Sample records for adverse effect level

  1. adverse cardiovascular effects: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Adverse Effects of Antenatal Ultrasonography A. J. Baczkowski Department of Statistics, University the recent evidence for potential adverse effects of antenatal...

  2. Adverse Health Effects of Air Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haley, R. W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Adverse Health Effects of Air Pollution Robert W. Haley, M.D. Professor of Medicine Director, Division of Epidemiology University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center Dallas, Texas ? Texas Medical Association has adopted resolutions... Rice University study of how to maintain energy efficiency while reducing air pollution. ? Supported legislation based on the findings. The Medical Professor Increasingly Concerned ? Asthma ? Emphysema ? Heart Attacks ? Stunted lung...

  3. adverse health effects: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    j.vaccine.2009.12.030 Expected and Unexpected adverse effects H1N1 vaccination for health care workers in a University Hospital CiteSeer Summary: All authors declare that...

  4. Potential adverse health effects of wood smoke

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierson, W.E.; Koenig, J.Q.; Bardana, E.J. Jr.

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of wood stoves has increased greatly in the past decade, causing concern in many communities about the health effects of wood smoke. Wood smoke is known to contain such compounds as carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, aldehydes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and fine respirable particulate matter. All of these have been shown to cause deleterious physiologic responses in laboratory studies in humans. Some compounds found in wood smoke--benzo(a)pyrene and formaldehyde--are possible human carcinogens. Fine particulate matter has been associated with decreased pulmonary function in children and with increased chronic lung disease in Nepal, where exposure to very high amounts of wood smoke occurs in residences. Wood smoke fumes, taken from both outdoor and indoor samples, have shown mutagenic activity in short-term bioassay tests. Because of the potential health effects of wood smoke, exposure to this source of air pollution should be minimal.29 references.

  5. The effects of adverse environmental conditions on workload

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ann Elizabeth

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and the high temperature-continuous noise combi na- tion were found to be significantly different from the other conditions tested. There were also significant effects of noise and temperature in increasing workload (p&. 01). ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I wish... and Maxfield, 1962). These areas were studied i n the present experi men&. . Another aspect of a man-machine system that affects the perfor- mance of a human operator is the level of workload imposed on the oper- ator by the task (Knowles, 1963; Senders...

  6. aed adverse effects: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the effects of SAD. In high-latitude countries (e.g., Canada, UK, Nordic and Baltic countries), evaluating proposals for high-risk programmes during the late fall...

  7. adverse radiotherapy effects: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the effects of SAD. In high-latitude countries (e.g., Canada, UK, Nordic and Baltic countries), evaluating proposals for high-risk programmes during the late fall...

  8. The issue of 'Adverse Effects and the Impacts of Response Measures' in UNFCCC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    of emission reduction activities on energy exporting countries. In negotiations the Organisation of Petroleum. This paper explores the political, economic and legal dimensions of this interlocked adverse effects to the impacts of climate change. This suggests that tacit G77-China support for OPEC's position may therefore

  9. THE ADVERSE EFFECTS TO FISHES OF PILE-DRIVING - THE IMPLICATIONS FOR ESA AND EFH CONSULTATIONS IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, John H.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ADVERSE EFFECTS TO FISHES OF PILE-DRIVING - THE IMPLICATIONS753-9517 Chapter 2 Abstract Piles are integral components ofWhile treated-wood and concrete piles are commonly used for

  10. Effect of Sea Level Rise

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy Chinaof EnergyImpactOn July 2, 2014 in theGroup Report |ofM A NNRELU.S.-JapanWear

  11. adversely impacting posttransplant: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the prefrontal cortex. Next we consider studies that suggest that the effect of environmental adversity may be conditional on an individuals genotype. We also briefly...

  12. Sea-Level Rise OF THE EFFECTS OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change AND Sea-Level Rise IN Florida AN Update OF THE EFFECTS OF Climate Change ON FLORIDA to them. Florida Oceans and Coastal Council. 2010. Climate Change and Sea-Level Rise in Florida: An Update, sea-level rise, with the expectation that updates for increasing greenhouse gases, air temperature

  13. Effects of Low Level Laser Therapy on Orthodontic Pain 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buchwald, Bradley

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine the effectiveness of low level laser therapy applied extra orally on the reduction of orthodontic pain. Materials and Methods: Sixty dental students were voluntarily recruited for this randomized, double-blinded, placebo...

  14. The effect of dietary protein level on growth and reproduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Nancy Delane

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , after which the levels declined over the next 6 d to basal values. Tritiated estradiol was found in association with nuclear chromatin, suggesting that estradiol has an early effect on the process of transcription (Eisenfeld, 1974). Within 1 hr...

  15. air pollution adversely: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Adverse Health Effects of Air Pollution Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: Rice University study of how to...

  16. Effects of low levels of radiation on humans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auxier, J.A.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The state of knowledge on effects of low-level ionizing radiations on humans is reviewed. Several problems relating to dose thresholds or lack of thresholds for several types of cancer and high LET radiations and the effects of fractionation and dose protection are discussed. (ACR)

  17. The effect of inhibitor transport on leveling in electrodeposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, K.G.; Tobias, C.W. (Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Univ. of California, and Materials and Chemical Sciences Div., Lawrence Berkeley Lab., Berkeley, CA (US))

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on the electrodeposition of nickel into an angular trench in the presence of coumarin, a widely used inhibitor, simulated using boundary layer approximations representative of flow parallel and transverse to the groove. Based on the diffusion-adsorption mechanism of leveling action, the dependence of the developing contours on variations in the Langmuir coefficient and inhibitor/metal-ion flux ratio are investigated. Leveling efficiency is shown to be highest for thin, planar boundary layers, and lowest for contour following boundary layers. The model successfully predicts the leveling-off of the inhibitor effect with increasing inhibitor vs. metal-ion flux, and that there is an optimal mass transfer boundary layer thickness, or flux of additive which results in superior leveling performance. Satisfactory agreement is found between the predicted contours, obtained by solving the model equations using the boundary element method, and the experimental leveling efficiencies determined by previous investigators.

  18. Equipment level fallout radiation-effects approach. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    National Security Decision Directive (NSDD) 97 and Executive Order (EO) 12472 call for the ability to maintain National Security Emergency Preparedness (NSEP) communication capabilities in times of national disaster, which includes a nuclear attack. The Office of the Manager, National Communications System (OMNCS) sponsors the Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) Mitigation Program to evaluate and, where possible, mitigate the effects of the nuclear attack. Fallout radiation has been identified as an environment that may effect the performance of the regional and national telecommunication system. This report presents the investigations in the network-level fallout radiation methodology used to determine the effects of this environment. Alternative techniques are presented to improve the methodology.

  19. Network-level fallout radiation effects assessment. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    National Security calls for the ability to maintain communication capabilities in times of national disaster, which could include a nuclear attack. Nuclear detonation has two basic by-products for which telecommunication equipments are susceptible to damage. These are electromagnetic pulse (EMP) and fallout radiation. The purposes of the EMP Mitigation Program are to analyze and to lessen the effects of EMP and fallout radiation on national telecommunications resources. Fallout radiation occurs after the initial intense high-frequency EMP, and is the subject of this analysis. Fallout radiation is the residual radiation that remains in the atmosphere after a nuclear blast, and which can be carried by weather conditions to locations far from the detonation point. This analysis focuses on the effects of fallout radiation on the telecommunications network of the American Telephone and Telegraph Co. (AT and T). This assessment of AT and T-network's communications-capabilities uses a network-level approach to assess fallout-radiation effects on the network's performance. The approach used was developed for assessing network-level EMP effects on Public Switched Network communication capabilities. Details are given on how EMP assessments utilize this method. Equipment-level fallout-radiation survivability data is also required.

  20. POWER LEVEL EFFECT IN A PWR ROD EJECTION ACCIDENT.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DIAMOND,D.J.; BROMLEY,B.P.; ARONSON,A.L.

    2002-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of the initial power level during a rod ejection accident (REA) on the ejected rod worth and the resulting energy deposition in the fuel. The model used is for the hot zero power (HZP) conditions at the end of a typical fuel cycle for the Three Mile Island Unit 1 pressurized water reactor. PARCS, a transient, three-dimensional, two-group neutron nodal diffusion code, coupled with its own thermal-hydraulics model, is used to perform both steady-state and transient simulations. The worth of an ejected control rod is affected by both power level, and the positions of control banks. As the power level is increased, the worth of a single central control rod tends to drop due to thermal-hydraulic feedback and control bank removal, both of which flatten the radial neutron flux and power distributions. Although the peak fuel pellet enthalpy rise during an REA will be greater for a given ejected rod worth at elevated initial power levels, it is more likely the HZP condition will cause a greater net energy deposition because an ejected rod will have the highest worth at HZP. Thus, the HZP condition can be considered the most conservative in a safety evaluation.

  1. Evaluate the Effect of Upper-Level Cirrus Clouds on Satellite Retrievals of Low-Level Cloud Droplet Effective Radius

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-l 1, 13Evacuation Emergency Informationthe Effect of

  2. Adverse Health Effects of Air Pollution 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haley, R. W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on clean air: ? 2007: Encouraging energy efficiencies, no more coal plants ? 2009: Retrofitting old coal plants and old diesel engines ? 2011: Disclosure of ?fracking? fluids injected below ground ? Alliance with Texas Business for Clean Air ? Financed...

  3. RECENTER -ADVERSITY INTO TRANSFORMATION Course Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coles, William A.

    Center" delivers power tools and real time strategies for creating performance transformation ­ no matter what and practical system for transforming your communication skills from the inside and outside. · Use real timeRECENTER - ADVERSITY INTO TRANSFORMATION Course Description: Knowing how to use adversity

  4. Primary Research Paper Untangling the confounding effects of urbanization and high water level on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMaster University

    Primary Research Paper Untangling the confounding effects of urbanization and high water level form 1 December 2004; accepted 15 December 2004 Key words: multiple stressors, water level

  5. Quantum coherence effects in quasidegenerate two-level atomic systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong Yabin; Wang Haihong; Gao Jiangrui; Zhang Junxiang [State Key Laboratory of Quantum Optics and Quantum Optics Devices, Institute of Opto-Electronics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China)

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The wealth of quantum coherence effects depending on the orientation of external magnetic field, the polarization of coupling and probe lights, and the Rabi frequency of the coupling beam are studied in transition F{sub e}=2{r_reversible}F{sub g}=3 of Cs D{sub 2} line. The split of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) resonances on two or three resonances determined by the different combination of the polarization of interaction lights and the direction of applied magnetic fields is obtained. The shifting and widening of the EIT resonances with the strength of the magnetic field (i.e., Zeeman splitting in the upper and lower levels) and Rabi frequency of the coupling beam increasing are also discussed. It may develop into the potential application for tunable multichannel optical information storage. On the other hand, an explanation of observed asymmetry of spectra by laser frequency offset from the optical resonance is given with theoretical calculation, which is in good agreement with the experimental results.

  6. IMPACT OF ADVERSE WEATHER ON TRAFFIC CONDITIONS ON AN AMERICAN HIGHWAY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    IMPACT OF ADVERSE WEATHER ON TRAFFIC CONDITIONS ON AN AMERICAN HIGHWAY Effect of the Sun Glare ANALYTIQUE NOM PRENOM AUTEUR AUFFRAY Benjamin TITRE DU TFE IMPACT OF AN ADVERSE WEATHER ON AN AMERICAN réf. biblio. : 42 MOTS CLÉS Sun, Glare, Highway, Visibility, Weather, Sunlight, Delay, Traffic

  7. Magnified Effects of Changes in NIH Research Funding Levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghaffarzadegan, Navid

    What happens within the university-based research enterprise when a federal funding agency abruptly changes research grant funding levels, up or down? We use simple difference equation models to show that an apparently ...

  8. Effect of varying moisture levels on sorghum stand establishment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanyenji, Ben Machaki

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to germinate, emerge, and survive under low moisture situations. At the lowest moisture level (20% water holding capacity of the potted soil/media; 264 water on dry weight basis), germination was reduced by 50 percent. Hegari and CSM388 had the highest... germination performance at this moisture level. Seedling emergence was decreased by 60 percent from performance under optimum moisture (454 water holding capacity potted soil/media) and cultivers such as Segaolane and CSM388 had the highest emergence...

  9. Defining and Modeling Known Adverse Outcome Pathways: Domoic Acid and Neuronal Signaling as a Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watanabe, Karen H.; Andersen, Melvin E.; Basu, Nil; Carvan, Michael J.; Crofton, Kevin M.; King, Kerensa A.; Sunol, Cristina; Tiffany-Castiglioni, Evelyn; Schultz, Irvin R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An adverse outcome pathway (AOP) is a sequence of key events from a molecular-level initiating event and an ensuing cascade of steps to an adverse outcome with population level significance. To implement a predictive strategy for ecotoxicology, the multiscale nature of an AOP requires computational models to link salient processes (e.g., in chemical uptake, toxicokinetics, toxicodynamics, and population dynamics). A case study with domoic acid was used to demonstrate strategies and enable generic recommendations for developing computational models in an effort to move toward a toxicity testing paradigm focused on toxicity pathway perturbations applicable to ecological risk assessment. Domoic acid, an algal toxin with adverse effects on both wildlife and humans, is a potent agonist for kainate receptors (ionotropic glutamate receptors whose activation leads to the influx of Na+ and Ca2+). Increased Ca2+ concentrations result in neuronal excitotoxicity and cell death primarily in the hippocampus, which produces seizures, impairs learning and memory, and alters behavior in some species. Altered neuronal Ca2+ is a key process in domoic acid toxicity which can be evaluated in vitro. Further, results of these assays would be amenable to mechanistic modeling for identifying domoic acid concentrations and Ca2+ perturbations that are normal, adaptive, or clearly toxic. In vitro assays with outputs amenable to measurement in exposed populations can link in vitro to in vivo conditions, and toxicokinetic information will aid in linking in vitro results to the individual organism. Development of an AOP required an iterative process with three important outcomes: (1) a critically reviewed, stressor-specific AOP; (2) identification of key processes suitable for evaluation with in vitro assays; and (3) strategies for model development.

  10. The Effect of Reflectors and Delamping Upon Light Levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pashkevich, P. A.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    raging from 52 percent between rows to 80 percent under rows for an average of nearly 70 percent. Light levels in rooms with fixtures on an even grid spacing ranged from 73 percent between fixtures to 86 percent under fixtures for room averages of 75...

  11. Effective sea-level rise and deltas: Causes of change and human dimension implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Effective sea-level rise and deltas: Causes of change and human dimension implications Jason P January 2006 Abstract An assessment is made of contemporary effective sea-level rise (ESLR) for a sample of eustatic sea-level rise, the natural gross rate of fluvial sediment deposition and subsidence

  12. Network-level fallout radiation-effects assessment. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The EMP Mitigation Program analyzes, and where feasible, lessens the degradation effects of EMP on national telecommunication resources. The program focuses on the resources of the public switched network (PSN) because the PSN comprises the largest, most diverse set of telecommunication assets in the United States and is the focus of National Security Emergency Preparedness (NSEP) telecommunication enhancement activities. Additionally, the majority of various organizations rely on the PSN to conduct their NSEP telecommunications responsibilities. Telecommunication equipment is most susceptible to high altitude EMP (HEMP) which occurs when a nuclear weapon is detonated at an altitude greater that 50 km above the earth's surface. In addition to studying the effects of EMP, the program has expanded to address the effects of fallout radiation and serve traffic congestion on the PSN.

  13. A formula for low achievement: using multi-level models to understand the impact of individual level effects and school level effects on mathematics achievement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parks, Kathrin Ann

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The following study utilizes data from the High School and Beyond Study in order to predict mathematics achievement using both student characteristics and school level characteristics. Utilizing Hierarchical Linear Modeling, this study extends...

  14. The Vroman effect: a molecular level description of fibrinogen displacement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Seung-Yong

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    is free to rearrange its position on the surface to maximize its interactions with an incoming multivalent protein, virus, bacterium, or toxin.2,66,67 For example, in the case of anti-2,4 dinitrophenyl IgG antibodies interacting with a supported... the effect of ligand density and cholesterol content on the binding of anti-2,4 dinitrophenyl IgG antibodies with DNP-Cap PE lipids in phosphatidylcholine membranes. The antibodies were labeled with Texas Red dye so that they could be visualized...

  15. Effect of Special Education Proportion on School-Level Achievement in Texas Elementary Schools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grande, Robert John

    2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    indicates that understanding the effect on school level achievement that increasing percentages of special education students within a school has on that school’s achievement has not been adequately addressed. Using a main effects model (multiple regression...

  16. Adverse Weather Conditions If adverse weather conditions occur which affects tube, bus or rail services, Heads of Department/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adverse Weather Conditions If adverse weather conditions occur which affects tube, bus or rail to present him/herself for work. Where, due to the adverse weather conditions, public transport is affected as a result of the adverse weather conditions (for example a child's school is closed), they should consult

  17. The south Karelia air pollution study: Effects of low-level expsoure to malodorous sulfur compounds on symptoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Partti-Pellinen, K.; Marttila, O. [South Karelia Allergy and Environment Inst., Tiuruniemi (Finland); Vilkka, V. [South Karelia Central Hospital, Lappeenranta (Finland); Jaakkola, J.J. [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)]|[National Inst. of Public Health, Oslo (Norway)] [and others

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exposure to very low levels of ambient-air malodorous sulfur compounds and their effect on eye irritation, respiratory-tract symptoms, and central nervous system symptoms in adults were assessed. A cross-sectional self-administered questionnaire (response rate = 77%) was distributed during March and April 1992 to adults (n = 336) who lived in a neighborhood that contained a pulp mill and in a nonpolluted reference community (n = 380). In the exposed community, the measured annual mean concentrations of total reduced sulfur compounds and sulfur dioxide measured in two stations were 2 to 3 {mu}g/m{sup 3} and 1 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, respectively. In the reference community, the annual mean concentration of sulfur dioxide was 1 {mu}g/m{sup 3}. The residents of the community near the pulp mill reported an excess of cough, respiratory infections, and headache during the previous 4 wk, as well as during the preceding 12 mo. The relative risk for headache was increased significantly in the exposed community, compared with the reference area: the adjusted odds ratio (aOR) was 1.83 (95% confidence interval [95% Cl] = 1.06-3.15) during the previous 4 wk and 1.70 (95% Cl = 1.05-2.73) during the preceding 12 mo. The relative risk for cough was also increased during the preceding 12 mo (aOR = 1.64, 95% Cl = 1.01-2.64). These results indicated that adverse health effects of malodorous sulfur compounds occur at lower concentrations than reported previously. 25 refs., 3 tabs.

  18. Effect of exogenous prolactin on plasma luteinizing hormone levels in ovariectomized cows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forrest, David Wayne

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECT OF EXOGENOUS PROLACTIN ON PLASMA LUTEINIZING HORMONE LEVELS IN OVARIECTOMIZEO COWS A Thesis by David Wayne Footrest Approved as to style and content by: airman of Committee Hea of epartme t Member Mem P Member August 1976... ABSTRACT Effect of Exogenous Prolactin on Plasma Luteinizing Hormone Levels in Ovariectomized Cows. (August 1976) David Wayne Forrest, B. S. , Abilene Christian College Cha1rman of Advisory Committee; Dr. P. G. Harms The effect of exogenous prolact1n...

  19. Adverse Diversity Analysis Guidance | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you0 ARRA Newsletters 20103-03Energy Advanced Technology andCleanAdverse

  20. Determination and Mitigation of Precipitation Effects on Portal Monitor Gamma Background Levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Revis, Stephen

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project is to establish a correlation between precipitation and background gamma radiation levels at radiation portal monitors (RPM) deployed at various ports worldwide, and to devise a mechanism by which the effects...

  1. The effects of selected sound pressure levels on the color discrimination of red, yellow, and green

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone, Raymond Bruce

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECTS OF SELECTED SOUND PRESSURE LEVELS ON THE COLOR DISCRIMINATION OF RED, YELLOW AND GREEN A Thesis by RAYMOND BRUCE STONE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AB, M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August, 1972 Major Subject: Industrial Safety THE EFFECTS OF SELECTED SOUND PRESSURE LEVELS ON THE COLOR DISCRIMINATION OF RED, YELLOW AND GREEN A Thesis by RAYMOND BRUCE STONE Approved as to style and content by: C...

  2. Evaluation of the effect of progesterone CIDR Devices on circulating levels of progesterone in cyclic ewes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satterfield, Michael Carey

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    EVALUATION OF THE EFFECT OF PROGESTERONE CIDR DEVICES ON CIRCULATING LEVELS... CIDR DEVICES ON CIRCULATING LEVELS OF PROGESTERONE IN CYCLIC EWES A Thesis by MICHAEL CAREY SATTERFIELD Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved...

  3. Effect of Macromolecular Crowding on Protein Folding Dynamics at the Secondary Structure Level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shorter, James

    Effect of Macromolecular Crowding on Protein Folding Dynamics at the Secondary Structure Level coupled to the process of protein folding in vivo. While previous studies have provided invaluable insight about how crowding affects protein folding dynamics at the secondary structure level. In this study, we

  4. High-Level Power Estimation with Interconnect Effects Kavel M. Buyuksahin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najm, Farid N.

    the predicted (at RTL) power against that measured using SPICE. An average er- ror of 14.4% is obtainedHigh-Level Power Estimation with Interconnect Effects Kavel M. B¨uy¨uks¸ahin ECE Dept.najm@toronto.edu ABSTRACT We extend earlier work on high-level average power esti- mation to include the power due

  5. Effects on milk yield and composition of infusions of different levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Effects on milk yield and composition of infusions of different levels and natures of energy of propionic acid. However, pro- pionic infusion did not always lead to an increase in protein content (Hurtaud explain this effect. A rumen infusion of propionic acid (13.41 mol/d) was compared with water as a nega

  6. HighLevel Power Estimation with Interconnect Effects # Kavel M. B

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najm, Farid N.

    ) power against that measured using SPICE. An average er­ ror of 14.4% is obtained for the averageHigh­Level Power Estimation with Interconnect Effects # Kavel M. B Ë? uy Ë? uksâ?ºahin ECE Dept.najm@toronto.edu ABSTRACT We extend earlier work on high­level average power esti­ mation to include the power due

  7. adverse clinical sequelae: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Immunization Practices (ACIP) (13). ACIP reviewed the cases, recommended enhanced surveillance for adverse events, and updated the ACIP statement on YEL (4). This report...

  8. Energy Department Announces Secretarial Determination of No Adverse...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    transfers of uranium will not have an adverse material impact on the domestic uranium mining, conversion, or enrichment industries. Find a copy of the Secretarial Determination...

  9. Secretary Chu Announces Determination of No Adverse Material...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    transfer of uranium will not have an adverse material impact on the domestic uranium mining, conversion, or enrichment industries. View the Secretarial Determination (pdf -148...

  10. adverse reproductive outcomes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lynn 2012-01-01 5 Inflammatory bowel disease - risk factors for adverse outcomes, and preventive measures. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Kornfeld D. 1997...

  11. adverse perinatal outcome: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lynn 2012-01-01 5 Inflammatory bowel disease - risk factors for adverse outcomes, and preventive measures. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Kornfeld D. 1997...

  12. adversely affect neurological: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of microtubules, as is whether paclitaxel is released Walter, Nils G. 77 Does the knowledge of unaudited account balances adversely affect the performance of substantive...

  13. adverse reaction reporting: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dissertations Summary: ??Numerous studies have investigated the association between air pollution and adverse reproductive outcomes. Many estimated exposure at the birth...

  14. ENERGY LEVEL EFFECTS ON DEFORMATION MECHANISM IN MICRO-SCALE LASER PEEN FORMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Y. Lawrence

    forming, is a flexible rapid prototyping and low- volume manufacturing process, which uses laser) show the potential of laser peen forming for becoming a flexible manufacturing process with desirableENERGY LEVEL EFFECTS ON DEFORMATION MECHANISM IN MICRO-SCALE LASER PEEN FORMING Youneng Wang, Yajun

  15. Local Danger Warnings for Drivers: The Effect of Modality and Level of Assistance on Driver Reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theune, Mariët

    Local Danger Warnings for Drivers: The Effect of Modality and Level of Assistance on Driver¨ucken, Germany christian.mueller@dfki.de ABSTRACT Local danger warning is an important function of Advanced presentation) is particularly crucial to a successful danger avoidance. We present a user study investigating

  16. Effectiveness of Integration of System-Level Optimization in Concurrent Engineering for Rocket Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Effectiveness of Integration of System-Level Optimization in Concurrent Engineering for Rocket in Concurrent Engineering for Rocket Design by Brian Kenichi Bairstow Submitted to the Department of Aeronautics in Aeronautics and Astronautics Abstract Integrated concurrent engineering is a method for rapid conceptual

  17. Effects of dietary crude protein levels on development, antioxidant status, and total midgut protease activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effects of dietary crude protein levels on development, antioxidant status, and total midgut crude protein on the development, antioxidant enzymatic activity, and total midgut protease activity in the test. Dietary treatments were pure rape pollen (Control) and pollen substitutes (PS) with crude protein

  18. THE EFFECT OF LAKE ERIE WATER LEVEL VARIATIONS ON SEDIMENT RESUSPENSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foster, Diane

    THE EFFECT OF LAKE ERIE WATER LEVEL VARIATIONS ON SEDIMENT RESUSPENSION A Thesis Presented regions of resuspension. In this study, areas of possible resuspension were examined for the heavily populated Cleveland, Ohio, region and for the entire lake. Areas of possible resuspension were identified

  19. Effect of N level on rice yield, nitrogen accumulation and rice blast occurrence under rice intercropping system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Li; Lu, Guoli; Cu, Yiou; Zhang, Chaochun; Zhang, Fusuo; Zheng, Yi

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 Effects of nitrogen levels on incidence of leaf blast andal. Effects of nitrogen and silicon nutrition on rice blastsame column. Effect of high N rate on rice blast High N rate

  20. Effect of feedback on the control of a two-level dissipative quantum system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. C. Wang; X. L. Huang; X. X. Yi

    2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that it is possible to modify the stationary state by a feedback control in a two-level dissipative quantum system. Based on the geometric control theory, we also analyze the effect of the feedback on the time-optimal control in the dissipative system governed by the Lindblad master equation. These effects are reflected in the function $\\Delta_A(\\vec{x})$ and $\\Delta_B(\\vec{x})$ that characterize the optimal trajectories, as well as the switching function $\\Phi(t)$ and $\\theta(t),$ which characterize the switching point in time for the time-optimal trajectory.

  1. Beam-beam effects in different luminosity levelling scenarios for the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buffat, X; Coombs, G R; Herr, W; Pieloni, T

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Adjusting luminosity and optimizing the luminous region in each interaction point of the LHC according to the experiments needs has become a requirement to maximize the efficiency of the different detectors. Several techniques are envisaged, most importantly by varying ?? or a transverse offset at the interaction point. Coherent and incoherent stability in the presence of beam-beam effects will be discussed in realistic luminosity levelling scenarios for the LHC.

  2. Effects of Water Levels on Productivity of Canada Geese in the Northern Flathead Valley, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, Daniel

    1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power Planning Council calls for wildlife mitigation at hydroelectric projects in the Columbia River System. Beginning April, 1984, the Bonneville Power Administration funded a study of the effects of the operation of Hungry Horse and Kerr Dams on the western Canada goose (Branta canadensis moffittii) inhabitating the Flathead Valley of northwest Montana. The study was conducted by personnel of the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks (MDFWP), to: (1) identify the size and productivity of this population, (2) identify current habitat conditions and losses of nesting and brood-rearing areas, (3) describe the effects of water level fluctuations on nesting and brood-rearing, and (4) identify mitigation alternatives to offset these effects. Annual pair and nest surveys were used to document the location and fate of goose nests. The number of known nesting attempts varied from 44 in 1984 to 108 in 1985, to 136 in 1986 and 134 in 1987. Fifty-four percent of the annual meeting nesting effort took place on elevated sites which were secure from the flooding and dewatering effects of fluctuating water levels. An average of 15 nests were found on stumps in the remnant Flathead River delta, however, an area strongly influenced by the operation of Kerr Dam. Annual nest losses to flooding and predation attributable to fluctuations caused by the dam were recorded. 53 refs., 24 figs., 35 tabs.

  3. Effects of cooking on levels of PCBs in the fillets of winter flounder (Pseudopleuronectes americanus)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poston, T.M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Durell, G.S.; Koczwara, G.; Spellacy, A.M. [Battelle Ocean Sciences, Duxbury, MA (United States)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory and Battelle Ocean Sciences performed a study to determine the effect of cooking on polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) levels in the fillets of winter flounder (Pseudopleuronectes americanus). Broiling, pan frying, and deep frying in oil were tested on fillets from 21 fish collected from New Bedford Harbor, Massachusetts, on February 21, 1991. The evaluation involved estimating the change in PCB concentrations using a mass-balance approach that factored the change in fillet weight resulting from cooking with the changes in PCB concentration expressed on a precooked wet-weight basis. Deep frying in oil resulted in a 47% reduction in total PCB levels in fillet tissue. Additionally, deep frying caused a 40% reduction in fillet mass. Pan frying and broiling resulted in statistically in insignificant increases in total PCB levels of 15% and 17%, respectively. Fillet mass reductions resulting from pan frying and broiling were 7% and 15%, respectively. The effects of cooking on 18 individual congeners generally paralleled the results observed for total PCB. All 18 congeners were significantly reduced by deep frying. Congener Cl{sub 2}(08) also was significantly reduced by either pan frying. Congeners Cl{sub 5}(105) and Cl{sub 5}(118) showed apparent significant increases in concentrations following pan frying. Congeners Cl{sub 5}(105), Cl{sub 5}(118), and C1{sub 6}(138) showed significant increases in concentration following broiling.

  4. adverse events related: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with severe adverse events consistent with YEL-AND or YEL-AVD were reported. All six patients were vaccinated in the United States with 17Dderived YEL, required...

  5. adverse environmental conditions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Abstract Autonomous Driving benefits strongly from a 3D recon- struction of the environment in real 7 THE BLOOD OF NORTH AMERICAN FRESH-WATER MUSSELS UNDER NORMAL AND ADVERSE...

  6. adverse health outcomes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Latex Allergy and Occupational Asthma in Health Care Workers: Adverse Outcomes CiteSeer Summary: The prevalence of natural rubber...

  7. Adverse Diversity Analysis Guidance | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'s Reply Comments AT&T,FACT S HEET FACT S HEETInformation Resources

  8. Carbon fiber composite characterization in adverse thermal environments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomez-Vasquez, Sylvia; Brown, Alexander L.; Hubbard, Joshua A.; Ramirez, Ciro J.; Dodd, Amanda B.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The behavior of carbon fiber aircraft composites was studied in adverse thermal environments. The effects of resin composition and fiber orientation were measured in two test configurations: 102 by 127 millimeter (mm) test coupons were irradiated at approximately 22.5 kW/m{sup 2} to measure thermal response, and 102 by 254 mm test coupons were irradiated at approximately 30.7 kW/m{sup 2} to characterize piloted flame spread in the vertically upward direction. Carbon-fiber composite materials with epoxy and bismaleimide resins, and uni-directional and woven fiber orientations, were tested. Bismaleimide samples produced less smoke, and were more resistant to flame spread, as expected for high temperature thermoset resins with characteristically lower heat release rates. All materials lost approximately 20-25% of their mass regardless of resin type, fiber orientation, or test configuration. Woven fiber composites displayed localized smoke jetting whereas uni-directional composites developed cracks parallel to the fibers from which smoke and flames emanated. Swelling and delamination were observed with volumetric expansion on the order of 100% to 200%. The purpose of this work was to provide validation data for SNL's foundational thermal and combustion modeling capabilities.

  9. Climate scenarios of sea level rise for the northeast Atlantic Ocean: a study including the effects of ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drijfhout, Sybren

    Climate scenarios of sea level rise for the northeast Atlantic Ocean: a study including the effects. Here we present a set of regional climate scenarios of sea level rise for the northeast Atlantic Ocean best estimate of twenty-first century sea level rise in the northeast Atlantic Ocean, given the current

  10. Effect of sea-level rise on piping plover (Charadrius melodus) breeding habitat Jennifer R. Seavey a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGarigal, Kevin

    Effect of sea-level rise on piping plover (Charadrius melodus) breeding habitat Jennifer R. Seavey, threatening many low-lying coastal areas and associated wildlife. We assessed the threat of sea-level rise sys- tems because of their vulnerability to sea-level rise (Farbotko, 2010; Nicholls et al., 2007

  11. Effect of chronic exposure to low levels of ethylene on cotton during germination and early development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cowan, Elaine Nan

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the degree of NASTER OF SCIENCE Auoust 1979 . "iajor Subject: Plant Physiology THE EFFECT OF CHRONIC EXPOSURE TO LON LEVELS OF ETHYLENE ON COTTON DURING GERMINATION AND EARLY DEVELOPMENT A Thesis by ELAINF NAN CONAN Approved as to sty1e and content... and Ryan indicated that endopeptidase reached a peak in activity 10 days after planting. Fumigation with 0. 5 ul/1 ethylene for 5 days prior to harvest inhibited this in- crease in activity. The present study was undertaken to deter- mine...

