National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for adverse effect level

  1. Adverse Outcome Pathways and Ecological Risk Assessment: Bridging to Population-Level Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, Vincent J.; Etterson, Matthew A.; Hecker, Markus; Murphy, Cheryl A.; Roesijadi, Guritno; Spade, Daniel J.; Spromberg, Julann A.; Wang, Magnus; Ankley, Gerald T.

    2010-11-24

    The viability of populations of plants and animals is a key focus for environmental regulation. Population-level responses integrate the cumulative effects of chemical stressors on individuals as those individuals interact with and are affected by their con-specifics, competitors, predators, prey, habitat and other biotic and abiotic factors. Models of population-level effects of contaminants can integrate information from lower levels of biological organization and feed that information into higher-level community and ecosystem models. As individual-level endpoints are utilized to predict population responses, this requires that biological responses at lower levels of organization be translated into a form that is useable by the population modeler. In this paper we describe how mechanistic data, as captured in adverse outcome pathways, can be translated into modeling focused on population-level risk assessments. First, we present a succinct overview of different approaches to population modeling, and discuss the types of data needed for these models. Then we discuss how toxicity data are used currently for population modeling, and provide recommendations as to how testing might be modified to better generate information to support modeling. From this we describe how different key processes measured at the level of the individual serve as the bridge between mechanistic toxicology data and predictions of population status, and provide case examples of how this linkage has been/can be achieved.

  2. Adverse Health Effects of Air Pollution 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haley, R. W.

    2011-01-01

    Effects of Air Pollution Robert W. Haley, M.D. Professor of Medicine Director, Division of Epidemiology University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center Dallas, Texas ? Texas Medical Association has adopted resolutions on clean air: ? 2007... of how to maintain energy efficiency while reducing air pollution. ? Supported legislation based on the findings. The Medical Professor Increasingly Concerned ? Asthma ? Emphysema ? Heart Attacks ? Stunted lung development ? Brain damage...

  3. Do physicians communicate the adverse effects of medications that older patients want to hear?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarn, DM; Wenger, A; Good, JS; Hoffing, M; Scherger, JE; Wenger, NS

    2015-01-01

    renal effects Four adverse effects Cough ? electrolytes ?renal effects ? other Cough ? renal effects ?dizziness ? other Cough ? electrolytes ? two others

  4. The issue of 'Adverse Effects and the Impacts of Response Measures' in UNFCCC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    of emission reduction activities on energy exporting countries. In negotiations the Organisation of Petroleum. This paper explores the political, economic and legal dimensions of this interlocked adverse effects to the impacts of climate change. This suggests that tacit G77-China support for OPEC's position may therefore

  5. OCCURRENCE AND POTENTIAL ADVERSE EFFECTS OF SEMIVOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN STREAMBED SEDIMENT, UNITED STATES, 1992-95

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 OCCURRENCE AND POTENTIAL ADVERSE EFFECTS OF SEMIVOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN STREAMBED SEDIMENT) in streambed sediment were assessed at 536 sites in 20 major river basins across the United States from 1992 density, and PAHs also correlated with physical/chemical properties. On the basis of sediment

  6. Human exposure to mercury: A critical assessment of the evidence of adverse health effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratcliffe, H.E.; Swanson, G.M.; Fischer, L.J. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    1996-10-25

    The ubiquitous nature of mercury in the environment, its global atmospheric cycling, and its toxicity to humans at levels that are uncomfortably close to exposures experienced by a proportion of the population are some of the current concerns associated with this pollutant. The purpose of this review is to critically evaluate the scientific quality of published reports involving human exposures to mercury and associated health outcomes as an aid in the risk evaluation of this chemical. A comprehensive review of the scientific literature involving human exposures to mercury was performed and each publication evaluated using a defined set of criteria that are considered standards in epidemiologic and toxicologic research. Severe, sometimes fatal, effects of mercury exposure at high levels were primarily reported as case studies. The disasters in Minamata, Japan, in the 1950s and in Iraq in 1971-1972 clearly demonstrated neurologic effects associated with ingestion of methylmercury both in adults and in infants exposed in utero. The effects were convincingly Associated with methylmercury ingestion, despite limitations of the study design. Several well-conducted studies have investigated the effects of methylmercury at levels below those in the Iraq incident but have not provided clear evidence of an effect. The lower end of the dose-response curve constructed from the Iraq data therefore still needs to be confirmed. The studies of mercury exposure in the workplace were mainly of elemental or inorganic mercury, and effects that were observed at relatively low exposure levels were primarily neurologic and renal. Several studies have investigated effects associated with dental amalgam but have been rated as inconclusive because of methodologic deficiencies. In our overall evaluation, 29 of 110 occupational studies and 20 of 54 studies where exposure occurred in the natural environment provided at least suggestive evidence of an exposure-related effect. 259 refs., 4 tabs.

  7. Effect of Sea Level Rise

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  8. Dose-Effect Relationships for Adverse Events After Cranial Radiation Therapy in Long-term Childhood Cancer Survivors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dijk, Irma W.E.M. van, E-mail: i.w.vandijk@amc.uva.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Cardous-Ubbink, Mathilde C. [Department of Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Pal, Helena J.H. van der [Department of Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Pediatric Oncology, Emma Children's Hospital/Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Heinen, Richard C. [Department of Pediatric Oncology, Emma Children's Hospital/Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Pediatric Oncology, Emma Children's Hospital/Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Leeuwen, Flora E. van [Department of Epidemiology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Epidemiology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Oldenburger, Foppe; Os, Rob M. van [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Ronckers, Cécile M. [Dutch Childhood Oncology Group, Long-term Effects after Childhood Cancer, The Hague (Netherlands)] [Dutch Childhood Oncology Group, Long-term Effects after Childhood Cancer, The Hague (Netherlands); Schouten–van Meeteren, Antoinette Y.N. [Department of Pediatric Oncology, Emma Children's Hospital/Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Caron, Huib N. [Department of Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands) [Department of Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Pediatric Oncology, Emma Children's Hospital/Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Koning, Caro C.E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kremer, Leontien C.M. [Department of Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands) [Department of Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Pediatric Oncology, Emma Children's Hospital/Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the prevalence and severity of clinical adverse events (AEs) and treatment-related risk factors in childhood cancer survivors treated with cranial radiation therapy (CRT), with the aim of assessing dose-effect relationships. Methods and Materials: The retrospective study cohort consisted of 1362 Dutch childhood cancer survivors, of whom 285 were treated with CRT delivered as brain irradiation (BI), as part of craniospinal irradiation (CSI), and as total body irradiation (TBI). Individual CRT doses were converted into the equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions (EQD{sub 2}). Survivors had received their diagnoses between 1966 and 1996 and survived at least 5 years after diagnosis. A complete inventory of Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events grade 3.0 AEs was available from our hospital-based late-effect follow-up program. We used multivariable logistic and Cox regression analyses to examine the EQD{sub 2} in relation to the prevalence and severity of AEs, correcting for sex, age at diagnosis, follow-up time, and the treatment-related risk factors surgery and chemotherapy. Results: There was a high prevalence of AEs in the CRT group; over 80% of survivors had more than 1 AE, and almost half had at least 5 AEs, both representing significant increases in number of AEs compared with survivors not treated with CRT. Additionally, the proportion of severe, life-threatening, or disabling AEs was significantly higher in the CRT group. The most frequent AEs were alopecia and cognitive, endocrine, metabolic, and neurologic events. Using the EQD{sub 2}, we found significant dose-effect relationships for these and other AEs. Conclusion: Our results confirm that CRT increases the prevalence and severity of AEs in childhood cancer survivors. Furthermore, analyzing dose-effect relationships with the cumulative EQD{sub 2} instead of total physical dose connects the knowledge from radiation therapy and radiobiology with the clinical experience.

  9. The Effect of Reflectors and Delamping Upon Light Levels 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pashkevich, P. A.

    1989-01-01

    In the 1987 Georgia Institutional Conservation Program ICP), recommendations for installation of reflectors in fluorescent fixtures accompanied by delamping totaled $5.4 million. Concerned with that effects of these recommendations on light levels...

  10. LOW-LEVEL RADIATION HEALTH EFFECTS: PROGRAMS AND PANEL DISCUSSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shlyakhter, Ilya

    41 LOW-LEVEL RADIATION HEALTH EFFECTS: PROGRAMS AND PANEL DISCUSSION Cosponsored by the Biology. The reduction was presumably due to the reduced effects at low dose rate. THE DATA SETS In the former USSR dose: Of those we expect up to 50 to develop cancers due to radiation. 2. The 25 000 people evacuated

  11. Nonlinear effect on quantum control for two-level systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Wang; J. Shen; X. X. Yi

    2009-06-05

    The traditional quantum control theory focuses on linear quantum system. Here we show the effect of nonlinearity on quantum control of a two-level system, we find that the nonlinearity can change the controllability of quantum system. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the Lyapunov control can be used to overcome this uncontrollability induced by the nonlinear effect.

  12. Evaluate the Effect of Upper-Level Cirrus Clouds on Satellite Retrievals of Low-Level Cloud Droplet Effective Radius

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansasCommunitiesof Energy8) Wigner Home ·the Effect of Upper-Level Cirrus

  13. HEALTH EFFECTS OF LOW-LEVEL IONIZING RADIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, Jacob I.

    2012-01-01

    any exposure to radiation at low levels of dose carries some1 as the dose of radiation increases above very low levels,any exposure to radiation at low levels of dose carries some

  14. Research Article Defining and Assessing Adverse Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hameed, Sultan

    Research Article Defining and Assessing Adverse Environmental Impact Symposium 2001 The, ecological risk assessment, recruitment, striped bass, Hudson River, adverse environmental impact the consequences of ignoring the distinction between measurement error and natural variability in an assessment

  15. Probiotic Microbes Sustain Youthful Serum Testosterone Levels and Testicular Size in Aging Mice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poutahidis, Theofilos

    The decline of circulating testosterone levels in aging men is associated with adverse health effects. During studies of probiotic bacteria and obesity, we discovered that male mice routinely consuming purified lactic acid ...

  16. Magnified Effects of Changes in NIH Research Funding Levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghaffarzadegan, Navid

    What happens within the university-based research enterprise when a federal funding agency abruptly changes research grant funding levels, up or down? We use simple difference equation models to show that an apparently ...

  17. Effect of reactor conditions on MSIV-ATWS power level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diamond, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    In a boiling water reactor (BWR) when there is closure of the main steam isolation valves (MSIVs), the energy generated in the core will be transferred to the pressure suppression pool (PSP) via steam that flows out of the relief valves. The pool has limited capacity as a heat sink and hence, if there is no reactor trip (an anticipated transient without scram (ATWS) event), there is the possibility that the pool temperature may rise beyond acceptable limits. The present study was undertaken to determine how the initial reactor conditions affect the power level during an MSIV-ATWS event. The time of interest is the 20- to 30-min period when it is assumed that the reactor is in a quasi equilibrium condition with the water level and pressure fixed, natural circulation conditions and no control rod movement or significant boron in the core. The initial conditions of interest are the time of the cycle and the operating state.

  18. Generalized Landau-level representation: effect of static screening in quantum Hall effect in graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Igor A. Shovkovy; Lifang Xia

    2015-08-18

    By making use of the generalized Landau-level representation (GLLR) for the quasiparticle propagator, we study the effect of screening on the properties of the quantum Hall states with integer filling factors in graphene. The analysis is performed in the low-energy Dirac model in the improved rainbow approximation, in which the long-range Coulomb interaction is modified by the one-loop static screening effects in the presence of a background magnetic field. By utilizing a rather general ansatz for the propagator, in which all dynamical parameters are running functions of the Landau-level index $n$, we derive a self-consistent set of the Schwinger-Dyson (gap) equations and solve them numerically. The explicit solutions demonstrate that static screening leads to a substantial suppression of the gap parameters in the quantum Hall states with a broken $U(4)$ flavor symmetry. The temperature dependence of the energy gaps is also studied. The corresponding results mimic well the temperature dependence of the activation energies measured in experiment. It is also argued that, in principle, the Landau-level running of the quasiparticle dynamical parameters could be measured via optical studies of the integer quantum Hall states.

  19. The effect of nuclear deformation on level statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Al-Sayed

    2009-03-01

    We analyze the nearest neighbor spacing distributions of low-lying 2+ levels of even-even nuclei. We grouped the nuclei into classes defined by the quadrupole deformation parameter (Beta2). We calculate the nearest neighbor spacing distributions for each class. Then, we determine the chaoticity parameter for each class with the help of the Bayesian inference method. We compare these distributions to a formula that describes the transition to chaos by varying a tuning parameter. This parameter appears to depend in a non-trivial way on the nuclear deformation, and takes small values indicating regularity in strongly deformed nuclei and especially in those having an oblate deformation.

  20. Generalized Landau-level representation: effect of static screening in quantum Hall effect in graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shovkovy, Igor A

    2015-01-01

    By making use of the generalized Landau-level representation (GLLR) for the quasiparticle propagator, we study the effect of screening on the properties of the quantum Hall states with integer filling factors in graphene. The analysis is performed in the low-energy Dirac model in the improved rainbow approximation, in which the long-range Coulomb interaction is modified by the one-loop static screening effects in the presence of a background magnetic field. By utilizing a rather general ansatz for the propagator, in which all dynamical parameters are running functions of the Landau-level index $n$, we derive a self-consistent set of the Schwinger-Dyson (gap) equations and solve them numerically. The explicit solutions demonstrate that static screening leads to a substantial suppression of the gap parameters in the quantum Hall states with a broken $U(4)$ flavor symmetry. The temperature dependence of the energy gaps is also studied. The corresponding results mimic well the temperature dependence of the activa...

  1. On the Effectiveness of API-Level Access Control Using Bytecode Rewriting in Android

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Du, Wenliang "Kevin"

    On the Effectiveness of API-Level Access Control Using Bytecode Rewriting in Android Hao Hao, Vicky, New York, USA {hahao,vsingh02,wedu}@syr.edu ABSTRACT Bytecode rewriting on Android applications has the effectiveness of API-level access control using bytecode rewriting on Android Operating System. In our

  2. The south Karelia air pollution study: Effects of low-level expsoure to malodorous sulfur compounds on symptoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Partti-Pellinen, K.; Marttila, O.; Vilkka, V.; Jaakkola, J.J. |

    1996-07-01

    Exposure to very low levels of ambient-air malodorous sulfur compounds and their effect on eye irritation, respiratory-tract symptoms, and central nervous system symptoms in adults were assessed. A cross-sectional self-administered questionnaire (response rate = 77%) was distributed during March and April 1992 to adults (n = 336) who lived in a neighborhood that contained a pulp mill and in a nonpolluted reference community (n = 380). In the exposed community, the measured annual mean concentrations of total reduced sulfur compounds and sulfur dioxide measured in two stations were 2 to 3 {mu}g/m{sup 3} and 1 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, respectively. In the reference community, the annual mean concentration of sulfur dioxide was 1 {mu}g/m{sup 3}. The residents of the community near the pulp mill reported an excess of cough, respiratory infections, and headache during the previous 4 wk, as well as during the preceding 12 mo. The relative risk for headache was increased significantly in the exposed community, compared with the reference area: the adjusted odds ratio (aOR) was 1.83 (95% confidence interval [95% Cl] = 1.06-3.15) during the previous 4 wk and 1.70 (95% Cl = 1.05-2.73) during the preceding 12 mo. The relative risk for cough was also increased during the preceding 12 mo (aOR = 1.64, 95% Cl = 1.01-2.64). These results indicated that adverse health effects of malodorous sulfur compounds occur at lower concentrations than reported previously. 25 refs., 3 tabs.

  3. Energy Department Announces Secretarial Determination of No Adverse...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Secretarial Determination of No Adverse Material Impact for Uranium Transfers Energy Department Announces Secretarial Determination of No Adverse Material Impact for Uranium...

  4. Secretarial Determination of No Adverse Material Impact for Uranium...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Secretarial Determination of No Adverse Material Impact for Uranium Transfers Secretarial Determination of No Adverse Material Impact for Uranium Transfers The determination covers...

  5. The effect of environmental pH and calcium level on survival and blood plasma electrolyte levels in juvenile channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davison, Lori Ann

    1986-01-01

    THE EFFECT OP ENVIRONMENTAL pH AND CALCIUM LEVEL ON SURVIVAL AND BLOOD PLASMA ELECTROLYTE LEVELS IN JUVENILE CHANNEL CATFISH, ICTALURUS PUNCTATUS A Thesis by LORI ANN DAVISON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Msy, 1986 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences THE EFFECT OF ENVIRONMENTAL pH AND CALCIUM LEVEL ON SURVIVAL AND BLOOD PLASMA ELECTROLYTE LEVELS IN JUVENILE CHANNEL...

  6. Effects of source and level of zinc on feedlot performance and carcass characteristics in steers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nunnery, Greg Alan

    1998-01-01

    To determine the effects of source and level of dietary Zn on performance, carcass characteristics and tissue Zn concentration, Angus steers (n = 120; initial weight = 325 kg ?2.57) were assigned to diets containing five levels of added Zn (5, 35...

  7. Introduction Risk associated with an adverse price

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Laughlin, Jay

    Introduction Risk associated with an adverse price change (price risk) is a normal part commodities are sold suggests price risk is an unavoidable part of being involved in the industry. Producers that have significant price variability. Recent domestic farm policy changes and trade barrier reductions

  8. Effect of Macromolecular Crowding on Protein Folding Dynamics at the Secondary Structure Level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shorter, James

    Effect of Macromolecular Crowding on Protein Folding Dynamics at the Secondary Structure Level coupled to the process of protein folding in vivo. While previous studies have provided invaluable insight into the effect of crowding on the stability and folding rate of protein tertiary structures, very little is known

  9. Effect of feeding high calcium levels and soft phosphate in the diet of laying hens 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durham, James Ivey

    1961-01-01

    EFFECT OF FEEDING HIGH CALCIUM LEVELS AND SOFT PHOSPHATE IN THE DIET OF LAYING HENS A Thesis by James Ivey Durham Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements... Experimental Plan. Table 2 Basal Diets. Table 3 Effect of Calcium Level snd Phosphor"us nulce orr Egg Production and Feed Conversran. Table 4 Eftec:t: of the Removal oi' Calcium frr Three Dsy- Duels Each 28-Dsy 'Period on Egg Production. 22 Table 5...

  10. The effect of various calcium and phosphorus levels on egg production and egg shell quality 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradley, John Warren

    1980-01-01

    . ) (Pleiahc~) Angust 1980 ABSTRACT The Effect of Various Calcium and Phosphorus Levels on Egg Production and Egg Shell Quality. (August 1980) John Warren Bradley, Junior B. S. , Texas A&M University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. C. R. Creger Two... experiments were conducted, using a commercial strain of White Leghorn laying hens, to determine the effect of feeding various dietary combinations of calcium and phosphorus on egg production and egg shell quality. Calcium carbonate in the form of oyster...

  11. THE EFFECT OF LAKE ERIE WATER LEVEL VARIATIONS ON SEDIMENT RESUSPENSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foster, Diane

    THE EFFECT OF LAKE ERIE WATER LEVEL VARIATIONS ON SEDIMENT RESUSPENSION A Thesis Presented regions of resuspension. In this study, areas of possible resuspension were examined for the heavily populated Cleveland, Ohio, region and for the entire lake. Areas of possible resuspension were identified

  12. Local Danger Warnings for Drivers: The Effect of Modality and Level of Assistance on Driver Reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theune, Mariët

    Local Danger Warnings for Drivers: The Effect of Modality and Level of Assistance on Driver¨ucken, Germany christian.mueller@dfki.de ABSTRACT Local danger warning is an important function of Advanced presentation) is particularly crucial to a successful danger avoidance. We present a user study investigating

  13. Levels of Processing Effects on Memory Encoding and Retrieval: An ERP Mapping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson Jr.,, Ray

    Levels of Processing Effects on Memory Encoding and Retrieval: An ERP Mapping Study Ray Johnson, Jr potentials (ERPs) to specify the spatio-temporal patterns of brain activity underlying memory encoding their decision. ERPs were recorded from 83 scalp sites for 2150 ms. There were clear differences in brain

  14. Policy on adverse weather conditions affecting Higher Education Review visits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neirotti, Juan Pablo

    Policy on adverse weather conditions affecting Higher Education Review visits This policy entered into owing to adverse weather conditions will be by mutual agreement of QAA and the provider. Attendance at the review visit by the QAA officer If adverse weather conditions prevent, or appear likely

  15. Effects of cooking on levels of PCBs in the fillets of winter flounder (Pseudopleuronectes americanus)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poston, T.M.; Durell, G.S.; Koczwara, G.; Spellacy, A.M.

    1995-08-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory and Battelle Ocean Sciences performed a study to determine the effect of cooking on polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) levels in the fillets of winter flounder (Pseudopleuronectes americanus). Broiling, pan frying, and deep frying in oil were tested on fillets from 21 fish collected from New Bedford Harbor, Massachusetts, on February 21, 1991. The evaluation involved estimating the change in PCB concentrations using a mass-balance approach that factored the change in fillet weight resulting from cooking with the changes in PCB concentration expressed on a precooked wet-weight basis. Deep frying in oil resulted in a 47% reduction in total PCB levels in fillet tissue. Additionally, deep frying caused a 40% reduction in fillet mass. Pan frying and broiling resulted in statistically in insignificant increases in total PCB levels of 15% and 17%, respectively. Fillet mass reductions resulting from pan frying and broiling were 7% and 15%, respectively. The effects of cooking on 18 individual congeners generally paralleled the results observed for total PCB. All 18 congeners were significantly reduced by deep frying. Congener Cl{sub 2}(08) also was significantly reduced by either pan frying. Congeners Cl{sub 5}(105) and Cl{sub 5}(118) showed apparent significant increases in concentrations following pan frying. Congeners Cl{sub 5}(105), Cl{sub 5}(118), and C1{sub 6}(138) showed significant increases in concentration following broiling.

  16. A COST-EFFECTIVE TWO-LEVEL ADAPTIVE BRANCH PREDICTOR STEVEN, G. B., EGAN, C., SHIM, W. VINTAN, L.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vintan, Lucian N.

    - 1 - A COST-EFFECTIVE TWO-LEVEL ADAPTIVE BRANCH PREDICTOR STEVEN, G. B., EGAN, C., SHIM, W. VINTAN.B.Steven@herts.ac.uk wonshim@duck.snut.ac.kr vintan@cs.sibiu.ro ABSTRACT During the 1990s Two-level Adaptive Branch Predictors processors. However, while two-level adaptive predictors achieve very high prediction rates, they tend

  17. Measuring the effectiveness of infrastructure-level detection of large-scale botnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Guanhua; Eidenbenz, Stephan; Zeng, Yuanyuan; Shin, Kang G

    2010-12-16

    Botnets are one of the most serious security threats to the Internet and its end users. In recent years, utilizing P2P as a Command and Control (C&C) protocol has gained popularity due to its decentralized nature that can help hide the hotmaster's identity. Most bot detection approaches targeting P2P botnets either rely on behavior monitoring or traffic flow and packet analysis, requiring fine-grained information collected locally. This requirement limits the scale of detection. In this paper, we consider detection of P2P botnets at a high-level - the infrastructure level - by exploiting their structural properties from a graph analysis perspective. Using three different P2P overlay structures, we measure the effectiveness of detecting each structure at various locations (the Autonomous System (AS), the Point of Presence (PoP), and the router rendezvous) in the Internet infrastructure.

  18. Effects of Mid-Level Ethanol Blends on Conventional Vehicle Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knoll, K.; West, B.; Huff, S.; Thomas, J.; Orban, J.; Cooper, C.

    2010-06-01

    Tests were conducted in 2008 on 16 late-model conventional vehicles (1999-2007) to determine short-term effects of mid-level ethanol blends on performance and emissions. Vehicle odometer readings ranged from 10,000 to 100,000 miles, and all vehicles conformed to federal emissions requirements for their federal certification level. The LA92 drive cycle, also known as the Unified Cycle, was used for testing because it more accurately represents real-world acceleration rates and speeds than the Federal Test Procedure. Test fuels were splash-blends of up to 20 volume percent ethanol with federal certification gasoline. Both regulated and unregulated air-toxic emissions were measured. For the 16-vehicle fleet, increasing ethanol content resulted in reductions in average composite emissions of both nonmethane hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide and increases in average emissions of ethanol and aldehydes.

  19. Considerations of the effects of high winds on a low-level radioactive interim storage pile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D.E. )

    1991-11-01

    On Wednesday, March 27, 1991, the St. Louis area experienced high winds that damaged a synthetic cover of a low-level radioactive waste storage pile at the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hazelwood Interim Storage Site (HISS) in Hazelwood, Missouri. Winds in the St. Louis area at the time of the incident were reported to be 35 mi/h with gusts up to 50 mi/h. Tornado warnings were in effect at the time. The purpose of this summary is to analyze the effects of uplift forces on a synthetic pile cover because of high winds. Consideration is given to anchoring the synthetic cover, type and placement of ballast on the pile, and the type of synthetic membranes best suited to this application. Discussion also includes the emergency procedures used in responding to the incident.

  20. Continuum and Three-Nucleon Force Effects on 9Be Energy Levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joachim Langhammer; Petr Navratil; Sofia Quaglioni; Guillaume Hupin; Angelo Calci; Robert Roth

    2014-11-10

    We extend the recently proposed ab initio no-core shell model with continuum to include three-nucleon (3N) interactions beyond the few-body domain. The extended approach allows for the assessment of effects of continuum degrees of freedom as well as of the 3N force in ab initio calculations of structure and reaction observables of p- and lower-sd-shell nuclei. As first application we concentrate on energy levels of the 9Be system for which all excited states lie above the n-8Be threshold. For all energy levels, the inclusion of the continuum significantly improves the agreement with experiment, which was an issue in standard no-core shell model calculations. Furthermore, we find the proper treatment of the continuum indispensable for reliable statements about the quality of the adopted 3N interaction from chiral effective field theory. In particular, we find the 1/2+ resonance energy, which is of astrophysical interest, in good agreement with experiment.

  1. Effectiveness of State-Level Policies on Solar Market Development in Different State Contexts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steward, D.; Doris, E.; Krasko, V.; Hillman, D.

    2014-02-01

    In response to public interest in customer-sited distributed solar photovoltaics (PV), state and local policymakers have implemented policy initiatives with the goal of encouraging private investment and building a robust PV market. Policymakers face challenges, including limited budgets and incomplete information about the effectiveness of the various policy options in their specific situation, in crafting and executing policy that supports market development goals. Recent work investigated the effect of the order in which policies are implemented (referred to as 'policy stacking') and the presence of low-cost enabling policies, such as interconnection standards and net metering, can have on the success of states in promoting PV markets. Findings indicate that implementation of interconnection standards and policy related to the valuation of excess electricity (e.g., net metering), along with indicators of long term government support for a solar PV market (e.g., RPS) and a non-policy determinant (population), explain about 70% of the variation among states in new PV capacity. This paper builds on that research to determine the most effective policy strategies for different types of states, as determined by their physical, demographic and macroeconomic context. A number of researchers have investigated the effectiveness of state-level policy using various statistical methods to determine relationships between installed solar PV projects and policy initiatives. In this study, the grouping of states by non-policy factors adds dimension to these analyses by identifying how policies function in different non-policy environments.

  2. Energy level effects during multiphoton dissociation and the laser separation of closely spaced isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreou, D.

    1996-09-01

    A novel approach for enhancing the selectivity of the desired isotope in the molecular laser isotope separation (MLIS) process is presented. The scheme consists of simultaneously applying two laser beams with frequencies corresponding to those between the ground and the first energy excitation level and the ground and the second energy excitation level, respectively. Practical relations on the properties of the spherical-top molecules are derived and a semiclassical analysis of the electromagnetic interaction within the limits of the experimental conditions applied in actual MLIS experiments shows that the selectivity, defined as the ratio of the absorption cross sections of the two isotopes, increases by a factor of 10{endash}20 times in the case of the uranium isotopes. In addition, it is demonstrated that during the multiphoton absorption process energy-level splittings due to induced magnetic dipoles and induced electric quadrupoles are by no means negligible. They become significant during multiphoton processes where two or more photons are lost during the interaction process. At high pumping powers they become dominant and inhibit selectivity. They cancel out during interaction processes where there is no change in the total number of photons, such as scattering. These effects can be avoided by applying the laser beams to the molecular gas in arrangements which in principle are equivalent to a Mach{endash}Zehnder interferometer with the molecules substituted for the reuniting beam splitter. Moreover, the induced electric quadrupoles (E2) are fully exploited. The application of the results and the concepts described herein can render the MLIS process the most economic and practical method for the commercial separation of the uranium isotopes. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. HELLE: Health Effects of Low Level Exposures/ Gezondheidseffecten van lage blootstellingniveaus [International workshop: Influence of low level exposures to chemicals and radiation on human and ecological health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoten, Eert

    1998-11-26

    The Health Council is closely involved in establishing the scientific foundation of exposure limits for substances and radiation in order to protect public health. Through the years, the Council has contributed to the formulation of principles and procedures, both for carcinogenic and for noncarcinogenic agents. As a rule, the discussion with regard to the derivation of health-based recommended exposure limits centers around the appropriateness of extrapolation methods (What can be inferred from data on high exposure levels and on experimental animals?). Generally speaking, there is a lack of direct information on the health effects of low levels of exposure. Effects at these levels cannot usually be detected by means of traditional animal experiments or epidemiological research. The capacity of these analytical instruments to distinguish between ''signal'' and ''noise'' is inadequate in most cases. Annex B of this report contains a brief outline of the difficulties and the established methods for tackling this problem. In spite of this, the hope exists that the posited weak signals, if they are indeed present, can be detected by other means. The search will have to take place on a deeper level. In other words, effort must be made to discover what occurs at underlying levels of biological organization when organisms are exposed to low doses of radiation or substances. Molecular and cell biology provide various methods and techniques which give an insight into the processes within the cell. This results in an increase in the knowledge about the molecular and cellular effects of exposure to agents, or stated differently, the working mechanisms which form the basis of the health effects. Last year, the Health Council considered that the time was ripe to take stock of the state of knowledge in this field. To this end, an international working conference was held from 19 to 21 October 1997, entitled ''Health Effects of Low Level Exposures: Scientific Developments and Perspectives for Risk Assessment''. The central question was the extent to which the sometimes fast-growing knowledge about molecular and cellular effects offers the desired basis for extrapolation. Against this setting, a number of more specific questions which have been hotly debated for some time were also addressed. One of the primary questions concerned the traditional but increasingly questioned division between stochastic and non-stochastic working agents, and the corresponding division between exposure-effect relations without a threshold and with a threshold. Thoughts were also exchanged on what is often referred to as hormesis: the notion that low levels of exposure could actually improve health. For the purpose of illuminating the many aspects of these issues, experts from a number of areas were invited. In addition to this, three agents were selected to serve as points of crystallization for the general debate: ionizing radiation, ultraviolet (UV) radiation and dioxins. The present report calls attention to a selection of issues which emerged during the discussions on the above-mentioned central topic. Various more detailed questions and the wider context of the points considered are described at greater length in the enclosed conference report and in the background documents attached to the report. What follows is a series of considerations regarding the scientific basis for the derivation of recommended exposure levels, viewed in the light of current procedures and against the background of the work of the Health Council. In the preparation of the following comments and recommendations, various Dutch experts have been consulted.

  4. The Effect of Set Induction on student knowledge, attitude, and engagement levels of high school agricultural science students 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Tiffany Sarah Lavern

    2010-01-14

    The purpose of this study was to determine if applying set induction to the beginning of a lesson would have an effect on student knowledge, attitude, and/or engagement levels throughout the lesson. Researchers addressed specific objectives...

  5. The effects of level of automation and adaptive automation on human performance, situation awareness and workload in a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaber, David B.

    The effects of level of automation and adaptive automation on human performance, situation., 4731 East Forest Peak, Marietta, GA 30066, USA Keywords: Level of automation (LOA); adaptive automation of automation (LOAs) for maintaining operator involvement in complex systems control and facilitating situation

  6. Effect of dietary calcium and phosphorus levels on performance and bone development of large-framed developing boars 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, Robert Glen

    1975-01-01

    EFFECT OF DIETARY CALCIUM AND PHOSPHORUS LEVELS ON PERFORMANCE AND BONE DEVELOPMENT OF LARGE-FRAMED DEVELOPING BOARS A Thesis by ROBERT GLEN ROBINSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AQ4 University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1975 Major Subject. : Animal Science EFFECT OF DIETARY CALCIUM AND PHOSPHORUS LEVELS ON PERFORMANCE AND BONE DEVELOPMENT OF LARGE-~ DEVELOPING BOARS A Thesis by ROBERT GLEN ROBINSON Approved...

  7. Effects on electrical distribution networks of dispersed power generation at high levels of connection penetration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Longrigg, P.

    1983-07-01

    The advent and deployment of significant levels of photovoltaic and wind energy generation in the spatially dispersed mode (i.e., residential and intermediate load centers) may have deleterious effects upon existing protective relay equipment and its time-current coordination on radial distribution circuits to which power conditioning equipment may be connected for power sell-back purposes. The problems that may arise involve harmonic injection from power conditioning inverters that can affect protective relays and cause excessive voltage and current from induced series and parallel resonances on feeders and connected passive equipment. Voltage regulation, var requirements, and consumer metering can also be affected by this type of dispersed generation. The creation of islands of supply is also possible, particularly on rural supply systems. This paper deals mainly with the effects of harmonics and short-circuit currents from wind energy conversion systems (WECS) and photovoltaic (PV) systems upon the operating characteristics of distribution networks and relays and other protective equipment designed to ensure the safety and supply integrity of electrical utility networks. Traditionally, electrical supply networks have been designed for one-way power flow-from generation to load, with a balance maintained between the two by means of automatic generation and load-frequency controls. Dispersed generation, from renewables like WECS or PV or from nonrenewable resources, can change traditional power flow. These changes must be dealt with effectively if renewable energy resources are to be integrated into the utility distribution system. This paper gives insight into these problems and proposes some solutions.

  8. The Welfare Effects of Adverse Selection in Privatized Medicare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lustig, Joshua

    2008-01-01

    Cost Marginal Cost of Generosity Per Capita Income / 1000 #Cost Marginal Cost of Generosity Per Capita Income / 1000 #

  9. Effect of a relativistic correction to the Coulomb potential on the energy levels of hydrogen atom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behera, Harihar

    2012-01-01

    Based on classical electrodynamics, it is argued that the Coulomb potential (which is strictly valid for two point charges at rest), commonly used in the study of energy levels of hydrogen atom is not the correct one, because the electron in the hydrogen atom moves with relativistic speeds with respect to the nucleus. Retardation effect has to be considered in accordance with Li\\'{e}nard-Wiechert (or retarded) potential of a moving charge or the relativistic electrodynamics. However, such a consideration introduces a correction to the Coulomb potential, whose quantum mechanical expectation value is estimated at $E_{ret} = - \\frac{mc^2\\alpha ^4}{2n^3(l+1/2)}$, which is of the same order as the fine structure of hydrogen atom and hence added to the standard energy eigenvalue values of H-atom. This correction lifts the $l$-degeneracy in the spectra of H-atom and hence modifies the standard result. The result disturbs the existing agreement between the theory and experiments on H-atom and hence requires further t...

  10. Effect of a relativistic correction to the Coulomb potential on the energy levels of hydrogen atom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harihar Behera

    2012-01-10

    Based on classical electrodynamics, it is argued that the Coulomb potential (which is strictly valid for two point charges at rest), commonly used in the study of energy levels of hydrogen atom is not the correct one, because the electron in the hydrogen atom moves with relativistic speeds with respect to the nucleus. Retardation effect has to be considered in accordance with Li\\'{e}nard-Wiechert (or retarded) potential of a moving charge or the relativistic electrodynamics. However, such a consideration introduces a correction to the Coulomb potential, whose quantum mechanical expectation value is estimated at $E_{ret} = - \\frac{mc^2\\alpha ^4}{2n^3(l+1/2)}$, which is of the same order as the fine structure of hydrogen atom and hence added to the standard energy eigenvalue values of H-atom. This correction lifts the $l$-degeneracy in the spectra of H-atom and hence modifies the standard result. The result disturbs the existing agreement between the theory and experiments on H-atom and hence requires further theoretical and experimental re-examination. The implications of this result for the Kepler-problem in general is also discussed in the context of Heaviside's gravity, which seems to offer an alternative explanation for the non-Newtonian perihelion advance of Mercury without invoking the space-time curvature formalism of Einstein's general theory of relativity.

  11. Electrode level Monte Carlo model of radiation damage effects on astronomical CCDs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prod'homme, T; Lindegren, L; Short, A D T; Brown, S W

    2011-01-01

    Current optical space telescopes rely upon silicon Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs) to detect and image the incoming photons. The performance of a CCD detector depends on its ability to transfer electrons through the silicon efficiently, so that the signal from every pixel may be read out through a single amplifier. This process of electron transfer is highly susceptible to the effects of solar proton damage (or non-ionizing radiation damage). This is because charged particles passing through the CCD displace silicon atoms, introducing energy levels into the semi-conductor bandgap which act as localized electron traps. The reduction in Charge Transfer Efficiency (CTE) leads to signal loss and image smearing. The European Space Agency's astrometric Gaia mission will make extensive use of CCDs to create the most complete and accurate stereoscopic map to date of the Milky Way. In the context of the Gaia mission CTE is referred to with the complementary quantity Charge Transfer Inefficiency (CTI = 1-CTE). CTI is an ...

  12. Composite Fermions and the First-Landau-Level Fine Structure of the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haxton, W C

    2015-01-01

    We show that an alternative use of operators introduced in 1996 by Ginocchio and Haxton (GH) leads to a simple representation of the wave functions for the fractional quantum Hall effect, as non-interacting quasi-electrons (or composite fermions) fully filling fine-structure subshells within the first Landau level (FLL). In the present GH2 construction each shell corresponds to a distinct quasi-electron, constructed explicitly on both the sphere and the plane as vector products of spinors creating an electron and one unit of magnetic flux, a structure we argue follows from the coordinate scale invariance of the Coulomb potential. The quasi-electrons are eigenstates of angular momentum L and Lz. The hierarchy and conjugate states are the lowest-energy filled-shell configurations of these quasi-electrons, where the energy "counting" is related to Haldane's pseudo-potential. The construction yields a correspondence between the quasi-particle representation of the incompressible FLL state of filling p/(2p +1) and...

  13. Carbon fiber composite characterization in adverse thermal environments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomez-Vasquez, Sylvia; Brown, Alexander L.; Hubbard, Joshua A.; Ramirez, Ciro J.; Dodd, Amanda B.

    2011-05-01

    The behavior of carbon fiber aircraft composites was studied in adverse thermal environments. The effects of resin composition and fiber orientation were measured in two test configurations: 102 by 127 millimeter (mm) test coupons were irradiated at approximately 22.5 kW/m{sup 2} to measure thermal response, and 102 by 254 mm test coupons were irradiated at approximately 30.7 kW/m{sup 2} to characterize piloted flame spread in the vertically upward direction. Carbon-fiber composite materials with epoxy and bismaleimide resins, and uni-directional and woven fiber orientations, were tested. Bismaleimide samples produced less smoke, and were more resistant to flame spread, as expected for high temperature thermoset resins with characteristically lower heat release rates. All materials lost approximately 20-25% of their mass regardless of resin type, fiber orientation, or test configuration. Woven fiber composites displayed localized smoke jetting whereas uni-directional composites developed cracks parallel to the fibers from which smoke and flames emanated. Swelling and delamination were observed with volumetric expansion on the order of 100% to 200%. The purpose of this work was to provide validation data for SNL's foundational thermal and combustion modeling capabilities.

  14. Effects of cholesterol, type of fat, energy level and lipotropic agents in the diet of the domestic fowl 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svacha, Richard Lincoln

    1959-01-01

    ? ciency, Body Weight, Egg Size, Caloric Intake, and Protein Intake of the Caged Layer..................... .. . ...... 55 TABLE 15 The Effect of Energy Levels on Percent Egg production of Laying Hens for Each 28-Day Period....................... 56... TABLE 16 The Average Caloric Intake Per Dozen Eggs Produced by the Laying Hen At Various Energy Levels............ 57 TABLE 17 The Average Caloric Intake Per Bird of the Laying Hen at Various Energy Leyels........................ ........... 58...

