Letter, we present our photometric data of SN 2011fe taken at an unprecedented late epoch of ?930 days with GMOS-N mounted on the Gemini North telescope (g=23.43 0.28, r=24.14 0.14, i=23.91 0.18, and z=23.90 0.17) to study the energy production and retention in the ejecta of SN 2011fe. Together with previous measurements by other groups, our result suggests that the optical supernova light curve can still be explained by the full thermalization of the decay positrons of {sup 56}Co. This is in spite of theoretical predicted effects (e.g., infrared catastrophe, positron escape, and dust) that advocate a substantial energy redistribution and/or loss via various processes that result in a more rapid dimming at these very late epochs.

  13. AntBot: Anti-pollution peer-to-peer botnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Guanhua; Eidenbenz, Stephan; Ha, Duc T

    2009-01-01

    Botnets, which are responsible for many email sparnming and DDoS (Distributed Denial of Service) attacks in the current Internet, have emerged as one of most severe cyber-threats in recent years. To evade detection and improve resistance against countermeasures, botnets have evolved from the first generation that relies on IRC chat channels to deliver commands to the current generation that uses highly resilient P2P (Peer-to-Peer) protocols to spread their C&C (Command and Control) information. It is, however, revealed that P2P botnets, although relieved from the single point of failure that IRC botnets suffer, can be easily disrupted using pollution-based mitigation schemes [15]. In this paper, we play the devil's advocate and propose a new type of hypothetical botnets called AntBot, which aim to propagate their C&C information to individual bots even though there exists an adversary that persistently pollutes keys used by seized bots to search the command information. The key idea of AntBot is a tree-like structure that bots use to deliver the command so that captured bots reveal only limited information. To evaluate effectiveness of AntBot against pollution-based mitigation in a virtual environment, we develop a distributed P2P botnet simulator. Using extensive experiments, we demonstrate that AntBot operates resiliently against pollution-based mitigation. We further present a few potential defense schemes that could effectively disrupt AntBot operations.

  14. Gluon-gluon contributions to W+ W- production and Higgs interference effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, John M.; Ellis, R.Keith; Williams, Ciaran

    2011-07-01

    In this paper we complete our re-assessment of the production of W boson pairs at the LHC, by calculating analytic results for the gg {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -} {yields} {nu}{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}} process including the effect of massive quarks circulating in the loop. Together with the one-loop amplitudes containing the first two generations of massless quarks propagating in the loop, these diagrams can give a significant contribution with a large flux of gluons. One of the component parts of this calculation is the production of a standard model Higgs boson, gg {yields} H and its subsequent decay, H {yields} W{sup +}({yields} {nu}{ell}{sup +})W{sup -}({yields} {ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}). We will quantify the importance of the interference between the Higgs boson production process and the gluon-induced continuum production in the context of searches for the Higgs boson at the Tevatron and the LHC. For instance, for m{sub H} < 140 GeV the effect of the interference typically results in around a 10% reduction in the expected number of Higgs signal events. The majority of this interference is due to non-resonant contributions. Therefore cuts on the transverse mass such as those currently used by the ATLAS collaboration reduce the destructive interference to about a 1% effect. We advocate that a cut on the maximum transverse mass be used in future Higgs searches in this channel.

  15. A Cognitive Approach to Student-Centered e-Learning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greitzer, Frank L.

    2002-09-30

    Like traditional classroom instruction, distance/electronic learning (e-Learning) derives from largely behaviorist computer-based instruction paradigms that tend to reflect passive training philosophies. Over the past thirty years, more flexible, student-centered classroom teaching methods have been advocated based on the concepts of ''discovery'' learning and ''active'' learning; student-centered approaches are likewise encouraged in the development of e-Learning applications. Nevertheless, many e-Learning applications that employ state-of-the art multimedia technology in which students interact with simulations, animations, video, and sounds still fail to meet their expected training potential. Implementation of multimedia-based training features may give the impression of engaging the student in more active forms of learning, but sophisticated use of multimedia features does not necessarily produce the desired effect. This paper briefly reviews some general guidelines for applying cognitive science principles to development of student-centered e-Learning applications and describes a cognitive approach to e-Learning development that is being undertaken for the US Army.

  16. Expansion techniques for collisionless stellar dynamical simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meiron, Yohai; Li, Baile; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Spurzem, Rainer

    2014-09-10

    We present graphics processing unit (GPU) implementations of two fast force calculation methods based on series expansions of the Poisson equation. One method is the self-consistent field (SCF) method, which is a Fourier-like expansion of the density field in some basis set; the other method is the multipole expansion (MEX) method, which is a Taylor-like expansion of the Green's function. MEX, which has been advocated in the past, has not gained as much popularity as SCF. Both are particle-field methods and optimized for collisionless galactic dynamics, but while SCF is a 'pure' expansion, MEX is an expansion in just the angular part; thus, MEX is capable of capturing radial structure easily, while SCF needs a large number of radial terms. We show that despite the expansion bias, these methods are more accurate than direct techniques for the same number of particles. The performance of our GPU code, which we call ETICS, is profiled and compared to a CPU implementation. On the tested GPU hardware, a full force calculation for one million particles took ?0.1 s (depending on expansion cutoff), making simulations with as many as 10{sup 8} particles fast for a comparatively small number of nodes.

  17. Streamline, Organizational, Legislative and Administrative Response to Permitting, PV Market Share, and Solar Energy Costs (Broward Go SOLAR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halsey, Jeffery D.

    2013-08-28

    Broward County and its partners (the Go SOLAR Team), operating under a Department of Energy Rooftop Solar Challenge Agreement, designed, developed and implemented an online permitting system for rooftop solar PV systems. This is a single web based system with a single permit fee that will issue a permit, with a set of design plans preapproved by partner building officials, within one hour. The system is currently available at gosolar.broward.org for use within any of the partner Authorities Having [permitting] Jurisdiction (AHJ). Additionally, the Go SOLAR Team researched, developed and to the extent feasible, implemented three best management practices to make a fertile environment for the new online permit system. These included Net Metering and Interconnection Standards, Solar-Friendly Financing, and Planning and Zoning Ordinances. Finally, the team implemented a substantial outreach effort to advocate for the development of solar in Broward County, with an emphasis on Solar Rights, concluding with a Go SOLAR Fest day and a half conference with over 1,200 attendees and 50 exhibitors. The Go SOLAR project was completed on time, under DOE’s budgeted amount, and all project objectives were met or exceeded.

  18. Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/6: Pakistani Perceptions and Prospects of Reducing the Nuclear Danger in South Asia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamal, N.

    1999-01-01

    The Indian and Pakistani nuclear tests in May 1998 triggered a full-blown nuclear debate. For the first time, hard-liners, moderates, and pacifists engaged in an extensive public discussion that helped to make the people of Pakistan more sensitive to the dangers of nuclear competition. Pakistan's concerns about its conventional military inferiority, both in the present and future, and the belief that nuclear capability would deter India from exerting its superior military strength, constituted the bedrock of its perception on the nuclear issue. Ofilcial Pakistani statements, both immediately after the nuclear tests and later, have advocated restraint on the issue of nuclearization, indicating cognizance of the importance of avoiding a regional nuclear arms competition, both for security and economic reasons. This paper suggests a variety of nonweaponization and nondeployment options that would serve the security interests of India and Pakistan. Besides preventing a hair-trigger situation, these options could reduce the financial and logistical burden of ensuring the safety and security of nuclear weapons as well as lower strategic threat-perceptions.

  19. How Many Performance Shaping Factors are Necessary for Human Reliability Analysis?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald L. Boring

    2010-06-01

    It has been argued that human reliability analysis (HRA) has expended considerable energy on creating detailed representations of human performance through an increasingly long list of performance shaping factors (PSFs). It is not clear, however, to what extent this refinement and expansion of PSFs has enhanced the quality of HRA. Indeed, there is considerable range in the number of PSFs provided by individual HRA methods, ranging from single factor models such as time-reliability curves, up to 50 or more PSFs in some current HRA models. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission advocates 15 PSFs in its HRA Good Practices (NUREG-1792), while its SPAR-H method (NUREG/CR-6883) espouses the use of eight PSFs and its ATHEANA method (NUREG-1624) features an open-ended number of PSFs. The apparent differences in the optimal number of PSFs can be explained in terms of the diverse functions of PSFs in HRA. The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of PSFs across different stages of HRA, including identification of potential human errors, modeling of these errors into an overall probabilistic risk assessment, quantifying errors, and preventing errors.

  20. Time-Based Data Streams: Fundamental Concepts for a Data Resource for Streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beth A. Plale

    2009-10-10

    Real time data, which we call data streams, are readings from instruments, environmental, bodily or building sensors that are generated at regular intervals and often, due to their volume, need to be processed in real time. Often a single pass is all that can be made on the data, and a decision to discard or keep the instance is made on the spot. Too, the stream is for all practical purposes indefinite, so decisions must be made on incomplete knowledge. This notion of data streams has a different set of issues from a file, for instance, that is byte streamed to a reader. The file is finite, so the byte stream is becomes a processing convenience more than a fundamentally different kind of data. Through the duration of the project we examined three aspects of streaming data: the first, techniques to handle streaming data in a distributed system organized as a collection of web services, the second, the notion of the dashboard and real time controllable analysis constructs in the context of the Fermi Tevatron Beam Position Monitor, and third and finally, we examined provenance collection of stream processing such as might occur as raw observational data flows from the source and undergoes correction, cleaning, and quality control. The impact of this work is severalfold. We were one of the first to advocate that streams had little value unless aggregated, and that notion is now gaining general acceptance. We were one of the first groups to grapple with the notion of provenance of stream data also.

  1. Poster — Thur Eve — 74: Distributed, asynchronous, reactive dosimetric and outcomes analysis using DICOMautomaton

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, Haley; Wu, Jonn; Moiseenko, Vitali; Thomas, Steven

    2014-08-15

    Many have speculated about the future of computational technology in clinical radiation oncology. It has been advocated that the next generation of computational infrastructure will improve on the current generation by incorporating richer aspects of automation, more heavily and seamlessly featuring distributed and parallel computation, and providing more flexibility toward aggregate data analysis. In this report we describe how a recently created — but currently existing — analysis framework (DICOMautomaton) incorporates these aspects. DICOMautomaton supports a variety of use cases but is especially suited for dosimetric outcomes correlation analysis, investigation and comparison of radiotherapy treatment efficacy, and dose-volume computation. We describe: how it overcomes computational bottlenecks by distributing workload across a network of machines; how modern, asynchronous computational techniques are used to reduce blocking and avoid unnecessary computation; and how issues of out-of-date data are addressed using reactive programming techniques and data dependency chains. We describe internal architecture of the software and give a detailed demonstration of how DICOMautomaton could be used to search for correlations between dosimetric and outcomes data.

  2. Applications of compact accelerator-driven neutron sources: An updated assessment from the perspective of materials research in Italy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Andreani, C.; Anderson, I. S.; Carpenter, J. M.; Festa, G.; Gorini, G.; Loong, C. -K.; Senesi, R.

    2014-12-24

    In 2005 the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna published a report [1] on ‘Development Opportunities of Small and Medium Scale Accelerator Driven Neutron Sources’ which summarized the prospect of smaller sources in supporting the large spallation neutron sources for materials characterization and instrumentation, a theme advocated by Bauer, Clausen, Mank, and Mulhauser in previous publications [2-4]. In 2010 the Union for Compact Accelerator-driven Neutron Sources (UCANS) was established [5], galvanizing cross-disciplinary collaborations on new source and neutronics development and expanded applications based on both slow-neutron scattering and other neutron-matter interactions of neutron energies ranging from 10⁻⁶ to 10²more » MeV [6]. Here, we first cover the recent development of ongoing and prospective projects of compact accelerator-driven neutron sources (CANS) but concentrate on prospective accelerators currently proposed in Italy. Two active R&D topics, irradiation effects on electronics and cultural heritage studies, are chosen to illustrate the impact of state-of-the-art CANS on these programs with respect to the characteristics and complementarity of the accelerator and neutronics systems as well as instrumentation development.« less

  3. Applications of compact accelerator-driven neutron sources: An updated assessment from the perspective of materials research in Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreani, C.; Anderson, I. S.; Carpenter, J. M.; Festa, G.; Gorini, G.; Loong, C. -K.; Senesi, R.

    2014-12-24

    In 2005 the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna published a report [1] on ‘Development Opportunities of Small and Medium Scale Accelerator Driven Neutron Sources’ which summarized the prospect of smaller sources in supporting the large spallation neutron sources for materials characterization and instrumentation, a theme advocated by Bauer, Clausen, Mank, and Mulhauser in previous publications [2-4]. In 2010 the Union for Compact Accelerator-driven Neutron Sources (UCANS) was established [5], galvanizing cross-disciplinary collaborations on new source and neutronics development and expanded applications based on both slow-neutron scattering and other neutron-matter interactions of neutron energies ranging from 10⁻⁶ to 10² MeV [6]. Here, we first cover the recent development of ongoing and prospective projects of compact accelerator-driven neutron sources (CANS) but concentrate on prospective accelerators currently proposed in Italy. Two active R&D topics, irradiation effects on electronics and cultural heritage studies, are chosen to illustrate the impact of state-of-the-art CANS on these programs with respect to the characteristics and complementarity of the accelerator and neutronics systems as well as instrumentation development.

  4. Blackout: coal, climate and the last energy crisis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heinberg, R. [Post Carbon Institute in California, CA (United States)

    2009-07-15

    Coal fuels more than 30 per cent of UK electricity production, and about 50 per cent in the US, providing a significant portion of total energy output. China and India's recent ferocious economic growth has been based almost entirely on coal-generated electricity. Coal currently looks like a solution to many of our fast-growing energy problems. However, while coal advocates are urging us full steam ahead, the increasing reliance on this dirtiest of all fossil fuels has crucial implications for energy policy, pollution levels, the global climate, world economy and geopolitics. Drawbacks to a coal-based energy strategy include: Scarcity - new studies suggest that the peak of world coal production may actually be less than two decades away; Cost - the quality of produced coal is declining, while the expense of transportation is rising, leading to spiralling costs and increasing shortages; and, Climate impacts - our ability to deal with the historic challenge of climate change may hinge on reducing coal consumption in future years.

  5. Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-12-01

    Power through Policy: 'Best Practices' for Cost-Effective Distributed Wind is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-funded project to identify distributed wind technology policy best practices and to help policymakers, utilities, advocates, and consumers examine their effectiveness using a pro forma model. Incorporating a customized feed from the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE), the Web-based Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool (Policy Tool) is designed to assist state, local, and utility officials in understanding the financial impacts of different policy options to help reduce the cost of distributed wind technologies. The Policy Tool can be used to evaluate the ways that a variety of federal and state policies and incentives impact the economics of distributed wind (and subsequently its expected market growth). It also allows policymakers to determine the impact of policy options, addressing market challenges identified in the U.S. DOE’s '20% Wind Energy by 2030' report and helping to meet COE targets.

  6. Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool Guidebook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-11-01

    Power through Policy: 'Best Practices' for Cost-Effective Distributed Wind is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-funded project to identify distributed wind technology policy best practices and to help policymakers, utilities, advocates, and consumers examine their effectiveness using a pro forma model. Incorporating a customized feed from the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE), the Web-based Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool (Policy Tool) is designed to assist state, local, and utility officials in understanding the financial impacts of different policy options to help reduce the cost of distributed wind technologies. The Policy Tool can be used to evaluate the ways that a variety of federal and state policies and incentives impact the economics of distributed wind (and subsequently its expected market growth). It also allows policymakers to determine the impact of policy options, addressing market challenges identified in the U.S. DOE's '20% Wind Energy by 2030' report and helping to meet COE targets.

  7. Rattling Nucleons: New Developments in Active Interrogation of Special Nuclear Material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert C. Runkle; David L. Chichester; Scott J. Thompson

    2012-01-01

    Active interrogation is a vigorous area of research and development due to its promise of offering detection and characterization capabilities of special nuclear material in environments where passive detection fails. The primary value added by active methods is the capability to penetrate shielding - special nuclear material itself, incidental materials, or intentional shielding - and advocates hope that active interrogation will provide a solution to the problem of detecting shielded uranium, which is at present the greatest obstacle to interdiction efforts. The technique also provides a unique benefit for quantifying nuclear material in high background-radiation environments, an area important for nuclear material safeguards and material accountancy. Progress has been made in the field of active interrogation on several fronts, most notably in the arenas of source development, systems integration, and the integration and exploitation of multiple fission and non-fission signatures. But penetration of interrogating radiation often comes at a cost, not only in terms of finance and dose but also in terms of induced backgrounds, system complexity, and extended measurement times (including set up and acquisition). These costs make the calculus for deciding to implement active interrogation more subtle than may be apparent. The purpose of this review is thus to examine existing interrogation methods, compare and contrast their attributes and limitations, and identify missions where active interrogation may hold the most promise.

  8. Elements of an environmental decision support system for seasonal wetland salt management in a river basin subjected to water quality regulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T.

    2009-06-01

    Seasonally managed wetlands in the Grasslands Basin on the west-side of California's San Joaquin Valley provide food and shelter for migratory wildfowl during winter months and sport for waterfowl hunters during the annual duck season. Surface water supply to these wetlands contain salt which, when drained to the San Joaquin River during the annual drawdown period, can negatively impact water quality and cause concern to downstream agricultural riparian water diverters. Recent environmental regulation, limiting discharges salinity to the San Joaquin River and primarily targeting agricultural non-point sources, now also targets return flows from seasonally managed wetlands. Real-time water quality management has been advocated as a means of continuously matching salt loads discharged from agricultural, wetland and municipal operations to the assimilative capacity of the San Joaquin River. Past attempts to build environmental monitoring and decision support systems (EDSS's) to implement this concept have enjoyed limited success for reasons that are discussed in this paper. These reasons are discussed in the context of more general challenges facing the successful implementation of a comprehensive environmental monitoring, modelling and decision support system for the San Joaquin River Basin.

  9. White paper report on using nuclear reactors to search for a value of theta13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, K.; Anjos, J.C.; Ayres, D.; Beacom, J.; Bediaga, I.; de Bellefon, A.; Berger, B.E.; Bilenky, S.; Blucher, E.; Bolton, T.; Buck, C.; Bugg, W.; Busenitz, J.; Choubey, S.; Conrad, J.; Cribier, M.; Dadoun, O.; Dalnoki-Veress, F.; Decowski, M.; de Gouvea, Andre; Demutrh, D.; Dessages-Ardellier, F.; Efremenko, Y.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Finley, D.; Formaggio, J.A.; Freedman, S.J.; Fujikawa, B.K.; Garbini, M.; Giusti, P.; Goger-Neff, M.; Goodman, M.; Gray, F.; Grieb, C.; Grudzinski, J.J.; Guarino, V.J.; Hartmann, F.; Hagner, C.; Heeger, K.M.; Hofmann, W.; Horton-Smith, G.; Huber, P.; Inzhechik, L.; Jochum, J.; Jostlein, H.; Kadel, R.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Kaplan, D.; Kasper, P.; de Kerret, H.; Kersten, J.; Klein, J.; Knopfle, K.T.; Kopeikin, V.; Kozlov, Yu.; Kryn, D.; Kuchler, V.; Kuze, M.; Lachenmaier, T.; Lasserre, T.; Laughton, C.; Lendvai, C.; Li, J.; Lindner, M.; Link, J.; Longo, M.; Lu, Y.S.; Luk, K.B.; Ma, Y.Q.; Martemyanov, V.P.; Mauger, C.; Manghetti, H.; McKeown, R.; Mention, G.; Meyer, J.P.; Mikaelyan, L.; Minakata, H.; Naples, D.; Nunokawa, H.; Oberauer, L.; Obolensky, M.; Parke, S.; Petcov, S.T.; Peres, O.L.G.; Potzel, W.; Pilcher, J.; Plunkett, R.; Raffelt, G.; Rapidis, P.; Reyna, D.; Roe, B.; Rolinec, M.; Sakamoto, Y.; Sartorelli, G.; Schonert, S.; Schwertz, T.; Selvi, M.; Shaevitz, M.; Shellard, R.; Shrock, R.; Sidwell, R.; Sims, J.; Sinev, V.; Stanton, N.; Stancu, I.; Stefanski, R.; Seukane, F.; Sugiyama, H.; Sukhotin, S.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Svoboda, R.; Talaga, R.; Tamura, N.; Tanimoto, M.; Thron, J.; von Toerne, E.; Vignaud, D.; Wagner, C.; Wang, Y.F.; Wang, Z.; Winter, W.; Wong, H.; Yakushev, E.; Yang, C.G.; Yasuda, O.