  12. Effect of Increased Levels of Liquefied Natural Gas Exports on U.S. Energy Markets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA :Work4/11ComputationalEdNERSC: DeliveringEdwinoverEffect

  13. A cost-effective adverse-weather precision guidance system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fellerhoff, R.; Burgett, S.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This SAND report documents the results of an LDRD project undertaken to study the accuracy of terrain-aided navigation coupled with highly accurate topographic maps. A revolutionary new mapping technology, interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR), has the ability to make terrain maps of extremely high accuracy and spatial resolution, more than an order of magnitude better than currently available DMA map products. Using a laser altimeter and the Sandia Labs Twin Otter Radar Testbed, fix accuracies of less than 3 meters CEP were obtained over urban and natural terrain regions.

  14. adverse environmental effects: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in benthic invertebrate communities across the country was one of mild to moderate eutrophication, particularly in riverine habitats, although more pronounced eutrophication was...

  15. adverse drug effects: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of alcohol and drugs. 6. Describe the personality traits of the alcoholic and drug addict. 7. Describe the treatment and rehabilitation of the alcoholic and drug addict. 8....

  16. adverse side effects: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    survival, chromosome aberration formation and repair capacity of radiation-induced damage have been applied to evaluate individual radiosensitivity in vitro. 5%-7% of cancer...

  17. Drilling to Decipher Long-Term Sea-Level Changes and Effects--A Joint Consortium for Ocean Leadership,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    rise of 1.7 ± 0.3 mm yr-1 and a signifi- cant acceleration of sea-level rise of 0.013 ± 0.006 mm yr-2 contribute little to sea-level rise. Best estimates are that sea level could rise by as much as 50 cm) rel- ative sea-level rise exceeds 4 mm yryryr-1 (Psuty and Collins, 1996) due to combined effects

  18. Effectiveness of State-Level Policies on Solar Market Development in Different State Contexts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steward, D.; Doris, E.; Krasko, V.; Hillman, D.

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to public interest in customer-sited distributed solar photovoltaics (PV), state and local policymakers have implemented policy initiatives with the goal of encouraging private investment and building a robust PV market. Policymakers face challenges, including limited budgets and incomplete information about the effectiveness of the various policy options in their specific situation, in crafting and executing policy that supports market development goals. Recent work investigated the effect of the order in which policies are implemented (referred to as 'policy stacking') and the presence of low-cost enabling policies, such as interconnection standards and net metering, can have on the success of states in promoting PV markets. Findings indicate that implementation of interconnection standards and policy related to the valuation of excess electricity (e.g., net metering), along with indicators of long term government support for a solar PV market (e.g., RPS) and a non-policy determinant (population), explain about 70% of the variation among states in new PV capacity. This paper builds on that research to determine the most effective policy strategies for different types of states, as determined by their physical, demographic and macroeconomic context. A number of researchers have investigated the effectiveness of state-level policy using various statistical methods to determine relationships between installed solar PV projects and policy initiatives. In this study, the grouping of states by non-policy factors adds dimension to these analyses by identifying how policies function in different non-policy environments.

  19. Effects of single-particle potentials on the level density parameter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bora Canbula; Ramazan Bulur; Deniz Canbula; Halil Babacan

    2014-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The new definition of the energy dependence for the level density parameter including collective effects depends strongly on the semi-classical approach. For this method, defining an accurate single-particle potential is of great importance. The effect of the single-particle potential terms, which are central, spin-orbit, harmonic oscillator, Woods-Saxon and Coulomb potential, both for spherical and deformed cases, on the level density parameter was investigated by examining the local success of the global parameterizations of eight different combinations of these terms. Among these combinations, the sum of the central, spin-orbit, harmonic oscillator and Coulomb potentials, gives the most accurate predictions compared with experimental data. The local selections of the global parameterizations show that the single-particle models, which are based on Woods-Saxon potential as the main term, are more suitable candidates than the models based on harmonic oscillator potential to extrapolate away far from stability. Also it can be concluded that the contribution of the Coulomb interaction, both around the closed and open shells is not neglectable.

  20. EFFECT OF HUMIDITY LEVEL ON THE CREEP PROPERTIES OF ALLOY 903 AT 650 C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dryepondt, Sebastien N [ORNL; Pint, Bruce A [ORNL; Mitchell, Ryan D [Solar Turbines, Inc.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alloy 903 (FeNiCo+Nb) is currently used for certain components in industrial gas turbines for low coefficient of thermal expansion applications. A variance in creep behavior for material quality control evaluations suggested a possible effect of moisture level on stress rupture properties. To investigate the role of water vapor on the creep properties of alloy 903, controlled laboratory experiments were conducted at 650 C with 0 to 100% relative humidity. The water content was controlled by flowing dry air through a water bath at a constant temperature. A significant decrease of lifetime was observed in the presence of water vapor, which is likely related to grain boundary embrittlement by the inward diffusion of hydrogen. The increase of the microstructure grain aspect ratio by different forging processes generally improved the rupture lifetime and elongation in air. However, all specimens had reduced lifetime in the presence of water vapor despite the microstructure grain aspect ratios.

  1. The Effect of Set Induction on student knowledge, attitude, and engagement levels of high school agricultural science students

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Tiffany Sarah Lavern

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to determine if applying set induction to the beginning of a lesson would have an effect on student knowledge, attitude, and/or engagement levels throughout the lesson. Researchers addressed specific objectives...

  2. The effects of level of automation and adaptive automation on human performance, situation awareness and workload in a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaber, David B.

    The effects of level of automation and adaptive automation on human performance, situation., 4731 East Forest Peak, Marietta, GA 30066, USA Keywords: Level of automation (LOA); adaptive automation of automation (LOAs) for maintaining operator involvement in complex systems control and facilitating situation

  3. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of the energy-level alignment at hybrid interfaces: Role of many-body effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Zhigang

    Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of the energy-level alignment at hybrid interfaces: Role of many; published 29 May 2009 An approach is presented for obtaining a highly accurate description of the energy-level alignment at hybrid interfaces, using quantum Monte Carlo calculations to include many-body effects

  4. Effects on milk protein yield of graded levels of lysine infused into the duodenum of dairy cows fed diets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Effects on milk protein yield of graded levels of lysine infused into the duodenum of dairy cows). In order to determine ly- sine requirements, graded levels of lysine (0, 15, 30, 45 g/d) were infused period (2 wk) they received a duo- denal infusion of one dose of lysine + 11 g of methionine and enough

  5. adverse times sporulation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Customer satisfaction 12;Heijunka Leveling cycle time Leveling g lean (waste) 12;LEVELING (Heijunka)LEVELING (Heijunka) Leveling in healthcare l b lab ...

  6. Figure-of-merit analysis and cost effectiveness of low-level radioactive waste treatment systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, N.D.; Falconer, K.L.; McCormack, M.D.; Hootman, H.D.; Thompson, T.K.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two studies were performed to assess low-level waste treatment systems that are available commercially for volume reduction and/or solidification. In the first, a Figure-of-Merit (FOM) decision analysis technique was used to evaluate fourteen low-level radioactive waste processing systems on their ability to treat power reactor wastes. The assessment of the various processing systems was accomplished using a five member task force. The systems were judged on eleven major criteria and twenty subcriteria. The system judged superior to all the others was compaction of dry wastes with liquid wastes and sludges being directly incorporated into concrete. This was also the lowest cost system. The controlled air incinerator was judged the preferred incineration process. The Werner-Pfleider bitumen extruder was the preferred liquid waste treatment system. In the second study, the cost economy of volume reduction measured in land disposal dollars was investigated. The greatest cost savings with volume reduction were realized with a BWR using a deep bed condensate polishing system; the least with a PWR with condensate polishing. For both BWR systems and PWRs without condensate cleanup, over 80% of the savings in land disposal dollars resulted from volume reduction of liquid waste streams (concentrated liquids and filter sludge). For a PWR with a condensate polishing system, which had the least cost effective system for volume reduction, about one-third of the savings resulting from incineration of spent resin and compactible trash was offset by the increased expense of casks required for transporting concentrated liquids which have undergone additional volume reduction.

  7. Human-Centered Systems Analysis of Aircraft Separation from Adverse Weather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vigeant-Langlois, Laurence

    Adverse weather significantly impacts the safety and efficiency of flight operations. Weather information

  8. Effect of dietary calcium and phosphorus levels on performance and bone development of large-framed developing boars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, Robert Glen

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in determining bone strength. His expertise and willingness to help on short notice many times under adverse conditions will always be remembered. Special recognition is also due and gratefully given to personal friends Darrell Knabe and Edward Gregg...

  9. Effect of a relativistic correction to the Coulomb potential on the energy levels of hydrogen atom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harihar Behera

    2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on classical electrodynamics, it is argued that the Coulomb potential (which is strictly valid for two point charges at rest), commonly used in the study of energy levels of hydrogen atom is not the correct one, because the electron in the hydrogen atom moves with relativistic speeds with respect to the nucleus. Retardation effect has to be considered in accordance with Li\\'{e}nard-Wiechert (or retarded) potential of a moving charge or the relativistic electrodynamics. However, such a consideration introduces a correction to the Coulomb potential, whose quantum mechanical expectation value is estimated at $E_{ret} = - \\frac{mc^2\\alpha ^4}{2n^3(l+1/2)}$, which is of the same order as the fine structure of hydrogen atom and hence added to the standard energy eigenvalue values of H-atom. This correction lifts the $l$-degeneracy in the spectra of H-atom and hence modifies the standard result. The result disturbs the existing agreement between the theory and experiments on H-atom and hence requires further theoretical and experimental re-examination. The implications of this result for the Kepler-problem in general is also discussed in the context of Heaviside's gravity, which seems to offer an alternative explanation for the non-Newtonian perihelion advance of Mercury without invoking the space-time curvature formalism of Einstein's general theory of relativity.

  10. The Effect of Composition on Spinel Equilibrium and Crystal Size in High-Level Waste Glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, B. K.; Hrma, Pavel R.; Alton, Jesse; Plaisted, Trevor J.; Vienna, John D.

    2002-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The equilibrium concentration (Co) of spinel was measured in 16 high-level waste (HLW) glasses as a function of temperature (T). Glasses were formulated by increasing or decreasing concentrations of Al2O3, Cr2O3, Fe2O3, Li2O, MgO, Na2O, or NiO, one-at-a-time, from a baseline composition. Data were fitted using the quasi-ideal-solution relationship between Co and T. The coefficients of this relationship were expressed as functions of glass composition using first-order approximation. All glass components had an effect on liquidus temperature (TL), but only NiO and Fe2O3 had a significant impact on spinel concentration below TL. The temperature at which Co had a given value was also expressed as a function of glass composition. These results can be used to optimize a HLW glass formulation to meet a constraint of either no spinel or a limited spinel fraction in the melter. In addition, the measurement of the size of spinel crystals and subsequent calculation of crystal number density (n) showed that Cr2O4 and Al2O3 increase n.

  11. This fact sheet summarizes what is known about the adverse impacts of land-based

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23,EnergyChicopeeTechnologyfact sheet summarizes what is known about the adverse

  12. Simplified 1-D Hydrodynamic and Salinity Transport Modeling of the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta: Sea Level Rise and Water Diversion Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleenor, William E.; Bombardelli, Fabian

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrodynamic and Salinity Transport Modeling of the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta: Sea Level Rise and Water Diversion Effects

  13. Effect of Sea Level Rise on Energy Infrastructure in Four Major...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to identify energy facilities exposed to sea level rise (SLR) through 2100 that is flexible and scalable, uses existing and robust data sources, accounts for global and local...

  14. Effects of pelleting, dietary protein level and unidentified factors on feed cost and the performance of egg type layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karunajeewa, Hector

    1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECTS OF PELLETING, DIETARY PROTEIN LEVEL AND UNIDENTIFIED FACTORS ON FEED COST AND THE PERFORMANCE OF EGG TYPE LAYERS A Thesis by Hector Reruns]eewa Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas... in Partial Fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Master of Science August 1961 Ma)or Sub)ect - Poultry Science EPPECTS OP PELLETING, DIETARY PROTEIN LEVEL AND DNIDENTIPTED FACTORS ON PEED COST AND THE PERFORNANCE OP BIN' TTPE LAYERS A...

  15. Effects of cholesterol, type of fat, energy level and lipotropic agents in the diet of the domestic fowl 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svacha, Richard Lincoln

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ? ciency, Body Weight, Egg Size, Caloric Intake, and Protein Intake of the Caged Layer..................... .. . ...... 55 TABLE 15 The Effect of Energy Levels on Percent Egg production of Laying Hens for Each 28-Day Period....................... 56... TABLE 16 The Average Caloric Intake Per Dozen Eggs Produced by the Laying Hen At Various Energy Levels............ 57 TABLE 17 The Average Caloric Intake Per Bird of the Laying Hen at Various Energy Leyels........................ ........... 58...

  16. The effect of dietary fat, caloric intake, and protein level on the development of fatty livers in the mature hen 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDaniel, Archie Hugh

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fc h. M CUlLcUE Or ] tXA? THE EFFECT OF DIETARY FAT, CALORIC INTAKE, AND PROTEIN LEVEL ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF FATTY LIVERS IN THE MATURE HEN A Dissertation By Archie Hugh McDaniel Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural... and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May 1958 Major Subject: Poultry Science (Nutrition) THE EFFECT OF DIETARY FAT, CALORIC INTAKE, AND PROTEIN LEVEL ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF FATTY...

  17. alkaline intermediate level: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    intermediation. Positive scale effects may make a single monopoly intermediary optimal. Comparing can also eliminate the problems of adverse selection and inefficient...

  18. Effects of dietary pantethine and lipid levels on growth and body composition of channel catfish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stowell, Sandra Lee

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    phosphorylation of the pantetheine to form 4' phosphopantetheine. This product can then be converted to reduced coenzyme A (CoASH) through dephospho-CoASH. CH~ [ HO-CHz-J CHC-NH-CHg-CH2-C-NH-CHg-CHz-S-] z I II II CHg OH 0 Fig. 1. Chemical structure... levels on lipid hi' f h i huh(1 I!) "gd using a 2 x 3 factorial design. Purified casein/gelatin diets containing two levels of lipid (5 and 10%) and three levels of pantethine (0, 250, and 1000 mg/kg) were fed to fingerling channel catfish in 40-liter...

  19. Effects of level and source of copper on copper status of ewes and newborn lambs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eckert, Gregory Evan

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ), and dry matter intake (DMI) of ewes. . 61 Effects of prepartum dietary Cu concentration on ewe liver mineral concentration (mg/kg). 63 10 EfFects of prepartum Cu concentration on lamb plasma ceruloplasmin and plasma Cu at the time of birth...). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 The effect of Cu intake (mg/d) and Cu source (proteinate or sulfate) on flank wool length (cm) . . 50 6 Effect of high- and low-Cu treatment on ewe plasma ceruloplasmin, . . . . . . . 65 The effects of the high- and low-Cu treatment groups...

  20. Procedures for Interagency Consultation to Avoid or Mitigate Adverse

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHA AdministrativeofDepartmentEnergyLoanEffects on Rivers in the

  1. The effect of pet ownership/attachment on the stress level of multiple sclerosis patients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loven, Ashley Marie

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    whether or not pet ownership and/or attachment influenced the perceived stress level and number of negative life events experienced by MS patients in the relapsing remitting stage. Participants were given a questionnaire that consisted of 7 surveys...

  2. A Field Analysis of System-level Effects of Soft Errors Occurring in Microprocessors used in Information Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaeli, David R.

    A Field Analysis of System-level Effects of Soft Errors Occurring in Microprocessors used, will generate sufficient charge to cause a soft error. In the absence of error correction schemes, the system rates for unprotected systems [8]. Soft errors are emerging as a significant obstacle to increasing

  3. Effects on milk yield and composition of infusions of graded levels of glucose into the duodenum of dairy cows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Effects on milk yield and composition of infusions of graded levels of glucose into the duodenum glucose supply. Three continuous duodenal infusions of glu- cose (500, 750 or 1 500 g/d) were compared alfalfa, 25.1% energy concentrate and 7.4% soybean meal) was fed proportionally to the energy infused so

  4. Effect of somatostatin on nonesterified fatty acid levels modifies glucose homeostasis during fasting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrick, G.K.; Frizzell, R.T.; Cherrington, A.D. (Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (USA))

    1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the 7-days fasted conscious dog, unlike the postabsorptive conscious dog, somatostatin infusion results in decreased levels of nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) and increased glucose utilization (R{sub d}) even when insulin and glucagon levels are held constant. The aim of this study was to determine whether NEFA replacement in such animals would prevent the increase in R{sub d}. In each of three protocols there was an 80-min tracer equilibration period, a 40-min basal period, and a 3-h test period. During the test period in the first protocol saline was infused, in the second protocol somatostatin was infused along with intraportal replacement amounts of insulin and glucagon (hormone replacement), while in the third protocol somatostatin plus the pancreatic hormones were infused with concurrent heparin plus Intralipid infusion. Glucose turnover was assessed using (3-{sup 3}H)glucose. The peripheral levels of insulin, glucagon, and glucose were similar and constant in all three protocols; however, during somatostatin infusion, exogenous glucose infusion was necessary to maintain euglycemia. The NEFA level was constant during saline infusion and decreased in the hormone replacement protocol. In the hormone replacement plus NEFA protocol, the NEFA level did not change during the first 90-min period and then increased during the second 90-min period. After a prolonged fast in the dog, (1) somatostatin directly or indirectly inhibits adipose tissue NEFA release and causes a decrease in the plasma NEFA level, and (2) this decrease in the NEFA level causes an increase in R{sub d}.

  5. Human-centered systems analysis of aircraft separation from adverse weather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vigeant-Langlois, Laurence, 1974-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Adverse weather significantly impacts the safety and efficiency of flight operations. Weather information plays a key role in mitigating the impact of adverse weather on flight operations by supporting air transportation ...

  6. The effect of nutrition and exercise on the level of glycogen in skeletal muscle of sheep

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Pethick JB Rowe 'School of Veterinary Studies, Murdoch University, 6150 Western Australia ; 2Dept Animal Science, University of New England, Armidale, 2350 New South Wales, Australia A high level of glycogen % barely grain, 1 % mineral/vitamin premix (13.5 % protein and 10.7 MJ metabolisable energy (ME)/kg as fed

  7. Effects of Tricaine Methanesulfonate, Hypno, Metomidate, Quinaldine, and Salt on Plasma Cortisol Levels following Acute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    .--Blood plasma cortisol concentration is an indicator of stress in fish, and anesthetics may serve to ameliorate species; little information exists for tropical fishes. Mortalities are increased after handling stress fish. Plasma cortisol levels were evaluated in threespot gourami after a handling stressor

  8. Paper 2008-01-0434 Effects of Sulfur Level and Anisotropy of Sulfide Inclusions on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fatemi, Ali

    to fatigue strength, the high sulfur material had up to 25% lower fatigue strength than the ultra low sulfur, monotonic tensile and CVN impact behavior of SAE 4140 steel with high (0.077% S), low (0.012% S) and ultra low (0.004% S) sulfur contents at two hardness levels (40 HRC and 50 HRC). The longitudinally oriented

  9. Report on policy and activities concerning public awareness of health effects of low-level radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the summer of 1986, the Executive Committee authorized a study limited to determining policy and practices relevant to dissemination of information to the public on radiation health effects in three federal agencies. This report summarizes findings on two broad questions related to the communication issue: What, if any, are the policies under which federal agencies operate in disseminating information on health effects of radiation and what are the current programs and activities designed to provide the public information on health effects of radiation.

  10. anticancer transcript-level effects: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the effects of SAD. In high-latitude countries (e.g., Canada, UK, Nordic and Baltic countries), evaluating proposals for high-risk programmes during the late fall...

  11. Quantum Hall effect and Landau-level crossing of Dirac fermions in trilayer graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taychatanapat, Thiti

    The physics of Dirac fermions in condensed-matter systems has received extraordinary attention following the discoveries of two new types of quantum Hall effect in single-layer and bilayer graphene1, 2, 3. The electronic ...

  12. Effects of pulse shape on strongly driven two-level systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conover, C. W. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Colby College, Waterville, Maine 04901 (United States)

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an experimental study of the dynamics of a two-level system driven by strong nonresonant electromagnetic pulses as a function of pulse intensity and detuning. We have explored the qualitative and quantitative behavior of the transition probability as a function of pulse area for five different temporal profiles: Lorentzian, Lorentzian squared, hyperbolic secant, hyperbolic secant squared, and Gaussian. The two-level system consists of a fine-structure doublet in sodium Rydberg states coupled by Raman transitions driven through far-off-resonance intermediate states. The pulses are in the microwave regime and have high fidelity and uniform intensity. Experiments show that, despite the similarity in the pulse shapes, the behavior of the population transfer versus intensity depends dramatically on the temporal shape and that the spectral properties and area of the pulse do not adequately describe the response.

  13. Health effects of low-level radiation in shipyard workers. Final report: [Draft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matanoski, G.M.

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Shipyard Workers Study (NSWS) was designed to determine whether there is an excess risk of leukemia or other cancers associated with exposure to low levels of gamma radiation. The study compares the mortality experience of shipyard workers who qualified to work in radiation areas to the mortality of similar workers who hold the same types of jobs but who are not authorized to work in radiation areas. The population consists of workers from six government and two private shipyards.

  14. The effects of selected wavelengths and energy levels of ultraviolet irradiation on the endopeptidase and hemolytic activity of Aeromonas proteolytica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovett, David Franklin

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    irradiation of the radiosensitive B strain of Escherichia cali induced, at a high frequency, a radiation resistance strain, which she designated as B/r. Six years later Clark (2) found that this B/r strain was not only more resistant to ultraviolet...THE EFFECTS OF SELECTED WAVELENGTHS AND ENERGY LEVELS OF ULTRAVIOLET IRRADIATION ON THE ENDOPEPTIDASE AND HEMOLYTIC ACTIVITY OF AEROMONAS PROTEOLYTICA A Thesis by DAVID FRANKLIN LOVETT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM...

  15. The Effect of Graded Levels of Dietary Starch on Cecal Environment in Horses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Kristen L.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    an indirect measure of fermented hexose, methane, and carbon dioxide. Diet did not influence dry matter intake (DMI), however it did have an effect on starch intake (P < 0.0001) and caused a linear increase in starch consumption as the amount of offered starch...

  16. The Effectiveness of State-Level Policies on Solar Market Development in Different State Contexts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafetyTed5,Audit ReportThe EECBGEffect ofTheThe

  17. The effect of high-level waste glass composition on spinel liquidus temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Riley, Brian J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Matyas, Josef

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Spinel crystals precipitate in high-level waste glasses containing Fe, Cr, Ni , Mn, Zn, and Ru. The liquidus temperature (TL) of spinel as the primary crystallization phase is a function of glass composition and the spinel solubility (c0) is a function of both glass composition and temperature (T). Previously reported models of TL as a function of composition are based on TL measured directly, which requires laborious experimental procedures. Viewing the curve of c0 versus T as the liquidus line allows a significant broadening of the composition region for model fitting. This paper estimates TL as a function of composition based on c0 data obtained with the X-ray diffraction technique.

  18. The effect of high-level waste glass composition on spinel liquidus temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruger, A. A. [Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland, Washington (United States); Riley, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Crum, Jarrod V. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hrma, Pavel [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Matyas, Josef [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Spinel crystals precipitate in high-level waste glasses containing Fe, Cr, Ni, Mn, Zn, and Ru. The liquidus temperature (T{sub L}d) of spinel as the primary crystallization phase is a function of glass composition, and the spinel solubility (c{sub o}) is a function of both glass composition and temperature (T). Previously reported models of T{sub L} as a function of composition are based on T{sub L} measured directly, which requires laborious experimental procedures. Viewing the curve of c{sub o} versus T as the liquidus line allows a significant broadening of the composition region for model fitting. This paper estimates T{sub L} as a function of composition based on c{sub o} data obtained with the X-ray diffraction technique.

  19. Effects of reservoir drawdown and refill on mercury levels in fish and other biota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jagoe, C.H.; Salice, C.; Yabnochko, G.; Grasman, B.T.; Youngblood, T. [Savannah River Ecology Lab., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Mercury bioavailability from contaminated sediments is controlled by methylation, related to bacterial activity and degradable organic material. These variables may be affected by large changes in water level and chemistry in a reservoir. At Par Pond, a 1,200 ha impoundment on the USDOE Savannah River Site, South Carolina, potential failure of an earthen dam prompted lowering the reservoir by 3 meters over a two month period in 1991, decreasing water volume about 70%. The reservoir was refilled over a two month period in 1995. Largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) were sampled at quarterly intervals before, during and after the drawdown. Length and weight were determined, and liver and muscle analyzed for total Hg. Hg was also measured in top level predators (alligators), forage fish, macrophytes and invertebrates. From Fall 1991 Winter 1994--5, Hg ranged from 0.05 to 2.0 ug/g wet mass in bass muscle, and was strongly related to fish size, based on about 400 fish. Condition factor rose soon after drawdown, then declined as forage populations collapsed. Using fish size as covariate, bass muscle Hg was greater in spring 1992 than all other sampling dates. However, after 3 years of drawdown, there was no overall trend in bass Hg. Forage species differed in Hg, with highest concentrations in brook silversides (0.13 {micro}g Hg/g wet mass in 2 g fish). Alligators contained up to 20 {micro}g Hg/g dry mass in liver. Refill caused inundation of terrestrial plants on exposed sediments, and microbial action associated with the decay of these may enhance Hg methylation. Experiments with caged fish are underway to measure uptake rates.

  20. Optomechanical effects of two-level systems in a back-action evading measurement of micro-mechanical motion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suh, J.; Weinstein, A. J.; Schwab, K. C. [Applied Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)] [Applied Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the two-level systems (TLS) in lithographic superconducting circuits act as a power-dependent dielectric leading to non-linear responses in a parametrically coupled electromechanical system. Driven TLS shift the microwave resonance frequency and modulate the mechanical resonance through the optical spring effect. By pumping with two tones in a back-action evading measurement, these effects produce a mechanical parametric instability which limits single quadrature imprecision to 1.4 x{sub zp}. The microwave resonator noise is also consistent to a TLS-noise model. These observations suggest design strategies for minimizing TLS effects to improve ground-state cooling and quantum non-demolition measurements of motion.

  1. Effect of Sea Level Rise on Energy Infrastructure in Four Major

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 Federal Register / Vol.6: RecordJune-YearEffect of Intake on

  2. Multi-level effects of low dose rate ionizing radiation on southern toad, Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stark, Karolina; Scott, David E.; Tsyusko, Olga; Coughlin, Daniel P.; Hinton, Thomas G.; Amendola, Roberto

    2015-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite their potential vulnerability to contaminants from exposure at multiple life stages, amphibians are one of the least studied groups of vertebrates in ecotoxicology, and research on radiation effects in amphibians is scarce. We used multiple endpoints to assess the radiosensitivity of the southern toad (Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris) during its pre-terrestrial stages of development –embryonic, larval, and metamorphic. Toads were exposed, from several hours after oviposition through metamorphosis (up to 77 days later), to four low dose rates of ¹³?Cs at 0.13, 2.4, 21, and 222 mGy d?¹, resulting in total doses up to 15.8 Gy. Radiation treatments did notmore »affect hatching success of embryos, larval survival, or the length of the larval period. The individual family variation in hatching success of embryos was larger than the radiation response. In contrast, newly metamorphosed individuals from the higher dose-rate treatments had higher mass and mass/length body indices, a measure which may relate to higher post-metamorphic survival. The increased mass and index at higher dose rates may indicate that the chronic, low dose rate radiation exposures triggered secondary responses. Additionally, the increases in growth were linked to a decrease in DNA damage (as measured by the Comet Assay) in red blood cells at a dose rate of 21mGy d?¹ and a total dose of 1.1 Gy. In conclusion, the complex effects of low dose rates of ionizing radiation may trigger growth and cellular repair mechanisms in amphibian larvae.« less

  3. Multi-level effects of low dose rate ionizing radiation on southern toad, Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stark, Karolina [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden); Univ. of Georgia, Aiken, SC (United States); Scott, David E. [Univ. of Georgia, Aiken, SC (United States); Tsyusko, Olga [Univ. of Georgia, Aiken, SC (United States); Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Coughlin, Daniel P. [Univ. of Georgia, Aiken, SC (United States); Hinton, Thomas G. [Univ. of Georgia, Aiken, SC (United States); Inst. of Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety, Cadarache (France); Amendola, Roberto [ENEA, (Italy)

    2015-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite their potential vulnerability to contaminants from exposure at multiple life stages, amphibians are one of the least studied groups of vertebrates in ecotoxicology, and research on radiation effects in amphibians is scarce. We used multiple endpoints to assess the radiosensitivity of the southern toad (Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris) during its pre-terrestrial stages of development –embryonic, larval, and metamorphic. Toads were exposed, from several hours after oviposition through metamorphosis (up to 77 days later), to four low dose rates of ¹³?Cs at 0.13, 2.4, 21, and 222 mGy d?¹, resulting in total doses up to 15.8 Gy. Radiation treatments did not affect hatching success of embryos, larval survival, or the length of the larval period. The individual family variation in hatching success of embryos was larger than the radiation response. In contrast, newly metamorphosed individuals from the higher dose-rate treatments had higher mass and mass/length body indices, a measure which may relate to higher post-metamorphic survival. The increased mass and index at higher dose rates may indicate that the chronic, low dose rate radiation exposures triggered secondary responses. Additionally, the increases in growth were linked to a decrease in DNA damage (as measured by the Comet Assay) in red blood cells at a dose rate of 21mGy d?¹ and a total dose of 1.1 Gy. In conclusion, the complex effects of low dose rates of ionizing radiation may trigger growth and cellular repair mechanisms in amphibian larvae.

  4. Effect of antimony on the deep-level traps in GaInNAsSb thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Islam, Muhammad Monirul, E-mail: islam.monir.ke@u.tsukuba.ac.jp; Miyashita, Naoya; Ahsan, Nazmul; Okada, Yoshitaka [Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology (RCAST), The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro ku, Tokyo 153-8904 (Japan); Sakurai, Takeaki; Akimoto, Katsuhiro [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Admittance spectroscopy has been performed to investigate the effect of antimony (Sb) on GaInNAs material in relation to the deep-level defects in this material. Two electron traps, E1 and E2 at an energy level 0.12 and 0.41?eV below the conduction band (E{sub C}), respectively, were found in undoped GaInNAs. Bias-voltage dependent admittance confirmed that E1 is an interface-type defect being spatially localized at the GaInNAs/GaAs interface, while E2 is a bulk-type defect located around mid-gap of GaInNAs layer. Introduction of Sb improved the material quality which was evident from the reduction of both the interface and bulk-type defects.

  5. The Accessibility of patient information leaflets concerning cervical cancer - the effect of high leaflet readability level and the reader's level of education 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gale, Jennifer

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research suggests that many Patient Information Leaflets are written at too high a level for the population to understand. This study took 2 leaflets on Cervical Cancer, with their readability measured using 3 different ...

  6. Effects of climate, tectonism, and variations in sea level on formation of Cretaceous coals of North America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCabe, P.J.; Brownfield, M.E.; Hansen, D.E.; Hettinger, R.D.; Kirschbaum, M.A.; Sanchez, D.

    1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extensive deposits of Cretaceous coal-bearing strata are present in western North America, extending from the North Slope of Alaska to northern Mexico. Most of the Cretaceous sediments were derived from the active Cordillera region and were deposited in foreland basins on the western margin of the Western Interior seaway. A multidisciplinary study is in progress to document and attempt to explain the temporal and spatial distribution of the Cretaceous coals. The study examines the effects of variations of paleoclimate, tectonics, and relative sea level on a continentwide scale. In addition, coal quality is related to the regional depositional settings. Many aspects of coal quality (for example, maceral composition, ash content, sulfur content) are determined by the flora and hydrology of the mire in which the original peat accumulated. The existence of Cretaceous coals throughout the length of the Western Cordillera provides a unique opportunity to determine variations in mire type with climate over a range of 50/degrees/ of paleolatitude, and to examine the effects of these variations on coal quality. The relationships between coal beds and associated clastic facies should also be expected to change with varying mire types. Recent developments in their understanding of foreland basin evolution, Cretaceous sea level changes, and peat-forming environments make this an optimal time to begin a regional synthesis of North America's Cretaceous coals. Results of this study should aid the development of better predictive models of coal quality and seam thickness. These models will take into account the effects of major controls on sedimentation (climate, tectonics, sea level changes) rather than just the local depositional environment.