  15. The effects of source and level of calcium on the performance and shell quality of laying hens 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lockamy, Terry Allan

    1972-01-01

    THE EFFECTS OF SOURCE AND LEVEL OF CALCIUM ON THE PERFORMANCE AND SHELL QUALITY OF LAYING HENS A Thesis by Terry Allan Lockamy Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the reguirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE Augusta 1972 Major Subject: Poultry Science THE EFFECTS OF SOURCE AND LEVEL OF CALCIUM ON THE PERFORMANCE AND SHELL QUALITY OF LAYING HENS A Thesis by Terry Allan Lockamy Approved as to style and content by: irman of Committee...

  16. System level design enhancements for cost effective renewable power generation by reverse electrodialysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiner, Adam Michael

    2015-01-01

    Studies of the future competitiveness of reverse electrodialysis (RED) with other energy technologies show that the projected levelized cost of electricity realized through current stack designs is prohibitively high. ...

  17. Effectiveness of integration of system-level optimization in concurrent engineering for rocket design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bairstow, Brian Kenichi

    2006-01-01

    Integrated concurrent engineering is a method for rapid conceptual design. Previous study has suggested that integration of system-level optimization techniques into integrated concurrent engineering can benefit the design ...

  18. The effects of economic development and international dependency levels on international conflict initiation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramirez, Jason Alexander

    2000-01-01

    to establish a link between the likelihood of military conflict and economic factors. Specifically, I tested whether a state's level of economic development or international dependency affected the type of international interaction in which it normally...

  19. Effects of global eustatic sea level variations and tectonism on stratigraphy of Iraq

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gawarecki, S.L.; Schamel, S.

    1986-05-01

    The stratigraphy of Iraq is marked by complex vertical and lateral facies sequences controlled predominantly by two factors: (1) eustatic sea level variations, and (2) tectonic movements. Analysis of the sedimentary cycles provides a framework for evaluating the relative economic importance of transgressive versus regressive facies within the Iraq stratigraphic succession. Most reservoir rocks, principally reefal and neritic limestones and to a lesser extent deltaic facies, were deposited during relatively high sea level stands. Source rock depositional environments in Iraq were typically either deep subsiding or shallow restricted intrashelf basins. These environments were not controlled by sea level, but primarily by local tectonics. Applying modern theories of plate tectonics and sea level control of facies to this well-studied petroleum province allows new interpretations of the region's geologic evolution.

  20. Effects on carbon monoxide levels in mobile homes using unvented kerosene heaters for residential heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, R.; Walsh, D.; White, J.; Jackson, M.; Mumford, J.

    1992-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) emission levels were continuously monitored in 8 mobile trailer homes less than 10 years old. These homes were monitored in an US EPA study on indoor air quality as affected by unvented portable kerosene heaters. Respondents were asked to operate their heaters in a normal fashion. CO, air exchange and temperature values were measured during the study in each home. Results indicate that consumers using unvented kerosene heaters may be unknowingly exposed to high CO levels without taking proper precautions.

  1. The effects of selected sound pressure levels on the color discrimination of red, yellow, and green 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone, Raymond Bruce

    1972-01-01

    to be 80 &I 8 . pressure levels- it is believed to noise over 130 dB is should be avoided; while there no hazard for levels below 2. Frequency distribution of sound energy- the ear is more susceptible to damage at middle and higher frequencies than... performing test I Blue showed the greatest number of errors with test I after exposure to 95 dBA. 8. 5 P L x Exposure x Test ? in this interaction, yellow and red showed the greatest number of 49 incorrect position placements using test 1 at no noise...

  2. Paper 2008-01-0434 Effects of Sulfur Level and Anisotropy of Sulfide Inclusions on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fatemi, Ali

    to fatigue strength, the high sulfur material had up to 25% lower fatigue strength than the ultra low sulfur, monotonic tensile and CVN impact behavior of SAE 4140 steel with high (0.077% S), low (0.012% S) and ultra low (0.004% S) sulfur contents at two hardness levels (40 HRC and 50 HRC). The longitudinally oriented

  3. Effects of Tricaine Methanesulfonate, Hypno, Metomidate, Quinaldine, and Salt on Plasma Cortisol Levels following Acute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    .--Blood plasma cortisol concentration is an indicator of stress in fish, and anesthetics may serve to ameliorate species; little information exists for tropical fishes. Mortalities are increased after handling stress fish. Plasma cortisol levels were evaluated in threespot gourami after a handling stressor

  4. Effect of Level and Frequency of Protein Supplementation on Utilization of Native South Texas Grass Hay 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monson, Greta 1988-

    2011-04-20

    was to quantify forage utilization when grade levels of protein were delivered infrequently. Five ruminally cannulated Angus × Hereford steers (BW = 410 ± 43 kg) were used in a 5 × 4 incomplete Latin square. Steers were provided ad libitum access to native grass...

  5. Human-Centered Systems Analysis of Aircraft Separation from Adverse Weather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vigeant-Langlois, Laurence

    Adverse weather significantly impacts the safety and efficiency of flight operations. Weather information

  6. Effects of stress on serum triglycerides, nonsterified fatty acids, and total cholesterol levels in male rats after ethanol administration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hershock, D.; Vogel, W.H. (Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (USA))

    1989-02-09

    Serum triglycerides, nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA), and total cholesterol were determined during one hour immobilization stress in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats after ethanol administration (2g/kg, i.p.). Stress and ethanol effects were evaluated in two experiments: (1) rats maintained on Purina Rodent Chow for six weeks and fasted for 24 hours; and (2) rats maintained on the same diet supplemented with 1% cholesterol and 10% peanut oil for six weeks and nonfasted prior to experimentation. Blood was obtained from indwelling jugular catheters. In each experiment, differences were seen in triglyceride and NEFA levels but not in total cholesterol. In the regular diet-fed rats (1), serum triglyceride levels were not affected by either stress or ethanol. However, NEFA levels did show differences in the response to ethanol and stress. A 63% decrease from baseline after 5{prime} of stress was partially abolished by ethanol; instead, a 24% increase was observed. Also, a stress-induced increase in NEFA which occurred after 15{prime} was not observed in the ethanol treated rats; rather, a decrease in NEFA was noted. Total cholesterol did not change in response to stress or ethanol. In the high cholesterol diet-fed rats (2), ethanol did not suppress a stress-induced increase in triglyceride levels. NEFA levels in ethanol-treated rats were higher during the first 15{prime} of stress as compared to stress alone. A decrease in NEFA was however seen in the ethanol-treated rats after 30{prime} of stress and these levels remained lower than the stress alone group. A diet-induced increase in total cholesterol levels was observed; however, no changes were seen due to either or ethanol. Thus, ethanol administration prior to acute immobilization stress did affect serum triglyceride and NEFA levels but did not change total cholesterol.

  7. Effects of pulse shape on strongly driven two-level systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conover, C. W. S.

    2011-12-15

    We present an experimental study of the dynamics of a two-level system driven by strong nonresonant electromagnetic pulses as a function of pulse intensity and detuning. We have explored the qualitative and quantitative behavior of the transition probability as a function of pulse area for five different temporal profiles: Lorentzian, Lorentzian squared, hyperbolic secant, hyperbolic secant squared, and Gaussian. The two-level system consists of a fine-structure doublet in sodium Rydberg states coupled by Raman transitions driven through far-off-resonance intermediate states. The pulses are in the microwave regime and have high fidelity and uniform intensity. Experiments show that, despite the similarity in the pulse shapes, the behavior of the population transfer versus intensity depends dramatically on the temporal shape and that the spectral properties and area of the pulse do not adequately describe the response.

  8. Regional Changes to Lake Effect Snow Levels in New York State Under Projected Future Climate Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uzilov, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    M.A. (1992). Design ground snow loads for Ohio. J. Appl.2006. Historic Lake Effect Snow Storm of October 12-13,of surface albedo and snow cover in AR4 coupled climate

  9. Quantum Hall effect and Landau-level crossing of Dirac fermions in trilayer graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taychatanapat, Thiti

    The physics of Dirac fermions in condensed-matter systems has received extraordinary attention following the discoveries of two new types of quantum Hall effect in single-layer and bilayer graphene1, 2, 3. The electronic ...

  10. The effect of ethylene on the levels of leaf protease and growth in cotton 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahan, James Rudolph

    1979-01-01

    , Martin and Thimann have shown that proteolysis also occurs ~ ~g senescenoe in detached oat leaves ( 19 ). Further they have shown that this breakdown of protein preceeds chlorosis by approximately 24 h. Thus, while chlorosis is a convenient visual.... 'whether tho o'oserved change in R?&A levels '. . " the &csult cf in- creased iUlase activity or simply normal turnover coupled "&ith red& ced synthesis is not clear. The imoor Lance of nucleic a id breakdown ( catabolicm) in sen- escence is further...

  11. The Effectiveness of State-Level Policies on Solar Market Development in Different State Contexts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.Week Day Year(active tab) 2016The DarkTheEffect ofSciTechThe

  12. Effect of level of fish meal on intake and performance in calves grazing sorghum 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scaglia Alonso, Guillermo

    1994-01-01

    Effect of five concentrations of fish meal (FM 0, 9, 27, 45 and 630-. of DM) in .91 kg/d of a supplement was evaluated in thirty-five Brahman-European cross calves (avg BW=160 + 20 kg). Supplements were formulated with rice mill feed, molasses...

  13. Assessment of global warming effect on the level of extremes and intra-annual structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lobanov, V.A.

    1997-12-31

    In this research a new approach for the parametrization of intra-annual Variations has been developed that is based on the poly-linear decomposition and relationships with average climate conditions. This method allows to divide the complex intra-annual variations during every year into two main parts: climate and synoptic processes. In this case, the climate process is presented by two coefficients (B1, B0) of linear function between the particular year data and average intra-year conditions over the long-term period. Coefficient B1 is connected with an amplitude of intra-annual function and characterizes the extremes events and BO-coefficient obtaines the level of climate conditions realization in the particular year. The synoptic process is determined as the remainders or errors of every year linear function or their generalized parameter, such as variance.

  14. The effect of high-level waste glass composition on spinel liquidus temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Riley, Brian J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Matyas, Josef

    2014-01-15

    Spinel crystals precipitate in high-level waste glasses containing Fe, Cr, Ni , Mn, Zn, and Ru. The liquidus temperature (TL) of spinel as the primary crystallization phase is a function of glass composition and the spinel solubility (c0) is a function of both glass composition and temperature (T). Previously reported models of TL as a function of composition are based on TL measured directly, which requires laborious experimental procedures. Viewing the curve of c0 versus T as the liquidus line allows a significant broadening of the composition region for model fitting. This paper estimates TL as a function of composition based on c0 data obtained with the X-ray diffraction technique.

  15. The effects of source, levels and method of feeding calcium on the performance of commercial layers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Jerry Charles

    1970-01-01

    ' shell supplemented daily on top of' f'eed (see Table 1). FC = Free choice + 15 a 'd' tion, hen-sizr oyster shell z!as fcd f neo-choice on top of the Coed bringing the total calculated levels to lr. 75, 5. 27 and 6, 26 p. rcent, respectively... 75/a QS (FC ) 4, 75 64 Lj. l 8 2, 75'g L+2, 77/o OS (FC ) 5 27 68, 27 9 3. 50/0 L+2, 76/s OS (FC ) 6. 26 67 78 w 266 b xy 2. 74 bc wx 2. 72 b 2. 88 jk vw 2. 5( 2. 69 wx 15i. 7 b xy 1544 b wz 1554 ab m z 1537 vw 1543 kl wz 1505 w, w vw k...

  16. Effect of reactor conditions on MSIV (main steam isolation valves)-ATWS power level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diamond, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    In a boiling water reactor (BWR) when there is closure of the main steam isolation valves (MSIVs), the energy generated in the core will be transferred to the pressure suppression pool (PSP) via steam flows out of the relief valves. The pool has limited capacity as a heat sink and hence, if there is no reactor trip (an ATWS event), there is the possibility that the pool temperature may rise beyond acceptable limits. The present study was undertaken to determine how the initial reactor conditions affect the power during an MSIV-ATWS event. The time of interest is during the 20-30 minute period when it is assumed that the reactor is in a quasi-equilibrium condition with the water level and pressure fixed, natural circulation conditions and no control rod movement or significant boron in the core. The initial conditions of interest are the time during the cycle and the operating state. 4 refs., 2 tabs.

  17. Effect of Increased Levels of Liquefied Natural Gas Exports on U.S. Energy Markets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas Nuclear Profile 2010MesoscopyStaff »Vehicle automation is aoverEffect

  18. Their Reputations Precede Them: The CEO Successor's Reputation and Shareholders' Assessment of Adverse Selection 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trahms, Cheryl Ann

    2014-08-05

    has potential to enhance the market value of the firm (i.e., increase the share price). A CEO selection may have a significant effect on a firm’s performance (Mackey, 2008). The success of this CEO selection is predicated on the ability of the CEO... the costs to minimize information asymmetry and the potential costs of adverse selection. The choice of CEO can serve as a highly profitable or costly endeavor to the shareholders. Through the use of variance decomposition, Mackey (2008) re...

  19. Effect of antimony on the deep-level traps in GaInNAsSb thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Islam, Muhammad Monirul Miyashita, Naoya; Ahsan, Nazmul; Okada, Yoshitaka; Sakurai, Takeaki; Akimoto, Katsuhiro

    2014-09-15

    Admittance spectroscopy has been performed to investigate the effect of antimony (Sb) on GaInNAs material in relation to the deep-level defects in this material. Two electron traps, E1 and E2 at an energy level 0.12 and 0.41?eV below the conduction band (E{sub C}), respectively, were found in undoped GaInNAs. Bias-voltage dependent admittance confirmed that E1 is an interface-type defect being spatially localized at the GaInNAs/GaAs interface, while E2 is a bulk-type defect located around mid-gap of GaInNAs layer. Introduction of Sb improved the material quality which was evident from the reduction of both the interface and bulk-type defects.

  20. Assessing out-of-band flare effects at the wafer level for EUV lithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George, Simi; Naulleau, Patrick; Kemp, Charles; Denham, Paul; Rekawa, Senajith

    2010-01-25

    To accurately estimate the flare contribution from the out-of-band (OOB), the integration of a DUV source into the SEMATECH Berkeley 0.3-NA Micro-field Exposure tool is proposed, enabling precisely controlled exposures along with the EUV patterning of resists in vacuum. First measurements evaluating the impact of bandwidth selected exposures with a table-top set-up and subsequent EUV patterning show significant impact on line-edge roughness and process performance. We outline a simulation-based method for computing the effective flare from resist sensitive wavelengths as a function of mask pattern types and sizes. This simulation method is benchmarked against measured OOB flare measurements and the results obtained are in agreement.

  1. Multi-level effects of low dose rate ionizing radiation on southern toad, Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stark, Karolina; Scott, David E.; Tsyusko, Olga; Coughlin, Daniel P.; Hinton, Thomas G.; Amendola, Roberto

    2015-04-30

    Despite their potential vulnerability to contaminants from exposure at multiple life stages, amphibians are one of the least studied groups of vertebrates in ecotoxicology, and research on radiation effects in amphibians is scarce. We used multiple endpoints to assess the radiosensitivity of the southern toad (Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris) during its pre-terrestrial stages of development –embryonic, larval, and metamorphic. Toads were exposed, from several hours after oviposition through metamorphosis (up to 77 days later), to four low dose rates of ¹³?Cs at 0.13, 2.4, 21, and 222 mGy d?¹, resulting in total doses up to 15.8 Gy. Radiation treatments did notmore »affect hatching success of embryos, larval survival, or the length of the larval period. The individual family variation in hatching success of embryos was larger than the radiation response. In contrast, newly metamorphosed individuals from the higher dose-rate treatments had higher mass and mass/length body indices, a measure which may relate to higher post-metamorphic survival. The increased mass and index at higher dose rates may indicate that the chronic, low dose rate radiation exposures triggered secondary responses. Additionally, the increases in growth were linked to a decrease in DNA damage (as measured by the Comet Assay) in red blood cells at a dose rate of 21mGy d?¹ and a total dose of 1.1 Gy. In conclusion, the complex effects of low dose rates of ionizing radiation may trigger growth and cellular repair mechanisms in amphibian larvae.« less

  2. Multi-level effects of low dose rate ionizing radiation on southern toad, Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stark, Karolina [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden); Univ. of Georgia, Aiken, SC (United States); Scott, David E. [Univ. of Georgia, Aiken, SC (United States); Tsyusko, Olga [Univ. of Georgia, Aiken, SC (United States); Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Coughlin, Daniel P. [Univ. of Georgia, Aiken, SC (United States); Hinton, Thomas G. [Univ. of Georgia, Aiken, SC (United States); Inst. of Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety, Cadarache (France); Amendola, Roberto [ENEA, (Italy)

    2015-04-30

    Despite their potential vulnerability to contaminants from exposure at multiple life stages, amphibians are one of the least studied groups of vertebrates in ecotoxicology, and research on radiation effects in amphibians is scarce. We used multiple endpoints to assess the radiosensitivity of the southern toad (Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris) during its pre-terrestrial stages of development –embryonic, larval, and metamorphic. Toads were exposed, from several hours after oviposition through metamorphosis (up to 77 days later), to four low dose rates of ¹³?Cs at 0.13, 2.4, 21, and 222 mGy d?¹, resulting in total doses up to 15.8 Gy. Radiation treatments did not affect hatching success of embryos, larval survival, or the length of the larval period. The individual family variation in hatching success of embryos was larger than the radiation response. In contrast, newly metamorphosed individuals from the higher dose-rate treatments had higher mass and mass/length body indices, a measure which may relate to higher post-metamorphic survival. The increased mass and index at higher dose rates may indicate that the chronic, low dose rate radiation exposures triggered secondary responses. Additionally, the increases in growth were linked to a decrease in DNA damage (as measured by the Comet Assay) in red blood cells at a dose rate of 21mGy d?¹ and a total dose of 1.1 Gy. In conclusion, the complex effects of low dose rates of ionizing radiation may trigger growth and cellular repair mechanisms in amphibian larvae.

  3. System level latchup mitigation for single event and transient radiation effects on electronics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kimbrough, Joseph Robert (Pleasanton, CA); Colella, Nicholas John (Livermore, CA)

    1997-01-01

    A "blink" technique, analogous to a person blinking at a flash of bright light, is provided for mitigating the effects of single event current latchup and prompt pulse destructive radiation on a micro-electronic circuit. The system includes event detection circuitry, power dump logic circuitry, and energy limiting measures with autonomous recovery. The event detection circuitry includes ionizing radiation pulse detection means for detecting a pulse of ionizing radiation and for providing at an output terminal thereof a detection signal indicative of the detection of a pulse of ionizing radiation. The current sensing circuitry is coupled to the power bus for determining an occurrence of excess current through the power bus caused by ionizing radiation or by ion-induced destructive latchup of a semiconductor device. The power dump circuitry includes power dump logic circuitry having a first input terminal connected to the output terminal of the ionizing radiation pulse detection circuitry and having a second input terminal connected to the output terminal of the current sensing circuitry. The power dump logic circuitry provides an output signal to the input terminal of the circuitry for opening the power bus and the circuitry for shorting the power bus to a ground potential to remove power from the power bus. The energy limiting circuitry with autonomous recovery includes circuitry for opening the power bus and circuitry for shorting the power bus to a ground potential. The circuitry for opening the power bus and circuitry for shorting the power bus to a ground potential includes a series FET and a shunt FET. The invention provides for self-contained sensing for latchup, first removal of power to protect latched components, and autonomous recovery to enable transparent operation of other system elements.

  4. System level latchup mitigation for single event and transient radiation effects on electronics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kimbrough, J.R.; Colella, N.J.

    1997-09-30

    A ``blink`` technique, analogous to a person blinking at a flash of bright light, is provided for mitigating the effects of single event current latchup and prompt pulse destructive radiation on a micro-electronic circuit. The system includes event detection circuitry, power dump logic circuitry, and energy limiting measures with autonomous recovery. The event detection circuitry includes ionizing radiation pulse detection means for detecting a pulse of ionizing radiation and for providing at an output terminal thereof a detection signal indicative of the detection of a pulse of ionizing radiation. The current sensing circuitry is coupled to the power bus for determining an occurrence of excess current through the power bus caused by ionizing radiation or by ion-induced destructive latchup of a semiconductor device. The power dump circuitry includes power dump logic circuitry having a first input terminal connected to the output terminal of the ionizing radiation pulse detection circuitry and having a second input terminal connected to the output terminal of the current sensing circuitry. The power dump logic circuitry provides an output signal to the input terminal of the circuitry for opening the power bus and the circuitry for shorting the power bus to a ground potential to remove power from the power bus. The energy limiting circuitry with autonomous recovery includes circuitry for opening the power bus and circuitry for shorting the power bus to a ground potential. The circuitry for opening the power bus and circuitry for shorting the power bus to a ground potential includes a series FET and a shunt FET. The invention provides for self-contained sensing for latchup, first removal of power to protect latched components, and autonomous recovery to enable transparent operation of other system elements. 18 figs.

  5. Human-centered systems analysis of aircraft separation from adverse weather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vigeant-Langlois, Laurence, 1974-

    2004-01-01

    Adverse weather significantly impacts the safety and efficiency of flight operations. Weather information plays a key role in mitigating the impact of adverse weather on flight operations by supporting air transportation ...

  6. Comparative effects of parathion and chlorpyrifos on extracellular endocannabinoid levels in rat hippocampus: Influence on cholinergic toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Jing [Department of Physiological Sciences, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK (United States); Parsons, Loren [Committee on Neurobiology of Affective Disorders, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA (United States); Pope, Carey, E-mail: carey.pope@okstate.edu [Department of Physiological Sciences, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Parathion (PS) and chlorpyrifos (CPF) are organophosphorus insecticides (OPs) that elicit acute toxicity by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Endocannabinoids (eCBs, N-arachidonoylethanolamine, AEA; 2-arachidonoylglycerol, 2AG) can modulate neurotransmission by inhibiting neurotransmitter release. We proposed that differential inhibition of eCB-degrading enzymes (fatty acid amide hydrolase, FAAH, and monoacylglycerol lipase, MAGL) by PS and CPF leads to differences in extracellular eCB levels and toxicity. Microdialysis cannulae were implanted into hippocampus of adult male rats followed by treatment with vehicle (peanut oil, 2 ml/kg, sc), PS (27 mg/kg) or CPF (280 mg/kg) 6–7 days later. Signs of toxicity, AChE, FAAH and MAGL inhibition, and extracellular levels of AEA and 2AG were measured 2 and 4 days later. Signs were noted in PS-treated rats but not in controls or CPF-treated rats. Cholinesterase inhibition was extensive in hippocampus with PS (89–90%) and CPF (78–83%) exposure. FAAH activity was also markedly reduced (88–91%) by both OPs at both time-points. MAGL was inhibited by both OPs but to a lesser degree (35–50%). Increases in extracellular AEA levels were noted after either PS (about 2-fold) or CPF (about 3-fold) while lesser treatment-related 2-AG changes were noted. The cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist AM251 (3 mg/kg, ip) had no influence on functional signs after CPF but markedly decreased toxicity in PS-treated rats. The results suggest that extracellular eCBs levels can be markedly elevated by both PS and CPF. CB1-mediated signaling appears to play a role in the acute toxicity of PS but the role of eCBs in CPF toxicity remains unclear. - Highlights: • Chlorpyrifos and parathion both extensively inhibited hippocampal cholinesterase. • Functional signs were only noted with parathion. • Chlorpyrifos and parathion increased hippocampal extracellular anandamide levels. • 2-Arachidonoylglycerol levels were lesser affected. • The CB1 antagonist AM251 had no effect on chlorpyrifos but reduced parathion toxicity.

  7. The effects of deep level traps on the electrical properties of semi-insulating CdZnTe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zha, Gangqiang; Yang, Jian; Xu, Lingyan; Feng, Tao; Wang, Ning; Jie, Wanqi

    2014-01-28

    Deep level traps have considerable effects on the electrical properties and radiation detection performance of high resistivity CdZnTe. A deep-trap model for high resistivity CdZnTe was proposed in this paper. The high resistivity mechanism and the electrical properties were analyzed based on this model. High resistivity CdZnTe with high trap ionization energy E{sub t} can withstand high bias voltages. The leakage current is dependent on both the deep traps and the shallow impurities. The performance of a CdZnTe radiation detector will deteriorate at low temperatures, and the way in which sub-bandgap light excitation could improve the low temperature performance can be explained using the deep trap model.

  8. Effects of protein and energy levels during the growing and laying periods on performance and egg production costs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santana, Jose

    1968-01-01

    Ih O O I IA I O o 0' V V V V Al F! I nlI 0 o 0 0 a J2 nl 0 C4 H 0 I! I! IA O nl A u nl nl nl W A nl A nl nl I! Cl 4 W W 0 0 V 0 '0 cl nl u u V II nl Sl nl nl In n! nl m M nl g A CI CI nl ~ In 28... of diet to pullets from 8 to 21 weeks of age, combined with an all-mash and a mash plus unground milo free choice feeding system, in a factorial arrangement (3xZx2) had no effect on body weight, level of peak production or egg size during the laying...

  9. Mycorrhizae and phosphorus fertilization effects on survival, growth, total biomass and leaf nutrient levels of two-year old Leucaena leucocephala 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mbugua, David Kahuria

    1985-01-01

    MYCORRHIZAE AND PHOSPHORUS FERTILIZATION EFFECTS ON SURVIVAL, GRONTH& TOTAL BIOMASS AND LEAF NUTRIENT LEVELS OF TWO-YEAR CLD LEUCAENA LEUCOCEPHALA A Thesis by DAVID KAHURIA MBUGUA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1985 Major Subject: Forestry MYCORRHIZAE AND PHOSPHORUS FERTILIZATION EFFECTS ON SURVIVAL, GROWTH& TOTAL BIOMASS AND LEAF NUTRIENT LEVELS OF TWO-YEAR OLD LEUCAENA...

  10. The validation of an invitro colonic motility assay as a biomarker for gastrointestinal adverse drug reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keating, Christopher, E-mail: C.Keating@sheffield.ac.u [Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Sheffield, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Martinez, Vicente; Ewart, Lorna [Department of Safety Pharmacology, Safety Assessment UK, AstraZeneca, Alderley Park (United Kingdom); Gibbons, Stephen; Grundy, Luke [Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Sheffield, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Valentin, Jean-Pierre [Department of Safety Pharmacology, Safety Assessment UK, AstraZeneca, Alderley Park (United Kingdom); Grundy, David [Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Sheffield, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-15

    Motility-related gastrointestinal adverse drug reactions (GADRs), such as constipation and diarrhea, are some of the most frequently reported adverse events associated with the clinical development of new chemical entities, and for marketed drugs. However, biomarkers capable of detecting such GADRs are lacking. Here, we describe an in vitro assay developed to detect and quantify changes in intestinal motility as a surrogate biomarker for constipation/diarrhea-type GADRs. In vitro recordings of intraluminal pressure were used to monitor the presence of colonic peristaltic motor complexes (CPMCs) in mouse colonic segments. CPMC frequency, contractile and total mechanical activity were assessed. To validate the assay, two experimental protocols were conducted. Initially, five drugs with known gastrointestinal effects were tested to determine optimal parameters describing excitation and inhibition as markers for disturbances in colonic motility. This was followed by a 'blinded' evaluation of nine drugs associated with or without clinically identified constipation/diarrhea-type GADRs. Concentration-response relationships were determined for these drugs and the effects were compared with their maximal free therapeutic plasma concentration in humans. The assay detected stimulatory and inhibitory responses, likely correlating to the occurrence of diarrhea or constipation. Concentration-related effects were identified and potential mechanisms of action were inferred for several drugs. Based on the results from the fourteen drugs assessed, the sensitivity of the assay was calculated at 90%, with a specificity of 75% and predictive capacity of 86%. These results support the potential use of this assay in screening for motility-related GADRs during early discovery phase, safety pharmacology assessment.

  11. The accumulations of HIF-1? and HIF-2? by JNK and ERK are involved in biphasic effects induced by different levels of arsenite in human bronchial epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Yuan; Li, Yuan [Institute of Toxicology, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China) [Institute of Toxicology, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China); The Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China); Li, Huiqiao [Qujing Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Qujing 655000, Yunnan (China)] [Qujing Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Qujing 655000, Yunnan (China); Pang, Ying; Zhao, Yue; Jiang, Rongrong; Shen, Lu [Institute of Toxicology, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China) [Institute of Toxicology, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China); The Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China); Zhou, Jianwei; Wang, Xinru [The Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China)] [The Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China); Liu, Qizhan, E-mail: drqzliu@hotmail.com [Institute of Toxicology, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China) [Institute of Toxicology, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China); The Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China)

    2013-01-15

    The biphasic effects of arsenite, in which low levels of arsenite induce cell proliferation and high levels of arsenite induce DNA damage and apoptosis, apparently contribute to arsenite-induced carcinogenesis. However, the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are not well understood. In this study, we investigated the effects of different levels of arsenite on cell proliferation, DNA damage and apoptosis as well as on signal transduction pathways in human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells. Our results show that a low level of arsenite activates extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), which probably mediate arsenite-inhibited degradation of ubiquitinated hypoxia-inducible factor-2? (HIF-2?) in HBE cells. ERK inhibition blocks cell proliferation induced by a low level of arsenite, in part via HIF-2?. In contrast, a high level of arsenite activates c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK), which provoke a response to suppress ubiquitinated HIF-1? degradation. Down-regulation of HIF-1? by inhibiting JNK, however, increases the DNA damage but decreases the apoptosis induced by a high level of arsenite. Thus, data in the present study suggest that the accumulations of HIF-1? and HIF-2? by JNK and ERK are involved in different levels of arsenite-induced biphasic effects, with low levels of arsenite inducing cell proliferation and high levels of arsenite inducing DNA damage and apoptosis in HBE cells. -- Highlights: ? Biphasic effects induced by different concentrations of arsenite. ? Different regulation of ERK or JNK signal pathway by arsenite. ? Different regulation of HIF1? or HIF 2? by arsenite.

  12. Simulating the growth response of aspen to elevated ozone: a mechanistic approach to scaling a leaf-level model of ozone effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simulating the growth response of aspen to elevated ozone: a mechanistic approach to scaling a leaf-level model of ozone effects on photosynthesis to a complex canopy architecture§ M.J. Martina, *, G.E. Hosta; accepted 17 July 2001 ``Capsule'': A process model is described that predicts the relative effects of ozone

  13. Effect of sorghum bran addition on lipid oxidation and sensory properties of ground beef patties differing in fat levels 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemphill, Susan Patricia

    2006-10-30

    at 0.2% of the meat weight; 4) high level of sorghum at 1.0% of the meat weight; 5) medium level of sorghum at 0.5% of the meat weight; and, 6) a low level of sorghum at 0.25% of the meat weight. The ground beef was aerobically packaged and stored for 0...

  14. Ecological Applications, Scott V. Ollinger et al. Ozone Effects on Forest Productivity 7(4), 1997, pp. 1237-1251

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    pollution in the lower atmosphere is known to have adverse effects on forest vegetation, but the degree layers within the model in order to allow interaction with stand- and canopy-level factors such as light: ozone; air pollution; forest productivity; NPP; tree growth; modeling; forest canopy; photosynthesis

  15. Development of Effective Solvent Modifiers for the Solvent Extraction of Cesium from Alkaline High-Level Tank Waste.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonnesen, Peter V.; Delmau, Laetitia H.; Moyer, Bruce A.; Lumetta, Gregg J. )

    2003-01-01

    A series of novel alkylphenoxy fluorinated alcohols were prepared and investigated for their effectiveness as modifiers in solvents containing calix[4]arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo)-crown-6 for extracting cesium from alkaline nitrate media. A modifier that contained a terminal 1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethoxy group was found to decompose following long-term exposure to warm alkaline solutions. However, replacement of the tetrafluoroethoxy group with a 2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy group led to a series of modifiers that possessed the alkaline stability required for a solvent extraction process. Within this series of modifiers, the structure of the alkyl substituent (tert-octyl, tert-butyl, tert-amyl, and sec-butyl) of the alkylphenoxy moiety was found to have a profound impact on the phase behavior of the solvent in liquid-liquid contacting experiments, and hence on the overall suitability of the modifier for a solvent extraction process. The sec-butyl derivative[1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol] (Cs-7SB) was found to possess the best overall balance of properties with respect to third phase and coalescence behavior, cleanup following degradation, resistance to solids formation, and cesium distribution behavior. Accordingly, this modifier was selected for use as a component of the solvent employed in the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process for removing cesium from high level nuclear waste (HLW) at the U.S. Department of Energy?s (DOE) Savannah River Site. In batch equilibrium experiments, this solvent has also been successfully shown to extract cesium from both simulated and actual solutions generated from caustic leaching of HLW tank sludge stored in tank B-110 at the DOE?s Hanford Site.

  16. The effect of different levels of forage and fish meal on the live performance and rumen volatile fatty acid concentation of heifers fed high molasses diets 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estrada, Sergio

    1973-01-01

    THE EFFECT OF DIFFERENT LEVELS OF FORAGE AND FISH MEAL ON THE LIVE PERFORMANCE AND RUMEN VOLATILE FATTY ACID CONCEN- TRATION OF HEIFERS FED HIGH MOLASSES DIETS A Thesis by SERGIO ESTRADA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM...- TRATION OF HEIFERS FED HIGH MOLASSES DIETS A Thesis by SERGIO ESTRADA Approved as to style and content by: ) / Chairman of i tee Member Head of Department Member August 1973 4 3 6 8 1 5 AB STRACT The Effect of Different Levels of Forage and Fish...

  17. The Effects of Placement Examinations and Enforcing Prerequisites on Student Success in EntryLevel Mathematics Courses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearce, Kent

    ­level mathematics courses at Texas Tech University were a combination of stipulated high school background­Level Mathematics Courses Kent Pearce and Ronald M. Anderson Department of Mathematics and Statistics Texas Tech at Texas Tech University and Mathematics Prerequisite Requirements at Texas Tech University Prior to Fall

  18. The Effects of Placement Examinations and Enforcing Prerequisites on Student Success in Entry-Level Mathematics Courses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearce, Kent

    -level mathematics courses at Texas Tech University were a combination of stipulated high school background-Level Mathematics Courses Kent Pearce and Ronald M. Anderson Department of Mathematics and Statistics Texas Tech at Texas Tech University and Mathematics Prerequisite Requirements at Texas Tech University Prior to Fall

  19. Minimize Adverse Motor and Adjustable Speed Drive Interactions

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    drive (VFD) with a fast-rise-time insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) to reduce switching losses and noise levels. However, higher carrier frequencies and faster rise-time...

  20. A SNPshot of PubMed to associate genetic variants with drugs, diseases, and adverse reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baral, Chitta

    A SNPshot of PubMed to associate genetic variants with drugs, diseases, and adverse reactions Jörg, drug efficacy, and drug responses between individuals and sub-populations. Wrong dosages of drugs can lead to severe adverse drug reac- tions in individuals whose drug metabolism drastically differs from

  1. Queueing in Traffic Flows This project studies the effects of vehicle routing on pollution levels. We aim to develop queueing theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boucherie, Richard J.

    Queueing in Traffic Flows This project studies the effects of vehicle routing on pollution levels model to predict air pollution in a wider region. These predictions will be tested using remote sensing)-direct road traffic to avoid pollution. Traffic Theory The capacity drop is a process in which the traffic

  2. Effect of level of dietary calcium and phosphorus on the site of absorption and utilization of phosphorus in gestating and lactating ruminants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Robert Clay

    2002-01-01

    Two digestion trials were conducted to determine the effect of level of Ca and P on the site and extent of absorption of P in gestating and lactating ruminants. Gestating Nubian dairy nannies (n=8; 41-55 kg) with abomasal ...

  3. Radiosensitizing Effects of Ectopic miR-101 on Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cells Depend on the Endogenous miR-101 Level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Susie; Wang Hongyan; Ng, Wooi Loon; Curran, Walter J.; Wang Ya

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Previously, we showed that ectopic miR-101 could sensitize human tumor cells to radiation by targeting ATM and DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) to inhibit DNA repair, as the endogenous miR-101 levels are low in tumors in general. However, the heterogeneity of human cancers may result in an exception. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that a few tumor cell lines with a high level of endogenous miR-101 would prove less response to ectopic miR-101. Methods and Materials: Fourteeen non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines and one immortalized non-malignant lung epithelial cell line (NL20) were used for comparing endogenous miR-101 levels by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Based on the different miR-101 levels, four cell lines with different miR-101 levels were chosen for transfection with a green fluorescent protein-lentiviral plasmid encoding miR-101. The target protein levels were measured by using Western blotting. The radiosensitizing effects of ectopic miR-101 on these NSCLC cell lines were determined by a clonogenic assay and xenograft mouse model. Results: The endogenous miR-101 level was similar or lower in 13 NSCLC cell lines but was 11-fold higher in one cell line (H157) than in NL20 cells. Although ectopic miR-101 efficiently decreased the ATM and DNA-PKcs levels and increased the radiosensitization level in H1299, H1975, and A549 cells, it did not change the levels of the miR-101 targets or radiosensitivity in H157 cells. Similar results were observed in xenograft mice. Conclusions: A small number of NSCLC cell lines could have a high level of endogenous miR-101. The ectopic miR-101 was able to radiosensitize most NSCLC cells, except for the NSCLC cell lines that had a much higher endogenous miR-101 level. These results suggest that when we choose one miRNA as a therapeutic tool, the endogenous level of the miRNA in each tumor should be considered.

  4. The effect of ionization on the populations of excited levels of C IV and C V in tokamak edge plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawson, K D; Aggarwal, K M; Keenan, F P; Contributors, JET-EFDA; 10.1088/0953-4075/46/3/035701

    2013-01-01

    The main populating and depopulating mechanisms of the excited energy levels of ions in plasmas with densities <1023-1024 m-3 are electron collisional excitation from the ion's ground state and radiative decay, respectively, with the majority of the electron population being in the ground state of the ionization stage. Electron collisional ionization is predominately expected to take place from one ground state to that of the next higher ionization stage. However, the question arises as to whether, in some cases, ionization can also affect the excited level populations. This would apply particularly to those cases involving transient events such as impurity influxes in a laboratory plasma. An analysis of the importance of ionization in populating the excited levels of ions in plasmas typical of those found in the edge of tokamaks is undertaken for the C IV and C V ionization stages. The emphasis is on those energy levels giving rise to transitions of most use for diagnostic purposes. Carbon is chosen since...

  5. Effects of the Hawaiian Islands on the Vertical1 Structure of Low-level Clouds from CALIPSO Lidar2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    -top elevation over the windward slopes of the islands of Kauai and Oahu due32 to orographic lifting and daytime island heating. In the nighttime near-island wake of33 Kauai, CALIPSO captures a striking cloud eddy of the mechanical wake behind35 the island of Hawaii favors the formation of low-level clouds

  6. Edinburgh Research Explorer Effect of the UK's revised paracetamol poisoning management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    Edinburgh Research Explorer Effect of the UK's revised paracetamol poisoning management guidelines of the UK's revised paracetamol poisoning management guidelines on admissions, adverse reactions and costs. 2014 #12;Effect of the UK's revised paracetamol poisoning management guidelines on admissions, adverse

  7. Alleviation of fermi-level pinning effect at metal/germanium interface by the insertion of graphene layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baek, Seung-heon Chris; Seo, Yu-Jin; Oh, Joong Gun; Albert Park, Min Gyu; Bong, Jae Hoon; Yoon, Seong Jun; Lee, Seok-Hee, E-mail: seokheelee@ee.kaist.ac.kr [Department of Electrical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Minsu; Park, Seung-young [Division of Materials Science, Korea Basic Science Institute (KBSI), 169-148 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Byong-Guk [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-18

    In this paper, we report the alleviation of the Fermi-level pinning on metal/n-germanium (Ge) contact by the insertion of multiple layers of single-layer graphene (SLG) at the metal/n-Ge interface. A decrease in the Schottky barrier height with an increase in the number of inserted SLG layers was observed, which supports the contention that Fermi-level pinning at metal/n-Ge contact originates from the metal-induced gap states at the metal/n-Ge interface. The modulation of Schottky barrier height by varying the number of inserted SLG layers (m) can bring about the use of Ge as the next-generation complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor material. Furthermore, the inserted SLG layers can be used as the tunnel barrier for spin injection into Ge substrate for spin-based transistors.