    2004-02-26

    There has been superb progress in understanding the neutrino sector of elementary particle physics in the past few years. It is now widely recognized that the possibility exists for a rich program of measuring CP violation and matter effects in future accelerator {nu} experiments, which has led to intense efforts to consider new programs at neutrino superbeams, off-axis detectors, neutrino factories and beta beams. However, the possibility of measuring CP violation can be fulfilled only if the value of the neutrino mixing parameter {theta}{sub 13} is such that sin{sup 2} (2{theta}{sub 13}) greater than or equal to on the order of 0.01. The authors of this white paper are an International Working Group of physicists who believe that a timely new experiment at a nuclear reactor sensitive to the neutrino mixing parameter {theta}{sub 13} in this range has a great opportunity for an exciting discovery, a non-zero value to {theta}{sub 13}. This would be a compelling next step of this program. We are studying possible new reactor experiments at a variety of sites around the world, and we have collaborated to prepare this document to advocate this idea and describe some of the issues that are involved.

  10. Conceptualisation of the characteristics of advanced practitioners in the medical radiation professions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Tony; Harris, Jillian; Woznitza, Nick; Maresse, Sharon; Sale, Charlotte

    2015-09-15

    Professions grapple with defining advanced practice and the characteristics of advanced practitioners. In nursing and allied health, advanced practice has been defined as ‘a state of professional maturity in which the individual demonstrates a level of integrated knowledge, skill and competence that challenges the accepted boundaries of practice and pioneers new developments in health care’. Evolution of advanced practice in Australia has been slower than in the United Kingdom, mainly due to differences in demography, the health system and industrial relations. This article describes a conceptual model of advanced practitioner characteristics in the medical radiation professions, taking into account experiences in other countries and professions. Using the CanMEDS framework, the model includes foundation characteristics of communication, collaboration and professionalism, which are fundamental to advanced clinical practice. Gateway characteristics are: clinical expertise, with high level competency in a particular area of clinical practice; scholarship and teaching, including a masters qualification and knowledge dissemination through educating others; and evidence-based practice, with judgements made on the basis of research findings, including research by the advanced practitioner. The pinnacle of advanced practice is clinical leadership, where the practitioner has a central role in the health care team, with the capacity to influence decision making and advocate for others, including patients. The proposed conceptual model is robust yet adaptable in defining generic characteristics of advanced practitioners, no matter their clinical specialty. The advanced practice roles that evolve to meet future health service demand must focus on the needs of patients, local populations and communities.

  11. HOGEN{trademark} proton exchange membrane hydrogen generators: Commercialization of PEM electrolyzers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, W.F.; Molter, T.M.

    1997-12-31

    PROTON Energy Systems` new HOGEN series hydrogen generators are Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) based water electrolyzers designed to generate 300 to 1000 Standard Cubic Feet Per Hour (SCFH) of high purity hydrogen at pressures up to 400 psi without the use of mechanical compressors. This paper will describe technology evolution leading to the HOGEN, identify system design performance parameters and describe the physical packaging and interfaces of HOGEN systems. PEM electrolyzers have served US and UK Navy and NASA needs for many years in a variety of diverse programs including oxygen generators for life support applications. In the late 1970`s these systems were advocated for bulk hydrogen generation through a series of DOE sponsored program activities. During the military buildup of the 1980`s commercial deployment of PEM hydrogen generators was de-emphasized as priority was given to new Navy and NASA PEM electrolysis systems. PROTON Energy Systems was founded in 1996 with the primary corporate mission of commercializing PEM hydrogen generators. These systems are specifically designed and priced to meet the needs of commercial markets and produced through manufacturing processes tailored to these applications. The HOGEN series generators are the first step along the path to full commercial deployment of PEM electrolyzer products for both industrial and consumer uses. The 300/1000 series are sized to meet the needs of the industrial gases market today and provide a design base that can transition to serve the needs of a decentralized hydrogen infrastructure tomorrow.

  12. Development of a partnership with government and industry to accelerate the commercialization of hydrogen. Final report, 9/30/1995--10/31/1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-31

    This Final Technical Report provides a summary of the activities performed by the NHA in accordance with the Cooperative Agreement. Activities are broken down by task area, and include the following: (1) Information exchange within the NHA, which includes the two NHA newsletters, the NHA Advocate, and the H{sub 2} Digest, as well as directory information. (2) Information exchange within the hydrogen industry, which includes conferences and meeting attendance, presentations of papers, and HTAP activities. (3) Information exchange with other critical industries and the public, which includes press conferences, and public awareness activities. (4) Annual US hydrogen meeting, NHA`s signature event. The 7th Annual US Hydrogen Meeting was held April 2--4, 1996 in Alexandria, Virginia in conjunction with the US DOE`s Hydrogen Technical Advisory Panel Meeting and the SAE`s Fuel Cell TOPTEC. (5) Industry perspective and needs, which covers activities related to the Hydrogen Industrialization Plan. (6) Codes and standards, which includes workshop and workgroup activities, as well as other safety-related activities. The objective of the codes and standards activities is to establish expert working groups to develop industry consensus on safety issues, and develop compatible standards and formats, and product certification protocols.

  13. Recent developments in large-scale finite-element Lagrangian hydrocode technology. [Dyna 20/dyna 30 computer code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goudreau, G.L.; Hallquist, J.O.

    1981-10-01

    The state of Lagrangian hydrocodes for computing the large deformation dynamic response of inelastic continuua is reviewed in the context of engineering computation at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA, and the DYNA2D/DYNA3D finite elements codes. The emphasis is on efficiency and computational cost. The simplest elements with explicit time integration. The two-dimensional four node quadrilateral and the three-dimensional hexahedron with one point quadrature are advocated as superior to other more expensive choices. Important auxiliary capabilities are a cheap but effective hourglass control, slidelines/planes with void opening/closure, and rezoning. Both strain measures and material formulation are seen as a homogeneous stress point problem and a flexible material subroutine interface admits both incremental and total strain formulation, dependent on internal energy or an arbitrary set of other internal variables. Vectorization on Class VI computers such as the CRAY-1 is a simple exercise for optimally organized primitive element formulations. Some examples of large scale computation are illustrated, including continuous tone graphic representation.

  14. Do diminishing marginal returns apply to DSM?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sioshansi, F.P.

    1994-05-01

    The U.S. electric power industry is currently spending approximately $2 billion annually on demand-side management (DSM) programs, a substantial increase over just a few years ago. The level of DSM spending is expected to continue to grow in the foreseeable future, according to various industry surveys. Environmental benefits are among the chief assumed - and expected - benefits of DSM. In fact, the answer to how much cost-effective and achievable DSM is available depends, to some extent, on whether the value of environmental benefits of DSM is considered explicitly or implicitly. Several states now specifically require the environmental effect of alternative supply or demand options to be considered in utility resource-planning decisions. On the surface, it seems plausible that, assuming the current level of DSM is `good` for the environment, an even more aggressive level of DSM would be even better. Carrying this line of argument a step further would suggest that a highly aggressive DSM strategy, coupled with a heavy dose of nonpolluting renewable energy technologies, would eliminate the need for all new supply-side resources and be the closest thing to achieving nirvana - low-cost, environmentally benign electricity service - in utility resource planning. Those advocating such a strategy argue that is is not only justified from an environmental point of view, but also from an economic perspective, because it is the cheapest course of action to follow.

  15. Design methodology for rock excavations at the Yucca Mountain project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alber, M.; Bieniawski, Z.T.

    1993-12-31

    The problems involved in the design of the proposed underground repository for high-level nuclear waste call for novel design approaches. Guidelines for the design are given by the Mission Plan Amendment in which licensing and regulatory aspects have to be satisfied. Moreover, systems engineering was proposed, advocating a top-down approach leading to the identification of discrete, implementable system elements. These objectives for the design process can be integrated in an engineering design methodology. While design methodologies for some engineering disciplines are available, they were of limited use for rock engineering because of the inherent uncertainties about the geologic media. Based on the axiomatic design approach of Suh, Bieniawski developed a methodology for design in rock. Design principles and design stages are clearly stated to assist in effective decision making. For overall performance goals, the domain of objectives is defined through components (DCs) - representing a design solution - satisfy the FRs, resulting in discrete, independent functional relations. Implementation is satisfied by evaluation and optimization of the design with respect to the constructibility of the design components.

  16. A Component Approach to Collaborative Scientific Software Development: Tools and Techniques Utilized by the Quantum Chemistry Science Application Partnership

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kenny, Joseph P.; Janssen, Curtis L.; Gordon, Mark S.; Sosonkina, Masha; Windus, Theresa L.

    2008-01-01

    Cutting-edge scientific computing software is complex, increasingly involving the coupling of multiple packages to combine advanced algorithms or simulations at multiple physical scales. Component-based software engineering (CBSE) has been advanced as a technique for managing this complexity, and complex component applications have been created in the quantum chemistry domain, as well as several other simulation areas, using the component model advocated by the Common Component Architecture (CCA) Forum. While programming models do indeed enable sound software engineering practices, the selection of programming model is just one building block in a comprehensive approach to large-scale collaborative development which must also addressmore » interface and data standardization, and language and package interoperability. We provide an overview of the development approach utilized within the Quantum Chemistry Science Application Partnership, identifying design challenges, describing the techniques which we have adopted to address these challenges and highlighting the advantages which the CCA approach offers for collaborative development.« less

  17. Phase diagram and transformations of iron pentacarbonyl to nm layered hematite and carbon-oxygen polymer under pressure

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ryu, Young Jay; Kim, Minseob; Yoo, Choong -Shik

    2015-10-12

    In this study, we present the phase diagram of Fe(CO)5, consisting of three molecular polymorphs (phase I, II and III) and an extended polymeric phase that can be recovered at ambient condition. The phase diagram indicates a limited stability of Fe(CO)5 within a pressure-temperature dome formed below the liquid- phase II- polymer triple point at 4.2 GPa and 580 K. The limited stability, in turn, signifies the temperature-induced weakening of Fe-CO back bonds, which eventually leads to the dissociation of Fe-CO at the onset of the polymerization of CO. The recovered polymer is a composite of novel nm-lamellar layers ofmore » crystalline hematite Fe2O3 and amorphous carbon-oxygen polymers. These results, therefore, demonstrate the synthesis of carbon-oxygen polymer by compressing Fe(CO)5, which advocates a novel synthetic route to develop atomistic composite materials by compressing organometallic compounds.« less

  18. Advances in electron kinetics and theory of gas discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolobov, Vladimir I.; The University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899

    2013-10-15

    “Electrons, like people, are fertile and infertile: high-energy electrons are fertile and able to reproduce.”—Lev TsendinModern physics of gas discharges increasingly uses physical kinetics for analysis of non-equilibrium plasmas. The description of underlying physics at the kinetic level appears to be important for plasma applications in modern technologies. In this paper, we attempt to grasp the legacy of Professor Lev Tsendin, who advocated the use of the kinetic approach for understanding fundamental problems of gas discharges. We outline the fundamentals of electron kinetics in low-temperature plasmas, describe elements of the modern kinetic theory of gas discharges, and show examples of the theoretical approach to gas discharge problems used by Lev Tsendin. Important connections between electron kinetics in gas discharges and semiconductors are also discussed. Using several examples, we illustrate how Tsendin's ideas and methods are currently being developed for the implementation of next generation computational tools for adaptive kinetic-fluid simulations of gas discharges used in modern technologies.

  19. Amplifying Real Estate Value through Energy&WaterManagement: From ESCO to 'Energy Services Partner'

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Evan

    2004-06-08

    The energy service company (ESCO) business model could become significantly more effective by integrating the energy-efficiency purveyor and their capital into the underlying building ownership and operation partnership, rather than the current model in which the ESCO remains an outsider with higher transaction costs and limited interest and participation in the value created by the cost savings. Resource conservation advocates rarely use the language of real estate to articulate the cost effectiveness of capital improvements aimed at reducing utility costs in commercial and residential income properties. Conventional methods that rely on rarefied academic notions of simple payback time or a narrow definition of return on investment fail to capture a significant component of the true market value created by virtue of reduced operating expenses. Improvements in energy and water efficiency can increase the fundamental profitability of real estate investments by raising Net Operating Income (NOI), and hence returns during the holding period, and, ultimately, proceeds at time of sale. We introduce the concept of an Energy Services Partner, who takes an equity interest in a real estate partnership in exchange for providing the expertise and capital required to reduce utility operating costs. Profit to all partners increases considerably as a result. This approach would also help to address a crisis facing ESCOs today stemming from their considerable liabilities (through guaranteed savings) and negligible offsetting assets.

  20. A prototype decision aid for evaluating and selecting R&D proposals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Ayat, R.A.; Lamont, A.; Sicherman, A.

    1992-05-01

    This report describes a prototype decision aid which has been developed to assist the Institutional Research and Development (IR&D) Committee in selecting proposals for funding. This tool was requested to help address the following concerns about the IR&D proposal selection process: Some good proposals might be overlooked simply because no one on the Committee advocates them forcefully. The process takes a lot of time. The final portfolio of proposals selected may not maximize the long-run benefits to the Laboratory. These concerns stem from the observation that there is no formal framework for making distinctions between proposals, or weighing and comparing those distinctions. It was felt that the process could be improved by a framework that: Provides explicit descriptors that Committee members can use to evaluate and compare different features of proposals. Encourages the Committee to use a uniform, systematic scheme for evaluating the proposals. Helps the Committee focus more quickly on the issues that are truly relevant for distinguishing between proposals.

  1. Lumen Maintenance and Light Loss Factors: Consequences of Current Design Practices for LED's

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Royer, Michael P.

    2013-09-17

    Synopsis: Light loss factors are used to help lighting systems meet quantitative design criteria throughout the life of the installation, but they also influence energy use. As the light sources currently being specified continue to evolve, it is necessary to reevaluate the methods used in calculating light loss factors, as well as carefully consider the consequences of different product performance attributes. Because of the unique operating characteristics of LEDs and lack of a comprehensive lifetime rating—as well as the problematic relationship between lifetime and lumen maintenance—determining an appropriate lamp lumen depreciation (LLD) factor for LED products is difficult. As a result, a unique solution has been advocated: when quantity of light is an important design consideration, the IES recommends using an LLD of not greater than 0.70. This method deviates from the typical practice for conventional sources of using the ratio of mean to initial lumen output, and can misrepresent actual performance, increase energy use, and inhibit comparisons between products. This paper discusses the complications related to LLD and LEDs, compares the performance of conventional and LED products, and examines alternatives to a maximum LLD of 0.70 for LEDs.

  2. Financial Analysis of Incentive Mechanisms to Promote Energy Efficiency: Case Study of a Prototypical Southwest Utility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cappers, Peter; Goldman, Charles; Chait, Michele; Edgar, George; Schlegel, Jeff; Shirley, Wayne

    2009-03-04

    Many state regulatory commissions and policymakers want utilities to aggressively pursue energy efficiency as a strategy to mitigate demand and energy growth, diversify the resource mix, and provide an alternative to building new, costly generation. However, as the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency (NAPEE 2007) points out, many utilities continue to shy away from aggressively expanding their energy efficiency efforts when their shareholder's fundamental financial interests are placed at risk by doing so. Thus, there is increased interest in developing effective ratemaking and policy approaches that address utility disincentives to pursue energy efficiency or lack of incentives for more aggressive energy efficiency efforts. New regulatory initiatives to promote increased utility energy efficiency efforts also affect the interests of consumers. Ratepayers and their advocates are concerned with issues of fairness, impacts on rates, and total consumer costs. From the perspective of energy efficiency advocates, the quid pro quo for utility shareholder incentives is the obligation to acquire all, or nearly all, achievable cost-effective energy efficiency. A key issue for state regulators and policymakers is how to maximize the cost-effective energy efficiency savings attained while achieving an equitable sharing of benefits, costs and risks among the various stakeholders. In this study, we modeled a prototypical vertically-integrated electric investor-owned utility in the southwestern US that is considering implementing several energy efficiency portfolios. We analyze the impact of these energy efficiency portfolios on utility shareholders and ratepayers as well as the incremental effect on each party when lost fixed cost recovery and/or utility shareholder incentive mechanisms are implemented. A primary goal of our quantitative modeling is to provide regulators and policymakers with an analytic framework and tools that assess the financial impacts of alternative incentive approaches on utility shareholders and customers if energy efficiency is implemented under various utility operating, cost, and supply conditions.We used and adapted a spreadsheet-based financial model (the Benefits Calculator) which was developed originally as a tool to support the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency (NAPEE). The major steps in our analysis are displayed graphically in Figure ES- 1. Two main inputs are required: (1) characterization of the utility which includes its initial financial and physical market position, a forecast of the utility?s future sales, peak demand, and resource strategy to meet projected growth; and (2) characterization of the Demand-Side Resource (DSR) portfolio ? projected electricity and demand savings, costs and economic lifetime of a portfolio of energy efficiency (and/or demand response) programs that the utility is planning or considering implementing during the analysis period. The Benefits Calculator also estimates total resource costs and benefits of the DSR portfolio using a forecast of avoided capacity and energy costs. The Benefits Calculator then uses inputs provided in the Utility Characterization to produce a ?business-as usual? base case as well as alternative scenarios that include energy efficiency resources, including the corresponding utility financial budgets required in each case. If a decoupling and/or a shareholder incentive mechanism are instituted, the Benefits Calculator model readjusts the utility?s revenue requirement and retail rates accordingly. Finally, for each scenario, the Benefits Calculator produces several metrics that provides insights on how energy efficiency resources, decoupling and/or a shareholder incentive mechanism impacts utility shareholders (e.g. overall earnings, return on equity), ratepayers (e.g., average customer bills and rates) and society (e.g. net resource benefits).

  3. Management Plan for Experimental Reintroduction of Sockeye into Skaha Lake; Proposed Implementation, Monitoring, and Evaluation, 2004 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, Howie; Smith, Howard

    2004-01-01

    Okanagan River sockeye salmon, which spawn near the town of Oliver, B.C., have their farther upstream migration limited by several water control and diversion dams. Stock numbers have been declining for many years and the Okanagan Native Alliance Fisheries Department (ONAFD) has been the principal advocate of a program to restore their numbers and range by reintroducing them into upstream waters where they may once have occurred in substantial numbers Some investigators have warned that without effective intervention Okanagan sockeye are at considerable risk of extinction. Among a host of threats, the quality of water in the single nursery areas in Osoyoos Lake. is deteriorating and a sanctuary such as that afforded in larger lakes higher in the system could be essential. Because the proposed reintroduction upstream has implications for other fish species, (particularly kokanee, the so-called ''landlocked sockeye'' which reside in many Okanagan lakes), the proponents undertook a three-year investigation, with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration and the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, to identify possible problem areas, and they committed to an interim experimental reintroduction to Skaha Lake where any problems could be worked out before a more ambitious reintroduction, (e.g. to Okanagan Lake) could be formally considered. The three-year investigation was completed in the spring of 2003. It included an assessment of risks from disease or the possible introduction of unwanted exotic species. It also considered the present quality and quantity of sockeye habitat, and opportunities for expanding or improving it. Finally ecological complexity encouraged the development of a life history model to examine interactions of sockeye with other fishes and their food organisms. While some problem areas were exposed in the course of these studies, they appeared to be manageable and the concept of an experimental reintroduction was largely supported but with the proviso that there should be a thorough evaluation and reporting of progress and results. A 2004 start on implementation and monitoring has now been proposed.