  7. System level latchup mitigation for single event and transient radiation effects on electronics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kimbrough, J.R.; Colella, N.J.

    1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A ``blink`` technique, analogous to a person blinking at a flash of bright light, is provided for mitigating the effects of single event current latchup and prompt pulse destructive radiation on a micro-electronic circuit. The system includes event detection circuitry, power dump logic circuitry, and energy limiting measures with autonomous recovery. The event detection circuitry includes ionizing radiation pulse detection means for detecting a pulse of ionizing radiation and for providing at an output terminal thereof a detection signal indicative of the detection of a pulse of ionizing radiation. The current sensing circuitry is coupled to the power bus for determining an occurrence of excess current through the power bus caused by ionizing radiation or by ion-induced destructive latchup of a semiconductor device. The power dump circuitry includes power dump logic circuitry having a first input terminal connected to the output terminal of the ionizing radiation pulse detection circuitry and having a second input terminal connected to the output terminal of the current sensing circuitry. The power dump logic circuitry provides an output signal to the input terminal of the circuitry for opening the power bus and the circuitry for shorting the power bus to a ground potential to remove power from the power bus. The energy limiting circuitry with autonomous recovery includes circuitry for opening the power bus and circuitry for shorting the power bus to a ground potential. The circuitry for opening the power bus and circuitry for shorting the power bus to a ground potential includes a series FET and a shunt FET. The invention provides for self-contained sensing for latchup, first removal of power to protect latched components, and autonomous recovery to enable transparent operation of other system elements. 18 figs.

  8. System level latchup mitigation for single event and transient radiation effects on electronics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kimbrough, Joseph Robert (Pleasanton, CA); Colella, Nicholas John (Livermore, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A "blink" technique, analogous to a person blinking at a flash of bright light, is provided for mitigating the effects of single event current latchup and prompt pulse destructive radiation on a micro-electronic circuit. The system includes event detection circuitry, power dump logic circuitry, and energy limiting measures with autonomous recovery. The event detection circuitry includes ionizing radiation pulse detection means for detecting a pulse of ionizing radiation and for providing at an output terminal thereof a detection signal indicative of the detection of a pulse of ionizing radiation. The current sensing circuitry is coupled to the power bus for determining an occurrence of excess current through the power bus caused by ionizing radiation or by ion-induced destructive latchup of a semiconductor device. The power dump circuitry includes power dump logic circuitry having a first input terminal connected to the output terminal of the ionizing radiation pulse detection circuitry and having a second input terminal connected to the output terminal of the current sensing circuitry. The power dump logic circuitry provides an output signal to the input terminal of the circuitry for opening the power bus and the circuitry for shorting the power bus to a ground potential to remove power from the power bus. The energy limiting circuitry with autonomous recovery includes circuitry for opening the power bus and circuitry for shorting the power bus to a ground potential. The circuitry for opening the power bus and circuitry for shorting the power bus to a ground potential includes a series FET and a shunt FET. The invention provides for self-contained sensing for latchup, first removal of power to protect latched components, and autonomous recovery to enable transparent operation of other system elements.

  9. The effect of temperature and oxygen level on the production of testosterone, androstenedione and progesterone by rat testis in vitro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dudley, Peter Anthony

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE AND OXYGEN LEVEL ON THE PRODUCTION OF TESTOSTERONE, ANDROSTFNEDIONE AND PROGESTERONE BY RAT TESTIS IN VITRO A Thesis by PETER ANTHONY DUDLEY Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A%M University in partial... IN VITRO A Thesis by PETER ANTHONY DUDLEY Approved as to style and content by: (C irman of Committee) (Head of Department) &, 'Mcmbe r ) ' M c'm b e r ) AC KN OW LEDG MENTS The author i'eels extremely fortunate to have had as the chair- man...

  10. Data-driven Markov models and their application in the evaluation of adverse events in radiotherapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abler, Daniel; Davies, Jim; Dosanjh, Manjit; Jena, Raj; Kirkby, Norman; Peach, Ken

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Decision-making processes in medicine rely increasingly on modelling and simulation techniques; they are especially useful when combining evidence from multiple sources. Markov models are frequently used to synthesize the available evidence for such simulation studies, by describing disease and treatment progress, as well as associated factors such as the treatment's effects on a patient's life and the costs to society. When the same decision problem is investigated by multiple stakeholders, differing modelling assumptions are often applied, making synthesis and interpretation of the results difficult. This paper proposes a standardized approach towards the creation of Markov models. It introduces the notion of ‘general Markov models’, providing a common definition of the Markov models that underlie many similar decision problems, and develops a language for their specification. We demonstrate the application of this language by developing a general Markov model for adverse event analysis in radiotherapy ...

  11. Adverse Drug Reaction Monitoring In Psychiatric OPD Adverse Drug Reaction Monitoring In Psychiatric Outpatient Department Of A Tertiary Care Hospital

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiren K. Prajapati; Nisarg D. Joshi; Hiren R. Trivedi; Manubhai C. Parmar; Shilpa P. Jadav; Dinesh M. Parmar; Jalpan G. Kareliya

    Abstracts Background:Pharmacovigilance in psychiatry units can play vital role in detecting adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and alerting physician to such events, thereby protecting the user population from avoidable harm. Objective: To assess the suspected ADRs profile of psychotropic drugs in psychiatry OPD of a tertiary care hospital and its comparison with available literature data as well as to create awareness among the consultant psychiatrists to these ADRs profile. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was conducted in the psychiatry OPD. Thirty five consecutive patients per day were screened irrespective of their psychiatric diagnosis for suspected ADRs on 3 fixed days in a week from January 2011 to December 2011. CDSCO form was used to record the ADRs. Causality was assessed by WHO causality assessment scale while severity was assessed using Hartwig and Siegel scale. Results: Out of 4410 patients were screened, 383 patients were suspected of having at least one ADR. Thus, 8.68 % of our study population reported ADRs. Of 407 events recorded, 369(90.60%) were “probable ” and rest “possible ” according to WHO-UMC causality assessment

  12. Effects of Water Levels on Productivity of Canada Geese in the Northern Flathead Valley, 1985 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, Daniel

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operation of Hungry Horse Dam on the South Fork Flathead River causes sporadic water level fluctuations along the main stem Flathead River. Changes in chronology of seasonal water level fluctuations and substantial habitat losses have occurred as a result of construction and operation of Kerr Dam, which regulates Flathead Lake. These fluctuations may impact goose populations through flooding and erosion of nesting and brood-rearing habitats, and increased susceptibility of nests and young to predation. The number, location, and success of goose nests were determined through pair surveys and nest searches. Our 1985 pair count data indicated that 95 to 143 nests may have been present. Hatching success for 1985 nests (55%) was low compared to long-term averages for the region. Predation was the predominant cause of ground nest failure (25 nests); we documented 2 nest failures due to flooding. The maximum gosling count in the study area for 1985 was 197. Six key brood-rearing areas were identified. Most (80%) sites were located in the herbaceous or pasture cover type and the riparian bench landform. Analysis of aerial photographs taken prior to construction of Kerr Dam documented the loss of 1859 acres of habitat along the north shore of Flathead Lake. Losses were attributed to inundation and to continuing erosion due to operation of Kerr Dam. Lake and river water level regimes were compared with the chronology of important periods in the nesting cycle. Low lake levels in May and early June coincide with the breed-rearing period. Mudflats are heavily used by broods, but their effect on survival must still be documented. Preliminary recommendations to protect and enhance Canada goose habitat and production are being developed.

  13. Comparative effects of parathion and chlorpyrifos on extracellular endocannabinoid levels in rat hippocampus: Influence on cholinergic toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Jing [Department of Physiological Sciences, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK (United States); Parsons, Loren [Committee on Neurobiology of Affective Disorders, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA (United States); Pope, Carey, E-mail: carey.pope@okstate.edu [Department of Physiological Sciences, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK (United States)

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Parathion (PS) and chlorpyrifos (CPF) are organophosphorus insecticides (OPs) that elicit acute toxicity by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Endocannabinoids (eCBs, N-arachidonoylethanolamine, AEA; 2-arachidonoylglycerol, 2AG) can modulate neurotransmission by inhibiting neurotransmitter release. We proposed that differential inhibition of eCB-degrading enzymes (fatty acid amide hydrolase, FAAH, and monoacylglycerol lipase, MAGL) by PS and CPF leads to differences in extracellular eCB levels and toxicity. Microdialysis cannulae were implanted into hippocampus of adult male rats followed by treatment with vehicle (peanut oil, 2 ml/kg, sc), PS (27 mg/kg) or CPF (280 mg/kg) 6–7 days later. Signs of toxicity, AChE, FAAH and MAGL inhibition, and extracellular levels of AEA and 2AG were measured 2 and 4 days later. Signs were noted in PS-treated rats but not in controls or CPF-treated rats. Cholinesterase inhibition was extensive in hippocampus with PS (89–90%) and CPF (78–83%) exposure. FAAH activity was also markedly reduced (88–91%) by both OPs at both time-points. MAGL was inhibited by both OPs but to a lesser degree (35–50%). Increases in extracellular AEA levels were noted after either PS (about 2-fold) or CPF (about 3-fold) while lesser treatment-related 2-AG changes were noted. The cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist AM251 (3 mg/kg, ip) had no influence on functional signs after CPF but markedly decreased toxicity in PS-treated rats. The results suggest that extracellular eCBs levels can be markedly elevated by both PS and CPF. CB1-mediated signaling appears to play a role in the acute toxicity of PS but the role of eCBs in CPF toxicity remains unclear. - Highlights: • Chlorpyrifos and parathion both extensively inhibited hippocampal cholinesterase. • Functional signs were only noted with parathion. • Chlorpyrifos and parathion increased hippocampal extracellular anandamide levels. • 2-Arachidonoylglycerol levels were lesser affected. • The CB1 antagonist AM251 had no effect on chlorpyrifos but reduced parathion toxicity.

  14. The Effect of Temperature and Composition on Spinel Concentration and Crystal Size in High-Level Waste Glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mika, M (.); Patek, M (.); Maixner, J (.); Randakova, S (.); Hrma, Pavel R. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Anibal Taboas, Rick Vanbrabant, Gary Benda.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-level radioactive wastes can be safely immobilized in alkali-aluminoborosilicate glass. To reduce the cost of the vitrification process, the waste loading should be maximized. This can be done by optimizing the process using mathematical modeling. The main objective of our work was to determine one of the necessary inputs for the mathematical model, which is the effect of temperature and composition on the concentration of spinel crystals and their size. We prepared six glasses with a different content of Li+, Na+, Mg2+, Ni2+, Cr3+, and SiIV and studied the effect of composition on the temperature dependence of spinel equilibrium concentration in glass by X-ray powder diffraction. The size of crystals was determined using optical microscopy. It was found that the temperature effect on spinel concentration significantly increased as the content of Ni2+ or Mg2+ in glass increased and slightly decreased as the content of Cr3+ increased and Li+ and Na+ content decreased. Both Ni2+ and Cr3+ acted as nucleating agents, producing a huge number of tiny spinel crystals ({approx}2 im). In particular, Ni2+ seems to very significantly facilitate spinel crystallization.

  15. Effects of cysteamine on pituitary, MTTW15 tumor, and serum prolactin levels measured by rat lymphoma cell bioassay and radioimmunoassay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parsons, J.A.; Peterson, E.K.; Hartfel, M.A.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cysteamine (CSH), a sulfhydryl compound, reduces both serum and anterior pituitary (AP) PRL measured by RIA. We have used the Nb2 lymphoma cell bioassay (BIO) for PRL to evaluate possible CSH-related changes in PRL levels in sera and tissues of male and MtTW15 mammosomatotropic tumor-bearing female rats. Experimental animals received a single sc injection of CSH (300 mg/kg), and samples were collected 0.5-24 h later. Since CSH and serum from CSH rats were toxic in BIO, samples were dialyzed before assay. All samples were evaluated for PRL and GH by RIA as well. A significant decrease (P less than 0.05) in BIO serum PRL was evident in male rats 0.5 h after CSH; levels remained low for 24 h. Serum PRL by RIA was significantly depressed at 4 h but not at 0.5 h or 24 h. PRL in AP extracts was decreased (60-90%) at all times by BIO and RIA. Significant decreases of BIO- and RIA-detectable PRL were recorded in serum and tissues (AP and tumors) at 4 h in tumor rats. Sequentially bled (0.5-4 h) CSH-treated tumor-bearing rats showed 50% and 80% reductions in serum PRL at 1 and 4 h by both BIO and RIA. CSH had no effect on GH levels in sera and tissues of any animal studied at any time interval. Our results substantiate earlier reports on CSH-induced decreases in RIA-detectable PRL. They show that such changes cannot be attributed to assay effects alone, as significant decreases in circulating and stored PRL (both AP and tumor) were evident by BIO. Results with tissue extracts were the most dramatic. They suggest an action of CSH or a metabolic intermediate with stored PRL which reduces both extractable PRL and hormone release. Such an effect of CSH on PRL extraction has been suggested by others. Whatever the mechanism, it appears to be relatively specific, since GH cells were not affected.

  16. Detect adverse drug reactions for drug Atorvastatin Yihui Liu1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aickelin, Uwe

    Detect adverse drug reactions for drug Atorvastatin Yihui Liu1,2 1 Institute of Intelligent Department of Computer Science, University of Nottingham, UK Abstract--Adverse drug reaction (ADR) is widely feature matrix and feature selection. The experiments are carried out on the drug Atorvastatin. Major side

  17. Detect adverse drug reactions for drug Simvastatin Yihui Liu1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aickelin, Uwe

    Detect adverse drug reactions for drug Simvastatin Yihui Liu1,2 1 Institute of Intelligent Department of Computer Science, University of Nottingham, UK Abstract--Adverse drug reaction (ADR) is widely feature matrix and feature selection. The experiments are carried out on the drug Simvastatin. Major side

  18. Detect adverse drug reactions for drug Alendronate Yihui Liu1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aickelin, Uwe

    Detect adverse drug reactions for drug Alendronate Yihui Liu1,2 1 Institute of Intelligent Department of Computer Science, University of Nottingham, UK Abstract--Adverse drug reaction (ADR) is widely feature matrix and feature selection. The experiments are carried out on the drug Alendronate. Major side

  19. Detect adverse drug reactions for drug Pioglitazone Yihui Liu1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aickelin, Uwe

    Detect adverse drug reactions for drug Pioglitazone Yihui Liu1,2 1 Institute of Intelligent Department of Computer Science, University of Nottingham, UK Abstract--Adverse drug reaction (ADR) is widely feature matrix and feature selection. The experiments are carried out on the drug Pioglitazone. Major side

  20. The effect of fusion-relevant helium levels on the mechanical properties of isotopically tailored ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hankin, G.L. [Loughborough Univ. (United Kingdom); Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The yield and maximum strengths of an irradiated series of isotopically tailored ferritic alloys were evaluated using the shear punch test. The composition of three of the alloys was Fe-12Cr-1.5Ni. Different balances of nickel isotopes were used in each alloy in order to produce different helium levels. A fourth alloy, which contained no nickel, was also irradiated. The addition of nickel at any isotopic balance to the Fe-12Cr base alloy significantly increased the shear yield and maximum strengths of the alloys, and as expected, the strength of the alloys decreased with increasing irradiation temperature. Helium itself, up to 75 appm over 7 dpa appears to have little effect on the mechanical properties of the alloys.

  1. Effects of optical feedback in a birefringence-Zeeman dual frequency laser at high optical feedback levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mao Wei; Zhang Shulian

    2007-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical feedback effects are studied in a birefringence-Zeeman dual frequency laser at high optical feedback levels. The intensity modulation features of the two orthogonally polarized lights are investigated in both isotropic optical feedback (IOF) and polarized optical feedback (POF). In IOF, the intensities of both beams are modulated simultaneously, and four zones, i.e., the e-light zone, the o-light and e-light zone, the o-light zone, and the no-light zone, are formed in a period corresponding to a half laser wavelength displacement of the feedback mirror. In POF, the two orthogonally polarized lights will oscillate alternately. Strong mode competition can be observed, and it affects the phase difference between the two beams greatly. The theoretical analysis is presented, which is in good agreement with the experimental results. The potential use of the experimental results is also discussed.

  2. The Effect of Composition on Spinel Crystals Equilibrium in Low-Silica High-Level Waste Glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiricka, Milos; Hrma, Pavel R.; Vienna, John D.

    2003-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The liquidus temperature (TL) and the equilibrium mass fraction of spinel were measured in the regions of low-silica (less than 42 mass% SiO2) high-level waste borosilicate glasses within the spinel primary phase field as functions of glass composition. The components that varied, one at a time, were Al2O3, B2O3, Cr2O3, Fe2O3, Li2O, MnO, Na2O, NiO, SiO2, and ZrO2. The effects of Al2O3, B2O3, Fe2O3, NiO, SiO2, and ZrO2 on the TL in this region and in glasses with 42 to 56 mass% SiO2 were similar. However, in the low-silica region, Cr2O3 increased the TL substantially less, and Li2O and Na2O decreased the TL significantly less than in the region with 42 to 56 mass% SiO2. The effect of MnO on the TL of the higher SiO2 glasses is not yet understood with sufficient accuracy. The temperature at which the equilibrium mass fraction of spinel was 1 mass% was 25C to 64C below the TL.

  3. The Effect of Composition on Spinel Crystals Equilibrium in Low-Silica High-Level Waste Glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiricka, Milos (ASSOC WESTERN UNIVERSITY); Hrma, Pavel R. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Vienna, John D. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

    2003-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The liquidus temperature (TL) and the equilibrium mass fraction of spinel were measured in the regions of low-silica (less than 42 mass% SiO2) high-level waste borosilicate glasses within the spinel primary phase field as functions of glass composition. The components that varied, one at a time, were Al2O3, B2O3, Cr2O3, Fe2O3, Li2O, MnO, Na2O, NiO, SiO2, and ZrO2. The effects of Al2O3, B2O3, Fe2O3, NiO, SiO2, and ZrO2 on the TL in this region and in glasses with 42 to 56 mass% SiO2 were similar. However, in the low-silica region, Cr2O3 increased the TL substantially less, and Li2O and Na2O decreased the TL significantly less than in the region with 42 to 56 mass% SiO2. The effect of MnO on the TL of the higher SiO2 glasses is not yet understood with sufficient accuracy. The temperature at which the equilibrium mass fraction of spinel was 1 mass% was 25?C to 64?C below the TL.

  4. Effects of pelleting, dietary protein, energy, and calcium level and intermittent antibiotic supplementation on summer feed consumption and performance of fall-hatched birds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fowler, John Clemons

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECTS OF PELLET1NG, DIETARY PRO'TEIN, ENERGY, AND CALCIUM LEVEL AND INTERMITTENT ANTIBIOTIC SUPPLEMENTATION ON SUMMER FEED CONSUMPTION AND PERFORMANCE OF FALL -. HATCHED BIRDS A Thesis By John Clemons Fowler Submitted to '. he Graduate... College of the Texas A8? Universi y in partial fi lfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1967 Major Subject Poultry Science EFFECTS OF PELLETING, DIETARY PROTEIN, ENERGY, AND CALCIUM LEVEL AND INTERMITTENT...

  5. Mycorrhizae and phosphorus fertilization effects on survival, growth, total biomass and leaf nutrient levels of two-year old Leucaena leucocephala

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mbugua, David Kahuria

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MYCORRHIZAE AND PHOSPHORUS FERTILIZATION EFFECTS ON SURVIVAL, GRONTH& TOTAL BIOMASS AND LEAF NUTRIENT LEVELS OF TWO-YEAR CLD LEUCAENA LEUCOCEPHALA A Thesis by DAVID KAHURIA MBUGUA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1985 Major Subject: Forestry MYCORRHIZAE AND PHOSPHORUS FERTILIZATION EFFECTS ON SURVIVAL, GROWTH& TOTAL BIOMASS AND LEAF NUTRIENT LEVELS OF TWO-YEAR OLD LEUCAENA...

  6. adverse survival factor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heat treatment pH, recovery1 Survival curves of heated bacterial spores:1 Effect of environmental factors on Weibull heat13 resistance for non-log linear survival curves. One...

  7. A continuous GRASP to determine the relationship between drugs and adverse reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirsch, Michael J. [Raytheon, Inc., Network Centric Systems, P.O. Box 12248, St. Petersburg, FL, 33733 (United States); Meneses, Claudio N.; Pardalos, Panos M.; Ragle, Michelle [Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, University of Florida, 303 Weil Hall, Gainesville, FL, 32611 (United States); Resende, Mauricio G. C. [Algorithms and Optimization Research Department, AT and T Labs Research, 180 Park Avenue, Room C241, Florham Park, NJ 07932 (United States)

    2007-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Adverse drag reactions (ADRs) are estimated to be one of the leading causes of death. Many national and international agencies have set up databases of ADR reports for the express purpose of determining the relationship between drugs and adverse reactions that they cause. We formulate the drug-reaction relationship problem as a continuous optimization problem and utilize C-GRASP, a new continuous global optimization heuristic, to approximately determine the relationship between drugs and adverse reactions. Our approach is compared against others in the literature and is shown to find better solutions.

  8. Simulating the growth response of aspen to elevated ozone: a mechanistic approach to scaling a leaf-level model of ozone effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simulating the growth response of aspen to elevated ozone: a mechanistic approach to scaling a leaf-level model of ozone effects on photosynthesis to a complex canopy architecture§ M.J. Martina, *, G.E. Hosta; accepted 17 July 2001 ``Capsule'': A process model is described that predicts the relative effects of ozone

  9. The accumulations of HIF-1? and HIF-2? by JNK and ERK are involved in biphasic effects induced by different levels of arsenite in human bronchial epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Yuan; Li, Yuan [Institute of Toxicology, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China) [Institute of Toxicology, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China); The Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China); Li, Huiqiao [Qujing Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Qujing 655000, Yunnan (China)] [Qujing Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Qujing 655000, Yunnan (China); Pang, Ying; Zhao, Yue; Jiang, Rongrong; Shen, Lu [Institute of Toxicology, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China) [Institute of Toxicology, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China); The Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China); Zhou, Jianwei; Wang, Xinru [The Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China)] [The Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China); Liu, Qizhan, E-mail: drqzliu@hotmail.com [Institute of Toxicology, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China) [Institute of Toxicology, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China); The Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The biphasic effects of arsenite, in which low levels of arsenite induce cell proliferation and high levels of arsenite induce DNA damage and apoptosis, apparently contribute to arsenite-induced carcinogenesis. However, the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are not well understood. In this study, we investigated the effects of different levels of arsenite on cell proliferation, DNA damage and apoptosis as well as on signal transduction pathways in human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells. Our results show that a low level of arsenite activates extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), which probably mediate arsenite-inhibited degradation of ubiquitinated hypoxia-inducible factor-2? (HIF-2?) in HBE cells. ERK inhibition blocks cell proliferation induced by a low level of arsenite, in part via HIF-2?. In contrast, a high level of arsenite activates c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK), which provoke a response to suppress ubiquitinated HIF-1? degradation. Down-regulation of HIF-1? by inhibiting JNK, however, increases the DNA damage but decreases the apoptosis induced by a high level of arsenite. Thus, data in the present study suggest that the accumulations of HIF-1? and HIF-2? by JNK and ERK are involved in different levels of arsenite-induced biphasic effects, with low levels of arsenite inducing cell proliferation and high levels of arsenite inducing DNA damage and apoptosis in HBE cells. -- Highlights: ? Biphasic effects induced by different concentrations of arsenite. ? Different regulation of ERK or JNK signal pathway by arsenite. ? Different regulation of HIF1? or HIF 2? by arsenite.

  10. Strategies for mitigating adverse environmental impacts due to structural building materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaturvedi, Swati, 1976-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis assesses the problem of adverse environmental impacts due to the use of Portland cement and structural steel in the construction industry. The thesis outlines three technology and policy strategies to mitigate ...

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - adverse health risks Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Search Sample search results for: adverse health risks Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Health Care through the Lens of Risk Call for Papers for a four part special issue of...

  12. Energy Department Announces Secretarial Determination of No Adverse

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian NuclearandJunetrackEllen O'KaneSystems (EGS) SubsurfaceMaterial Impact

  13. Secretarial Determination of No Adverse Material Impact for Uranium

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014,Zaleski - Policy Advisor, EnergyA look atTransfers | Department of

  14. Secretary Chu Announces Determination of No Adverse Material Impact for

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014,Zaleski - Policy Advisor, EnergyA lookTechnology |Energy

  15. Effect of Feed Melting, Temperature History and Minor Component Addition on Spinel Crystallization in High-Level Waste Glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izak, Pavel; Hrma, Pavel R.; Arey, Bruce W.; Plaisted, Trevor J.

    2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was undertaken to help design mathematical models for high-level waste (HLW) glass melter that simulate spinel behavior in molten glass. Spinel, (Fe,Ni,Mn) (Fe,Cr)2O4, is the primary solid phase that precipitates from HLW glasses containing Fe and Ni in sufficient concentrations. Spinel crystallization affects the anticipated cost and risk of HLW vitrification. To study melting reactions, we used simulated HLW feed, prepared with co-precipitated Fe, Ni, Cr, and Mn hydroxides. Feed samples were heated up at a temperature-increase rate (4C/min) close to that which the feed experiences in the HLW glass melter. The decomposition, melting, and dissolution of feed components (such as nitrates, carbonates, and silica) and the formation of intermediate crystalline phases (spinel, sodalite [Na8(AlSiO4)6(NO2)2], and Zr-containing minerals) were characterized using evolved gas analysis, volume-expansion measurement, optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and X-ray diffraction. Nitrates and quartz, the major feed components, converted to a glass-forming melt by 880C. A chromium-free spinel formed in the nitrate melt starting from 520C and Sodalite, a transient product of corundum dissolution, appeared above 600C and eventually dissolved in glass. To investigate the effects of temperature history and minor components (Ru,Ag, and Cu) on the dissolution and growth of spinel crystals, samples were heated up to temperatures above liquidus temperature (TL), then subjected to different temperature histories, and analyzed. The results show that spinel mass fraction, crystals composition, and crystal size depend on the chemical and physical makeup of the feed and temperature history.

  16. Impacts of Water Level Fluctuations on Kokanee Reproduction in Flathead Lake; Effects of Operation of Kerr and Hungry Horse Dam on Reproductive Success, 1983 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Decker-Hess, Janet; McMullin, Steve L.

    1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Koktneesalmon (Oncorhvnchusnerka), the land-locked form of sockeye salmon, were originally introduced to Flathead Lake in 1916. My 1933, kokanee had become established in the lake and provided a popular summer trolling fishery as well as a fall snagging fishery in shoreline areas. Presently, Flathead Lake supports the second highest fishing pressure of any lake or reservoir in Montana (Montana Department of Fish and Game 1976). During 1981-82, the lake provided 168,792 man-days of fishing pressure. Ninety-two percent of the estimated 536,870 fish caught in Flathead Lake in 1981-82 were kokanee salmon. Kokanee also provided forage for bull trout seasonally and year round for lake trout. Kokanee rear to maturity in Flathead Lake, then return to various total grounds to spawn. Spawning occurred in lake outlet streams, springs, larger rivers and lake shoreline areas in suitable but often limited habitat. Shoreline spawning in Flathead Lake was first documented in the mid-1930's. Spawning kokanee were seized from shoreline areas in 1933 and 21,000 cans were processed and packed for distribution to the needy. Stefanich (1953 and 1954) later documented extensive but an unquantified amount of spawning along the shoreline as well as runs in Whitefish River and McDonald Creek in the 1950's. A creel census conducted in 1962-63 determined 11 to 13 percent of the kokanee caught annually were taken during the spawning period (Robbins 1966). During a 1981-82 creel census, less than one percent of the fishermen on Flathead Lake were snagging kokanee (Graham and Fredenberg 1982). The operation of Kerr Dam, located below Flathead Lake on the Flathead River, has altered seasonal fluctuations of Flathead Lake. Lake levels presently remain high during kokanee spawning in November and decline during the incubation and emergence periods. Groundwater plays an important role in embryo and fry survival in redds of shoreline areas exposed by lake drawdown. Stefanich (1954) and Domrose (1968) found live eggs and fry only in shoreline spawning areas wetted by groundwater seeps. Impacts of the operation of Kerr Dam on lakeshore spawning have not been quantified. Recent studies have revealed that operation of Hungry Horse Dam severely impacted successful kokanee spawning and incubation in the Flathead River above Flathead Lake (Graham et al. 1980, McMullin and Graham 1981, Fraley and Graham 1982 and Fraley and McMullin 1983). Flows from Hungry Horse Dam to enhance kokanee reproduction in the river system have been voluntarily met by the Bureau of Reclamation since 1981. In lakeshore spawning areas in other Pacific Northwest systems, spawning habitat for kokanee and sockeye salmon was characterized by seepage or groundwater flow where suitable substrate composition existed (Foerster 1968). Spawning primarily occurred in shallower depths (<6 m) where gravels were cleaned by wave action (Hassemer and Rieman 1979 and 1980, Stober et al. 1979a). Seasonal drawdown of reservoirs can adversely affect survival of incubating kokanee eggs and fry spawned in shallow shoreline areas. Jeppon (1955 and 1960) and Whitt (1957) estimated 10-75 percent kokanee egg loss in shoreline areas of Pend Oreille Lake, Idaho after regulation of the upper three meters occurred in 1952. After 20 years of operation, Bowler (1979) found Pend Oreille shoreline spawning to occur in fewer areas with generally lower numbers of adults. In studies on Priest Lake, Idaho, Bjornn (1957) attributed frozen eggs and stranded fry to winter fluctuations of the upper three meters of the lake. Eggs and fry frozen during winter drawdown accounted for a 90 percent loss to shoreline spawning kokanee in Donner Lake, California (Kimsey 1951). Stober et al. (1979a) determined irrigation drawdown of Banks Lake, Washington reduced shoreline survival during five of the seven years the system was studied. The goal of this phase of the study was to evaluate and document effects of the operation of Kerr Dam on kokanee shoreline reproduction in Flathead Lake. Specific objectives to meet this goal are: (1) Del

  17. Edinburgh Research Explorer Effect of the UK's revised paracetamol poisoning management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    Edinburgh Research Explorer Effect of the UK's revised paracetamol poisoning management guidelines of the UK's revised paracetamol poisoning management guidelines on admissions, adverse reactions and costs. 2014 #12;Effect of the UK's revised paracetamol poisoning management guidelines on admissions, adverse

  18. Effect of feed levels and stocking density on growth and survival of Penaeus vannamei and Penaeus stylirostris stocked in pond cages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luszczynski, Jack Roman

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECT OF FEED LEVELS AND STOCKING DENSITY ON GROWTH AND SURVIVAL OF F *I. ARD F ~tl' t STOCKED IN POND CAGES A thesis by JACK ROMAN LUSZCZYNSKI Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1987 Major subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences EFFECT OF FEED LEVELS AND STOCKING DENSITY ON GROWTH AND nnnvlvAL QF pena ua v n m ' AFD p ~tl 'o t STOCKED IN POND CAGES A Thesis by JACK ROMAN...

  19. Effects of injections and/or subcutaneous implants of melatonin on pituitary and plasma levels of LH, FSH and PRL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of LH, FSH and PRL in ovariectomized Syrian hamsters. C. TRAKULRUNGSI R. J. REITER W. K. TRAKULRUNGSI M hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and prolactin (PRL) were measured by radioimmunoassay gland while pituitary PRL levels fell. Plasma levels of LH and FSH also rose while PRL titers remained

  20. The stability of low levels of ethylene oxide in gas sampling bags

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swerzenski, Peter

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to be no interactive effect between initial EtO concentration and bag type but high relative humidities may adversely affect the stability of EtO in gas sampling bags especially at EtO levels around 10-15 ppm. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I wish to thank Dr. Richard B. Konzen... exposure, medical surveillance. signs and labels, regulated areas, training, record keeping and emergency response were also included within the EtO standard. Even though a reference to a short term exposure limit (STEL) of 10 ppm over a 15 minute period...

  1. Transcranial Low-Level Laser Therapy Improves Neurological Performance in Traumatic Brain Injury in Mice: Effect of Treatment Repetition Regimen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamblin, Michael R.

    Low-level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) has been clinically applied around the world for a spectrum of disorders requiring healing, regeneration and prevention of tissue death. One area that is attracting growing interest ...

  2. An evaluation of the effects of an alcoholic extract of fescue grass on the plasma prolactin levels of cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheeler, Lauren Venette

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PRL levels, respiration rates, and rectal temperatures. The relationship between this material and that associated with fescue toxicity and a decrease in plasma prolactin levels has yet to be established. ACKNONLEDGEMENTS I wish to acknowledge.... vii LIST OF FIGURES. iX LIST OF TABLES xi INTRODUCTION. LITERATURE REVIEW. The regulation of prol actin and fts association with fescue toxicity. . . . . Identification of an endophytic fungus associated with fescue toxicity...