  8. Effects of Prenatal Methylmercury Exposure on Motor Coordination, Activity Levels and Mitochondrial Membrane Potential in Adult Mice 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackey, Jessica

    2006-08-16

    METHYLMERCURY EXPOSURE ON MOTOR COORDINATION, ACTIVITY LEVELS AND MITOCHONDRIAL MEMBRANE POTENTIAL IN ADULT MICE A Senior Honors Thesis by JESSICA MARIE MACKEY Submitted to the Office of Honors Programs & Academic Scholarships Texas A&M University... AND MITOCHONDRIAL MEMBRANE POTENTIAL IN ADULT MICE A Senior Honors Thesis by JESSICA MARIE MACKEY Submitted to the Office of Honors Programs & Academic Scholarships Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the UNIVERSITY...

  9. Numerical study of the effect of normalised window size, sampling frequency, and noise level on short time Fourier transform analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ota, T. A.

    2013-10-15

    Photonic Doppler velocimetry, also known as heterodyne velocimetry, is a widely used optical technique that requires the analysis of frequency modulated signals. This paper describes an investigation into the errors of short time Fourier transform analysis. The number of variables requiring investigation was reduced by means of an equivalence principle. Error predictions, as the number of cycles, samples per cycle, noise level, and window type were varied, are presented. The results were found to be in good agreement with analytical models.

  10. Qualitative reasoning about fault effects in electrical cir-cuits has reached a level of achievement which allows it to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburg,.Universität

    - stance, the FLAME system (Pugh and Snooke 1996) per- forms failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) is employed for automated FMEA and diagnosis guidelines generation for mechatronic car subsystems

  11. Strategies for mitigating adverse environmental impacts due to structural building materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaturvedi, Swati, 1976-

    2004-01-01

    This thesis assesses the problem of adverse environmental impacts due to the use of Portland cement and structural steel in the construction industry. The thesis outlines three technology and policy strategies to mitigate ...

  12. A University's Resilience in the Face of Adversity September 2010 Earthquake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    A University's Resilience in the Face of Adversity The 4th September 2010 Earthquake Shakenbutnot.................................................................................................................. 7 2 The September 4th Earthquake ....................................................................... 10 3.2 Prior Understanding of the Earthquake Risk

  13. Higher Levels of c-Met Expression and Phosphorylation Identify Cell Lines With Increased Sensitivity to AMG-458, a Novel Selective c-Met Inhibitor With Radiosensitizing Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Bo; Torossian, Artour [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Sun, Yunguang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kimmel Cancer Center, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kimmel Cancer Center, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Du, Ruihong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Dicker, Adam P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kimmel Cancer Center, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kimmel Cancer Center, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Lu Bo, E-mail: bo.lu@jefferson.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Kimmel Cancer Center, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: c-Met is overexpressed in some non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines and tissues. Cell lines with higher levels of c-Met expression and phosphorylation depend on this receptor for survival. We studied the effects of AMG-458 on 2 NSCLC cell lines. Methods and Materials: 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl) -2H-tetrazolium assays assessed the sensitivities of the cells to AMG-458. Clonogenic survival assays illustrated the radiosensitizing effects of AMG-458. Western blot for cleaved caspase 3 measured apoptosis. Immunoblotting for c-Met, phospho-Met (p-Met), Akt/p-Akt, and Erk/p-Erk was performed to observe downstream signaling. Results: AMG-458 enhanced radiosensitivity in H441 but not in A549. H441 showed constitutive phosphorylation of c-Met. A549 expressed low levels of c-Met, which were phosphorylated only in the presence of exogenous hepatocyte growth factor. The combination of radiation therapy and AMG-458 treatment was found to synergistically increase apoptosis in the H441 cell line but not in A549. Radiation therapy, AMG-458, and combination treatment were found to reduce p-Akt and p-Erk levels in H441 but not in A549. H441 became less sensitive to AMG-458 after small interfering RNA knockdown of c-Met; there was no change in A549. After overexpression of c-Met, A549 became more sensitive, while H441 became less sensitive to AMG-458. Conclusions: AMG-458 was more effective in cells that expressed higher levels of c-Met/p-Met, suggesting that higher levels of c-Met and p-Met in NSCLC tissue may classify a subset of tumors that are more sensitive to molecular therapies against this receptor.

  14. Procedures for Interagency Consultation to Avoid or Mitigate Adverse

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested PartiesBuildingBudget | Department Primus PowerEffects on Rivers in the

  15. Decoherence-free evolution of time-dependent superposition states of two-level systems and thermal effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prado, F. O.; Duzzioni, E. I. [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia, Caixa Postal 593, 38400-902 Uberlandia, Minas Geraisn (Brazil); Almeida, N. G. de [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Goias, 74001-970, Goiania, Goias (Brazil); Moussa, M. H. Y. [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Caixa Postal 369, 13560-970 Sao Carlos, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Villas-Boas, C. J. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, P.O. Box 676, 13565-905 Sao Carlos, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2011-07-15

    In this paper we detail some results advanced in a recent letter [Prado et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 073008 (2009).] showing how to engineer reservoirs for two-level systems at absolute zero by means of a time-dependent master equation leading to a nonstationary superposition equilibrium state. We also present a general recipe showing how to build nonadiabatic coherent evolutions of a fermionic system interacting with a bosonic mode and investigate the influence of thermal reservoirs at finite temperature on the fidelity of the protected superposition state. Our analytical results are supported by numerical analysis of the full Hamiltonian model.

  16. Adiabatic limit interference effects for two energy level transition amplitudes and Nikitin - Umanskii formula studied by fundamental solution method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan Giller

    2003-04-04

    A method of fundamental solutions has been used to study adiabatic transition amplitudes in two energy level systems for a class of Hamiltonians allowing some simplifications of Stokes graphs corresponding to such transitions. It has been shown that for simplest such cases the amplitudes take the Nikitin - Umanskii form but for more complicated ones they are formed by a sum of terms strictly related to a structure of Stokes graph corresponding to such cases. This paper corrects our previous one [Phys. Rev. A, 63 052101 (2001)] and its results are in a full agreement with the ones of Joye, Mileti and Pfister [Phys. Rev. A, 44 4280 (1991)].

  17. Biodegradation of orthodontic appliances and their effects on the blood level of nickel and chromium. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrett, R.D.

    1990-05-01

    Austenitic stainless steels containing approximately 18 percent chromium and 8 percent nickel for orthodontic bands, brackets and wires is universally used in orthodontic practices. With the introduction of nickel-titanium alloys as orthodontic archwires in the 1970's an additional source of patient exposure to metal corrosion products has been introduced. Since the oral environment is particularly ideal for the biodegradation of metals due to its ionic, thermal, microbiologic and enzymatic properties some level of patient exposure to the corrosion products of these alloys is assured.

  18. Effects of season, plane of nutrition, and levels of protein and energy on reproductive phenomena in gilts 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gossett, John Warren

    1957-01-01

    invaluable. Sincere appreciation is also expressed to Dr. R. 0. Berry of the Animal Husbandry Department and Dr. H. 0. Kunkel of the Animal Husbandry and Biocliemistry and Nutrition Departments for their continued encouragement and inspiration during.... SUMMARY OF EFFECTS OF ENERGY ON REPRODUCTIVE PHENOMENA (STUDIES I AND I I ) .....................52 TA BLEESab le PeePgRB le PIPa1b lI aP.alCLgRNGP .OPIlEPIS MBRLCNPB NNN FIC N G H AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA X2 PART III 8. SUMMARY OF EFFECTS OF SEASONS...

  19. Effects of Water Levels on Productivity of Canada Geese in the Northern Flathead Valley, 1984 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, Daniel

    1985-02-01

    Operation of Hungry Horse Dam on the South Fork Flathead River causes sporadic level fluctuations along the main stem Flathead River. Seasonal water level fluctuations and substantial habitat losses have occurred as a result of construction and operation of Kerr Dam, which regulates Flathead Lake. These fluctuations may impact goose populations through flooding or erosion of nesting and brood-rearing habitats, and increased susceptibility of nests and young to predation. The number, location, and success of goose nests were determined through pair surveys and nest searches. Counts of indicated pairs suggest there were 73-125 occupied nests in the study area; 44 were located in 1984. Twenty were island ground nests, 19 were tree nests, and 5 were on man-made structures. Hatching success was 76 percent. Sixty-one percent of all nests were in deciduous forest habitat; 87 percent were on riparian bench or island landforms. Seventy-four percent of all nests were within 5 m of the seasonal high water mark (HWM) and 85 percent of ground nests were 1 m or less above the HWM. Production, habitat use, and distribution of broods were documented through aerial, boat, ground, and observation tower surveys. 28 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Assessing underwater noise levels during pile-driving at an offshore windfarm and its potential effects on marine mammals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aberdeen, University of

    impacts Renewable energy a b s t r a c t Marine renewable developments have raised concerns over impacts; Gordon et al., 2003). Over the last decade there has been a growing interest in marine renewable energy effects on marine mammals Helen Bailey a,*, Bridget Senior a , Dave Simmons b , Jan Rusin b , Gordon

  1. An evaluation of the effects of an alcoholic extract of fescue grass on the plasma prolactin levels of cattle 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheeler, Lauren Venette

    1985-01-01

    as to style and content by: Max S. Amoss Jr. (Ch rman of Committee) Gerald R. Bratton (Member) Oavid W. Forrest (Member) J. O. McCrady (Head of Oepartment) ABSTRACT An Evaluat1on of the Effects of an Alcoholic Extract of Fescue Grass on Plasma.... Gerald R. Bratton, for their assistance in the preparation of this manuscript. I would like to recognize the contributions of my colleagues, Lauretta A. Rund and Jay P. Kile, for their invaluable assistance in the conduction of numerous exper- iments...

  2. Multi-level effects of low dose rate ionizing radiation on southern toad, Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stark, Karolina; Scott, David E.; Tsyusko, Olga; Coughlin, Daniel P.; Hinton, Thomas G.; Amendola, Roberto

    2015-04-30

    Despite their potential vulnerability to contaminants from exposure at multiple life stages, amphibians are one of the least studied groups of vertebrates in ecotoxicology, and research on radiation effects in amphibians is scarce. We used multiple endpoints to assess the radiosensitivity of the southern toad (Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris) during its pre-terrestrial stages of development –embryonic, larval, and metamorphic. Toads were exposed, from several hours after oviposition through metamorphosis (up to 77 days later), to four low dose rates of ¹³?Cs at 0.13, 2.4, 21, and 222 mGy d?¹, resulting in total doses up to 15.8 Gy. Radiation treatments did not affect hatching success of embryos, larval survival, or the length of the larval period. The individual family variation in hatching success of embryos was larger than the radiation response. In contrast, newly metamorphosed individuals from the higher dose-rate treatments had higher mass and mass/length body indices, a measure which may relate to higher post-metamorphic survival. The increased mass and index at higher dose rates may indicate that the chronic, low dose rate radiation exposures triggered secondary responses. Additionally, the increases in growth were linked to a decrease in DNA damage (as measured by the Comet Assay) in red blood cells at a dose rate of 21mGy d?¹ and a total dose of 1.1 Gy. In conclusion, the complex effects of low dose rates of ionizing radiation may trigger growth and cellular repair mechanisms in amphibian larvae.

  3. What is the effect of 4-H involvement on levels of empathy, self-esteem, community involvement and positive view of the future on urban youth? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonnett, Erika Dawn

    2007-04-25

    -1 WHAT IS THE EFFECT OF 4-H INVOLVEMENT ON LEVELS OF EMPATHY, SELF-ESTEEM, COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT AND POSITIVE VIEW OF THE FUTURE ON URBAN YOUTH? A Thesis by ERIKA DAWN BONNETT Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A...-ESTEEM, COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT AND POSITIVE VIEW OF THE FUTURE ON URBAN YOUTH? A Thesis by ERIKA DAWN BONNETT Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER...

  4. The effect of actinides on the microstructural development in a metallic high-level nuclear waste form

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keiser, D. D., Jr.; Sinkler, W.; Abraham, D. P.; Richardson, J. W., Jr.; McDeavitt, S. M.

    1999-10-25

    Waste forms to contain material residual from an electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel have been developed by Argonne National Laboratory. One of these waste forms contains waste stainless steel (SS), fission products that are noble to the process (e.g., Tc, Ru, Pd, Rh), Zr, and actinides. The baseline composition of this metallic waste form is SS-15wt.% Zr. The metallurgy of this baseline alloy has been well characterized. On the other hand, the effects of actinides on the alloy microstructure are not well understood. As a result, SS-Zr alloys with added U, Pu, and/or Np have been cast and then characterized, using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and neutron diffraction, to investigate the microstructural development in SS-Zr alloys that contain actinides. Actinides were found to congregate non-uniformally in a Zr(Fe,Cr,Ni){sub 2+x} phase. Apparently, the actinides were contained in varying amounts in the different polytypes (C14, C15, and C36) of the Zr(Fe,Cr,Ni){sub 2+x} phase. Heat treatment of an actinide-containing SS-15 wt.% Zr alloy showed the observed microstructure to be stable.

  5. EFFECTS OF QUARTZ PARTICLE SIZE AND SUCROSE ADDITION ON MELTING BEHAVIOR OF A MELTER FEED FOR HIGH-LEVEL GLASS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MARCIAL J; KRUGER AA; HRMA PR; SCHWEIGER MJ; SWEARINGEN KJ; TEGROTENHUIS WE; HENAGER SH

    2010-07-28

    The behavior of melter feed (a mixture of nuclear waste and glass-forming additives) during waste-glass processing has a significant impact on the rate of the vitrification process. We studied the effects of silica particle size and sucrose addition on the volumetric expansion (foaming) of a high-alumina feed and the rate of dissolution of silica particles in feed samples heated at 5 C/min up to 1200 C. The initial size of quartz particles in feed ranged from 5 to 195 {micro}m. The fraction of the sucrose added ranged from 0 to 0.20 g per g glass. Extensive foaming occurred only in feeds with 5-{micro}m quartz particles; particles {ge}150 {micro}m formed clusters. Particles of 5 {micro}m completely dissolved by 900 C whereas particles {ge}150 {micro}m did not fully dissolve even when the temperature reached 1200 C. Sucrose addition had virtually zero impact on both foaming and the dissolution of silica particles. Over 100 sites in the United States are currently tasked with the storage of nuclear waste. The largest is the Hanford Site located in southeastern Washington State with 177 subterranean tanks containing over fifty-million gallons of nuclear waste from plutonium production from 1944 through 1987. This waste will be vitrified at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. In the vitrification process, feed is charged into a melter and converted into glass to be ultimately stored in a permanent repository. The duration of waste-site cleanups by the vitrification process depends on the rate of melting, i.e., on the rate of the feed-to-glass conversion. Foaming associated with the melting process and the rate of dissolution of quartz particles (silica being the major glass-forming additive) are assumed to be important factors that influence the rate of melting. Previous studies on foaming of high-alumina feed demonstrated that varying the makeup of a melter feed has a significant impact on foaming. The volume of feeds that contained 5-{micro}m quartz particles substantially increased because of foaming. The extent of foaming decreased as the particle size of quartz increased. Moreover, samples containing quartz particles 195 {micro}m formed agglomerates at temperatures above 900 C that only slowly dissolved in the melt. This study continues previous work on the feed-melting process, specifically on the effects of the size of silica particles on the formation of nuclear-waste glasses to determine a suitable range of silica particle sizes that causes neither excessive foaming nor undesirable agglomeration. Apart from varying the silica-particle size, carbon was added in the form of sucrose. Sucrose has been used to accelerate the rate of melting. In this study, we have observed its impact on feed foaming and quartz dissolution.

  6. Guide to using Multiple Regression in Excel (MRCX v.1.1) for Removal of River Stage Effects from Well Water Levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackley, Rob D.; Spane, Frank A.; Pulsipher, Trenton C.; Allwardt, Craig H.

    2010-09-01

    A software tool was created in Fiscal Year 2010 (FY11) that enables multiple-regression correction of well water levels for river-stage effects. This task was conducted as part of the Remediation Science and Technology project of CH2MHILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC). This document contains an overview of the correction methodology and a user’s manual for Multiple Regression in Excel (MRCX) v.1.1. It also contains a step-by-step tutorial that shows users how to use MRCX to correct river effects in two different wells. This report is accompanied by an enclosed CD that contains the MRCX installer application and files used in the tutorial exercises.

  7. Effect of dietary fat on plasma glutathione peroxidase levels and intestinal absorption of /sup 75/Se-labeled sodium selenite in chicks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mutanen, M.L.; Mykkaenen, H.M.

    1984-05-01

    The effect of dietary fat on the availability of selenium was investigated in chicks fed either 4 or 20% butter, olive oil, rape oil, corn oil or sunflower oil in the diet for 3 weeks after hatching. Plasma glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity was used as an indicator of the body selenium status. In addition, the intestinal absorption of sodium selenite (/sup 75/Se-labeled) was determined by using both the in vivo ligated loop procedure and oral administration of the isotope. The plasma GSH-Px levels increased with increasing proportion of the polyunsaturated fatty acids in the diet. Increasing the amount of fat from 4 to 20% significantly enhanced the GSH-Px activity in the groups receiving butter or olive oil, but had no effect in animals fed the unsaturated fats. The absorption of (/sup 75/Se)selenite from the ligated duodenal loops tended to be reduced in chicks fed corn oil or sunflower oil as compared to the animals receiving butter in their diet. On the other hand, the type of dietary fat did not appear to affect the absorption of the orally administered selenite. The present study demonstrates that the type of dietary fat can affect the plasma GSH-Px levels in chicks without altering the intestinal absorption of selenite. However, the results on the absorption of the intraduodenally injected sodium selenite suggest that dietary fat plays some role in the intestinal transport of selenium.

  8. High-throughput identification of off-targets for the mechanistic study of severe adverse drug reactions induced by analgesics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Jian-Bo [Department of Chemical Biology, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, The Key Laboratory for Chemical Biology of Fujian Province, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Ji, Nan; Pan, Wen; Hong, Ru [State Key Laboratory of Stress Cell Biology, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361102 (China); Wang, Hao [Department of Chemical Biology, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, The Key Laboratory for Chemical Biology of Fujian Province, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Ji, Zhi-Liang, E-mail: appo@xmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Stress Cell Biology, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361102 (China); Department of Chemical Biology, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, The Key Laboratory for Chemical Biology of Fujian Province, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China)

    2014-01-01

    Drugs may induce adverse drug reactions (ADRs) when they unexpectedly bind to proteins other than their therapeutic targets. Identification of these undesired protein binding partners, called off-targets, can facilitate toxicity assessment in the early stages of drug development. In this study, a computational framework was introduced for the exploration of idiosyncratic mechanisms underlying analgesic-induced severe adverse drug reactions (SADRs). The putative analgesic-target interactions were predicted by performing reverse docking of analgesics or their active metabolites against human/mammal protein structures in a high-throughput manner. Subsequently, bioinformatics analyses were undertaken to identify ADR-associated proteins (ADRAPs) and pathways. Using the pathways and ADRAPs that this analysis identified, the mechanisms of SADRs such as cardiac disorders were explored. For instance, 53 putative ADRAPs and 24 pathways were linked with cardiac disorders, of which 10 ADRAPs were confirmed by previous experiments. Moreover, it was inferred that pathways such as base excision repair, glycolysis/glyconeogenesis, ErbB signaling, calcium signaling, and phosphatidyl inositol signaling likely play pivotal roles in drug-induced cardiac disorders. In conclusion, our framework offers an opportunity to globally understand SADRs at the molecular level, which has been difficult to realize through experiments. It also provides some valuable clues for drug repurposing. - Highlights: • A novel computational framework was developed for mechanistic study of SADRs. • Off-targets of drugs were identified in large scale and in a high-throughput manner. • SADRs like cardiac disorders were systematically explored in molecular networks. • A number of ADR-associated proteins were identified.

  9. A Systematic Review of Adverse Effects Associated with Topical Treatments for Psoriasis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruner, Christine R. MD; Feldman, Steven R. MD PhD; Ventrapragada, Madhuri BS; Fleischer, Alan B. Jr MD

    2003-01-01

    Topical Treatments for Psoriasis Christine R. Bruner, MD,Abstract Mild to moderate psoriasis is a disease that canwith different topical psoriasis treatments. A review of

  10. Tiltmeter leveling mechanism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunter, Steven L. (Livermore, CA); Boro, Carl O. (Milpitas, CA); Farris, Alvis (late of Byron, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A tiltmeter device having a pair of orthogonally disposed tilt sensors that are levelable within an inner housing containing the sensors. An outer housing can be rotated to level at least one of the sensor pair while the inner housing can be rotated to level the other sensor of the pair. The sensors are typically rotated up to about plus or minus 100 degrees. The device is effective for measuring tilts in a wide range of angles of inclination of wells and can be employed to level a platform containing a third sensor.

  11. Elimination of Adverse Leakage Flow in a Miniature Pediatric Centrifugal Blood Pump by Computational Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paden, Brad

    Elimination of Adverse Leakage Flow in a Miniature Pediatric Centrifugal Blood Pump levitated centrifugal blood pump intended to deliver 0.3­1.5 l/min of support to neo- nates and infants by centrifugal force to flow radially outwards toward the outlet of the impeller against an unfavorable pressure

  12. Large-scale prediction of adverse drug reactions using chemical, biological, and phenotypic properties of drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Mei; Wu, Yonghui; Chen, Yukun; Sun, Jingchun; Zhao, Zhongming; Chen, Xue-wen; Matheny, Michael Edwin; Xu, Hua

    2012-06-19

    Abstract Objective Adverse drug reaction (ADR) is one of the major causes of failure in drug development. Severe ADRs that go undetected until the post-marketing phase of a drug often lead to patient morbidity. Accurate prediction of potential ADRs...

  13. Spin-free Dirac-Coulomb calculations augmented with a perturbative treatment of spin-orbit effects at the Hartree-Fock level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Lan, E-mail: chenglanster@gmail.com [Institute for Theoretical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)] [Institute for Theoretical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Stopkowicz, Stella, E-mail: stella.stopkowicz@kjemi.uio.no [Centre for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo, N-0315 Oslo (Norway)] [Centre for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); Gauss, Jürgen, E-mail: gauss@uni-mainz.de [Institut für Physikalische Chemie, Universität Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany)] [Institut für Physikalische Chemie, Universität Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany)

    2013-12-07

    A perturbative approach to compute second-order spin-orbit (SO) corrections to a spin-free Dirac-Coulomb Hartree-Fock (SFDC-HF) calculation is suggested. The proposed scheme treats the difference between the DC and SFDC Hamiltonian as perturbation and exploits analytic second-derivative techniques. In addition, a cost-effective scheme for incorporating relativistic effects in high-accuracy calculations is suggested consisting of a SFDC coupled-cluster treatment augmented by perturbative SO corrections obtained at the HF level. Benchmark calculations for the hydrogen halides HX, X = F-At as well as the coinage-metal fluorides CuF, AgF, and AuF demonstrate the accuracy of the proposed perturbative treatment of SO effects on energies and electrical properties in comparison with the more rigorous full DC treatment. Furthermore, we present, as an application of our scheme, results for the electrical properties of AuF and XeAuF.

  14. Theoretical Analysis of Effects of Deep Level, Back Contact, and Absorber Thickness on Capacitance-Voltage Profiling of CdTe Thin-Film Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, J. V.; Halverson, A. F.; Sulima, O. V.; Bansal, S.; Burst, J. M.; Barnes, T. M.; Gessert, T. A.; Levi, D. H.

    2012-05-01

    The apparent carrier density profile measured by the capacitance-voltage technique in CdTe thin-film solar cells frequently displays a distinctive U-shape. We show that, even assuming a uniform carrier density, such a U-shape may arise from deep levels, a non-ohmic back-contact, and a thin absorber, which are commonly present in practical CdTe thin-film solar cells. A thin CdTe absorber contributes to the right branch of the U-shape due to a punch-through effect at reverse or zero biases, when the CdTe absorber is nearly fully depleted. A rectifying back-contact contributes to both branches of the U-shape due to voltage sharing with the front junction under a forward bias and early punch-through under a reverse bias. Deep levels contribute to the right branch, but also raise the bottom of the U-shape, leading to an overestimate of carrier density.

  15. Operating Experience Level 1, 2, and 3 Documents

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Operating Experience Level 1, 2, and 3 documents communicate required actions, information on safety issues or trends of concern, and lessons learned on operating experience to the DOE Complex to prevent adverse operating incidents and to expand the sharing of good work practices.

  16. Adverse reproductive outcomes in families of atomic veterans: The feasibility of epidemiologic studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-31

    This is an outstanding report from a distinguished academy committee, which in 71 pages of text provides the scientific basis for the carefully crafted 8-page executive summary. The principles and issues of the required epidemiological study are presented calmly and concisely, as are the ensuing short chapters on radiation biology, genetics and risk estimation, and all other adverse reproductive outcomes. The committee was mandated by Congress to determine the feasibility, cost and duration of a study on adverse reproductive outcomes in families of atomic veteran. The committee found that a scientifically adequate and epidemiologically valid study could not be mounted and the cost would be tens of millions of dollars lasting a decade. The Committee presents a number of well-discussed approaches in support of their position.

  17. The Impact of Adverse Childhood Events on Temporal Summation of Second Pain 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    You, Dokyoung Sophia

    2012-10-19

    ACE Adverse Childhood Experience AUC Area Under the Curve BNST Bed Nucleus of the Stria Terminalis CES-D Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale ETISR-SR Early Trauma Inventory Self Report-Short Form FPQ Fear of Pain... indicates more negative affect. The scale was administered to measure affect at the moment of the experiment. The Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) is widely used to assess depressive symptomatology during the past week.95...

  18. Addressing Crises More Effectively: The Other Answers to Rising Sea Levels, Storms, Floods, Desertification, Earthquakes and More Environmental Crises in the Sacramento Delta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roe, Emery

    2010-01-01

    Sea Levels, Storms, Floods, Desertification,  Earthquakes and the storms, floods and dry periods associated with

  19. Pain Levels Within 24 Hours After UFE: A Comparison of Morphine and Fentanyl Patient-Controlled Analgesia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Hyun S. Czuczman, Gregory J.; Nicholson, Wanda K.; Pham, Luu D.; Richman, Jeffrey M.

    2008-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the presence and severity of pain levels during 24 h after uterine fibroid embolization (UFE) for symptomatic leiomyomata and compare the effectiveness and adverse effects of morphine patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) versus fentanyl PCA. We carried out a prospective, nonrandomized study of 200 consecutive women who received UFE and morphine or fentanyl PCA after UFE. Pain perception levels were obtained on a 0-10 scale for the 24-h period after UFE. Linear regression methods were used to determine pain trends and differences in pain trends between two groups and the association between pain scores and patient covariates. One hundred eighty-five patients (92.5%) reported greater-than-baseline pain after UFE, and 198 patients (99%) required IV opioid PCA. One hundred thirty-six patients (68.0%) developed nausea during the 24-h period. Seventy-two patients (36%) received morphine PCA and 128 (64%) received fentanyl PCA, without demographic differences. The mean dose of morphine used was 33.8 {+-} 26.7 mg, while the mean dose of fentanyl was 698.7 {+-} 537.4 {mu}g. Using this regimen, patients who received morphine PCA had significantly lower pain levels than those who received fentanyl PCA (p < 0.0001). We conclude that patients develop pain requiring IV opioid PCA within 24 h after UFE. Morphine PCA is more effective in reducing post-uterine artery embolization pain than fentanyl PCA. Nausea is a significant adverse effect from opioid PCA.

  20. Quantifying the Impact of Adverse Events on the Electricity Grid as a Function of Grid Topology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coles, Garill A.; Sadovsky, Artyom; Du, Pengwei

    2011-11-30

    Abstract--Traditional approaches to the study of grid vulnerability have taken an asset based approach, which seeks to identify those assets most likely to result in grid-wide failures or disruptions in the event that they are compromised. We propose an alternative approach to the study of grid vulnerability, one based on the topological structure of the entire grid. We propose a method that will identify topological parameters most closely related to the ability of the grid to withstand an adverse event. We compare these topological parameters in terms of their impact on the vulnerability metric we have defined, referred to as the grid’s “survivability”. Our approach is motivated by Paul Baran’s work on communications networks, which also studied vulnerability in terms of network-wide parameters. Our approach is useful both as a planning model for evaluating proposed changes to a grid and as a risk assessment tool.

  1. Correlation of Clinical and Dosimetric Factors With Adverse Pulmonary Outcomes in Children After Lung Irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkatramani, Rajkumar; Kamath, Sunil; Wong, Kenneth; Malvar, Jemily; Sposto, Richard; Goodarzian, Fariba; Freyer, David R.; Keens, Thomas G.; and others

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To identify the incidence and the risk factors for pulmonary toxicity in children treated for cancer with contemporary lung irradiation. Methods and Materials: We analyzed clinical features, radiographic findings, pulmonary function tests, and dosimetric parameters of children receiving irradiation to the lung fields over a 10-year period. Results: We identified 109 patients (75 male patients). The median age at irradiation was 13.8 years (range, 0.04-20.9 years). The median follow-up period was 3.4 years. The median prescribed radiation dose was 21 Gy (range, 0.4-64.8 Gy). Pulmonary toxic chemotherapy included bleomycin in 58.7% of patients and cyclophosphamide in 83.5%. The following pulmonary outcomes were identified and the 5-year cumulative incidence after irradiation was determined: pneumonitis, 6%; chronic cough, 10%; pneumonia, 35%; dyspnea, 11%; supplemental oxygen requirement, 2%; radiographic interstitial lung disease, 40%; and chest wall deformity, 12%. One patient died of progressive respiratory failure. Post-irradiation pulmonary function tests available from 44 patients showed evidence of obstructive lung disease (25%), restrictive disease (11%), hyperinflation (32%), and abnormal diffusion capacity (12%). Thoracic surgery, bleomycin, age, mean lung irradiation dose (MLD), maximum lung dose, prescribed dose, and dosimetric parameters between V{sub 22} (volume of lung exposed to a radiation dose ?22 Gy) and V{sub 30} (volume of lung exposed to a radiation dose ?30 Gy) were significant for the development of adverse pulmonary outcomes on univariate analysis. MLD, maximum lung dose, and V{sub dose} (percentage of volume of lung receiving the threshold dose or greater) were highly correlated. On multivariate analysis, MLD was the sole significant predictor of adverse pulmonary outcome (P=.01). Conclusions: Significant pulmonary dysfunction occurs in children receiving lung irradiation by contemporary techniques. MLD rather than prescribed dose should be used to perform risk stratification of patients receiving lung irradiation.

  2. Modeling the effect of climate change on U.S. state-level buildings energy demands in an integrated assessment framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Yuyu; Clarke, Leon E.; Eom, Jiyong; Kyle, G. Page; Patel, Pralit L.; Kim, Son H.; Dirks, James A.; Jensen, Erik A.; Liu, Ying; Rice, Jennie S.; Schmidt, Laurel C.; Seiple, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01

    As long-term socioeconomic transformation and energy service expansion show large spatial heterogeneity, advanced understanding of climate impact on building energy use at the sub-national level will offer useful insights into climate policy and regional energy system planning. In this study, we presented a detailed building energy model with a U.S. state-level representation, nested in the GCAM integrated assessment framework. We projected state-level building energy demand and its spatial pattern over the century, considering the impact of climate change based on the estimates of heating and cooling degree days derived from downscaled USGS CASCaDE temperature data. The result indicates that climate change has a large impact on heating and cooling building energy and fuel use at the state level, exhibiting large spatial heterogeneity across states (ranges from -10% to +10%). The sensitivity analysis reveals that the building energy demand is subject to multiple key factors, such as the magnitude of climate change, the choice of climate models, and the growth of population and GDP, and that their relative contributions vary greatly across the space. The scale impact in building energy use modeling highlights the importance of constructing a building energy model with the spatially-explicit representation of socioeconomics, energy system development, and climate change. These findings will help the climate-based policy decision and energy system, especially utility planning related to building sector at the U.S. state and regional level facing the potential climate change.

  3. Chronic exposure to environmental levels of tribromophenol impairs zebrafish reproduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng Jun [State Key Laboratory of Freshwater Ecology and Biotechnology, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430072 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Liu Chunsheng; Yu Liqin [State Key Laboratory of Freshwater Ecology and Biotechnology, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430072 (China); Zhou Bingsheng, E-mail: bszhou@ihb.ac.c [State Key Laboratory of Freshwater Ecology and Biotechnology, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2010-02-15

    Tribromophenol (2,4,6-TBP) is ubiquitously found in aquatic environments and biota. In this study, we exposed zebrafish embryos (F{sub 0}; 2'''' days post-fertilization, dpf) to environmental concentration (0.3 mug/L) and a higher concentration (3.0 mug/L) of TBP and assessed the impact of chronic exposure (120 dpf) on reproduction. TBP exposure did not cause a significant increase in the malformation and reduction in the survival in the F{sub 0}-generation fish. After TBP exposure, the plasma testosterone and estradiol levels significantly increased in males and decreased in females. The transcription of steroidogenic genes (3beta-HSD, 17beta-HSD, CYP17, CYP19A, CYP19B) was significantly upregulated in the brain and testes in males and downregulated in the brain and ovary in females. TBP exposure significantly downregulated and upregulated the expression of VTG in the liver of female and male fish, respectively. Meanwhile, TBP exposure altered the sex ratio toward a male-dominant state. The F{sub 1}-generation larvae exhibited increased malformation, reduced survival, and retarded growth, suggesting that TBP in the aquatic environment has significant adverse effects on fish population.

  4. The Effects of Surrogate Caregivers on The Relationship Between Fatherless/Fatherloss African American Male Youths and Their Level of Delinquent Behavior 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter-Haith, James A., Jr.

    2010-01-14

    behaviors in the youth. Other researchers, Mackey & Mackey (2003), seem to agree that the total absence of a male role model has a direct affect on the aggression level of the African American male youths. 8 8 This review will focus on developmental... on the delinquency of African American male youths than previously indicated (Mackey & Mackey, 2003). Research reports a positive correlation between the quality of the father-child relationship and self-esteem, but does not solely identify fatherloss...

  5. Investigating the Detection of Adverse Drug Events in a UK General Practice Electronic Health-Care Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aickelin, Uwe

    -Care Database Jenna Reps1, Jan Feyereisl1, Jonathan M. Garibaldi1, Uwe Aickelin1, Jack E. Gibson2, Richard B databases. These techniques aim to find adverse drug events accurately and efficiently. Spon- taneous reporting databases are prone to missing information, under reporting and incorrect entries. This often

  6. Modeling analyses of the effects of changes in nitrogen oxides emissions from the electric power sector on ozone levels in the eastern United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edith Gego; Alice Gilliland; James Godowitch

    2008-04-15

    In this paper, we examine the changes in ambient ozone concentrations simulated by the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model for summer 2002 under three different nitrogen oxides (NOx) emission scenarios. Two emission scenarios represent best estimates of 2002 and 2004 emissions; they allow assessment of the impact of the NOx emissions reductions imposed on the utility sector by the NOx State Implementation Plan (SIP) Call. The third scenario represents a hypothetical rendering of what NOx emissions would have been in 2002 if no emission controls had been imposed on the utility sector. Examination of the modeled median and 95th percentile daily maximum 8-hr average ozone concentrations reveals that median ozone levels estimated for the 2004 emission scenario were less than those modeled for 2002 in the region most affected by the NOx SIP Call. Comparison of the 'no-control' with the '2002' scenario revealed that ozone concentrations would have been much higher in much of the eastern United States if the utility sector had not implemented NOx emission controls; exceptions occurred in the immediate vicinity of major point sources where increased NO titration tends to lower ozone levels. 13 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. The effects of sulfate fertilization and high levels of sulfate and salt drinking water on the growth and mineral status of ruminants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Kehe

    1999-01-01

    Three experiments were conducted to determine the effects of sulfate (SO?²?) in forage and drinking water on the performance and mineral status of cattle and sheep. In Experiment 1, forty-eight late gestation crossbred cows were grazed on twelve 10...

  8. The Effect of Staff Training on the Level of Engagement with Individuals with Developmental Disabilities within Two Day-Habilitation Settings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Para-Cremer, James Alan

    2008-04-25

    they were working; (e) whether teachers took advantage of teaching opportunities as they implemented the schedule; (f) whether teachers shared their time effectively across clients served involved in the schedule; and (g) the overall quality of the client... ................................................................................................................. 43 Appendix D................................................................................................................. 44 Appendix E...

  9. The effect of three levels of calcium and two sources of nitrogen upon the anatomy of the stem of Lycopersicon esculentum Mill, and Lycopersicon pimpinellifolium Mill 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rico Ballester, Marcial

    1958-01-01

    , 1e . ", . s n'b a?. so??, m o" nit, r~, . on ae?"I "'. :ncy o, *;xc reel uc '" b:. c;r?, u r?" renounce?lt "1' " x a wor 'v. Iy 3ic ot JllyA~ ~di '@' L z . ', i h vcr( 16 brdn atal38 ~ 7hora Moro avidont C?. lgta. "ac;, ' c. . lciQio 00... Levels or absenos ef substrate oaI?ina bg varions Investigators (Ig 11, Iy, N)? Xn beth sposies there was a ton4oncg towar4s nintsmwa 4ovolopnsnt sf seoon4arg tis?uss an4 sortex an4 of ~ dsvolepnsnt of pith as cnmpare4 with the prsvisns treatmimto...

  10. Nearest Neighbor Averaging and its Effect on the Critical Level and Minimum Detectable Concentration for Scanning Radiological Survey Instruments that Perform Facility Release Surveys.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fournier, Sean Donovan; Beall, Patrick S [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA; Miller, Mark L.

    2014-08-01

    Through the SNL New Mexico Small Business Assistance (NMSBA) program, several Sandia engineers worked with the Environmental Restoration Group (ERG) Inc. to verify and validate a novel algorithm used to determine the scanning Critical Level (L c ) and Minimum Detectable Concentration (MDC) (or Minimum Detectable Areal Activity) for the 102F scanning system. Through the use of Monte Carlo statistical simulations the algorithm mathematically demonstrates accuracy in determining the L c and MDC when a nearest-neighbor averaging (NNA) technique was used. To empirically validate this approach, SNL prepared several spiked sources and ran a test with the ERG 102F instrument on a bare concrete floor known to have no radiological contamination other than background naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). The tests conclude that the NNA technique increases the sensitivity (decreases the L c and MDC) for high-density data maps that are obtained by scanning radiological survey instruments.