  4. Research universities for the 21st century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gover, J.; Huray, P.G.

    1998-05-01

    The `public outcomes` from research universities are educated students and research that extends the frontiers of knowledge. Measures of these `public outcomes` are inadequate to permit either research or education consumers to select research universities based on quantitative performance data. Research universities annually spend over $20 billion on research; 60% of these funds are provided by Federal sources. Federal funding for university research has recently grown at an annual rate near 6% during a time period when other performers of Federal research have experienced real funding cuts. Ten universities receive about 25% of the Federal funds spent on university research. Numerous studies of US research universities are reporting storm clouds. Concerns include balancing research and teaching, the narrow focus of engineering education, college costs, continuing education, and public funding of foreign student education. The absence of research on the `public outcomes` from university research results in opinion, politics, and mythology forming the basis of too many decisions. Therefore, the authors recommend studies of other nations` research universities, studies of various economic models of university research, analysis of the peer review process and how well it identifies the most capable research practitioners and at what cost, and studies of research university ownership of intellectual property that can lead to increased `public outcomes` from publicly-funded research performed by research universities. They advocate two practices that could increase the `public outcomes` from university research. These are the development of science roadmaps that link science research to `public outcomes` and `public outcome` metrics. Changes in the university research culture and expanded use of the Internet could also lead to increased `public outcomes`. They recommend the use of tax incentives to encourage companies to develop research partnerships with research universities.

  5. Siting and constructing very deep monitoring wells on the US Department of Energy`s Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cullen, J J; Jacobson, R L; Russell, C E

    1991-12-31

    Many aspects of the Nevada Test Site`s (NTS) hydrogeologic setting restrict the use of traditional methods for the siting and construction of ground-water characterization and monitoring wells. The size of the NTS precludes establishing high-density networks of characterization wells, as are typically used at smaller sites. The geologic complexity and variability of the NTS requires that the wells be criticality situated. The hydrogeologic complexity requires that each well provide access to many aquifers. Depths to ground water on the NTS require the construction of wells averaging approximately 1000 meters in depth. Wells meeting these criteria are uncommon in the ground-water industry, therefore techniques used by petroleum engineers are being employed to solve certain siting-, design- and installation-related problems. To date, one focus has been on developing completion strings that facilitate routine and efficient ground-water sampling from multiple intervals in a single well. The method currently advocated employs a new design of sliding side door sleeve that is actuated by an electrically operated hydraulic shifting tool. Stemming of the wells is being accomplished with standard materials (cement based grouts and sands); however, new stemming methods are being developed, to accommodate the greater depths, to minimize pH-related problems caused by the use of cements, to enhance the integrity of the inter-zone seals, and to improve the representativeness of radionuclide analyses performed on ground-water samples. Bench-scale experiments have been used to investigate the properties of more than a dozen epoxy-aggregate grout mixtures -- materials that are commonly used in underwater sealing applications.

  6. CENTRAL STORAGE FACILITY PROJECT IN COLOMBIA TO PROVIDE THE SAFE STORAGE AND PROTECTION OF HIGH-ACTIVITY RADIOACTIVE SOURCES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenberg, Raymond; Wright, Kyle A.; McCaw, Erica E.; Vallejo, Jorge

    2009-10-07

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) reduces and protects vulnerable nuclear and radiological material located at civilian sites worldwide. Internationally, over 40 countries are cooperating with GTRI to enhance the security of these materials. The GTRI program has worked successfully with foreign countries to remove and protect nuclear and radioactive materials, including orphaned and disused high-activity sources. GTRI began cooperation with the Republic of Colombia in April 2004. This cooperation has been a resounding success by securing forty high-risk sites, consolidating disused/orphan sources at an interim secure national storage facility, and developing a comprehensive approach to security, training, and sustainability. In 2005 the Colombian Ministry of Mines and Energy requested the Department of Energys support in the construction of a new Central Storage Facility (CSF). In December 2005, the Ministry selected to construct this facility at the Institute of Geology and Mining (Ingeominas) site in Bogota. This site already served as Colombias national repository, where disused sources were housed in various buildings around the complex. The CSF project was placed under contract in May 2006, but environmental issues and public protests, which led to a class action lawsuit against the Colombian Government, forced the Ministry to quickly suspend activities, thereby placing the project in jeopardy. Despite these challenges, however, the Ministry of Mines and Energy worked closely with public and environmental authorities to resolve these issues, and continued to be a strong advocate of the GTRI program. In June 2008, the Ministry of Mines and Energy was granted the construction and environmental licenses. As a result, construction immediately resumed and the CSF was completed by December 2008. A commissioning ceremony was held for the new facility in January 2009, which was attended by representatives from the Department of Energy, U.S. Embassy, and the Ministry of Mines and Energy, including the Minister and Vice Minister.

  7. Quantifying the value that energy efficiency and renewable energy provide as a hedge against volatile natural gas prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Bachrach, Devra; Golove, William

    2002-05-15

    Advocates of energy efficiency and renewable energy have long argued that such technologies can mitigate fuel price risk within a resource portfolio. Such arguments--made with renewed vigor in the wake of unprecedented natural gas price volatility during the winter of 2000/2001--have mostly been qualitative in nature, however, with few attempts to actually quantify the price stability benefit that these sources provide. In evaluating this benefit, it is important to recognize that alternative price hedging instruments are available--in particular, gas-based financial derivatives (futures and swaps) and physical, fixed-price gas contracts. Whether energy efficiency and renewable energy can provide price stability at lower cost than these alternative means is therefore a key question for resource acquisition planners. In this paper we evaluate the cost of hedging gas price risk through financial hedging instruments. To do this, we compare the price of a 10-year natural gas swap (i.e., what it costs to lock in prices over the next 10 years) to a 10-year natural gas price forecast (i.e., what the market is expecting spot natural gas prices to be over the next 10 years). We find that over the past two years natural gas users have had to pay a premium as high as $0.76/mmBtu (0.53/242/kWh at an aggressive 7,000 Btu/kWh heat rate) over expected spot prices to lock in natural gas prices for the next 10 years. This incremental cost to hedge gas price risk exposure is potentially large enough - particularly if incorporated by policymakers and regulators into decision-making practices - to tip the scales away from new investments in variable-price, natural gas-fired generation and in favor of fixed-price investments in energy efficiency and renewable energy.

  8. A compound power-law model for volcanic eruptions: Implications for risk assessment of volcanism at the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ho, Chih-Hsiang

    1994-10-17

    Much of the ongoing debate on the use of nuclear power plants in U.S.A. centers on the safe disposal of the radioactive waste. Congress, aware of the importance of the waste issue, passed the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, requiring the federal government to develop a geologic repository for the permanent disposal of high level radioactive wastes from civilian nuclear power plants. The Department of Energy (DOE) established the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) in 1983 to identify potential sites. When OCRWM had selected three potential sites to study, Congress enacted the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987, which directed the DOE to characterize only one of those sites, Yucca Mountain, in southern Nevada. For a site to be acceptable, theses studies must demonstrate that the site could comply with regulations and guidelines established by the federal agencies that will be responsible for licensing, regulating, and managing the waste facility. Advocates and critics disagree on the significance and interpretation of critical geological features which bear on the safety and suitability of Yucca Mountain as a site for the construction of a high-level radioactive waste repository. Recent volcanism in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain is readily recognized as an important factor in determining future public and environmental safety because of the possibility of direct disruption of a repository site by volcanism. In particular, basaltic volcanism is regarded as direct and unequivocal evidence of deep-seated geologic instability. In this paper, statistical analysis of volcanic hazard assessment at the Yucca Mountain site is discussed, taking into account some significant geological factors raised by experts. Three types of models are considered in the data analysis. The first model assumes that both past and future volcanic activities follow a homogeneous Poisson process (HPP).

  9. Managing Floods and Resources at the Arroyo Las Positas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez, L; Van Hattem, M; Mathews, S

    2002-03-05

    Engineers and water resource professionals are challenged with protecting facilities from flood events within environmental resource protection, regulatory, and economic constraints. One case in point is the Arroyo Las Positas (ALP), an intermittent stream that traverses the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California. Increased runoff from post-drought rainfall, upstream development, and new perennial discharges from LLNL activities have resulted in increased dry weather flows and wetland vegetation. These new conditions have recently begun to provide improved habitat for the federally threatened California red-legged frog (Rana aurora draytonii; CRLF), but the additional vegetation diminishes the channel's drainage capacity and increases flood risk. When LLNL proposed to re-grade the channel to reestablish the 100-year flood capacity, traditional dredging practices were no longer being advocated by environmental regulatory agencies. LLNL therefore designed a desilting maintenance plan to protect LLNL facility areas from flooding, while minimizing impacts to wetland resources and habitat. The result was a combination of structural upland improvements and the ALP Five Year Maintenance Plan (Maintenance Plan), which includes phased desilting in segments so that the entire ALP is desilted after five years. A unique feature of the Maintenance Plan is the variable length of the segments designed to minimize LLNL's impact on CRLF movement. State and federal permits also added monitoring requirements and additional constraints on desilting activities. Two years into the Maintenance Plan, LLNL is examining the lessons learned on the cost-effectiveness of these maintenance measures and restrictions and reevaluating the direction of future maintenance activities.

  10. Flow units from integrated WFT and NMR data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kasap, E.; Altunbay, M.; Georgi, D.

    1997-08-01

    Reliable and continuous permeability profiles are vital as both hard and soft data required for delineating reservoir architecture. They can improve the vertical resolution of seismic data, well-to-well stratigraphic correlations, and kriging between the well locations. In conditional simulations, permeability profiles are imposed as the conditioning data. Variograms, covariance functions and other geostatistical indicators are more reliable when based on good quality permeability data. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) logging and Wireline Formation Tests (WFT) separately generate a wealth of information, and their synthesis extends the value of this information further by providing continuous and accurate permeability profiles without increasing the cost. NMR and WFT data present a unique combination because WFTs provide discrete, in situ permeability based on fluid-flow, whilst NMR responds to the fluids in the pore space and yields effective porosity, pore-size distribution, bound and moveable fluid saturations, and permeability. The NMR permeability is derived from the T{sub 2}-distribution data. Several equations have been proposed to transform T{sub 2} data to permeability. Regardless of the transform model used, the NMR-derived permeabilities depend on interpretation parameters that may be rock specific. The objective of this study is to integrate WFT permeabilities with NMR-derived, T{sub 2} distribution-based permeabilities and thereby arrive at core quality, continuously measured permeability profiles. We outlined the procedures to integrate NMR and WFT data and applied the procedure to a field case. Finally, this study advocates the use of hydraulic unit concepts to extend the WFT-NMR derived, core quality permeabilities to uncored intervals or uncored wells.

  11. Taking off the training wheels: the properties of a dynamic vegetation model without climate envelopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, R. A.; Muszala, S.; Verteinstein, M.; Lawrence, P.; Xu, C.; McDowell, N. G.; Knox, R. G.; Koven, C.; Holm, J.; Rogers, B. M.; Lawrence, D.; Bonan, G.

    2015-04-29

    We describe an implementation of the Ecosystem Demography (ED) concept in the Community Land Model. The structure of CLM(ED) and the physiological and structural modifications applied to the CLM are presented. A major motivation of this development is to allow the prediction of biome boundaries directly from plant physiological traits via their competitive interactions. Here we investigate the performance of the model for an example biome boundary in Eastern North America. We explore the sensitivity of the predicted biome boundaries and ecosystem properties to the variation of leaf properties determined by the parameter space defined by the GLOPNET global leaf trait database. Further, we investigate the impact of four sequential alterations to the structural assumptions in the model governing the relative carbon economy of deciduous and evergreen plants. The default assumption is that the costs and benefits of deciduous vs. evergreen leaf strategies, in terms of carbon assimilation and expenditure, can reproduce the geographical structure of biome boundaries and ecosystem functioning. We find some support for this assumption, but only under particular combinations of model traits and structural assumptions. Many questions remain regarding the preferred methods for deployment of plant trait information in land surface models. In some cases, plant traits might best be closely linked with each other, but we also find support for direct linkages to environmental conditions. We advocate for intensified study of the costs and benefits of plant life history strategies in different environments, and for the increased use of parametric and structural ensembles in the development and analysis of complex vegetation models.

  12. Andromeda (M31) optical and infrared disk survey. I. Insights in wide-field near-IR surface photometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sick, Jonathan; Courteau, Stphane; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; McDonald, Michael; De Jong, Roelof; Tully, R. Brent

    2014-05-01

    We present wide-field near-infrared J and K{sub s} images of the Andromeda Galaxy (M31) taken with WIRCam at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope as part of the Andromeda Optical and Infrared Disk Survey. This data set allows simultaneous observations of resolved stars and near-infrared (NIR) surface brightness across M31's entire bulge and disk (within R = 22 kpc), permitting a direct test of the stellar composition of near-infrared light in a nearby galaxy. Here we develop NIR observation and reduction methods to recover a uniform surface brightness map across the 3 1 disk of M31 with 27 WIRCam fields. Two sky-target nodding strategies are tested, and we find that strictly minimizing sky sampling latency cannot improve background subtraction accuracy to better than 2% of the background level due to spatio-temporal variations in the NIR skyglow. We fully describe our WIRCam reduction pipeline and advocate using flats built from night-sky images over a single night, rather than dome flats that do not capture the WIRCam illumination field. Contamination from scattered light and thermal background in sky flats has a negligible effect on the surface brightness shape compared to the stochastic differences in background shape between sky and galaxy disk fields, which are ?0.3% of the background level. The most dramatic calibration step is the introduction of scalar sky offsets to each image that optimizes surface brightness continuity. Sky offsets reduce the mean surface brightness difference between observation blocks from 1% to <0.1% of the background level, though the absolute background level remains statistically uncertain to 0.15% of the background level. We present our WIRCam reduction pipeline and performance analysis to give specific recommendations for the improvement of NIR wide-field imaging methods.

  13. Nuclear Nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkins-Duffin, C E

    2008-12-10

    With an explosion equivalent of about 20kT of TNT, the Trinity test was the first demonstration of a nuclear weapon. Conducted on July 16, 1945 in Alamogordo, NM this site is now a Registered National Historic Landmark. The concept and applicability of nuclear power was demonstrated on December 20, 1951 with the Experimental Breeder Reactor Number One (EBR-1) lit four light bulbs. This reactor is now a Registered National Historic Landmark, located near Arco, ID. From that moment forward it had been clearly demonstrated that nuclear energy has both peaceful and military applications and that the civilian and military fuel cycles can overlap. For the more than fifty years since the Atoms for Peace program, a key objective of nuclear policy has been to enable the wider peaceful use of nuclear energy while preventing the spread of nuclear weapons. Volumes have been written on the impact of these two actions on the world by advocates and critics; pundits and practioners; politicians and technologists. The nations of the world have woven together a delicate balance of treaties, agreements, frameworks and handshakes that are representative of the timeframe in which they were constructed and how they have evolved in time. Collectively these vehicles attempt to keep political will, nuclear materials and technology in check. This paper captures only the briefest abstract of the more significant aspects on the Nonproliferation Regime. Of particular relevance to this discussion is the special nonproliferation sensitivity associated with the uranium isotope separation and spent fuel reprocessing aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle.

  14. Taking off the training wheels: the properties of a dynamic vegetation model without climate envelopes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fisher, R. A.; Muszala, S.; Verteinstein, M.; Lawrence, P.; Xu, C.; McDowell, N. G.; Knox, R. G.; Koven, C.; Holm, J.; Rogers, B. M.; et al

    2015-04-29

    We describe an implementation of the Ecosystem Demography (ED) concept in the Community Land Model. The structure of CLM(ED) and the physiological and structural modifications applied to the CLM are presented. A major motivation of this development is to allow the prediction of biome boundaries directly from plant physiological traits via their competitive interactions. Here we investigate the performance of the model for an example biome boundary in Eastern North America. We explore the sensitivity of the predicted biome boundaries and ecosystem properties to the variation of leaf properties determined by the parameter space defined by the GLOPNET global leafmore » trait database. Further, we investigate the impact of four sequential alterations to the structural assumptions in the model governing the relative carbon economy of deciduous and evergreen plants. The default assumption is that the costs and benefits of deciduous vs. evergreen leaf strategies, in terms of carbon assimilation and expenditure, can reproduce the geographical structure of biome boundaries and ecosystem functioning. We find some support for this assumption, but only under particular combinations of model traits and structural assumptions. Many questions remain regarding the preferred methods for deployment of plant trait information in land surface models. In some cases, plant traits might best be closely linked with each other, but we also find support for direct linkages to environmental conditions. We advocate for intensified study of the costs and benefits of plant life history strategies in different environments, and for the increased use of parametric and structural ensembles in the development and analysis of complex vegetation models.« less

  15. TriBITS lifecycle model. Version 1.0, a lean/agile software lifecycle model for research-based computational science and engineering and applied mathematical software.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willenbring, James M.; Bartlett, Roscoe Ainsworth; Heroux, Michael Allen

    2012-01-01

    Software lifecycles are becoming an increasingly important issue for computational science and engineering (CSE) software. The process by which a piece of CSE software begins life as a set of research requirements and then matures into a trusted high-quality capability is both commonplace and extremely challenging. Although an implicit lifecycle is obviously being used in any effort, the challenges of this process - respecting the competing needs of research vs. production - cannot be overstated. Here we describe a proposal for a well-defined software lifecycle process based on modern Lean/Agile software engineering principles. What we propose is appropriate for many CSE software projects that are initially heavily focused on research but also are expected to eventually produce usable high-quality capabilities. The model is related to TriBITS, a build, integration and testing system, which serves as a strong foundation for this lifecycle model, and aspects of this lifecycle model are ingrained in the TriBITS system. Here, we advocate three to four phases or maturity levels that address the appropriate handling of many issues associated with the transition from research to production software. The goals of this lifecycle model are to better communicate maturity levels with customers and to help to identify and promote Software Engineering (SE) practices that will help to improve productivity and produce better software. An important collection of software in this domain is Trilinos, which is used as the motivation and the initial target for this lifecycle model. However, many other related and similar CSE (and non-CSE) software projects can also make good use of this lifecycle model, especially those that use the TriBITS system. Indeed this lifecycle process, if followed, will enable large-scale sustainable integration of many complex CSE software efforts across several institutions.

  16. Bottom-up, decision support system development : a wetlandsalinity management application in California's San Joaquin Valley

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.