  3. An evaluation of the effects of an alcoholic extract of fescue grass on the plasma prolactin levels of cattle 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheeler, Lauren Venette

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PRL levels, respiration rates, and rectal temperatures. The relationship between this material and that associated with fescue toxicity and a decrease in plasma prolactin levels has yet to be established. ACKNONLEDGEMENTS I wish to acknowledge.... vii LIST OF FIGURES. iX LIST OF TABLES xi INTRODUCTION. LITERATURE REVIEW. The regulation of prol actin and fts association with fescue toxicity. . . . . Identification of an endophytic fungus associated with fescue toxicity...

  4. Effect of level of dietary calcium and phosphorus on the site of absorption and utilization of phosphorus in gestating and lactating ruminants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Robert Clay

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two digestion trials were conducted to determine the effect of level of Ca and P on the site and extent of absorption of P in gestating and lactating ruminants. Gestating Nubian dairy nannies (n=8; 41-55 kg) with abomasal cannulas were used...

  5. The effects of sulfate fertilization and high levels of sulfate and salt drinking water on the growth and mineral status of ruminants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Kehe

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the serum mineral concentrations of cows grazing oat pastures. Experiment 2 was conducted to determine the effects of high levels of calcium sulfate (CaSO?²?) and sodium chloride (NaCl) in drinking water on the performance and mineral status of growing...

  6. Effect of level of dietary calcium and phosphorus on the site of absorption and utilization of phosphorus in gestating and lactating ruminants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Robert Clay

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two digestion trials were conducted to determine the effect of level of Ca and P on the site and extent of absorption of P in gestating and lactating ruminants. Gestating Nubian dairy nannies (n=8; 41-55 kg) with abomasal cannulas were used...

  7. Effects of ultraviolet light on aerobic plate counts, Salmonella typhimurium, and Escherichia coli levels on eggshell surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chavez, Cesar

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -catalyzed compound, ozone gas, and hydrogen peroxide. However, these methods may present problems in the poultry industry. Formaldehyde Fumigation Fumigation with formaldehyde has been the prevailing method of sanitation used in poultry hatcheries. Williams (1970...), indicated that the use of ozone gas was effective in reducing bacterial populations, and had no effect on moisture loss. Another sanitizer that is being used is hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide use in hatcheries has been effective in reducing...

  8. Effect of residual gases in high vacuum on the energy-level alignment at noble metal/organic interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helander, M. G.; Wang, Z. B.; Lu, Z. H.

    2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy-level alignment at metal/organic interfaces has traditionally been studied using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) in ultra-high vacuum (UHV). However, since most devices are fabricated in high vacuum (HV), these studies do not accurately reflect the interfaces in real devices. We demonstrate, using UPS measurements of samples prepared in HV and UHV and current-voltage measurements of devices prepared in HV, that the small amounts of residual gases that are adsorbed on the surface of clean Cu, Ag, and Au (i.e., the noble metals) in HV can significantly alter the energy-level alignment at metal/organic interfaces.

  9. Competition between pressure effects and airflow influence for the performance of plasma actuators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kriegseis, J., E-mail: kriegseis@kit.edu [Institute of Fluid Mechanics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Barckmann, K.; Grundmann, S., E-mail: grundmann@csi.tu-darmstadt.de [Center of Smart Interfaces, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany); Frey, J. [Institute for Aerospace Engineering, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Tropea, C. [Center of Smart Interfaces, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany); Institute of Fluid Mechanics and Aerodynamics, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The present work addresses the combined influence of pressure variations and different airflow velocities on the discharge intensity of plasma actuators. Power consumption, plasma length, and discharge capacitance were investigated systematically for varying pressure levels (p?=?0.1–1 bar) and airflow velocities (U{sub ?}=0?100 m/s) to characterize and quantify the favorable and adverse effects on the discharge intensity. In accordance with previous reports, an increasing plasma actuator discharge intensity is observed for decreasing pressure levels. At constant pressure levels, an adverse airflow influence on the electric actuator performance is demonstrated. Despite the improved discharge intensity at lower pressure levels, the seemingly improved performance of the plasma actuators is accompanied with a more pronounced drop of the relative performance. These findings demonstrate the dependency of the (kinematic and thermodynamic) environmental conditions on the electric performance of plasma actuators, which in turn affects the control authority of plasma actuators for flow control applications.

  10. Assessing underwater noise levels during pile-driving at an offshore windfarm and its potential effects on marine mammals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aberdeen, University of

    Assessing underwater noise levels during pile-driving at an offshore windfarm and its potential of underwater noise on marine spe- cies, particularly from pile-driving for wind turbines. Environmental population of bottlenose dol- phins. We measured pile-driving noise at distances of 0.1 (maximum broadband

  11. Effects of Prenatal Methylmercury Exposure on Motor Coordination, Activity Levels and Mitochondrial Membrane Potential in Adult Mice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackey, Jessica

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    , open field and Morris water maze were used to test for changes in coordination, activity levels, spatial learning and memory. Differences were observed between control and MeHg groups in rota-rod, footprint analysis, open field and Morris water maze...

  12. The effect of vitamin B 12 and various levels of iodine in the diet of growing chicks and mature hens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banta, Edward Mack

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    giaeral miatwre+) Vitaaia NiatareO ) SS, O S0, 0 1 0 (1)maideatified Srewth fetor so~oes ~ed were as followsi (1) Cried hrewers yeast, (S) Cried Ciatillera soluhlee, (S) alfalfa aa4 (4) Cried delaetoeed whey. (S)The siaerals aa4 levels scc...

  13. Topics in N = 1 supergravity in four dimensions and superstring effective field theories beyond tree-level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saririan, K.

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, the author presents some works in the direction of studying quantum effects in locally supersymmetric effective field theories that appear in the low energy limit of superstring theory. After reviewing the Kaehler covariant formulation of supergravity, he shows the calculation of the divergent one-loop contribution to the effective boson Lagrangian for supergravity, including the Yang-Mills sector and the helicity-odd operators that arise from integration over fermion fields. The only restriction is on the Yang-Mills kinetic energy normalization function, which is taken diagonal in gauge indices, as in models obtained from superstrings. He then presents the full result for the divergent one-loop contribution to the effective boson Lagrangian for supergravity coupled to chiral and Yang-Mills supermultiplets. He also considers the specific case of dilaton couplings in effective supergravity Lagrangians from superstrings, for which the one-loop result is considerably simplified. He studies gaugino condensation in the presence of an intermediate mass scale in the hidden sector. S-duality is imposed as an approximate symmetry of the effective supergravity theory. Furthermore, the author includes in the Kaehler potential the renormalization of the gauge coupling and the one-loop threshold corrections at the intermediate scale. It is shown that confinement is indeed achieved. Furthermore, a new running behavior of the dilaton arises which he attributes to S-duality. He also discusses the effects of the intermediate scale, and possible phenomenological implications of this model.

  14. Qualitative reasoning about fault effects in electrical cir-cuits has reached a level of achievement which allows it to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburg,.Universität

    - stance, the FLAME system (Pugh and Snooke 1996) per- forms failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) is employed for automated FMEA and diagnosis guidelines generation for mechatronic car subsystems

  15. THE ROLE OF ODP IN UNDERSTANDING THE CAUSESTHE ROLE OF ODP IN UNDERSTANDING THE CAUSESTHE ROLE OF ODP IN UNDERSTANDING THE CAUSESTHE ROLE OF ODP IN UNDERSTANDING THE CAUSESTHE ROLE OF ODP IN UNDERSTANDING THE CAUSES AND EFFECTS OF GLOBAL SEA LEVEL CHANGEA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    profound impacts on the distribution of sediments sources of mineral and water resources the stability IN UNDERSTANDING THE CAUSES AND EFFECTS OF GLOBAL SEA LEVEL CHANGEAND EFFECTS OF GLOBAL SEA LEVEL CHANGEAND EFFECTS OF GLOBAL SEA LEVEL CHANGEAND EFFECTS OF GLOBAL SEA LEVEL CHANGEAND EFFECTS OF GLOBAL SEA LEVEL CHANGE "Much

  16. Alleviation of fermi-level pinning effect at metal/germanium interface by the insertion of graphene layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baek, Seung-heon Chris; Seo, Yu-Jin; Oh, Joong Gun; Albert Park, Min Gyu; Bong, Jae Hoon; Yoon, Seong Jun; Lee, Seok-Hee, E-mail: seokheelee@ee.kaist.ac.kr [Department of Electrical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Minsu; Park, Seung-young [Division of Materials Science, Korea Basic Science Institute (KBSI), 169-148 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Byong-Guk [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we report the alleviation of the Fermi-level pinning on metal/n-germanium (Ge) contact by the insertion of multiple layers of single-layer graphene (SLG) at the metal/n-Ge interface. A decrease in the Schottky barrier height with an increase in the number of inserted SLG layers was observed, which supports the contention that Fermi-level pinning at metal/n-Ge contact originates from the metal-induced gap states at the metal/n-Ge interface. The modulation of Schottky barrier height by varying the number of inserted SLG layers (m) can bring about the use of Ge as the next-generation complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor material. Furthermore, the inserted SLG layers can be used as the tunnel barrier for spin injection into Ge substrate for spin-based transistors.

  17. Hybrid Multideterminant calculation of energy levels of carbon isotopes with a chiral effective nucleon-nucleon interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovanni Puddu

    2011-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform calculations for the binding energies and low-lying levels of ${}^{10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20,21,22}C$ nuclei starting from the chiral $N3LO$ nucleon-nucleon potential within the framework of the Hybrid Multideterminant scheme. The calculations are restricted to 4 major harmonic oscillator shells, via the Lee-Suzuki renormalization scheme. The results are compared with the experimental data.

  18. Effect of feed melting, temperature history, and minor component addition on spinel crystallization in high-level waste glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izak, Pavel (ASSOC WESTERN UNIVERSITY) [ASSOC WESTERN UNIVERSITY; Hrma, Pavel R.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)) [BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB); Arey, Bruce W.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)) [BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB); Plaisted, Trevor J.(ASSOC WESTERN UNIVERSITY) [ASSOC WESTERN UNIVERSITY

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spinel crystallization affects the anticipated cost and risk of high-level waste (HLW) vitrification. Spinel, (Fe,Ni) (Fe,Cr)2O4, is the primary crystalline phase that precipitates from melts containing Fe and Ni in sufficient concentrations. This study was undertaken to help design and verify mathematical models for a HLW glass melter in which spinel crystals precipitate and partially settle.

  19. Numerical study of the effect of normalised window size, sampling frequency, and noise level on short time Fourier transform analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ota, T. A. [AWE, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom)] [AWE, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Photonic Doppler velocimetry, also known as heterodyne velocimetry, is a widely used optical technique that requires the analysis of frequency modulated signals. This paper describes an investigation into the errors of short time Fourier transform analysis. The number of variables requiring investigation was reduced by means of an equivalence principle. Error predictions, as the number of cycles, samples per cycle, noise level, and window type were varied, are presented. The results were found to be in good agreement with analytical models.

  20. The effects of neighborhood environments on the level of physical activity among older african american women in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shin, Woo Hwa

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    , that provide social identity, support, and role definition Institutional Factors Rules, regulations, policies, and informal structures, which may constrain or promote recommended behaviors Community Factors Social networks and norms, or standards, which... courts, or bowling greens. (Booth et al., 2000) Older women who perceived that biking or walking trails, or parks located within 20 minute-walking distance from their homes showed significantly higher levels of pedometer walking records than those who...

  1. High-throughput identification of off-targets for the mechanistic study of severe adverse drug reactions induced by analgesics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Jian-Bo [Department of Chemical Biology, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, The Key Laboratory for Chemical Biology of Fujian Province, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Ji, Nan; Pan, Wen; Hong, Ru [State Key Laboratory of Stress Cell Biology, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361102 (China); Wang, Hao [Department of Chemical Biology, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, The Key Laboratory for Chemical Biology of Fujian Province, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Ji, Zhi-Liang, E-mail: appo@xmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Stress Cell Biology, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361102 (China); Department of Chemical Biology, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, The Key Laboratory for Chemical Biology of Fujian Province, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drugs may induce adverse drug reactions (ADRs) when they unexpectedly bind to proteins other than their therapeutic targets. Identification of these undesired protein binding partners, called off-targets, can facilitate toxicity assessment in the early stages of drug development. In this study, a computational framework was introduced for the exploration of idiosyncratic mechanisms underlying analgesic-induced severe adverse drug reactions (SADRs). The putative analgesic-target interactions were predicted by performing reverse docking of analgesics or their active metabolites against human/mammal protein structures in a high-throughput manner. Subsequently, bioinformatics analyses were undertaken to identify ADR-associated proteins (ADRAPs) and pathways. Using the pathways and ADRAPs that this analysis identified, the mechanisms of SADRs such as cardiac disorders were explored. For instance, 53 putative ADRAPs and 24 pathways were linked with cardiac disorders, of which 10 ADRAPs were confirmed by previous experiments. Moreover, it was inferred that pathways such as base excision repair, glycolysis/glyconeogenesis, ErbB signaling, calcium signaling, and phosphatidyl inositol signaling likely play pivotal roles in drug-induced cardiac disorders. In conclusion, our framework offers an opportunity to globally understand SADRs at the molecular level, which has been difficult to realize through experiments. It also provides some valuable clues for drug repurposing. - Highlights: • A novel computational framework was developed for mechanistic study of SADRs. • Off-targets of drugs were identified in large scale and in a high-throughput manner. • SADRs like cardiac disorders were systematically explored in molecular networks. • A number of ADR-associated proteins were identified.

  2. Higher Levels of c-Met Expression and Phosphorylation Identify Cell Lines With Increased Sensitivity to AMG-458, a Novel Selective c-Met Inhibitor With Radiosensitizing Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Bo; Torossian, Artour [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Sun, Yunguang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kimmel Cancer Center, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kimmel Cancer Center, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Du, Ruihong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Dicker, Adam P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kimmel Cancer Center, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kimmel Cancer Center, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Lu Bo, E-mail: bo.lu@jefferson.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Kimmel Cancer Center, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: c-Met is overexpressed in some non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines and tissues. Cell lines with higher levels of c-Met expression and phosphorylation depend on this receptor for survival. We studied the effects of AMG-458 on 2 NSCLC cell lines. Methods and Materials: 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl) -2H-tetrazolium assays assessed the sensitivities of the cells to AMG-458. Clonogenic survival assays illustrated the radiosensitizing effects of AMG-458. Western blot for cleaved caspase 3 measured apoptosis. Immunoblotting for c-Met, phospho-Met (p-Met), Akt/p-Akt, and Erk/p-Erk was performed to observe downstream signaling. Results: AMG-458 enhanced radiosensitivity in H441 but not in A549. H441 showed constitutive phosphorylation of c-Met. A549 expressed low levels of c-Met, which were phosphorylated only in the presence of exogenous hepatocyte growth factor. The combination of radiation therapy and AMG-458 treatment was found to synergistically increase apoptosis in the H441 cell line but not in A549. Radiation therapy, AMG-458, and combination treatment were found to reduce p-Akt and p-Erk levels in H441 but not in A549. H441 became less sensitive to AMG-458 after small interfering RNA knockdown of c-Met; there was no change in A549. After overexpression of c-Met, A549 became more sensitive, while H441 became less sensitive to AMG-458. Conclusions: AMG-458 was more effective in cells that expressed higher levels of c-Met/p-Met, suggesting that higher levels of c-Met and p-Met in NSCLC tissue may classify a subset of tumors that are more sensitive to molecular therapies against this receptor.

  3. Effects of cholesterol, type of fat, energy level and lipotropic agents in the diet of the domestic fowl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svacha, Richard Lincoln

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Basal Diet - Experiment 2 ................................ 30 TABLE 4- Experimental Plan - Experiment 2.... .....................31 TABLE 5 Experimental Diet - Experiment 3 ......................... 32 TABLE 6 Experimental Plan - Experiment 3...?........................ 33 TABLE 7 Experimental Plan - Experiment 4......................... 3^ TABLE 8 Experiment Diet - Experiment 5........................... 35 TABLE 9 Experimental Plan - Experiment 5......................... 3^ TABLE 10 Effect of Type of Fat...

  4. Effect of bird density and dietary protein levels on the performance of midget and normal commercial inbred cross layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez Delfino, Andres

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Midgets 2 were fed two levels of prot'ein, 17 and. 16%. For nor- mal-sized birds a 16. 1% protein was used. . Body weights ranged from 1057 to 1125 gms. for midgets and from 1595 to 1601 gms. for normal-sized birds. The midgets weighed approximately... were statistically significant and reflected the smaller maintenance requirements of midget birds. Normal-sized birds produced significantly more eggs (69, 'o) than midgets (5P/o). Midgets housed. two per cage had the highest hen-day egg production...

  5. Effects of the differentiated keratinocyte phenotype on expression levels of CYP1-4 family genes in human skin cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du Liping [Department of Biochemistry, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Neis, Mark M. [Department of Dermatology and Allergology, University Hospital of the RWTH, Aachen (Germany); Ladd, Patricia A. [Department of Medicine/Dermatology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Lanza, Diane L. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Yost, Garold S. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Keeney, Diane S. [VA Tennessee Valley Healthcare System, Nashville, TN 37212 (United States) and Department of Medicine/Dermatology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States) and Department of Biochemistry, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States)]. E-mail: diane.keeney@vanderbilt.edu

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids produced by mouse CYP2B19 have been implicated in mechanisms regulating epidermal cornification (Ladd, P.A., Du, L., Capdevila, J.H., Mernaugh, R., Keeney, D.S., 2003. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids activate transglutaminases in situ and induce cornification of epidermal keratinocytes. J. Biol. Chem. 278, 35184-35192). In this study, we aimed to identify CYPs that are up-regulated during keratinocyte differentiation and potentially responsible for epoxyeicosatrienoic acid formation in human skin. The cellular differentiation state of human epidermal cell cultures was manipulated to resemble the basal, spinous, and granular cell phenotypes in vivo. Changes in CYP mRNA levels were measured as a function of differentiation state for a panel of 15 CYPs that included known and putative arachidonate monooxygenases. Quantitative real-time PCR analyses showed that all of the CYPs were expressed in differentiating epidermal cell cultures and in human epidermis, with the exception of CYP2B6, which was poorly expressed in vitro. Six CYPs were strongly up-regulated at Day 6 and Day 8 of in vitro differentiation (CYP4B1, 2W1, 2C18, 3A4, 2C19, 2C9); the increase in mRNA levels ranged from 27- to 356-fold. Only CYP2U1 mRNA levels decreased (6-fold change) during cellular differentiation. Six CYPs showed little variation (<2-fold change) in mRNA levels during in vitro differentiation (CYP2S1, 2J2, 1B1, 1A1, 2E1, 2D6). No single CYP was identifiable as being a functional counterpart to CYP2B19 in mouse skin since none qualified as being mainly responsible for epidermal epoxyeicosatrienoic acid formation. Rather, the data suggest that epoxyeicosatrienoic acids in human skin are formed by several CYPs expressed in different cell layers of the epidermis. This would predict that CYP-derived eicosanoids have different functions in different epidermal cell layers.

  6. Effects of Water Levels on Productivity of Canada Geese in the Northern Flathead Valley, 1984 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, Daniel

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operation of Hungry Horse Dam on the South Fork Flathead River causes sporadic level fluctuations along the main stem Flathead River. Seasonal water level fluctuations and substantial habitat losses have occurred as a result of construction and operation of Kerr Dam, which regulates Flathead Lake. These fluctuations may impact goose populations through flooding or erosion of nesting and brood-rearing habitats, and increased susceptibility of nests and young to predation. The number, location, and success of goose nests were determined through pair surveys and nest searches. Counts of indicated pairs suggest there were 73-125 occupied nests in the study area; 44 were located in 1984. Twenty were island ground nests, 19 were tree nests, and 5 were on man-made structures. Hatching success was 76 percent. Sixty-one percent of all nests were in deciduous forest habitat; 87 percent were on riparian bench or island landforms. Seventy-four percent of all nests were within 5 m of the seasonal high water mark (HWM) and 85 percent of ground nests were 1 m or less above the HWM. Production, habitat use, and distribution of broods were documented through aerial, boat, ground, and observation tower surveys. 28 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Semantics-Driven Frequent Data Pattern Mining on Electronic Health Records for Effective Adverse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jingshan

    Technology Siemens Corporation Princeton, New Jersey 08540-6632 Email: jiangbo.dang@siemens.com He Zhang & D cost for new drug discovery and on transforming current pharmacovigilance methods to reduce

  8. adverse neuro-developmental effects: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    medicine (CAM) preparations and dietary supplement (DS) products are frequently used by patients without the knowledge of their physicians. Such preparations can be purchased...

  9. amodiaquine-associated adverse effects: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    medicine (CAM) preparations and dietary supplement (DS) products are frequently used by patients without the knowledge of their physicians. Such preparations can be purchased...

  10. Phencyclidine Intoxication and Adverse Effects: A Clinical and Pharmacological Review of an Illicit Drug

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bey, Tareg; Patel, Anar

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Management of Poisoning and Drug Overdose. Philadelphia,patterns seen in street drug analysis. Clin Toxicol 1976; 9:Poklis A, Maginn D, Barr JL. Drug findings in ‘Driving Under

  11. No Adverse Effect of Genetically Modified Antifungal Wheat on Decomposition Dynamics and the Soil Fauna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    exist. * E-mail: andreas.lindfeld@iee.unibe.ch Introduction Since the first commercialised GM crops were]. The global area cultivated with GM crops increased from 1.7 million ha in 1996 to 134 million ha in 2009 [3]. But the release of GM crops raises concerns about potential ecological and environmental risks. GM crops, planted

  12. Irrigation and fertilization effects on Nantucket Pine Tip Moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) Damage levels and pupal weight in an intensively-managed pine plantation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coyle, David, R.; Nowak, John, T.; Fettig, Christopher, J.

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The widespread application of intensive forest management practices throughout the southeastern U.S. has increased loblolly pine, Pinus taeda L., yields and shortened conventional rotation lengths. Fluctuations in Nantucket pine tip moth, Rhyacionia frustrana (Comstock), population density and subsequent damage levels have been linked to variations in management intensity. We examined the effects of two practices, irrigation and fertilization, on R. frustrana damage levels and pupal weights in an intensively-managed P. taeda plantation in South Carolina. Trees received intensive weed control and one of the following treatments; irrigation only. fertilization only, irrigation + fertilization, or control. Mean whole-tree tip moth damage levels ranged from <1 to 48% during this study. Damage levels differed significantly among treatments in two tip moth generations in 2001, but not 2000. Pupal weight was significantly heavier in fertilization compared to the irrigation treatment in 2000, but no significant differences were observed in 2001. Tree diameter. height. and aboveground volume were significantly greater in the irrigation + fertilization than in the irrigation treatment after two growing seasons. Our data suggest that intensive management practices that include irrigation and fertilization do not consistently increase R. frustrana damage levels and pupal weights as is commonly believed. However, tip moth suppression efforts in areas adjacent to our study may have partially reduced the potential impacts of R. frustrana on this experiment.

  13. Effects of protein and energy levels during the growing and laying periods on performance and egg production costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santana, Jose

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF TABLES Table Page Treatment groups during the growing phase 15 Diets fed from 8 to 24 weeks of age for the pullet-rearing phase of the experiment 16 2a Protein and Energy values used in calculating the rations 17 Diets fed during the laying phase.... In an effort to study some of the points discussed, this re- search was undertaken with the objectives of determining: (1) the effects of amino acid supplementation of low protein diets upon laying hen performance when the pullets were kept under sub...

  14. The effect of dietary vitamin D level on the generation of protective cellular immunity against pulmonary tuberculosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernandez-Frontera, Evaurely

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFPECT OF DIETARY VITAMIN D LBVBL ON THE GENERATION OF PROTBCTZVE CBLLULAR IMMUNITY AGAINST PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS A Thesis by EVAURELY HERNANDEZ-FRONTERA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ASM University in partial... HERNANDEZ-FRONTERA Approved as to style and content by: David N. McMurray (Co-Chair of Committee) Wal er M. Kem (Co-Chair of Committee) Billy G. Foster (Member) Timothy C. Hall (Head of Department) August 1990 ABSTRACT The effect of dietary vitamin...

  15. Defining Molecular Initiating Events in the Adverse Outcome Pathway Framework for Risk Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Timothy E. H.; Goodman, Jonathan M.; Gutsell, Steve; Russell, Paul

    2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Template, and Guidance on Developing and Assessing the Completeness of Adverse Outcome Pathways, Appendix I, Collection of Working Definitions. http:/www.oecd.org/chemicalsafety/testingofchemicals/49963576.pdf. (2) Ankley, G. T., Bennett, R. S., Erickson, R... ) Research to strengthen the scientific basis for health risk assessment: a survey of the context and rationale for mechanistically based methods and models. Toxicology 102, 3–20. (17) Aardema, M. J., and MacGregor, J. T. (2002) Toxicology and genetic...

  16. Effects of climate, tectonics, and sea-level changes on rhythmic bedding patterns in the Niobrara Formation (Upper Cretaceous), US Western Interior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laferriere, A.P.; Hattin, D.E.; Archer, A.W.

    1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regional correlation of interbedded pelagic/hemipelagic limestones and calcareous shales of the Fort Hays Limestone Member of the Niobrara Formation confirms development of at least two levels of cyclicity. Occurrence of time-parallel rhythmically deposited beds that can be correlated over distances exceeding 800 km lends strong support to the hypothesis that these cycles were induced by Milankovitch-type climatic forcing. However, visual observation and Fourier analysis of variations in shale and limestone thickness demonstrate that the pattern of Fort Hays cyclicity lacks regional uniformity. Complications in the cyclic pattern may have resulted from the influence of orbital parameters having differing periodicities. Additionally, departures from simple cyclical patterns resulted from sedimentary effects of the Sevier orogeny and from erosional events associated with sea-level changes. Documentation of thickness variations within the regionally persistent Fort Hays bedding sequence furnishes a basis for fine-scale analysis of Cretaceous crustal movements within the Western Interior seaway.

  17. The effect of actinides on the microstructural development in a metallic high-level nuclear waste form

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keiser, D. D., Jr.; Sinkler, W.; Abraham, D. P.; Richardson, J. W., Jr.; McDeavitt, S. M.

    1999-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste forms to contain material residual from an electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel have been developed by Argonne National Laboratory. One of these waste forms contains waste stainless steel (SS), fission products that are noble to the process (e.g., Tc, Ru, Pd, Rh), Zr, and actinides. The baseline composition of this metallic waste form is SS-15wt.% Zr. The metallurgy of this baseline alloy has been well characterized. On the other hand, the effects of actinides on the alloy microstructure are not well understood. As a result, SS-Zr alloys with added U, Pu, and/or Np have been cast and then characterized, using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and neutron diffraction, to investigate the microstructural development in SS-Zr alloys that contain actinides. Actinides were found to congregate non-uniformally in a Zr(Fe,Cr,Ni){sub 2+x} phase. Apparently, the actinides were contained in varying amounts in the different polytypes (C14, C15, and C36) of the Zr(Fe,Cr,Ni){sub 2+x} phase. Heat treatment of an actinide-containing SS-15 wt.% Zr alloy showed the observed microstructure to be stable.

  18. EFFECTS OF QUARTZ PARTICLE SIZE AND SUCROSE ADDITION ON MELTING BEHAVIOR OF A MELTER FEED FOR HIGH-LEVEL GLASS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MARCIAL J; KRUGER AA; HRMA PR; SCHWEIGER MJ; SWEARINGEN KJ; TEGROTENHUIS WE; HENAGER SH

    2010-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The behavior of melter feed (a mixture of nuclear waste and glass-forming additives) during waste-glass processing has a significant impact on the rate of the vitrification process. We studied the effects of silica particle size and sucrose addition on the volumetric expansion (foaming) of a high-alumina feed and the rate of dissolution of silica particles in feed samples heated at 5 C/min up to 1200 C. The initial size of quartz particles in feed ranged from 5 to 195 {micro}m. The fraction of the sucrose added ranged from 0 to 0.20 g per g glass. Extensive foaming occurred only in feeds with 5-{micro}m quartz particles; particles {ge}150 {micro}m formed clusters. Particles of 5 {micro}m completely dissolved by 900 C whereas particles {ge}150 {micro}m did not fully dissolve even when the temperature reached 1200 C. Sucrose addition had virtually zero impact on both foaming and the dissolution of silica particles. Over 100 sites in the United States are currently tasked with the storage of nuclear waste. The largest is the Hanford Site located in southeastern Washington State with 177 subterranean tanks containing over fifty-million gallons of nuclear waste from plutonium production from 1944 through 1987. This waste will be vitrified at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. In the vitrification process, feed is charged into a melter and converted into glass to be ultimately stored in a permanent repository. The duration of waste-site cleanups by the vitrification process depends on the rate of melting, i.e., on the rate of the feed-to-glass conversion. Foaming associated with the melting process and the rate of dissolution of quartz particles (silica being the major glass-forming additive) are assumed to be important factors that influence the rate of melting. Previous studies on foaming of high-alumina feed demonstrated that varying the makeup of a melter feed has a significant impact on foaming. The volume of feeds that contained 5-{micro}m quartz particles substantially increased because of foaming. The extent of foaming decreased as the particle size of quartz increased. Moreover, samples containing quartz particles 195 {micro}m formed agglomerates at temperatures above 900 C that only slowly dissolved in the melt. This study continues previous work on the feed-melting process, specifically on the effects of the size of silica particles on the formation of nuclear-waste glasses to determine a suitable range of silica particle sizes that causes neither excessive foaming nor undesirable agglomeration. Apart from varying the silica-particle size, carbon was added in the form of sucrose. Sucrose has been used to accelerate the rate of melting. In this study, we have observed its impact on feed foaming and quartz dissolution.

  19. The effects of zeranol and two dietary levels of calcium and phosphorus on performance, carcass and bone characteristics, and calcium status in feedlot lambs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheson, John Paul

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of parathyroid hormone (PTH) and Ca. Lambs were assigned to either an implant or non-implant treatment group, and either a high dietary Ca(. 84) and P(. 64) or normal dietary Ca(. 44) and P(. 3 ' ) in a 2 X 2 factorial arrangement of treatments. Lambs were... to determine the effects of zeranol and two dietary levels of Ca and P on performance, carcass and bone charateristics, serum parathyroid hormone and Ca concentrations. Lambs were randomly assigned to either an implant or non-implant treatment group...

  20. Guide to using Multiple Regression in Excel (MRCX v.1.1) for Removal of River Stage Effects from Well Water Levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackley, Rob D.; Spane, Frank A.; Pulsipher, Trenton C.; Allwardt, Craig H.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A software tool was created in Fiscal Year 2010 (FY11) that enables multiple-regression correction of well water levels for river-stage effects. This task was conducted as part of the Remediation Science and Technology project of CH2MHILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC). This document contains an overview of the correction methodology and a user’s manual for Multiple Regression in Excel (MRCX) v.1.1. It also contains a step-by-step tutorial that shows users how to use MRCX to correct river effects in two different wells. This report is accompanied by an enclosed CD that contains the MRCX installer application and files used in the tutorial exercises.

  1. Epistemic levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greco, Daniel (Daniel Louis)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this dissertation I defend some controversial "level-bridging" principles in epistemology. In the first chapter, I defend the KK principle-the principle that if one knows that P, then one knows that one knows that P. I ...

  2. A review and rationale for studying the cardiovascular effects of drinking water arsenic in women of reproductive age

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwok, Richard K., E-mail: rkwok@rti.org

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drinking water arsenic has been shown to be associated with a host of adverse health outcomes at exposure levels > 300 {mu}g of As/L. However, the results are not consistent at exposures below this level. We have reviewed selected articles that examine the effects of drinking water arsenic on cardiovascular outcomes and present a rationale for studying these effects on women of reproductive age, and also over the course of pregnancy when they would potentially be more susceptible to adverse cardiovascular and reproductive outcomes. It is only recently that reproductive effects have been linked to drinking water arsenic. However, there is a paucity of information about the cardiovascular effects of drinking water arsenic on women of reproductive age. Under the cardiovascular challenge of pregnancy, we hypothesize that women with a slightly elevated exposure to drinking water arsenic may exhibit adverse cardiovascular outcomes at higher rates than in the general population. Studying sensitive clinical and sub-clinical indicators of disease in susceptible sub-populations may yield important information about the potentially enormous burden of disease related to low-level drinking water arsenic exposure.

  3. Operating Experience Level 1, 2, and 3 Documents

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Operating Experience Level 1, 2, and 3 documents communicate required actions, information on safety issues or trends of concern, and lessons learned on operating experience to the DOE Complex to prevent adverse operating incidents and to expand the sharing of good work practices.