  11. Effect of parameter variations on the static and dynamic behaviour of a self-assembled quantum-dot laser using circuit-level modelling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Razm-Pa, M; Emami, F

    2015-01-31

    We report a new circuit model for a self-assembled quantum-dot (SAQD) laser made of InGaAs/GaAs structures. The model is based on the excited state and standard rate equations, improves the previously suggested circuit models and also provides and investigates the performance of this kind of laser. The carrier dynamic effects on static and dynamic characteristics of a SAQD laser are analysed. The phonon bottleneck problem is simulated. Quantum-dot lasers are shown to be quite sensitive to the crystal quality outside and inside quantum dots. The effects of QD coverage factor, inhomogeneous broadening, the physical source of which is the size fluctuation of quantum dots formed by self-assembly of atoms, and cavity length on the SAQD laser characteristics are analysed. The results of simulation show that an increase in the cavity length and in the QD coverage factor results in the growth of the output power. On the other hand, an increase in the coverage factor and a degradation of inhomogeneous broadening lead to an increase in the modulation bandwidth. The effect of the QD height (cylindrical shape) and stripe width of the laser cavity on QD laser modulation is also analysed. (lasers)

  12. Based on staff policy from KAP (with assistance from Helen Hymers (POD), February 2010. Approved IB SEVERE/ADVERSE WEATHER GUIDANCE FOR STUDENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    SEVERE/ADVERSE WEATHER GUIDANCE FOR STUDENTS Introduction There will be occasions where severe or adverse weather creates difficulties in attending the University on time or at all. There are so many potential situations resulting from severe weather, all of which will have a different impact, that detailed

  13. The effects of lithium doping level on the structural, electrical properties of Li{sup +}-doped BPO{sub 4} solid electrolyte

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Shan; Shui, Miao, E-mail: shuimiao@nbu.edu.cn; Zheng, Weidong; Yang, Tianci; Shu, Jie; Cheng, Liangliang; Feng, Lin; Ren, Yuanlong

    2013-08-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Better ionic conductivities when 0.05 ? x ? 0.13. • V{sup ?}{sub B}+3Li{sub i} model was preferred. • Grain size, lattice strain and Li{sup +}conductivity are closely related. - Abstract: A series of lithium ion conducting solid electrolytes Li{sub x}B{sub 1?x/3}PO{sub 4}(x = 0.01, 0.05, 0.09, 0.13, 0.17, 0.20) is synthesized by a soft-chemistry route. FTIR and XRD measurements reveal that the electrolyte is pure phase of tetragonal structure. AC-impedance spectroscopy (AC-IS) at room temperature shows that Li{sub x}B{sub 1?x/3}PO{sub 4} exhibits higher ionic conductivities in the range 0.05 ? x ? 0.13, beyond which, the ionic conductivities decrease quickly. Maximum ionic conductivity of the Li{sub x}B{sub 1?x/3}PO{sub 4} reaches 3.35 × 10{sup ?5} S cm{sup ?1} at room temperature for x = 0.05. Direct current polarizing (DCP) measurement indicates that the decomposition voltage for the solid electrolyte reaches up to 3.7 V. Micro-structure parameters of synthesized Li{sub x}B{sub 1?x/3}PO{sub 4} samples are calculated by Rietveld refinement of X-ray diffraction spectra. The unit-cell parameters, lattice strain, crystal grain size and ionic conductivities of the samples are correlated with the lithium ion doping level x.

  14. Edge and bulk components of lowest-Landau-level orbitals, correlated fractional quantum Hall effect incompressible states, and insulating behavior in finite graphene samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Constantine Yannouleas; Igor Romanovsky; Uzi Landman

    2010-09-13

    Many-body calculations of the total energy of interacting Dirac electrons in finite graphene samples exhibit joint occurrence of cusps at angular momenta corresponding to fractional fillings characteristic of formation of incompressible (gapped) correlated states (nu=1/3 in particular) and opening of an insulating energy gap (that increases with the magnetic field) at the Dirac point, in correspondence with experiments. Single-particle basis functions obeying the zigzag boundary condition at the sample edge are employed in exact diagonalization of the interelectron Coulomb interaction, showing, at all sizes, mixed equal-weight bulk and edge components. The consequent depletion of the bulk electron density attenuates the fractional-quantum-Hall-effect excitation energies and the edge charge accumulation results in a gap in the many-body spectrum.

  15. Matching field effects at tesla-level magnetic fields in critical current density in high-Tc superconductors containing self-assembled columnar defects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinclair, J. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Zuev, Yuri L [ORNL; Cantoni, Claudia [ORNL; Wee, Sung Hun [ORNL; Varanasi, C. V. [University of Dayton Research Institute; Thompson, James R [ORNL; Christen, David K [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the superconductive transport properties of YBa2Cu3O7 films containing self-assembled columnar arrays of second phase SrZrO3 or BaSnO3 precipitates. A matching condition between columnar pinning sites (aligned at or near the c axis) and external magnetic flux, tilted with respect to them, is identified in the critical current JC.H/ data. The results for the material containing SrZrO3-based pins are analyzed within a simple intuitive model. At matching, the critical current is enhanced above the model prediction. In complementary contact-free investigations of BaSnO3-doped material, matching effects are observed over a wide range of temperatures in the field dependence of JC.H/. The deduced matching fields agree reasonably well with the densities of columnar pins directly observed by scanning electron microscopy.

  16. Eruption of bullae within psoriatic plaques: A rare adverse effect of narrow-band ultraviolet B (NB-UVB) phototherapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corey, Kristen; Levin, Nikki A; Hure, Michelle; Deng, April; Mailhot, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    of phototherapy protocols for psoriasis treatment. J Am Acadof moderate-to-severe psoriasis in patients compared with01) UVB phototherapy for psoriasis: a report of four cases.

  17. Recreational Use of Erectile Dysfunction Medications and Its Adverse Effects on Erectile Function in Young Healthy Men

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meston, Cindy

    for the treatment of ED (sildenafil [Viagra, Pfizer, Inc., New York, NY, USA], tadalafil [Cialis, Lilly, ICOS

  18. THE EFFECT OF THE PRESENCE OF OZONE ON THE LOWER FLAMMABILITY LIMIT OF HYDROGEN IN VESSELS CONTAINING SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherburne, C.

    2012-01-12

    The Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process uses ozone to effect the oxidation of metal oxalates produced during the dissolution of sludge in the Savannah River Site (SRS) waste tanks. The ozone reacts with the metal oxalates to form metal oxide and hydroxide precipitants, and the CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and any unreacted O{sub 3} gases are discharged into the vapor space. In addition to the non-radioactive metals in the waste, however, the SRS radioactive waste also contains a variety of radionuclides, hence, hydrogen gas is also present in the vapor space of the ECC system. Because hydrogen is flammable, the impact of this resultant gas stream on the Lower Flammability Limit (LFL) of hydrogen must be understood for all possible operating scenarios of both normal and off-normal situations, with particular emphasis at the elevated temperatures and pressures of the typical ECC operating conditions. Oxygen is a known accelerant in combustion reactions, but while there are data associated with the behavior of hydrogen/oxygen environments, recent, relevant studies addressing the effect of ozone on the flammability limit of hydrogen proved scarce. Further, discussions with industry experts verified the absence of data in this area and indicated that laboratory testing, specific to defined operating parameters, was needed to comprehensively address the issue. Testing was thus designed and commissioned to provide the data necessary to support safety related considerations for the ECC process. A test matrix was developed to envelope the bounding conditions considered credible during ECC processing. Each test consists of combining a gas stream of high purity hydrogen with a gas stream comprised of a specified mixture of ozone and oxygen in a temperature and pressure regulated chamber such that the relative compositions of the two streams are controlled. The gases are then stirred to obtain a homogeneous mixture and ignition attempted by applying 10J of energy to a fuse wire. A gas combination is considered flammable when a pressure rise of 7% of the initial absolute pressure is observed. The specified testing methodology is consistent with guidelines established in ASTM E-918-83 (2005) 'Standard Practices for Determining Limits of Flammability of Chemicals at Elevated Temperature and Pressure'.

  19. Effect of metal on zeolite catalysts for extinction hydrocracking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, T.Y. (Mobil Research and Development Corp., Princeton, NJ (US))

    1990-10-01

    This paper reports on the slow diffusivity of large molecules into the micropores which results in shape selectivity in the conversion of mixed feeds. The metals deposit on the zeolite, as the hydrogenation components further reduce this diffusivity through pore filling and pore mouth blocking, leading to ineffective catalysts for extinction hydrocracking. By using active metals at low loadings, these adverse effects can be minimized. To demonstrate this principle, experimental catalysts were compared. Unlike NiW/REX (REX = rare earth exchanged X-type zeolite), the experimental catalysts Pt and Pd on REX at 0.5 wt% levels were effective for the extinction hydrocracking of heavy gas oil blends. There was no heavy-end buildup in the recycle feed. The catalysts were active, low in aging rate, and high in selectivity for naphthas.

  20. The Enterprise Level Roadmap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lean Advancement Initiative

    2000-01-01

    The Enterprise Level Roadmap is part of a Transition-To-Lean Guide, a three volume set of materials designed to help a user navigate through the Roadmap at increasingly deeper levels of detail.

  1. Essays on the Effectiveness of Environmental Conservation and Water Management Policies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mezzatesta, Mariano

    2012-10-19

    An awareness of the effect of agricultural production on the environment has led to the development of policies to mitigate its adverse effects. This dissertation provides analyses of agri-environmental policies designed to protect environmental...

  2. A Holistic Look at Minimizing Adverse Environmental Impact Under Section 316(b) of the Clean Water Act

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Veil, John A.; Puder, Markus G.; Littleton, Debra J.; Johnson, Nancy

    2002-01-01

    Section 316(b) of the Clean Water Act (CWA) requires that “the location, design, construction, and capacity of cooling water intake structures reflect the best technology available for minimizing adverse environmental impact.” As the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) develops new regulations to implement Section 316(b), much of the debate has centered on adverse impingement and entrainment impacts of cooling-water intake structures. Depending on the specific location and intake layout, once-through cooling systems withdrawing many millions of gallons of water per day can, to a varying degree, harm fish and other aquatic organisms in the water bodies from which the coolingmore »water is withdrawn. Therefore, opponents of once-through cooling systems have encouraged the EPA to require wet or dry cooling tower systems as the best technology available (BTA), without considering site-specific conditions. However, within the context of the broader scope of the CWA mandate, this focus seems too narrow. Therefore, this article examines the phrase “minimizing adverse environmental impact” in a holistic light. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of the terms “environmental” and “minimizing.” Congress chose “environmental” in lieu of other more narrowly focused terms like “impingement and entrainment,” “water quality,” or “aquatic life.” In this light, BTA for cooling-water intake structures must minimize the entire suite of environmental impacts, as opposed to just those associated with impingement and entrainment. Wet and dry cooling tower systems work well to minimize entrainment and impingement, but they introduce other equally important impacts because they impose an energy penalty on the power output of the generating unit. The energy penalty results from a reduction in plant operating efficiency and an increase in internal power consumption. As a consequence of the energy penalty, power companies must generate additional electricity to achieve the same net output. This added production leads to additional environmental impacts associated with extraction and processing of the fuel, air emissions from burning the fuel, and additional evaporation of freshwater supplies during the cooling process. Wet towers also require the use of toxic biocides that are subsequently discharged or disposed. The other term under consideration, “minimizing,” does not equal “eliminating.” Technologies may be available to minimize but not totally eliminate adverse environmental impacts.« less

  3. Liquid level detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grasso, A.P.

    1984-02-21

    A liquid level detector for low pressure boilers. A boiler tank, from which vapor, such as steam, normally exits via a main vent, is provided with a vertical side tube connected to the tank at the desired low liquid level. When the liquid level falls to the level of the side tube vapor escapes therethrough causing heating of a temperature sensitive device located in the side tube, which, for example, may activate a liquid supply means for adding liquid to the boiler tank. High liquid level in the boiler tank blocks entry of vapor into the side tube, allowing the temperature sensitive device to cool, for example, to ambient temperature.

  4. Liquid level detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grasso, Albert P. (Vernon, CT)

    1986-01-01

    A liquid level detector for low pressure boilers. A boiler tank, from which apor, such as steam, normally exits via a main vent, is provided with a vertical side tube connected to the tank at the desired low liquid level. When the liquid level falls to the level of the side tube vapor escapes therethrough causing heating of a temperature sensitive device located in the side tube, which, for example, may activate a liquid supply means for adding liquid to the boiler tank. High liquid level in the boiler tank blocks entry of vapor into the side tube, allowing the temperature sensitive device to cool, for example, to ambient temperature.

  5. Effects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas Nuclear Profile 2010MesoscopyStaff »VehicleEffective TeachingEffects of

  6. Guidance on health effects of toxic chemicals. Safety Analysis Report Update Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foust, C.B.; Griffin, G.D.; Munro, N.B.; Socolof, M.L.

    1994-02-01

    Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (MMES), and Martin Marietta Utility Services, Inc. (MMUS), are engaged in phased programs to update the safety documentation for the existing US Department of Energy (DOE)-owned facilities. The safety analysis of potential toxic hazards requires a methodology for evaluating human health effects of predicted toxic exposures. This report provides a consistent set of health effects and documents toxicity estimates corresponding to these health effects for some of the more important chemicals found within MMES and MMUS. The estimates are based on published toxicity information and apply to acute exposures for an ``average`` individual. The health effects (toxicological endpoints) used in this report are (1) the detection threshold; (2) the no-observed adverse effect level; (3) the onset of irritation/reversible effects; (4) the onset of irreversible effects; and (5) a lethal exposure, defined to be the 50% lethal level. An irreversible effect is defined as a significant effect on a person`s quality of life, e.g., serious injury. Predicted consequences are evaluated on the basis of concentration and exposure time.

  7. Precision liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Field, Michael E. (Albuquerque, NM); Sullivan, William H. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1985-01-01

    A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced R. F. bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge.

  8. Precision liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Field, M.E.; Sullivan, W.H.

    1985-01-29

    A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced R. F. bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge. 2 figs.

  9. Division of Research FACULTY-LEVEL RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    1 Division of Research SUBJECT: FACULTY-LEVEL RESEARCH APPOINTMENTS Effective Date: 02/01/13 Policy Number 10.1.3 Supersedes: 08/01/08 Page Of 1 3 Responsible Authority: Vice President for Research I. BACKGROUND Faculty-level research appointments, identified by the titles of Research Assistant Professor

  10. Action and Inaction Levels in Pest Management. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sterling, Winfield

    1984-01-01

    to this problem be to use the term "action level" as a replacement term "economic threshold" and the term "inac level" for the critical natural enemy densities (134). terms are more fitting because economic and factors are both important in pest manage dec... component of level model. If the plant has reserves of n sufficient time remaining during the growing replace damaged fruit , then a higher action level be set. The effect of leaf damage as related phenological stage of cotton plant growth is ill...

  11. Low-level waste program technical strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bledsoe, K.W.

    1994-10-01

    The Low-Level Waste Technical Strategy document describes the mechanisms which the Low-Level Waste Program Office plans to implement to achieve its mission. The mission is to manage the receipt, immobilization, packaging, storage/disposal and RCRA closure (of the site) of the low-level Hanford waste (pretreated tank wastes) in an environmentally sound, safe and cost-effective manner. The primary objective of the TWRS Low-level waste Program office is to vitrify the LLW fraction of the tank waste and dispose of it onsite.

  12. The effects of air pollution regulations on the US refining industry. Task 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-06-01

    Numerous air pollution regulations affecting petroleum refineries recently have been promulgated, have been proposed, or are under consideration at the federal, state, and local level. As shown in Figure ES-1, all of these environmental regulations are intended to take effect over the relatively short time period from 1989 through 1995. In the aggregate these regulatory activities have significant implications for the US refining industry and the Nation, including: Major investment requirements; changes in industry profitability; potential closure of some refineries; and potential changes in crude oil or product import dependence. At issue is whether the cumulative effect of these regulations could so adversely affect the US refining industry that US national security would be affected. In addition to the regulations outlined in Figure ES-1, President Bush recently presented a major new plan to improve the nation`s air quality. The aspects of the President`s plan that could strongly affect US refineries are summarized below.

  13. High-Level Current Macro-Model for Logic Blocks Srinivas Bodapati, Member, IEEE, Farid N. Najm, Fellow, IEEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najm, Farid N.

    . Index Terms-- Current estimation, Power grid The minimum feature size of very large scale integrated designs adversely effect the robustness of the power grid. The power grid becomes more susceptible currents in the power grid affect the reliability as well as performance of the circuit. As This research

  14. PLUTONIUM SOLUBILITY IN HIGH-LEVEL WASTE ALKALI BOROSILICATE GLASS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marra, J.; Crawford, C.; Fox, K.; Bibler, N.

    2011-01-04

    The solubility of plutonium in a Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) reference glass and the effect of incorporation of Pu in the glass on specific glass properties were evaluated. A Pu loading of 1 wt % in glass was studied. Prior to actual plutonium glass testing, surrogate testing (using Hf as a surrogate for Pu) was conducted to evaluate the homogeneity of significant quantities of Hf (Pu) in the glass, determine the most appropriate methods to evaluate homogeneity for Pu glass testing, and to evaluate the impact of Hf loading in the glass on select glass properties. Surrogate testing was conducted using Hf to represent between 0 and 1 wt % Pu in glass on an equivalent molar basis. A Pu loading of 1 wt % in glass translated to {approx}18 kg Pu per Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister, or about 10X the current allowed limit per the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (2500 g/m{sup 3} of glass or about 1700 g/canister) and about 30X the current allowable concentration based on the fissile material concentration limit referenced in the Yucca Mountain Project License Application (897 g/m{sup 3}3 of glass or about 600 g Pu/canister). Based on historical process throughput data, this level was considered to represent a reasonable upper bound for Pu loading based on the ability to provide Pu containing feed to the DWPF. The task elements included evaluating the distribution of Pu in the glass (e.g. homogeneity), evaluating crystallization within the glass, evaluating select glass properties (with surrogates), and evaluating durability using the Product Consistency Test -- Method A (PCT-A). The behavior of Pu in the melter was evaluated using paper studies and corresponding analyses of DWPF melter pour samples.The results of the testing indicated that at 1 wt % Pu in the glass, the Pu was homogeneously distributed and did not result in any formation of plutonium-containing crystalline phases as long as the glass was prepared under 'well-mixed' conditions. The incorporation of 1 wt % Pu in the glass did not adversely impact glass viscosity (as assessed using Hf surrogate) or glass durability. Finally, evaluation of DWPF glass pour samples that had Pu concentrations below the 897 g/m{sup 3} limit showed that Pu concentrations in the glass pour stream were close to targeted compositions in the melter feed indicating that Pu neither volatilized from the melt nor stratified in the melter when processed in the DWPF melter.

  15. Ultrasonic liquid level detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotz, Dennis M. (North Augusta, SC); Hinz, William R. (Augusta, GA)

    2010-09-28

    An ultrasonic liquid level detector for use within a shielded container, the detector being tubular in shape with a chamber at its lower end into which liquid from in the container may enter and exit, the chamber having an ultrasonic transmitter and receiver in its top wall and a reflector plate or target as its bottom wall whereby when liquid fills the chamber a complete medium is then present through which an ultrasonic wave may be transmitted and reflected from the target thus signaling that the liquid is at chamber level.

  16. Effectiveness of Shading Air-Cooled Condensers of Air-Conditioning Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ElSherbini, A.; Maheshwari, G. P.

    2010-01-01

    of the condenser and the high ambient temperatures can be detrimental for the energy performance. The effectiveness of shading the condensing unit to mitigate this adverse impact is investigated in this paper. A limiting analysis compares the performance of several...

  17. LEVEL 01 FLOOR LEVEL 1 / GROUND FLOOR / SUPPORT SERVICES BUILDING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lennard, William N.

    LEVEL 01 FLOOR LEVEL 1 / GROUND FLOOR / SUPPORT SERVICES BUILDING 05/02/2012ACCESSIBILITY WESTERN FLOOR PLAN SUPPORT SERVICES BUILDING Level 2 Lower building Rm.2350 1393 WESTERN ROAD N6G -1G9 UPDATE DRAWN #12;LEVEL 02 FLOOR LEVEL 2 / SECOND FLOOR / SUPPORT SERVICES BUILDING 05/02/2012ACCESSIBILITY

  18. Treatment of External Levels in Neutron Resonance Fitting: Application...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    techniques are reviewed. They describe the contribution of external levels to the R matrix concisely in terms of average resonance parameters (strength function, effective...

  19. Turbulence at Hydroelectric Power Plants and its Potential Effects on Fish.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, Glenn F.; Odeh, Mufeed

    2001-01-01

    The fundamental influence of fluid dynamics on aquatic organisms is receiving increasing attention among aquatic ecologists. For example, the importance of turbulence to ocean plankton has long been a subject of investigation (Peters and Redondo 1997). More recently, studies have begun to emerge that explicitly consider the effects of shear and turbulence on freshwater invertebrates (Statzner et al. 1988; Hart et al. 1996) and fishes (Pavlov et al. 1994, 1995). Hydraulic shear stress and turbulence are interdependent natural fluid phenomena that are important to fish, and consequently it is important to develop an understanding of how fish sense, react to, and perhaps utilize these phenomena under normal river flows. The appropriate reaction to turbulence may promote movement of migratory fish or prevent displacement of resident fish. It has been suggested that one of the adverse effects of flow regulation by hydroelectric projects is the reduction of normal turbulence, particularly in the headwaters of reservoirs, which can lead to disorientation and slowing of migration (Williams et al. 1996; Coutant et al. 1997; Coutant 1998). On the other hand, greatly elevated levels of shear and turbulence may be injurious to fish; injuries can range from removal of the mucous layer on the body surface to descaling to torn opercula, popped eyes, and decapitation (Neitzel et al. 2000a,b). Damaging levels of fluid stress can occur in a variety of circumstances in both natural and man-made environments. This paper discusses the effects of shear stress and turbulence on fish, with an emphasis on potentially damaging levels in man-made environments. It defines these phenomena, describes studies that have been conducted to understand their effects, and identifies gaps in our knowledge. In particular, this report reviews the available information on the levels of turbulence that can occur within hydroelectric power plants, and the associated biological effects. The final section provides the preliminary design of an experimental apparatus that will be used to expose fish to representative levels of turbulence in the laboratory.

  20. Radiation therapy of pediatric brain tumors : comparison of long-term health effects and costs between proton therapy and IMRT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vu, An T. (An Thien)

    2011-01-01

    Radiation therapy is an important component of pediatric brain tumor treatment. However, radiation-induced damage can lead to adverse long-term health effects. Proton therapy has the ability to reduce the dose delivered ...

  1. Toxicological effects of methylmercury on walleye (Sander vitreus) and perch (Perca flavescens) from lakes of the boreal forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Bernard

    ) were studied in four Canadian boreal forest lakes representing a mercury (Hg) exposure gradient adverse effects on the physiology and cellular metabolism of walleye and perch at environmentally relevant

  2. Mapping Climate Change Hazards: Using GIS to Identify Social Vulnerability to the Effects of Environmental Hazards in the UK 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batool, Najya

    2010-11-24

    Research suggests that the precise nature and effects of climate change, including changes to the Earth’s climate patterns, can have an adverse environmental impact on localities, regions, and countries. Research shows that socially disadvantaged...

  3. Liquid level detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tshishiku, Eugene M. (Augusta, GA)

    2011-08-09

    A liquid level detector for conductive liquids for vertical installation in a tank, the detector having a probe positioned within a sheath and insulated therefrom by a seal so that the tip of the probe extends proximate to but not below the lower end of the sheath, the lower end terminating in a rim that is provided with notches, said lower end being tapered, the taper and notches preventing debris collection and bubble formation, said lower end when contacting liquid as it rises will form an airtight cavity defined by the liquid, the interior sheath wall, and the seal, the compression of air in the cavity preventing liquid from further entry into the sheath and contact with the seal. As a result, the liquid cannot deposit a film to form an electrical bridge across the seal.

  4. Level III baseline risk evaluation for Building 3505 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mostella, W.B. Jr.

    1994-12-01

    The Level III Baseline Risk Evaluation (BRE) for Building 3505, the ORNL Metal Recovery Facility, provides an analysis of the potential for adverse health effects, current or future, associated with the presence of hazardous substances in the building. The Metal Recovery Facility was used from 1952 through 1960 to process large quantities of radioactive material using the PUREX process for the recovery of uranium-238, plutonium-239, neptunium-237, and americium-241. The facility consists of seven process cells (A through G), a canal, a dissolver room, a dissolver pit, an office, locker room, storage area, control room, electrical gallery, shop, and makeup area. The cells were used to house the nuclear fuel reprocessing equipment, and the canal was constructed to be used as a water-shielded transfer canal. Currently, there are no known releases of radioactive contaminants from Building 3505. To perform the BRE, historical radiological survey data were used to estimate the concentration of alpha- and beta/gamma emitting radionuclides in the various cells, rooms, and other areas in Building 3505. Data from smear surveys were used to estimate the amount of transferable contamination (to which receptors can be exposed via inhalation and ingestion), and data from probe surveys were used to estimate the amount of both fixed and transferable contamination (from which receptors can receive external exposure). Two land use scenarios, current and future, and their subsequent exposure scenarios were explored in the BRE. Under the current land use scenario, two exposure scenarios were evaluated. The first was a worst-case industrial exposure scenario in which the receptor is a maintenance worker who works 8 hours/day, 350 days/year in the building for 25 years. In the second, more realistic exposure scenario, the receptor is a surveillance and maintenance (S&M) worker who spends two 8-hour days/year in the building for 25 years.

  5. Technical/Support Job Level Technical/Support Level I Technical/Support Level II Technical/Support Level III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical/Support Job Level Technical/Support Level I Technical/Support Level II Technical supervision Problem Solving Refers to procedures, technical aids, co-workers, or supervisors to solve routine are varied and non-routine Uses knowledge of standardized rules, procedures, and operations to resolve

  6. Combined effects of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and maternal restraint stress on hypothalamus adrenal axis (HPA) function in the offspring of mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ribes, Diana; Fuentes, Silvia; Torrente, Margarita; Colomina, M. Teresa [Department of Psychology and Research Center for Behavioral Assessment (CRAMC), 'Rovira i Virgili' University, Sescelades Campus, 43007 Tarragona, Catalonia (Spain); Laboratory of Toxicology and Environmental Health, School of Medicine, IISPV, 'Rovira i Virgili' University, Sant Llorenc 21, 43201 Reus, Catalonia (Spain); Domingo, Jose L., E-mail: joseluis.domingo@urv.ca [Laboratory of Toxicology and Environmental Health, School of Medicine, IISPV, 'Rovira i Virgili' University, Sant Llorenc 21, 43201 Reus, Catalonia (Spain)

    2010-02-15

    Although it is known that prenatal exposure to perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) can cause developmental adverse effects in mammals, the disruptive effects of this compound on hormonal systems are still controversial. Information concerning the effects of PFOS on hypothalamus adrenal (HPA) axis response to stress and corticosterone levels is not currently available. On the other hand, it is well established that stress can enhance the developmental toxicity of some chemicals. In the present study, we assessed the combined effects of maternal restraint stress and PFOS on HPA axis function in the offspring of mice. Twenty plug-positive female mice were divided in two groups. Animals were given by gavage 0 and 6 mg PFOS/kg/day on gestation days 12-18. One half of the animals in each group were also subjected to restraint stress (30 min/session, 3 sessions/day) during the same period. Five plug-positive females were also included as non-manipulated controls. At 3 months of age, activity in an open-field and the stress response were evaluated in male and female mice by exposing them to 30 min of restraint stress. Male and female offspring were subsequently sacrificed and blood samples were collected to measure changes in corticosterone levels at four different moments related to stress exposure conditions: before stress exposure, immediately after 30 min of stress exposure, and recuperation levels at 60 and 90 min after stress exposure. Results indicate corticosterone levels were lower in mice prenatally exposed to restraint. In general terms, PFOS exposure decreased corticosterone levels, although this effect was only significant in females. The recuperation pattern of corticosterone was mainly affected by prenatal stress. Interactive effects between PFOS and maternal stress were sex dependent. The current results suggest that prenatal PFOS exposure induced long-lasting effects in mice.

  7. Effects of broadleaf woodland cover on streamwater chemistry and risk assessments of streamwater acidification in acid-sensitive catchments in the UK 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gagkas, Zisis

    2007-01-01

    Acidification of surface waters has been recognised as the major water quality problem in the UK uplands. The adverse effects of conifer afforestation on streamwater chemistry and ecology are well documented in ...

  8. Specified assurance level sampling procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willner, O.

    1980-11-01

    In the nuclear industry design specifications for certain quality characteristics require that the final product be inspected by a sampling plan which can demonstrate product conformance to stated assurance levels. The Specified Assurance Level (SAL) Sampling Procedure has been developed to permit the direct selection of attribute sampling plans which can meet commonly used assurance levels. The SAL procedure contains sampling plans which yield the minimum sample size at stated assurance levels. The SAL procedure also provides sampling plans with acceptance numbers ranging from 0 to 10, thus, making available to the user a wide choice of plans all designed to comply with a stated assurance level.

  9. Upstream urbanization exacerbates urban heat island effects Da-Lin Zhang,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Da-Lin

    Upstream urbanization exacerbates urban heat island effects Da-Lin Zhang,1 Yi-Xuan Shou,1; published 19 December 2009. [1] Urban Heat Island (UHI) effects adversely impact weather, air quality find that upstream urbanization exacerbates UHI effects and that meteorological consequences of extra-urban

  10. The Effect of the iBEAM Evo Carbon Fiber Tabletop on Skin Sparing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, John B. Godwin, Guy A.

    2011-10-01

    Replicating the attenuation properties of the treatment tabletop are of primary importance for accurate treatment planning; however, the effect of the tabletop on the skin-sparing properties of x-rays can be overlooked. Under some conditions, the reaction of skin to the radiation can be so serious as to be the dose-limiting organ for radiotherapy treatment. Hence, an understanding of the magnitude of the reduction in skin sparing is important. Because of the development of image-guided radiotherapy, modern tabletops have been developed without the use of metal supports that otherwise provided the necessary level of rigidity. Rigidity is instead provided by compressed foam within a carbon-fiber shell, which, although it provides artefact-free imaging and high levels of rigidity, has an adverse affect on the dose in the build-up region. Representative of this type is the iBEAM evo tabletop, whose effect on the skin dose was determined at 6-MV, 10-MV, and 18-MV x-rays. Skin dose was found to increase by 60-70% owing to the tabletop, with the effect increasing with field size and decreasing with energy. By considering an endpoint of erythema, a radiobiological advantage of selecting 10 MV over 6 MV for applicable treatments was demonstrated.

  11. Interior Light Level Measurements Appendix F -Interior Light Level Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix F ­ Interior Light Level Measurements #12;F.1 Appendix F - Interior Light Level. A potential concern is that a lower VT glazing may increase electric lighting use to compensate for lost qualify and quantify a representative loss of daylighting, and therefore electric lighting use

  12. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin treatment alters eicosanoid levels in several organs of the mouse in an aryl hydrocarbon receptor-dependent fashion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bui, Peter; Solaimani, Parrisa [Molecular Toxicology Program, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States) [Molecular Toxicology Program, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Dept of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Wu, Xiaomeng [Dept of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States) [Dept of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Hankinson, Oliver, E-mail: ohank@mednet.ucla.edu [Molecular Toxicology Program, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States) [Molecular Toxicology Program, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Dept of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Molecular Biology Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2012-03-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) adversely affects many mammalian organs and tissues. These effects are mediated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 are upregulated by the liganded AHR. These (and other) cytochromes P450 can metabolize arachidonic acid into a variety of bioactive eicosanoids. Towards investigating a potential role of eicosanoids in TCDD toxicity, arachidonic acid, two other unsaturated long-chain fatty acids, and up to twenty-five eicosanoids were measured in five organs/tissues of male and female wild-type and Ahr null mice treated or untreated with TCDD. TCDD generally increased the levels of the four dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs) and (where measured) 5,6-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid and 18-, 19- and 20-hydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (HETEs) in the serum, liver, spleen and lungs, but not the heart, of both sexes, and increased the levels in the serum, liver and spleen of several metabolites that are usually considered products of lipoxygenase activity, but which may also be generated by cytochromes P450. TCDD also increased the levels of the esterified forms of these eicosanoids in the liver in parallel with the corresponding free forms. The levels of prostanoids were generally not affected by TCDD. The above changes did not occur in Ahr null mice, and are therefore mediated by the AHR. TCDD increased the mRNA levels of Cyp1a1, Cyp1a2, Cyp1b1 and the Pla2g12a form of phospholipase A{sub 2} to varying degrees in the different organs, and these increases correlated with some but not all the changes in eicosanoids levels in the organs, suggesting that other enzymes may also be involved. -- Highlights: ? TCDD treatment increases the levels of many eicosanoids in several mouse organs. ? Products of both the cytochrome P450 and classical lipoxygenase pathways are increased. ? These increases are dependent on the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. ? Cyp1a1, Cyp1a2 and Cyp1b1 appear to be responsible for much but not all of the increases.

  13. The role of many-body effects in describing low-lying excited states of pi-conjugated chromophores: high-level equation-of-motion coupled-cluster studies of fused porphyrin systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kowalski, Karol [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Olson, Ryan M [Cray, Inc.; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Tipparaju, Vinod [ORNL; Apra, Edoardo [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The unusual photophysical properties of the {pi}-conjugated chromophores make them potential building blocks of various molecular devices. In particular, significant narrowing of the HOMO-LUMO gaps can be observed as an effect of functionalization chromophores with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In this paper we present equation-of-motion coupled cluster (EOMCC) calculations for vertical excitation energies of several functionalized forms of porphyrins. The results for free-base porphyrin (FBP) clearly demonstrate significant differences between functionalization of FBP with one- (anthracene) and two-dimensional (coronene) structures. We also compare the EOMCC results with the experimentally available results for anthracene fused zinc-porphyrin. The impact of various types of correlation effects is illustrated on several benchmark models, where the comparison with the experiment is possible. In particular, we demonstrate that for all excited states considered in this paper, all of them being dominated by single excitations, the inclusion of triply excited configurations is crucial for attaining qualitative agreement with experiment. We also demonstrate the parallel performance of the most computationally intensive part of the completely renormalized EOMCCSD(T) approach (CR-EOMCCSD(T)) across 120000 cores.

  14. Role of Many-Body Effects in Describing Low-Lying Excited States of pi-Conjugated Chromophores: High-Level Equation-of-Motion Coupled-Cluster Studies of Fused Porphyrin Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kowalski, Karol; Olson, Ryan M.; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Tipparaju, Vinod; Apra, Edoardo

    2011-07-12

    The unusual photophysical properties of the pi-conjugated chrompohores makes them potential building blocks of various molecular devices. In particular, significant narrowing of the HOMO-LUMO gaps can be observed as an effect of functionalization chromophores with polycyclic aromatic hydrocabrons (PAHs). In this paper we present equation-of-motion coupled cluster calculations for vertical excitation energies of several functionalized forms of porphyrins. The results of free-base porphyrin (FBP) clearly demonstrate significant differences between functionalization of FBP with one- (anthracene) and two-dimensional (coronene) structures. We also compare the EOMCC results with the experimentally available results for the anthracene fused zinc porphyrin. The impact of various-type correlation effects is illustrated on several benchmark models where the comparison with the experiment is possible. In particular, we demonstrate that for all excited states considered in this paper, all of them being dominated by single excitations, the inclusion of triply excited configurations is crucial for attaining qualitative agreement with the experiment. We also demonstrate the parallel performance of the most computationally intensive part of the completely renormalized EOMCCSD(T) approach (CR-EOMCCSD(T)) across 120,000 cores.

  15. Service Level Agreement/Specification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flynn, E. Victor

    Service Level Agreement/Specification For Maintenance and Associated Risk Management Services Team c. Contract Labour 4. REACTIVE MAINTENANCE 5. ESTATE DATA REQUIREMENTS 6. ESTATE EMERGENCY. RISK MANAGEMENT a. General b. Scope of Service c. Statement of Intent Service Level Agreement 2007 Vers

  16. ALIGNMENT, LEVELING AND DEPLOYMENT CONSTRAINTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Crew Deployment Description Passive Seismic Experiment (PSE) Crew Deployment Description Leveling and Alignment Solar Wind Spectrometer (SWS) Crew Deployment Description Leveling to deplo~nent. Design of ALSEP allows deployment when sun angle is from 5 to 45 degrees. 2 #12;CENTRAL

  17. Approach Motivation and Attentional Breadth: Role of Construal Levels 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Serra, Raymond Nicholas

    2011-02-22

    Previous research has observed that approach motivation can both increase and decrease attentional breadth. How does the same motivation have these seemingly divergent effects? Three studies tested the hypothesis that mental construal levels help...

  18. Proximity and Investment: Evidence from Plant-Level Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giroud, Xavier

    Proximity to plants makes it easier for headquarters to monitor and acquire information about plants. In this article, I estimate the effects of headquarters’ proximity to plants on plant-level investment and productivity. ...

  19. BAT: The Bit-Level Analysis Tool Panagiotis Manolios1, Sudarshan K. Srinivasan2, and Daron Vroon1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manolios, Panagiotis "Pete"

    effective methods for bit-level verification of low-level proper- ties exist, system-level properties-level properties. Key features of the BAT system are an ex- pressive strongly-typed modeling and specification- erties of complex systems described at the bit-level, such as the verification of bit-level pipelined

  20. Research Library Service Level Agreement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    Research Library Service Level Agreement 2015-2016 Contents THE SLAC RESEARCH LIBRARY PURPOSE.................................................................................................3 DESCRIPTION OF SLAC RESEARCH LIBRARY COLLECTIONS AND SERVICES......4 Electronic Resources Access.......................................................................................9 APPENDIX: SLAC RESEARCH LIBRARY RULES...................................................10 #12

  1. Low Level Heat Recovery Technology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    With today's high fuel prices, energy conservation projects to utilize low level waste heat have become more attractive. Exxon Chemical Company Central Engineering has been developing guidelines and assessing the potential for application of low...

  2. Low-Level Waste Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09

    The guide provides criteria for determining which DOE radioactive wastes are to be managed as low-level waste in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter IV.

  3. High-Level Waste Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09

    The guide provides the criteria for determining which DOE radioactive wastes are to be managed as high-level waste in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1.

  4. Effect of Z{sub 1/2}, EH{sub 5}, and Ci1 deep defects on the performance of n-type 4H-SiC epitaxial layers Schottky detectors: Alpha spectroscopy and deep level transient spectroscopy studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mannan, Mohammad A.; Chaudhuri, Sandeep K.; Nguyen, Khai V.; Mandal, Krishna C.

    2014-06-14

    Spectroscopic performance of Schottky barrier alpha particle detectors fabricated on 50??m thick n-type 4H-SiC epitaxial layers containing Z{sub 1/2}, EH{sub 5}, and Ci1 deep levels were investigated. The device performance was evaluated on the basis of junction current/capacitance characterization and alpha pulse-height spectroscopy. Capacitance mode deep level transient spectroscopy revealed the presence of the above-mentioned deep levels along with two shallow level defects related to titanium impurities (Ti(h) and Ti(c)) and an unidentified deep electron trap located at 2.4?eV below the conduction band minimum, which is being reported for the first time. The concentration of the lifetime killer Z{sub 1/2} defects was found to be 1.7?×?10{sup 13}?cm{sup ?3}. The charge transport and collection efficiency results obtained from the alpha particle pulse-height spectroscopy were interpreted using a drift-diffusion charge transport model. Based on these investigations, the physics behind the correlation of the detector properties viz., energy resolution and charge collection efficiency, the junction properties like uniformity in barrier-height, leakage current, and effective doping concentration, and the presence of defects has been discussed in details. The studies also revealed that the dominating contribution to the charge collection efficiency was due to the diffusion of charge carriers generated in the neutral region of the detector. The 10 mm{sup 2} large area detectors demonstrated an impressive energy resolution of 1.8% for 5486?keV alpha particles at an optimized operating reverse bias of 130?V.

  5. Level indicator for pressure vessels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1982-04-28

    A liquid-level monitor for tracking the level of a coal slurry in a high-pressure vessel including a toroidal-shaped float with magnetically permeable bands thereon disposed within the vessel, two pairs of magnetic-field generators and detectors disposed outside the vessel adjacent the top and bottom thereof and magnetically coupled to the magnetically permeable bands on the float, and signal-processing circuitry for combining signals from the top and bottom detectors for generating a monotonically increasing analog control signal which is a function of liquid level. The control signal may be utilized to operate high-pressure control valves associated with processes in which the high-pressure vessel is used.

  6. High pressure liquid level monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bean, Vern E. (Frederick, MD); Long, Frederick G. (Ijamsville, MD)

    1984-01-01

    A liquid level monitor for tracking the level of a coal slurry in a high-pressure vessel including a toroidal-shaped float with magnetically permeable bands thereon disposed within the vessel, two pairs of magnetic field generators and detectors disposed outside the vessel adjacent the top and bottom thereof and magnetically coupled to the magnetically permeable bands on the float, and signal processing circuitry for combining signals from the top and bottom detectors for generating a monotonically increasing analog control signal which is a function of liquid level. The control signal may be utilized to operate high-pressure control valves associated with processes in which the high-pressure vessel is used.

  7. Does level of educational attainment and readability level of text affect understanding of health leaflets ? A questionnaire based study using readability formulae 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dougal, Louise

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the effects of educational attainment and the readability levels of text on the effective understanding and comprehension of health leaflets. Methods: Forty-six female university students and ...