    2006-05-10

    Seasonally managed wetlands in the Grasslands Basin ofCalifornia's San Joaquin Valley provide food and shelter for migratorywildfowl during winter months and sport for waterfowl hunters during theannual duck season. Surface water supply to these wetland contain saltwhich, when drained to the San Joaquin River during the annual drawdownperiod, negatively impacts downstream agricultural riparian waterdiverters. Recent environmental regulation, limiting discharges salinityto the San Joaquin River and primarily targeting agricultural non-pointsources, now addresses return flows from seasonally managed wetlands.Real-time water quality management has been advocated as a means ofmatching wetland return flows to the assimilative capacity of the SanJoaquin River. Past attempts to build environmental monitoring anddecision support systems to implement this concept have failed forreasons that are discussed in this paper. These reasons are discussed inthe context of more general challenges facing the successfulimplementation of environmental monitoring, modelling and decisionsupport systems. The paper then provides details of a current researchand development project which will ultimately provide wetland managerswith the means of matching salt exports with the available assimilativecapacity of the San Joaquin River, when fully implemented. Manipulationof the traditional wetland drawdown comes at a potential cost to thesustainability of optimal wetland moist soil plant habitat in thesewetlands - hence the project provides appropriate data and a feedback andresponse mechanism for wetland managers to balance improvements to SanJoaquin River quality with internally-generated information on the healthof the wetland resource. The author concludes the paper by arguing thatthe architecture of the current project decision support system, whencoupled with recent advances in environmental data acquisition, dataprocessing and information dissemination technology, holds significantpromise to address some of the problems described earlier in the paperthat have limited past efforts to improve Basin water qualitymanagement.

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF A REFRIGERANT DISTRIBUTION SECTION FOR ASHRAE STANDARD 152.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ANDREWS,J.W.

    2001-09-07

    In a recent draft report titled ''Impacts of Refrigerant Line Length on System Efficiency in Residential Heating and Cooling Systems Using Refrigerant Distribution,'' (Andrews 2000) some baseline calculations were performed to estimate various impacts on system efficiency of long refrigerant distribution lines. Refrigerant distribution refers to ''mini-splits'' and other types of space beating and cooling equipment that utilize refrigerant lines, rather than ducts or pipes, to transport heat and cooling effect from the outdoor unit to the building spaces where this heat or cooling is used. Five factors affecting efficiency were studied in each of the space conditioning modes (heating and cooling) for a total of ten factors in all. Temperature changes and pressure drops in each of the two refrigerant lines accounted for four of the factors, with the remaining one being elevation of the indoor unit relative to the outdoor unit. Of these factors, pressure drops in the suction line in cooling showed by far the largest effect. This report builds on these baseline calculations to develop a possible algorithm for a refrigerant distribution section of ASHRAE Standard 152. It is based on the approximate treatment of the previous report, and is therefore subject to error that might be corrected using a more detailed analysis, possibly including computer modeling and field testing. However, because the calculated efficiency impacts are generally small (a few percent being typical) it may be that the approximate treatment is sufficient. That question is left open for discussion. The purpose of this report is not to advocate the adoption of the methodology developed, but rather to present it as an option that could either be adopted as-is or used as a starting point for further analysis. It is assumed that the reader has available and is familiar with ASHRAE Standard 152P and with the previous analysis referred to above.

  18. Global change and the value of biodiversity for new product research. Final project report, September 1, 1995--August 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, R.D.; Sedjo, R.A.

    1997-06-01

    A number of biologists believe that human activities are causing species extinctions at alarming rates. The only precedents, they claim, are to be found in the mass extinctions associated with a handful of apocalyptic volcanic eruptions and/or meteorite strikes distributed over geological time scales. Slowing the rates of greenhouse gas emissions, natural habitat destruction, and other factors that are believed to be inducing modem extinctions could be very expensive, however. It is natural to ask, then, what is the value of preserving biodiversity. One (although admittedly, among many) argument frequently made is that biodiversity is a source of new industrial, agricultural, and, particularly, pharmaceutical products. Natural organisms, it is argued, are great repositories of genetic information. Wild species, in their struggle to capture prey, escape predators, resist infection, and enhance reproductive success have evolved chemical mechanisms more elaborate and inventive than those synthetic chemists can now create. If these chemical mechanisms could be adapted and refined for human use, they could be of great value. There has, therefore, been considerable interest among natural scientists and conservation advocates in {open_quotes}biodiversity prospecting{close_quotes} the search for new commercial products among naturally occurring organisms-as both a mechanism and an argument for preserving biodiversity. In recent years economists and others have attempted to estimate the value of biodiversity for use in new product development. These studies vary considerably in their data, methods, and estimates. The Simpson, Sedjo and Reid and Polasky and Solow papers differ from previous work in that they focus on what is arguably the economically relevant issue: what is the value of biodiversity on the margin.

  19. What is the best method to fit time-resolved data? A comparison of the residual minimization and the maximum likelihood techniques as applied to experimental time-correlated, single-photon counting data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Santra, Kalyan; Zhan, Jinchun; Song, Xueyu; Smith, Emily A.; Vaswani, Namrata; Petrich, Jacob W.

    2016-02-10

    The need for measuring fluorescence lifetimes of species in subdiffraction-limited volumes in, for example, stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy, entails the dual challenge of probing a small number of fluorophores and fitting the concomitant sparse data set to the appropriate excited-state decay function. This need has stimulated a further investigation into the relative merits of two fitting techniques commonly referred to as “residual minimization” (RM) and “maximum likelihood” (ML). Fluorescence decays of the well-characterized standard, rose bengal in methanol at room temperature (530 ± 10 ps), were acquired in a set of five experiments in which the total number ofmore » “photon counts” was approximately 20, 200, 1000, 3000, and 6000 and there were about 2–200 counts at the maxima of the respective decays. Each set of experiments was repeated 50 times to generate the appropriate statistics. Each of the 250 data sets was analyzed by ML and two different RM methods (differing in the weighting of residuals) using in-house routines and compared with a frequently used commercial RM routine. Convolution with a real instrument response function was always included in the fitting. While RM using Pearson’s weighting of residuals can recover the correct mean result with a total number of counts of 1000 or more, ML distinguishes itself by yielding, in all cases, the same mean lifetime within 2% of the accepted value. For 200 total counts and greater, ML always provides a standard deviation of <10% of the mean lifetime, and even at 20 total counts there is only 20% error in the mean lifetime. Here, the robustness of ML advocates its use for sparse data sets such as those acquired in some subdiffraction-limited microscopies, such as STED, and, more importantly, provides greater motivation for exploiting the time-resolved capacities of this technique to acquire and analyze fluorescence lifetime data.« less

  20. A HIGH-RESOLUTION ATLAS OF URANIUM-NEON IN THE H BAND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Redman, Stephen L.; Terrien, Ryan; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Ramsey, Lawrence W.; Bender, Chad F. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Ycas, Gabriel G. [Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Osterman, Steven N. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Diddams, Scott A.; Quinlan, Franklyn [Time and Frequency Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Lawler, James E. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Nave, Gillian [Atomic Physics Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)

    2012-03-01

    We present a high-resolution (R Almost-Equal-To 50,000) atlas of a uranium-neon (U/Ne) hollow-cathode spectrum in the H band (1454-1638 nm) for the calibration of near-infrared spectrographs. We obtained this U/Ne spectrum simultaneously with a laser-frequency comb spectrum, which we used to provide a first-order calibration to the U/Ne spectrum. We then calibrated the U/Ne spectrum using the recently published uranium line list of Redman et al., which is derived from high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer measurements. These two independent calibrations allowed us to easily identify emission lines in the hollow-cathode lamp that do not correspond to known (classified) lines of either uranium or neon, and to compare the achievable precision of each source. Our frequency comb precision was limited by modal noise and detector effects, while the U/Ne precision was limited primarily by the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of the observed emission lines and our ability to model blended lines. The standard deviation in the dispersion solution residuals from the S/N-limited U/Ne hollow-cathode lamp was 50% larger than the standard deviation of the dispersion solution residuals from the modal-noise-limited laser-frequency comb. We advocate the use of U/Ne lamps for precision calibration of near-infrared spectrographs, and this H-band atlas makes these lamps significantly easier to use for wavelength calibration.

  1. Emergence of Integrated Urology-Radiation Oncology Practices in the State of Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jhaveri, Pavan M. [Section of Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Section of Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States); Sun Zhuyi [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Ballas, Leslie [Valley Radiotherapy Associates Medical Group, Manhattan Beach, California (United States)] [Valley Radiotherapy Associates Medical Group, Manhattan Beach, California (United States); Followill, David S. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hoffman, Karen E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Jiang Jing [Division of Quantitative Sciences, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Division of Quantitative Sciences, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Smith, Benjamin D., E-mail: BSmith3@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Integrated urology-radiation oncology (RO) practices have been advocated as a means to improve community-based prostate cancer care by joining urologic and radiation care in a single-practice environment. However, little is known regarding the scope and actual physical integration of such practices. We sought to characterize the emergence of such practices in Texas, their extent of physical integration, and their potential effect on patient travel times for radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A telephone survey identified integrated urology-RO practices, defined as practices owned by urologists that offer RO services. Geographic information software was used to determine the proximity of integrated urology-RO clinic sites with respect to the state's population. We calculated patient travel time and distance from each integrated urology-RO clinic offering urologic services to the RO treatment facility owned by the integrated practice and to the nearest nonintegrated (independent) RO facility. We compared these times and distances using the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. Results: Of 229 urology practices identified, 12 (5%) offered integrated RO services, and 182 (28%) of 640 Texas urologists worked in such practices. Approximately 53% of the state population resides within 10 miles of an integrated urology-RO clinic site. Patients with a diagnosis of prostate cancer at an integrated urology-RO clinic site travel a mean of 19.7 miles (26.1 min) from the clinic to reach the RO facility owned by the integrated urology-RO practice vs 5.9 miles (9.2 min) to reach the nearest nonintegrated RO facility (P<.001). Conclusions: Integrated urology-RO practices are common in Texas and are generally clustered in urban areas. In most integrated practices, the urology clinics and the integrated RO facilities are not at the same location, and driving times and distances from the clinic to the integrated RO facility exceed those from the clinic to the nearest nonintegrated RO facility.

  2. Using federal technology policy to strength the US microelectronics industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gover, J.E.; Gwyn, C.W.

    1994-07-01

    A review of US and Japanese experiences with using microelectronics consortia as a tool for strengthening their respective industries reveals major differences. Japan has established catch-up consortia with focused goals. These consortia have a finite life targeted from the beginning, and emphasis is on work that supports or leads to product and process-improvement-driven commercialization. Japan`s government has played a key role in facilitating the development of consortia and has used consortia promote domestic competition. US consortia, on the other hand, have often emphasized long-range research with considerably less focus than those in Japan. The US consortia have searched for and often made revolutionary technology advancements. However, technology transfer to their members has been difficult. Only SEMATECH has assisted its members with continuous improvements, compressing product cycles, establishing relationships, and strengthening core competencies. The US government has not been a catalyst nor provided leadership in consortia creation and operation. We propose that in order to regain world leadership in areas where US companies lag foreign competition, the US should create industry-wide, horizontal-vertical, catch-up consortia or continue existing consortia in the six areas where the US lags behind Japan -- optoelectronics, displays, memories, materials, packaging, and manufacturing equipment. In addition, we recommend that consortia be established for special government microelectronics and microelectronics research integration and application. We advocate that these consortia be managed by an industry-led Microelectronics Alliance, whose establishment would be coordinated by the Department of Commerce. We further recommend that the Semiconductor Research Corporation, the National Science Foundation Engineering Research Centers, and relevant elements of other federal programs be integrated into this consortia complex.

  3. Stimuli-Responsive/Rheoreversible Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids as a Greener Alternative to Support Geothermal and Fossil Energy Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, Hun Bok; Carroll, KC; Kabilan, Senthil; Heldebrant, David J.; Hoyt, David W.; Zhong, Lirong; Varga, Tamas; Stephens, Sean A.; Adams, Lexor; Bonneville, Alain; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Fernandez, Carlos A.

    2015-01-01

    Cost-effective yet safe creation of high-permeability reservoirs within deep bedrock is the primary challenge for the viability of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) and unconventional oil/gas recovery. Although fracturing fluids are commonly used for oil/gas, standard fracturing methods are not developed or proven for EGS temperatures and pressures. Furthermore, the environmental impacts of currently used fracturing methods are only recently being determined. Widespread concerns about the environmental contamination have resulted in a number of regulations for fracturing fluids advocating for greener fracturing processes. To enable EGS feasibility and lessen environmental impact of reservoir stimulation, an environmentally benign, CO2-activated, rheoreversible fracturing fluid that enhances permeability through fracturing (at significantly lower effective stress than standard fracturing fluids) due to in situ volume expansion and gel formation is investigated herein. The chemical mechanism, stability, phase-change behavior, and rheology for a novel polyallylamine (PAA)-CO2 fracturing fluid was characterized at EGS temperatures and pressures. Hydrogel is formed upon reaction with CO2 and this process is reversible (via CO2 depressurization or solubilizing with a mild acid) allowing removal from the formation and recycling, decreasing environmental impact. Rock obtained from the Coso geothermal field was fractured in laboratory experiments under various EGS temperatures and pressures with comparison to standard fracturing fluids, and the fractures were characterized with imaging, permeability measurement, and flow modeling. This novel fracturing fluid and process may vastly reduce water usage and the environmental impact of fracturing practices and effectively make EGS production and unconventional oil/gas exploitation cost-effective and cleaner.

  4. DOE GIS core team - a best practice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bollinger, J.; Bhaduri, Budhendra; Bleakly, D. R.; Brady-Sabeff, Liz; Guber, Al; Guziel, K. A.; Hargrove, Susan; Lee, J.; Lee, R.; Mickus, Kurt; Morehouse, David; Moore, K.; Ramsdell, Amy; Rich, P. M.

    2004-01-01

    Large government organizations such as the Department of Energy (DOE) are challenged with identifying and implementing best geospatial information management practices to ensure that operational needs are met and government objectives are achieved. Geographic Information System (GIS) professionals, complex wide within the Department, conduct spatial information management practices on a daily basis to complete a wide variety of science and engineering tasks. The DOE Office of the CIO recognized the wealth of geospatial information management knowledge within the DOE complex and formed the DOE GIS Core Team in 2001 as a result. The team is comprised of GIS experts-representing all major DOE labs, site facilities, and programs-who volunteer their time to address issues impacting the entire complex. These include the President's management agenda (with emphasis on the Geospatial One-Stop), homeland security, emergency response, site management, software and geospatial data licensing, and federal, national, and international standards governing the creation and dissemination of geospatial data. The strength of the DOE GIS Core Team is the wide diversity of GIS and scientific expertise represented on the team, which allows it to provide the DOE CIO's office with sound guidance on complex wide issues from a GIS practitioner's perspective. The Core Team's mission is 'to foster technical excellence and communication, to identify and advocate best business practices, and to provide sound recommendations on policy and standards.' As a first step toward identifying best practices the feam conducted a survey of all known GIS assets across the DOE complex. The survey identified each site's GIS expertise, operating systems architecture and software applications, major project areas supported, and a number of other metrics important to the operation of a GIS organization. Results of the survey will be discussed, along with the mission of the Core Team. A broad overview of best practices utilized by many of the leading GIS organizations across the complex will also be provided.

  5. Final Report for Award DE-SC0005403. Improved Electrochemical Performance of Strained Lattice Electrolytes via Modulated Doping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hertz, Joshua L.; Prasad, Ajay K.

    2015-09-06

    The enclosed document provides a final report to document the research performed at the University of Delaware under Grant DE-SC0005403: Improved Electrochemical Performance of Strained Lattice Electrolytes via Modulated Doping. The ultimate goal of this project was to learn how to systematically strain the inter-atomic distance in thin ceramic films and how to use this newfound control to improve the ease by which oxygen ions can conduct through the films. Increasing the ionic conductivity of ceramics holds the promise of drastic improvements in the performance of solid oxide fuel cells, chemical sensors, gas permeation membranes, and related devices. Before this work, the experimental evidence advocating for strain-based techniques was often controversial and poorly characterized. Enabling much of this work was a new method to quickly create a very wide range of ceramic nanostructures that was established during the first phase of the project. Following this initial phase, we created a variety of promising nanostructured epitaxial films and multilayers with systematic variations in lattice mismatch and dopant content. Over the course of the work, a positive effect of tensile atomic strain on the oxygen conductivity was conclusively found using a few different forms of samples and experimental techniques. The samples were built by sputtering, an industrially scalable technique, and thus the technological implementation of these results may be economically feasible. Still, two other results consistently achieved over multiple efforts in this work give pause. The first of these results was that very specific, pristine surfaces upon which to build the nanostructures were strictly required in order to achieve measurable results. The second of these results was that compressively strained films with concomitant reductions in oxygen conductivity are much easier to obtain relative to tensile-strained films with increased conductivity.

  6. US DOE EECBG BBNP REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Driscoll, Brian; Conkey, Todd; Edgar, George; Fox, Lisa; Kahl, Shannon; Lightbourn, Steve; Moubry, Cindy; Nettleton, Greg; Plunkett, Mike; Smith, Paul; Thibert-Blank, Jackie; Wollin, Amanda

    2013-12-31

    The Wisconsin Energy Efficiency (WE2) Program delivered residential and commercial programming for the City of Milwaukee (Me2) and the City of Madison (Green Madison) as well as commercial only programming for the City of Racine (Re2). Direct incentives and loan products for homeowners and business owners were offered, with the goal to achieve at least 15 percent in energy savings. At the time of this report, there were more than 2,000 residential energy efficiency upgrades completed and more than 300 commercial energy efficiency upgrades completed. The average energy savings for the WE2 Program’s portfolio of residential and commercial projects exceeds 15 percent and is closer to 30 percent energy savings. Combined energy savings of both residential and commercial activities were: 20,937,369 kWh; 1,018,907 Therms; and 31,655 gallons of heating oil; or at least 332,788 MMBTUs; or at least $3,444,828 in estimated energy costs saved. Conservative economic impact estimates include the employment of more than 100 residential auditors and contractors, more than 90 commercial contractors, and more than $41 million in total project costs expended in the targeted communities. WECC, along with the Partner Cities, attempted to create energy efficiency programming that helped to increase economic activity, increase workforce opportunities, and save energy in three of the largest communities in Wisconsin. Homeowners were assisted through the residential process by Energy Advocates, consultants, and contractors. Business owners were assisted through the commercial process by Program Advocates, contractors and trade allies. Contractors in both the residential and commercial programs were educated and trained by the many offerings provided by WECC. Together, all parties involved made the WE2 Program successful. The most prominent innovative approaches employed in the Me2 and Green Madison programs for residential retrofits were: use of a loan loss reserve approach to improve access to lower cost financing; a primary focus on “community-based” marketing and outreach through local organizations to attract program participants; use of Energy Advocates to facilitate homeowner understanding during participation of the retrofit process; increase in financial incentives, especially to achieve higher project savings; and additional building science and sales training for participating contractors, as well as the use of a Community Workforce Agreement (CWA). The most prominent innovative approaches used in the commercial building retrofit programs for the Me2, Green Madison and Re2 programs were: development and use of innovative customer financing through loan-loss reserves for small commercial building retrofits; cash collateral advance account for larger projects which mitigated the financial risk of lenders; and the ultimate development of a Commercial Property Assessed Clean Energy (C-PACE) program in the City of Milwaukee. Other approaches included: increased customer financial incentives, especially for small commercial projects, in excess of the incentives available from the Focus on Energy program. Each Partner City’s commercial program was built on existing Focus on Energy programming, which allowed the WE2 Program to leverage experience from Focus on Energy personnel to help promote participation, and encourage more extensive retrofits. Several legacy items will continue into the future, while there will be ongoing attempts to create a sustainable program. In the future, homeowners in Milwaukee and Madison will continue to have opportunities for incentives through the Focus on Energy program, as well as loan products being offered through Me2 and Green Madison. Similarly, business owners will continue to benefit from incentives through the Focus on Energy program, as well as loan products being offered through Me2 and Green Madison. Finally, the most recent development and implementation of C-PACE for large commercial building owners or business owners in Milwaukee may have substantial economic impacts. C-PACE may have similar impacts in Madison should they choose to implement the program in the near future. The WE2 Program’s immediate economic activity, workforce development, and energy savings coupled with long-term opportunities such as C-PACE provide a strong platform for the future, and could have only been created through meaningful collaboration. 