  4. Tiltmeter leveling mechanism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunter, Steven L. (Livermore, CA); Boro, Carl O. (Milpitas, CA); Farris, Alvis (late of Byron, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A tiltmeter device having a pair of orthogonally disposed tilt sensors that are levelable within an inner housing containing the sensors. An outer housing can be rotated to level at least one of the sensor pair while the inner housing can be rotated to level the other sensor of the pair. The sensors are typically rotated up to about plus or minus 100 degrees. The device is effective for measuring tilts in a wide range of angles of inclination of wells and can be employed to level a platform containing a third sensor.

  5. The effects of a suboptimal intake of magnesium with soy protein concentrate on parturition, growth, and viability in the rat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carson, Sonja D'Awn

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    % casein or 20% soy concentrate as the protein source, and supplemented with 700 ppm, 650 ppm, 75 ppm or 0 ppm magnesium. The experiment was conducted from growth throughout lactation. Maternal performance postpartum was adversely affected by sub... prompted research of soy products (23). Few have reported on the effects of feeding rats a suboptimal level of magnesium in a diet based on casein or soy protein concentrate from weanling through gestation and lactation. The objectives of this study...

  6. Association of adverse cardiovascular outcomes with weighted morphologic variability following non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarker, Joyatee Mudra

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Patients who have had an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) are at a relatively high risk of having subsequent adverse cardiac events. Several electrocardiographic (ECG) measures such as heart rate variability, heart rate ...

  7. Simplified 1-D Hydrodynamic and Salinity Transport Modeling of the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta: Sea Level Rise and Water Diversion Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleenor, William E.; Bombardelli, Fabian

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    salinity simulations of sea level rise scenarios. AppendixSan Joaquin Delta: Sea Level Rise and Water Diversiona 1-D model of sea level rise in an estuary must account for

  8. Effects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA :Work4/11ComputationalEdNERSC:Effect of0/2002Effects of

  9. Evaluation of Hot Water Wash Parameters to Achieve Maximum Effectiveness in Reducing Levels of Salmonella Typhimurium, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and coliforms/Escherichia coli on Beef Carcass Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, Melissa A.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    EVALUATION OF HOT WATER WASH PARAMETERS TO ACHIEVE MAXIMUM EFFECTIVENESS IN REDUCING LEVELS OF SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM, ESCHERICHIA COLI O157:H7 AND COLIFORMS/ ESCHERICHIA COLI ON BEEF CARCASS SURFACES A Thesis by MELISSA ANN DAVIDSON... PARAMETERS TO ACHIEVE MAXIMUM EFFECTIVENESS IN REDUCING LEVELS OF SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM, ESCHERICHIA COLI O157:H7 AND COLIFORMS/ ESCHERICHIA COLI ON BEEF CARCASS SURFACES A Thesis by MELISSA ANN DAVIDSON Submitted to the Office of Graduate...

  10. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4Li from ENSDF

  11. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4Li from

  12. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4Li from2 O

  13. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4Li from2 O3

  14. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4Li from2 O3Be

  15. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4Li from2

  16. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4Li from2B

  17. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4Li from2BBe

  18. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4Li from2BBeNe

  19. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4Li

  20. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4LiB from

  1. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4LiB fromC

  2. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4LiB fromCNe

  3. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4LiB fromCNe9

  4. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4LiB fromCNe9C

  5. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4LiB

  6. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4LiBN from

  7. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4LiBN from5 H

  8. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4LiBN from5 H6

  9. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4LiBN from5

  10. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4LiBN from58 C

  11. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4LiBN from58

  12. Multiple metals predict prolactin and thyrotropin (TSH) levels in men

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meeker, John D., E-mail: meekerj@umich.edu [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University of Michigan School of Public Health, 6635 SPH Tower, 109 S. Observatory St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Rossano, Mary G. [Department of Animal and Food Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)] [Department of Animal and Food Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Protas, Bridget [Department of Epidemiology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States)] [Department of Epidemiology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Diamond, Michael P.; Puscheck, Elizabeth [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States)] [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States); Daly, Douglas [Grand Rapids Fertility and IVF, Grand Rapids, MI (United States)] [Grand Rapids Fertility and IVF, Grand Rapids, MI (United States); Paneth, Nigel [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States)] [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Wirth, Julia J. [Department of Epidemiology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States) [Department of Epidemiology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Exposure to a number of metals can affect neuroendocrine and thyroid signaling, which can result in adverse effects on development, behavior, metabolism, reproduction, and other functions. The present study assessed the relationship between metal concentrations in blood and serum prolactin (PRL) and thyrotropin (TSH) levels, markers of dopaminergic, and thyroid function, respectively, among men participating in a study of environmental influences on male reproductive health. Blood samples from 219 men were analyzed for concentrations of 11 metals and serum levels of PRL and TSH. In multiple linear regression models adjusted for age, BMI and smoking, PRL was inversely associated with arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, manganese, molybdenum, and zinc, but positively associated with chromium. Several of these associations (Cd, Pb, Mo) are consistent with limited studies in humans or animals, and a number of the relationships (Cr, Cu, Pb, Mo) remained when additionally considering multiple metals in the model. Lead and copper were associated with non-monotonic decrease in TSH, while arsenic was associated with a dose-dependent increase in TSH. For arsenic these findings were consistent with recent experimental studies where arsenic inhibited enzymes involved in thyroid hormone synthesis and signaling. More research is needed for a better understanding of the role of metals in neuroendocrine and thyroid function and related health implications.

  13. Effects of Nb doping level on the electronic transport, photoelectric effect and magnetoresistance across La{sub 0.5}Ca{sub 0.5}MnO{sub 3}/Nb:SrTiO{sub 3} junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, J. F., E-mail: jifewang@gmail.com [Department of Physics, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); College of Science, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310018 (China); Jiang, Y. C.; Gao, J., E-mail: jugao@hku.hk [Department of Physics, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); Chen, M. G. [College of Science, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310018 (China)] [College of Science, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310018 (China)

    2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Heterojunctions composed of La{sub 0.5}Ca{sub 0.5}MnO{sub 3} and Nb doped SrTiO{sub 3} were fabricated, and the effects of the Nb doping level on their electronic transport, photoelectric effect, and magnetoresistance were investigated. A lower doping concentration of Nb led to better rectifying properties and higher open circuit voltages. The I-V curves for La{sub 0.5}Ca{sub 0.5}MnO{sub 3}/0.7?wt.?% Nb-SrTiO{sub 3} showed a negligible response to magnetic fields for all temperatures, whereas La{sub 0.5}Ca{sub 0.5}MnO{sub 3}/0.05?wt.?% Nb-SrTiO{sub 3} exhibited distinct magnetoresistance, which depended on both the bias voltage and temperature. These results are discussed with the assistance of conventional semiconductor theories.

  14. Quantifying the Impact of Adverse Events on the Electricity Grid as a Function of Grid Topology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coles, Garill A.; Sadovsky, Artyom; Du, Pengwei

    2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract--Traditional approaches to the study of grid vulnerability have taken an asset based approach, which seeks to identify those assets most likely to result in grid-wide failures or disruptions in the event that they are compromised. We propose an alternative approach to the study of grid vulnerability, one based on the topological structure of the entire grid. We propose a method that will identify topological parameters most closely related to the ability of the grid to withstand an adverse event. We compare these topological parameters in terms of their impact on the vulnerability metric we have defined, referred to as the grid’s “survivability”. Our approach is motivated by Paul Baran’s work on communications networks, which also studied vulnerability in terms of network-wide parameters. Our approach is useful both as a planning model for evaluating proposed changes to a grid and as a risk assessment tool.

  15. Correlation of Clinical and Dosimetric Factors With Adverse Pulmonary Outcomes in Children After Lung Irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkatramani, Rajkumar, E-mail: rvenkatramani@chla.usc.edu [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Kamath, Sunil [Department of Pulmonology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Wong, Kenneth [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Olch, Arthur J. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Malvar, Jemily [Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Sposto, Richard [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Goodarzian, Fariba [Department of Radiology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Freyer, David R. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Keens, Thomas G. [Department of Pediatrics, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Department of Pulmonology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); and others

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To identify the incidence and the risk factors for pulmonary toxicity in children treated for cancer with contemporary lung irradiation. Methods and Materials: We analyzed clinical features, radiographic findings, pulmonary function tests, and dosimetric parameters of children receiving irradiation to the lung fields over a 10-year period. Results: We identified 109 patients (75 male patients). The median age at irradiation was 13.8 years (range, 0.04-20.9 years). The median follow-up period was 3.4 years. The median prescribed radiation dose was 21 Gy (range, 0.4-64.8 Gy). Pulmonary toxic chemotherapy included bleomycin in 58.7% of patients and cyclophosphamide in 83.5%. The following pulmonary outcomes were identified and the 5-year cumulative incidence after irradiation was determined: pneumonitis, 6%; chronic cough, 10%; pneumonia, 35%; dyspnea, 11%; supplemental oxygen requirement, 2%; radiographic interstitial lung disease, 40%; and chest wall deformity, 12%. One patient died of progressive respiratory failure. Post-irradiation pulmonary function tests available from 44 patients showed evidence of obstructive lung disease (25%), restrictive disease (11%), hyperinflation (32%), and abnormal diffusion capacity (12%). Thoracic surgery, bleomycin, age, mean lung irradiation dose (MLD), maximum lung dose, prescribed dose, and dosimetric parameters between V{sub 22} (volume of lung exposed to a radiation dose ?22 Gy) and V{sub 30} (volume of lung exposed to a radiation dose ?30 Gy) were significant for the development of adverse pulmonary outcomes on univariate analysis. MLD, maximum lung dose, and V{sub dose} (percentage of volume of lung receiving the threshold dose or greater) were highly correlated. On multivariate analysis, MLD was the sole significant predictor of adverse pulmonary outcome (P=.01). Conclusions: Significant pulmonary dysfunction occurs in children receiving lung irradiation by contemporary techniques. MLD rather than prescribed dose should be used to perform risk stratification of patients receiving lung irradiation.

  16. The effect of a low dosage of parathion upon DRL performance and acquisition in the albino rat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Marion Stockton

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    studied extensively. Prenatal effects studied by Al Hachim and Fink (1968) may be related to hormone factors since the f'etal environment is largely dependent upon various hormone levels of the mother for its stability. It was re- ported that rats... that this agent, when used in normal con- centrations for pest control, does not pose a significant threat to the integrity of small animal populations through adverse effects on complex behaviors. REFERENCES Al Hachim, G. M. , and Fink, G. B. , "The effect...

  17. Hepatology . Author manuscript Beneficial paracrine effects of cannabinoid receptor 2 on liver injury and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    acute hepatitis induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl ), CB2 were induced in the non-parenchymal cell ; pharmacology ; Carbon Tetrachloride ; adverse effects ; Cells, Cultured ; Disease Models, Animal ; Drug

  18. Effects of application intervals and levels of N, P, and K on cold hardiness relationships in Tifgreen bermudagrass (Cynodon sp.) and St. Augustinegrass (Stenotaphrum secundatum)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reeves, Sim Adair

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    direct relationship between N-K and N-P. As tissue N levels increased, the P and K levels increased also, Tifgreen bermudagrass grown under different nutrient levels, con- trolled conditions, and artificially frozen in a growth chamber showed...-inch round plastic containers, surrounded with sand, and moved to the greenhouse where the temperature was maintained at approximately 75-80 F. Immediately after transplanting, one plug from each block was artificially frozen in a Sherer growth...

  19. WHAT DO THREAT LEVELS AND RESPONSE LEVELS MEAN? THREAT LEVELS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    WHAT DO THREAT LEVELS AND RESPONSE LEVELS MEAN? THREAT LEVELS: The UK Threat Level is decided by the Government's Joint Terrorism Analysis Centre (JTAC). It is the system to assess the threat to the UK from Threat Levels: Low - an attack is unlikely Moderate - an attack is possible, but not likely Substantial

  20. Generated using version 3.0 of the official AMS LATEX template Wind effects on past and future regional sea-level trends in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timmermann, Axel

    characteristics of projected regional sea-level rise. Wind-related changes in near- surface mass and heat transports. Depending on the sign of the related Ekman pumping velocity, warm water is either pumped down into the ocean which leads to a deepening of the tropical thermocline and an increase in local sea level, or cold

  1. The Development of an Effective Transportation Risk Assessment Model for Analyzing the Transport of Spent Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste to the Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McSweeney; Thomas; Winnard; Ross; Steven B.; Best; Ralph E.

    2001-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Past approaches for assessing the impacts of transporting spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste have not been effectively implemented or have used relatively simple approaches. The Yucca Mountain Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) analysis considers 83 origins, 34 fuel types, 49,914 legal weight truck shipments, 10,911 rail shipments, consisting of 59,250 shipment links outside Nevada (shipment kilometers and population density pairs through urban, suburban or rural zones by state), and 22,611 shipment links in Nevada. There was additional complexity within the analysis. The analysis modeled the behavior of 41 isotopes, 1091 source terms, and used 8850 food transfer factors (distinct factors by isotope for each state). The model also considered different accident rates for legal weight truck, rail, and heavy haul truck by state, and barge by waterway. To capture the all of the complexities of the transportation analysis, a Microsoft{reg_sign} Access database was created. In the Microsoft{reg_sign} Access approach the data is placed in individual tables and equations are developed in queries to obtain the overall impacts. While the query might be applied to thousands of table entries, there is only one equation for a particular impact. This greatly simplifies the validation effort. Furthermore, in Access, data in tables can be linked automatically using query joins. Another advantage built into MS Access is nested queries, or the ability to develop query hierarchies. It is possible to separate the calculation into a series of steps, each step represented by a query. For example, the first query might calculate the number of shipment kilometers traveled through urban, rural and suburban zones for all states. Subsequent queries could join the shipment kilometers query results with another table containing the state and mode specific accident rate to produce accidents by state. One of the biggest advantages of the nested queries is in validation. Temporarily restricting the query to one origin, one shipment, or one state and validating that the query calculation is returning the expected result allows simple validation. The paper will show the flexibility of the assessment tool to consider a wide variety of impacts. Through the use of pre-designed queries, impacts by origin, mode, fuel type or many other parameters can be obtained.

  2. Effect of Gas Sparging in Mammalian Cell Bioreactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Daniel I.C.

    One of the major problems in the operations of mammalian cell bioreactors is the detrimental effect of gas sparging. Since the most convenient way to oxygenate any bioreactor is by gas sparging, this adverse effect has ...

  3. Modeling the effect of climate change on U.S. state-level buildings energy demands in an integrated assessment framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Yuyu; Clarke, Leon E.; Eom, Jiyong; Kyle, G. Page; Patel, Pralit L.; Kim, Son H.; Dirks, James A.; Jensen, Erik A.; Liu, Ying; Rice, Jennie S.; Schmidt, Laurel C.; Seiple, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As long-term socioeconomic transformation and energy service expansion show large spatial heterogeneity, advanced understanding of climate impact on building energy use at the sub-national level will offer useful insights into climate policy and regional energy system planning. In this study, we presented a detailed building energy model with a U.S. state-level representation, nested in the GCAM integrated assessment framework. We projected state-level building energy demand and its spatial pattern over the century, considering the impact of climate change based on the estimates of heating and cooling degree days derived from downscaled USGS CASCaDE temperature data. The result indicates that climate change has a large impact on heating and cooling building energy and fuel use at the state level, exhibiting large spatial heterogeneity across states (ranges from -10% to +10%). The sensitivity analysis reveals that the building energy demand is subject to multiple key factors, such as the magnitude of climate change, the choice of climate models, and the growth of population and GDP, and that their relative contributions vary greatly across the space. The scale impact in building energy use modeling highlights the importance of constructing a building energy model with the spatially-explicit representation of socioeconomics, energy system development, and climate change. These findings will help the climate-based policy decision and energy system, especially utility planning related to building sector at the U.S. state and regional level facing the potential climate change.

  4. The effect of feeding various levels of energy and phosphorus on blood glucose and blood phosphorus in heifers pre- and post-partum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fugger, Edward Floyd

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    levels during treatment period. , 41 25 Average blood phosphorus of high phosphorous groups on two energy levels during treatment period. . 42 26 Illustration of lifting procedure for paralyzed hei, fera. 27 Heated building facilities for weak calves... 0 0 auuu oo u' uu u ouzo g CV Cl 4 60 l4 17 likewise constructed for ease of moving groups to the working facili- ties with the least amount of excitement as illustrated in figure 5 and 6. All groups were weighed at bi-weekly intervals...

  5. Interference Effect in Multi-level Transport through a Quantum Dot Hisashi Aikawa, Kensuke Kobayashi, Akira Sano, Shingo Katsumoto, and Yasuhiro Iye

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katsumoto, Shingo

    to the leads and the phase of traversing electrons is locked. We have detected the phase change at the vertices and a model to solve the problem of "in-phase Coulomb peaks" ubiquitously observed in transport through of Coulomb-diamond-like structures in the excitation spectrum. One of the two levels is strongly coupled

  6. Colloque C 1, supplkment all no 1, Tome 30, Janvier 1969,page C 1 -3 INTRODUCTORY PAPER ON HANLE EFFECT, LEVEL CROSSING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    by free atoms in the neighborhood of a resonant frequency for invest~gationof excited atomic energy levels corresponds to the energy differences of the states connected by dip01 radiation, large cross sections connect the intermediate state with the final state, the behavior of the state function

  7. The Effect of Staff Training on the Level of Engagement with Individuals with Developmental Disabilities within Two Day-Habilitation Settings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Para-Cremer, James Alan

    2008-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examined the effects of a staff-training intervention on the use of engagement procedures by direct-care staff who worked with adults with developmental disabilities. The intervention consisted of a mini-workshop, observation and feedback...

  8. OCCURRENCE AND POTENTIAL ADVERSE EFFECTS OF SEMIVOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN STREAMBED SEDIMENT, UNITED STATES, 1992-95

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Carson City, NV U.S. Geological Survey, National Water-Quality Laboratory, Box 25046, Denver Federal. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were detected most frequently and at the highest concentrations. Concentrations of PAHs and phthalates were about 10 times higher at sites influenced by urban activities than

  9. The effect of different levels of forage and fish meal on the live performance and rumen volatile fatty acid concentation of heifers fed high molasses diets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estrada, Sergio

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in a high molasses diet is of critical economical and nutritional importance. Developing an appropriate system of feeding high levels of molasses (B5/. or more of the ration) to cattle could drastically change the horizons of cattle feeding... of molasses as the major energy source in beef cattle fattening rations. In recent years Preston and co-worl ers undertook the feeding of molasses-urea mixtures, first as a supplement to ad libitum grain feeding. Later they developed a feeding system...

  10. Nearest Neighbor Averaging and its Effect on the Critical Level and Minimum Detectable Concentration for Scanning Radiological Survey Instruments that Perform Facility Release Surveys.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fournier, Sean Donovan; Beall, Patrick S [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA; Miller, Mark L.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Through the SNL New Mexico Small Business Assistance (NMSBA) program, several Sandia engineers worked with the Environmental Restoration Group (ERG) Inc. to verify and validate a novel algorithm used to determine the scanning Critical Level (L c ) and Minimum Detectable Concentration (MDC) (or Minimum Detectable Areal Activity) for the 102F scanning system. Through the use of Monte Carlo statistical simulations the algorithm mathematically demonstrates accuracy in determining the L c and MDC when a nearest-neighbor averaging (NNA) technique was used. To empirically validate this approach, SNL prepared several spiked sources and ran a test with the ERG 102F instrument on a bare concrete floor known to have no radiological contamination other than background naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). The tests conclude that the NNA technique increases the sensitivity (decreases the L c and MDC) for high-density data maps that are obtained by scanning radiological survey instruments.

  11. A Holistic Look at Minimizing Adverse Environmental Impact Under Section 316(b) of the Clean Water Act

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Veil, John A.; Puder, Markus G.; Littleton, Debra J.; Johnson, Nancy

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Section 316(b) of the Clean Water Act (CWA) requires that “the location, design, construction, and capacity of cooling water intake structures reflect the best technology available for minimizing adverse environmental impact.” As the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) develops new regulations to implement Section 316(b), much of the debate has centered on adverse impingement and entrainment impacts of cooling-water intake structures. Depending on the specific location and intake layout, once-through cooling systems withdrawing many millions of gallons of water per day can, to a varying degree, harm fish and other aquatic organisms in the water bodies from which the coolingmore »water is withdrawn. Therefore, opponents of once-through cooling systems have encouraged the EPA to require wet or dry cooling tower systems as the best technology available (BTA), without considering site-specific conditions.However, within the context of the broader scope of the CWA mandate, this focus seems too narrow. Therefore, this article examines the phrase “minimizing adverse environmental impact” in a holistic light. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of the terms “environmental” and “minimizing.” Congress chose “environmental” in lieu of other more narrowly focused terms like “impingement and entrainment,” “water quality,” or “aquatic life.” In this light, BTA for cooling-water intake structures must minimize the entire suite of environmental impacts, as opposed to just those associated with impingement and entrainment. Wet and dry cooling tower systems work well to minimize entrainment and impingement, but they introduce other equally important impacts because they impose an energy penalty on the power output of the generating unit. The energy penalty results from a reduction in plant operating efficiency and an increase in internal power consumption. As a consequence of the energy penalty, power companies must generate additional electricity to achieve the same net output. This added production leads to additional environmental impacts associated with extraction and processing of the fuel, air emissions from burning the fuel, and additional evaporation of freshwater supplies during the cooling process. Wet towers also require the use of toxic biocides that are subsequently discharged or disposed. The other term under consideration, “minimizing,” does not equal “eliminating.” Technologies may be available to minimize but not totally eliminate adverse environmental impacts.« less

  12. The Effects of Oxygen Partial Pressure on Liquidus Temperature of a High-Level Waste Glass with Spinel as the Primary Phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izak, Pavel; Hrma, Pavel R.; Wilson, Benjamin K.; Vienna, John D.

    2000-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The redox state of iron affects spinal crystallization in vitrified high-level waste (HLW) glass. Simulated HLW glass with spinel as the primary crystalline phase field was heat treated at constant temperatures within the interval from 850 C to 1300 C under varying atmospheres with oxygen partial pressure, Po2, ranging from 1x10-16 kPa (pure CO) to 101 kPa (pure O2). Liquidus temperature (TL) of glass increased with decreasing Po2 up to Po2 > 3 x 10-9 kPa. At Po2 < 3 x 10-9 kPa, Ni-Fe alloy precipitated from the glass, and TL decreased. Samples were analyzed with optical microscope and scanning electron microscope. The mass fraction of spinel in glass was determined using quantitative X-ray diffraction. Spinel composition was investigated with energy disperse spectroscopy. Ferrous-ferric equilibrium at TL was calculated in a HLW glass as a function of temperature and Po2, based on the previous studies by Schreiber. TL/FeO over the itnerval 0.0063 < gFeO < 0.051 (1x10-2 kPa < Po2 < 3x10-9 kPa) was estimated from calucated ferrous-ferric equilibrium at TL as 1835 C.

  13. Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program, Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, Version 3.0, DCTD, NCI, NIH, DHHS March 31, 2003 (http://ctep.cancer.gov), Publish Date: December 12, 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program, Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, Version 3.0 Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 (CTCAE) Publish Date: December 12, 2003 Quick Reference The NCI Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 is a descriptive terminology which can be utilized

  14. Matching field effects at tesla-level magnetic fields in critical current density in high-Tc superconductors containing self-assembled columnar defects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinclair, J. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Zuev, Yuri L [ORNL; Cantoni, Claudia [ORNL; Wee, Sung Hun [ORNL; Varanasi, C. V. [University of Dayton Research Institute; Thompson, James R [ORNL; Christen, David K [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated the superconductive transport properties of YBa2Cu3O7 films containing self-assembled columnar arrays of second phase SrZrO3 or BaSnO3 precipitates. A matching condition between columnar pinning sites (aligned at or near the c axis) and external magnetic flux, tilted with respect to them, is identified in the critical current JC.H/ data. The results for the material containing SrZrO3-based pins are analyzed within a simple intuitive model. At matching, the critical current is enhanced above the model prediction. In complementary contact-free investigations of BaSnO3-doped material, matching effects are observed over a wide range of temperatures in the field dependence of JC.H/. The deduced matching fields agree reasonably well with the densities of columnar pins directly observed by scanning electron microscopy.

  15. Edge and bulk components of lowest-Landau-level orbitals, correlated fractional quantum Hall effect incompressible states, and insulating behavior in finite graphene samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Constantine Yannouleas; Igor Romanovsky; Uzi Landman

    2010-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Many-body calculations of the total energy of interacting Dirac electrons in finite graphene samples exhibit joint occurrence of cusps at angular momenta corresponding to fractional fillings characteristic of formation of incompressible (gapped) correlated states (nu=1/3 in particular) and opening of an insulating energy gap (that increases with the magnetic field) at the Dirac point, in correspondence with experiments. Single-particle basis functions obeying the zigzag boundary condition at the sample edge are employed in exact diagonalization of the interelectron Coulomb interaction, showing, at all sizes, mixed equal-weight bulk and edge components. The consequent depletion of the bulk electron density attenuates the fractional-quantum-Hall-effect excitation energies and the edge charge accumulation results in a gap in the many-body spectrum.

  16. Effects of Quartz Particle Size and Sucrose Addition on Melting Behavior of a Melter Feed for High-Level Waste Glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marcial, Jose; Hrma, Pavel R.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Swearingen, Kevin J.; Tegrotenhuis, Nathan E.; Henager, Samuel H.

    2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The behavior of melter feed (a mixture of nuclear waste and glass-forming additives) during waste-glass processing has a significant impact on the rate of the vitrification process. We studied the effects of silica particle size and sucrose addition on the volumetric expansion (foaming) of a high-alumina feed and the rate of dissolution of silica particles in feed samples heated at 5°C/min up to 1200°C. The initial size of quartz particles in feed ranged from 5 to 195 µm. The fraction of the sucrose added ranged from 0 to 0.20 g per g glass. Extensive foaming occurred only in feeds with 5-?m quartz particles; particles ?150 µm formed clusters. Particles of 5 µm completely dissolved by 900°C whereas particles ?150 µm did not fully dissolve even when the temperature reached 1200°C. Sucrose addition had virtually zero impact on both foaming and the dissolution of silica particles.

  17. THE EFFECT OF THE PRESENCE OF OZONE ON THE LOWER FLAMMABILITY LIMIT OF HYDROGEN IN VESSELS CONTAINING SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherburne, C.

    2012-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process uses ozone to effect the oxidation of metal oxalates produced during the dissolution of sludge in the Savannah River Site (SRS) waste tanks. The ozone reacts with the metal oxalates to form metal oxide and hydroxide precipitants, and the CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and any unreacted O{sub 3} gases are discharged into the vapor space. In addition to the non-radioactive metals in the waste, however, the SRS radioactive waste also contains a variety of radionuclides, hence, hydrogen gas is also present in the vapor space of the ECC system. Because hydrogen is flammable, the impact of this resultant gas stream on the Lower Flammability Limit (LFL) of hydrogen must be understood for all possible operating scenarios of both normal and off-normal situations, with particular emphasis at the elevated temperatures and pressures of the typical ECC operating conditions. Oxygen is a known accelerant in combustion reactions, but while there are data associated with the behavior of hydrogen/oxygen environments, recent, relevant studies addressing the effect of ozone on the flammability limit of hydrogen proved scarce. Further, discussions with industry experts verified the absence of data in this area and indicated that laboratory testing, specific to defined operating parameters, was needed to comprehensively address the issue. Testing was thus designed and commissioned to provide the data necessary to support safety related considerations for the ECC process. A test matrix was developed to envelope the bounding conditions considered credible during ECC processing. Each test consists of combining a gas stream of high purity hydrogen with a gas stream comprised of a specified mixture of ozone and oxygen in a temperature and pressure regulated chamber such that the relative compositions of the two streams are controlled. The gases are then stirred to obtain a homogeneous mixture and ignition attempted by applying 10J of energy to a fuse wire. A gas combination is considered flammable when a pressure rise of 7% of the initial absolute pressure is observed. The specified testing methodology is consistent with guidelines established in ASTM E-918-83 (2005) 'Standard Practices for Determining Limits of Flammability of Chemicals at Elevated Temperature and Pressure'.

  18. air guiding effect: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    this (more) Tabor, Caroline Mary 2011-01-01 33 Adverse Health Effects of Air Pollution Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: Rice University study of how to maintain energy...

  19. Essays on the Effectiveness of Environmental Conservation and Water Management Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mezzatesta, Mariano

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An awareness of the effect of agricultural production on the environment has led to the development of policies to mitigate its adverse effects. This dissertation provides analyses of agri-environmental policies designed to protect environmental...

  20. Effect of surface passivation by SiN/SiO{sub 2} of AlGaN/GaN high-electron mobility transistors on Si substrate by deep level transient spectroscopy method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gassoumi, Malek, E-mail: malek.gassoumi@fsm.rnu.tn; Mosbahi, Hana; Zaidi, Mohamed Ali [Universite deMonastir, Laboratoire de Micro-Optoelectroniques et Nanostructures, Faculte des Sciences de Monastir (Tunisia); Gaquiere, Christophe [Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, Institut d'Electronique de Microelectronique et de Nanotechnologie IEMN, Departement hyperfrequences et Semiconducteurs (France); Maaref, Hassen [Universite deMonastir, Laboratoire de Micro-Optoelectroniques et Nanostructures, Faculte des Sciences de Monastir (Tunisia)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Device performance and defects in AlGaN/GaN high-electron mobility transistors have been correlated. The effect of SiN/SiO{sub 2} passivation of the surface of AlGaN/GaN high-electron mobility transistors on Si substrates is reported on DC characteristics. Deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) measurements were performed on the device after the passivation by a (50/100 nm) SiN/SiO{sub 2} film. The DLTS spectra from these measurements showed the existence of the same electron trap on the surface of the device.

  1. Users' Requirements for Environmental Effects From Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems and Their Fuel Cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carreter, M.; Gray, M.; Falck, E.; Bonne, A.; Bell, M. [International Atomic Energy Agency - IAEA, P.O. Box 100, Wagramer Strasse 5, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) is to support the safe, sustainable, economic and proliferation resistant use of nuclear technology to meet the needs of the 21. century. The first part of the project focusses on the development of an understanding of the requirements of possible users of innovative concepts for reactors and fuel cycle applications. This paper reports progress made on the identification of user requirements as they relate to the environment and environmental protection. The user requirements being formulated are intended to limit adverse environmental effects from the different facilities involved in the nuclear fuel cycles to be well below maximum acceptable levels. To determine if the user requirements are met, it is necessary to identify those factors that are relevant to assessment of the environmental performance of innovative nuclear systems. To this effect, Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) and the Material Flow accounting (MFA) methodologies are being appraised for the suitability for application. This paper develops and provides the rationale for the 'users' requirements' as they are currently defined. Existing Environmental Impact Assessment and Materials Flow Accounting methodologies that can be applied to determine whether or not innovative technologies conform to the User Requirements are briefly described. It is concluded that after establishing fundamental principles, it is possible to formulate sets of general and specific users' requirements against which, the potential adverse environmental effects to be expected from innovative nuclear energy systems (INES) can be assessed. The application of these users' requirements should keep the adverse environmental effects from INES's within acceptable limits. (authors)

  2. Health Effects Support Document for Hexachlorobutadiene Health Effects Support Document

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    For Hexachlorobutadiene

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA), as amended in 1996, requires the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to establish a list of contaminants to aid the agency in regulatory priority setting for the drinking water program. In addition, SDWA requires EPA to make regulatory determinations for no fewer than five contaminants by August 2001. The criteria used to determine whether or not to regulate a chemical on the CCL are the following: The contaminant may have an adverse effect on the health of persons. The contaminant is known to occur or there is a substantial likelihood that the contaminant will occur in public water systems with a frequency and at levels of public health concern. In the sole judgment of the administrator, regulation of such contaminant presents a meaningful opportunity for health risk reduction for persons served by public water systems. The Agency’s findings for the three criteria are used in making a determination to regulate a contaminant. The Agency may determine that there is no need for regulation when a contaminant fails to meet one of the criteria. This document provides the health effects basis for the regulatory determination for hexachlorobutadiene. In arriving at the regulatory determination, data on toxicokinetics, human

  3. West Valley high-level nuclear waste glass development: a statistically designed mixture study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chick, L.A.; Bowen, W.M.; Lokken, R.O.; Wald, J.W.; Bunnell, L.R.; Strachan, D.M.