  8. Acceptor levels in ZnMgO:N probed by deep level optical spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, A.; Hierro, A. Muñoz, E.

    2014-02-24

    A combination of deep level optical spectroscopy and lighted capacitance voltage profiling has been used to analyze the effect of N into the energy levels close to the valence band of Zn{sub 0.9}Mg{sub 0.1}O. Three energy levels at E{sub V}?+?0.47?eV, E{sub V}?+?0.35?eV, and E{sub V}?+?0.16?eV are observed in all films with concentrations in the range of 10{sup 15}–10{sup 18}?cm{sup ?3}. The two shallowest traps at E{sub V}?+?0.35?eV and E{sub V}?+?0.16?eV have very large concentrations that scale with the N exposure and are thus potential acceptor levels. In order to correctly quantify the deep level concentrations, a metal-insulator-semiconductor model has been invoked, explaining well the resulting capacitance-voltage curves.

  9. Development of low-level radioactive waste disposal capacity in the United States - progress or stalemate?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devgun, J.S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Larson, G.S. [Midwest Low-Level Radioactive Waste Commission, St. Paul, MN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    It has been fifteen years since responsibility for the disposal of commercially generated low-level radioactive waste (LLW) was shifted to the states by the United States Congress through the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 (LLRWPA). In December 1985, Congress revisited the issue and enacted the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 (LLRWPAA). No new disposal sites have opened yet, however, and it is now evident that disposal facility development is more complex, time-consuming, and controversial than originally anticipated. For a nation with a large nuclear power industry, the lack of availability of LLW disposal capacity coupled with a similar lack of high-level radioactive waste disposal capacity could adversely affect the future viability of the nuclear energy option. The U.S. nuclear power industry, with 109 operating reactors, generates about half of the LLW shipped to commercial disposal sites and faces dwindling access to waste disposal sites and escalating waste management costs. The other producers of LLW - industries, government (except the defense related research and production waste), academic institutions, and medical institutions that account for the remaining half of the commercial LLW - face the same storage and cost uncertainties. This paper will summarize the current status of U.S. low-level radioactive waste generation and the status of new disposal facility development efforts by the states. The paper will also examine the factors that have contributed to delays, the most frequently suggested alternatives, and the likelihood of change.

  10. ECE Teaching Staff, Level 4,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    ECE Teaching Staff, Level 4, Von Haast Building ECE Labs Electrical & Computer Engineering #12;ELEC Electronics Lab & Randy Hampton Control Lab Machines Lab & Ken Smart Mech. Workshop & Dave Healy Power Building Student Workshop The Shed Café Kim Rutter 441 & Philipp Hof Yonghe Liu Seminar Room 457 Von Haast

  11. The Vroman effect: a molecular level description of fibrinogen displacement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Seung-Yong

    2005-02-17

    this system. The results demonstrate that the protein's ?C domains play the critical role. When fibrinogen is adsorbed to a hydrophilic surface via these moieties, its displacement rate in the presence of human plasma is approximately 170 times faster...

  12. Effects of Low Level Laser Therapy on Orthodontic Pain 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buchwald, Bradley

    2014-04-28

    that can be felt at the exact time of placement of heavy forces on a tooth. It is related to the initial compression of the periodontal ligament by a heavy force. On the contrary, delayed pain occurs from forces that can range from light to heavy..., and represents hyperalgesia of the periodontal membrane. Delayed pain often changes with time amongst the three degree mentioned above. For example, delayed pain can start as third degree pain and then become first or second degree pain with increasing time...

  13. Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels (Technical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby aLED Street Lighting Host Site:ERDA Critical

  14. Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels (Technical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby aLED Street Lighting Host Site:ERDA CriticalReport) |

  15. Evaluation of the Effects of Turbulence on the Behavior of Migratory Fish, 2002 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Odeh, Mufeed.

    2002-03-01

    The fundamental influence of fluid dynamics on aquatic organisms is receiving increasing attention among aquatic ecologists. For example, the importance of turbulence to ocean plankton has long been a subject of investigation (Peters and Redondo 1997). More recently, studies have begun to emerge that explicitly consider the effects of shear and turbulence on freshwater invertebrates (Statzner et al. 1988; Hart et al. 1996) and fishes (Pavlov et al. 1994, 1995). Hydraulic shear stress and turbulence are interdependent natural hydraulic phenomena that are important to fish, and consequently it is important to develop an understanding of how fish sense, react to, and perhaps utilize these phenomena under normal river flows. The appropriate reaction to turbulence may promote movement of migratory fish (Coutant 1998) or prevent displacement of resident fish. It has been suggested that one of the adverse effects of flow regulation by hydroelectric projects is the reduction of normal turbulence, particularly in the headwaters of reservoirs, which can lead to disorientation and slowing of migration (Williams et al. 1996; Coutant et al. 1997; Coutant 1998). On the other hand, greatly elevated levels of shear and turbulence may be injurious to fish; injuries can range from removal of the mucous layer on the body surface to descaling to torn opercula, popped eyes, and decapitation (Neitzel et al. 2000a,b). Damaging levels of fluid stress, such turbulence, can occur in a variety of circumstances in both natural and man-made environments. This report discusses the effects of shear stress and turbulence on fish, with an emphasis on potentially damaging levels in man-made environments. It defines these phenomena, describes studies that have been conducted to understand their effects, and identifies gaps in our knowledge. In particular, this report reviews the available information on the levels of turbulence that can occur within hydroelectric power plants, and the associated biological effects. Furthermore, this report describes an experimental apparatus designed to test the effect of turbulence on fish, and defines its hydraulics. It gives the results of experiments in which three different fish species were exposed to representative levels of turbulence in the laboratory.

  16. Adventure and Adversity Issue 2 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    2013-11-27

    's career is threatened, he has no choice. Love Me Tender (AK/Edrington) by Anne Fairchild 72 Archie is persuaded to accept an invitationfrom Lord Edrington. Lobster Bisque (Horatio/Edrington) by Elizabeth Holden 79 In which Lord Edrington proffers... Lt. Bracegirdle reflects on love and longing, and receives recognition from unexpected quarters Possession (Horatio/Pellew, Bracegirdle/Pellew) by Elizabeth Holden 104 Lt. Bracegirdle discovers a terrible secret that excoriates a memory from his...

  17. Hanford low-level tank waste interim performance assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, F.M.

    1996-09-16

    The Hanford Low-Level Tank Waste Interim Performance Assessment examines the long-term environmental and human health effects associated with the disposal of the low-level fraction of the Hanford single- and double-shell tank waste in the Hanford Site 200 East Area. This report was prepared as a good management practice to provide needed information about the relationship between the disposal system design and its performance as early as possible in the project cycle. The calculations in this performance assessment show that the disposal of the low-level fraction can meet environmental and health performance objectives.

  18. The state-level approach: moving beyond integrated safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tape, James W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The concept of a State-Level Approach (SLA) for international safeguards planning, implementation, and evaluation was contained in the Conceptual Framework for Integrated Safeguards (IS) agreed in 2002. This paper describes briefly the key elements of the SLA, including State-level factors and high-level safeguards objectives, and considers different cases in which application of the SLA methodology could address safeguards for 'suspect' States, 'good' States, and Nuclear Weapons States hosting fuel cycle centers. The continued use and further development of the SLA to customize safeguards for each State, including for States already under IS, is seen as central to effective and efficient safeguards for an expanding nuclear world.

  19. Potential Moderating Effects of Selenium on Mercury Uptake and Selenium:Mercury Molar Ratios in Fish From Oak Ridge and Savannah River Site - 12086

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Donio, Mark; Jeitner, Christian; Pittfield, Taryn

    2012-07-01

    Mercury contamination is an important remediation issue at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation and to a lesser extent at other DOE sites because of the hazard it presents, potential consequences to humans and eco-receptors, and completed pathways, to offsite receptors. Recent work has emphasized that selenium might ameliorate the toxicity of mercury, and we examine the selenium:mercury (Se:Hg) molar ratios in fish from Oak Ridge, and compare them to Se:Hg molar ratios in fish from the Savannah River. Selenium/mercury molar ratios varied considerably among and within fish species. There was considerable variation in the molar ratios for individual fish (as opposed to mean ratios by species) for freshwater fish from both sites. The inter-individual variation in molar ratios indicates that such that the molar ratios of mean Se and Hg concentrations may not be representative. Even for fish species with relatively low mercury levels, some individual fish have molar ratios less than unity, the value sometime thought to be protective. Selenium levels varied narrowly regardless of fish size, consistent with homeostatic regulation of this essential trace element. The data indicate that considerable attention will need to be directed toward variations and variances, as well as the mechanisms of the interaction of selenium and mercury, before risk assessment and risk management policies can use this information to manage mercury pollution and risk. Even so, if there are high levels of selenium in the fish from Poplar Creek on Oak Ridge, then the potential exists for some amelioration of adverse health effects, on the fish themselves, predators that eat them, and people who consume them. This work will aid DOE because it will allow managers and scientists to understand another aspect that affects fate and transport of mercury, as well as the potential effects of methylmercury in fish for human and ecological receptors. The variability within fish species, however, suggests that the relative Se:Hg molar ratios in fish are not stable enough to be used in risk assessment at this time. Nor is it known how much excess selenium is required to confer any degree of protectiveness. That is, in conducting risk assessments, it is not possible to determine the spread of ratios, which would be needed for probabilistic risk assessment. Significantly more fish samples per species are required to begin to generate data that would allow it use in risk assessment. Adding Se:Hg molar ratios seems to complicate risk assessment for the potential adverse effects of mercury exposure, and using mercury levels at this time remains the most viable option. (authors)

  20. Dispensing Equipment Testing with Mid-Level Ethanol/Gasoline Test Fluid: Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyce, K.; Chapin, J. T.

    2010-11-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Nonpetroleum-Based Fuel Task addresses the hurdles to commercialization of biomass-derived fuels and fuel blends. One such hurdle is the unknown compatibility of new fuels with current infrastructure, such as the equipment used at service stations to dispense fuel into automobiles. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Vehicle Technology Program and the Biomass Program have engaged in a joint project to evaluate the potential for blending ethanol into gasoline at levels higher than nominal 10 volume percent. This project was established to help DOE and NREL better understand any potentially adverse impacts caused by a lack of knowledge about the compatibility of the dispensing equipment with ethanol blends higher than what the equipment was designed to dispense. This report provides data about the impact of introducing a gasoline with a higher volumetric ethanol content into service station dispensing equipment from a safety and a performance perspective.

  1. Upstream Urbanization Exacerbates Urban Heat Island Effects Da-Lin Zhang*, Yi-Xuan Shou, & Russell R. Dickerson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickerson, Russell R.

    1 Upstream Urbanization Exacerbates Urban Heat Island Effects Da-Lin Zhang*, Yi-Xuan Shou, Maryland 20742 Email: dalin@atmos.umd.edu The adverse impacts of urbanization on climate and weather through urban heat island (UHI) effects and greenhouse emissions are issues of growing concern1

  2. Company Level Imports Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1 Table 1.101Company Level Imports Explanatory Notes

  3. Runtime deadlock analysis for system level design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheung, Eric; Chen, Xi; Hsieh, Harry; Davare, Abhijit; Sangiovanni-Vincentelli, Alberto; Watanabe, Yosinori

    2009-01-01

    workshop on high level design validation and test, Nov. 2001Metropolis, and two real world design examples, which aredetection · System-level design · SystemC · Metropolis E.

  4. Low level tank waste disposal study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mullally, J.A.

    1994-09-29

    Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) contracted a team consisting of Los Alamos Technical Associates (LATA), British Nuclear Fuel Laboratories (BNFL), Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), and TRW through the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Technical Support Contract to conduct a study on several areas concerning vitrification and disposal of low-level-waste (LLW). The purpose of the study was to investigate how several parameters could be specified to achieve full compliance with regulations. The most restrictive regulation governing this disposal activity is the National Primary Drinking Water Act which sets the limits of exposure to 4 mrem per year for a person drinking two liters of ground water daily. To fully comply, this constraint would be met independently of the passage of time. In addition, another key factor in the investigation was the capability to retrieve the disposed waste during the first 50 years as specified in Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. The objective of the project was to develop a strategy for effective long-term disposal of the low-level waste at the Hanford site.

  5. A formula for low achievement: using multi-level models to understand the impact of individual level effects and school level effects on mathematics achievement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parks, Kathrin Ann

    2004-09-30

    the body of literature by exploring how race, socio-economic status, and gender, as well as the percentage of minority students in a school, whether or not the school is Catholic, the proportion of students in the academic track, and the mean socioeconomic...

  6. PFC: Transparent Optimization of Existing Prefetching Strategies for Multi-level Storage Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Xiaosong

    the increasing relative cost of disk I/O, existing multi-level storage studies have focused mostly on cache re prefetching will not be able to effectively use the lower-level cache space, while overly aggressive an innovative approach to this problem: rather than de- signing a new, multi-level prefetching algorithm, we

  7. ORIGINAL PAPER The effect of low dose rate on metabolomic response to radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenner, David Jonathan

    ORIGINAL PAPER The effect of low dose rate on metabolomic response to radiation in mice Maryam assessment. Keywords Metabolomics Á Low dose rate radiation Á Mass spectrometry Introduction The adverse at high dose rates (HDR), but many will experience exposure to low dose rate (LDR) radiation from fallout

  8. Effects of applied voltages and dissolved oxygen on sustained power generation by microbial fuel cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effects of applied voltages and dissolved oxygen on sustained power generation by microbial fuel to 0.3 mg/L during MFC operation was not found to adversely affect power generation over subsequent for up to 10 days and 10 hrs also did not affect power generation, as power rapidly returned to previous

  9. Process Control on Workplace Level - User Comfort Energy Optimalization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verhaart, J.; Zeiler, W.; Boxem, G.

    2013-01-01

    nano grid, connected to a micro-grid on building level and eventually to a Smart grid. This way, comfort demand is matched directly to energy supply in a multi-agent system, making the most effective use of available resources. The article provides...

  10. Fine-Grained Power Management Using Process-level Profiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Weisong

    . To evaluate energy efficiency, the Green Grid group proposed the definition of power usage effectiveness (PUE1 Fine-Grained Power Management Using Process-level Profiling Hui Chen, Youhuizi Li and Weisong Shi Department of Computer Science Wayne State University {huichen,huizi,weisong}@wayne.edu Abstract--Low-power

  11. A Markovian, Variation-Aware Circuit-Level Aging Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cotofana, Sorin

    A Markovian, Variation-Aware Circuit-Level Aging Model Nicoleta Cucu Laurenciu, and Sorin Dan.CucuLaurenciu, S.D.Cotofana}@tudelft.nl Abstract--Accurate age modeling, and fast, yet robust relia- bility sign at design-time appropriate guardbands selection and effective aging mitigation/compensation techniques

  12. Lead iron phosphate glass as a containment medium for disposal of high-level nuclear waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boatner, Lynn A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sales, Brian C. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1989-01-01

    Lead-iron phosphate glasses containing a high level of Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 for use as a storage medium for high-level radioactive nuclear waste. By combining lead-iron phosphate glass with various types of simulated high-level nuclear waste, a highly corrosion resistant, homogeneous, easily processed glass can be formed. For corroding solutions at 90.degree. C., with solution pH values in the range between 5 and 9, the corrosion rate of the lead-iron phosphate nuclear waste glass is at least 10.sup.2 to 10.sup.3 times lower than the corrosion rate of a comparable borosilicate nuclear waste glass. The presence of Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 in forming the lead-iron phosphate glass is critical. Lead-iron phosphate nuclear waste glass can be prepared at temperatures as low as 800.degree. C., since they exhibit very low melt viscosities in the 800.degree. to 1050.degree. C. temperature range. These waste-loaded glasses do not readily devitrify at temperatures as high as 550.degree. C. and are not adversely affected by large doses of gamma radiation in H.sub.2 O at 135.degree. C. The lead-iron phosphate waste glasses can be prepared with minimal modification of the technology developed for processing borosilicate glass nuclear wasteforms.

  13. The LHC Low Level RF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baudrenghien, Philippe; Molendijk, John Cornelis; Olsen, Ragnar; Rohlev, Anton; Rossi, Vittorio; Stellfeld, Donat; Valuch, Daniel; Wehrle, Urs

    2006-01-01

    The LHC RF consists of eight 400 MHz superconducting cavities per ring, with each cavity independently powered by a 300 kW klystron, via a circulator. The challenge for the Low Level is to cope with very high beam current (more than 1 A RF component) and achieve excellent beam lifetime (emittance growth time in excess of 25 hours). Each cavity has an associated Cavity Controller rack consisting of two VME crates which implement high gain RF Feedback, a Tuner Loop with a new algorithm, a Klystron Ripple Loop and a Conditioning system. In addition each ring has a Beam Control system (four VME crates) which includes a Frequency Program, Phase Loop, Radial Loop and Synchronization Loop. A Longitudinal Damper (dipole and quadrupole mode) acting via the 400 MHz cavities is included to reduce emittance blow-up due to filamentation from phase and energy errors at injection. Finally an RF Synchronization system implements the bunch into bucket transfer from the SPS into each LHC ring. When fully installed in 2007, the...

  14. Glass blowing on a wafer level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eklund, E. Jesper; Shkel, Andrei M.

    2007-01-01

    Wafer-Level Micro-Glass-Blowing UCI Of?ce of Technology176, 2005. [3] ——, Glass Blowing on a Wafer Scale (Expandedmodels. EKLUND AND SHKEL: GLASS BLOWING ON A WAFER LEVEL [5

  15. High Level Waste System Plan Revision 9

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, N.R.; Wells, M.N.; Choi, A.S.; Paul, P.; Wise, F.E.

    1998-04-01

    Revision 9 of the High Level Waste System Plan documents the current operating strategy of the HLW System at SRS to receive, store, treat, and dispose of high-level waste.

  16. An indicator energy of two close levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander V. Shamanin

    2013-09-17

    In this paper, we introduce a concept of an indicator energy of two close levels in the perturbation.

  17. Short Papers___________________________________________________________________________________________________ Mining Multiple-Level Association

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Xindong

    ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ Mining Multiple-Level Association Rules in Large Databases Jiawei Han, Member, IEEE Computer Society for efficient mining of multiple-level association rules from large transaction databases based on the Apriori. Index TermsÐData mining, knowledge discovery in databases, association rules, multiple-level association

  18. Hurricane jeanne Preliminary Water Levels Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hurricane jeanne Preliminary Water Levels Report Tide Gauges within the Path of Hurricane Jeanne-OPS Hurricane JEANNE Preliminary Report #12;SUMMARY CO-OPS Tide Gauge Data for Hurricane Jeanne NOAA's Center://tidesonline.nos.noaa.gov). Storm surge is the observed water level minus the predicted water level referred to MLLW. Hurricane

  19. Global Warming and Caspian Sea Level Fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ardakanian, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Coastal regions have a high social, economical and environmental importance. Due to this importance the sea level fluctuations can have many bad consequences. In this research the correlation between the increasing trend of temperature in coastal stations due to Global Warming and the Caspian Sea level has been established. The Caspian Sea level data has been received from the Jason-1 satellite. It was resulted that the monthly correlation between the temperature and sea level is high and also positive and almost the same for all the stations. But the yearly correlation was negative. It means that the sea level has decreased by the increase in temperature.

  20. Skin thickness effects on in vivo LXRF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preiss, I.L.; Washington, W. II

    1995-12-31

    The analysis of lead concentration in bone utilizing LXRF can be adversely effected by overlying issue. A quantitative measure of the attenuation of the 10.5 keV Pb L a x-ray signal by skin and skin equivalent plastic has been conducted. Concentration ranges in plaster of Paris and goat bone from 7 to 90 ppm with attenuators of Lucite{reg_sign} and pig skin were examined. It is concluded that no quantitative or semi quantitative analysis can be achieved if overlying sue thickness exceeds 3 mm for Ph concentrations of less than 30 porn Ph in bone.

  1. Oil price shocks and their short-and long-term effects on the Chinese economy Weiqi Tang a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthews, Adrian

    a historical record of US$147 per barrel in July 2008. The adverse impact of such oil-price shocksOil price shocks and their short- and long-term effects on the Chinese economy Weiqi Tang a , Libo-correction model Oil-price shocks Price transmission mechanisms Investment Output Producer/consumer price index

  2. Service Levels and Associated Cleaning Areas Service Level 0 -No Service will be provided.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    Level 0 ­ Includes all rooms/areas categorized as: Hazardous Material, mechanical, storage, issue, stockService Levels and Associated Cleaning Areas Service Level 0 - No Service will be provided. Service Level 1- Includes all rooms/areas categorized as: offices, copy, file, mail, hallways, vestibules

  3. Chinese and Japanese Word Segmentation Using Word-Level and Character-Level Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chinese and Japanese Word Segmentation Using Word-Level and Character-Level Information Tetsuji and Japanese word segmentation. Word-level information is useful for analysis of known words, while character-level informa- tion is useful for analysis of unknown words, and the method utilizes both these two types

  4. Operating Experience Level 3: Radiologically Contaminated Respirators...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Experience Level 3 provides information on a safety concern related to radiological contamination of launderedreconditioned respirators and parts that have been certified as...

  5. TECHNOLOGY READINESS LEVELS A White Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    028 TECHNOLOGY READINESS LEVELS A White Paper April 6, 1995 John C. Mankins Advanced Concepts Office Office of Space Access and Technology NASA Introduction Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs) are a systematic metric/measurement system that supports assessments of the maturity of a particular technology

  6. Seminar -4. letnik Landau Levels in Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramsak, Anton

    Seminar - 4. letnik Landau Levels in Graphene Author: Zala Lenarcic Mentor: prof. Anton Ramsak Ljubljana, December 2010 Abstract In this seminar I present graphene, a new material with promising to graphene's unusual energy dispersion. I will derive Landau levels for standard electrons, for electrons

  7. IT Services' Service Level Agreement TECHNICAL SUPPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburger, Peter

    IT Services' Service Level Agreement TECHNICAL SUPPORT and HARDWARE/SOFTWARE/NETWORK MAINTENANCE This service level agreement (SLA) describes the computer services provided by Walb Union Operations into the university services card system's database by Union Operations. Walb Union Operations creates university

  8. An Integrated Low Level Heat Recovery System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sierra, A. V., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A large amount of low level thermal energy is lost to air or water in a typical petroleum refinery. This paper discusses a complex integrated low level heat recovery system that is being engineered for installation in a large petroleum refinery...

  9. Hurricane IVAN Preliminary Water Levels Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hurricane IVAN Preliminary Water Levels Report *For the purpose of timely release, data contained and Services #12;CO-OPS Water Level Data for Hurricane IVAN NOAA's Center for Operational Oceanographic and in the Gulf of Mexico. During the hurricane season (June through November) CO-OPS personnel actively maintain

  10. An evaluation of styrene levels emitted during cast polymer production of cultured marble building materials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, Lewis Ray

    1994-01-01

    emitted into the surrounding facility and outside ambient air. These concentrations were tabulated and compared against styrene levels from each major process in the fabrication of cultured marble. Additionally, the removal effectiveness of the ventilation...

  11. Serum 25-OH vitamin D levels and risk of developing prostate cancer in older men

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    y ORIGINAL PAPER Serum 25-OH vitamin D levels and risk ofshown clear evidence of vitamin D’s anti-tumor effects onthe associa- tion between vitamin D and prostate cancer risk

  12. Strategies for Mitigating the Reduction in Economic Value of Variable Generation with Increasing Penetration Levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Andrew; Wiser, Ryan

    2014-03-03

    In this report, we evaluate individual options that have the potential to stem the decline in the marginal value of variable generation (VG) with increasing penetration levels. We focus only on the effectiveness of mitigation measures for wind and PV.

  13. Using high level dialogue information for dialogue act recognition using prosodic features. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Helen; Poesio, Massimo; Isard, Stephen

    1999-01-01

    We look at the effect of using high level discourse knowledge in dialogue act type detection. We also look at ways this knowledge can be used for improving language modelling and intonation modelling of utterance types. ...

  14. The Relationship Between Leadership Level and Preference for Administrative Interview Questions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tulipana, Teresa Marie

    2010-05-31

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether administrators at differing levels (elementary, secondary and central office) had a preference for interview questions and composite scales designed to identify effective ...

  15. Blood Lead Levels in Children What Do Parents Need to Know to Protect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blood Lead Levels in Children What Do Parents Need to Know to Protect Their Children? Protecting children from exposure to lead is important to lifelong good health. Even low levels of lead in blood have been shown to affect IQ, ability to pay attention, and academic achievement. And effects of lead

  16. Response of ectomycorrhizal fungus sporocarp production to varying levels and patterns of green-tree retention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Response of ectomycorrhizal fungus sporocarp production to varying levels and patterns of green is the first study complete with pre-treatment data that examines the effects of silvicultural manipulations of two patterns (aggregated [A], dispersed [D]) and four levels (100, 75, 40, and 15%) of green

  17. Using UML in Architecture-Level Modifiability Analysis Nico Lassing, Daan Rijsenbrij and Hans van Vliet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Vliet, Hans

    Using UML in Architecture-Level Modifiability Analysis Nico Lassing, Daan Rijsenbrij and Hans van architecture-level modifiability analysis of business information systems, we use architectural views to determine and express the effect of change scenarios. We distinguish four architectural views. We used

  18. Trading places - an innovative SO{sub 2} trading program to mitigate potential adverse impacts on class I areas: part II. Mitigation plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louis Militana; Cindy Huber; Christopher Colbert; Chris Arrington; Don Shepherd

    2005-08-01

    This is the second of two articles describing a plan that was developed to mitigate the effects of acid deposition and visibility impairment in four Class I areas from the proposed Longview Power Project. Part I (published in July 2005) discussed the air quality impacts of the proposed coal-fired power plant. Part II discusses the mitigation plan. 2 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  19. Likely social impacts of proposed national-level policy initiatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piernot, C.A.; Rothweiler, M.A.; Levine, A.; Crews, R.

    1981-03-01

    The results are described of an investigation of likely social effects of enacting nine proposed national-level policy initiatives to accelerate development and use of solar energy. This study is part of the Technology Assessment of Solar Energy Systems (TASE) project supported by the US Department of Energy. The report presents general social impact information about the variety of ways in which the American people could be affected by enactment of these initiatives. It identifies the effects of each initiative on individuals, groups, organizations, communities, and society as a whole. In addition, it provides a framework for organizing a myriad of impact information into a set of conceptually exclusive impact categories. It illustrates that social impacts means effects on people as individuals, groups, organizations, and communities as well as on the infrastructure of society. Finally, it demonstrates the importance of specifying an audience of impact with a case example from the residential rental market.

  20. Low-level radioactive waste disposal facility closure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, G.J.; Ferns, T.W.; Otis, M.D.; Marts, S.T.; DeHaan, M.S.; Schwaller, R.G.; White, G.J. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

    1990-11-01

    Part I of this report describes and evaluates potential impacts associated with changes in environmental conditions on a low-level radioactive waste disposal site over a long period of time. Ecological processes are discussed and baselines are established consistent with their potential for causing a significant impact to low-level radioactive waste facility. A variety of factors that might disrupt or act on long-term predictions are evaluated including biological, chemical, and physical phenomena of both natural and anthropogenic origin. These factors are then applied to six existing, yet very different, low-level radioactive waste sites. A summary and recommendations for future site characterization and monitoring activities is given for application to potential and existing sites. Part II of this report contains guidance on the design and implementation of a performance monitoring program for low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. A monitoring programs is described that will assess whether engineered barriers surrounding the waste are effectively isolating the waste and will continue to isolate the waste by remaining structurally stable. Monitoring techniques and instruments are discussed relative to their ability to measure (a) parameters directly related to water movement though engineered barriers, (b) parameters directly related to the structural stability of engineered barriers, and (c) parameters that characterize external or internal conditions that may cause physical changes leading to enhanced water movement or compromises in stability. Data interpretation leading to decisions concerning facility closure is discussed. 120 refs., 12 figs., 17 tabs.

  1. Meltwater effects on flow of Greenland's ice sheet less severe...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Side effects of increasing meltwater less severe than feared Meltwater effects on flow of Greenland's ice sheet less severe for sea level rise than earlier feared, scientists...

  2. Inhalation and Ingestion Intakes with Associated Dose Estimates for Level II and Level III Personnel Using Capstone Study Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szrom, Fran; Falo, Gerald A.; Lodde, Gordon M.; Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Daxon, Eric G.

    2009-03-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) intake rates and subsequent dose rates were estimated for personnel entering armored combat vehicles perforated with DU penetrators (level II and level III personnel) using data generated during the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study. Inhalation intake rates and associated dose rates were estimated from cascade impactors worn by sample recovery personnel and from cascade impactors that served as area monitors. Ingestion intake rates and associated dose rates were estimated from cotton gloves worn by sample recovery personnel and from wipe test samples from the interior of vehicles perforated with large caliber DU munitions. The mean DU inhalation intake rate for level II personnel ranged from 0.447 mg h-1 based on breathing zone monitor data (in and around a perforated vehicle) to 14.5 mg h-1 based on area monitor data (in a perforated vehicle). The mean DU ingestion intake rate for level II ranged from 4.8 mg h-1 to 38.9 mg h-1 based on the wipe test data including surface to glove transfer factors derived from the Capstone data. Based on glove contamination data, the mean DU ingestion intake rates for level II and level III personnel were 10.6 mg h-1 was and 1.78 mg h-1, respectively. Effective dose rates and peak kidney uranium concentration rates were calculated based on the intake rates. The peak kidney uranium concentration rate cannot be multiplied by the total exposure duration when multiple intakes occur because uranium will clear from the kidney between the exposures.

  3. Level shift operators for open quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Merkli

    2006-01-07

    Level shift operators describe the second order displacement of eigenvalues under perturbation. They play a central role in resonance theory and ergodic theory of open quantum systems at positive temperatures. We exhibit intrinsic properties of level shift operators, properties which stem from the structure of open quantum systems at positive temperatures and which are common to all such systems. They determine the geometry of resonances bifurcating from eigenvalues of positive temperature Hamiltonians and they relate the Gibbs state, the kernel of level shift operators, and zero energy resonances. We show that degeneracy of energy levels of the small part of the open quantum system causes the Fermi Golden Rule Condition to be violated and we analyze ergodic properties of such systems.

  4. Low Level Radiation SEAB Ltr. to Moniz

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    on how DOE should pursue research on the question of a 'linear' or 'threshold' low-level radiation exposure model. Should DOE continue its efforts on this subject or...

  5. Making Use of Low-Level Heat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plaster, W. E.

    1979-01-01

    Immense amounts of energy are being thrown away every day in petroleum refineries, chemical plants, and throughout all types of industrial operations. Much of this energy is at temperature levels below 350OF and is typically rejected...

  6. Variable Speed Pumping for Level Control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasel, M.

    1982-01-01

    analysis, and a brief discussion of variable frequency drive design considerations. Energy savings figures are based upon actual electricity costs at the plant involved. Process duty cycle and energy requirement levels were verified by a wattmeter...

  7. Tank farms compacted low-level waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hetzer, D.C.

    1997-08-01

    This report describes the process of Low-Level Waste (LLW) volume reduction by compaction. Also included is the data used for characterization of LLW destined for compaction. Scaling factors (ratios) are formed based on data contained in this report.

  8. Tank farms compacted low level waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waters, M.S., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-01

    This report describes the process of Low Level Waste (LLW) volume reduction by compaction. Also included is the data used for characterization of LLW destined for compaction. Scaling factors (ratios) are formed based on data contained in this report.

  9. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sternwheeler, W.D.E.

    1992-12-31

    This paper provides highlights from the 1992 winter meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Wastes Forum. Topics of discussion included: legal information; state and compact reports; freedom of information requests; and storage.

  10. Level-2 Calorimeter Trigger Upgrade at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flanagan, G.U.; /Purdue U.

    2007-04-01

    The CDF Run II Level-2 calorimeter trigger is implemented in hardware and is based on an algorithm used in Run I. This system insured good performance at low luminosity obtained during the Tevatron Run II. However, as the Tevatron instantaneous luminosity increases, the limitations of the current system due to the algorithm start to become clear. In this paper, we will present an upgrade of the Level-2 calorimeter trigger system at CDF. The upgrade is based on the Pulsar board, a general purpose VME board developed at CDF and used for upgrading both the Level-2 tracking and the Level-2 global decision crate. This paper will describe the design, hardware and software implementation, as well as the advantages of this approach over the existing system.

  11. LEVEL SET REGULARIZATION IN POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY 1 Level Set Method for Positron Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferguson, Thomas S.

    LEVEL SET REGULARIZATION IN POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY 1 Level Set Method for Positron Emission for integrated Petroleum Research). #12;LEVEL SET REGULARIZATION IN POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY 2 Abstract In positron emission tomography (PET) a radioactive compound is injected into the body to promote a tissue

  12. Exploiting level sensitive latches in wire pipelining 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seth, Vikram

    2005-02-17

    margin for setup time and clock skew, i.e. in the interval of [T -Tp,T -Tsetup-Tskew], as shown by the yellow shaded interval in Figure 3 for positive level sensitive latches. Here Tp is the duration of positive clock signal level... occupy certain region and disallow repeater or synchronous element insertions. In this scenario, the timing flexibility of latches can facilitate further TCLK TP Tn Tsetup 8 improvement on latency compared with flip-flop based wire...

  13. Features, Events, and Processes: system Level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. McGregor

    2004-10-15

    The purpose of this analysis report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of the system-level features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to modeling used to support the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA). A screening decision, either Included or Excluded, is given for each FEP along with the technical basis for screening decisions. This information is required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at 10 CFR 63.113 (d, e, and f) (DIRS 156605). The system-level FEPs addressed in this report typically are overarching in nature, rather than being focused on a particular process or subsystem. As a result, they are best dealt with at the system level rather than addressed within supporting process-level or subsystem-level analyses and models reports. The system-level FEPs also tend to be directly addressed by regulations, guidance documents, or assumptions listed in the regulations; or are addressed in background information used in development of the regulations. For included FEPs, this analysis summarizes the implementation of the FEP in the TSPA-LA (i.e., how the FEP is included). For excluded FEPs, this analysis provides the technical basis for exclusion from the TSPA-LA (i.e., why the FEP is excluded). The initial version of this report (Revision 00) was developed to support the total system performance assessment for site recommendation (TSPA-SR). This revision addresses the license application (LA) FEP List (DIRS 170760).

  14. Instruction-level performance modeling and characterization of multimedia applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Y.; Cameron, K.W.

    1999-06-01

    One of the challenges for characterizing and modeling realistic multimedia applications is the lack of access to source codes. On-chip performance counters effectively resolve this problem by monitoring run-time behaviors at the instruction-level. This paper presents a novel technique of characterizing and modeling workloads at the instruction level for realistic multimedia applications using hardware performance counters. A variety of instruction counts are collected from some multimedia applications, such as RealPlayer, GSM Vocoder, MPEG encoder/decoder, and speech synthesizer. These instruction counts can be used to form a set of abstract characteristic parameters directly related to a processor`s architectural features. Based on microprocessor architectural constraints and these calculated abstract parameters, the architectural performance bottleneck for a specific application can be estimated. Meanwhile, the bottleneck estimation can provide suggestions about viable architectural/functional improvement for certain workloads. The biggest advantage of this new characterization technique is a better understanding of processor utilization efficiency and architectural bottleneck for each application. This technique also provides predictive insight of future architectural enhancements and their affect on current codes. In this paper the authors also attempt to model architectural effect on processor utilization without memory influence. They derive formulas for calculating CPI{sub 0}, CPI without memory effect, and they quantify utilization of architectural parameters. These equations are architecturally diagnostic and predictive in nature. Results provide promise in code characterization, and empirical/analytical modeling.

  15. Reproductive toxicity of low-level lead exposure in men

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Telisman, Spomenka Colak, Bozo; Pizent, Alica; Jurasovic, Jasna; Cvitkovic, Petar

    2007-10-15

    Parameters of semen quality, seminal plasma indicators of secretory function of the prostate and seminal vesicles, sex hormones in serum, and biomarkers of lead, cadmium, copper, zinc, and selenium body burden were measured in 240 Croatian men 19-52 years of age. The subjects had no occupational exposure to metals and no known other reasons suspected of influencing male reproductive function or metal metabolism. After adjusting for age, smoking, alcohol, blood cadmium, and serum copper, zinc, and selenium by multiple regression, significant (P<0.05) associations of blood lead (BPb), {delta}-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD), and/or erythrocyte protoporphyrin (EP) with reproductive parameters indicated a lead-related increase in immature sperm concentration, in percentages of pathologic sperm, wide sperm, round sperm, and short sperm, in serum levels of testosterone and estradiol, and a decrease in seminal plasma zinc and in serum prolactin. These reproductive effects were observed at low-level lead exposure (BPb median 49 {mu}g/L, range 11-149 {mu}g/L in the 240 subjects) common for general populations worldwide. The observed significant synergistic effect of BPb and blood cadmium on increasing serum testosterone, and additive effect of a decrease in serum selenium on increasing serum testosterone, may have implications on the initiation and development of prostate cancer because testosterone augments the progress of prostate cancer in its early stages.

  16. Seasonal sand level changes on southern california beaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yates, Marissa L.

    2009-01-01

    2.3 Sand level measurements . . . . . .2.4 Sand level changes . . . . . . . . . . 2.5 Wave4.3.2 Sand level observations . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  17. Seasonal Sand Level Changes on Southern California Beaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yates, Marissa L

    2009-01-01

    2.3 Sand level measurements . . . . . .2.4 Sand level changes . . . . . . . . . . 2.5 Wave4.3.2 Sand level observations . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  18. ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT; ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    5 audit of SRP radioactive waste Ashley, C. 05 NUCLEAR FUELS; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT; ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS; RADIOACTIVE EFFLUENTS; EMISSION; HIGH-LEVEL...

  19. System Effectiveness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, Danny H; Elwood Jr, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    An effective risk assessment system is needed to address the threat posed by an active or passive insider who, acting alone or in collusion, could attempt diversion or theft of nuclear material. It is critical that a nuclear facility conduct a thorough self-assessment of the material protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A) system to evaluate system effectiveness. Self-assessment involves vulnerability analysis and performance testing of the MPC&A system. The process should lead to confirmation that mitigating features of the system effectively minimize the threat, or it could lead to the conclusion that system improvements or upgrades are necessary to achieve acceptable protection against the threat. Analysis of the MPC&A system is necessary to understand the limits and vulnerabilities of the system to internal threats. Self-assessment helps the facility be prepared to respond to internal threats and reduce the risk of theft or diversion of nuclear material. MSET is a self-assessment or inspection tool utilizing probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methodology to calculate the system effectiveness of a nuclear facility's MPC&A system. MSET analyzes the effectiveness of an MPC&A system based on defined performance metrics for MPC&A functions based on U.S. and international best practices and regulations. A facility's MC&A system can be evaluated at a point in time and reevaluated after upgrades are implemented or after other system changes occur. The total system or specific subareas within the system can be evaluated. Areas of potential performance improvement or system upgrade can be assessed to determine where the most beneficial and cost-effective improvements should be made. Analyses of risk importance factors show that sustainability is essential for optimal performance. The analyses reveal where performance degradation has the greatest detrimental impact on total system risk and where performance improvements have the greatest reduction in system risk. The risk importance factors show the amount of risk reduction achievable with potential upgrades and the amount of risk reduction actually achieved after upgrades are completed. Applying the risk assessment tool gives support to budget prioritization by showing where budget support levels must be sustained for MC&A functions most important to risk. Results of the risk assessment are also useful in supporting funding justifications for system improvements that significantly reduce system risk.

  20. Novel energy level structure of Dirac oscillator in magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Md. Moniruzzaman; S. B. Faruque

    2015-08-12

    We have presented an elegant high energy quantum problem, namely, the full Dirac oscillator under axial magnetic field with its full solution. We have found the energy spectrum which is rich and at the same time has a novel structure. The quantized energy levels show coupling of the oscillator frequency with the Larmor frequency in the 2D surface where the electrons under consideration follow a 2D oscillator. The axis in which magnetic field is pointed, the electrons follow a 1D oscillator. There is also coupling between spin and orbital motion and also a coupling between a resultant effect of orbital and spin motion with Larmor precession.