  7. Some Specific CASL Requirements for Advanced Multiphase Flow Simulation of Light Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. A. Berry

    2010-11-01

    Because of the diversity of physical phenomena occuring in boiling, flashing, and bubble collapse, and of the length and time scales of LWR systems, it is imperative that the models have the following features: • Both vapor and liquid phases (and noncondensible phases, if present) must be treated as compressible. • Models must be mathematically and numerically well-posed. • The models methodology must be multi-scale. A fundamental derivation of the multiphase governing equation system, that should be used as a basis for advanced multiphase modeling in LWR coolant systems, is given in the Appendix using the ensemble averaging method. The remainder of this work focuses specifically on the compressible, well-posed, and multi-scale requirements of advanced simulation methods for these LWR coolant systems, because without these are the most fundamental aspects, without which widespread advancement cannot be claimed. Because of the expense of developing multiple special-purpose codes and the inherent inability to couple information from the multiple, separate length- and time-scales, efforts within CASL should be focused toward development of a multi-scale approaches to solve those multiphase flow problems relevant to LWR design and safety analysis. Efforts should be aimed at developing well-designed unified physical/mathematical and high-resolution numerical models for compressible, all-speed multiphase flows spanning: (1) Well-posed general mixture level (true multiphase) models for fast transient situations and safety analysis, (2) DNS (Direct Numerical Simulation)-like models to resolve interface level phenmena like flashing and boiling flows, and critical heat flux determination (necessarily including conjugate heat transfer), and (3) Multi-scale methods to resolve both (1) and (2) automatically, depending upon specified mesh resolution, and to couple different flow models (single-phase, multiphase with several velocities and pressures, multiphase with single velocity and pressure, etc.) A unified, multi-scale approach is advocated to extend the necessary foundations and build the capability to simultaneously solve the fluid dynamic interface problems (interface resolution) as well as multiphase mixtures (homogenization).

  8. QER- Comment of William Smith III

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hello DOE, Thanks for accepting my comments on the Quadrennial Energy Review by e-mail. There will be those who wish to promote nuclear energy as a source of electricity for future use in the USA. I speak against this form of energy. Because it creates long-lived radioactive wastes, nuclear power is incompatible with the biological world in which we live and from which we evolved. The lasting nature of these wastes creates a moral quandry for us in this generation, as we leave behind such biological poisons for our descents to manage, in ways which we do not yet know. A further problem with nucler energy is that any fission reaction creates plutonium, the stuff of nuclear weapons. If nuclear power reactors were to be spread around the world, inevitably the proliferation of nuclear weapons would follow. So-called '4th generation' or 'thorium' reactors suffer from a similar problem, for although they may generate less plutonium, their fuel cycle involves creation of large amounts of U-233 which carries a similar proliferation risk to plutonium-239. I advocate crafting an energy future for our nation bsed on the natural flows of renewable energy, coupled with a diversified structure which generates electricity at many smaller sources. Implicit in any modern energy system is the increased efficiency of energy usage which will continue to lower the bulk amounts of energy, particularly electricity, which our society uses to satisfy our industrial, military, commercial, and personal needs. Clearly as a nation we must participate in the worldwide effort to control the buildup of carbon dioxide gases and other pollutants which threaten the stability of the earth's climate. I would like to bring to your attention these papers from the Rocky Mountain Institute which touch on the above issues: http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2009-09_FourNuclearMyths and http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2012-01_FarewellToFossilFuels and http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/E05-14_NuclearPowerEconomics.... If you have not yet done so, I strongly urge you to contact the Rocky Mountain Institute and contract with them for their advice in consulting on the Quadrennial Energy Review. Sincerely, William Wharton Smith III

  9. RTP as an Optional Service: It's Alive, But Is It Well?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, Charles; Barbose, Galen; Neenan, Bernie

    2006-03-10

    Economists have advocated for real-time pricing (RTP) of electricity on the basis of the gains in economic efficiency that would result from charging customers the contemporaneous marginal cost of supplying electricity instead of the average cost. In recent years, RTP has also become the subject of interest in a variety of policy contexts, including integrated resource planning initiatives, ongoing efforts to improve efficiency and reliability in competitive electricity markets, and implementation of default service in states with retail choice. Most experience with RTP has been as an optional service, that is, a self-selecting alternative to the standard utility service. By our count, approximately 70 utilities in the U.S. offered an optional RTP program at some point over the past 20 years. However, many programs are now defunct. In 2003, 47 utilities in the U.S. were still offering an optional RTP program, on either a pilot or permanent basis (see Figure 1). In addition, 10 utilities in states with retail choice currently offer RTP as the default service for large customers that are not under contract with a competitive supplier. Another two utilities have received regulatory approval to do so in the next few years. Although the results of a few optional RTP programs have been publicized, the vast majority of programs have operated in relative obscurity. To provide a wider perspective on utility and customer experience with RTP, we surveyed 43 optional RTP programs offered in 2003. We interviewed RTP program managers and other utility staff, and reviewed publicly available sources, including key regulatory documents and program evaluations. Based on this research, we identified trends related to RTP program history and outlook, program design and implementation, customer participation, and participant price response. The results are both surprising and instructive. We conclude that RTP is indeed alive but is not prospering as well it could. Thus, we offer a number of recommendations for policymakers and utilities that are considering optional RTP as a strategy for developing price responsive demand.

  10. A Framework for Risk Analysis for Ecological Restoration Projects in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Hofseth, Keith

    2005-01-03

    This report provides a framework for incorporating risk analysis into the six-step planning process for ecosystem restoration projects. This report is part of a larger research and development effort to develop procedures and guidelines for risk analysis in USACE ecosystem restoration planning. The focus is on risk analysis: identifying the range of possible outcomes from alternative ecosystem restoration actions, assessing the potential for achieving the desired outcome, characterizing the likelihood of adverse consequences, and communicating these findings to stakeholders and decision makers. This framework document makes simplifying assumptions to allow a focus on incorporating risk information in the planning and decision-making process. A conceptual model of the site and landscape is advocated as a central organizing structure within the six-step process for ecosystem restoration project planning. This is responsive to USACE directives that restoration projects be conceived in a systems context using an ecosystem and/or watershed approach. The conceptual model delineates the empirical quantities to be addressed in risk analysis and modeling. Although the planning process is described in six distinct steps, in practice these steps are iterative and often carried out simultaneously. Risk analysis within this context has the same character. The approach for incorporating risk analysis into the planning process provides direction intended to help the planner: Identify the levels of uncertainty that are acceptable, at the start of the planning process. Use conceptual and numerical models to communicate the planning teams understanding of the ecosystem to others, and reduce the risk of mis-specifying the system. Consider the uncertainty associated with the variables chosen to measure project effects. Use alternative designs to manage identified uncertainty. Use risk information to eliminate alternatives with unacceptable risk from consideration. Incorporate risk analysis into the USACE four criteria of effectiveness, efficiency, completeness, and acceptability. Use an alternatives irreducible uncertainty as an attribute to be considered along with other attributes in the comparison of alternative plans. Use risk information in the final plan selection process. There are three other efforts associated with this framework document, which offer information and guidance for incorporating risk analysis into cost-estimation, and biological and hydrologic modeling.

  11. Technologies for water resources management: an integrated approach to manage global and regional water resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, W. C., LLNL

    1998-03-23

    Recent droughts in California have highlighted and refocused attention on the problem of providing reliable sources of water to sustain the State`s future economic development. Specific elements of concern include not only the stability and availability of future water supplies in the State, but also how current surface and groundwater storage and distribution systems may be more effectively managed and upgraded, how treated wastewater may be more widely recycled, and how legislative and regulatory processes may be used or modified to address conflicts between advocates of urban growth, industrial, agricultural, and environmental concerns. California is not alone with respect to these issues. They are clearly relevant throughout the West, and are becoming more so in other parts of the US. They have become increasingly important in developing and highly populated nations such as China, India, and Mexico. They are critically important in the Middle East and Southeast Asia, especially as they relate to regional stability and security issues. Indeed, in almost all cases, there are underlying themes of `reliability` and `sustainability` that pertain to the assurance of current and future water supplies, as well as a broader set of `stability` and `security` issues that relate to these assurances--or lack thereof--to the political and economic future of various countries and regions. In this latter sense, and with respect to regions such as China, the Middle East, and Southeast Asia, water resource issues may take on a very serious strategic nature, one that is most illustrative and central to the emerging notion of `environmental security.` In this report, we have identified a suite of technical tools that, when developed and integrated together, may prove effective in providing regional governments the ability to manage their water resources. Our goal is to formulate a framework for an Integrated Systems Analysis (ISA): As a strategic planning tool for managing regional water resources; As an evaluation tool for selecting appropriate remediation technologies for reclaiming water; and As an assessment tool for determining the effectiveness of implementing the remediation technologies. We have included a discussion on the appropriate strategy for LLNL to integrate its technical tools into the global business, geopolitical, and academic communities, whereby LLNL can form partnerships with technology proponents in the commercial, industrial, and public sectors.

  12. An application of the theory of planned behaviour to study the influencing factors of participation in source separation of food waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karim Ghani, Wan Azlina Wan Ab.; Rusli, Iffah Farizan; Biak, Dayang Radiah Awang; Idris, Azni

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ? Theory of planned behaviour (TPB) has been conducted to identify the influencing factors for participation in source separation of food waste using self administered questionnaires. ? The findings suggested several implications for the development and implementation of waste separation at home programme. ? The analysis indicates that the attitude towards waste separation is determined as the main predictors where this in turn could be a significant predictor of the repondents actual food waste separation behaviour. ? To date, none of similar have been reported elsewhere and this finding will be beneficial to local Authorities as indicator in designing campaigns to promote the use of waste separation programmes to reinforce the positive attitudes. - Abstract: Tremendous increases in biodegradable (food waste) generation significantly impact the local authorities, who are responsible to manage, treat and dispose of this waste. The process of separation of food waste at its generation source is identified as effective means in reducing the amount food waste sent to landfill and can be reused as feedstock to downstream treatment processes namely composting or anaerobic digestion. However, these efforts will only succeed with positive attitudes and highly participations rate by the public towards the scheme. Thus, the social survey (using questionnaires) to analyse publics view and influencing factors towards participation in source separation of food waste in households based on the theory of planned behaviour technique (TPB) was performed in June and July 2011 among selected staff in Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor. The survey demonstrates that the public has positive intention in participating provided the opportunities, facilities and knowledge on waste separation at source are adequately prepared by the respective local authorities. Furthermore, good moral values and situational factors such as storage convenience and collection times are also encouraged publics involvement and consequently, the participations rate. The findings from this study may provide useful indicator to the waste management authorities in Malaysia in identifying mechanisms for future development and implementation of food waste source separation activities in household programmes and communication campaign which advocate the use of these programmes.

  13. ICT reuse in socio-economic enterprises

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ongondo, F.O.; Williams, I.D.; Dietrich, J.; Carroll, C.

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: We analyse ICT equipment reuse operations of socio-economic enterprises. Most common ICT products dealt with are computers and related equipment. In the UK in 2010, ?143,750 appliances were reused. Marketing and legislative difficulties are the common hurdles to reuse activities. Socio-economic enterprises can significantly contribute to resource efficiency. - Abstract: In Europe, socio-economic enterprises such as charities, voluntary organisations and not-for-profit companies are involved in the repair, refurbishment and reuse of various products. This paper characterises and analyses the operations of socio-economic enterprises that are involved in the reuse of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) equipment. Using findings from a survey, the paper specifically analyses the reuse activities of socio-economic enterprises in the UK from which Europe-wide conclusions are drawn. The amount of ICT products handled by the reuse organisations is quantified and potential barriers and opportunities to their operations are analysed. By-products from reuse activities are discussed and recommendations to improve reuse activities are provided. The most common ICT products dealt with by socio-economic enterprises are computers and related equipment. In the UK in 2010, an estimated 143,750 appliances were reused. However, due to limitations in data, it is difficult to compare this number to the amount of new appliances that entered the UK market or the amount of waste electrical and electronic equipment generated in the same period. Difficulties in marketing products and numerous legislative requirements are the most common barriers to reuse operations. Despite various constraints, it is clear that organisations involved in reuse of ICT could contribute significantly to resource efficiency and a circular economy. It is suggested that clustering of their operations into reuse parks would enhance both their profile and their products. Reuse parks would also improve consumer confidence in and subsequently sales of the products. Further, it is advocated that industrial networking opportunities for the exchange of by-products resulting from the organisations activities should be investigated. The findings make two significant contributions to the current literature. One, they provide a detailed insight into the reuse operations of socio-economic enterprises. Previously unavailable data has been presented and analysed. Secondly, new evidence about the by-products/materials resulting from socio-economic enterprises reuse activities has been obtained. These contributions add substantially to our understanding of the important role of reuse organisations.

  14. Customer Strategies for Responding to Day-Ahead Market HourlyElectricity Pricing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, Chuck; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan,Bernie; Boisvert, Dick; Cappers, Peter; Pratt, Donna; Butkins, Kim

    2005-08-25

    Real-time pricing (RTP) has been advocated as an economically efficient means to send price signals to customers to promote demand response (DR) (Borenstein 2002, Borenstein 2005, Ruff 2002). However, limited information exists that can be used to judge how effectively RTP actually induces DR, particularly in the context of restructured electricity markets. This report describes the second phase of a study of how large, non-residential customers' adapted to default-service day-ahead hourly pricing. The customers are located in upstate New York and served under Niagara Mohawk, A National Grid Company (NMPC)'s SC-3A rate class. The SC-3A tariff is a type of RTP that provides firm, day-ahead notice of hourly varying prices indexed to New York Independent System Operator (NYISO) day-ahead market prices. The study was funded by the California Energy Commission (CEC)'s PIER program through the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC). NMPC's is the first and longest-running default-service RTP tariff implemented in the context of retail competition. The mix of NMPC's large customers exposed to day-ahead hourly prices is roughly 30% industrial, 25% commercial and 45% institutional. They have faced periods of high prices during the study period (2000-2004), thereby providing an opportunity to assess their response to volatile hourly prices. The nature of the SC-3A default service attracted competitive retailers offering a wide array of pricing and hedging options, and customers could also participate in demand response programs implemented by NYISO. The first phase of this study examined SC-3A customers' satisfaction, hedging choices and price response through in-depth customer market research and a Constant Elasticity of Substitution (CES) demand model (Goldman et al. 2004). This second phase was undertaken to answer questions that remained unresolved and to quantify price response to a higher level of granularity. We accomplished these objectives with a second customer survey and interview effort, which resulted in a higher, 76% response rate, and the adoption of the more flexible Generalized Leontief (GL) demand model, which allows us to analyze customer response under a range of conditions (e.g. at different nominal prices) and to determine the distribution of individual customers' response.

  15. Informed Consent for Interventional Radiology Procedures: A Survey Detailing Current European Practice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Dwyer, H.M.; Lyon, S.M.; Fotheringham, T.; Lee, M.J.

    2003-09-15

    Purpose: Official recommendations for obtaining informed consent for interventional radiology procedures are that the patient gives their consent to the operator more than 24 hr prior to the procedure. This has significant implications for interventional radiology practice. The purpose of this study was to identify the proportion of European interventional radiologists who conform to these guidelines. Methods: A questionnaire was designed consisting of 12 questions on current working practice and opinions regarding informed consent. These questions related to where, when and by whom consent was obtained from the patient. Questions also related to the use of formal consent forms and written patient information leaflets. Respondents were asked whether they felt patients received adequate explanation regarding indications for intervention,the procedure, alternative treatment options and complications. The questionnaire was distributed to 786 European interventional radiologists who were members of interventional societies. The anonymous replies were then entered into a database and analyzed. Results: Two hundred and fifty-four (32.3%) questionnaires were returned. Institutions were classified as academic (56.7%),non-academic (40.5%) or private (2.8%). Depending on the procedure,in a significant proportion of patients consent was obtained in the outpatient department (22%), on the ward (65%) and in the radiology day case ward (25%), but in over half (56%) of patients consent or re-consent was obtained in the interventional suite. Fifty percent of respondents indicated that they obtain consent more than 24 hr before some procedures, in 42.9% consent is obtained on the morning of the procedure and 48.8% indicated that in some patients consent is obtained immediately before the procedure. We found that junior medical staff obtained consent in 58% of cases. Eighty-two percent of respondents do not use specific consent forms and 61% have patient information leaflets. The majority of respondents were satisfied with their level of explanation regarding indications for treatment (69.3%) and the procedure (78.7%). Fifty-nine percent felt patients understood alternative treatment options. Only 37.8% of radiologists document possible complications in the patient's chart. Comments from respondents indicated that there is insufficient time for radiologists to obtain consent in all patients. Suggestions to improve current local policies included developing the role of radiology nursing staff and the use of radiology outpatient clinics. Conclusions: More than 50% of respondents are unhappy with their policies for obtaining informed consent. Interventional societies have a role to play in advocating formal consent guidelines.

  16. Disorder dependent half-metallicity in Mn{sub 2}CoSi inverse Heusler alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Mukhtiyar; Saini, Hardev S.; Thakur, Jyoti; Reshak, Ali H.; Kashyap, Manish K.

    2013-12-15

    Heusler alloys based thin-films often exhibit a degree of atomic disorder which leads to the lowering of spin polarization in spintronic devices. We present ab-initio calculations of atomic disorder effects on spin polarization and half-metallicity of Mn{sub 2}CoSi inverse Heusler alloy. The five types of disorder in Mn{sub 2}CoSi have been proposed and investigated in detail. The A2{sub a}-type and B2-type disorders destroy the half-metallicity whereas it sustains for all disorders concentrations in DO{sub 3a}- and A2{sub b}-type disorder and for smallest disorder concentration studied in DO{sub 3b}-type disorder. Lower formation energy/atom for A2{sub b}-type disorder than other four disorders in Mn{sub 2}CoSi advocates the stability of this disorder. The total magnetic moment shows a strong dependence on the disorder and the change in chemical environment. The 100% spin polarization even in the presence of disorders explicitly supports that these disorders shall not hinder the use of Mn{sub 2}CoSi inverse Heusler alloy in device applications. - Graphical abstract: Minority-spin gap (E{sub g↓}) and HM gap (E{sub sf}) as a function of concentrations of various possible disorder in Mn{sub 2}CoSi inverse Heusler alloy. The squares with solid line (black color)/dotted line (blue color)/dashed line (red color) reperesents E{sub g↓} for DO{sub 3a}-/DO{sub 3b}-/A2{sub b}-type disorder in Mn{sub 2}CoSi and the spheres with solid line (black color)/dottedline (blue color)/dashed line (red color) represents E{sub sf} for DO{sub 3a}-/DO{sub 3b}-/A2{sub b}-type disorder in Mn{sub 2}CoSi. - Highlights: • The DO{sub 3}- and A2-type disorders do not affect the half-metallicity in Mn{sub 2}CoSi. • The B2-type disorder solely destroys half-metallicity in Mn{sub 2}CoSi. • The A2-type disorder most probable to occur out of all three types. • The total spin magnetic moment strongly depends on the disorder concentrations.