    1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first full-scale conversion of high-level commercial nuclear wastes to glass in the United States will be conducted at West Valley, New York, by West Valley Nuclear Services Company, Inc. (WVNS), for the US Department of Energy. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is supporting WVNS in the design of the glass-making process and the chemical formulation of the glass. This report describes the statistically designed study performed by PNL to develop the glass composition recommended for use at West Valley. The recommended glass contains 28 wt% waste, as limited by process requirements. The waste loading and the silica content (45 wt%) are similar to those in previously developed waste glasses; however, the new formulation contains more calcium and less boron. A series of tests verified that the increased calcium results in improved chemical durability and does not adversely affect the other modeled properties. The optimization study assessed the effects of seven oxide components on glass properties. Over 100 melts combining the seven components into a wide variety of statistically chosen compositions were tested. Viscosity, electrical conductivity, thermal expansion, crystallinity, and chemical durability were measured and empirically modeled as a function of the glass composition. The mathematical models were then used to predict the optimum formulation. This glass was tested and adjusted to arrive at the final composition recommended for use at West Valley. 56 references, 49 figures, 18 tables.

  4. Effectiveness of Shading Air-Cooled Condensers of Air-Conditioning Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ElSherbini, A.; Maheshwari, G. P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the condenser and the high ambient temperatures can be detrimental for the energy performance. The effectiveness of shading the condensing unit to mitigate this adverse impact is investigated in this paper. A limiting analysis compares the performance of several...

  5. Company Level Imports Archives

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecadeReservesYear21Company Level Imports Company Level

  6. Improved freezing level retrieval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Sungwook

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TRMM Microwave Imager(TMI)-based passive microwave retrieval techniques result in biased estimates of the freezing level and rainfall over the east Pacific in the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). Passive microwave rainfall estimates...

  7. Sea level change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, M.F. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) 1995 Scientific Assessment, Chapter 7. Sea Level Change, presents a modest revision of the similar chapter in the 1990 Assessment. Principal conclusions on observed sea-level change and the principal terms in the sea-level equation (ocean thermal expansion, glaciers, ice sheets, and land hydrology), including our knowledge of the present-day (defined as the 20th Century) components of sea-level rise, and projections of these for the future, are presented here. Some of the interesting glaciological problems which are involved in these studies are discussed in more detail. The emphasis here is on trends over decades to a century, not on shorter variations nor on those of the geologic past. Unfortunately, some of the IPCC projections had not been agreed at the time of writing of this paper, and these projections will not be given here. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  8. PLUTONIUM SOLUBILITY IN HIGH-LEVEL WASTE ALKALI BOROSILICATE GLASS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marra, J.; Crawford, C.; Fox, K.; Bibler, N.

    2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The solubility of plutonium in a Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) reference glass and the effect of incorporation of Pu in the glass on specific glass properties were evaluated. A Pu loading of 1 wt % in glass was studied. Prior to actual plutonium glass testing, surrogate testing (using Hf as a surrogate for Pu) was conducted to evaluate the homogeneity of significant quantities of Hf (Pu) in the glass, determine the most appropriate methods to evaluate homogeneity for Pu glass testing, and to evaluate the impact of Hf loading in the glass on select glass properties. Surrogate testing was conducted using Hf to represent between 0 and 1 wt % Pu in glass on an equivalent molar basis. A Pu loading of 1 wt % in glass translated to {approx}18 kg Pu per Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister, or about 10X the current allowed limit per the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (2500 g/m{sup 3} of glass or about 1700 g/canister) and about 30X the current allowable concentration based on the fissile material concentration limit referenced in the Yucca Mountain Project License Application (897 g/m{sup 3}3 of glass or about 600 g Pu/canister). Based on historical process throughput data, this level was considered to represent a reasonable upper bound for Pu loading based on the ability to provide Pu containing feed to the DWPF. The task elements included evaluating the distribution of Pu in the glass (e.g. homogeneity), evaluating crystallization within the glass, evaluating select glass properties (with surrogates), and evaluating durability using the Product Consistency Test -- Method A (PCT-A). The behavior of Pu in the melter was evaluated using paper studies and corresponding analyses of DWPF melter pour samples.The results of the testing indicated that at 1 wt % Pu in the glass, the Pu was homogeneously distributed and did not result in any formation of plutonium-containing crystalline phases as long as the glass was prepared under 'well-mixed' conditions. The incorporation of 1 wt % Pu in the glass did not adversely impact glass viscosity (as assessed using Hf surrogate) or glass durability. Finally, evaluation of DWPF glass pour samples that had Pu concentrations below the 897 g/m{sup 3} limit showed that Pu concentrations in the glass pour stream were close to targeted compositions in the melter feed indicating that Pu neither volatilized from the melt nor stratified in the melter when processed in the DWPF melter.

  9. Level 3 baseline risk evaluation for Building 3506 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golden, K.M.; Robers, S.K.; Cretella, F.M.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the Level 3 Baseline Risk Evaluation (BRE) performed on Building 3506 located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This BRE is intended to provide an analysis of the potential for adverse health effects (current or future) posed by contaminants at the facility. The decision was made to conduct a Level 3 (least rigorous) BRE because only residual contamination exists in the building. Future plans for the facility (demolition) also preclude a rigorous analysis. Site characterization activities for Building 3506 were conducted in fall of 1993. Concrete core samples were taken from the floors and walls of both the cell and the east gallery. These cores were analyzed for radionuclides and organic and inorganic chemicals. Smear samples and direct radiation measurements were also collected. Sediment exists on the floor of the cell and was also analyzed. To adequately characterize the risks posed by the facility, receptors for both current and potential future land uses were evaluated. For the current land use conditions, two receptors were evaluated. The first receptor is a hypothetical maintenance worker who spends 250 days (8 hours/day) for 25 years working in the facility. The remaining receptor evaluated is a hypothetical S and M worker who spends 2 days (8 hours/day) per year for 25 years working within the facility. This particular receptor best exemplifies the current worker scenario for the facility. The two current exposure scenarios and parameters of exposure (e.g., inhalation and ingestion rates) have been developed to provide a conservative (i.e. health protective) estimate of potential exposure.

  10. Ultrasonic liquid level detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotz, Dennis M. (North Augusta, SC); Hinz, William R. (Augusta, GA)

    2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrasonic liquid level detector for use within a shielded container, the detector being tubular in shape with a chamber at its lower end into which liquid from in the container may enter and exit, the chamber having an ultrasonic transmitter and receiver in its top wall and a reflector plate or target as its bottom wall whereby when liquid fills the chamber a complete medium is then present through which an ultrasonic wave may be transmitted and reflected from the target thus signaling that the liquid is at chamber level.

  11. DATE SUBMITTED: GRADE LEVEL:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution4Customer-Comments Sign InFutureSUBMITTED: GRADE LEVEL:

  12. Toxicological effects of methylmercury on walleye (Sander vitreus) and perch (Perca flavescens) from lakes of the boreal forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Bernard

    ) were studied in four Canadian boreal forest lakes representing a mercury (Hg) exposure gradient adverse effects on the physiology and cellular metabolism of walleye and perch at environmentally relevant

  13. Radiation therapy of pediatric brain tumors : comparison of long-term health effects and costs between proton therapy and IMRT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vu, An T. (An Thien)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation therapy is an important component of pediatric brain tumor treatment. However, radiation-induced damage can lead to adverse long-term health effects. Proton therapy has the ability to reduce the dose delivered ...

  14. Mapping Climate Change Hazards: Using GIS to Identify Social Vulnerability to the Effects of Environmental Hazards in the UK 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batool, Najya

    2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Research suggests that the precise nature and effects of climate change, including changes to the Earth’s climate patterns, can have an adverse environmental impact on localities, regions, and countries. Research shows that socially disadvantaged...

  15. Level: National Data;

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal StocksProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)Wellhead0 Capability to.5 First

  16. Company Level Imports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting theCommercialization and Innovation2010 2010 EIA-28 Financial

  17. Level Diagram Format Choice

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5Let us count the ways. We've13, 2009 InFormWhich

  18. Tables of Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis of 2D Alloys &8-5070P3. U.S.7.

  19. anthropometrics hormonal levels: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Summary.-The effects of hormone and drug treatments on plasma prolactin (PRL) levels and mammary tumour growth were investigated in rats bearing continuously...

  20. anticancer drug levels: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Summary.-The effects of hormone and drug treatments on plasma prolactin (PRL) levels and mammary tumour growth were investigated in rats bearing continuously...

  1. appetite hormone levels: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Summary.-The effects of hormone and drug treatments on plasma prolactin (PRL) levels and mammary tumour growth were investigated in rats bearing continuously...

  2. acid levels prolactin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Summary.-The effects of hormone and drug treatments on plasma prolactin (PRL) levels and mammary tumour growth were investigated in rats bearing continuously...

  3. Turbulence at Hydroelectric Power Plants and its Potential Effects on Fish.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, Glenn F.; Odeh, Mufeed

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fundamental influence of fluid dynamics on aquatic organisms is receiving increasing attention among aquatic ecologists. For example, the importance of turbulence to ocean plankton has long been a subject of investigation (Peters and Redondo 1997). More recently, studies have begun to emerge that explicitly consider the effects of shear and turbulence on freshwater invertebrates (Statzner et al. 1988; Hart et al. 1996) and fishes (Pavlov et al. 1994, 1995). Hydraulic shear stress and turbulence are interdependent natural fluid phenomena that are important to fish, and consequently it is important to develop an understanding of how fish sense, react to, and perhaps utilize these phenomena under normal river flows. The appropriate reaction to turbulence may promote movement of migratory fish or prevent displacement of resident fish. It has been suggested that one of the adverse effects of flow regulation by hydroelectric projects is the reduction of normal turbulence, particularly in the headwaters of reservoirs, which can lead to disorientation and slowing of migration (Williams et al. 1996; Coutant et al. 1997; Coutant 1998). On the other hand, greatly elevated levels of shear and turbulence may be injurious to fish; injuries can range from removal of the mucous layer on the body surface to descaling to torn opercula, popped eyes, and decapitation (Neitzel et al. 2000a,b). Damaging levels of fluid stress can occur in a variety of circumstances in both natural and man-made environments. This paper discusses the effects of shear stress and turbulence on fish, with an emphasis on potentially damaging levels in man-made environments. It defines these phenomena, describes studies that have been conducted to understand their effects, and identifies gaps in our knowledge. In particular, this report reviews the available information on the levels of turbulence that can occur within hydroelectric power plants, and the associated biological effects. The final section provides the preliminary design of an experimental apparatus that will be used to expose fish to representative levels of turbulence in the laboratory.

  4. Level III baseline risk evaluation for Building 3505 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mostella, W.B. Jr.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Level III Baseline Risk Evaluation (BRE) for Building 3505, the ORNL Metal Recovery Facility, provides an analysis of the potential for adverse health effects, current or future, associated with the presence of hazardous substances in the building. The Metal Recovery Facility was used from 1952 through 1960 to process large quantities of radioactive material using the PUREX process for the recovery of uranium-238, plutonium-239, neptunium-237, and americium-241. The facility consists of seven process cells (A through G), a canal, a dissolver room, a dissolver pit, an office, locker room, storage area, control room, electrical gallery, shop, and makeup area. The cells were used to house the nuclear fuel reprocessing equipment, and the canal was constructed to be used as a water-shielded transfer canal. Currently, there are no known releases of radioactive contaminants from Building 3505. To perform the BRE, historical radiological survey data were used to estimate the concentration of alpha- and beta/gamma emitting radionuclides in the various cells, rooms, and other areas in Building 3505. Data from smear surveys were used to estimate the amount of transferable contamination (to which receptors can be exposed via inhalation and ingestion), and data from probe surveys were used to estimate the amount of both fixed and transferable contamination (from which receptors can receive external exposure). Two land use scenarios, current and future, and their subsequent exposure scenarios were explored in the BRE. Under the current land use scenario, two exposure scenarios were evaluated. The first was a worst-case industrial exposure scenario in which the receptor is a maintenance worker who works 8 hours/day, 350 days/year in the building for 25 years. In the second, more realistic exposure scenario, the receptor is a surveillance and maintenance (S&M) worker who spends two 8-hour days/year in the building for 25 years.

  5. Liquid level detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tshishiku, Eugene M. (Augusta, GA)

    2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid level detector for conductive liquids for vertical installation in a tank, the detector having a probe positioned within a sheath and insulated therefrom by a seal so that the tip of the probe extends proximate to but not below the lower end of the sheath, the lower end terminating in a rim that is provided with notches, said lower end being tapered, the taper and notches preventing debris collection and bubble formation, said lower end when contacting liquid as it rises will form an airtight cavity defined by the liquid, the interior sheath wall, and the seal, the compression of air in the cavity preventing liquid from further entry into the sheath and contact with the seal. As a result, the liquid cannot deposit a film to form an electrical bridge across the seal.

  6. Pinning down energy levels | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    levels Pinning down energy levels Released: September 12, 2014 Scientists discover the energy differences behind green fluorescent protein's glow The research begins with (a)...

  7. Blood plasma levels of sex steroid hormones and vitellogenin in striped bass (morone saxatilis) exposed to 3,3{prime}, 4,4{prime}-Tetrachlorobiphenyl (TCB)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monosson, E.; Fleming, W.J.; Sullivan, C.V. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)] [and others] [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); and others

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) can impair reproductive processes in fish. Laboratory studies have demonstrated adverse effects in several different fish species. Evidence also exits for an association between exposure to PCBs and related compounds and impaired reproduction in wild fish. Although the mechanism of reproductive toxicity of PCBs is unclear, it appears that PCBs act of several different levels of the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis (HPG). Because of their structural similarity to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (dioxin), planar PCB congengers (e.g. 3,3`,4,4`-tetrachlorobiphenyl (TCB)) are among the most toxic PCBs. Both TCB and dioxon are reproductive toxicants in fish. TCB exposure (via intraperitoneal injections) impaired maturation in adult female white perch (Monroe americana) and reduced egg deposition in killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus). Larval or fry survival was also reduced following either maternal exposure to TCB for white perch or injections of TCB into fertilized eggs of rainbow trout. This study investigate the effects of exposure to TCB on reproductive processes in female striped bass. 12 refs., 2 tabs.

  8. Effects of broadleaf woodland cover on streamwater chemistry and risk assessments of streamwater acidification in acid-sensitive catchments in the UK 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gagkas, Zisis

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Acidification of surface waters has been recognised as the major water quality problem in the UK uplands. The adverse effects of conifer afforestation on streamwater chemistry and ecology are well documented in ...

  9. Screening Level Risk Assessment for the New Waste Calcining Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. L. Abbott; K. N. Keck; R. E. Schindler; R. L. VanHorn; N. L. Hampton; M. B. Heiser

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This screening level risk assessment evaluates potential adverse human health and ecological impacts resulting from continued operations of the calciner at the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The assessment was conducted in accordance with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) report, Guidance for Performing Screening Level Risk Analyses at Combustion Facilities Burning Hazardous Waste. This screening guidance is intended to give a conservative estimate of the potential risks to determine whether a more refined assessment is warranted. The NWCF uses a fluidized-bed combustor to solidify (calcine) liquid radioactive mixed waste from the INTEC Tank Farm facility. Calciner off volatilized metal species, trace organic compounds, and low-levels of radionuclides. Conservative stack emission rates were calculated based on maximum waste solution feed samples, conservative assumptions for off gas partitioning of metals and organics, stack gas sampling for mercury, and conservative measurements of contaminant removal (decontamination factors) in the off gas treatment system. Stack emissions were modeled using the ISC3 air dispersion model to predict maximum particulate and vapor air concentrations and ground deposition rates. Results demonstrate that NWCF emissions calculated from best-available process knowledge would result in maximum onsite and offsite health and ecological impacts that are less then EPA-established criteria for operation of a combustion facility.

  10. Topological insulators with SU(2) Landau levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi Li; Shou-Cheng Zhang; Congjun Wu

    2013-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct continuum models of 3D and 4D topological insulators by coupling spin-1/2 fermions to an SU(2) background gauge field, which is equivalent to a spatially dependent spin-orbit coupling. Higher dimensional generalizations of flat Landau levels are obtained in the Landau-like gauge. The 2D helical Dirac modes with opposite helicities and 3D Weyl modes with opposite chiralities are spatially separated along the third and fourth dimensions, respectively. Stable 2D helical Fermi surfaces and 3D chiral Fermi surfaces appear on open boundaries, respectively. The charge pumping in 4D Landau level systems shows quantized 4D quantum Hall effect.

  11. Sea Level Rise Media Release

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Aixue

    Sea Level Rise Media Release Coverage Report 07/06/2009 Melting Ice Could Lead to Massive Waves 06/11/2009 Rising sea levels could see U.S. Atlantic coast cities make hard choices; Where to let Baltimore Chronicle & Sentinel, The 06/08/2009 Rapid rise in sea levels on East Coast predicted Pittsburgh

  12. Assessment of Seawater Intrusion Potential From Sea-level Rise in Coastal Aquifers of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loáiciga, Hugo A; Pingel, Thomas J; Garcia, Elizabeth S

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2009). Impact of Sea-Level Rise on Sea Water Intrusion inC. (1997). Global Sea Level Rise: A Redetermination. Surveys2007). Effects of sea-level rise on groundwater flow in a

  13. Specified assurance level sampling procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willner, O.

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the nuclear industry design specifications for certain quality characteristics require that the final product be inspected by a sampling plan which can demonstrate product conformance to stated assurance levels. The Specified Assurance Level (SAL) Sampling Procedure has been developed to permit the direct selection of attribute sampling plans which can meet commonly used assurance levels. The SAL procedure contains sampling plans which yield the minimum sample size at stated assurance levels. The SAL procedure also provides sampling plans with acceptance numbers ranging from 0 to 10, thus, making available to the user a wide choice of plans all designed to comply with a stated assurance level.

  14. UNCORRECTED 2 Effects of dilution on the extinction characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Im, Hong G.

    relevant to micro-combustor application, the effects of mixture dilution on the 10 lean extinction reactions is rather 15 insensitive to the surface thermal conditions. These observations are explained. For this type 29 of combustors, high combustion temperature is 30 undesirable since it adversely affect

  15. USE OF AN EQUILIBRIUM MODEL TO FORECAST DISSOLUTION EFFECTIVENESS, SAFETY IMPACTS, AND DOWNSTREAM PROCESSABILITY FROM OXALIC ACID AIDED SLUDGE REMOVAL IN SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANKS 1-15

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KETUSKY, EDWARD

    2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis details a graduate research effort written to fulfill the Magister of Technologiae in Chemical Engineering requirements at the University of South Africa. The research evaluates the ability of equilibrium based software to forecast dissolution, evaluate safety impacts, and determine downstream processability changes associated with using oxalic acid solutions to dissolve sludge heels in Savannah River Site High Level Waste (HLW) Tanks 1-15. First, a dissolution model is constructed and validated. Coupled with a model, a material balance determines the fate of hypothetical worst-case sludge in the treatment and neutralization tanks during each chemical adjustment. Although sludge is dissolved, after neutralization more is created within HLW. An energy balance determines overpressurization and overheating to be unlikely. Corrosion induced hydrogen may overwhelm the purge ventilation. Limiting the heel volume treated/acid added and processing the solids through vitrification is preferred and should not significantly increase the number of glass canisters.

  16. Bringing science into river systems cumulative effects assessment practice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seitz, Nicole E. [Centre for Hydrology, Department of Geography and Planning, University of Saskatchewan. 117 Science Place, Saskatoon, SK. S7N 5C8 (Canada); Westbrook, Cherie J., E-mail: cherie.westbrook@usask.c [Centre for Hydrology, Department of Geography and Planning, University of Saskatchewan. 117 Science Place, Saskatoon, SK. S7N 5C8 (Canada); Noble, Bram F. [Department of Geography and Planning, School for the Environment and Sustainability, University of Saskatchewan. 117 Science Place, Saskatoon, SK. S7N 5C8 (Canada)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fast-paced watershed change, driven by anthropogenic development, is threatening the sustainability of freshwater resources across the globe. Developments within watersheds interact in a manner that is additive and synergistic over space and time. Such cumulative environmental effects are defined as the results of actions that are individually minor but collectively significant when added to other past, present, and reasonably foreseeable future actions. Cumulative effects assessment (CEA) then is broadly defined as the process of evaluating the potential impacts of such collective actions on the environment and is a requirement in many countries, including in Canada at the federal level under the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act. However, current approaches to CEA for river systems are proving to be ineffective, which is largely attributed to the disconnect between CEA science and practice. We highlight this gap herein by discussing contradictions in the CEA literature, challenges in quantifying cumulative interactions, including overcoming spatiotemporal scale issues, multiple hydrologic and ecological pathways, and lack of predictive analysis. Our analysis shows there is a need for improved CEA for river systems, and in responding to this need we propose a conceptual framework for better integrating science and practice for improved CEA for river systems using one of the most adversely affected rivers basins in Canada, the Athabasca River, as our model. We conclude by addressing the challenges inherent to CEA with the intent of providing scientists with ways to help improve CEA of river systems.

  17. Interior Light Level Measurements Appendix F -Interior Light Level Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix F ­ Interior Light Level Measurements #12;F.1 Appendix F - Interior Light Level. A potential concern is that a lower VT glazing may increase electric lighting use to compensate for lost qualify and quantify a representative loss of daylighting, and therefore electric lighting use

  18. ALIGNMENT, LEVELING AND DEPLOYMENT CONSTRAINTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Crew Deployment Description Passive Seismic Experiment (PSE) Crew Deployment and Alignment Central Station Antenna Crew Deployment Description Leveling, Alignment, and Pointing Radioisotope

  19. Effect of Collection Method and Archiving Conditions on the Survivability of Vegetative and Spore Forming Bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kassab, Asmaa S.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    and Schafer, 1998). Aerosols play a large role in a multiplicity of different production processes. Airborne particles, especially pathogenic microorganisms and other biological materials, are potential public and industrial health hazards. To ensure... the effective protection of This thesis followed the style and format of Aerosol Science and Technology. 2 both general and occupational populations from the adverse effects of airborne hazards, reliable...

  20. Evaluations of average level spacings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liou, H.I.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The average level spacing for highly excited nuclei is a key parameter in cross section formulas based on statistical nuclear models, and also plays an important role in determining many physics quantities. Various methods to evaluate average level spacings are reviewed. Because of the finite experimental resolution, to detect a complete sequence of levels without mixing other parities is extremely difficult, if not totally impossible. Most methods derive the average level spacings by applying a fit, with different degrees of generality, to the truncated Porter-Thomas distribution for reduced neutron widths. A method that tests both distributions of level widths and positions is discussed extensivey with an example of /sup 168/Er data. 19 figures, 2 tables.

  1. Adventure and Adversity Issue 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    . I desire only to have a roof over my head, some decent food and a warm bed provided by servants who know me, and know that their master would wish to pro vide for me. A few days in my lovers' house, even if they are not there to soothe me, and I.... "Ibelieve your mind is more willing that your body tonight, my dearest Jamie," Ed ward cautions me with a little smile, and a soft kiss to the forehead. "You must sleep now." I am frustrated by my own desire, and the knowledge of how little time we...

  2. Overview of toxicity data and risk assessment methods for evaluating the chemical effects of depleted uranium compounds.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartmann, H. M.; Monette, F. A.; Avci, H. I.; Environmental Assessment

    2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the United States, depleted uranium is handled or used in several chemical forms by both governmental agencies and private industry (primarily companies producing and machining depleted uranium metal for military applications). Human exposure can occur as a result of handling these compounds, routine low-level effluent releases to the environment from processing facilities, or materials being accidentally released from storage locations or during processing or transportation. Exposure to uranium can result in both chemical and radiological toxicity, but in most instances chemical toxicity is of greater concern. This article discusses the chemical toxic effects from human exposure to depleted uranium compounds that are likely to be handled during the long-term management and use of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) inventories in the United States. It also reviews representative publications in the toxicological literature to establish appropriate reference values for risk assessments. Methods are described for evaluating chemical toxicity caused by chronic low-level exposure and acute exposure. Example risk evaluations are provided for illustration. Preliminary results indicate that chemical effects of chronic exposure to uranium compounds under normal operating conditions would be negligibly small. Results also show that acute exposures under certain accident conditions could cause adverse chemical effects among the populations exposed.

  3. Dataflow Transformations in High-level DSP System Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhattacharyya, Shuvra S.

    in the application that can be analyzed and transformed for effective optimization. Because of the high level of abstraction at which they operate, the transformations employed in this process have a large impact on keyDataflow Transformations in High-level DSP System Design (Invited Paper) Sankalita Saha, Sebastian

  4. Levelling of microprofiles in electrodeposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, K.G.

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation addresses current distribution phenomena in the smoothing of advancing and receding microprofiles during electrodeposition in the following areas: levelling in the presence of inhibitors, levelling in the presence of corrosive agents, and levelling caused by periodic current reversal. These phenomena are relevant to many commercial electrodeposition processes. Theoretical analysis of moving boundaries in electrodeposition is addressed, focusing on the levelling of microscopic surface contours. The literature relevant to the solution of current distribution problems is reviewed. Convection of inhibitors to the depth of trenches is evaluated using the finite element method, and characterized as a function of Reynolds number, notch angle, and depth. Secondary flows are shown to noticeably enhance transport into microscopic trenches only at high Peclet numbers, i.e. at very high flow velocities. The boundary element method (BEM) is used to analyze levelling caused by inhibitors consumed at the transport limiting rate during electrodeposition. It is predicted that (1) better levelling performance can be obtained if the microscopic surface waviness is oriented perpendicular to the convective flow, and (2) for surface roughness oriented parallel to the flow, there is an optimum boundary layer thickness, or flux of additive, which results in superior levelling performance. Profilometry and photomicrography is applied to obtain the current distribution, current efficiency and levelling performance on novel microprofiled electrodes for two orientations with respect to the fluid flow during nickel electrodeposition in the presence of coumarin. Slightly better levelling occurs in flows transverse to grooves, and the deposit thickness increases in the flow direction. It is concluded that coumarin acts by simultaneously lowering the current efficiency, and blocking metal deposition. 331 refs., 86 figs., 8 tabs.

  5. High-Level Waste Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The guide provides the criteria for determining which DOE radioactive wastes are to be managed as high-level waste in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1.

  6. Low-Level Waste Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The guide provides criteria for determining which DOE radioactive wastes are to be managed as low-level waste in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter IV.

  7. Low Level Heat Recovery Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, W. J.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    level heat recovery technology. This paper discusses heat distribution systems, latest developments in absorption refrigeration and organic Rankine cycles, and pressure, minimization possibilities. The relative merits and economics of the various...

  8. Promoting system-level learning from project-level lessons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jong, Amos A. de, E-mail: amosdejong@gmail.com [Innovation Management, Utrecht (Netherlands); Runhaar, Hens A.C., E-mail: h.a.c.runhaar@uu.nl [Section of Environmental Governance, Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands); Runhaar, Piety R., E-mail: piety.runhaar@wur.nl [Organisational Psychology and Human Resource Development, University of Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Kolhoff, Arend J., E-mail: Akolhoff@eia.nl [The Netherlands Commission for Environmental Assessment, Utrecht (Netherlands); Driessen, Peter P.J., E-mail: p.driessen@geo.uu.nl [Department of Innovation and Environment Sciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A growing number of low and middle income nations (LMCs) have adopted some sort of system for environmental impact assessment (EIA). However, generally many of these EIA systems are characterised by a low performance in terms of timely information dissemination, monitoring and enforcement after licencing. Donor actors (such as the World Bank) have attempted to contribute to a higher performance of EIA systems in LMCs by intervening at two levels: the project level (e.g. by providing scoping advice or EIS quality review) and the system level (e.g. by advising on EIA legislation or by capacity building). The aims of these interventions are environmental protection in concrete cases and enforcing the institutionalisation of environmental protection, respectively. Learning by actors involved is an important condition for realising these aims. A relatively underexplored form of learning concerns learning at EIA system-level via project level donor interventions. This 'indirect' learning potentially results in system changes that better fit the specific context(s) and hence contribute to higher performances. Our exploratory research in Ghana and the Maldives shows that thus far, 'indirect' learning only occurs incidentally and that donors play a modest role in promoting it. Barriers to indirect learning are related to the institutional context rather than to individual characteristics. Moreover, 'indirect' learning seems to flourish best in large projects where donors achieved a position of influence that they can use to evoke reflection upon system malfunctions. In order to enhance learning at all levels donors should thereby present the outcomes of the intervention elaborately (i.e. discuss the outcomes with a large audience), include practical suggestions about post-EIS activities such as monitoring procedures and enforcement options and stimulate the use of their advisory reports to generate organisational memory and ensure a better information dissemination.

  9. High Level Waste Management Division High. Level Waste System Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet WhenHiggs Boson May| ArgonneHigh Level

  10. Space elevator systems level analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laubscher, B. E. (Bryan E.)

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Space Elevator (SE) represents a major paradigm shift in space access. It involves new, untried technologies in most of its subsystems. Thus the successful construction of the SE requires a significant amount of development, This in turn implies a high level of risk for the SE. This paper will present a systems level analysis of the SE by subdividing its components into their subsystems to determine their level of technological maturity. such a high-risk endeavor is to follow a disciplined approach to the challenges. A systems level analysis informs this process and is the guide to where resources should be applied in the development processes. It is an efficient path that, if followed, minimizes the overall risk of the system's development. systems level analysis is that the overall system is divided naturally into its subsystems, and those subsystems are further subdivided as appropriate for the analysis. By dealing with the complex system in layers, the parameter space of decisions is kept manageable. Moreover, A rational way to manage One key aspect of a resources are not expended capriciously; rather, resources are put toward the biggest challenges and most promising solutions. This overall graded approach is a proven road to success. The analysis includes topics such as nanotube technology, deployment scenario, power beaming technology, ground-based hardware and operations, ribbon maintenance and repair and climber technology.

  11. Official Certificate List Level(s)* Academic Administrative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risk, Uncertainty and Decision Analysis EGRU335 Certificate in Engineering Thermal Energy Systems EGRU International Certificate ALSU198 Certificate for Biology in Engineering for Engineering Majors EGRU135 Level IESG310 Certificate in Engineering for Energy Sustainability EGRU340 Certificate in Engineering

  12. High pressure liquid level monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bean, Vern E. (Frederick, MD); Long, Frederick G. (Ijamsville, MD)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid level monitor for tracking the level of a coal slurry in a high-pressure vessel including a toroidal-shaped float with magnetically permeable bands thereon disposed within the vessel, two pairs of magnetic field generators and detectors disposed outside the vessel adjacent the top and bottom thereof and magnetically coupled to the magnetically permeable bands on the float, and signal processing circuitry for combining signals from the top and bottom detectors for generating a monotonically increasing analog control signal which is a function of liquid level. The control signal may be utilized to operate high-pressure control valves associated with processes in which the high-pressure vessel is used.

  13. Level indicator for pressure vessels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1982-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid-level monitor for tracking the level of a coal slurry in a high-pressure vessel including a toroidal-shaped float with magnetically permeable bands thereon disposed within the vessel, two pairs of magnetic-field generators and detectors disposed outside the vessel adjacent the top and bottom thereof and magnetically coupled to the magnetically permeable bands on the float, and signal-processing circuitry for combining signals from the top and bottom detectors for generating a monotonically increasing analog control signal which is a function of liquid level. The control signal may be utilized to operate high-pressure control valves associated with processes in which the high-pressure vessel is used.

  14. Simulation of leveling in electrodeposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dukovic, J.O.; Tobias, C.W. (Materials and Chemical Sciences Div., Lawrence Berkeley Lab. and Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (US))

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on a model of current distribution and electrode shape change for electrodeposition in the presence of diffusion-controlled leveling agents that have been developed. The system is treated as a special case of secondary current distribution, with the surface overpotential taken to depend on both the current density and the transport-limited flux of the leveling agent, according to an empirical relation adapted from polarization data measured at different conditions of agitation. The spatial variation of the leveling-agent flux is determined from a concentration field problem based on the assumption of a stagnant diffusion layer. The solution is obtained by the boundary element method, with a flexible moving-boundary algorithm for simulating the advancement of the electrode profile. To illustrate the model's performance, the evolution of a groove profile during deposition of nickel from a Watts-type bath containing coumarin is predicted and compared with measurements reported in the literature.