  1. Torsional ultrasonic wave based level measurement system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcomb, David E. (Oak Ridge, TN); Kisner, Roger A. (Knoxville, TN)

    2012-07-10

    A level measurement system suitable for use in a high temperature and pressure environment to measure the level of coolant fluid within the environment, the system including a volume of coolant fluid located in a coolant region of the high temperature and pressure environment and having a level therein; an ultrasonic waveguide blade that is positioned within the desired coolant region of the high temperature and pressure environment; a magnetostrictive electrical assembly located within the high temperature and pressure environment and configured to operate in the environment and cooperate with the waveguide blade to launch and receive ultrasonic waves; and an external signal processing system located outside of the high temperature and pressure environment and configured for communicating with the electrical assembly located within the high temperature and pressure environment.

  2. Statistical approach to nuclear level density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sen'kov, R. A.; Horoi, M.; Zelevinsky, V. G.

    2014-10-15

    We discuss the level density in a finite many-body system with strong interaction between the constituents. Our primary object of applications is the atomic nucleus but the same techniques can be applied to other mesoscopic systems. We calculate and compare nuclear level densities for given quantum numbers obtained by different methods, such as nuclear shell model (the most successful microscopic approach), our main instrument - moments method (statistical approach), and Fermi-gas model; the calculation with the moments method can use any shell-model Hamiltonian excluding the spurious states of the center-of-mass motion. Our goal is to investigate statistical properties of nuclear level density, define its phenomenological parameters, and offer an affordable and reliable way of calculation.

  3. Generalized Test Plan for the Vitrification of Simulated High-Level -Waste Calcine in the Idaho National Laboratory‘s Bench -Scale Cold Crucible Induction Melter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vince Maio

    2011-08-01

    This Preliminary Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Test Plan outlines the chronological steps required to initially evaluate the validity of vitrifying INL surrogate (cold) High-Level-Waste (HLW) solid particulate calcine in INL's Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM). Its documentation and publication satisfies interim milestone WP-413-INL-01 of the DOE-EM (via the Office of River Protection) sponsored work package, WP 4.1.3, entitled 'Improved Vitrification' The primary goal of the proposed CCIM testing is to initiate efforts to identify an efficient and effective back-up and risk adverse technology for treating the actual HLW calcine stored at the INL. The calcine's treatment must be completed by 2035 as dictated by a State of Idaho Consent Order. A final report on this surrogate/calcine test in the CCIM will be issued in May 2012-pending next fiscal year funding In particular the plan provides; (1) distinct test objectives, (2) a description of the purpose and scope of planned university contracted pre-screening tests required to optimize the CCIM glass/surrogate calcine formulation, (3) a listing of necessary CCIM equipment modifications and corresponding work control document changes necessary to feed a solid particulate to the CCIM, (4) a description of the class of calcine that will be represented by the surrogate, and (5) a tentative tabulation of the anticipated CCIM testing conditions, testing parameters, sampling requirements and analytical tests. Key FY -11 milestones associated with this CCIM testing effort are also provided. The CCIM test run is scheduled to be conducted in February of 2012 and will involve testing with a surrogate HLW calcine representative of only 13% of the 4,000 m3 of 'hot' calcine residing in 6 INL Bin Sets. The remaining classes of calcine will have to be eventually tested in the CCIM if an operational scale CCIM is to be a feasible option for the actual INL HLW calcine. This remaining calcine's make-up is HLW containing relatively high concentrations of zirconium and aluminum, representative of the cladding material of the reprocessed fuel that generated the calcine. A separate study to define the CCIM testing needs of these other calcine classifications in currently being prepared under a separate work package (WP-0) and will be provided as a milestone report at the end of this fiscal year.

  4. Fault-tolerant three-level inverter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Edwards, John; Xu, Longya; Bhargava, Brij B.

    2006-12-05

    A method for driving a neutral point clamped three-level inverter is provided. In one exemplary embodiment, DC current is received at a neutral point-clamped three-level inverter. The inverter has a plurality of nodes including first, second and third output nodes. The inverter also has a plurality of switches. Faults are checked for in the inverter and predetermined switches are automatically activated responsive to a detected fault such that three-phase electrical power is provided at the output nodes.

  5. Closed-field capacitive liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1995-01-01

    A liquid level sensor based on a closed field circuit comprises a ring oscillator using a symmetrical array of plate units that creates a displacement current. The displacement current varies as a function of the proximity of a liquid to the plate units. The ring oscillator circuit produces an output signal with a frequency inversely proportional to the presence of a liquid. A continuous liquid level sensing device and a two point sensing device are both proposed sensing arrangements. A second set of plates may be located inside of the probe housing relative to the sensing plate units. The second set of plates prevent any interference between the sensing plate units.

  6. High Burnup Effects Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barner, J.O.; Cunningham, M.E.; Freshley, M.D.; Lanning, D.D.

    1990-04-01

    This is the final report of the High Burnup Effects Program (HBEP). It has been prepared to present a summary, with conclusions, of the HBEP. The HBEP was an international, group-sponsored research program managed by Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories (BNW). The principal objective of the HBEP was to obtain well-characterized data related to fission gas release (FGR) for light water reactor (LWR) fuel irradiated to high burnup levels. The HBEP was organized into three tasks as follows: Task 1 -- high burnup effects evaluations; Task 2 -- fission gas sampling; and Task 3 -- parameter effects study. During the course of the HBEP, a program that extended over 10 years, 82 fuel rods from a variety of sources were characterized, irradiated, and then examined in detail after irradiation. The study of fission gas release at high burnup levels was the principal objective of the program and it may be concluded that no significant enhancement of fission gas release at high burnup levels was observed for the examined rods. The rim effect, an as yet unquantified contributor to athermal fission gas release, was concluded to be the one truly high-burnup effect. Though burnup enhancement of fission gas release was observed to be low, a full understanding of the rim region and rim effect has not yet emerged and this may be a potential area of further research. 25 refs., 23 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Prioritizing Acquisition Pathways in the State Level Concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Chantell L.; Budlong-Sylvester, Kory; Pilat, Joseph F.

    2012-06-27

    The International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) Department of Safeguards has launched a project to further develop the State-level concept for the planning, implementation, and evaluation of safeguards activities. In order to further evolve the safeguards system an emphasis is placed on integrating inspection-related activities and the State evaluation process to draw safeguards conclusions in the most efficient way. The credible implementation of acquisition pathway analysis is central to the success of the IAEA's State-level concept. NNSA's Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security (NA-241) The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) is sponsoring Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to produce a study that will examine the use of acquisition pathway analysis in: (1) Developing a State-specific, State-level approach (SLA) and Annual Implementation Plan (AIP); (2) Maximizing the utility of the physical model; and (3) Supporting resource allocation decisions through a pathway prioritization. To deal with the challenge of developing an effective and efficient SLA, this study looks at: (1) Prioritizing proliferation pathways based on an assessment of a State's capabilities and assumed proliferation strategies; and (2) Relevant State behavior (e.g., transparency, cooperation, etc.) while avoiding subjective judgments about States themselves. The study makes use of case studies and concrete examples in order to illustrate how new concepts and approaches will be implemented, and how they may differ from more traditional safeguards approaches.

  8. Steam Reforming of Low-Level Mixed Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    Under DOE Contract No. DE-AR21-95MC32091, Steam Reforming of Low-Level Mixed Waste, ThermoChem has successfully designed, fabricated and operated a nominal 90 pound per hour Process Development Unit (PDU) on various low-level mixed waste surrogates. The design construction, and testing of the PDU as well as performance and economic projections for a 500- lb/hr demonstration and commercial system are described. The overall system offers an environmentally safe, non-incinerating, cost-effective, and publicly acceptable method of processing LLMW. The steam-reforming technology was ranked the No. 1 non-incineration technology for destruction of hazardous organic wastes in a study commissioned by the Mixed Waste Focus Area published April 1997.1 The ThermoChem steam-reforming system has been developed over the last 13 years culminating in this successful test campaign on LLMW surrogates. Six surrogates were successfidly tested including a 750-hour test on material simulating a PCB- and Uranium- contaminated solid waste found at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The test results indicated essentially total (>99.9999oA) destruction of RCRA and TSCA hazardous halogenated organics, significant levels of volume reduction (> 400 to 1), and retention of radlonuclides in the volume-reduced solids. Cost studies have shown the steam-reforming system to be very cost competitive with more conventional and other emerging technologies.

  9. High-level radioactive wastes. Supplement 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLaren, L.H.

    1984-09-01

    This bibliography contains information on high-level radioactive wastes included in the Department of Energy's Energy Data Base from August 1982 through December 1983. These citations are to research reports, journal articles, books, patents, theses, and conference papers from worldwide sources. Five indexes, each preceded by a brief description, are provided: Corporate Author, Personal Author, Subject, Contract Number, and Report Number. 1452 citations.

  10. Expectations of two-level telegraph noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jesse Fern

    2006-11-02

    We find expectation values of functions of time integrated two-level telegraph noise. Expectation values of this noise are evaluated under simple control pulses. Both the Gaussian limit and $1/f$ noise are considered. We apply the results to a specific superconducting quantum computing example, which illustrates the use of this technique for calculating error probabilities.

  11. The Science of Level Design Kenneth Hullett

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    elements and gameplay. The next step is to validate this theory with a series of experiments that test]: Human factors, K.8.0 [Personal Computing]: Games General Terms Design, Human Factors Keywords level propose to conduct a series of experiments. A combination of qualitative and quantitative assessments

  12. Methodology for Prototyping Increased Levels of Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valasek, John

    Methodology for Prototyping Increased Levels of Automation for Spacecraft Rendezvous Functions of automation than previous NASA vehicles, due to program requirements for automation, including Automated Ren authority between humans and computers (i.e. automation) as a prime driver for cost, safety, and mission

  13. Complexity Management in System-level Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    , and work with a range of constraints and optimization criteria. This design process is quite complex1 of 22 Complexity Management in System-level Design Asawaree Kalavade Edward A. Lee Keywords design space exploration, hardware-software codesign, design methodology management, design flow

  14. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    This paper provides the results of the winter meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Forum. Discussions were held on the following topics: new developments in states and compacts; adjudicatory hearings; information exchange on siting processes, storage surcharge rebates; disposal after 1992; interregional access agreements; and future tracking and management issues.

  15. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1991-12-31

    This report contains highlights from the 1991 fall meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Forum. Topics included legal updates; US NRC updates; US EPA updates; mixed waste issues; financial assistance for waste disposal facilities; and a legislative and policy report.

  16. BIOSAFETY LEVELS AND RISK ASSESSMENT POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    BIOSAFETY LEVELS AND RISK ASSESSMENT POLICY Procedure: 2.2 Created: 3/7/2014 Version: 1.0 A risk assessment to account for the characteristics of the agent being used, the procedures of infection, a risk assessment is required in all cases to initially establish the appropriate biocontainment

  17. County Level Wind Erosion Estimation Using National

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Fuller (1987), Rao (2003). 11 #12;Model searching for Wind Erosion In NRI, wind erosion WEQCounty Level Wind Erosion Estimation Using National Resources Inventory Survey Taps Maiti. · Approx. 3 points/PSU; 800,000 points in 1997 NRI 4 #12;· Data on Urban land, small water etc

  18. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This paper provides highlights from the 1995 summer meeting of the Low Level radioactive Waste Forum. Topics included: new developments in state and compacts; federal waste management; DOE plans for Greater-Than-Class C waste management; mixed wastes; commercial mixed waste management; international export of rad wastes for disposal; scintillation cocktails; license termination; pending legislation; federal radiation protection standards.

  19. PAIRWISE BLENDING OF HIGH LEVEL WASTE (HLW)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CERTA, P.J.

    2006-02-22

    The primary objective of this study is to demonstrate a mission scenario that uses pairwise and incidental blending of high level waste (HLW) to reduce the total mass of HLW glass. Secondary objectives include understanding how recent refinements to the tank waste inventory and solubility assumptions affect the mass of HLW glass and how logistical constraints may affect the efficacy of HLW blending.

  20. Combining Unit-level Symbolic Execution and System-level Concrete Execution for Testing NASA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasareanu, Corina

    Combining Unit-level Symbolic Execution and System-level Concrete Execution for Testing NASA Software Corina S. Pasareanu, Peter C. Mehlitz, David H. Bushnell, Karen Gundy-Burlet, Michael Lowry NASA.h.bushnell, karen.gundy-burlet, michael.r.lowry}@nasa.gov Suzette Person Department of Computer Science

  1. INTRODUCTION Fish routinely exhibit a level of agility that far surpasses the level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mittal, Rajat

    4043 INTRODUCTION Fish routinely exhibit a level of agility that far surpasses the level that human-engineered underwater vehicles have been able to achieve (Bandyopadhyay, 2002). Fish such as sunfish, perch and goldfish in both quiescent and turbulent flows (Lauder et al., 2006). There are many reasons why fish are more

  2. Relative Sea-Level Chanhes in Iceland 25 3. Relative Sea-Level Changes in Iceland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingólfsson, Ólafur

    Relative Sea-Level Chanhes in Iceland 25 3. Relative Sea-Level Changes in Iceland: new Aspects of the Weichselian Deglaciation of Iceland Hreggviður Norðdahl1 and Halldór G. Pétursson2 1 University of Iceland, Science Institute, Dunhagi 3, IS-107 Reykjavik 2 Icelandic Institute of Natural History, IS-600 Akureyri 3

  3. HighHigh--LevelSynthesisforLevelSynthesisfor LowPowerLowPower

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohanty, Saraju P.

    ;4 DesignQualityMeasuresDesignQualityMeasures ·Area ·Performance ·Power ·Testability1 HighHigh--LevelSynthesisforLevelSynthesisfor LowPowerLowPower SarajuP.Mohanty smohanty.Dynamicpowerdissipationdetails 3.Howtoreducedynamicpower? 4.EffectofFrequencyonEnergy/Power 5.Fewlow-powerresearchworks #12

  4. HYDROGEN EFFECTS ON LASER ENGINEERED NET SHAPE (LENS) REPAIRED WELDMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korinko, P; Thad Adams, T

    2006-10-06

    New methods of repairing mis-machined components are always of interest. In this study, an innovative method using Laser Engineered Net Shape{trademark} (LENS{reg_sign}) forming was used to repair intentionally mis-machined test articles. The components were repaired and subsequently hydrogen charged and burst tested. The LENS repair did not have an adverse effect on the solid state weld process that was used to repair the components. Hydrogen charged samples failed in a similar manner to the uncharged samples. Overall, the prospects for LENS repairing similar products are favorable and further work is encouraged.

  5. Low-level waste feed staging plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Certa, P.J.; Grams, W.H.; McConville, C.M.; L. W. Shelton, L.W.; Slaathaug, E.J., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-12

    The `Preliminary Low-Level Waste Feed Staging Plan` was updated to reflect the latest requirement in the Tank Waste Remediation Privatization Request for Proposals (RFP) and amendments. The updated plan develops the sequence and transfer schedule for retrieval of DST supernate by the management and integration contractor and delivery of the staged supernate to the private low-activity waste contractors for treatment. Two DSTs are allocated as intermediate staging tanks. A transfer system conflict analysis provides part of the basis for determining transfer system upgrade requirements to support both low-activity and high-level waste feed delivery. The intermediate staging tank architecture and retrieval system equipment are provided as a planning basis until design requirements documents are prepared. The actions needed to successfully implement the plan are identified. These include resolution of safety issues and changes to the feed envelope limits, minimum order quantities, and desired batch sizes.

  6. High-Level Waste Melter Study Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez, Joseph M.; Bickford, Dennis F.; Day, Delbert E.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Lambert, Steven L.; Marra, Sharon L.; Peeler, David K.; Strachan, Denis M.; Triplett, Mark B.; Vienna, John D.; Wittman, Richard S.

    2001-07-13

    At the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, the path to site cleanup involves vitrification of the majority of the wastes that currently reside in large underground tanks. A Joule-heated glass melter is the equipment of choice for vitrifying the high-level fraction of these wastes. Even though this technology has general national and international acceptance, opportunities may exist to improve or change the technology to reduce the enormous cost of accomplishing the mission of site cleanup. Consequently, the U.S. Department of Energy requested the staff of the Tanks Focus Area to review immobilization technologies, waste forms, and modifications to requirements for solidification of the high-level waste fraction at Hanford to determine what aspects could affect cost reductions with reasonable long-term risk. The results of this study are summarized in this report.

  7. Electronic multi-purpose material level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1997-03-11

    The present electronic multi-purpose material level sensor is based on time domain reflectometry (TDR) of very short electrical pulses. Pulses are propagated along a transmission line that is partially immersed in a liquid, powder, or other substance such as grain in a silo. The time difference of the reflections at the start of the transmission line and the air/liquid interface are used to determine levels to better than 0.01 inch. The sensor is essentially independent of circuit element and temperature variations, and can be mass produced at an extremely low price. The transmission line may be a Goubau line, microstrip, coaxial cable, twin lead, CPS or CPW, and may typically be a strip placed along the inside wall of a tank. The reflected pulses also contain information about strata within the liquid such as sludge-build-up at the bottom of an oil tank. 9 figs.

  8. Electronic multi-purpose material level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1997-01-01

    The present electronic multi-purpose material level sensor is based on time domain reflectometry (TDR) of very short electrical pulses. Pulses are propagated along a transmission line that is partially immersed in a liquid, powder, or other substance such as grain in a silo. The time difference of the reflections at the start of the transmission line and the air/liquid interface are used to determine levels to better than 0.01 inch. The sensor is essentially independent of circuit element and temperature variations, and can be mass produced at an extremely low price. The transmission line may be a Goubau line, microstrip, coaxial cable, twin lead, CPS or CPW, and may typically be a strip placed along the inside wall of a tank. The reflected pulses also contain information about strata within the liquid such as sludge-build-up at the bottom of an oil tank.

  9. High {sup 222}Rn levels, enhanced plateout, increased diffusion coefficient

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard, B.E.

    1994-12-31

    In a previous study of plateout and resuspension effects for {sup 222}Rn progeny, an unexpected suppression of the airborne {sup 218}Po and {sup 214}Po levels, which is total unrelated and not predicted by theory or other works, was observed when high {sup 222}Rn concentrations were utilized in a 0.283-m{sup 3} test chamber. Two separate time-dependent methods were used and are reported here to measure this airborne progeny suppression effect to attempt to possibly determine the magnitude and cause of the effect and possible consequences on prior and current ongoing radon research by others. The earlier buildup method was used to observe the buildup phase of {sup 222} Rn and its daughters from a constant emanation source, a constant air change rate (ACH), and initially zero concentrations Rn and progeny. The data were compared with theory using Leonard`s solutions to the Bateman equations to determine the magnitude of the suppression. The second method, referred to as the {open_quotes}down{close_quotes} method, was to measure the decrease in {sup 222}Rn and progeny concentrations from an initially injected high {sup 222}Rn activity concentration in the test chamber, the decrease resulting from a constant ACH of {approximately}0.1 h{sup -1} imposed by the gradual removal of air from the chamber at a constant rate of {approximately}0.5 l/min. No {sup 222}Rn emanation source was present during the second method after the initial injection so that the level of the {sup 222}Rn underwent a monotonic decrease in concentration.

  10. Review of APR+ Level 2 PSA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehner, J.R.; Mubayi, V.; Pratt, W. T.

    2012-02-17

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) assisted the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) in reviewing the Level 2 Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) of the APR+ Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) prepared by the Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power Co., Ltd (KHNP) and KEPCO Engineering & Construction Co., Inc. (KEPCO-E&C). The work described in this report involves a review of the APR+ Level 2 PSA submittal [Ref. 1]. The PSA and, therefore, the review is limited to consideration of accidents initiated by internal events. As part of the review process, the review team also developed three sets of Requests for Additional Information (RAIs). These RAIs were provided to KHNP and KEPCO-E&C for their evaluation and response. This final detailed report documents the review findings for each technical element of the PSA and includes consideration of all of the RAIs made by the reviewers as well as the associated responses. This final report was preceded by an interim report [Ref. 2] that focused on identifying important issues regarding the PSA. In addition, a final meeting on the project was held at BNL on November 21-22, 2011, where BNL and KINS reviewers discussed their preliminary review findings with KHNP and KEPCO-E&C staffs. Additional information obtained during this final meeting was also used to inform the review findings of this final report. The review focused not only on the robustness of the APR+ design to withstand severe accidents, but also on the capability and acceptability of the Level 2 PSA in terms of level of detail and completeness. The Korean nuclear regulatory authorities will decide whether the PSA is acceptable and the BNL review team is providing its comments for KINS consideration. Section 2.0 provides the basis for the BNL review. Section 3.0 presents the review of each technical element of the PSA. Conclusions and a summary are presented in Section 4.0. Section 5.0 contains the references.

  11. Circuit level modeling of inductive elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muyshondt, G.P.; Portnoy, W.M.

    1989-01-01

    Design and analysis of spacecraft power systems have been difficult to perform because of the lack of circuit level models for nonlinear inductive elements. This paper reviews some of the models which have been proposed, their limitations, and applications. An improved saturation dependent model will be described. The model has been implemented in SPICE and with a commercial circuit program and demonstrated to be satisfactory in both implementations. 3 refs., 9 figs.

  12. Practical Loop Transformations for Tensor Contraction Expressions on Multi-Level Memory Hierarchies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Wenjing; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Agrawal, Gagan

    2011-04-01

    Modern architectures are characterized by deeper levels of memory hierarchy, often explicitly addressable. Optimizing applications for such architectures requires careful management of the data movement across all these levels. In this paper, we focus on the problem of mapping tensor contractions to memory hierarchies with more than two levels, specifically addressing placement of memory allocation and data movement statements, choice of loop fusions, and tile size selection. Existing algorithms to find an integrated solution to this problem even for two-level memory hierarchies has been shown to be expensive. We improve upon this work by focusing on the first-order cost components, simplifying the analysis required and reducing the number of candidates to be evaluated. We have evaluated our framework on a cluster of GPUs. Using five tensor contraction expressions, we show that fusion at multiple levels improves performance, and our framework is effective in determining protable transformations.

  13. Low-cost household paint abatement to reduce children's blood lead levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taha, T.; Kanarek, M.S.; Schultz, B.D.; Murphy, A.

    1999-11-01

    The purpose was to examine the effectiveness of low-cost abatement on children's blood lead levels. Blood lead was analyzed before and after abatement in 37 homes of children under 7 years old with initial blood lead levels of 25--44 {micro}g/dL. Ninety-five percent of homes were built before 1950. Abatement methods used were wet-scraping and repainting deteriorated surfaces and wrapping window wells with aluminum or vinyl. A control group was retrospectively selected. Control children were under 7 years old, had initial blood lead levels of 25--44 {micro}g/dL and a follow-up level at least 28 days afterward, and did not have abatements performed in their homes between blood lead levels. After abatement, statistically significant declines occurred in the intervention children's blood lead levels. The mean decline was 22%, 1 to 6 months after treatment. After adjustment for seasonality and child's age, the mean decline was 6.0 {micro}g/dL, or 18%. The control children's blood levels did not decline significantly. There was a mean decline of 0.25 {micro}g/dL, or 0.39%. After adjustment for seasonality and age, the mean decline for control children was 1.6 {micro}g/dL, or 1.8%. Low-cost abatement and education are effective short-term interim controls.

  14. Lid design for low level waste container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holbrook, R.H.; Keener, W.E.

    1995-02-28

    A container for low level waste includes a shell and a lid. The lid has a frame to which a planar member is welded. The lid frame includes a rectangular outer portion made of square metal tubing, a longitudinal beam extending between axial ends of the rectangular outer portion, and a transverse beam extending between opposite lateral sides of the rectangular outer portion. Two pairs of diagonal braces extend between the longitudinal beam and the four corners of the rectangular outer portion of the frame. 6 figs.

  15. Simulation levels of detail for plant motion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beaudoin, Jacob Michael

    2013-02-22

    that motion interactive [PCOI, DCFOI, EMF03]. A comparison of our method with some of these other methods is provided in section 7. 1. SLODs have come into prominence only in the last few years [Ber97, CF97]. They have sometimes taken other names ? Endo et... al. refer to them as levels of motion detail, or LOmDs [EMF03]. There have been a wide variety of applications for SLODs. These include rigid body dynamics and motion [CIF99, DO01, CAF01], simple collision detection and response [CH97, ODG*03...

  16. EM Corporate Performance Metrics, Complex Level

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (BillionProvedTravel TravelChallengesOhio andTechnologiesLandEnergy BeginsComplex Level July,

  17. EM Corporate Performance Metrics, Site Level

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (BillionProvedTravel TravelChallengesOhio andTechnologiesLandEnergy BeginsComplex Level July,Site

  18. ARM - Sea Level and Climate Change

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska OutreachCalendarPressExtended Facility SGPScienceScienceLevel and

  19. ARM - Sea Surface and Sea Level

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska OutreachCalendarPressExtended Facility SGPScienceScienceLevel

  20. ARM - Lesson Plans: Past Sea Level Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach Home Room News PublicationsClimatePast Sea Level Data

  1. Property:DIA/Level | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceIIInformationEnergyReportNumberCoolingTowerWaterUseWinterGrossCurrentLevel Jump

  2. Hight-Level Waste & Facilities Disposition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenry Bellamy, Ph.D. Title:Highlights LANS invests inHigh-Level Waste

  3. AVTA Voltec AC Level 1 and Level 2 Charging Systems Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following report describes results from testing done on the Voltec Level 1 and Level 2 charging systems for plug-in electric vehicles. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory.

  4. Short-Term Effects of Ankaferd Hemostat for Renal Artery Embolization: An Experimental Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozbek, Orhan; Acar, Kadir; Koc, Osman; Saritas, Kadir; Toy, Hatice; Solak, Yalcin; Ozbek, Seda; Kucukapan, Ahmet; Guler, Ibrahim; Gaipov, Abduzhappar; Turk, Suleyman; Haznedaroglu, Ibrahim Celaleddin

    2013-04-15

    Renal artery embolization (RAE) is a minimally invasive therapeutic technique that is utilized in a number of disorders. Ankaferd is a novel hemostatic agent with a new mechanism of action independent of clotting factors. We used Ankaferd for RAE in a sheep model. Seven adult female sheep were included in the study. Selective renal arteriogram using 5-F diagnostic catheter was performed to make sure that each kidney was fed by a single renal artery and the animal had normal renal vasculature. Coaxial 2.7-F microcatheter was advanced to the distal main renal artery. Under fluoroscopic guidance, 2 mL of Ankaferd mixed with 2 mL of nonionic iodinated contrast agent was slowly injected. Fluoroscopy was used to observe the deceleration of flow and stagnation. Control renal angiograms were performed just after embolization. After the procedure, the animals were observed for 1 day and then sacrificed with intravenous sodium thiopental. The technical success was observed in seven of the seven animals.. After embolization procedure, none of the animals died or experienced a major systemic adverse event. On macroscopic examination of the embolized kidneys, thrombus at the level of main renal artery formed after Ankaferd embolization was more compact compared with the thrombi that was not Ankaferd-associated, which was observed elsewhere. Microscopically, majority of the renal tubular cells (80-90 %) were necrotic, and there was epithelial cell damage in a small portion of the cells (10-20 %). RAE was safe and effective in the short-term with Ankaferd in studied animals. Further studies should be conducted to better delineate the embolizing potential of this novel hemostatic agent.

  5. GUIDANCE ON CONDUCTING ADVERSE DIVERSITY ANALYSIS

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the specific actions is well documented. Use of the accepted statistical tests of discrimination facilitates expeditious review of the likelihood of discriminatory impact. Where...

  6. GUIDANCE ON CONDUCTING ADVERSE DIVERSITY ANALYSIS

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,Executive Compensation References: FARWashers | GSATransmission ENERGYGUIDANCE

  7. Adverse Diversity Analysis Guidance | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram:Y-12 Beta-3AUDITLeslie Pezzullo OfficeDepartmentEnergy

  8. Cooling Strategies for Vane Leading Edges in a Syngas Environment Including Effects of Deposition and Turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ames, Forrest; Bons, Jeffrey

    2014-09-30

    The Department of Energy has goals to move land based gas turbine systems to alternate fuels including coal derived synthetic gas and hydrogen. Coal is the most abundant energy resource in the US and in the world and it is economically advantageous to develop power systems which can use coal. Integrated gasification combined cycles are (IGCC) expected to allow the clean use of coal derived fuels while improving the ability to capture and sequester carbon dioxide. These cycles will need to maintain or increase turbine entry temperatures to develop competitive efficiencies. The use of coal derived syngas introduces a range of potential contaminants into the hot section of the gas turbine including sulfur, iron, calcium, and various alkali metals. Depending on the effectiveness of the gas clean up processes, there exists significant likelihood that the remaining materials will become molten in the combustion process and potentially deposit on downstream turbine surfaces. Past evidence suggests that deposition will be a strong function of increasing temperature. Currently, even with the best gas cleanup processes a small level of particulate matter in the syngas is expected. Consequently, particulate deposition is expected to be an important consideration in the design of turbine components. The leading edge region of first stage vanes most often have higher deposition rates than other areas due to strong fluid acceleration and streamline curvature in the vicinity of the surface. This region remains one of the most difficult areas in a turbine nozzle to cool due to high inlet temperatures and only a small pressure ratio for cooling. The leading edge of a vane often has relatively high heat transfer coefficients and is often cooled using showerhead film cooling arrays. The throat of the first stage nozzle is another area where deposition potentially has a strongly adverse effect on turbine performance as this region meters the turbine inlet flow. Based on roughness levels found on in service vanes (Bons, et al., 2001, up to 300 microns) flow blockage in first stage turbine nozzles can easily reach 1 to 2 percent in conventional turbines. Deposition levels in syngas fueled gas turbines are expected to be even more problematic. The likelihood of significant deposition to the leading edge of vanes in a syngas environment indicates the need to examine this effect on the leading edge cooling problem. It is critical to understand the influence of leading edge geometry and turbulence on deposition rates for both internally and showerhead cooled leading edge regions. The expected level of deposition in a vane stagnation region not only significantly changes the heat transfer problem but also suggests that cooling arrays may clog. Addressing the cooling issue suggests a need to better understand stagnation region heat transfer with realistic roughness as well as the other variables affecting transport near the leading edge. Also, the question of whether leading edge regions can be cooled internally with modern cooling approaches should also be raised, thus avoiding the clogging issue. Addressing deposition in the pressure side throat region of the nozzle is another critical issue for this environment. Issues such as examining the protective effect of slot and full coverage discrete-hole film cooling on limiting deposition as well as the influence of roughness and turbulence on effectiveness should be raised. The objective of this present study is to address these technical challenges to help enable the development of high efficiency syngas tolerant gas turbine engines.

  9. High Level Waste Disposal System Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dirk Gombert; M. Connolly; J. Roach; W. Holtzscheiter

    2005-02-01

    The high level waste (HLW) disposal system consists of the Yucca Mountain Facility (YMF) and waste product (e.g. glass) generation facilities. Responsibility for management is shared between the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Offices of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (DOE-RW) and Environmental Management (DOE-EM). The DOE-RW license application and the Waste Acceptance System Requirements Document (WASRD), as well as the DOE-EM Waste Acceptance Product Specification for Vitrified High Level Waste Forms (WAPS) govern the overall performance of the system. This basis for HLW disposal should be reassessed to consider waste form and process technology research and development (R&D), which have been conducted by DOE-EM, international agencies (i.e. ANSTO, CEA), and the private sector; as well as the technical bases for including additional waste forms in the final license application. This will yield a more optimized HLW disposal system to accelerate HLW disposition, more efficient utilization of the YMF, and overall system cost reduction.

  10. MESERAN Calibration for Low Level Organic Residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benkovich, M.G.

    2004-04-08

    Precision cleaning studies done at Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T), the Kansas City Plant (KCP), and at other locations within the Department of Energy (DOE) Weapons complex over the last 30 years have depended upon results from MESERAN Evaporative Rate Analysis for detecting low levels of organic contamination. The characterization of the surface being analyzed is carried out by depositing a Carbon-14 tagged radiochemical onto the test surface and monitoring the rate at which the radiochemical disappears from the surface with a Geiger-Mueller counter. In the past, the total number of counts over a 2-minute span have been used to judge whether a surface is contaminated or not and semi-quantitatively to what extent. This technique is very sensitive but has not enjoyed the broad acceptance of a purely quantitative analysis. The work on this project developed calibrations of various organic contaminants typically encountered in KCP operations. In addition, a new analysis method was developed to enhance the ability of MESERAN Analyzers to detect organic contamination and yield quantitative data in the microgram and nanogram levels.

  11. PUREX low-level waste radionuclide characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellis, M.W.; LeBaron, G.J.

    1995-01-16

    The PUREX low-level waste (LLW) radionuclide characterization document describes the methodology for the characterization of solid LLW and solid low-level mixed waste (MW) with the respect to radiological characteristics. This document only serves as an overview of the PUREX radionuclide characterization methodology and provides specific examples for how the radionuclide distribution is derived. It would be impractical to provide all background information in this document. If further clarification and background information is required, consult the PUREX Regulatory Compliance group files. This document applies to only that waste generated in or is the responsibility of the PUREX facilities. The US Department of Energy (DOE) establishes the requirements for radioactive solid waste in DOE Order 5820.2A Radioactive Waste Management. Chapters 2 and 3 from DOE Order 5820.2A requires that generators of solid wastes in the LLW categories and the radioactive mixed waste subcategories: (1) identify the major radionuclides in each solid waste matrix and (2) determine the radionuclide concentrations and waste classes of their solid wastes. In addition, the Order also requires each generator to carry out a compliance program that ensures the proper certification of the solid waste generated.

  12. Parametric Multi-Level Tiling of Imperfectly Nested Loops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartono, Albert; Baskaran, Muthu M.; Bastoul, Cedric; Cohen, Albert; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Norris, Boyana; Ramanujam, J.; Sadayappan, Ponnuswamy

    2009-05-18

    Tiling is a critical loop transformation for generating high-performance code on modern architectures. Efficient generation of multilevel tiled code is essential to exploit several levels of parallelism and/or to maximize data reuse in deep memory hierarchies. Tiled loops with parameterized tile sizes (not compile time constants) facilitate runtime feedback and dynamic optimizations used in iterative compilation and automatic tuning. The existing parametric multilevel tiling approach has focused on transformation for perfectly nested loops, where all assignment statements are contained inside the innermost loop of a loop nest. Previous solutions to tiling for imperfect loop nests are limited to the case where tile sizes are fixed. In this paper, we present an approach to parameterized multilevel tiling for imperfectly nested loops. Our tiling algorithm generates loops that iterate over full rectangular tiles that are amenable for potential compiler optimizations such as register tiling. Experimental results using a number of computational benchmarks demonstrate the effectiveness of our tiling approach.

  13. Tree Level Metastability and Gauge Mediation in Baryon Deformed SQCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnard, James

    2009-01-01

    We investigate supersymmetric QCD with gauge group SU(2) and a baryon deformation to the superpotential. The existence of an uplifted vacuum at the origin with tree level metastability is demonstrated. When this model is implemented in a direct gauge mediation scenario we therefore find gaugino masses which are comparable to sfermion masses and parameterised by an effective number of messengers 1/8. All deformations are well motivated by appealing to the electric theory and an R-symmetry. This R-symmetry is explicitly broken by the same term responsible for supersymmetry breaking. Moreover, the model does not suffer from the Landau pole problem and we find that it can be described in terms of just two scales: the weak scale and a high scale like the Planck or GUT scale. The model can be tested by searching for new particles at the TeV scale charged under the visible sector gauge group.

  14. Tree Level Metastability and Gauge Mediation in Baryon Deformed SQCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Barnard

    2010-02-15

    We investigate supersymmetric QCD with gauge group SU(2) and a baryon deformation to the superpotential. The existence of an uplifted vacuum at the origin with tree level metastability is demonstrated. When this model is implemented in a direct gauge mediation scenario we therefore find gaugino masses which are comparable to sfermion masses and parameterised by an effective number of messengers 1/8. All deformations are well motivated by appealing to the electric theory and an R-symmetry. This R-symmetry is explicitly broken by the same term responsible for supersymmetry breaking. Moreover, the model does not suffer from the Landau pole problem and we find that it can be described in terms of just two scales: the weak scale and a high scale like the Planck or GUT scale. The model can be tested by searching for new particles at the TeV scale charged under the visible sector gauge group.

  15. Electric Drive Vehicle Level Control Development Under Various...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Level Control Development Under Various Thermal Conditions Electric Drive Vehicle Level Control Development Under Various Thermal Conditions 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

  16. Cummins SuperTruck Program - Technology and System Level Demonstration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and System Level Demonstration of Highly Efficient and Clean, Diesel Powered Class 8 Trucks Cummins SuperTruck Program - Technology and System Level Demonstration of Highly...

  17. Application of Synergistic Technologies to Achieve High Levels...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Synergistic Technologies to Achieve High Levels of Gasoline Engine Downsizing Application of Synergistic Technologies to Achieve High Levels of Gasoline Engine Downsizing Discussed...

  18. Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group Manual

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Low- LEVEL WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITY FEDERAL REVIEW GROUP MANUAL REVISION 3 JUNE 2008 (This page intentionally left blank) Low-Level JVllsfe Disposal Fllcilil' Federal Review Group...

  19. DOE Handbook: Implementing Activity-level Work Planning & Control...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Handbook: Implementing Activity-level Work Planning & Control at Nuclear Facilities DOE Handbook: Implementing Activity-level Work Planning & Control at Nuclear Facilities May 16,...

  20. SEM supports CMM-SW Level 2 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Mapping of the DOE Systems Engineering Methodology to the Software Engineering Institute (SEI) Software Capability Maturity Model (CMMSW) level 2. SEM supports CMM-SW Level 2 More...

  1. Agricultural Productivity Growth in China: Farm Level versus National Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Colin A.; Chen, Jing; Chu, Baojin

    1999-01-01

    bias any measurement of agricultural productivity, becauseProductivity Growth in China: Farm Level versus National MeasurementProductivity Growth in China: Farm Level versus National Measurement

  2. Dispensing Equipment Testing With Mid-Level Ethanol/Gasoline...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dispensing Equipment Testing With Mid-Level EthanolGasoline Test Fluid Dispensing Equipment Testing With Mid-Level EthanolGasoline Test Fluid The National Renewable Energy...

  3. System level modeling of thermoelectric generators for automotive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    level modeling of thermoelectric generators for automotive applications System level modeling of thermoelectric generators for automotive applications Uses a model to predict and...

  4. Steam reforming of low-level mixed waste. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-06-01

    ThermoChem has successfully designed, fabricated and operated a nominal 90 pound per hour Process Development Unit (PDU) on various low-level mixed waste surrogates. The design, construction, and testing of the PDU as well as performance and economic projections for a 300-lb/hr demonstration and commercial system are described. The overall system offers an environmentally safe, non-incinerating, cost-effective, and publicly acceptable method of processing LLMW. The steam-reforming technology was ranked the No. 1 non-incineration technology for destruction of hazardous organic wastes in a study commissioned by the Mixed Waste Focus Area and published in April 1997. The ThermoChem steam-reforming system has been developed over the last 13 years culminating in this successful test campaign on LLMW surrogates. Six surrogates were successfully tested including a 750-hour test on material simulating a PCB- and Uranium-contaminated solid waste found at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The test results indicated essentially total (> 99.9999%) destruction of RCRA and TSCA hazardous halogenated organics, significant levels of volume reduction (> 400 to 1), and retention of radionuclides in the volume-reduced solids. Economic evaluations have shown the steam-reforming system to be very cost competitive with more conventional and other emerging technologies.

  5. Properties of slag concrete for low-level waste containment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C.A. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Wong, P.B. (Bechtel National, Inc., Aiken, SC (United States))

    1991-01-01

    Ground granulated blast furnace slag was incorporated in the concrete mix used for construction of low-level radioactive waste disposal vaults. The vaults were constructed as six 100 {times} 100 {times} 25 ft cells with each cell sharing internal walls with the two adjacent cells. The vaults were designed to contain a low-level radioactive wasteform called saltstone and to isolate the saltstone from the environment until the landfill is closed. Closure involves backfilling with native soil, installation of clay cap, and run-off control. The design criteria for the slag-substituted concrete included compressive strength, 4000 psi after 28 days; slump, 6 inch; permeability, less than 10{sup {minus}7} cm/sec; and effective nitrate, chromium and technetium diffusivities of 10{sup {minus}8}, 10{sup {minus}12} and 10{sup {minus}12} cm{sup 2}/sec, respectively. The reducing capacity of the slag resulted in chemically reducing Cr{sup +6} to Cr{sup +3} and Tc{sup +7} to Tc{sup +4} and subsequent precipitation of the respective hydroxides in the alkaline pore solution. Consequently, the concrete vault enhances containment of otherwise mobile waste ions and contributes to the overall protection of the groundwater at the disposal site.