  17. Mid-Atlantic Regional Wind Energy Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Courtney Lane

    2011-12-20

    As the Department of Energy stated in its 20% Wind Energy by 2030 report, there will need to be enhanced outreach efforts on a national, state, regional, and local level to communicate wind development opportunities, benefits and challenges to a diverse set of stakeholders. To help address this need, PennFuture was awarded funding to create the Mid-Atlantic Regional Wind Energy Institute to provide general education and outreach on wind energy development across Maryland, Virginia, Delaware, Pennsylvania and West Virginia. Over the course of the two-year grant period, PennFuture used its expertise on wind energy policy and development in Pennsylvania and expanded it to other states in the Mid-Atlantic region. PennFuture accomplished this through reaching out and establishing connections with policy makers, local environmental groups, health and economic development organizations, and educational institutions and wind energy developers throughout the Mid-Atlantic region. PennFuture conducted two regional wind educational forums that brought together wind industry representatives and public interest organizations from across the region to discuss and address wind development in the Mid-Atlantic region. PennFuture developed the agenda and speakers in collaboration with experts on the ground in each state to help determine the critical issue to wind energy in each location. The sessions focused on topics ranging from the basics of wind development; model ordinance and tax issues; anti-wind arguments and counter points; wildlife issues and coalition building. In addition to in-person events, PennFuture held three webinars on (1) Generating Jobs with Wind Energy; (2) Reviving American Manufacturing with Wind Power; and (3) Wind and Transmission. PennFuture also created a web page for the institute (http://www.midatlanticwind.org) that contains an online database of fact sheets, research reports, sample advocacy letters, top anti-wind claims and information on how to address them, wind and wildlife materials and sample model ordinances. Video and presentations from each in-person meeting and webinar recordings are also available on the site. At the end of the two-year period, PennFuture has accomplished its goal of giving a unified voice and presence to wind energy advocates in the Mid-Atlantic region. We educated a broad range of stakeholders on the benefits of wind energy and gave them the tools to help make a difference in their states. We grew a database of over 500 contacts and hope to continue the discussion and work around the importance of wind energy in the region.

  18. Advancing the surgical implantation of electronic tags in fish: a gap analysis and research agenda based on a review of trends in intracoelomic tagging effects studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooke, Steven J.; Woodley, Christa M.; Eppard, M. B.; Brown, Richard S.; Nielsen, Jennifer L.

    2011-03-08

    Early approaches to surgical implantation of electronic tags in fish were often through trial and error, however, in recent years there has been an interest in using scientific research to identify techniques and procedures that improve the outcome of surgical procedures and determine the effects of tagging on individuals. Here we summarize the trends in 108 peer-reviewed electronic tagging effect studies focused on intracoleomic implantation to determine opportunities for future research. To date, almost all of the studies have been conducted in freshwater, typically in laboratory environments, and have focused on biotelemetry devices. The majority of studies have focused on salmonids, cyprinids, ictalurids and centrarchids, with a regional bias towards North America, Europe and Australia. Most studies have focused on determining whether there is a negative effect of tagging relative to control fish, with proportionally fewer that have contrasted different aspects of the surgical procedure (e.g., methods of sterilization, incision location, wound closure material) that could advance the discipline. Many of these studies included routine endpoints such as mortality, growth, healing and tag retention, with fewer addressing sublethal measures such as swimming ability, predator avoidance, physiological costs, or fitness. Continued research is needed to further elevate the practice of electronic tag implantation in fish in order to ensure that the data generated are relevant to untagged conspecifics (i.e., no long-term behavioural or physiological consequences) and the surgical procedure does not impair the health and welfare status of the tagged fish. To that end, we advocate for i) rigorous controlled manipulations based on statistical designs that have adequate power, account for inter-individual variation, and include controls and shams, ii) studies that transcend the laboratory and the field with more studies in marine waters, iii) incorporation of knowledge and techniques emerging from the medical and veterinary disciplines, iv) addressing all components of the surgical event, v) comparative studies that evaluate the same surgical techniques on multiple species and in different environments, vi) consideration of how biotic factors (e.g., sex, age, size) influence tagging outcomes, and vii) studies that cover a range of endpoints over ecologically-relevant time periods.

  19. A Perspective on Long-Term Recovery Following the Fukushima Nuclear Accident - 12075

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, S.Y.

    2012-07-01

    The tragic events at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station began occurring on March 11, 2011, following Japan's unprecedented earthquake and tsunami. The subsequent loss of external power and on-site cooling capacity severely compromised the plant's safety systems, and subsequently, led to core melt in the affected reactors and damage to spent nuclear fuel in the storage pools. Together with hydrogen explosions, this resulted in a substantial release of radioactive material to the environment (mostly Iodine-131 and Cesium- 137), prompting an extensive evacuation effort. The latest release estimate places the event at the highest severity level (Level 7) on the International Nuclear Event Scale, the same as the Chernobyl accident of 1986. As the utility owner endeavored to stabilize the damaged facility, environmental contamination continued to propagate and affect every aspect of daily life in the affected region of Japan. Elevated levels of radioactivity (mostly dominated by Cs-137 with the passage of time) were found in soil, drinking water, vegetation, produce, seafood, and other foodstuffs. An estimated 80,000 to 90,000 people were evacuated; more evacuations are being contemplated months after the accident, and a vast amount of land has become contaminated. Early actions were taken to ban the shipment and sale of contaminated food and drinking water, followed by later actions to ban the shipment and sale of contaminated beef, mushrooms, and seafood. As the event continues to evolve toward stabilization, the long-term recovery effort needs to commence - a process that doubtless will involve rather complex decision-making interactions between various stakeholders. Key issues that may be encountered and considered in such a process include (1) socio-political factors, (2) local economic considerations, (3) land use options, (4) remediation approaches, (5) decontamination methods, (6) radioactive waste management, (7) cleanup levels and options, and (8) government policies, among others. This paper offers a perspective on this likely long and arduous journey toward establishing a 'new normal' that will ultimately take shape. Toward this end, it is important to evaluate the 'optimization' process advocated by the international community in achieving long-term recovery from this particularly fateful event in Fukushima. In the process, experience and lessons learned from past events will be fully evaluated and considered. (author)

  20. Assessment of Tools and Data for System-Level Dynamic Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven J. Piet; Nick R. Soelberg

    2011-06-01

    The only fuel cycle for which dynamic analyses and assessments are not needed is the null fuel cycle - no nuclear power. For every other concept, dynamic analyses are needed and can influence relative desirability of options. Dynamic analyses show how a fuel cycle might work during transitions from today's partial fuel cycle to something more complete, impact of technology deployments, location of choke points, the key time lags, when benefits can manifest, and how well parts of fuel cycles work together. This report summarizes the readiness of existing Fuel Cycle Technology (FCT) tools and data for conducting dynamic analyses on the range of options. VISION is the primary dynamic analysis tool. Not only does it model mass flows, as do other dynamic system analysis models, but it allows users to explore various potential constraints. The only fuel cycle for which constraints are not important are those in concept advocates PowerPoint presentations; in contrast, comparative analyses of fuel cycles must address what constraints exist and how they could impact performance. The most immediate tool need is extending VISION to the thorium/U233 fuel cycle. Depending on further clarification of waste management strategies in general and for specific fuel cycle candidates, waste management sub-models in VISION may need enhancement, e.g., more on 'co-flows' of non-fuel materials, constraints in waste streams, or automatic classification of waste streams on the basis of user-specified rules. VISION originally had an economic sub-model. The economic calculations were deemed unnecessary in later versions so it was retired. Eventually, the program will need to restore and improve the economics sub-model of VISION to at least the cash flow stage and possibly to incorporating cost constraints and feedbacks. There are multiple sources of data that dynamic analyses can draw on. In this report, 'data' means experimental data, data from more detailed theoretical or empirical calculations on technology performance, and assumptions such as the earliest date a technology can be deployed. The only fuel cycles for which we currently have adequate data are those we are sure we will never build, e.g., a PUREX plant in the U.S. For actual candidates, even for once through LWRs, there remain missing data such as how the fuel cycle would be completed with a geologic repository. The most immediate data needs are probably basic reactor physics data for new concepts and data associated with waste management for anything other than current technology. The readiness of tools and data is fluid and depends on what purposes are envisioned to drive upcoming analyses and further definition of the waste-related characteristics of fuel cycle candidates. Tools and data sets evolve as needs evolve. Thus, much of the document explains that if the FCT program wants a certain type of analysis, then the tools and data needs are as indicated. For example, functions can be treated as either commodities or facilities. Reactors, separation, fuel fabrication, repository are treated as facility types. Other functions such as uranium mining, conversion, enrichment, and waste packaging and non-repository disposal are treated as commodities and therefore not modeled as extensively. In summary, the tools are functional and can answer many fuel cycle questions but some analyses will require that the tools be modified to support those analyses.

  1. Allocation of energy use in petroleum refineries to petroleum products : implications for life-cycle energy use and emission inventory of petroleum transportation fuels.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M.; Lee, H.; Molburg, J.

    2004-01-01

    Studies to evaluate the energy and emission impacts of vehicle/fuel systems have to address allocation of the energy use and emissions associated with petroleum refineries to various petroleum products because refineries produce multiple products. The allocation is needed in evaluating energy and emission effects of individual transportation fuels. Allocation methods used so far for petroleum-based fuels (e.g., gasoline, diesel, and liquefied petroleum gas [LPG]) are based primarily on mass, energy content, or market value shares of individual fuels from a given refinery. The aggregate approach at the refinery level is unable to account for the energy use and emission differences associated with producing individual fuels at the next sub-level: individual refining processes within a refinery. The approach ignores the fact that different refinery products go through different processes within a refinery. Allocation at the subprocess level (i.e., the refining process level) instead of at the aggregate process level (i.e., the refinery level) is advocated by the International Standard Organization. In this study, we seek a means of allocating total refinery energy use among various refinery products at the level of individual refinery processes. We present a petroleum refinery-process-based approach to allocating energy use in a petroleum refinery to petroleum refinery products according to mass, energy content, and market value share of final and intermediate petroleum products as they flow through refining processes within a refinery. The results from this study reveal that product-specific energy use based on the refinery process-level allocation differs considerably from that based on the refinery-level allocation. We calculated well-to-pump total energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for gasoline, diesel, LPG, and naphtha with the refinery process-based allocation approach. For gasoline, the efficiency estimated from the refinery-level allocation underestimates gasoline energy use, relative to the process-level based gasoline efficiency. For diesel fuel, the well-to-pump energy use for the process-level allocations with the mass- and energy-content-based weighting factors is smaller than that predicted with the refinery-level allocations. However, the process-level allocation with the market-value-based weighting factors has results very close to those obtained by using the refinery-level allocations. For LPG, the refinery-level allocation significantly overestimates LPG energy use. For naphtha, the refinery-level allocation overestimates naphtha energy use. The GHG emission patterns for each of the fuels are similar to those of energy use.We presented a refining-process-level-based method that can be used to allocate energy use of individual refining processes to refinery products. The process-level-based method captures process-dependent characteristics of fuel production within a petroleum refinery. The method starts with the mass and energy flow chart of a refinery, tracks energy use by individual refining processes, and distributes energy use of a given refining process to products from the process. In allocating energy use to refinery products, the allocation method could rely on product mass, product energy contents, or product market values as weighting factors. While the mass- and energy-content-based allocation methods provide an engineering perspective of energy allocation within a refinery, the market-value-ased allocation method provides an economic perspective. The results from this study show that energy allocations at the aggregate refinery level and at the refining process level could make a difference in evaluating the energy use and emissions associated with individual petroleum products. Furthermore, for the refining-process-level allocation method, use of mass -- energy content- or market value share-based weighting factors could lead to different results for diesel fuels, LPG, and naphtha. We suggest that, when possible, energy use allocations should be made at the lowest subprocess level

  2. Aperture-Tolerant, Chemical-Based Methods to Reduce Channeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randall S. Seright

    2007-09-30

    This final technical progress report describes work performed from October 1, 2004, through May 16, 2007, for the project, 'Aperture-Tolerant, Chemical-Based Methods to Reduce Channeling'. We explored the potential of pore-filling gels for reducing excess water production from both fractured and unfractured production wells. Several gel formulations were identified that met the requirements--i.e., providing water residual resistance factors greater than 2,000 and ultimate oil residual resistance factors (F{sub rro}) of 2 or less. Significant oil throughput was required to achieve low F{sub rro} values, suggesting that gelant penetration into porous rock must be small (a few feet or less) for existing pore-filling gels to provide effective disproportionate permeability reduction. Compared with adsorbed polymers and weak gels, strong pore-filling gels can provide greater reliability and behavior that is insensitive to the initial rock permeability. Guidance is provided on where relative-permeability-modification/disproportionate-permeability-reduction treatments can be successfully applied for use in either oil or gas production wells. When properly designed and executed, these treatments can be successfully applied to a limited range of oilfield excessive-water-production problems. We examined whether gel rheology can explain behavior during extrusion through fractures. The rheology behavior of the gels tested showed a strong parallel to the results obtained from previous gel extrusion experiments. However, for a given aperture (fracture width or plate-plate separation), the pressure gradients measured during the gel extrusion experiments were much higher than anticipated from rheology measurements. Extensive experiments established that wall slip and first normal stress difference were not responsible for the pressure gradient discrepancy. To explain the discrepancy, we noted that the aperture for gel flow (for mobile gel wormholing through concentrated immobile gel within the fracture) was much narrower than the width of the fracture. The potential of various approaches were investigated for improving sweep in parts of the Daqing Oil Field that have been EOR targets. Possibilities included (1) gel treatments that are directed at channeling through fractures, (2) colloidal dispersion gels, (3) reduced polymer degradation, (4) more viscous polymer solutions, and (5) foams and other methods. Fractures were present in a number of Daqing wells (both injectors and producers). Because the fractures were narrow far from the wellbore, severe channeling did not occur. On the contrary, fractures near the wellbore aided reservoir sweep. In the February 2006 issue of the Journal of Petroleum Technology, a 'Distinguished-Author-Series' paper claimed that a process using aqueous colloidal dispersion gels (CDG gels) performed superior to polymer flooding. Unfortunately, this claim is misleading and generally incorrect. Colloidal dispersion gels, in their present state of technological development, should not be advocated as an improvement to, or substitute for, polymer flooding.

  3. Phase I Water Rental Pilot Project : Snake River Resident Fish and Wildlife Resources and Management Recommendations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riggin, Stacey H.; Hansen, H. Jerome

    1992-10-01

    The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project was implemented as a part of the Non-Treaty Storage Fish and Wildlife Agreement (NTSA) between Bonneville Power Administration and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority. The goal of the project is to improve juvenile and adult salmon and steelhead passage in the lower Snake River with the use of rented water for flow augmentation. The primary purpose of this project is to summarize existing resource information and provide recommendations to protect or enhance resident fish and wildlife resources in Idaho with actions achieving flow augmentation for anadromous fish. Potential impacts of an annual flow augmentation program on Idaho reservoirs and streams are modeled. Potential sources of water for flow augmentation and operational or institutional constraints to the use of that water are identified. This report does not advocate flow augmentation as the preferred long-term recovery action for salmon. The state of Idaho strongly believes that annual drawdown of the four lower Snake reservoirs is critical to the long-term enhancement and recovery of salmon (Andrus 1990). Existing water level management includes balancing the needs of hydropower production, irrigated agriculture, municipalities and industries with fish, wildlife and recreation. Reservoir minimum pool maintenance, water quality and instream flows are issues of public concern that will be directly affected by the timing and quantity of water rental releases for salmon flow augmentation, The potential of renting water from Idaho rental pools for salmon flow augmentation is complicated by institutional impediments, competition from other water users, and dry year shortages. Water rental will contribute to a reduction in carryover storage in a series of dry years when salmon flow augmentation is most critical. Such a reduction in carryover can have negative impacts on reservoir fisheries by eliminating shoreline spawning beds, reducing available fish habitat, and exacerbating adverse water quality conditions. A reduction in carry over can lead to seasonal reductions in instream flows, which may also negatively affect fish, wildlife, and recreation in Idaho. The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project does provide opportunities to protect and enhance resident fish and wildlife habitat by improving water quality and instream flows. Control of point sources, such as sewage and industrial discharges, alone will not achieve water quality goals in Idaho reservoirs and streams. Slow, continuous releases of rented water can increase and stabilize instream flows, increase available fish and wildlife habitat, decrease fish displacement, and improve water quality. Island integrity, requisite for waterfowl protection from mainland predators, can be maintained with improved timing of water releases. Rebuilding Snake River salmon and steelhead runs requires a cooperative commitment and increased flexibility in system operations to increase flow velocities for fish passage and migration. Idaho's resident fish and wildlife resources require judicious management and a willingness by all parties to liberate water supplies equitably.

  4. Historical collection of preprints, reprints, working papers, correspondence, and other documents related to the "cold fusion" experiments conducted by Stanley Pons and Martin Fleischmann.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-04-01

    This historical collection consists of various letters, correspondence, working papers, reprints, preprints, workshop reports, and news clippings related to the "cold fusion" experiments conducted by Stanley Pons and Martin Fleischmann. Binders and contents. 1. Laboratory Reprints/Preprints (Laboratory Documents from 9 national Labs. Some original documents); 2. Summary Report by Dr. Duane L. Barney (Articles, Letters, and Reports through 1994 on Cold Fusion. Original Documents); 3. Conference Workshops (Official Documents, schedules, and notes from 4 conferences); 4. HSS&T Hearings, SRI Incident Jan. 1992 (Summary of Cold Fusion Research and reports following SRI Incident. Original Documents); 5. Media 1989 to Present (circa 1995) (Journals, Magazines, Newspapers, and Press Releases from 1989-1995. Some reprints, some original articles/magazines); 6. Science in Service of National Economy aka Manfred's Book (A comprehensive overview of various research being done at Laboratories across the country that could impact the economy); 7. ERAB Information (Comprehensive Report on Cold Fusion Research w/ recommendations on funding and continued research. Original documents); 8. Misc.: Memorandum, Notes, Reports, Summaries, and Updates Chronologically 1989 (Various documents related to Cold Fusion in order of print from 1989. Original documents); 9. Misc.: Memorandum, Notes, Reports, Summaries, and Updates Chronologically 1990-1992 (Various documents related to Cold Fusion including status reports and research in order of print from 1990-1992. Original documents); 10. Misc.: Memorandum, Notes, Reports, Summaries, and Updates Chronologically 1993-1995 (Various documents related to Cold Fusion including status reports and research in order of print from 1993-1995. Original documents); 11. General: Preprints/Reprints Filed by Institution A-H (Reports of Research and Conclusion from various universities and institutions.); 12. General: Preprints/Reprints Filed by Institution I-R (Reports of Research and Conclusion from various universities and institutions.); 13. General: Preprints/Reprints Filed by Institution S-Z (Reports of Research and Conclusion from various universities and institutions.); 14. General: Correspondence, Incoming, Inquiries A-F (Letters, Correspondence, and Inquiries regarding Cold Fusion and its research. Sorted by Last Name of Author. Original documents); 15. General: Correspondence, Incoming, Inquiries G-L (Letters, Correspondence, and Inquiries regarding Cold Fusion and its research. Sorted by Last Name of Author. Original documents); 16. General: Correspondence, Incoming, Inquiries M-R (Letters, Correspondence, and Inquiries regarding Cold Fusion and its research. Sorted by Last Name of Author. Original documents); 17. General: Correspondence, Incoming, Inquiries S-Z (Letters, Correspondence, and Inquiries regarding Cold Fusion and its research. Sorted by Last Name of Author. Original documents); 18. Miscellaneous papers (Investigation of Cold Fusion Phenomena in Deuterated Metals-NCFI Final Report Volumes I. II, and III; June 1991; 4th Annual Conference on Cold Fusion Proceedings: Volumes 1-4; Development of Advanced Concepts for Nuclear Processes in Deuterated Metals; A Comprehensive Report on the research methods, background information, and principles related to Cold Fusion; Cold Fusion Research: November 1989; ERAB report on Cold Fusion Research; Proceedings: Workshop on Anomalous Effects in Deuterided Metals; Workshop designed to generate audio between skeptics and advocates to examine Cold Fusion research results and remaining questions in research methods; Muon Catalyzed Fusion; Overview of Muon Catalyzed Fusion; Grant Application for Cold Fusion Research; Original application to DOE from Prof. Pons that was withdrawn in favor of a new grant proposal).