  15. The CMS High Level Trigger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam, W; Deldicque, C; Ero, J; Frühwirth, R; Jeitler, Manfred; Kastner, K; Köstner, S; Neumeister, N; Porth, M; Padrta P; Rohringer, H; Sakulinb, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Walzel, G; Wulz, C E; Lowette, S; Van De Vyver, B; De Lentdecker, G; Vanlaer, P; Delaere, C; Lemaître, V; Ninane, A; van der Aa, O; Damgov, J; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Lampen, T; Lassila-Perini, K M; Lehti, S; Nysten, J; Tuominiemi, J; Busson, P; Todorov, T; Schwering, G; Gras, P; Daskalakis, G; Sfyrla, A; Barone, M; Geralis, T; Markou, C; Zachariadou, K; Hidas, P; Banerjee, S; Mazumdara, K; Abbrescia, M; Colaleoa, A; D'Amato, N; De Filippis, N; Giordano, D; Loddo, F; Maggi, M; Silvestris, L; Zito, G; Arcelli, S; Bonacorsi, D; Capiluppi, P; Dallavalle, G M; Fanfani, A; Grandi, C; Marcellini, S; Montanari, A; Odorici, F; Travaglini, R; Costa, S; Tricomi, A; Ciulli, a V; Magini, N; Ranieri, R; Berti, L; Biasotto, M; Gulminia, M; Maron, G; Toniolo, N; Zangrando, L; Bellato, M; Gasparini, U; Lacaprara, S; Parenti, A; Ronchese, P; Vanini, S; Zotto, S; Ventura P L; Perugia; Benedetti, D; Biasini, M; Fano, L; Servoli, L; Bagliesi, a G; Boccali, T; Dutta, S; Gennai, S; Giassi, A; Palla, F; Segneri, G; Starodumov, A; Tenchini, R; Meridiani, P; Organtini, G; Amapane, a N; Bertolino, F; Cirio, R; Kim, J Y; Lim, I T; Pac, Y; Joo, K; Kim, S B; Suwon; Choi, Y I; Yu, I T; Cho, K; Chung, J; Ham, S W; Kim, D H; Kim, G N; Kim, W; CKim, J; Oh, S K; Park, H; Ro, S R; Son, D C; Suh, J S; Aftab, Z; Hoorani, H; Osmana, A; Bunkowski, K; Cwiok, M; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, K; Kazana, M; Królikowski, J; Kudla, I; Pietrusinski, M; Pozniak, Krzysztof T; Zabolotny, W M; Zalipska, J; Zych, P; Goscilo, L; Górski, M; Wrochna, G; Zalewski, P; Alemany-Fernandez, R; Almeida, C; Almeida, N; Da Silva, J C; Santos, M; Teixeira, I; Teixeira, J P; Varelaa, J; Vaz-Cardoso, N; Konoplyanikov, V F; Urkinbaev, A R; Toropin, A; Gavrilov, V; Kolosov, V; Krokhotin, A; Oulianov, A; Stepanov, N; Kodolova, O L; Vardanyan, I; Ilic, J; Skoro, G P; Albajar, C; De Troconiz, J F; Calderón, A; López-Virto, M A; Marco, R; Martínez-Rivero, C; Matorras, F; Vila, I; Cucciarelli, S; Konecki, M; Ashby, S; Barney, D; Bartalini, P; Benetta, R; Brigljevic, V; Bruno, G; Cano, E; Cittolin, S; Della Negra, M; de Roeck, A; Favre, P; Frey, A; Funk, W; Futyan, D; Gigi, D; Glege, F; Gutleber, J; Hansen, M; Innocente, V; Jacobs, C; Jank, W; Kozlovszky, Miklos; Larsen, H; Lenzi, M; Magrans, I; Mannelli, M; Meijers, F; Meschi, E; Mirabito, L; Murray, S J; Oh, A; Orsini, L; Palomares-Espiga, C; Pollet, L; Rácz, A; Reynaud, S; Samyn, D; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schwick, C; Sguazzoni, G; Sinanis, N; Sphicas, P; Spiropulu, M; Strandlie, A; Taylor, B G; Van Vulpen, I; Wellisch, J P; Winkler, M; Villigen; Kotlinski, D; Zurich; Prokofiev, K; Speer, T; Dumanoglu, I; Bristol; Bailey, S; Brooke, J J; Cussans, D; Heath, G P; Machin, D; Nash, S J; Newbold, D; Didcot; Coughlan, A; Halsall, R; Haynes, W J; Tomalin, I R; Marinelli, N; Nikitenko, A; Rutherford, S; Seeza, C; Sharif, O; Antchev, G; Hazen, E; Rohlf, J; Wu, S; Breedon, R; Cox, P T; Murray, P; Tripathi, M; Cousins, R; Erhan, S; Hauser, J; Kreuzer, P; Lindgren, M; Mumford, J; Schlein, P E; Shi, Y; Tannenbaum, B; Valuev, V; Von der Mey, M; Andreevaa, I; Clare, R; Villa, S; Bhattacharya, S; Branson, J G; Fisk, I; Letts, J; Mojaver, M; Paar, H P; Trepagnier, E; Litvine, V; Shevchenko, S; Singh, S; Wilkinson, R; Aziz, S; Bowden, M; Elias, J E; Graham, G; Green, D; Litmaath, M; Los, S; O'Dell, V; Ratnikova, N; Suzuki, I; Wenzel, H; Acosta, D; Bourilkov, D; Korytov, A; Madorsky, A; Mitselmakher, G; Rodríguez, J L; Scurlock, B; Abdullin, S; Baden, D; Eno, S; Grassi, T; Kunori, S; Pavlon, S; Sumorok, K; Tether, S; Cremaldi, L M; Sanders, D; Summers, D; Osborne, I; Taylor, L; Tuura, L; Fisher,W C; Mans6, J; Stickland, D P; Tully, C; Wildish, T; Wynhoff, S; Padley, B P; Chumney, P; Dasu, S; Smith, W H; CMS Trigger Data Acquisition Group

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Large Hadron Collider at CERN the proton bunches cross at a rate of 40MHz. At the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment the original collision rate is reduced by a factor of O (1000) using a Level-1 hardware trigger. A subsequent factor of O(1000) data reduction is obtained by a software-implemented High Level Trigger (HLT) selection that is executed on a multi-processor farm. In this review we present in detail prototype CMS HLT physics selection algorithms, expected trigger rates and trigger performance in terms of both physics efficiency and timing.

  16. Company Level Imports Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4Consumption TheX I A OCompany Level

  17. Synergistic effects of MoDTC and ZDTP on frictional behaviour of tribofilms at the nanometer scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    conditions in automotive engines, lubricating oils contain several additives, among which there are detergent ways resulting either in synergies or in adverse effects affecting the oil performance regarding anti1 Synergistic effects of MoDTC and ZDTP on frictional behaviour of tribofilms at the nanometer

  18. Cytotoxic effects and aromatase inhibition by xenobiotic endocrine disrupters alone and in combination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benachour, Nora [Laboratoire de Biochimie, EA2608, IBFA, Universite de Caen, Esplanade de la Paix, 14032 Caen (France); Moslemi, Safa [Laboratoire de Biochimie, EA2608, IBFA, Universite de Caen, Esplanade de la Paix, 14032 Caen (France); Laboratoire de Biochimie du Tissu Conjonctif, EA3214, CHU Cote de Nacre, Caen (France); Sipahutar, Herbert [Laboratoire de Biochimie, EA2608, IBFA, Universite de Caen, Esplanade de la Paix, 14032 Caen (France); Department of Biology, State University of Medan (Indonesia); Seralini, Gilles-Eric [Laboratoire de Biochimie, EA2608, IBFA, Universite de Caen, Esplanade de la Paix, 14032 Caen (France)]. E-mail: criigen@unicaen.fr

    2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Xenobiotics may cause long-term adverse effects in humans, especially at the embryonic level, raising questions about their levels of exposure, combined effects, and crucial endpoints. We are interested in the possible interactions between xenobiotic endocrine disrupters, cellular viability and androgen metabolism. Accordingly, we tested aroclor 1254 (A1254), atrazine (AZ), o,p'-DDT, vinclozolin (VZ), p,p'-DDE, bisphenol A (BPA), chlordecone (CD), nonylphenol (NP), tributylin oxide (TBTO), and diethylstilbestrol (DES) for cellular toxicity against human embryonic 293 cells, and activity against cellular aromatase, but also on placental microsomes and on the purified equine enzyme. Cellular viability was affected in 24 h by all the xenobiotics with a threshold at 50 {mu}M (except for TBTO and DES, 10 {mu}M threshold), and aromatase was inhibited at non-toxic doses. In combination synergism was observed reducing the threshold values of toxicity to 4-10 {mu}M, and aromatase activity by 50% in some cases. In placental microsomes the most active xenobiotics rapidly inhibited microsomal aromatase in a manner independent of NADPH metabolism. Prolonged exposures to low doses in cells generally amplified by 50 times aromatase inhibition. These xenobiotics may act by inhibition of the active site or by allosteric effects on the enzyme. Bioaccumulation is a feature of some xenobiotics, especially chlordecone, DDT and DDE, and low level chronic exposures can also affect cell signaling mechanisms. This new information about the mechanism of action of these xenobiotics will assist in improved molecular design with a view to providing safer compounds for use in the (human) environment.

  19. High temperature liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tokarz, Richard D. (West Richland, WA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A length of metal sheathed metal oxide cable is perforated to permit liquid access to the insulation about a pair of conductors spaced close to one another. Changes in resistance across the conductors will be a function of liquid level, since the wetted insulation will have greater electrical conductivity than that of the dry insulation above the liquid elevation.

  20. Texas Rangeland Monitoring: Level Three

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanselka, C. Wayne; Hart, Charles R.; McGinty, Allan

    2006-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    L-5455 10/06 Texas Rangeland Monitoring: Level Three C. Wayne Hanselka, Charles R. Hart and Allan McGinty* Monitoring is an essential tool in rangeland management. Monitoring is the way to determine whether goals are being achieved with current...

  1. Evaluation of the Effects of Turbulence on the Behavior of Migratory Fish, 2002 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Odeh, Mufeed.

    2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fundamental influence of fluid dynamics on aquatic organisms is receiving increasing attention among aquatic ecologists. For example, the importance of turbulence to ocean plankton has long been a subject of investigation (Peters and Redondo 1997). More recently, studies have begun to emerge that explicitly consider the effects of shear and turbulence on freshwater invertebrates (Statzner et al. 1988; Hart et al. 1996) and fishes (Pavlov et al. 1994, 1995). Hydraulic shear stress and turbulence are interdependent natural hydraulic phenomena that are important to fish, and consequently it is important to develop an understanding of how fish sense, react to, and perhaps utilize these phenomena under normal river flows. The appropriate reaction to turbulence may promote movement of migratory fish (Coutant 1998) or prevent displacement of resident fish. It has been suggested that one of the adverse effects of flow regulation by hydroelectric projects is the reduction of normal turbulence, particularly in the headwaters of reservoirs, which can lead to disorientation and slowing of migration (Williams et al. 1996; Coutant et al. 1997; Coutant 1998). On the other hand, greatly elevated levels of shear and turbulence may be injurious to fish; injuries can range from removal of the mucous layer on the body surface to descaling to torn opercula, popped eyes, and decapitation (Neitzel et al. 2000a,b). Damaging levels of fluid stress, such turbulence, can occur in a variety of circumstances in both natural and man-made environments. This report discusses the effects of shear stress and turbulence on fish, with an emphasis on potentially damaging levels in man-made environments. It defines these phenomena, describes studies that have been conducted to understand their effects, and identifies gaps in our knowledge. In particular, this report reviews the available information on the levels of turbulence that can occur within hydroelectric power plants, and the associated biological effects. Furthermore, this report describes an experimental apparatus designed to test the effect of turbulence on fish, and defines its hydraulics. It gives the results of experiments in which three different fish species were exposed to representative levels of turbulence in the laboratory.

  2. Effects of sulfation level on the desulfation behavior of pre...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    time-resolved x-ray diffraction (TR-XRD) techniques. We find that the amount of H2S desorbed during the desulfation in the H2 TPRX experiments is not proportional to the...

  3. LOW-LEVEL RADIATION HEALTH EFFECTS: PROGRAMS AND PANEL DISCUSSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shlyakhter, Ilya

    (Harvard) NUCLEAR ACCIDENTS IN THE USSR The goal of this summary is to draw attention to a num- ber of data in the former USSR. The Chernobyl accident of 1986 was only the most recent and the most publicized nuclear accident. The report of the Soviet Union to the International Atomic Energy Agency experts' meeting

  4. Effects of Low Level Laser Therapy on Orthodontic Pain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buchwald, Bradley

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    due to their orthodontic treatment. 1, 2 Oliver et al. conducted a survey to assess attitudes towards active orthodontic treatment.3 Anonymous questionnaires were distributed to patients at or near the end of orthodontic treatment at two dental... touching objects that are too sharp, cold, or hot. Inflammatory pain is caused by the activation of the immune system by tissue injury or infection. This pain discourages physical contact or movement of an injured body part which helps with its healing...

  5. Acceptor levels in ZnMgO:N probed by deep level optical spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, A.; Hierro, A., E-mail: adrian.hierro@upm.es; Muñoz, E. [ISOM and Dpto. Ingeniería Electrónica, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Mohanta, S. K.; Nakamura, A.; Temmyo, J. [Research Institute of Electronics, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 432-8011 (Japan)

    2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A combination of deep level optical spectroscopy and lighted capacitance voltage profiling has been used to analyze the effect of N into the energy levels close to the valence band of Zn{sub 0.9}Mg{sub 0.1}O. Three energy levels at E{sub V}?+?0.47?eV, E{sub V}?+?0.35?eV, and E{sub V}?+?0.16?eV are observed in all films with concentrations in the range of 10{sup 15}–10{sup 18}?cm{sup ?3}. The two shallowest traps at E{sub V}?+?0.35?eV and E{sub V}?+?0.16?eV have very large concentrations that scale with the N exposure and are thus potential acceptor levels. In order to correctly quantify the deep level concentrations, a metal-insulator-semiconductor model has been invoked, explaining well the resulting capacitance-voltage curves.

  6. Cost Savings and Energy Reduction: Bi-Level Lighting Retrofits in Multifamily Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ackley, J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Community Environmental Center implements Bi- Level Lighting fixtures as a component of cost-effective multifamily retrofits. These systems achieve substantial energy savings by automatically reducing lighting levels when common areas are unoccupied...

  7. Dispensing Equipment Testing with Mid-Level Ethanol/Gasoline Test Fluid: Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyce, K.; Chapin, J. T.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Nonpetroleum-Based Fuel Task addresses the hurdles to commercialization of biomass-derived fuels and fuel blends. One such hurdle is the unknown compatibility of new fuels with current infrastructure, such as the equipment used at service stations to dispense fuel into automobiles. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Vehicle Technology Program and the Biomass Program have engaged in a joint project to evaluate the potential for blending ethanol into gasoline at levels higher than nominal 10 volume percent. This project was established to help DOE and NREL better understand any potentially adverse impacts caused by a lack of knowledge about the compatibility of the dispensing equipment with ethanol blends higher than what the equipment was designed to dispense. This report provides data about the impact of introducing a gasoline with a higher volumetric ethanol content into service station dispensing equipment from a safety and a performance perspective.

  8. Radiation site cleanup regulations: Technical support document for the development of radionuclide cleanup levels for soil. Review draft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolbarst, A.B.; Mauro, J.; Anigstein, R.; Back, D.; Bartlett, J.W.

    1994-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents EPA`s approach to assessing some of the beneficial and adverse radiation health effects associated with various possible values for an annual dose limit. In particular, it discusses the method developed to determine how the choice of cleanup criterion affects (1) the time-integrated numbers of non-fatal and fatal radiogenic cancers averted among future populations, (2) the occurrence of radiogenic cancers among remediation workers and the public caused by the cleanup process itself, and (3) the volume of contaminated soil that may require remediation.

  9. Energy Level Diagrams A=10

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in the following

  10. Energy Level Diagrams A=11

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in the

  11. Energy Level Diagrams A=12

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in the2

  12. Energy Level Diagrams A=13

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in the23

  13. Energy Level Diagrams A=14

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in the234

  14. Energy Level Diagrams A=15

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in the2345

  15. Energy Level Diagrams A=16

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in the23456

  16. Energy Level Diagrams A=17

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in the234567

  17. Energy Level Diagrams A=18

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in the2345678

  18. Energy Level Diagrams A=19

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in the234567819

  19. Energy Level Diagrams A=20

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in

  20. Energy Level Diagrams A=4

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4 Available in

  1. Energy Level Diagrams A=5

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4 Available

  2. Energy Level Diagrams A=6

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4 Available6

  3. Energy Level Diagrams A=7

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4 Available67

  4. Energy Level Diagrams A=8

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4 Available678

  5. Energy Level Diagrams A=9

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4

  6. Mid-Level Ethanol Blends

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaeferApril 1,(EAC)TABLE OF CONTENTS 1of:Microsoft WordREMARKSMicrosoft

  7. anti-mullerian hormone levels: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Summary.-The effects of hormone and drug treatments on plasma prolactin (PRL) levels and mammary tumour growth were investigated in rats bearing continuously...

  8. Hanford low-level tank waste interim performance assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, F.M.

    1997-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Low-Level Tank Waste Interim Performance Assessment examines the long-term environmental and human health effects associated with the disposal of the low-level fraction of the Hanford single and double-shell tank waste in the Hanford Site 200 East Area. This report was prepared as a good management practice to provide needed information about the relationship between the disposal system design and performance early in the disposal system project cycle. The calculations in this performance assessment show that the disposal of the low-level fraction can meet environmental and health performance objectives.

  9. Hanford low-level tank waste interim performance assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, F.M.

    1996-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Low-Level Tank Waste Interim Performance Assessment examines the long-term environmental and human health effects associated with the disposal of the low-level fraction of the Hanford single- and double-shell tank waste in the Hanford Site 200 East Area. This report was prepared as a good management practice to provide needed information about the relationship between the disposal system design and its performance as early as possible in the project cycle. The calculations in this performance assessment show that the disposal of the low-level fraction can meet environmental and health performance objectives.

  10. The state-level approach: moving beyond integrated safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tape, James W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of a State-Level Approach (SLA) for international safeguards planning, implementation, and evaluation was contained in the Conceptual Framework for Integrated Safeguards (IS) agreed in 2002. This paper describes briefly the key elements of the SLA, including State-level factors and high-level safeguards objectives, and considers different cases in which application of the SLA methodology could address safeguards for 'suspect' States, 'good' States, and Nuclear Weapons States hosting fuel cycle centers. The continued use and further development of the SLA to customize safeguards for each State, including for States already under IS, is seen as central to effective and efficient safeguards for an expanding nuclear world.

  11. The ionizing radiation environment in space and its effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, Jim; Falconer, David; Fry, Dan [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research (CSPAR), UA Huntsville (United States); Space Radiation Analysis Group, NASA Johnson Space Center (United States)

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The ionizing radiation environment in space poses a hazard for spacecraft and space crews. The hazardous components of this environment are reviewed and those which contribute to radiation hazards and effects identified. Avoiding the adverse effects of space radiation requires design, planning, monitoring and management. Radiation effects on spacecraft are avoided largely though spacecraft design. Managing radiation exposures of space crews involves not only protective spacecraft design and careful mission planning. Exposures must be managed in real time. The now-casting and forecasting needed to effectively manage crew exposures is presented. The techniques used and the space environment modeling needed to implement these techniques are discussed.

  12. Low level tank waste disposal study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mullally, J.A.

    1994-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) contracted a team consisting of Los Alamos Technical Associates (LATA), British Nuclear Fuel Laboratories (BNFL), Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), and TRW through the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Technical Support Contract to conduct a study on several areas concerning vitrification and disposal of low-level-waste (LLW). The purpose of the study was to investigate how several parameters could be specified to achieve full compliance with regulations. The most restrictive regulation governing this disposal activity is the National Primary Drinking Water Act which sets the limits of exposure to 4 mrem per year for a person drinking two liters of ground water daily. To fully comply, this constraint would be met independently of the passage of time. In addition, another key factor in the investigation was the capability to retrieve the disposed waste during the first 50 years as specified in Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. The objective of the project was to develop a strategy for effective long-term disposal of the low-level waste at the Hanford site.

  13. Continental margin architecture : sea level and climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jenna Catherine

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. , 2006. Rapid sea-level rise and Holocene climate in theJ. , 2006. Rapid sea-level rise and Holocene climate in theby deceleration of sea-level rise. Science, 265: 228-231.

  14. Preliminary global assessment of terrestrial biodiversity consequences of sea level rise mediated by climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menon, Shaily; Soberó n, Jorge; Li, Xingong; Peterson, A. Townsend

    2010-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Considerable attention has focused on the climatic effects of global climate change on biodiversity, but few analyses and no broad assessments have evaluated the effects of sea level rise on biodiversity. Taking advantage of new maps of marine...

  15. Fluorescent optical liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid level sensor comprising a transparent waveguide containing fluorescent material that is excited by light of a first wavelength and emits at a second, longer wavelength. The upper end of the waveguide is connected to a light source at the first wavelength through a beveled portion of the waveguide such that the input light is totally internally reflected within the waveguide above an air/liquid interface in a tank but is transmitted into the liquid below this interface. Light is emitted from the fluorescent material only in those portions of the waveguide that are above the air/liquid interface, to be collected at the upper end of the waveguide by a detector that is sensitive only to the second wavelength. As the interface moves down in the tank, the signal strength from the detector will increase.

  16. Lead iron phosphate glass as a containment medium for disposal of high-level nuclear waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boatner, Lynn A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sales, Brian C. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lead-iron phosphate glasses containing a high level of Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 for use as a storage medium for high-level radioactive nuclear waste. By combining lead-iron phosphate glass with various types of simulated high-level nuclear waste, a highly corrosion resistant, homogeneous, easily processed glass can be formed. For corroding solutions at 90.degree. C., with solution pH values in the range between 5 and 9, the corrosion rate of the lead-iron phosphate nuclear waste glass is at least 10.sup.2 to 10.sup.3 times lower than the corrosion rate of a comparable borosilicate nuclear waste glass. The presence of Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 in forming the lead-iron phosphate glass is critical. Lead-iron phosphate nuclear waste glass can be prepared at temperatures as low as 800.degree. C., since they exhibit very low melt viscosities in the 800.degree. to 1050.degree. C. temperature range. These waste-loaded glasses do not readily devitrify at temperatures as high as 550.degree. C. and are not adversely affected by large doses of gamma radiation in H.sub.2 O at 135.degree. C. The lead-iron phosphate waste glasses can be prepared with minimal modification of the technology developed for processing borosilicate glass nuclear wasteforms.

  17. Exam Preparation Identifying Levels of Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , proposed a six-level model of learning, with each level requiring a different type of cognitive processingSee over Exam Preparation Identifying Levels of Learning When you are preparing for an exam, understand, apply, analyze, evaluate, and create. Understanding these levels and the types of exam questions

  18. Lecture course on Sea level variations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    level rise from tide gauges "viewpoint of the solid Earth" "A tide staff" Rate is ~ 20 cm/century 7 Level rise between 1993 and 2010 by satellite ALTIMETRY Sea level is rising (by altimetry) "viewpoint of space" 1993-2010 8Friday, November 11, 2011 #12;Sea level will be rising (IPCC scenarios) Figure 11

  19. Fine-Grained Power Management Using Process-level Profiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Weisong

    . To evaluate energy efficiency, the Green Grid group proposed the definition of power usage effectiveness (PUE between performance and energy consumption, fine-grained methods, such as process- level power management-aware decisions based on these information. In addition, we introduce a power-aware system module called Energy

  20. Application Level Optimizations for Energy Efficiency and Thermal Stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coskun, Ayse

    -efficiency, and (ii) the effect of temperature optimization on system-level energy consumption. 1. INTRODUCTION Recent]. A closely related issue is ther- mal management: High power consumption not only increases opera- tional challenges--Performance, Energy, and Temperature (PET)--solely through novel hardware design. We know

  1. SAD effects on grantmanship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lozano, George A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a state of depression induced by a lack of sufficient sunlight that occurs at high latitudes during the fall and winter. One effect of SAD is that causes people to be more risk-adverse, an effect that should be considered by granting agencies of high latitude countries. Funding agencies often have programmes aimed at high-risk, innovative research. However, the time of the year during which these purposefully high-risk proposals are evaluated usually does not take into consideration the effects of SAD. In high-latitude countries (e.g., Canada, UK, Nordic and Baltic countries), evaluating proposals for high-risk programmes during the late fall might significantly detract from the very purpose of such programmes. At this time of the year, grant evaluators might be in a darkness-induced state of mild depression. As such, evaluators might be more likely to opt for safe investments, more of the same, the well established, which is the antithesis of innovative research.

  2. Effective contracts in supply chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shum, Wanhang

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past decade, we have seen significant increase in the level of outsourcing in many industries. This increase in the level of outsourcing increases the importance of implementing effective contracts in supply chains. ...

  3. EXTENDING THE CONCEPTS OF RETURN PERIOD AND RETURN LEVEL TO A CHANGING CLIMATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz, Richard

    -Stationarity in Extremes (3) Risk Communication under Stationarity (4) Risk Communication under Climate Change (5;#12;(4) Risk Communication Under Climate Change · One Approach -- "Effective" return level Permit "return levelEXTENDING THE CONCEPTS OF RETURN PERIOD AND RETURN LEVEL TO A CHANGING CLIMATE Rick Katz Institute

  4. Adaptive Management of Migratory Birds Under Sea Level Rise Samuel Nicol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Adaptive Management of Migratory Birds Under Sea Level Rise Samuel Nicol CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences the East Asian-Australasian flyway given uncertainty about the rate of sea level rise. The non-Australasian (EAA) fly- way given uncertainty about the rate of sea level rise and its effect on shorebird

  5. Skin thickness effects on in vivo LXRF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preiss, I.L.; Washington, W. II [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The analysis of lead concentration in bone utilizing LXRF can be adversely effected by overlying issue. A quantitative measure of the attenuation of the 10.5 keV Pb L a x-ray signal by skin and skin equivalent plastic has been conducted. Concentration ranges in plaster of Paris and goat bone from 7 to 90 ppm with attenuators of Lucite{reg_sign} and pig skin were examined. It is concluded that no quantitative or semi quantitative analysis can be achieved if overlying sue thickness exceeds 3 mm for Ph concentrations of less than 30 porn Ph in bone.

  6. High Level Waste System Plan Revision 9

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, N.R.; Wells, M.N.; Choi, A.S.; Paul, P.; Wise, F.E.

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Revision 9 of the High Level Waste System Plan documents the current operating strategy of the HLW System at SRS to receive, store, treat, and dispose of high-level waste.

  7. Low Level Radioactive Waste Authority (Michigan)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Federal laws passed in 1980 and 1985 made each state responsible for the low-level radioactive waste produced within its borders. Act 204 of 1987 created the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Authority ...

  8. Dispersion of Metals from Abandoned Mines and their Effect on Biota in the Methow River, Okanogan County, Washington: Final Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peplow, Dan; Edmonds, Robert

    2003-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of mine-waste contamination effects on Methow River habitat on the eastern slopes of the north Cascade Mountains in Washington state, U.S.A., revealed impacts at ecosystem, community, population, individual, tissue, and cellular levels. Ore deposits in the area were mined for gold, silver, copper and zinc until the early 1950's, but the mines are now inactive. An above-and-below-mine approach was used to compare potentially impacted to control sites. The concentrations of eleven trace elements (i.e., Al, As, B, Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Pb, Se, and Zn) in Methow River sediments downstream from the abandoned mine sites were higher than background levels. Exposed trout and caddisfly larvae in the Methow River showed reduced growth compared to controls. Samples of liver from juvenile trout and small intestine from exposed caddisfly larvae were examined for evidence of metal accumulation, cytopathological change, and chemical toxicity. Morphological changes that are characteristic of nuclear apoptosis were observed in caddisfly small intestine columnar epithelial and trout liver nuclei where extensive chromatin condensation and margination was observed. Histopathological studies revealed glycogen bodies were present in the cytosol and nuclei, which are indicators of Type IV Glycogen Storage Disease (GSD IV). This suggests food is being converted into glycogen and stored in the liver but the glycogen is not being converted back normally into glucose for distribution to other tissues in the body resulting in poor growth. Examination of trout hepatocytes by transmission electron microscopy revealed the accumulation of electron dense granules in the mitochondrial matrix. Matrix granules contain mixtures of Cd, Cu, Au, Pb, Ni, and Ti. Contaminated sediments caused adverse biological effects at different levels of biological organization, from the cellular to ecosystem-level responses, even where dissolved metal concentrations in the corresponding surface water met water-quality criteria.

  9. Action and Inaction Levels in Pest Management.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sterling, Winfield

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1984 Action and Inaction Levels in Pest Management Winfield Sterling Department of Entomology Texas A&M University and The Texas Agricultural Experiment Station College Station, Texas 77843 Contents Introduction... of pests does the maintenance of pests below economic (112). The term inaction level for the density of enemies sufficient to maintain the pests below level is suggested (29). McDaniel & Sterling an example of an inaction level. They a ratio of one...

  10. CHARACTERIZING UNCERTAIN SEA LEVEL RISE PROJECTIONS TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    identifies scenarios where a decision to invest in near-term response to extreme sea level rise passes a cost. Keywords: Sea level rise, robust decision-making, climate change adaptation, cost-benefit analysis PleaseCHARACTERIZING UNCERTAIN SEA LEVEL RISE PROJECTIONS TO SUPPORT INVESTMENT DECISIONS

  11. Updating Maryland's Sea-level Rise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ezer,Tal

    Updating Maryland's Sea-level Rise Projections Scientific and Technical Working Group Maryland Climate Change Commission June 26, 2013 #12;Sea-level Rise Expert Group Donald F. Boesch* , University-author of the National Assessment Scenarios report Author of paper(s) on recent sea-level rise ~ Author contributing

  12. Level Set Implementations on Unstructured Point Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, James S.

    Level Set Implementations on Unstructured Point Cloud by HO, Hon Pong A Thesis Submitted;Level Set Implementations on Unstructured Point Cloud by HO, Hon Pong This is to certify that I have implementations on unstructured point cloud 15 3.1 Level set initialization

  13. Effect of Ventilation Strategies on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels Iain S. Walker ventilation used to reduce concentrations of indoor-generated pollutants. When assessing the effect of deliberate ventilation on occupant health one should consider not only

  14. Global Warming and Caspian Sea Level Fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ardakanian, Reza

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coastal regions have a high social, economical and environmental importance. Due to this importance the sea level fluctuations can have many bad consequences. In this research the correlation between the increasing trend of temperature in coastal stations due to Global Warming and the Caspian Sea level has been established. The Caspian Sea level data has been received from the Jason-1 satellite. It was resulted that the monthly correlation between the temperature and sea level is high and also positive and almost the same for all the stations. But the yearly correlation was negative. It means that the sea level has decreased by the increase in temperature.

  15. AVTA Voltec AC Level 1 and Level 2 Charging Systems Testing Results...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Eaton AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results AVTA: Aerovironment AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results AVTA: Siemens-VersiCharge AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results...

  16. Submitted to the Journal of the American Water Resources Association Potential Human Health Effects Associated with Pathogens in Urban Wet Weather Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitt, Robert E.

    Effects Associated with Pathogens in Urban Wet Weather Flows Robert Pitt1 , Melinda Lalor2 , and John stormwater conveyance systems, or wet weather sewage overflows, may adversely impact many of the desired uses. Urban runoff or wet weather flows include not only precipitation and washoff from lawns and landscaped

  17. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Levelized Costs AEO 2013 3 greenhouse gas (GHG) intensive technologies like coal-fired power and coal-to-liquids (CTL) plants without carbon control and sequestration (CCS)....

  18. Test of luminosity levelling with separated collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alemany, R; Giachino, R; Herr, W; Jacquet, D; Miyamoto, R; Papotti, G; Pieloni, T; Ponce, L; Schaumann, M

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this test we demonstrated that in the absence of strong long range interactions a levelling of the luminosity can be achieved by a small transverse offset.

  19. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    shown for U.S. Energy Information Administration | Levelized Costs AEO 2012 3 solar, wind, and hydroelectric resources are simple averages of the capacity factor for the...

  20. Sandia National Laboratories: high PV deployment level

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    deployment level ECIS-Princeton Power Systems, Inc.: Demand Response Inverter On March 19, 2013, in DETL, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Energy Surety, Facilities, Grid...

  1. Combining Unit-level Symbolic Execution and System-level Concrete Execution for Testing NASA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasareanu, Corina

    Combining Unit-level Symbolic Execution and System-level Concrete Execution for Testing NASA-level concrete execution for generating test cases that satisfy user-specified testing criteria. We have to testing complex safety critical software that combines unit-level symbolic execution and system

  2. Service Levels and Associated Cleaning Areas Service Level 0 -No Service will be provided.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    Level 0 ­ Includes all rooms/areas categorized as: Hazardous Material, mechanical, storage, issue, stockService Levels and Associated Cleaning Areas Service Level 0 - No Service will be provided. Service Level 1- Includes all rooms/areas categorized as: offices, copy, file, mail, hallways, vestibules

  3. Counting Rises, Levels and Drops in Compositions 1 Counting Rises, Levels and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heubach, Silvia

    Counting Rises, Levels and Drops in Compositions 1 Counting Rises, Levels and Drops in Compositions Mansour Department of Mathematics, Haifa University, Israel #12;Counting Rises, Levels and Drops;Counting Rises, Levels and Drops in Compositions 3 Definitions · A composition = 12 . . . m of n N

  4. The SLAC Vertical Comparator for the Calibration of Digital Levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woschitz, Helmut; /Graz U.; Gassner, Georg; Ruland, Robert; /SLAC

    2006-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Digital levels replaced spirit levels in most fields of precise height measurements because of the automation of the height readings. Three manufacturers offer digital levels with a single reading resolution of 10 {micro}m, and for all of them systematic effects are known. In Europe several facilities for system calibration of digital levels using vertical comparators were established within the last decade. However, there still was no system calibration facility in North America. In order to guarantee the accuracy required for the alignment of experiments at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) a calibration facility for the system calibration of digital levels was built. In this paper the setup of the SLAC vertical comparator is described in detail and its standard uncertainty is derived. In order to perform traditional rod calibration of conventional line-scaled rods, a CCD camera was integrated into the SLAC comparator. The CCD camera setup is also briefly described. To demonstrate the capabilities of the comparator, results of system and rod calibration are shown.