  6. Properties of slag concrete for low-level waste containment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Wong, P.B. [Bechtel National, Inc., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Ground granulated blast furnace slag was incorporated in the concrete mix used for construction of low-level radioactive waste disposal vaults. The vaults were constructed as six 100 {times} 100 {times} 25 ft cells with each cell sharing internal walls with the two adjacent cells. The vaults were designed to contain a low-level radioactive wasteform called saltstone and to isolate the saltstone from the environment until the landfill is closed. Closure involves backfilling with native soil, installation of clay cap, and run-off control. The design criteria for the slag-substituted concrete included compressive strength, 4000 psi after 28 days; slump, 6 inch; permeability, less than 10{sup {minus}7} cm/sec; and effective nitrate, chromium and technetium diffusivities of 10{sup {minus}8}, 10{sup {minus}12} and 10{sup {minus}12} cm{sup 2}/sec, respectively. The reducing capacity of the slag resulted in chemically reducing Cr{sup +6} to Cr{sup +3} and Tc{sup +7} to Tc{sup +4} and subsequent precipitation of the respective hydroxides in the alkaline pore solution. Consequently, the concrete vault enhances containment of otherwise mobile waste ions and contributes to the overall protection of the groundwater at the disposal site.

  7. Laboratory Experiments and Hydrodynamic Modeling of a Bed Leveler Used to Level the Bottom of Ship Channels after Dredging 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul, Ephraim Udo

    2011-02-22

    This study was conducted to ascertain the impacts of bed leveling, following ship channel dredging operations, and to also investigate the hydrodynamic flow field around box bed levelers. Laboratory experiments were conducted with bed levelers...

  8. Modeling and simulation technology readiness levels.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clay, Robert L.; Shneider, Max S.; Marburger, S. J.; Trucano, Timothy Guy

    2006-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of an effort to establish a framework for assigning and communicating technology readiness levels (TRLs) for the modeling and simulation (ModSim) capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories. This effort was undertaken as a special assignment for the Weapon Simulation and Computing (WSC) program office led by Art Hale, and lasted from January to September 2006. This report summarizes the results, conclusions, and recommendations, and is intended to help guide the program office in their decisions about the future direction of this work. The work was broken out into several distinct phases, starting with establishing the scope and definition of the assignment. These are characterized in a set of key assertions provided in the body of this report. Fundamentally, the assignment involved establishing an intellectual framework for TRL assignments to Sandia's modeling and simulation capabilities, including the development and testing of a process to conduct the assignments. To that end, we proposed a methodology for both assigning and understanding the TRLs, and outlined some of the restrictions that need to be placed on this process and the expected use of the result. One of the first assumptions we overturned was the notion of a ''static'' TRL--rather we concluded that problem context was essential in any TRL assignment, and that leads to dynamic results (i.e., a ModSim tool's readiness level depends on how it is used, and by whom). While we leveraged the classic TRL results from NASA, DoD, and Sandia's NW program, we came up with a substantially revised version of the TRL definitions, maintaining consistency with the classic level definitions and the Predictive Capability Maturity Model (PCMM) approach. In fact, we substantially leveraged the foundation the PCMM team provided, and augmented that as needed. Given the modeling and simulation TRL definitions and our proposed assignment methodology, we conducted four ''field trials'' to examine how this would work in practice. The results varied substantially, but did indicate that establishing the capability dependencies and making the TRL assignments was manageable and not particularly time consuming. The key differences arose in perceptions of how this information might be used, and what value it would have (opinions ranged from negative to positive value). The use cases and field trial results are included in this report. Taken together, the results suggest that we can make reasonably reliable TRL assignments, but that using those without the context of the information that led to those results (i.e., examining the measures suggested by the PCMM table, and extended for ModSim TRL purposes) produces an oversimplified result--that is, you cannot really boil things down to just a scalar value without losing critical information.

  9. Detecting low levels of radionuclides in fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Patch, Keith D. (Lexington, MA); Morgan, Dean T. (Sudbury, MA)

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for detecting low levels of one or more radionuclides in a fluid sample uses a substrate that includes an ion exchange resin or other sorbent material to collect the radionuclides. A collecting apparatus includes a collecting chamber that exposes the substrate to a measured amount of the fluid sample such that radionuclides in the fluid sample are collected by the ion exchange resin. A drying apparatus, which can include a drying chamber, then dries the substrate. A measuring apparatus measures emissions from radionuclides collected on the substrate. The substrate is positioned in a measuring chamber proximate to a detector, which provides a signal in response to emissions from the radionuclides. Other analysis methods can be used to detect non-radioactive analytes, which can be collected with other types of sorbent materials.

  10. Draft low level waste technical summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, W.J.; Benar, C.J.; Certa, P.J.; Eiholzer, C.R.; Kruger, A.A.; Norman, E.C.; Mitchell, D.E.; Penwell, D.E.; Reidel, S.P.; Shade, J.W.

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this document is to present an outline of the Hanford Site Low-Level Waste (LLW) disposal program, what it has accomplished, what is being done, and where the program is headed. This document may be used to provide background information to personnel new to the LLW management/disposal field and to those individuals needing more information or background on an area in LLW for which they are not familiar. This document should be appropriate for outside groups that may want to learn about the program without immediately becoming immersed in the details. This document is not a program or systems engineering baseline report, and personnel should refer to more current baseline documentation for critical information.

  11. Level Density in the Complex Scaling Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryusuke Suzuki; Takayuki Myo; Kiyoshi Kato

    2005-05-18

    It is shown that the continuum level density (CLD) at unbound energies can be calculated with the complex scaling method (CSM), in which the energy spectra of bound states, resonances and continuum states are obtained in terms of $L^2$ basis functions. In this method, the extended completeness relation is applied to the calculation of the Green functions, and the continuum-state part is approximately expressed in terms of discretized complex scaled continuum solutions. The obtained result is compared with the CLD calculated exactly from the scattering phase shift. The discretization in the CSM is shown to give a very good description of continuum states. We discuss how the scattering phase shifts can inversely be calculated from the discretized CLD using a basis function technique in the CSM.

  12. Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benenson, P.

    2010-01-01

    Acknowledgments SUMMARY Electricity Demand ElectricityAdverse Impacts ELECTRICITY DEMAND . . . .Demand forElectricity Sales Electricity Demand by Major Utility

  13. The detrimental effects of salinity on rooting of coleus cuttings and their alleviation with gypsum 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janssen, Antonius Hendrick

    1981-01-01

    concen- trations 2 Electrical conductivities (E. C. ) and osmolalities of 5 increasing salt solutions containing a 1/10- strength Hoagland's solution . 3 Electrical conductivities (E. C. ) of 4 NaCl solutions with increasing CaSO4 concentrations 4... of NaCl was due to a Na+ and/or Cl 1nhibition, a general 1on1c effect and/or osmot1c stresses of the salt solutions. 3. To determine if CaS04 reduces the adverse effects of increasing salinity in nutrient solutions and a peat-styra- foam propagation...

  14. THERMAL ANALYSIS OF GEOLOGIC HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE PACKAGES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hensel, S.; Lee, S.

    2010-04-20

    The engineering design of disposal of the high level waste (HLW) packages in a geologic repository requires a thermal analysis to provide the temperature history of the packages. Calculated temperatures are used to demonstrate compliance with criteria for waste acceptance into the geologic disposal gallery system and as input to assess the transient thermal characteristics of the vitrified HLW Package. The objective of the work was to evaluate the thermal performance of the supercontainer containing the vitrified HLW in a non-backfilled and unventilated underground disposal gallery. In order to achieve the objective, transient computational models for a geologic vitrified HLW package were developed by using a computational fluid dynamics method, and calculations for the HLW disposal gallery of the current Belgian geological repository reference design were performed. An initial two-dimensional model was used to conduct some parametric sensitivity studies to better understand the geologic system's thermal response. The effect of heat decay, number of co-disposed supercontainers, domain size, humidity, thermal conductivity and thermal emissivity were studied. Later, a more accurate three-dimensional model was developed by considering the conduction-convection cooling mechanism coupled with radiation, and the effect of the number of supercontainers (3, 4 and 8) was studied in more detail, as well as a bounding case with zero heat flux at both ends. The modeling methodology and results of the sensitivity studies will be presented.

  15. An object-oriented approach for analysing and characterizing urban landscape at the parcel level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    and characterizing the urban landscape structure at the parcel level using high-resolution digital aerial imagery classification accuracy. The study area is the Gwynns Falls watershed, which includes portions of Baltimore City classification approach proved to be effective for urban land cover classification. The overall accuracy

  16. A Universal Level Converter Towards the Realization of Energy Efficient Implantable Drug Delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohanty, Saraju P.

    A Universal Level Converter Towards the Realization of Energy Efficient Implantable Drug Delivery VLSI Design and CAD Laboratory (VDCL), University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203, USA. 2 Electrical many side effects, such as reduction in battery life time, increase in operating tempera- ture

  17. The study of pedestrian level wind at MacGregor dormitory building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wannaphahoon, Teerawut (Teerawut Lim)

    2011-01-01

    This study uses the Wright Brothers Wind Tunnel at MIT to study a 100:1 scaled model of the MacGregor dormitory building. The purposes are to quantify and analyze the effect of the presence of the building on pedestrian-level ...

  18. Analysis of Principal Gas Products During Combustion of Polyether Polyurethane Foam at Different Irradiance Levels 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bustamante Valencia, Lucas; Rogaume, Thomas; Guillaume, Eric; Rein, Guillermo; Torero, Jose L

    2009-01-01

    . This allows the mass balance of the elements in the virgin foam content with the gaseous product content. The effective heat of combustion and the ratio between heat release rate and CO2 mass flow are calculated at each of the irradiance levels....

  19. Wafer-Level Patterned and Aligned Polymer Nanowire/ Micro-and Nanotube Arrays on any Substrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    with silicon technology. Fabrication of PNW arrays of functional polymers has important applications rangingWafer-Level Patterned and Aligned Polymer Nanowire/ Micro- and Nanotube Arrays on any Substrate, and energy science.[1­7] A key requirement for these applications is the cost-effective growth of high

  20. Biomass, Flavonol Levels and Sensory Characteristics of Allium cultivars Grown Hydroponically at Ambient and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paré, Paul W.

    04ICES-136 Biomass, Flavonol Levels and Sensory Characteristics of Allium cultivars Grown growth chambers to evaluate the effect of elevated CO2 (1200 ppm) versus ambient CO2 (400 ppm) on biomass planting (dap). Regardless of cultivar or dap, plants grown at elevated CO2 had greater biomass

  1. AGRICULTURAL BMP PLACEMENT FOR COST-EFFECTIVE POLLUTION CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coello, Carlos A. Coello

    AGRICULTURAL BMP PLACEMENT FOR COST-EFFECTIVE POLLUTION CONTROL AT THE WATERSHED LEVEL Tamie Lynne-EFFECTIVE POLLUTION CONTROL AT THE WATERSHED LEVEL Tamie Lynne Veith Abstract The overall goal of this research was to increase, relative to targeting recommendations, the cost-effectiveness of pollution reduction measures

  2. ARM - Lesson Plans: Estimating Local Sea Level

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach Home Room News PublicationsClimate in theEffects

  3. Stochastic, Utility Accrual Real-Time Scheduling with Task-Level and System-Level Timeliness Assurances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravindran, Binoy

    Stochastic, Utility Accrual Real-Time Scheduling with Task-Level and System-Level Timeliness increasing interests and success in the context of Utility Accrual (UA) scheduling. However, few analytical results, such as bounds on task-level and system-level accrued utilities are known. In this paper, we

  4. Theory of Deep Impurity Levels in Cucl 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    REN, SY; Allen, Roland E.; DOW, JD; LEFKOWITZ, I.

    1982-01-01

    possiby, a' 1 1 ttice relaxation. e p A, Cu site Egap Hf Sc CrY Fe Ag MnPt Re CuRuMp N!tLu Ni Cp~Ir Au0sfcgbV~i Zr ~%At!I]tv! " E Cu site I s I -I5 "IO35 30 -25 -20 IMPURITY PO I s I -5 0 ( -like) substitution-V of the A & s- i~ g edicted... (eV)IMP UR ITY POTENT ies o t e - 'c (d 2 2-like e-f the E-symme?c -like EdA defect levels in the gap when on t e ~20925 P IMPURITY LE S yN CuClTHEORY OF DEE I Hf Sc Cr Y Fa n NELu fbi Cour AuCsPcAbVYhfTi a &r I I"li l II tI "I/I t'I Egop 3...

  5. Negation in context : electrophysiological and behavioral investigations of negation effects in discourse processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staab, Jenny

    2007-01-01

    level semantic processing: An ERP study. Brain and Language,P. , & Brown, C. M. (2000). ERP effects of listeningto speech: semantic ERP effects. Neuropsychologia, 11, 1518-

  6. Groundwater Level Status Report for 2005 Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.P. Allen; R.J. Koch

    2006-05-15

    The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in 2005 is provided in this report. The Groundwater Level Monitoring Project was instituted in 2005 to provide a framework for the collection and processing of quality controlled groundwater level data. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 137 monitoring wells, including 41 regional aquifer wells, 22 intermediate wells, and 74 alluvial wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 118 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well.

  7. NREL: State and Local Governments - The Effect of State Policy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    between demographic and economic contexts, state policies, and distributed solar installed capacity. Related reports include: The Effectiveness of State-Level Policies on...

  8. Demand models for U.S. domestic air passenger markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eriksen, Steven Edward

    1978-01-01

    The airline industry in recent years has suffered from the adverse effects of top level planning decisions based upon inaccurate demand forecasts. The air carriers have recognized the immediate need to develop their ...

  9. Time and location differentiated NOX control in competitive electricity markets using cap-and-trade mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Katherine C.

    2007-01-01

    Due to variations in weather and atmospheric chemistry, the timing and location of nitrogen oxide (NOX) reductions determine their effectiveness in reducing ground-level ozone, which adversely impacts human health. Electric ...

  10. Synthesis and Study of Boron and Antimony Lewis Acids as Small Anion Receptors and Ligands Towards Transition Metals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wade, Casey

    2012-02-14

    Although fluoride is used at low concentrations in drinking water as a means of promoting dental health, it poses a danger at high exposure levels where it can lead to skeletal fluorosis or other adverse effects. Cyanide is notoriously toxic...

  11. Variability-aware system-level design and analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandra, Saumya

    2009-01-01

    5 Variation-aware Analysis and Design Techniques at theof-the-art system-level analysis and design methodologies dosystem level design. Analysis and design techniques that are

  12. Universality level statistics disordered systems Heiko Bauke* and Stephan Mertens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mertens, Stephan

    k #8# check assumption statistically independent energy levels measured distribution of # kUniversality level statistics disordered systems Heiko Bauke* and Stephan Mertens + Institut published August 2004) Energy spectra disordered systems share a common feature: If entropy quenched

  13. Artificial general intelligence: an organism and level based position

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Leslie S.

    Artificial general intelligence: an organism and level based position statement Leslie S. SMITH 1. Keywords. artificial general intelligence, brain model, paramecium, level interaction Introduction There are many views of what should be described as artificial general intelligence. Gen- eral intelligence

  14. Development of ADECS to Meet 2010 Emission Levels: Optimization...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ADECS to Meet 2010 Emission Levels: Optimization of NOx, NH3 and Fuel Consumption Using High and Low Engine-Out NOx Calibrations Development of ADECS to Meet 2010 Emission Levels:...

  15. Oxygen levels in thermoplastic microfluidic devices during cell culture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ochs, Christopher J.

    We developed a computational model to predict oxygen levels in microfluidic plastic devices during cell culture. This model is based on experimental evaluation of oxygen levels. Conditions are determined that provide ...

  16. CRAD, Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management - April 30, 2015...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management - April 30, 2015 (EA CRAD 31-11, Rev. 0) CRAD, Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management - April 30, 2015 (EA CRAD 31-11, Rev. 0) April 2015...

  17. Weekday and Weekend Air Pollutant Levels in Ozone Problem Areas...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Weekday and Weekend Air Pollutant Levels in Ozone Problem Areas in the U.S. Weekday and Weekend Air Pollutant Levels in Ozone Problem Areas in the U.S. 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions...

  18. HIGH-LEVEL STATIC ANALYSIS FOR GENERIC Douglas Gregor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lumsdaine, Andrew

    HIGH-LEVEL STATIC ANALYSIS FOR GENERIC LIBRARIES By Douglas Gregor A Thesis Submitted;HIGH-LEVEL STATIC ANALYSIS FOR GENERIC LIBRARIES By Douglas Gregor An Abstract of a Thesis Submitted. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.1 Static analysis

  19. Automatic Thread-Level Parallelization in the Chombo AMR Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christen, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Automatic Thread-Level Parallelization in the Chombo AMRused target language for an automatic migration of the largemacros a perfect target for automatic ?ne-grained loop-level

  20. Community-Based Sea Level Rise Projections Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar will present a process for developing community-based sea level rise projections and facilitating their use.

  1. Estimating the Economic Cost of Sea-Level Rise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sugiyama, Masahiro.

    To improve the estimate of economic costs of future sea-level rise associated with global climate change,

  2. Architectural Level Risk Assessment Tool Based on UML Specifications 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goseva-Popstojanova, Katerina

    level of a failure of component/connector is estimated using FMEA [12]. Estimate scenario risk factor

  3. Track 1: Safety Culture- Taking ISMS to the Next Level

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 1: Safety Culture - Taking ISMS to the Next Level

  4. Level-1 Milestone 350 Definitions v1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, T

    2006-11-17

    This milestone is the direct result of work that started seven years ago with the planning for a 100-teraFLOP platform and will be satisfied when 100 teraFLOPS is placed in operation and readied for Stockpile Stewardship Program simulations. The end product of this milestone will be a production-level, high-performance computing system, code named Purple, designed to be used to solve the most demanding stockpile stewardship problems, that is, the large-scale application problems at the edge of our understanding of weapon physics. This fully functional 100 teraFLOPS system must be able to serve a diverse scientific and engineering workload. It must also have a robust code development and production environment, both of which facilitate the workload requirements. This multi-year effort includes major activities in contract management, facilities, infrastructure, system software, and user environment and support. Led by LLNL, the trilabs defined the statement of work for a 100-teraFLOP system that resulted in a contract with IBM known as the Purple contract. LLNL worked with IBM throughout the contract period to resolve issues and collaborated with the Program to resolve contractual issues to ensure delivery of a platform that best serves the Program for a reasonable cost. The Purple system represents a substantial increase in the classified compute resources at LLNL for NNSA. The center computer environment must be designed to accept the Purple system and to scale with the increase of compute resources to achieve required end-to-end services. Networking, archival storage, visualization servers, global file systems, and system software will all be enhanced to support Purple's size and architecture. IBM and LLNL are sharing responsibility for Purple's system software. LLNL is responsible for the scheduler, resource manager, and some code development tools. Through the Purple contract, IBM is responsible for the remainder of the system software including the operating system, parallel file system, and runtime environment. LLNL, LANL, and SNL share responsibility for the Purple user environment. Since LLNL is the host for Purple, LLNL has the greatest responsibility. LLNL will provide customer support for Purple to the tri-labs and as such has the lead for user documentation, negotiating the Purple usage model, mapping of the ASC computational environment requirements to the Purple environment, and demonstrating those requirements have been met. In addition, LLNL will demonstrate important capabilities of the computing environment including full functionality of visualization tools, file transport between Purple and remote site file systems, and the build environment for principle ASC codes. LANL and SNL are responsible for delivering unique capabilities in support of their users, porting important applications and libraries, and demonstrating remote capabilities. The key capabilities that LANL and SNL will test are user authorization and authentication, data transfer, file system, data management, and visualization. SNL and LANL should port and run in production mode a few key applications on a substantial number of Purple nodes.

  5. Learning at the Knowledge Level Thomas G. Dietterich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for such predictions has been suppressed. The key abstraction underlying the knowledge level is the notionLearning at the Knowledge Level Thomas G. Dietterich Department of Computer Science Oregon State University Corvallis, OR 97331 dietterich%oregon­state@csnet­relay Running head: Knowledge Level Learning #12

  6. Levels and Sources of Forest Fire Prevention Knowledge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Levels and Sources of Forest Fire Prevention Knowledge of California Hunters William S. Folkman U;Folkman, William S. 1963. Levels and sources of forest fire prevention knowl- edge of California hunters-managerial occupations. Their level of knowl- edge about forest fire prevention is generally high, but their knowledge

  7. Pure recoil corrections to hydrogen energy levels. Krzysztof Pachucki

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pachucki, Krzysztof

    Pure recoil corrections to hydrogen energy levels. Krzysztof Pachucki Max--Planck--Institut F approximation for the hydrogenic energy levels we can assume that the mass of the nucleus is infinite, vacuum polarization, etc. For the precise determination of hydrogenic energy levels we have to include

  8. Computing Energy Levels of the Confined Hydrogen Atom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuik, Kees

    Computing Energy Levels of the Confined Hydrogen Atom Karl K¨astner 02/03/2012 Supervisors: Martin of the Unconfined Atom The Confined Hydrogen Atom Energy Levels of the Confined Two Dimensional Hydrogen Atom Thesis of the Free Hydrogen Atom principal quantum number n EineV 0 5 10 15 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 Energy Levels

  9. APPLYING CACHING TO TWO-LEVEL ADAPTIVE BRANCH PREDICTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vintan, Lucian N.

    - 1 - APPLYING CACHING TO TWO-LEVEL ADAPTIVE BRANCH PREDICTION EGAN, C., STEVEN, G. B., SHIM, W of the Camera-ready paper. #12;- 2 - APPLYING CACHING TO TWO-LEVEL ADAPTIVE BRANCH PREDICTION ABSTRACT During the 1990s Two-level Adaptive Branch Predictors were developed to meet the requirement for accurate branch

  10. Multi-Level TESLA: Broadcast Authentication for Distributed Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ning, Peng

    Multi-Level µTESLA: Broadcast Authentication for Distributed Sensor Networks DONGGANG LIU and PENG named multi-level µTESLA based on µTESLA, a broadcast authentication protocol whose scalability is limited by its unicast-based initial parameter distribution. Multi-level µTESLA satisfies several nice

  11. Wellcome Trust CONSULTATION RESPONSE Ofqual: A level Reform Consultation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Wellcome Trust CONSULTATION RESPONSE Ofqual: A level Reform Consultation September 2012 1 Ofqual: A Level Reform Consultation Response by the Wellcome Trust September 2012 Key Points National Subject to university. We are therefore pleased to respond to this consultation on reforming A levels. Our comments

  12. LOW LEVEL JETS IN THE TROPICAL AMERICAS Submitted by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schubert, Wayne H.

    THESIS LOW LEVEL JETS IN THE TROPICAL AMERICAS Submitted by GABRIELA MORA ROJAS Department LEVEL JETS IN THE TROP- ICAL AMERICAS BE ACCEPTED AS FULFILLING IN PART REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE JETS IN THE TROPICAL AMERICAS The climatologies of five tropical low level jets are studied through

  13. HYBRID DECADE-MEAN GLOBAL SEA LEVEL WITH MESOSCALE RESOLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HYBRID DECADE-MEAN GLOBAL SEA LEVEL WITH MESOSCALE RESOLUTION Nikolai A. Maximenko1 and Pearn P of twin-satellite mission GRACE and mesoscale sea level tilt derived from the momentum balance as seen 55 #12;sea level exhibits excellent accuracy on mesoscale, but may contain significant systematic

  14. Using Direct Sub-Level Entity Access to Improve Nuclear Stockpile Simulation Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Y. Parker

    1999-08-01

    Direct sub-level entity access is a seldom-used technique in discrete-event simulation modeling that addresses the accessibility of sub-level entity information. The technique has significant advantages over more common, alternative modeling methods--especially where hierarchical entity structures are modeled. As such, direct sub-level entity access is often preferable in modeling nuclear stockpile, life-extension issues, an area to which it has not been previously applied. Current nuclear stockpile, life-extension models were demonstrated to benefit greatly from the advantages of direct sub-level entity access. In specific cases, the application of the technique resulted in models that were up to 10 times faster than functionally equivalent models where alternative techniques were applied. Furthermore, specific implementations of direct sub-level entity access were observed to be more flexible, efficient, functional, and scalable than corresponding implementations using common modeling techniques. Common modeling techniques (''unbatch/batch'' and ''attribute-copying'') proved inefficient and cumbersome in handling many nuclear stockpile modeling complexities, including multiple weapon sites, true defect analysis, and large numbers of weapon and subsystem types. While significant effort was required to enable direct sub-level entity access in the nuclear stockpile simulation models, the enhancements were worth the effort--resulting in more efficient, more capable, and more informative models that effectively addressed the complexities of the nuclear stockpile.

  15. EFFECT OF PORE SIZE ON TRAPPING ZINC VAPORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korinko, P.

    2010-12-17

    A series of experiments were conducted to determine the effect of pore size on pumping efficiency and zinc vapor trapping efficiency. A simple pumping efficiency test was conducted for all five pore diameters where it was observed that evacuation times were adversely affected by reducing the pore size below 5 {micro}m. Common test conditions for the zinc trapping efficiency experiments were used. These conditions resulted in some variability, to ascribe different efficiencies to the filter media. However, the data suggest that there is no significant difference in trapping efficiency for filter media with pores from 0.2 to 20 {micro}m with a thickness of 0.065-inch. Consequently, the 20 {micro}m pore filter media that is currently used at SRS is a suitable filter material for to utilize for future extractions. There is evidence that smaller pore filter will adversely affect the pumping times for the TEF and little evidence to suggest that a smaller pore diameters have significant impact on the trapping efficiency.

  16. Loss of pressurizer water level during station blackout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griggs, D.P.; Riggs, B.K.

    1986-01-01

    Station blackout is the loss of all alternating current (ac) power to both the essential and nonessential electrical buses in a nuclear power plant. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has proposed a requirement that all plants be capable of maintaining adequate core cooling during station blackout events lasting a specified duration. The NRC has also suggested acceptable specified durations of four or eight hours, depending on individual plant susceptibility to blackout events. In a pressurized water reactor (PWR), the occurrence of a station blackout event results in the functional loss of many plant components, including main feedwater, reactor coolant pumps, the emergency core cooling system, and pressurizer heaters and spray. Nevertheless, PWRs have the capability of removing decay heat for some period of time using steam-driven auxiliary feedwater pumps and the natural-circulation capability of the primary system. The purpose of this investigation is to determine the early response of a PWR to station blackout conditions. In particular, the effect of primary coolant shrinkage and inventory loss on pressurizer level is examined to gain insight into the operational and analytical issues associated with the proposed station blackout coping requirement.

  17. Defense High-Level Waste Leaching Mechanisms Program. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendel, J.E. (compiler)

    1984-08-01

    The Defense High-Level Waste Leaching Mechanisms Program brought six major US laboratories together for three years of cooperative research. The participants reached a consensus that solubility of the leached glass species, particularly solubility in the altered surface layer, is the dominant factor controlling the leaching behavior of defense waste glass in a system in which the flow of leachant is constrained, as it will be in a deep geologic repository. Also, once the surface of waste glass is contacted by ground water, the kinetics of establishing solubility control are relatively rapid. The concentrations of leached species reach saturation, or steady-state concentrations, within a few months to a year at 70 to 90/sup 0/C. Thus, reaction kinetics, which were the main subject of earlier leaching mechanisms studies, are now shown to assume much less importance. The dominance of solubility means that the leach rate is, in fact, directly proportional to ground water flow rate. Doubling the flow rate doubles the effective leach rate. This relationship is expected to obtain in most, if not all, repository situations.

  18. The Science of Level Design: Design Patterns and Analysis of Player Behavior in First-person Shooter Levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hullett, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    high- speed-data-driven-design-vs-console-development. [59]E. Byrne, Game Level Design, Charles River Media, 2004. A.Clayton, Introduction to Level Design for PC Games, Charles

  19. Statistical process control approach to reduce the bullwhip effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iyer, Harikumar

    2007-01-01

    The bullwhip effect is a pervasive problem in multi echelon supply chains that results in inefficient production operations and higher inventory levels. The causes of the bullwhip effect are well understood in industry and ...

  20. GreenIT Service Level Agreements IN SERVICE LEVEL AGREEMENTS IN GRIDS WORKSHOP COLOCATED WITH IEEE/ACM GRID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GreenIT Service Level Agreements IN SERVICE LEVEL AGREEMENTS IN GRIDS WORKSHOP COLOCATED WITH IEEE towards the inclusion of Green IT metrics as part of service level agreements for future Grids and Clouds. As part of this effort we need to revisit Green IT metrics and proxies that we consider optimizing against

  1. Essays on the household-level effects of house price growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sitgraves, Claudia Ayanna

    2009-01-01

    Indicator Constant Table 2.4 - Hedonic Price Regressions,Indicator Constant Table 2.5 - Hedonic Price Regressions,of improvements Table 2.32 - Unadjusted price variance - All

  2. Effects of vibrational motion on core-level spectra of prototype organic molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saykally, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    Division, the Molecular Foundry and the Ad- vanced LightCalifornia 94720. Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley

  3. Contributed Paper Using community-level metrics to monitor the effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewison, Rebecca

    diferentes de manera consistente en los estudios. Las respuestas de las medidas, derivadas de los conjuntos

  4. The effects of changing exercise levels on weight and age-related weight gain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Paul T.; Wood, Peter D.

    2004-01-01

    cumulative energy intake to Some of the Intra-individual variability in expenditure is estimated be less than 2% of energy expenditure

  5. The effects of estrogen and menhaden oil treatments on choline levels in the young chicken 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madden, Deborah Marie

    1995-01-01

    decreases plasma LDL by 14-15'to, increases HDL by 10-13 lo, and increases TG by 24-38 lo (16). Supplementation significantly increases the rate of LDL catabolism by increasing LDL receptors. Increasing VLDL production, may induce hypertriglyceridemia... + 10, 13[99] 21. 06 + 11. 14[99] 0. 0379& 26. 34+ 9. 65[98] 14. 13 + 7. 76[100] 0. 0001& LDL ('/s) 37. 15 + 20. 16[99] 41. 70 + 20. 28[99] 0. 0741 56. 22 + 12. 45[98] 22. 96 + 10. 72[100] 0. 0001t HDL ('/e) 42, 07+ 26, 50[99] 37. 11+ 25. 45[99] 0...

  6. Effects of level and source of copper on copper status of ewes and newborn lambs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eckert, Gregory Evan

    1997-01-01

    -Cu diets received an oral drench containing ammonium tetrathiomolybdate beginning 2 mo prior to parturition. At the time of birth lambs were assigned to either a treatment (cc- methyl-DL-p-tyrosine, AMPT) or control (saline) injection group, in order...

  7. The effects of protein level and feeding methods on egg production 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, James Cecil

    1952-01-01

    credo pxcteia aash gaxe satisfbctorp egg pxodsclkaag gcrth (1958) xeported oa six xxxthcds of fsediag lapisg hens ixxclxs&ag all~ah asd sash asd ~ sdxtcres?aad focsd that the all~ spstea of feediag hoss for ?gg pxodestioa gaea sX1gtrtdg hetter results...

  8. Effect of Environment and Genetics on Flavonoid Levels in Sorghum Grains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taleon Alban, Victor M

    2010-05-05

    Biosynthesis of Flavonoids ........................................................................................... 8 Flavonoid Extraction ................................................................................................... 10... .................................................................................. 15 Extraction for Total Phenols and Antioxidant Activity............................................... 16 Extraction for HPLC Analysis .................................................................................... 16 Total...

  9. Essays on the household-level effects of house price growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sitgraves, Claudia Ayanna

    2009-01-01

    in wealth from household saving, such passive gains canpassive changes in the value of other assets (such as vehicle depreciation), it is an estimate of how much households

  10. ALSEP Fligbt Systen1 6 (Array E) System Level Failure Mode Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Gravimeter Experiment (LSGE) +C. S. R =. 8998 Heat Flow Experiment (HFE) +C. S. R =·7972 ~~Passive Seismic housekeeping data (Criticality Rank = IV} Failure modes with a criticality rank of "I'' and "II" are termed

  11. Determination and Mitigation of Precipitation Effects on Portal Monitor Gamma Background Levels 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Revis, Stephen

    2012-07-16

    apart, as seen in Fig. 1. Each of these columns contains two 3He neutron detector units and two Polyvinyl Toluene (PVT) plastic scintillator gamma ray detection units. The 3He detector units consist of two 3He tubes encased in a white polyethylene... moderator, while the PVT detector units consist of a single, large rectangular prism of PVT, which is covered in black plastic to prevent ordinary visible light from affecting the detector. In Fig. 2, the PVT detector unit can be seen on the lower left...

  12. The effect of pet ownership/attachment on the stress level of multiple sclerosis patients 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loven, Ashley Marie

    2005-11-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is the most common demyelinating disease affecting the central nervous system. Over 80% of MS patients are in the relapsing remitting stage. Symptoms range from fever, fatigue, emotional distress, tingling, numbness, optic...

  13. High Altitude Platform's Instability Effect on Co-channel Interference Levels when Sharing the V band

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vouyioukas, Demosthenes

    the stratospheric layer. i. Unmanned Airships best represented in the literature by ITU studies and recommendations. Circling Manned Aircraft best represented by HALO platform [6]. Airships are unmanned semi-rigid or non

  14. Effects of environmental salinity and dietary protein levels on digestibility in four species of penaeid shrimp 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coelho, Silvio Romero de C.

    1984-01-01

    , for their solicitude in furnishing some of the animals used in the present study. Dr. Ronald L. Richter from the Department of Food Science Technology, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, who kindly permitted the use of the freeze-drier, The Empresa... experimental tanks. Initial average length and weight were 148. 93 + 8. 97 mm and 32. 24 + 5. 70 g, respectively. b) Penseus (Marsupenaeus) j aponicus Bate, 1888 The shrimp were received from the Empresa de Pesquisa Agropecuaria do Rio Grande do Norte S. A...

  15. THE BEIR-III REPORT AND THE HEALTH EFFECTS OF LOW-LEVEL RADIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    2010-01-01

    the body exposed to very low radiation doses and dose rates.carcinogenic risk of low-dose, low-LET radiation is subjectbe made for low- dose, low-LET radiation. It is for these

  16. THE HEALTH EFFECTS IN WOMEN EXPOSED TO LOW-LEVELS OF IONIZING RADIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    2010-01-01

    cancer following low-dose radiation exposure. Radiology 131:is the matter of low-dose radiation and the pregnant woman.considered incorrect; low-dose radiation can cause cancer,

  17. The effect of high-level waste glass composition on spinel liquidus...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Journal of Non-crystalline Solids, 384:32-40 Research Org: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL),...

  18. Mask Edge Effects in Optical Lithography and Chip Level Modeling Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Marshal

    2010-01-01

    Transmission for Chromeless PSM . Grating Based Experimentalvs. Duty Cycle for MoSi Att-PSM MoSi 0 th Order Transmissionfor MoSi Att-PSM . . . . . . . . . MoSi Compared to Ultra

  19. Field-Level Sublethal Effects of Approved Bee Hive Chemicals on Honey Bees (Apis mellifera L)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaplane, Keith S.

    , 3 The Food and Environment Research Agency, Sand Hutton, North Yorkshire, United Kingdom Abstract construction of queen supercedure cells compared to non-treated controls. Bees exposed to Check Mite unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source

  20. Essays on the household-level effects of house price growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sitgraves, Claudia Ayanna

    2009-01-01

    Irreversible invest- ment, real options, and competition:land prices: Evidence for real options in seattle. ” JournalGrowth controls, real options, and land development. ” Re-

  1. Effects of a supplement designed to increase ATP levels on muscle strength, power output, and endurance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herda, Trent J.; Ryan, Eric D.; Stout, Jeffrey R.; Cramer, Joel T.

    2008-01-01

    -administered ATP supplement on muscular strength, anaerobic power, and anaerobic capacity. The high dose of oral ATP taken 75 minutes prior to testing resulted in an increase in bench press strength, which the authors attributed to the presence of two outliers...-s Wingate tests for either the high- or low-dose groups. After 14 days of high-dose oral ATP supplementation, total lifting volume increased by 22%, however, neither muscular strength, anaerobic power, or anaerobic capac- ity were influenced...

  2. The Effect of Graded Levels of Dietary Starch on Cecal Environment in Horses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Kristen L.

    2010-07-14

    H. Samples were used to count total anaerobic bacteria and lactic acid bacteria, as well as determine methane activity, ammonia activity, volatile fatty acids, and in vitro dry matter digestibility (IVDMD). Stoichiometric calculations were performed to give...

  3. The Effects of Focus of Meditation on Pain Tolerance, Compassion, and Anxiety Levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kluck, Benjamin Joseph

    2008-01-01

    stream_size 67373 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Kluck_ku_0099D_10154_DATA_1.pdf.txt stream_source_info Kluck_ku_0099D_10154_DATA_1.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859...

  4. TOWARDS A COST-EFFECTIVE ILU PRECONDITIONER WITH HIGHER LEVEL FILLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Azevedo, Ed

    an appointment to the U.S. Department of Energy Postgraduate Research Program administered by Oak Ridge and Engineering Research Council of Canada, by the Information Technology Research Centre, which is funded by the Province of Ontario, and by the Applied Mathematical Sciences subprogram of the Oce of Energy Research, U

  5. Abstract--Bycatch studies have largely ignored population level effects on fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , social disruption, and habitat damage. However, the lack of specific abundance or catchability estimates for H. erectus means that the precise impact of trawl ing on this fish remains uncertain. This paper seahorses (Hippocampus erectus) in a Gulf of Mexico shrimp trawl fishery Julia K. Baum Jessica J. Meeuwig

  6. Manure P effects on corn growth and changes in soil test levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balser, Teri C.

    Sampling Pre-application and post-harvest 0 to 6" Bray 1-P (STP) Water extractable P (WEP) #12;Plant #12;Info. used in P Index Water extractable P (WEP) used in P Index as one factor in estimating

  7. Effects of corticosterone on the proportion of breeding females, reproductive output and yolk precursor levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    energetic demands via an increase in gluconeogenesis, resulting in maintenance of elevated blood glucose

  8. Determining the effects of fluctuating lake levels on wildlife habitat using GIS and remote sensing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sabella, Raymond Jacob

    1995-01-01

    of which are the result of the lake's principle role of floodwater storage and water resource management. Decisions on the location of these projects, however, are complicated by the relatively small elevation gradients which occur throughout the management...

  9. Effect of Special Education Proportion on School-Level Achievement in Texas Elementary Schools 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grande, Robert John

    2014-12-03

    For almost thirty years researchers have attempted to measure the impact that educating special education students with their regular education peers has on academic achievement. A review of the research literature addressing this broad question...

  10. The effect of temperature and relative humidity levels upon charcoal tube sampling for vinyl choloride 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCaskill, Gerald Daniel

    1983-01-01

    hygienist involves sorbent tubes. '~(hen correctly applied, samples collected in this manner yield time- weighted average values for airborne concentrations to which the individual of interest is exposed. To correctly use the results of this sampling.... This is a significant finding due to the fact that as the ambient air tem- perature rises, so does its capability to hoId water vapor. At 90! relative humidity, the amount of water vapor in the air virtually doubles when the ambient air temperature...

  11. Essays on the household-level effects of house price growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sitgraves, Claudia Ayanna

    2009-01-01

    Constructing measures of house price variance . . . . 2.4.4Flip That House? House Price Dynamics and Housing InvestmentHouse Price Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  12. THE BEIR-III REPORT AND THE HEALTH EFFECTS OF LOW-LEVEL RADIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    2010-01-01

    Symposium on Nuclear Reactor Safety: A Current Perspective.Symposium on Nuclear Reactor Safety: A Current Perscective.