  5. Final Technical Report Power through Policy: "Best Practices" for Cost-Effective Distributed Wind

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhoads-Weaver, Heather; Gagne, Matthew; Sahl, Kurt; Orrell, Alice; Banks, Jennifer

    2012-02-28

    Power through Policy: 'Best Practices' for Cost-Effective Distributed Wind is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-funded project to identify distributed wind technology policy best practices and to help policymakers, utilities, advocates, and consumers examine their effectiveness using a pro forma model. Incorporating a customized feed from the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE), the Web-based Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool (Policy Tool) is designed to assist state, local, and utility officials in understanding the financial impacts of different policy options to help reduce the cost of distributed wind technologies. The project's final products include the Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool, found at www.windpolicytool.org, and its accompanying documentation: Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool Guidebook: User Instructions, Assumptions, and Case Studies. With only two initial user inputs required, the Policy Tool allows users to adjust and test a wide range of policy-related variables through a user-friendly dashboard interface with slider bars. The Policy Tool is populated with a variety of financial variables, including turbine costs, electricity rates, policies, and financial incentives; economic variables including discount and escalation rates; as well as technical variables that impact electricity production, such as turbine power curves and wind speed. The Policy Tool allows users to change many of the variables, including the policies, to gauge the expected impacts that various policy combinations could have on the cost of energy (COE), net present value (NPV), internal rate of return (IRR), and the simple payback of distributed wind projects ranging in size from 2.4 kilowatts (kW) to 100 kW. The project conducted case studies to demonstrate how the Policy Tool can provide insights into 'what if' scenarios and also allow the current status of incentives to be examined or defended when necessary. The ranking of distributed wind state policy and economic environments summarized in the attached report, based on the Policy Tool's default COE results, highlights favorable market opportunities for distributed wind growth as well as market conditions ripe for improvement. Best practices for distributed wind state policies are identified through an evaluation of their effect on improving the bottom line of project investments. The case studies and state rankings were based on incentives, power curves, and turbine pricing as of 2010, and may not match the current results from the Policy Tool. The Policy Tool can be used to evaluate the ways that a variety of federal and state policies and incentives impact the economics of distributed wind (and subsequently its expected market growth). It also allows policymakers to determine the impact of policy options, addressing market challenges identified in the U.S. DOE's '20% Wind Energy by 2030' report and helping to meet COE targets. In providing a simple and easy-to-use policy comparison tool that estimates financial performance, the Policy Tool and guidebook are expected to enhance market expansion by the small wind industry by increasing and refining the understanding of distributed wind costs, policy best practices, and key market opportunities in all 50 states. This comprehensive overview and customized software to quickly calculate and compare policy scenarios represent a fundamental step in allowing policymakers to see how their decisions impact the bottom line for distributed wind consumers, while estimating the relative advantages of different options available in their policy toolboxes. Interested stakeholders have suggested numerous ways to enhance and expand the initial effort to develop an even more user-friendly Policy Tool and guidebook, including the enhancement and expansion of the current tool, and conducting further analysis. The report and the project's Guidebook include further details on possible next steps. NREL Report No. BK-5500-53127; DOE/GO-102011-3453.

  6. Particle Physics in a Season of Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quigg, Chris

    2012-02-01

    A digest of the authors opening remarks at the 2011 Hadron Collider Physics Symposium. I have chosen my title to reflect the transitions we are living through, in particle physics overall and in hadron collider physics in particular. Data-taking has ended at the Tevatron, with {approx} 12 fb{sup -1} of {bar p}p interactions delivered to CDF and D0 at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The Large Hadron Collider has registered a spectacular first full-year run, with ATLAS and CMS seeing > 5 fb{sup -1}, LHCb recording {approx} 1 fb{sup -1}, and ALICE logging nearly 5 pb{sup -1} of pp data at {radical}s = 7 TeV, plus a healthy dose of Pb-Pb collisions. The transition to a new energy regime and new realms of instantaneous luminosity exceeding 3.5 x 10{sup 33} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} has brought the advantage of enhanced physics reach and the challenge of pile-up reaching {approx} 15 interactions per beam crossing. I am happy to record that what the experiments have (not) found so far has roused some of my theoretical colleagues from years of complacency and stimulated them to think anew about what the TeV scale might hold. We theorists have had plenty of time to explore many proposals for electroweak symmetry breaking and for new physics that might lie beyond established knowledge. With so many different theoretical inventions in circulation, it is in the nature of things that most will be wrong. Keep in mind that we learn from what experiment tells us is not there, even if it is uncommon to throw a party for ruling something out. Some non-observations may be especially telling: the persistent absence of flavor-changing neutral currents, for example, seems to me more and more an important clue that we have not yet deciphered. It is natural that the search for the avatar of electroweak symmetry breaking preoccupies participants and spectators alike. But it is essential to conceive the physics opportunities before us in their full richness. I would advocate a three-fold approach: Explore, Search, Measure! The first phase of running at the LHC has brought us to two new lands - in proton-proton and lead-lead collisions - and we may well enter other new lands with each change of energy or increase of sensitivity. I believe that it will prove very rewarding to spend some time simply exploring each new landscape, without strong preconceptions, to learn what is there and, perhaps, to encounter interesting surprises. Directed searches, for which we have made extensive preparations, are of self-evident interest. Here the challenge will be to broaden the searches over time, so the searches are not too narrowly directed. Our very successful conception of particles and forces is highly idealized. We have a great opportunity to learn just how comprehensive is our network of understanding by making precise measurements and probing for weak spots, or finding more sweeping accord between theory and experiment.

  7. FY-09 Summary Report to the Office of Petroleum Reserves on the Western Energy Corridor Initiative Activities and Accomplishments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas R. Wood

    2010-01-01

    To meet its programmatic obligations under the Energy Policy Act of 2005, the Office of Naval Petroleum and Shale Oil Reserves (NPSOR) has initiated the Western Energy Corridor Initiative (WECI). The WECI will implement the Unconventional Strategic Fuels Task Force recommendations for accelerating and promoting the development of domestic unconventional fuels to help meet the nations’ energy needs. The mission of the WECI is to bolster America’s future fuel security by facilitating socially and environmentally responsible development of unconventional fuels resources in the Western Energy Corridor, using sound engineering principles and science-based methods to define and assess benefits, impacts, uncertainties, and mitigation options and to resolve impediments. The Task Force proposed a three-year program in its commercialization plan. The work described herein represents work performed by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in support of the DOE’s WECI. This effort represents an interim phase of work, designed to initiate only select portions of the initiative, limited by available funding resources within NPOSR. Specifically, the work presented here addresses what was accomplished in FY-09 with the remaining carryover (~$420K) from NPOSR FY-08 funds. It was the intent of the NPOSR program to seek additional funding for full implementation of the full scope of work; however, the original tasks were reduced in scope, terminated, or eliminated (as noted below). An effort is ongoing to obtain funding to continue the tasks initiated under this project. This study will focus on the integrated development of multiple energy resources in a carbon-neutral and environmentally acceptable manner. Emphasis will be placed on analyses of the interrelationships of various energy-resource development plans and the infrastructure, employment, training, fiscal, and economic demands placed on the region as a result of various development scenarios. The interactions at build-out during the design, permitting, and construction of individual and multiple energy developments are not fully considered at the local, state, regional, or national levels. The net impacts to the Western Energy Corridor cannot be understood and the design optimized under the current approach. A regional development plan is needed to model cumulative impacts, determine the carrying capacity of the basin, and provide valuable technically based information to both skeptics and advocates. The INL scope of work for FY-09 involved six tasks: 1. Evaluation of the ASPEN Code as a dynamic systems model for application and use under the WECI and communications with Alberta Oil Sands Research Institutions as an “analog” resource development in the Western Energy Corridor 2. Application of the Aspen Plus computer model to several oil shale processes to consider energy balances and inputs and outputs (e.g. water consumption, CO2 production, etc.) 3. Development of a regulatory roadmap for oil shale developments 4. Defining of the physiographic extent of the natural resource reserves that comprise the Western Energy Corridor 5. A review of the Unconventional Fuels Task Force Report to Congress for ideas, concepts and recommendations that crosscutting plans 6. Program development with stakeholders, including industry, academics, state and federal agencies, and non government organizations. This task also includes project management, strategic development and reporting.

  8. Atomistic Time-Domain Simulations of Light-Harvesting and Charge-Transfer Dynamics in Novel Nanoscale Materials for Solar Hydrogen Production.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prezhdo, Oleg V.

    2012-03-22

    Funded by the DOE grant (i) we continued to study and analyze the atomistic detail of the electron transfer (ET) across the chromophore-TiO2 interface in Gratzel cell systems for solar hydrogen production. (ii) We extensively investigated the nature of photoexcited states and excited state dynamics in semiconductor quantum dots (QD) designed for photovoltaic applications. (iii) We continued a newly initiated research direction focusing on excited state properties and electron-phonon interactions in nanoscale carbon materials. Over the past year, the results of the DOE funded research were summarized in 3 review articles. 12 original manuscripts were written. The research results were reported in 28 invited talks at conferences and university seminars. 20 invitations were accepted for talks in the near future. 2 symposia at national and international meetings have being organized this year on topics closely related to the DOE funded project, and 2 more symposia have been planned for the near future. We summarized the insights into photoinduced dynamics of semiconductor QDs, obtained from our time-domain ab initio studies. QDs exhibit both molecular and bulk properties. Unlike either bulk or molecular materials, QD properties can be modified continuously by changing QD shape and size. However, the chemical and physical properties of molecular and bulk materials often contradict each other, which can lead to differing viewpoints about the behavior of QDs. For example, the molecular view suggests strong electron-hole and charge-phonon interactions, as well as slow energy relaxation due to mismatch between electronic energy gaps and phonon frequencies. In contrast, the bulk view advocates that the kinetic energy of quantum confinement is greater than electron-hole interactions, that charge-phonon coupling is weak, and that the relaxation through quasi-continuous bands is rapid. By synthesizing the bulk and molecular viewpoints, we clarified the controversies and provided a unified atomistic picture of the nature and dynamics of photoexcited states in semiconductor QDs. We also summarized our recent findings about the photoinduced electron dynamics at the chromophore-semiconductor interfaces from a time-domain ab initio perspective. The interface provides the foundation for a new, promising type of solar cell and presents a fundamentally important case study for several fields, including photo-, electro- and analytical chemistries, molecular electronics, and photography. Further, the interface offers a classic example of an interaction between an organic molecular species and an inorganic bulk material. Scientists employ different concepts and terminologies to describe molecular and solid states of matter, and these differences make it difficult to describe the interface with a single model. At the basic atomistic level of description, however, this challenge can be largely overcome. Recent advances in non-adiabatic molecular dynamics and time-domain density functional theory have created a unique opportunity for simulating the ultrafast, photoinduced processes on a computer very similar to the way that they occur in nature. These state-of-the-art theoretical tools offered a comprehensive picture of a variety of electron transfer processes that occur at the interface, including electron injection from the chromophore to the semiconductor, electron relaxation and delocalization inside the semiconductor, back-transfer of the electron to the chromophore and to the electrolyte, and regeneration of the neutral chromophore by the electrolyte. The ab initio time-domain modeling is particularly valuable for understanding these dynamic features of the ultrafast electron transfer processes, which cannot be represented by a simple rate description. We demonstrated using symmetry adapted cluster theory with configuration interaction (SAC-CI) that charging of small PbSe nanocrystals (NCs) greatly modifies their electronic states and optical excitations. Conduction and valence band transitions that are not available in neutral NCs dominate

  9. Spinning Reserve From Responsive Loads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, B.J.

    2003-04-08

    Responsive load is the most underutilized reliability resource available to the power system today. It is currently not used at all to provide spinning reserve. Historically there were good reasons for this, but recent technological advances in communications and controls have provided new capabilities and eliminated many of the old obstacles. North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC), Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), Northeast Power Coordinating Council (NPCC), New York State Reliability Council (NYSRC), and New York Independent System Operator (NYISO) rules are beginning to recognize these changes and are starting to encourage responsive load provision of reliability services. The Carrier ComfortChoice responsive thermostats provide an example of these technological advances. This is a technology aimed at reducing summer peak demand through central control of residential and small commercial air-conditioning loads. It is being utilized by Long Island Power Authority (LIPA), Consolidated Edison (ConEd), Southern California Edison (SCE), and San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E). The technology is capable of delivering even greater response in the faster spinning reserve time frame (while still providing peak reduction). Analysis of demand reduction testing results from LIPA during the summer of 2002 provides evidence to back up this claim. It also demonstrates that loads are different from generators and that the conventional wisdom, which advocates for starting with large loads as better ancillary service providers, is flawed. The tempting approach of incrementally adapting ancillary service requirements, which were established when generators were the only available resources, will not work. While it is easier for most generators to provide replacement power and non-spinning reserve (the slower response services) than it is to supply spinning reserve (the fastest service), the opposite is true for many loads. Also, there is more financial reward for supplying spinning reserve than for supplying the other reserve services as a result of the higher spinning reserve prices. The LIPAedge program (LIPA's demand reduction program using Carrier ComfortChoice thermostats) provides an opportunity to test the use of responsive load for spinning reserve. With potentially 75 MW of spinning reserve capability already installed, this test program can also make an important contribution to the capacity needs of Long Island during the summer of 2003. Testing could also be done at ConEd ({approx}30 MW), SCE ({approx}15 MW), and/or SDG&E ({approx}15 MW). This paper is divided into six chapters. Chapter 2 discusses the contingency reserve ancillary services, their functions in supporting power system reliability, and their technical requirements. It also discusses the policy and tariff requirements and attempts to distinguish between ones that are genuinely necessary and ones that are artifacts of the technologies that were historically used to provide the services. Chapter 3 discusses how responsive load could provide contingency reserves (especially spinning reserve) for the power system. Chapter 4 specifically discusses the Carrier ComfortChoice responsive thermostat technology, the LIPAedge experience with that technology, and how the technology could be used to supply spinning reserve. Chapter 5 discusses a number of unresolved issues and suggests areas for further research. Chapter 6 offers conclusions and recommendations.

  10. Human Factors for Situation Assessment in Grid Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guttromson, Ross T.; Schur, Anne; Greitzer, Frank L.; Paget, Mia L.

    2007-08-08

    Executive Summary Despite advances in technology, power system operators must assimilate overwhelming amounts of data to keep the grid operating. Analyses of recent blackouts have clearly demonstrated the need to enhance the operators situation awareness (SA). The long-term objective of this research is to integrate valuable technologies into the grid operator environment that support decision making under normal and abnormal operating conditions and remove non-technical barriers to enable the optimum use of these technologies by individuals working alone and as a team. More specifically, the research aims to identify methods and principles to increase SA of grid operators in the context of system conditions that are representative or common across many operating entities and develop operationally relevant experimental methods for studying technologies and operational practices which contribute to SA. With increasing complexity and interconnectivity of the grid, the scope and complexity of situation awareness have grown. New paradigms are needed to guide research and tool development aimed to enhance and improve operations. In reviewing related research, operating practices, systems, and tools, the present study established a taxonomy that provides a perspective on research and development surrounding power grid situation awareness and clarifies the field of human factors/SA for grid operations. Information sources that we used to identify critical factors underlying SA included interviews with experienced operational personnel, available historical summaries and transcripts of abnormal conditions and outages (e.g., the August 14, 2003 blackout), scientific literature, and operational policies/procedures and other documentation. Our analysis of August 2003 blackout transcripts and interviews adopted a different perspective than previous analyses of this material, and we complemented this analysis with additional interviews. Based on our analysis and a broad literature review, we advocate a new perspective on SA in terms of sensemaking, also called situated or ecological decision making, where the focus of the investigation is to understand why the decision maker(s) experienced the situation the way they did, or why what they saw made sense to them at the time. This perspective is distinct from the traditional branch of human factors research in the field which focuses more on ergonomics and the transactional relationship between the human operator and the systems. Consistent with our findings from the literature review, we recognized an over-arching need to focus SA research on issues surrounding the concept of shared knowledge; e.g., awareness of what is happening in adjacent areas as well as ones own area of responsibility. Major findings were: a) Inadequate communication/information sharing is pervasive, b) Information is available, but not used. Many tools and mechanisms exist for operators to build awareness of the physical grid system, yet the transcripts reveal that they still need to call and exchange information with operators of neighboring areas to improve or validate their SA. The specific types of information that they request are quite predictable and, in most cases, cover information that could be available to both operators and reliability coordinators through readily available displays or other data sources, c) Shared Knowledge is Required on Operations/Actions as Well as Physical Status. In an ideal, technologically and organizationally perfect world, every control room and every reliability coordinator may have access to complete data across all regional control areas and yet, there would still be reason for the operators to call each other to gain and improve their SA of power grid operations, and d) Situation Awareness as sensemaking and shared knowledge.

  11. Final Technical Report: Hawaii Hydrogen Center for Development and Deployment of Distributed Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocheleau, Richard E.

    2008-09-30

    Hydrogen power park experiments in Hawai‘i produced real-world data on the performance of commercialized electrochemical components and power systems integrating renewable and hydrogen technologies. By analyzing the different losses associated with the various equipment items involved, this work identifies the different improvements necessary to increase the viability of these technologies for commercial deployment. The stand-alone power system installed at Kahua Ranch on the Big Island of Hawaii required the development of the necessary tools to connect, manage and monitor such a system. It also helped the electrolyzer supplier to adapt its unit to the stand-alone power system application. Hydrogen fuel purity assessments conducted at the Hawai‘i Natural Energy Institute (HNEI) fuel cell test facility yielded additional knowledge regarding fuel cell performance degradation due to exposure to several different fuel contaminants. In addition, a novel fitting strategy was developed to permit accurate separation of the degradation of fuel cell performance due to fuel impurities from other losses. A specific standard MEA and a standard flow field were selected for use in future small-scale fuel cell experiments. Renewable hydrogen production research was conducted using photoelectrochemical (PEC) devices, hydrogen production from biomass, and biohydrogen analysis. PEC device activities explored novel configurations of ‘traditional’ photovoltaic materials for application in high-efficiency photoelectrolysis for solar hydrogen production. The model systems investigated involved combinations of copper-indium-gallium-diselenide (CIGS) and hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). A key result of this work was the establishment of a robust “three-stage” fabrication process at HNEI for high-efficiency CIGS thin film solar cells. The other key accomplishment was the development of models, designs and prototypes of novel ‘four-terminal’ devices integrating high-efficiency CIGS and a-Si:H with operating features compatible with high-efficiency photoelectrochemical (PEC) water-splitting. The objective of one activity under the hydrogen production from biomass task was to conduct parametric testing of the Pearson gasifier and to determine the effects of gasifier operating conditions on the gas yields and quality. The hydrogen yield from this gasifier was evaluated in a parametric test series over a range of residence times from 0.8 to 2.2 seconds. H2 concentrations as high as 55% (volume) were measured in the product gas at the longer residence times and this corresponds to a hydrogen yield of 90 kg per tonne of bagasse without gas upgrading. The objective of another activity was to develop hot gas clean-up capabilities for the HNEI gasifier test facility to support hydrogen-from-biomass research. The product gas stream at the outlet of the hot gas filter was characterized for concentrations of permanent gas species and contaminants. Biomass feedstock processing activity included a preliminary investigation into methods for processing sugar cane trash at the Puunene Sugar Factory on the island of Maui, Hawaii. The objective of the investigation was to explore treatment methods that would enable the successful use of cane trash as fuel for the production of hydrogen via gasification. Analyses were completed for the technical and economic feasibility of producing biofuel from photosynthetic marine microbes on a commercial scale. Results included estimates for total costs, energy efficiency, and return on investment. The biohydrogen team undertook a comprehensive review of the field and came to what is considered a realistic conclusion. To summarize, continued research is recommended in the fundamentals of the science related to genetic engineering and specific topics to cover knowledge gaps. In the meantime, the team also advocates continued development of related processes which can be linked to pollution control and other real world applications. The extra revenues hydrogen can provide to these multi-product systems can improve profitability. The fact of the matter, though, is that the focused commercialization of hydrogen from biological processes awaits some necessary scientific breakthroughs and much higher conventional energy prices.

  12. Teuchos C++ memory management classes, idioms, and related topics, the complete reference : a comprehensive strategy for safe and efficient memory management in C++ for high performance computing.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartlett, Roscoe Ainsworth

    2010-05-01

    The ubiquitous use of raw pointers in higher-level code is the primary cause of all memory usage problems and memory leaks in C++ programs. This paper describes what might be considered a radical approach to the problem which is to encapsulate the use of all raw pointers and all raw calls to new and delete in higher-level C++ code. Instead, a set of cooperating template classes developed in the Trilinos package Teuchos are used to encapsulate every use of raw C++ pointers in every use case where it appears in high-level code. Included in the set of memory management classes is the typical reference-counted smart pointer class similar to boost::shared ptr (and therefore C++0x std::shared ptr). However, what is missing in boost and the new standard library are non-reference counted classes for remaining use cases where raw C++ pointers would need to be used. These classes have a debug build mode where nearly all programmer errors are caught and gracefully reported at runtime. The default optimized build mode strips all runtime checks and allows the code to perform as efficiently as raw C++ pointers with reasonable usage. Also included is a novel approach for dealing with the circular references problem that imparts little extra overhead and is almost completely invisible to most of the code (unlike the boost and therefore C++0x approach). Rather than being a radical approach, encapsulating all raw C++ pointers is simply the logical progression of a trend in the C++ development and standards community that started with std::auto ptr and is continued (but not finished) with std::shared ptr in C++0x. Using the Teuchos reference-counted memory management classes allows one to remove unnecessary constraints in the use of objects by removing arbitrary lifetime ordering constraints which are a type of unnecessary coupling [23]. The code one writes with these classes will be more likely to be correct on first writing, will be less likely to contain silent (but deadly) memory usage errors, and will be much more robust to later refactoring and maintenance. The level of debug-mode runtime checking provided by the Teuchos memory management classes is stronger in many respects than what is provided by memory checking tools like Valgrind and Purify while being much less expensive. However, tools like Valgrind and Purify perform a number of types of checks (like usage of uninitialized memory) that makes these tools very valuable and therefore complement the Teuchos memory management debug-mode runtime checking. The Teuchos memory management classes and idioms largely address the technical issues in resolving the fragile built-in C++ memory management model (with the exception of circular references which has no easy solution but can be managed as discussed). All that remains is to teach these classes and idioms and expand their usage in C++ codes. The long-term viability of C++ as a usable and productive language depends on it. Otherwise, if C++ is no safer than C, then is the greater complexity of C++ worth what one gets as extra features? Given that C is smaller and easier to learn than C++ and since most programmers don't know object-orientation (or templates or X, Y, and Z features of C++) all that well anyway, then what really are most programmers getting extra out of C++ that would outweigh the extra complexity of C++ over C? C++ zealots will argue this point but the reality is that C++ popularity has peaked and is becoming less popular while the popularity of C has remained fairly stable over the last decade22. Idioms like are advocated in this paper can help to avert this trend but it will require wide community buy-in and a change in the way C++ is taught in order to have the greatest impact. To make these programs more secure, compiler vendors or static analysis tools (e.g. klocwork23) could implement a preprocessor-like language similar to OpenMP24 that would allow the programmer to declare (in comments) that certain blocks of code should be ''pointer-free'' or allow smaller blocks to be 'pointers allowed'. This would significantly improve the robustness of code that uses the memory management classes described here.

  13. The Challenge for Arms Control Verification in the Post-New START World

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wuest, C R

    2012-05-24

    Nuclear weapon arms control treaty verification is a key aspect of any agreement between signatories to establish that the terms and conditions spelled out in the treaty are being met. Historically, arms control negotiations have focused more on the rules and protocols for reducing the numbers of warheads and delivery systems - sometimes resorting to complex and arcane procedures for counting forces - in an attempt to address perceived or real imbalances in a nation's strategic posture that could lead to instability. Verification procedures are generally defined in arms control treaties and supporting documents and tend to focus on technical means and measures designed to ensure that a country is following the terms of the treaty and that it is not liable to engage in deception or outright cheating in an attempt to circumvent the spirit and the letter of the agreement. As the Obama Administration implements the articles, terms, and conditions of the recently ratified and entered-into-force New START treaty, there are already efforts within and outside of government to move well below the specified New START levels of 1550 warheads, 700 deployed strategic delivery vehicles, and 800 deployed and nondeployed strategic launchers (Inter-Continental Ballistic Missile (ICBM) silos, Submarine-Launched Ballistic Missile (SLBM) tubes on submarines, and bombers). A number of articles and opinion pieces have appeared that advocate for significantly deeper cuts in the U.S. nuclear stockpile, with some suggesting that unilateral reductions on the part of the U.S. would help coax Russia and others to follow our lead. Papers and studies prepared for the U.S. Department of Defense and at the U.S. Air War College have also been published, suggesting that nuclear forces totaling no more than about 300 warheads would be sufficient to meet U.S. national security and deterrence needs. (Davis 2011, Schaub and Forsyth 2010) Recent articles by James M. Acton and others suggest that the prospects for maintaining U.S. security and minimizing the chances of nuclear war, while deliberately reducing stockpiles to a few hundred weapons, is possible but not without risk. While the question of the appropriate level of cuts to U.S. nuclear forces is being actively debated, a key issue continues to be whether verification procedures are strong enough to ensure that both the U.S. and Russia are fulfilling their obligations under the current New Start treaty and any future arms reduction treaties. A recent opinion piece by Henry Kissinger and Brent Scowcroft (2012) raised a number of issues with respect to governing a policy to enhance strategic stability, including: in deciding on force levels and lower numbers, verification is crucial. Particularly important is a determination of what level of uncertainty threatens the calculation of stability. At present, that level is well within the capabilities of the existing verification systems. We must be certain that projected levels maintain - and when possible, reinforce - that confidence. The strengths and weaknesses of the New START verification regime should inform and give rise to stronger regimes for future arms control agreements. These future arms control agreements will likely need to include other nuclear weapons states and so any verification regime will need to be acceptable to all parties. Currently, China is considered the most challenging party to include in any future arms control agreement and China's willingness to enter into verification regimes such as those implemented in New START may only be possible when it feels it has reached nuclear parity with the U.S. and Russia. Similarly, in keeping with its goals of reaching peer status with the U.S. and Russia, Frieman (2004) suggests that China would be more willing to accept internationally accepted and applied verification regimes rather than bilateral ones. The current verification protocols specified in the New START treaty are considered as the baseline case and are contrasted with possible alternative verification protocols that could be effective in a post-New START era of significant reductions in U.S. and other countries nuclear stockpiles. Of particular concern is the possibility of deception and breakout when declared and observed numbers of weapons are below the level considered to pose an existential threat to the U.S. In a regime of very low stockpile numbers, 'traditional' verification protocols as currently embodied in the New START treaty might prove less than adequate. I introduce and discuss a number of issues that need to be considered in future verification protocols, many of which do not have immediate solutions and so require further study. I also discuss alternatives and enhancements to traditional verification protocols, for example, confidence building measures such as burden sharing against the common threat of weapon of mass destruction (WMD) terrorism, joint research and development.

  14. The Citizen Cyberscience Lectures - 1) Mobile phones and Africa: a success story 2) Citizen Problem Solving

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    Mobile phones and Africa: a success story Dr. Mo Ibrahim, Mo Ibrahim Foundation Citizen Problem Solving Dr. Alpheus Bingham, InnoCentive The Citizen Cyberscience Lectures are hosted by the partners of the Citizen Cyberscience Centre, CERN, The UN Institute of Training and Research and the University of Geneva. The goal of the Lectures is to provide an inspirational forum for participants from the various international organizations and academic institutions in Geneva to explore how information technology is enabling greater citizen participation in tackling global development challenges as well as global scientific research. The first Citizen Cyberscience Lectures will welcome two speakers who have both made major innovative contributions in this area. Dr. Mo Ibrahim, founder of Celtel International, one of Africa?s most successful mobile network operators, will talk about ?Mobile phones and Africa: a success story?. Dr. Alpheus Bingham, founder of InnoCentive, a Web-based community that solves industrial R&D; challenges, will discuss ?Citizen Problem Solving?. The Citizen Cyberscience Lectures are open and free of charge. Participants from outside CERN must register by sending an email to Yasemin.Hauser@cern.ch BEFORE the 23rd october to be able to access CERN. THE LECTURES Mobile phones and Africa: a success story Dr. Mo Ibrahim, Mo Ibrahim Foundation Abstract The introduction of mobile phones into Africa changed the continent, enabling business and the commercial sector, creating directly and indirectly, millions of jobs. It enriched the social lives of many people. Surprisingly, it supported the emerging civil society and advanced the course of democracy Bio Dr Mo Ibrahim is a global expert in mobile communications with a distinguished academic and business career. In 1998, Dr Ibrahim founded Celtel International to build and operate mobile networks in Africa. Celtel became one of Africa?s most successful companies with operations in 15 countries, covering more than a third of the continent?s population and investing more than US$750 million in Africa. The company was sold to MTC Kuwait in 2005 for $3.4billion. In 2006 Dr Ibrahim established the Mo Ibrahim Foundation to support great African leadership. The Foundation focuses on two major initiatives to stimulate debate around, and improve the quality of, governance in Africa. The Ibrahim Prize for Achievement in African Leadership recognises and celebrates excellence; and the Ibrahim Index of African Governance provides civil society with a comprehensive and quantifiable tool to promote government accountability. Dr Ibrahim is also Founding Chairman of Satya Capital Ltd, an investment company focused on opportunities in Africa. Dr Ibrahim has been awarded an Honorary Doctorate by the University of London?s School of Oriental and African Studies, the University of Birmingham and De Montfort University, Leicester as well as an Honorary Fellowship Award from the London Business School. He has also received the Chairman?s Award for Lifetime Achievement from the GSM Association in 2007 and the Economists Innovation Award 2007 for Social & Economic Innovation. In 2008 Dr Ibrahim was presented with the BNP Paribas Prize for Philanthropy, and also listed by TIME magazine as one of the 100 most influential people in the world. Citizen Problem Solving Dr. Alpheus Bingham, InnoCentive Abstract American playwright Damien Runyon (Guys and Dolls) once remarked, "the race is not always to the swift, nor the victory to the strong -- but that IS how you bet." Not only does a system of race handicapping follow from this logic, but the whole notion of expertise and technical qualifications. Such 'credentials' allow one to 'bet' on who might most likely solve a difficult challenge, whether as consultant, contractor or employee. Of course, the approach would differ if one were allowed to bet AFTER the race. When such systems came into broad use, i.e., chat rooms, usenets, innocentive, etc., and were subsequently studied, it was often found that the greatest probability of solution lies in the "long tail" of the function rather than in the head representing formally vetted 'experts.' Insight into a problem is often the intersection of training, experience, metaphor and provocation (think Archimedes). Examples of "citizens" outside a targeted field of expertise providing uniques solutions will illustrate the principles involved. Bio Dr. Alph Bingham is a pioneer in the field of open innovation and an advocate of collaborative approaches to research and development. He is co-founder, and former president and chief executive officer of InnoCentive Inc., a Web-based community that matches companies facing R&D; challenges with scientists who propose solutions. Through InnoCentive, a platform that leverages the ability to connect to a whole planet of people through the Internet, organizations can access individuals ? problem solvers ? who might never have been found. Alph spent more than 25 years with Eli Lilly and Company, and offers deep experience in pharmaceutical research and development, research acquisitions and collaborations, and R&D; strategic planning. During his career he was instrumental in creating and developing Eli Lilly's portfolio management process as well as establishing the divisions of Research Acquisitions, the Office of Alliance Management and e.Lilly, a business innovation unit, from which various other ventures were spun out that create the advantages of open and networked organizational structures, including: InnoCentive, YourEncore, Inc., Coalesix, Inc., Maaguzi, Inc., Indigo Biosystems, Seriosity, Chorus and Collaborative Drug Discovery, Inc. He currently serves on the Board of Directors of InnoCentive, Inc., and Collaborative Drug Discovery, Inc.; the advisory boards of the Center for Collective Intelligence (MIT), and the Business Innovation Factory, as well as a member of the board of trustees of the Bankinter Foundation for Innovation in Madrid. He has lectured extensively at both national and international events and serves as a Visiting Scholar at the National Center for Supercomputing Application at the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana. He is also the former chairman of the Board of Editors of the Research Technology Management Journal. Dr. Bingham was the recipient of the Economist's Fourth Annual Innovation Summit "Business Process Award" for InnoCentive. He was also named as one of Project Management Institute's "Power 50" leaders in October 2005. Dr. Bingham received a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from Stanford University.

  15. Final Scientific/ Technical Report. Playas Grid Reliability and Distributed Energy Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romero, Van; Weinkauf, Don; Khan, Mushtaq; Helgeson, Wes; Weedeward, Kevin; LeClerc, Corey; Fuierer, Paul

    2012-06-30

    The future looks bright for solar and renewable energies in the United States. Recent studies claim that by 2050, solar power could supply a third of all electricity demand in the country’s western states. Technology advances, soft policy changes, and increased energy consciousness will all have to happen to achieve this goal. But the larger question is, what would it take to do more throughout the United States? The studies tie future solar and renewable growth in the United States to programs that aim to lower the soft costs of solar adoption, streamline utility interconnections, and increase technology advances through research and development. At the state and local levels, the most important steps are; Net metering: Net metering policies lets customers offset their electric bills with onsite solar and receive reliable and fair compensation for the excess electricity they provide to the grid. Not surprisingly, what utilities consider fair is not necessarily a rate that’s favorable to solar customers; Renewable portfolio standards (RPS): RPS policies require utilities to provide a certain amount of their power from renewable sources; some set specific targets for solar and other renewables. California’s aggressive RPS of 33% renewable energy by 2020 is not bankrupting the state, or its residents; Strong statewide interconnection policies: Solar projects can experience significant delays and hassles just to get connected to the grid. Streamlined feasibility and impact analysis are needed. Good interconnection policies are crucial to the success of solar or renewable energy development; Financing options: Financing is often the biggest obstacle to solar adoption. Those obstacles can be surmounted with policies that support creative financing options like third-party ownership (TPO) and property assessed clean energy (PACE). Attesting to the significance of TPO is the fact that in Arizona, it accounted for 86% of all residential photovoltaic (PV) installations in Q1 2013. Policies beyond those at the state level are also important for solar. The federal government must play a role including continuation of the federal Investment tax credit, responsible development of solar resources on public lands, and support for research and development (R&D) to reduce the cost of solar and help incorporate large amounts of solar into the grid. The local level can’t be ignored. Local governments should support: solar rights laws, feed-in tariffs (FITs), and solar-friendly zoning rules. A great example of how effective local policies can be is a city like Gainesville, Florida , whose FIT policy has put it on the map as a solar leader. This is particularly noteworthy because the Sunshine State does not appear anywhere on the list of top solar states, despite its abundant solar resource. Lancaster, California, began by streamlining the solar permitting process and now requires solar on every new home. Cities like these point to the power of local policies, and the ability of local governments to get things done. A conspicuously absent policy is Community Choice energy, also called community choice aggregation (CCA). This model allows local governments to pool residential, business, and municipal electricity loads and to purchase or generate on their behalf. It provides rate stability and savings and allows more consumer choice and local control. The model need not be focused on clean energy, but it has been in California, where Marin Clean Energy, the first CCA in California, was enabled by a state law -- highlighting the interplay of state and local action. Basic net metering8 has been getting a lot of attention. Utilities are attacking it in a number of states, claiming it’s unfair to ratepayers who don’t go solar. On the other hand, proponents of net metering say utilities’ fighting stance is driven by worries about their bottom line, not concern for their customers. Studies in California, Vermont , New York and Texas have found that the benefits of net metering (like savings on investments in infrastructure and on meeting state renewables requirements) outweigh the costs (like the lowered revenue to cover utility infrastructure costs). Many are eagerly awaiting a California Public Utilities Commission study due later this year, in the hopes that it will provide a relatively unbiased look at the issue. Meanwhile, some states continue to pursue virtual net metering policies. Under Colorado’s Solar Gardens Act, for example, utility customers can subscribe to power generated somewhere other than their own homes. The program allowed by that bill sold out in 30 minutes, evidence of the pent-up demand for this kind of arrangement. And California solar advocates are hoping for passage of a “shared renewables” bill in that state, which would provide for similar solar are significant in bringing solar power to the estimated 75% (likely a conservative number) of can’t put solar on our own roof. As great a resource as the sun is, when it comes to actually implementing solar or other renewables, technology advances, policy changes, bureaucratic practices, and increased energy consciousness will all have to happen to achieve a 30% by 2050 national goal. This project incorporated research activities focused on addressing each of these challenges. First, the project researchers evaluated several leading edge solar technologies by actually implementing these technologies at Playas, New Mexico, a remote town built in the 1970s by Phelps Dodge Mining Company for the company’s employees. This town was purchased by the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology in 2005 and converted to a training and research center. Playas is an all-electric town served by a substation about seven miles away. The town is the last user on a 240 kV utility transmission line owned by the Columbus Electric Cooperative (CEC) making it easy to isolate for experiment purposes. The New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (NMT) and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) perform various training and research activities at this site. Given its unique nature, Playas was chosen to test Micro-Grids and other examples of renewable distributed energy resources (DER). Several proposed distributed energy sources (DERs) were not implemented as planned including the Micro-Grid. However, Micro-Grid design and computer modeling were completed and these results are included in this report. As part of this research, four PV (solar) generating systems were installed with remote Internet based communication and control capabilities. These systems have been integrated into and can interact with the local grid So that (for example) excess power produced by the solar arrays can be exported to the utility grid. Energy efficient LED lighting was installed in several buildings to further reduce consumption of utility-supplied power. By combining reduced lighting costs; lowering HVAC loads; and installing smart PV generating equipment with energy storage (battery banks) these systems can greatly reduce electrical usage drawn from an older rural electrical cooperative (Co-Op) while providing clean dependable power. Several additional tasks under this project involved conducting research to develop methods of producing electricity from organic materials (i.e. biofuels, biomass. etc.), the most successful being the biodiesel reactor. Improvements with Proton Exchange Membranes (PEM) for fuels cells were demonstrated and advances in Dye Sensitized Solar Cells (DSSC) were also shown. The specific goals of the project include; Instrumentation of the power distribution system with distributed energy resources, demand-side control and intelligent homes within the town of Playas, NM; Creation of models (power flow and dynamic) of the Playas power distribution system; Validation of the models through comparison of predicted behavior to data collected from instrumentation; and Utilization of the models and test grid to characterize the impact of new devices and approaches (e.g., distributed generation and load management) on the local distribution system as well as the grid at large. In addition to the above stated objectives, the research also focused on three critical challenges facing renewable distributed energy platforms: 1) hydrogen from biomass, 2) improved catalyst support systems for electrolysis membranes and fuel cell systems, and 3) improved manufacturing methodologies of low cost photovoltaics. The following sections describe activities performed during this project. The various tasks were focused on establishing Playas as a “…theoretical and experimental test bed…” through which components of a modern/smart grid could be characterized. On a broader scale, project efforts were aimed at development of tools and gathering of experience/expertise that would accelerate progress toward implementation of a modern grid.