  13. THE EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT ESTRADIOL DELIVERY METHODS ON PLASMA ESTRADIOL LEVELS IN MICE 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oetken, Katherine

    2013-12-16

    the ovaries of mice and replacing E2 at a controlled dose for the length of the study. One method of E2 delivery involves compacting E2 and cholesterol into a pellet and implanting it subcutaneously on the back of the animal. While the release patters...

  14. Effect of Sea Level Rise on Energy Infrastructure in Four Major

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPL EnergyPlus,Department ofDepartment ofDepartment

  15. Fractional Quantum Hall Effect at Landau Level Filling v=4/11. (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) |production atmeasurementComparisonArticle)sNN=5.02Article) | SciTech

  16. The effect of high-level waste glass composition on spinel liquidus

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference)FeedbackProperties ofTheatmosphereSouthern Ocean duringtemperature

  17. Effect of Sea Level Rise on Energy Infrastructure in Four Major

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas Nuclear Profile 2010MesoscopyStaff »Vehicle automation isMetropolitan

  18. Low Level and Transuranic Waste Segregation and Low Level Waste Characterization at the 200 Area of the Hanford Site - 12424

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donohoue, Tom; Martin, E. Ray; Mason, John A. [ANTECH Corporation 9050 Marshall Court, Westminster, CO, 80031 (United States); Blackford, Ty; Estes, Michael; Jasen, William [CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company, 2420 Stevens Drive, Richland, WA, 99352 (United States); Cahill, Michael [Fluor Federal Services, 1200 Jadwin Avenue, Richland, WA, 99352 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes the waste measurement and waste characterization activities carried out by ANTECH Corporation (ANTECH) and CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) at the 200 Area of the Hanford Site under Contracts No. 22394 and No. 40245 for the US Department of Energy (DOE). These include Low Level Waste (LLW) and Transuranic (TRU) Waste segregation and LLW characterization for both 55-gallon (200-litre) drums with gross weight up to 454 kg and 85-gallon over-pack drums. In order to achieve efficient and effective waste drum segregation and assay, ANTECH deployed an automated Gamma Mobile Assay Laboratory (G-MAL) at the trench face in both 200 Area West and East. The unit consists of a modified 40 foot ISO shipping container with an automatic flow through roller conveyor system with internal drum weigh scale, four measurement and drum rotation positions, and four high efficiency high purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors with both detector and shadow shields. The unit performs multiple far-field measurements and is able to segregate drums at levels well below 100 nCi/g. The system is sufficiently sensitive that drums, which are classified as LLW, are characterized at measurement levels that meet the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). With measurement times of between 20 and 30 minutes the unit can classify and characterize over 40 drums in an 8-hour shift. The system is well characterized with documented calibrations, lower limits of detection (LLD) and total measurement uncertainty. The calibrations are confirmed and verified using nationally traceable standards in keeping with the CHPRC measurement requirements. The performance of the system has been confirmed and validated throughout the measurement process by independent CHPRC personnel using traceable standards. All of the measurement and maintenance work has been conducted during the period under a Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) compliant with the applicable criteria of NQA-1 (2000). This includes not only the calibrations and measurements but also the data analysis activities of the ANTECH Subject Matter Experts (SME) and ANTECH support and maintenance activities as well as the activities of CHPRC staff who recover, transport and load waste drums and disposition measured and characterized drums. The overall processes of drum recovery and analysis are described in the paper. Specific spectral data is presented which illustrates the segregation, sentencing and assay process for different types of drums with different radionuclide profiles. The process of identifying and quantifying a wide range of non-TRU radionuclide isotopes is explained and illustrated with spectral examples. The difficulties associated with the measurement of drums with a high gamma ray background, usually arising from high levels of Cs-137 are considered. These drums, which would normally be declared indeterminate and treated as TRU, are addressed under contract No. 40245 by the deployment of the ANTECH Neutron Mobile Assay Laboratory. This is an Active-Passive neutron assay system housed in a modified ISO shipping container. The unit is designed for the measurement and assay of both drums and crates (including B-25 boxes and SWB containers) and will quantify the content of both plutonium and uranium. The neutron system has been employed to perform further evaluation on indeterminate drums to classify them to either LLW or TRU. The experiences of both gamma ray and neutron system operation in different conditions are described; as are the issues of throughput, drum handling and system maintenance. All of these are considered in the overriding context of safe drum handling and safe assay system operation. (authors)

  19. SU(3) Latent Heat and Surface Tension from Tree Level and Tadpole Improved Actions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beinlich, B; Peikert, A

    1996-01-01

    We analyze the latent heat and surface tension at the SU(3) deconfinement phase transition with tree level and tadpole improved Symanzik actions on lattices with temporal extent $N_\\tau = 3$ and 4 and spatial extent $N_\\sigma/ N_\\tau = 4$, 6 and 8. In comparison to the standard Wilson action we do find a drastic reduction of cut-off effects already with tree level improved actions. On lattices with temporal extent $N_\\tau=4$ results for the surface tension and latent heat obtained with a tree level improved action agree well with those obtained with a tadpole improved action. A comparison with $N_\\tau=3$ calculations, however, shows that results obtained with tadpole action remain unaffected by cut-off effects even on this coarse lattice, while the tree level action becomes sensitive to the cut-off. For the surface tension and latent heat we find $\\sigma_I/ T_c^3 = 0.0155~(16)$ and $\\Delta\\epsilon/T_c^4 = 1.40~(9)$, respectively.

  20. SU(3) Latent Heat and Surface Tension from Tree Level and Tadpole Improved Actions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Beinlich; F. Karsch; A. Peikert

    1996-08-27

    We analyze the latent heat and surface tension at the SU(3) deconfinement phase transition with tree level and tadpole improved Symanzik actions on lattices with temporal extent $N_\\tau = 3$ and 4 and spatial extent $N_\\sigma/ N_\\tau = 4$, 6 and 8. In comparison to the standard Wilson action we do find a drastic reduction of cut-off effects already with tree level improved actions. On lattices with temporal extent $N_\\tau=4$ results for the surface tension and latent heat obtained with a tree level improved action agree well with those obtained with a tadpole improved action. A comparison with $N_\\tau=3$ calculations, however, shows that results obtained with tadpole action remain unaffected by cut-off effects even on this coarse lattice, while the tree level action becomes sensitive to the cut-off. For the surface tension and latent heat we find $\\sigma_I/ T_c^3 = 0.0155~(16)$ and $\\Delta\\epsilon/T_c^4 = 1.40~(9)$, respectively.

  1. Core-level satellites and outer core-level multiplet splitting in Mn model compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, A. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Reynolds, John G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Roos, Joseph W. [Ethyl Corporation, Richmond, Virginia 23217 (United States)] [Ethyl Corporation, Richmond, Virginia 23217 (United States)

    2000-07-01

    We report a systematic study of the Mn 2p, 3s, and 3p core-level photoemission and satellite structures for Mn model compounds. Charge transfer from the ligand state to the 3d metal state is observed and is distinguished by prominent shake-up satellites. We also observe that the Mn 3s multiplet splitting becomes smaller as the Mn oxidation state increases, and that 3s-3d electron correlation reduces the branching ratio of the {sup 7}S:{sup 5}S states in the Mn 3s spectra. In addition, as the ligand electronegativity decreases, the spin-state purity is lost in the 3s spectra, as evidenced by peak broadening. Our results are best understood in terms of the configuration-interaction model including intrashell electron correlation, charge transfer, and final-state screening. (c) 2000 American Vacuum Society.

  2. Disposal of low-level and mixed low-level radioactive waste during 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    Isotopic inventories and other data are presented for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed LLW disposed (and occasionally stored) during calendar year 1990 at commercial disposal facilities and Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Detailed isotopic information is presented for the three commercial disposal facilities located near Barnwell, SC, Richland, WA, and Beatty, NV. Less information is presented for the Envirocare disposal facility located near Clive, UT, and for LLW stored during 1990 at the West Valley site. DOE disposal information is included for the Savannah River Site (including the saltstone facility), Nevada Test Site, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Hanford Site, Y-12 Site, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Summary information is presented about stored DOE LLW. Suggestions are made about improving LLW disposal data.

  3. Wind Energy Facilities and Residential Properties: The Effect of Proximity and View on Sales Prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    San Diego State University; Bard Center for Environmental Policy at Bard College; Hoen, Ben; Wiser, Ryan; Cappers, Peter; Thayer, Mark; Sethi, Gautam

    2011-06-23

    With increasing numbers of communities considering wind power developments, empirical investigations regarding related community concerns are needed. One such concern is that proximate property values may be adversely affected, yet relatively little research exists on the subject. The present research investigates roughly 7,500 sales of single-family homes surrounding 24 existing U.S. wind facilities. Across four different hedonic models, and a variety of robustness tests, the results are consistent: neither the view of the wind facilities nor the distance of the home to those facilities is found to have a statistically significant effect on sales prices, yet further research is warranted.

  4. Guidance Manual for Conducting Screening Level Ecological Risk Assessments at the INEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. L. VanHorn; N. L. Hampton; R. C. Morris

    1995-06-01

    This document presents reference material for conducting screening level ecological risk assessments (SLERAs)for the waste area groups (WAGs) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Included in this document are discussions of the objectives of and processes for conducting SLERAs. The Environmental Protection Agency ecological risk assessment framework is closely followed. Guidance for site characterization, stressor characterization, ecological effects, pathways of contaminant migration, the conceptual site model, assessment endpoints, measurement endpoints, analysis guidance, and risk characterization are included.

  5. Level repulsion, nuclear chaos, and conserved quantum numbers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrett, J.D.

    1993-12-01

    A statistical analysis of the distribution of level spacings for states with the same spin and parity is described in which the average spacing is calculated for the total ensemble. Though the resulting distribution of level spacings for states of deformed nuclei with Z = 62 - 75 and A = 155 - 185 is the closest to that of a Poisson distribution yet obtained for nuclear levels, significant deviations are observed for small level spacings. Many, but not all, of the very closely-spaced levels have K-values differing by several units. The analysis of level spacings in {sup 157}Ho indicate that considerable caution should be excerised when drawing conclusions from such an analysis for a single deformed nucleus, since the sizable number of spacings that can be obtained from a few rotational bands are not all independent.

  6. Twelfth annual US DOE low-level waste management conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The papers in this document comprise the proceedings of the Department of Energy's Twelfth Annual Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Conference, which was held in Chicago, Illinois, on August 28 and 29, 1990. General subjects addressed during the conference included: mixed waste, low-level radioactive waste tracking and transportation, public involvement, performance assessment, waste stabilization, financial assurance, waste minimization, licensing and environmental documentation, below-regulatory-concern waste, low-level radioactive waste temporary storage, current challenges, and challenges beyond 1990.

  7. Dislocation-related trap levels in nitride-based light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venturi, Giulia; Castaldini, Antonio; Cavallini, Anna

    2014-05-26

    Deep level transient spectroscopy was performed on InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well light emitting diodes (LEDs) in order to determine the effect of the dislocation density on the deep intragap electronic levels. The LEDs were grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy on GaN templates with a high dislocation density of 8 × 10{sup 9} cm{sup ?2} and a low dislocation density of 3 × 10{sup 8} cm{sup ?2}. Three trapping levels for electrons were revealed, named A, A1, and B, with energies E{sub A}???0.04?eV, E{sub A1}???0.13?eV, and E{sub B}???0.54?eV, respectively. The trapping level A has a much higher concentration in the LEDs grown on the template with a high density of dislocations. The logarithmic dependence of the peak amplitude on the bias pulse width for traps A and A1 identifies the defects responsible for these traps as associated with linearly arranged defects. We conclude that traps A and A1 are dislocation-related intragap energy levels.

  8. Technology and System Level Demonstration of Highly Efficient...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Peer Evaluation arravt081vssnewhouse2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications Technology and System Level Demonstration of Highly Efficient and Clean, Diesel Powered Class 8...

  9. Technology and System Level Demonstration of Highly Efficient...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Evaluation Meeting arravt081vssnewhouse2012o.pdf More Documents & Publications Technology and System Level Demonstration of Highly Efficient and Clean, Diesel Powered Class 8...

  10. Distribution-Transformer Level Flynn, Eric B. [Los Alamos National

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Taming the Grid: Dynamic Load Composition Quantification at the Distribution-Transformer Level Flynn, Eric B. Los Alamos National Laboratory; Holby, Edward F. Los Alamos...

  11. Energy Levels of "Hydrogen Atom" in Discrete Time Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrei Khrennikov; Yaroslav Volovich

    2006-04-27

    We analyze dynamical consequences of a conjecture that there exists a fundamental (indivisible) quant of time. In particular we study the problem of discrete energy levels of hydrogen atom. We are able to reconstruct potential which in discrete time formalism leads to energy levels of unperturbed hydrogen atom. We also consider linear energy levels of quantum harmonic oscillator and show how they are produced in the discrete time formalism. More generally, we show that in discrete time formalism finite motion in central potential leads to discrete energy spectrum, the property which is common for quantum mechanical theory. Thus deterministic (but discrete time!) dynamics is compatible with discrete energy levels.

  12. Operating Experience Level 3: Safety Concern: Occurrences of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    : Safety Concern: Occurrences of Crushing Injuries to Operators of Industrial Equipment Operating Experience Level 3: Safety Concern: Occurrences of Crushing Injuries to Operators...

  13. The social values at risk from sea-level rise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, Sonia; Barnett, Jon; Fincher, Ruth; Hurlimann, Anna; Mortreux, Colette; Waters, Elissa

    2013-07-15

    Analysis of the risks of sea-level rise favours conventionally measured metrics such as the area of land that may be subsumed, the numbers of properties at risk, and the capital values of assets at risk. Despite this, it is clear that there exist many less material but no less important values at risk from sea-level rise. This paper re-theorises these multifarious social values at risk from sea-level rise, by explaining their diverse nature, and grounding them in the everyday practices of people living in coastal places. It is informed by a review and analysis of research on social values from within the fields of social impact assessment, human geography, psychology, decision analysis, and climate change adaptation. From this we propose that it is the ‘lived values’ of coastal places that are most at risk from sea-level rise. We then offer a framework that groups these lived values into five types: those that are physiological in nature, and those that relate to issues of security, belonging, esteem, and self-actualisation. This framework of lived values at risk from sea-level rise can guide empirical research investigating the social impacts of sea-level rise, as well as the impacts of actions to adapt to sea-level rise. It also offers a basis for identifying the distribution of related social outcomes across populations exposed to sea-level rise or sea-level rise policies.

  14. Operating Experience Level 3, Safe Practices for Working with...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    This Operating Experience Level 3 makes the Department of Energy (DOE) nanotechnology community aware of a new publication as it relates to DOE's nanoscale safety...

  15. High-Level Waste Corporate Board Presentation Archive | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Triay High-Level Waste Corporate Board, Mark Gilbertson EM Engineering & Technology Roadmap and Major Technology Demonstrations Office of River Protection Idaho National...

  16. Quantum Random Access Codes using Single $d$-level Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armin Tavakoli; Alley Hameedi; Breno Marques; Mohamed Bourennane

    2015-04-30

    Random access codes (RACs) are used by a party to despite limited communication access an arbitrary subset of information held by another party. Quantum resources are known to enable RACs that break classical limitations. Here, we study quantum and classical RACs with high-level communication. We derive average performances of classical RACs and present families of high-level quantum RACs. Our results show that high-level quantum systems can significantly increase the advantage of quantum RACs over the classical counterparts. We demonstrate our findings in an experimental realization of a quantum RAC with four-level communication.

  17. Scientists detect methane levels three times larger than expected...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    methane that actually preceded recent concerns about potential emissions from fracking," Dubey said. Scientists detect methane levels three times larger than expected over...

  18. Energy level structure and transition probabilities in the spectra...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    H.M. 74 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; DYSPROSIUM IONS; ENERGY LEVELS; ERBIUM IONS; EUROPIUM IONS; GADOLINIUM IONS; HOLMIUM IONS; LANTHANUM...

  19. ORISE: Report shows nuclear engineering graduation rates leveling...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ORISE report shows nuclear engineering graduation rates leveling off in 2014 after five years of increase Decline seen in undergraduate and master degrees, while number of doctoral...

  20. Application Assessment of Bi-Level LED Parking Lot Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-02-01

    This report summarizes an assessment project conducted to evaluate light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires with bi-level operation in an outdoor parking lot application.

  1. Operating Experience Level 3, OSHA's Revised Hazard Communication...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    June 5, 2012 OE-3 2012-04: OSHA's Revised Hazard Communication Standard This Operating Experience Level 3 provides informaiton on the OSHA Revised Hazard Communication Standard. On...

  2. Energy Levels of "Hydrogen Atom" in Discrete Time Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khrennikov, A; Khrennikov, Andrei; Volovich, Yaroslav

    2006-01-01

    We analyze dynamical consequences of a conjecture that there exists a fundamental (indivisible) quant of time. In particular we study the problem of discrete energy levels of hydrogen atom. We are able to reconstruct potential which in discrete time formalism leads to energy levels of unperturbed hydrogen atom. We also consider linear energy levels of quantum harmonic oscillator and show how they are produced in the discrete time formalism. More generally, we show that in discrete time formalism finite motion in central potential leads to discrete energy spectrum, the property which is common for quantum mechanical theory. Thus deterministic (but discrete time!) dynamics is compatible with discrete energy levels.

  3. Idaho High-Level Waste & Facilities Disposition, Final Environmental...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    must prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Copies of the Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement are available at the...

  4. Development of Sea Level Rise Scenarios for Climate Change Assessments...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Development of Sea Level Rise Scenarios for Climate Change Assessments of the Mekong Delta, Vietnam Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Development of Sea...

  5. High Level Computational Chemistry Approaches to the Prediction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Computational Chemistry Approaches to the Prediction of Energetic Properties of Chemical Hydrogen Storage Systems High Level Computational Chemistry Approaches to the Prediction...

  6. Distributing leadership to teachers through a District Level Math Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robertson, Melavel Odviar

    2008-01-01

    to Distribute Leadership through a District-level Math21 Table 3.1: K-12 Math Council potentialinto changes in the Math Literacy Council’s organization,

  7. Microbial degradation of low-level radioactive waste. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, R.D.; Hamilton, M.A.; Veeh, R.H.; McConnell, J.W. Jr

    1996-06-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission stipulates in 10 CFR 61 that disposed low-level radioactive waste (LLW) be stabilized. To provide guidance to disposal vendors and nuclear station waste generators for implementing those requirements, the NRC developed the Technical Position on Waste Form, Revision 1. That document details a specified set of recommended testing procedures and criteria, including several tests for determining the biodegradation properties of waste forms. Information has been presented by a number of researchers, which indicated that those tests may be inappropriate for examining microbial degradation of cement-solidified LLW. Cement has been widely used to solidify LLW; however, the resulting waste forms are sometimes susceptible to failure due to the actions of waste constituents, stress, and environment. The purpose of this research program was to develop modified microbial degradation test procedures that would be more appropriate than the existing procedures for evaluation of the effects of microbiologically influenced chemical attack on cement-solidified LLW. The procedures that have been developed in this work are presented and discussed. Groups of microorganisms indigenous to LLW disposal sites were employed that can metabolically convert organic and inorganic substrates into organic and mineral acids. Such acids aggressively react with cement and can ultimately lead to structural failure. Results on the application of mechanisms inherent in microbially influenced degradation of cement-based material are the focus of this final report. Data-validated evidence of the potential for microbially influenced deterioration of cement-solidified LLW and subsequent release of radionuclides developed during this study are presented.

  8. One size fits all? An assessment tool for solid waste management at local and national levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broitman, Dani; Ayalon, Ofira; Kan, Iddo

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Waste management schemes are generally implemented at national or regional level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Local conditions characteristics and constraints are often neglected. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We developed an economic model able to compare multi-level waste management options. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A detailed test case with real economic data and a best-fit scenario is described. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Most efficient schemes combine clear National directives with local level flexibility. - Abstract: As environmental awareness rises, integrated solid waste management (WM) schemes are increasingly being implemented all over the world. The different WM schemes usually address issues such as landfilling restrictions (mainly due to methane emissions and competing land use), packaging directives and compulsory recycling goals. These schemes are, in general, designed at a national or regional level, whereas local conditions and constraints are sometimes neglected. When national WM top-down policies, in addition to setting goals, also dictate the methods by which they are to be achieved, local authorities lose their freedom to optimize their operational WM schemes according to their specific characteristics. There are a myriad of implementation options at the local level, and by carrying out a bottom-up approach the overall national WM system will be optimal on economic and environmental scales. This paper presents a model for optimizing waste strategies at a local level and evaluates this effect at a national level. This is achieved by using a waste assessment model which enables us to compare both the economic viability of several WM options at the local (single municipal authority) level, and aggregated results for regional or national levels. A test case based on various WM approaches in Israel (several implementations of mixed and separated waste) shows that local characteristics significantly influence WM costs, and therefore the optimal scheme is one under which each local authority is able to implement its best-fitting mechanism, given that national guidelines are kept. The main result is that strict national/regional WM policies may be less efficient, unless some type of local flexibility is implemented. Our model is designed both for top-down and bottom-up assessment, and can be easily adapted for a wide range of WM option comparisons at different levels.

  9. Breit-Pauli energy levels, transition probabilities, and lifetimes for 3d^5 levels in Fe IV of astrophysical interest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charlotte Froese Fischer; Robert H. Rubin

    2004-08-24

    Energy levels, lifetimes, and transition probabilities for transitions between computed levels of 3d^5 of Fe IV are reported. The E2 and M1 transition probabilities are compared with earlier theoretical results, often only the values published by Garstang in 1958. From the available astronomical observations of optical emission lines arising from the same level, a few direct tests are now possible and they show consistency with the theoretical calculations.

  10. Two-step Doppler cooling of a three-level ladder system with an intermediate metastable level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caroline Champenois; Gaetan Hagel; Martina Knoop; Marie Houssin; Cedric Zumsteg; Fernande Vedel; Michael Drewsen

    2008-02-14

    Doppler laser cooling of a three-level ladder system using two near-resonant laser fields is analyzed in the case of the intermediate level being metastable while the upper level is short-lived. Analytical as well as numerical results for e.g. obtainable scattering rates and achievable temperatures are presented. When appropriate, comparisons with two-level single photon Doppler laser cooling is made. These results are relevant to recent experimental Doppler laser cooling investigations addressing intercombination lines in alkali-earth metal atoms and quadrupole transitions in alkali-earth metal ions.

  11. Platinum nanoparticle during electrochemical hydrogen evolution: Adsorbate distribution, active reaction species, and size effect

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tan, Teck L.; Wang, Lin -Lin; Zhang, Jia; Johnson, Duane D.; Bai, Kewu

    2015-03-13

    For small Pt nanoparticles (NPs), catalytic activity is, as observed, adversely affected by size in the 1–3 nm range. We elucidate, via first-principles-based thermodynamics, the operation H* distribution and cyclic voltammetry (CV) during the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) across the electrochemical potential, including the underpotential region (U ? 0) that is difficult to assess in experiment. We consider multiple adsorption sites on a 1 nm Pt NP model and show that the characteristic CV peaks from different H* species correspond well to experiment. We next quantify the activity contribution from each H* species to explain the adverse effect of size.more »From the resolved CV peaks at the standard hydrogen electrode potential (U = 0), we first deduce that the active species for the HER are the partially covered (100)-facet bridge sites and the (111)-facet hollow sites. Upon evaluation of the reaction barriers at operation H* distribution and microkinetic modeling of the exchange current, we find that the nearest-neighbor (100)-facet bridge site pairs have the lowest activation energy and contribute to ~75% of the NP activity. Edge bridge sites (fully covered by H*) per se are not active; however, they react with neighboring (100)-facet H* to account for ~18% of the activity, whereas (111)-facet hollow sites contribute little. As a result, extrapolating the relative contributions to larger NPs in which the ratio of facet-to-edge sites increases, we show that the adverse size effect of Pt NP HER activity kicks in for sizes below 2 nm.« less

  12. University of Vermont College-Level Examination Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    Exam Score UVM Course Equivalent(s) Credits Awarded American Government 50 POLS 021 (American Political.00 Spanish Level I 50 SPAN 001 (Elementary Spanish I) SPAN 002 (Elementary Spanish II) 3.00 3.00 Spanish Level II 63 SPAN 001 (Elementary Spanish I) SPAN 002 (Elementary Spanish II) SPAN 051 (Intermediate

  13. POSITION: Electrical Engineer / Full Time / Entry Level JOB DESCRIPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvaggio, Carl

    POSITION: Electrical Engineer / Full Time / Entry Level JOB DESCRIPTION: Due to Control Chief Corporation's continued growth we have a vacancy for an entry level Electrical Engineer to work in our educated engineering candidate with a 4-year degree in Electrical Engineering, Electrical Engineering

  14. Impact of Climate Changes on Pollution Levels in Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimov, Ivan

    Impact of Climate Changes on Pollution Levels in Europe Final Report NATO Project CLG 980505 Petra scientific project: "Impact of Climatic Changes on Pollution Levels in Europe" is partly supported by a NATO ..................................................................................................... 8 3. Constant meteorology versus constant anthropogenic emissions .................. 9 4. Climatic

  15. Architectural-Level Risk Analysis Using UMLy g

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Doo-Hwan

    6/12/2010 1 Architectural-Level Risk Analysis Using UMLy g IEEE Transactions on Software Introduction Background Risk analysis methodology Conclusion Discussion KAIST SE LAB 2010 2/27 #12;6/12/2010 2 at the architecture level is more beneficial than assessment at later development phases Risk analysis methodology

  16. Process for solidifying high-level nuclear waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ross, Wayne A. (Richland, WA)

    1978-01-01

    The addition of a small amount of reducing agent to a mixture of a high-level radioactive waste calcine and glass frit before the mixture is melted will produce a more homogeneous glass which is leach-resistant and suitable for long-term storage of high-level radioactive waste products.

  17. Density regulation in annual plant communities under variable resource levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novoplansky, Ariel

    Density regulation in annual plant communities under variable resource levels Hagit Shilo. E. and Turkington, R. 2005. Density regulation in annual plant communities under variable resource levels. Á/ Oikos 108: 241Á/252. Density regulation is assumed to be common, but is very rarely tested

  18. Forestry Commission Wales Guidance on rental levels for Hydro Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    initiated a process to facilitate the development of small- scale hydro-electricity schemes on land ownedForestry Commission Wales Guidance on rental levels for Hydro Power Guidance on rental levels for hydro power projects Tel: 02920 475961 Email: hydrowales@forestry.gsi.gov.uk Version 1.0 Mike Pitcher 17

  19. Synoptic Responses to Mountain Gravity Waves Encountering Directional Critical Levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lott, Francois

    Synoptic Responses to Mountain Gravity Waves Encountering Directional Critical Levels ARMEL MARTIN the synoptic response to mountain gravity waves (GWs) absorbed at directional critical levels. The model in the midtroposphere. First, the authors consider the case of an idealized mountain range such that the orographic

  20. Level shift operators for open quantum systems Marco Merkli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;ematiques, Universit#19;e de Montr#19;eal Succursale centre-ville, Montr#19;eal Canada, QC, H3C 3J7 January temperature Hamiltonians and they relate the Gibbs state, the kernel of level shift operators, and zero energy resonances. We show that degeneracy of energy levels of the small part of the open quantum system causes

  1. Fast Thermal Simulation for Architecture Level Dynamic Thermal Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Sheldon X.-D.

    Fast Thermal Simulation for Architecture Level Dynamic Thermal Management Pu Liu, Zhenyu Qi, Hang temperature by dynamic thermal managements becomes necessary. This paper proposes a novel approach to the thermal analysis at chip architecture level for efficient dynamic thermal management. Our new approach

  2. Privacy Preserving Smart Metering System Based Retail Level Electricity Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franchetti, Franz

    1 Privacy Preserving Smart Metering System Based Retail Level Electricity Market Cory Thoma, Tao technologies which includes load management and retail level electricity market support. Index Terms as the various market functionalities also pose great risks to customer privacy. In this work we propose a secure

  3. Detecting appropriate groundwater-level trends for safe groundwater development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    Detecting appropriate groundwater-level trends for safe groundwater development Rahul Gokhale-monsoon Groundwater(GW) levels are important for the periodic categorisation of regions in India according to their GW-safety. A specific procedure has been recommended by the Groundwater Estimation Committee, 1997(GEC'97), constituted

  4. Type-level module aliases: independent and equal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garrigue, Jacques

    . ­ Through nested structures, it allows for hierarchical design of libraries. ­ Sharing of types allows library) #12;Garrigue & White -- Type-level module aliases 9 The re-built hierarchy: SML/NJ ­ SML out of the specification. #12;Garrigue & White -- Type-level module aliases 10 A packed library

  5. Exports and exchange rate : a firm-level investigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Exports and exchange rate : a firm-level investigation N° 2008-02 Février 2008 Sarah Guillou OFCE-DRIC hal-00973044,version1-3Apr2014 #12;Exports and exchange rate: a firm-level investigation Sarah Guillou February 2008 Abstract This paper investigates the relation between export behaviour and the exchange rate

  6. Adhesive High-Level Replacement Categories and Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habel, Annegret

    Adhesive High-Level Replacement Categories and Systems Hartmut Ehrig1 , Annegret Habel2 , Julia.habel@informatik.uni-oldenburg.de Abstract. Adhesive high-level replacement (HLR) categories and sys- tems are introduced as a new of HLR systems with the new concept of adhesive categories introduced by Lack and Soboci

  7. Mixed and Low-Level Treatment Facility Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This appendix contains the mixed and low-level waste engineering design files (EDFS) documenting each low-level and mixed waste stream investigated during preengineering studies for Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project. The EDFs provide background information on mixed and low-level waste generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. They identify, characterize, and provide treatment strategies for the waste streams. Mixed waste is waste containing both radioactive and hazardous components as defined by the Atomic Energy Act and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, respectively. Low-level waste is waste that contains radioactivity and is not classified as high-level waste, transuranic waste, spent nuclear fuel, or 11e(2) byproduct material as defined by DOE 5820.2A. Test specimens of fissionable material irradiated for research and development only, and not for the production of power or plutonium, may be classified as low-level waste, provided the concentration of transuranic is less than 100 nCi/g. This appendix is a tool that clarifies presentation format for the EDFS. The EDFs contain waste stream characterization data and potential treatment strategies that will facilitate system tradeoff studies and conceptual design development. A total of 43 mixed waste and 55 low-level waste EDFs are provided.

  8. Component-Level Demonstration of a Microfabricated Atomic Frequency Reference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popovic, Zoya

    size and lower power dissipation. In particular, atomic clocks based on coherent population trappingComponent-Level Demonstration of a Microfabricated Atomic Frequency Reference V. Gerginov, S component-level functionality of the three critical subsystems for a miniature atomic clock based

  9. Level of Repair Analysis and Minimum Cost Homomorphisms of Graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutin, Gregory

    of Lillian Barros Abstract. Level of Repair Analysis (LORA) is a prescribed procedure for defence logistics, LORA seeks to determine an optimal provision of repair and maintenance facilities to minimize overall on bipartite graphs is polynomial time solvable. Keywords: Computational Logistics; Level of Repair Analysis

  10. NOAA Water Level and Meteorological Data Report HURRICANE SANDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Water Level and Meteorological Data Report HURRICANE SANDY Silver Spring, Maryland January 24 Report HURRICANE SANDY Colleen Fanelli, Paul Fanelli, David Wolcott January 24, 2013 noaa National, Richard Edwing #12;NOAA NOS Hurricane Sandy Water Level & Meteorological Data Report 1 Table of Contents

  11. Radiation levels on empty cylinders containing heel material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shockley, C.W. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Paducah, KY (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Empty UF{sub 6} cylinders containing heel material were found to emit radiation levels in excess of 200 mr/hr, the maximum amount stated in ORO-651. The radiation levels were as high as 335 mr/hr for thick wall (48X and 48Y) cylinders and 1050 mr/hr for thin wall (48G and 48H) cylinders. The high readings were found only on the bottom of the cylinders. These radiation levels exceeded the maximum levels established in DOT 49 CFR, Part 173.441 for shipment of cylinders. Holding periods of four weeks for thick-wall cylinders and ten weeks for thin-wall cylinders were established to allow the radiation levels to decay prior to shipment.

  12. GIS applications to evaluate public health effects of global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Regens, J.L.; Hodges, D.G.

    1996-12-31

    Modeling projections of future climatic conditions suggest changes in temperature and precipitation patterns that might induce direct adverse effects on human health by altering the extent and severity of infectious and vector-borne diseases. The incidence of mosquito-borne diseases, for example, could increase substantially in areas where temperature and relative humidity rise. The application of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) offers new methodologies to evaluate the impact of global warming on changes in the incidence of infectious and vector-borne diseases. This research illustrates the potential analytical and communication uses of GIS for monitoring historical patterns of climate and human health variables and for projecting changes in these health variables with global warming.

  13. Electrodes mitigating effects of defects in organic electronic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heller, Christian Maria Anton (Albany, NY)

    2008-05-06

    A compound electrode for organic electronic devices comprises a thin first layer of a first electrically conducting material and a second electrically conducting material disposed on the first layer. In one embodiment, the second electrically conducting material is formed into a plurality of elongated members. In another embodiment, the second material is formed into a second layer. The elongated members or the second layer has a thickness greater than that of the first layer. The second layer is separated from the first layer by a conducting material having conductivity less than at least the material of the first layer. The compound electrode is capable of mitigating adverse effects of defects, such as short circuits, in the construction of the organic electronic devices, and can be included in light-emitting or photovoltaic devices.

  14. Status Update on Action 2b: Revision of DOE G 226.1-2 with new Guidance for Activity-level Work Planning and Control

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slide Presentation by Roger Claycomb, Work Control Program Manager, DOE Idaho Operations Office. Strengthen guidance and formality associated with contractor implementation and Federal monitoring of activity-level WP&C. Develop a DOE Guide on Federal oversight and evaluation of the effectiveness of Activity-Level WP&C.

  15. Concurrent Circuit-Level/System-Level Optimization of a 24 GHz Mixer for Automotive Applications Using a Hybrid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tentzeris, Manos

    of automotive industry in developing a number of active and passive systems to enhance road safety. A DopplerConcurrent Circuit-Level/System-Level Optimization of a 24 GHz Mixer for Automotive Applications reported so far for this frequency range and in these operating conditions. Index Terms - Automotive radar

  16. A report on high-level nuclear waste transportation: Prepared pursuant to assembly concurrent resolution No. 8 of the 1987 Nevada Legislature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1988-12-01

    This report has been prepared by the staff of the State of Nevada Agency for Nuclear Projects/Nuclear Waste Project Office (NWPO) in response to Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 8 (ACR 8), passed by the Nevada State Legislature in 1987. ACR 8 directed the NWPO, in cooperation with affected local governments and the Legislative committee on High-Level Radioactive Waste, to prepare this report which scrutinizes the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) plans for transportation of high-level radioactive waste to the proposed yucca Mountain repository, which reviews the regulatory structure under which shipments to a repository would be made and which presents NWPO`s plans for addressing high-level radioactive waste transportation issues. The report is divided into three major sections. Section 1.0 provides a review of DOE`s statutory requirements, its repository transportation program and plans, the major policy, programmatic, technical and institutional issues and specific areas of concern for the State of Nevada. Section 2.0 contains a description of the current federal, state and tribal transportation regulatory environment within which nuclear waste is shipped and a discussion of regulatory issues which must be resolved in order for the State to minimize risks and adverse impacts to its citizens. Section 3.0 contains the NWPO plan for the study and management of repository-related transportation. The plan addresses four areas, including policy and program management, regulatory studies, technical reviews and studies and institutional relationships. A fourth section provides recommendations for consideration by State and local officials which would assist the State in meeting the objectives of the plan.

  17. Directions in low-level radioactive waste management: A brief history of commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-01

    This report presents a history of commercial low-level radioactive waste management in the United States, with emphasis on the history of six commercially operated low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. The report includes a brief description of important steps that have been taken during the 1980s to ensure the safe disposal of low-level waste in the 1990s and beyond. These steps include the issuance of Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 61, Licensing Requirements for the Land Disposal of Radioactive Waste, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, and steps taken by states and regional compacts to establish additional disposal sites. 42 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Alloy Engineering of Defect Properties in Semiconductors: Suppression of Deep Levels in 2D Transition-metal Dichalcogenides

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Huang, Bing; Yoon, Mina; Sumpter, Bobby G; Wei, Su-Huai; Liu, Feng

    2015-09-18

    Developing practical approaches to effectively reduce the deep defect levels in semiconductors is critical for their use in electronic and optoelectronic devices, but this is still a very challenging task. In this Letter, we propose that specific alloying can provide an effective means to suppress the deep defect levels in semiconductors while maintaining their basic electronic properties. Specifically, we demonstrate that for such 2D transition-metal dichalcogenides as MoSe2 and WSe2, in which the most abundant defects that can induce deep levels are anion vacancies, the deep levels can be effectively suppressed in Mo1-xWxSe2 alloys at low W concentrations. This surprisingmore »phenomenon is associated with the fact that the global alloy concentration can substantially tune the band edge energies, whereas the preferred locations of Se vacancies around W atoms control the defect level locally. Our findings illustrate a new concept of alloy engineering and provide a promising approach to control the defect properties of semiconductors.« less

  19. Synergism between arsenite and proteasome inhibitor MG132 over cell death in myeloid leukaemic cells U937 and the induction of low levels of intracellular superoxide anion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lombardo, Tomás; Cavaliere, Victoria; Costantino, Susana N.; Kornblihtt, Laura; Alvarez, Elida M.; Blanco, Guillermo A.

    2012-02-01

    Increased oxygen species production has often been cited as a mechanism determining synergism on cell death and growth inhibition effects of arsenic-combined drugs. However the net effect of drug combination may not be easily anticipated solely from available knowledge of drug-induced death mechanisms. We evaluated the combined effect of sodium arsenite with the proteasome inhibitor MG132, and the anti-leukaemic agent CAPE, on growth-inhibition and cell death effect in acute myeloid leukaemic cells U937 and Burkitt's lymphoma-derived Raji cells, by the Chou–Talalay method. In addition we explored the association of cytotoxic effect of drugs with changes in intracellular superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup ?}) levels. Our results showed that combined arsenite + MG132 produced low levels of O{sub 2}{sup ?} at 6 h and 24 h after exposure and were synergic on cell death induction in U937 cells over the whole dose range, although the combination was antagonistic on growth inhibition effect. Exposure to a constant non-cytotoxic dose of 80 ?M hydrogen peroxide together with arsenite + MG132 changed synergism on cell death to antagonism at all effect levels while increasing O{sub 2}{sup ?} levels. Arsenite + hydrogen peroxide also resulted in antagonism with increased O{sub 2}{sup ?} levels in U937 cells. In Raji cells, arsenite + MG132 also produced low levels of O{sub 2}{sup ?} at 6 h and 24 h but resulted in antagonism on cell death and growth inhibition. By contrast, the combination arsenite + CAPE showed high levels of O{sub 2}{sup ?} production at 6 h and 24 h post exposure but resulted in antagonism over cell death and growth inhibition effects in U937 and Raji cells. We conclude that synergism between arsenite and MG132 in U937 cells is negatively associated to O{sub 2}{sup ?} levels at early time points after exposure. -- Highlights: ? Arsenic combined cytotoxic and anti-proliferative effects by Chou–Talalay method. ? Cytotoxic effect associated with superoxide levels as assessed by flow cytometry. ? Synergism between arsenite and MG132 in U937 leukemia cell line. ? Synergism turned into antagonism by low levels of hydrogen peroxide. ? Resistance to arsenic cytotoxicity linked to early superoxide anion increased levels.

  20. Reference commercial high-level waste glass and canister definition.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slate, S.C.; Ross, W.A.; Partain, W.L.

    1981-09-01

    This report presents technical data and performance characteristics of a high-level waste glass and canister intended for use in the design of a complete waste encapsulation package suitable for disposal in a geologic repository. The borosilicate glass contained in the stainless steel canister represents the probable type of high-level waste product that will be produced in a commercial nuclear-fuel reprocessing plant. Development history is summarized for high-level liquid waste compositions, waste glass composition and characteristics, and canister design. The decay histories of the fission products and actinides (plus daughters) calculated by the ORIGEN-II code are presented.