  5. Chaotic Behaviour of Atomic Energy Levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Yilmaz; G. Hacibekiroglu; E. Bolcal; Y. Polatoglu

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors of this paper studied Schrodinger wave equation to investiagate the chaotic behavior of atomic energy levels in relation with three quantum numbers n, l, m by means of derived inequality. It could give rise to the siplitting of atomic spectral lines. Keywords: Chaos, Schrodinger wave equation, atomic energy levels

  6. An Integrated Low Level Heat Recovery System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sierra, A. V., Jr.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large amount of low level thermal energy is lost to air or water in a typical petroleum refinery. This paper discusses a complex integrated low level heat recovery system that is being engineered for installation in a large petroleum refinery...

  7. Methodology for Prototyping Increased Levels of Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valasek, John

    of automation than previous NASA vehicles, due to program requirements for automation, including Automated Ren into a human space flight vehicle, NASA has created the Function-specific Level of Autonomy and Automation Tool levels of automation than previous NASA vehicles. A key technology to the success of the CEV

  8. Fast System Level Benchmarks for Multicore Architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sen, Alper

    Fast System Level Benchmarks for Multicore Architectures Alper Sen, Gokcehan Kara Etem Deniz, Smail level synthetic benchmarks from traditional bench- marks. Synthetic benchmarks have similar performance behavior as the original benchmarks that they are generated from and they can run faster. Synthetics can

  9. Seminar -4. letnik Landau Levels in Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramsak, Anton

    Seminar - 4. letnik Landau Levels in Graphene Author: Zala Lenarcic Mentor: prof. Anton Ramsak Ljubljana, December 2010 Abstract In this seminar I present graphene, a new material with promising to graphene's unusual energy dispersion. I will derive Landau levels for standard electrons, for electrons

  10. Making Use of Low-Level Heat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plaster, W. E.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the atmosphere through cooling towers and air fin coolers. We will designate this as "low-level heat". Between 20 to 30% of all the energy that enters a plant is lost as low-level heat. In a 100,000 BPD refinery, this is the equivalent of about 2,500 BPD of oil...

  11. Likely social impacts of proposed national-level policy initiatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piernot, C.A.; Rothweiler, M.A.; Levine, A.; Crews, R.

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results are described of an investigation of likely social effects of enacting nine proposed national-level policy initiatives to accelerate development and use of solar energy. This study is part of the Technology Assessment of Solar Energy Systems (TASE) project supported by the US Department of Energy. The report presents general social impact information about the variety of ways in which the American people could be affected by enactment of these initiatives. It identifies the effects of each initiative on individuals, groups, organizations, communities, and society as a whole. In addition, it provides a framework for organizing a myriad of impact information into a set of conceptually exclusive impact categories. It illustrates that social impacts means effects on people as individuals, groups, organizations, and communities as well as on the infrastructure of society. Finally, it demonstrates the importance of specifying an audience of impact with a case example from the residential rental market.

  12. Possible energy effects of a US ban on Libyan oil imports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peach, J.D.

    1982-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Under current slack market conditions, a ban on trade with Libya is not likely to have a major impact on US oil supplies or prices. Current US oil imports from Libya are small, and oil is readily available from other sources. Libya could experience a temporary loss of oil revenues until it found new customers. Tight market conditions - unlikely in 1982 - would maximize the potential adverse effects on the United States and minimize those on Libya. US oil companies - both those producing and refining Libyan oil - are more likely to feel the adverse effects of a trade ban than the United States as a whole. Although a ban would probably prevent direct imports of Libyan oil from entering the United States, some Libyan oil could still enter the country as products refined elsewhere.

  13. Developing an integrated transit schedule with improved passenger level of service measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blume, Kelly Lyn

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -route transit services. Complementary paratransit services are expensive to provide, however, so it is important that they be provided in as cost-effective a manner as possible without reducing the level of service provided to passengers. One strategy...

  14. Variations in patterns of low fertility in South Korea in 2004: a county level analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoon, Jungwon

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the early 1960s, South Korea has been going through a rapid fertility decline, along with its socioeconomic development and effective family planning programs. After achieving a desired replacement level of fertility in 1984, the total...

  15. The Relationship Between Leadership Level and Preference for Administrative Interview Questions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tulipana, Teresa Marie

    2010-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether administrators at differing levels (elementary, secondary and central office) had a preference for interview questions and composite scales designed to identify effective ...

  16. Strategies for Mitigating the Reduction in Economic Value of Variable Generation with Increasing Penetration Levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Andrew; Wiser, Ryan

    2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, we evaluate individual options that have the potential to stem the decline in the marginal value of variable generation (VG) with increasing penetration levels. We focus only on the effectiveness of mitigation measures for wind and PV.

  17. An evaluation of styrene levels emitted during cast polymer production of cultured marble building materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, Lewis Ray

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    emitted into the surrounding facility and outside ambient air. These concentrations were tabulated and compared against styrene levels from each major process in the fabrication of cultured marble. Additionally, the removal effectiveness of the ventilation...

  18. A System-level Scheme for Resistance Drift Tolerance of a Multilevel Phase Change Memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Jie

    of a phase change material such as GTS tends to drift over time. The change in resistance severely degradesA System-level Scheme for Resistance Drift Tolerance of a Multilevel Phase Change Memory Pilin presents a system-level scheme to alleviate the effect of resistance drift in a multilevel phase change

  19. Blood Lead Levels in Children What Do Parents Need to Know to Protect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blood Lead Levels in Children What Do Parents Need to Know to Protect Their Children? Protecting children from exposure to lead is important to lifelong good health. Even low levels of lead in blood have been shown to affect IQ, ability to pay attention, and academic achievement. And effects of lead

  20. Level densities of transitional Sm nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Capote, R.; Ventura, A.; Cannata, F.; Quesada, J.M. [Nuclear Data Section, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Ente Nuove Tecnologie, Energia e Ambiente, and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Bologna (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell Universita and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Bologna (Italy); Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Sevilla (Spain)

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimentally determined level densities of the transitional isotopes {sup 148,149,150,152}Sm at excitation energies below and around the neutron binding energy are compared with microcanonical calculations based on a Monte Carlo approach to noncollective level densities, folded with a collective enhancement estimated in the frame of the interacting boson model (IBM). The IBM parameters are adjusted so as to reproduce the low-lying discrete levels of both parities, with the exception of the odd-mass nucleus, {sup 149}Sm, where complete decoupling of the unpaired neutron from the core is assumed.

  1. Minimum Aberration Blocking Schemes for Two-Level and Three-Level Fractional Factorial Designs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Hongquan; Lau, Sovia

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2 k?p fractional factorial designs. Technometrics 3, 311–three-level fractional factorial designs with small runs.of three-level fractional factorial designs. UCLA Statistics

  2. Minimum Aberration Blocking Schemes for Two-Level and Three-Level Fractional Factorial Designs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hongquan Xu; Sovia Lau

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2 k?p fractional factorial designs. Technometrics 3, 311–three-level fractional factorial designs with small runs.of three-level fractional factorial designs. UCLA Statistics

  3. Continental margin architecture : sea level and climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jenna Catherine

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    origin and distribution of gas hydrates in marine sediments,rise: Associations with gas hydrates. Geology, 23: 89-92.sea-level lowstands above gas hydrate-bearing sediments.

  4. Exploiting level sensitive latches in wire pipelining 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seth, Vikram

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The present research presents procedures for exploitation of level sensitive latches in wire pipelining. The user gives a Steiner tree, having a signal source and set of destination or sinks, and the location in rectangular plane, capacitive load...

  5. Stability of High Level Radioactive Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Besmann, T.M.; Kulkarni, N.S.; Spear, K.E.; Vienna, J.D.; Hanni, J.B.; Crum, J.D.; Hrma, P.

    2005-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation was given at the DOE Office of Science-Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) High-Level Waste Workshop held on January 19-20, 2005 at the Savannah River Site.

  6. Crystallization in High-Level Waste Glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrma, Pavel R. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Dane R Spearing, Gary L Smith, SK Sundaram

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This review outlines important aspects of crystallization in HLW glasses, such as equilibrium, nucleation, growth, and dissolution. The impact of crystallization on continuous melters and the chemical durability of high-level waste glass are briefly discussed.

  7. Continental margin architecture : sea level and climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jenna Catherine

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rise: Associations with gas hydrates. Geology, 23: 89-92.sea-level lowstands above gas hydrate-bearing sediments.salt diapirism and gas hydrate decomposition, In Schwab, W.

  8. Low-level radioactive waste disposal facility closure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, G.J.; Ferns, T.W.; Otis, M.D.; Marts, S.T.; DeHaan, M.S.; Schwaller, R.G.; White, G.J. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

    1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Part I of this report describes and evaluates potential impacts associated with changes in environmental conditions on a low-level radioactive waste disposal site over a long period of time. Ecological processes are discussed and baselines are established consistent with their potential for causing a significant impact to low-level radioactive waste facility. A variety of factors that might disrupt or act on long-term predictions are evaluated including biological, chemical, and physical phenomena of both natural and anthropogenic origin. These factors are then applied to six existing, yet very different, low-level radioactive waste sites. A summary and recommendations for future site characterization and monitoring activities is given for application to potential and existing sites. Part II of this report contains guidance on the design and implementation of a performance monitoring program for low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. A monitoring programs is described that will assess whether engineered barriers surrounding the waste are effectively isolating the waste and will continue to isolate the waste by remaining structurally stable. Monitoring techniques and instruments are discussed relative to their ability to measure (a) parameters directly related to water movement though engineered barriers, (b) parameters directly related to the structural stability of engineered barriers, and (c) parameters that characterize external or internal conditions that may cause physical changes leading to enhanced water movement or compromises in stability. Data interpretation leading to decisions concerning facility closure is discussed. 120 refs., 12 figs., 17 tabs.

  9. Comment on Energy Level Statistics in the Mixed Regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marko Robnik; Tomaz Prosen

    1997-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We comment on the recent paper by Abul-Magd (J.Phys.A: Math.Gen. 29 (1996) 1) concerning the energy level statistics in the mixed regime, i.e. such having the mixed classical dynamics where regular and chaotic regions coexist in the phase space. We point out that his basic assumption on the additive property of the level-repulsion function $r(S)$ (conditional probability density) in the sense of dividing it linearly into the regular and chaotic part in proportion to the classical fractional phase space volumes $\\rho_1$ and $\\rho_2=q$ is not justified, since among other things, it relies on the type of Berry's ergodic assumption, which however is right only in a homogeneous ensemble of ergodic systems, but not in the neighbourhood of an integrable system. Thus his resulting distribution cannot be regarded as a theoretically well founded object. We point out that the semiclassical limiting energy level spacing distribution must be of Berry-Robnik (1984) type, and explain what transitional behaviour of the Brody-type (with fractional power-law energy level repulsion) we observe in the near semiclassical regime where effective $\\hbar$ is not yet small enough. Thus we refer to the derivation, arguments and conclusions in our paper (Prosen and Robnik, J.Phys.A: Math.Gen. 26 (1994) 8059), and explain again the behaviour in this double transition region.

  10. Simulating plant motion with levels of detail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flannery, Rebecca Lynn

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    SIMULATING PLANT MOTION WITH LEVELS OF DETAIL A Senior Honors Thesis by REBECCA LYNN FLANNERY Submitted to the Office of Honors Programs k. Academic Scholarships Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... of the UNIVERSITY UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH FELLOWS April 2003 Group: Engineering & Physics I SIMULATING PLANT MOTION WITH LEVELS OF DETAIL A Senior Honors Thesis by REBECCA LYNN FLANNERY Submitted to the Office of Honors Programs & Academic Scholarships...

  11. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides highlights from the spring meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Forum. Topics of discussion included: state and compact reports; New York`s challenge to the constitutionality of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Amendments Act of 1985; DOE technical assistance for 1993; interregional import/export agreements; Department of Transportation requirements; superfund liability; nonfuel bearing components; NRC residual radioactivity criteria.

  12. Response of rice to soil phosphorus levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quddus, Mohammad Abdul

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RESPORSE OF RICE TO SOIL PHOSPHORUS LEVELS MOHJQRiD JL ~ QUDDUS Submitted te the Graduate Sohool of the kgrloultural and Mechanical College of Texas im partial fulfillment of the requirements for the legree of IGLSTER OF SCIENCE Luguet~ 1962... Eager Sub)cot& Agronomy RESPONSE OF RICE TO SOIL PHOSPHORUS LEVELS A Thesis KIHAMNAD Ae QUDDUS Approwed as to style and content by& Chairman of Committee Cpt r Head of Department August, 1962 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The author wishes to express his...

  13. QCD Level Density from Maximum Entropy Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinji Ejiri; Tetsuo Hatsuda

    2005-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a method to calculate the QCD level density directly from the thermodynamic quantities obtained by lattice QCD simulations with the use of the maximum entropy method (MEM). Understanding QCD thermodynamics from QCD spectral properties has its own importance. Also it has a close connection to phenomenological analyses of the lattice data as well as experimental data on the basis of hadronic resonances. Our feasibility study shows that the MEM can provide a useful tool to study QCD level density.

  14. Features, Events, and Processes: system Level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. McGregor

    2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this analysis report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of the system-level features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to modeling used to support the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA). A screening decision, either Included or Excluded, is given for each FEP along with the technical basis for screening decisions. This information is required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at 10 CFR 63.113 (d, e, and f) (DIRS 156605). The system-level FEPs addressed in this report typically are overarching in nature, rather than being focused on a particular process or subsystem. As a result, they are best dealt with at the system level rather than addressed within supporting process-level or subsystem-level analyses and models reports. The system-level FEPs also tend to be directly addressed by regulations, guidance documents, or assumptions listed in the regulations; or are addressed in background information used in development of the regulations. For included FEPs, this analysis summarizes the implementation of the FEP in the TSPA-LA (i.e., how the FEP is included). For excluded FEPs, this analysis provides the technical basis for exclusion from the TSPA-LA (i.e., why the FEP is excluded). The initial version of this report (Revision 00) was developed to support the total system performance assessment for site recommendation (TSPA-SR). This revision addresses the license application (LA) FEP List (DIRS 170760).

  15. Inhalation and Ingestion Intakes with Associated Dose Estimates for Level II and Level III Personnel Using Capstone Study Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szrom, Fran; Falo, Gerald A.; Lodde, Gordon M.; Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Daxon, Eric G.

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Depleted uranium (DU) intake rates and subsequent dose rates were estimated for personnel entering armored combat vehicles perforated with DU penetrators (level II and level III personnel) using data generated during the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study. Inhalation intake rates and associated dose rates were estimated from cascade impactors worn by sample recovery personnel and from cascade impactors that served as area monitors. Ingestion intake rates and associated dose rates were estimated from cotton gloves worn by sample recovery personnel and from wipe test samples from the interior of vehicles perforated with large caliber DU munitions. The mean DU inhalation intake rate for level II personnel ranged from 0.447 mg h-1 based on breathing zone monitor data (in and around a perforated vehicle) to 14.5 mg h-1 based on area monitor data (in a perforated vehicle). The mean DU ingestion intake rate for level II ranged from 4.8 mg h-1 to 38.9 mg h-1 based on the wipe test data including surface to glove transfer factors derived from the Capstone data. Based on glove contamination data, the mean DU ingestion intake rates for level II and level III personnel were 10.6 mg h-1 was and 1.78 mg h-1, respectively. Effective dose rates and peak kidney uranium concentration rates were calculated based on the intake rates. The peak kidney uranium concentration rate cannot be multiplied by the total exposure duration when multiple intakes occur because uranium will clear from the kidney between the exposures.

  16. System-level Max Power (SYMPO) -A Systematic Approach for Escalating System-level Power Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John, Lizy Kurian

    System-level Max Power (SYMPO) - A Systematic Approach for Escalating System-level Power a computer system for the worst case power consumption scenario, system architects often use hand-crafted max SYMPO, an automatic SYstem level Max POwer virus generation framework, which maximizes the power

  17. Reproductive toxicity of low-level lead exposure in men

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Telisman, Spomenka [Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health, Ksaverska cesta 2, P.O. Box 291, HR-10001 Zagreb (Croatia)], E-mail: telisman@imi.hr; Colak, Bozo [University Clinic for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases 'Vuk Vrhovac', Zagreb (Croatia); Pizent, Alica; Jurasovic, Jasna [Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health, Ksaverska cesta 2, P.O. Box 291, HR-10001 Zagreb (Croatia); Cvitkovic, Petar [University Clinic for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases 'Vuk Vrhovac', Zagreb (Croatia)

    2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Parameters of semen quality, seminal plasma indicators of secretory function of the prostate and seminal vesicles, sex hormones in serum, and biomarkers of lead, cadmium, copper, zinc, and selenium body burden were measured in 240 Croatian men 19-52 years of age. The subjects had no occupational exposure to metals and no known other reasons suspected of influencing male reproductive function or metal metabolism. After adjusting for age, smoking, alcohol, blood cadmium, and serum copper, zinc, and selenium by multiple regression, significant (P<0.05) associations of blood lead (BPb), {delta}-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD), and/or erythrocyte protoporphyrin (EP) with reproductive parameters indicated a lead-related increase in immature sperm concentration, in percentages of pathologic sperm, wide sperm, round sperm, and short sperm, in serum levels of testosterone and estradiol, and a decrease in seminal plasma zinc and in serum prolactin. These reproductive effects were observed at low-level lead exposure (BPb median 49 {mu}g/L, range 11-149 {mu}g/L in the 240 subjects) common for general populations worldwide. The observed significant synergistic effect of BPb and blood cadmium on increasing serum testosterone, and additive effect of a decrease in serum selenium on increasing serum testosterone, may have implications on the initiation and development of prostate cancer because testosterone augments the progress of prostate cancer in its early stages.

  18. Instruction-level performance modeling and characterization of multimedia applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Y. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Scientific Computing Group; Cameron, K.W. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States). Dept. of Computer Science

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the challenges for characterizing and modeling realistic multimedia applications is the lack of access to source codes. On-chip performance counters effectively resolve this problem by monitoring run-time behaviors at the instruction-level. This paper presents a novel technique of characterizing and modeling workloads at the instruction level for realistic multimedia applications using hardware performance counters. A variety of instruction counts are collected from some multimedia applications, such as RealPlayer, GSM Vocoder, MPEG encoder/decoder, and speech synthesizer. These instruction counts can be used to form a set of abstract characteristic parameters directly related to a processor`s architectural features. Based on microprocessor architectural constraints and these calculated abstract parameters, the architectural performance bottleneck for a specific application can be estimated. Meanwhile, the bottleneck estimation can provide suggestions about viable architectural/functional improvement for certain workloads. The biggest advantage of this new characterization technique is a better understanding of processor utilization efficiency and architectural bottleneck for each application. This technique also provides predictive insight of future architectural enhancements and their affect on current codes. In this paper the authors also attempt to model architectural effect on processor utilization without memory influence. They derive formulas for calculating CPI{sub 0}, CPI without memory effect, and they quantify utilization of architectural parameters. These equations are architecturally diagnostic and predictive in nature. Results provide promise in code characterization, and empirical/analytical modeling.

  19. Generalized Test Plan for the Vitrification of Simulated High-Level -Waste Calcine in the Idaho National Laboratory‘s Bench -Scale Cold Crucible Induction Melter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vince Maio

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Preliminary Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Test Plan outlines the chronological steps required to initially evaluate the validity of vitrifying INL surrogate (cold) High-Level-Waste (HLW) solid particulate calcine in INL's Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM). Its documentation and publication satisfies interim milestone WP-413-INL-01 of the DOE-EM (via the Office of River Protection) sponsored work package, WP 4.1.3, entitled 'Improved Vitrification' The primary goal of the proposed CCIM testing is to initiate efforts to identify an efficient and effective back-up and risk adverse technology for treating the actual HLW calcine stored at the INL. The calcine's treatment must be completed by 2035 as dictated by a State of Idaho Consent Order. A final report on this surrogate/calcine test in the CCIM will be issued in May 2012-pending next fiscal year funding In particular the plan provides; (1) distinct test objectives, (2) a description of the purpose and scope of planned university contracted pre-screening tests required to optimize the CCIM glass/surrogate calcine formulation, (3) a listing of necessary CCIM equipment modifications and corresponding work control document changes necessary to feed a solid particulate to the CCIM, (4) a description of the class of calcine that will be represented by the surrogate, and (5) a tentative tabulation of the anticipated CCIM testing conditions, testing parameters, sampling requirements and analytical tests. Key FY -11 milestones associated with this CCIM testing effort are also provided. The CCIM test run is scheduled to be conducted in February of 2012 and will involve testing with a surrogate HLW calcine representative of only 13% of the 4,000 m3 of 'hot' calcine residing in 6 INL Bin Sets. The remaining classes of calcine will have to be eventually tested in the CCIM if an operational scale CCIM is to be a feasible option for the actual INL HLW calcine. This remaining calcine's make-up is HLW containing relatively high concentrations of zirconium and aluminum, representative of the cladding material of the reprocessed fuel that generated the calcine. A separate study to define the CCIM testing needs of these other calcine classifications in currently being prepared under a separate work package (WP-0) and will be provided as a milestone report at the end of this fiscal year.

  20. GUIDANCE ON CONDUCTING ADVERSE DIVERSITY ANALYSIS

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Uniform Guidelines for Employee Selection Procedures adopted by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), Department of Labor's Office of Federal Contract...

  1. GUIDANCE ON CONDUCTING ADVERSE DIVERSITY ANALYSIS

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2: FinalOffers3.pdf0-45.pdf0 Budget Fossil EnergyFullGO 2009 Annual

  2. Spectroscopic investigation of simulated low-level nuclear waste glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rong, Chaoying; Li, Hong; Hrma, P.R.; Cho, H.M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Borosilicate glasses with high sodium concentrations, formulated to simulate vitrified Hanford low-level wastes (LLW), were investigated by {sup 31}P magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Phase separation, glass homogeneity changes during remelting, and the form of phosphate in glass following product consistency tests (PCT) were also examined by NMR. The results show that a distinct orthophosphate phase not part of the glass network is present in the glass. The effect of glass composition on phosphate chemical environments in the glass is discussed.

  3. Economics of cool storage for electric load leveling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asbury, J.G. (Argonne National Lab., IL); Dougherty, D.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Equipment and methods for cold storage in commercial buildings to effect reduced summer peak load demands for electric utilities are described and the economics of this load leveling means is examined using the Potomac Electric Power Co. (PEPCO) studies and data. This examination reveals that investments in this technology can offer attractive paybacks (3 to 5 y) in new building applications. Partial storage, because of chiller-capacity savings, offers faster payback than full-storage systems. Estimates of its market potential indicate that cool storage will play an important role in PEPCO's Energy Use Management Plan. (LCL)

  4. Tree level Leptogenesis from Kalb-Ramond Torsion Background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. de Cesare; Nick E. Mavromatos; Sarben Sarkar

    2015-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of torsion in theories of quantum gravity is known to be well described by an axion-like field which couples to matter as well as to gravitation and radiation gauge fields. In this note we consider a particular kind of torsion, arising from the Kalb-Ramond antisymmetric tensor field that appears in the gravitational multiplet of string theory. We investigate the implications for leptogenesis. It is shown that leptogenesis can occur even at tree-level and with only one generation of right-handed Majorana neutrinos, due to CP and CPT violation introduced by the background geometry.

  5. AVTA: Aerovironment AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Aerovironment AC Level 2 - February 2012 More Documents & Publications AVTA: Clipper Creek AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results AVTA: Eaton AC Level 2 Charging System...

  6. Typical Clothing Ensemble Insulation Levels for Sixteen Body Parts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Juyoun; Zhang, Hui; Arens, Edward

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal Comfort.1994 CLO Insulation Levels For Sixteen Bodya mesh arm chair whose insulation level was measured. FigureExperimental Conditions. CLO Insulation Levels For Sixteen

  7. Statistical approach to nuclear level density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sen'kov, R. A.; Horoi, M. [Department of Physics, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859 (United States); Zelevinsky, V. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the level density in a finite many-body system with strong interaction between the constituents. Our primary object of applications is the atomic nucleus but the same techniques can be applied to other mesoscopic systems. We calculate and compare nuclear level densities for given quantum numbers obtained by different methods, such as nuclear shell model (the most successful microscopic approach), our main instrument - moments method (statistical approach), and Fermi-gas model; the calculation with the moments method can use any shell-model Hamiltonian excluding the spurious states of the center-of-mass motion. Our goal is to investigate statistical properties of nuclear level density, define its phenomenological parameters, and offer an affordable and reliable way of calculation.

  8. A Software Architecture for High Level Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen,G.

    2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A modular software platform for high level applications is under development at the National Synchrotron Light Source II project. This platform is based on client-server architecture, and the components of high level applications on this platform will be modular and distributed, and therefore reusable. An online model server is indispensable for model based control. Different accelerator facilities have different requirements for the online simulation. To supply various accelerator simulators, a set of narrow and general application programming interfaces is developed based on Tracy-3 and Elegant. This paper describes the system architecture for the modular high level applications, the design of narrow and general application programming interface for an online model server, and the prototype of online model server.

  9. Torsional ultrasonic wave based level measurement system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcomb, David E. (Oak Ridge, TN); Kisner, Roger A. (Knoxville, TN)

    2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A level measurement system suitable for use in a high temperature and pressure environment to measure the level of coolant fluid within the environment, the system including a volume of coolant fluid located in a coolant region of the high temperature and pressure environment and having a level therein; an ultrasonic waveguide blade that is positioned within the desired coolant region of the high temperature and pressure environment; a magnetostrictive electrical assembly located within the high temperature and pressure environment and configured to operate in the environment and cooperate with the waveguide blade to launch and receive ultrasonic waves; and an external signal processing system located outside of the high temperature and pressure environment and configured for communicating with the electrical assembly located within the high temperature and pressure environment.

  10. HYDROGEN EFFECTS ON LASER ENGINEERED NET SHAPE (LENS) REPAIRED WELDMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korinko, P; Thad Adams, T

    2006-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    New methods of repairing mis-machined components are always of interest. In this study, an innovative method using Laser Engineered Net Shape{trademark} (LENS{reg_sign}) forming was used to repair intentionally mis-machined test articles. The components were repaired and subsequently hydrogen charged and burst tested. The LENS repair did not have an adverse effect on the solid state weld process that was used to repair the components. Hydrogen charged samples failed in a similar manner to the uncharged samples. Overall, the prospects for LENS repairing similar products are favorable and further work is encouraged.

  11. System Effectiveness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, Danny H [ORNL] [ORNL; Elwood Jr, Robert H [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An effective risk assessment system is needed to address the threat posed by an active or passive insider who, acting alone or in collusion, could attempt diversion or theft of nuclear material. It is critical that a nuclear facility conduct a thorough self-assessment of the material protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A) system to evaluate system effectiveness. Self-assessment involves vulnerability analysis and performance testing of the MPC&A system. The process should lead to confirmation that mitigating features of the system effectively minimize the threat, or it could lead to the conclusion that system improvements or upgrades are necessary to achieve acceptable protection against the threat. Analysis of the MPC&A system is necessary to understand the limits and vulnerabilities of the system to internal threats. Self-assessment helps the facility be prepared to respond to internal threats and reduce the risk of theft or diversion of nuclear material. MSET is a self-assessment or inspection tool utilizing probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methodology to calculate the system effectiveness of a nuclear facility's MPC&A system. MSET analyzes the effectiveness of an MPC&A system based on defined performance metrics for MPC&A functions based on U.S. and international best practices and regulations. A facility's MC&A system can be evaluated at a point in time and reevaluated after upgrades are implemented or after other system changes occur. The total system or specific subareas within the system can be evaluated. Areas of potential performance improvement or system upgrade can be assessed to determine where the most beneficial and cost-effective improvements should be made. Analyses of risk importance factors show that sustainability is essential for optimal performance. The analyses reveal where performance degradation has the greatest detrimental impact on total system risk and where performance improvements have the greatest reduction in system risk. The risk importance factors show the amount of risk reduction achievable with potential upgrades and the amount of risk reduction actually achieved after upgrades are completed. Applying the risk assessment tool gives support to budget prioritization by showing where budget support levels must be sustained for MC&A functions most important to risk. Results of the risk assessment are also useful in supporting funding justifications for system improvements that significantly reduce system risk.

  12. Short period fluctuations of sea level in the West Florida Keys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsu, Sangem

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    stages at each station. It is found that seiches at Vaca Key show strong correlations with weather conditions and also that short period fluctuations at several stations are influenced by effects of non-linear residual tidal currents (effects through... Fluctuations of Sea Level at Stations with Data Recorded in April. 4. 3 Short Period Fluctuations of Sea Level at Stations with Data Recorded in June. 21 21 24 vi 4. 4 Residual Tidal Currents 4. 5 Seiches in Vaca Key 4. 6 The Effects of Friction...

  13. Equivalence of effective superpotentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Argurio, Riccardo [Physique Theorique et Mathematique and International Solvay Institutes, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, C.P. 231, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the low-energy effective superpotential of an N=1 U(N) gauge theory with matter in the adjoint and arbitrary even tree-level superpotential has, in the classically unbroken case, the same functional form as the effective superpotential of a U(N) gauge theory with matter in the fundamental and the same tree-level interactions, up to some rescalings of the couplings. We also argue that the same kind of reasoning can be applied to other cases as well.

  14. Technical safety requirements control level verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STEWART, J.L.

    1999-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A Technical Safety Requirement (TSR) control level verification process was developed for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) TSRs at the Hanford Site in Richland, WA, at the direction of the US. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL). The objective of the effort was to develop a process to ensure that the TWRS TSR controls are designated and managed at the appropriate levels as Safety Limits (SLs), Limiting Control Settings (LCSs), Limiting Conditions for Operation (LCOs), Administrative Controls (ACs), or Design Features. The TSR control level verification process was developed and implemented by a team of contractor personnel with the participation of Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. (FDH), the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) integrating contractor, and RL representatives. The team was composed of individuals with the following experience base: nuclear safety analysis; licensing; nuclear industry and DOE-complex TSR preparation/review experience; tank farm operations; FDH policy and compliance; and RL-TWRS oversight. Each TSR control level designation was completed utilizing TSR control logic diagrams and TSR criteria checklists based on DOE Orders, Standards, Contractor TSR policy, and other guidance. The control logic diagrams and criteria checklists were reviewed and modified by team members during team meetings. The TSR control level verification process was used to systematically evaluate 12 LCOs, 22 AC programs, and approximately 100 program key elements identified in the TWRS TSR document. The verification of each TSR control required a team consensus. Based on the results of the process, refinements were identified and the TWRS TSRs were modified as appropriate. A final report documenting key assumptions and the control level designation for each TSR control was prepared and is maintained on file for future reference. The results of the process were used as a reference in the RL review of the final TWRS TSRs and control suite. RL concluded that the TSR control level verification process is clear and logically based upon DOE Order 5480.22, Technical Safety Requirements, and other TSR control selection guidelines. The process provides a documented, traceable basis for TSR level decisions and is a valid reference for preparation of new TSRs.

  15. State Level Analysis of Industrial Energy Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliott, R. N.; Shipley, A. M.; Brown, E.

    industrial energy use data is not readily available. The only data available is at the national or census regional level (DOE/EIA 200Ia). As a result, a methodology was developed based upon state-level economic activity data and national energy intensity... data reported in the 1998 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS)(DOE/EIA 2001a) and value of shipments data reported in the 1998 Annual Survey of Manufacturing (ASM)(Department of Commerce 2000) are used to estimate energy data from...

  16. Closed-field capacitive liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid level sensor based on a closed field circuit comprises a ring oscillator using a symmetrical array of plate units that creates a displacement current. The displacement current varies as a function of the proximity of a liquid to the plate units. The ring oscillator circuit produces an output signal with a frequency inversely proportional to the presence of a liquid. A continuous liquid level sensing device and a two point sensing device are both proposed sensing arrangements. A second set of plates may be located inside of the probe housing relative to the sensing plate units. The second set of plates prevent any interference between the sensing plate units.

  17. High Level Waste ManagemenfDivision ..

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet WhenHiggs Boson May| ArgonneHigh Level Waste

  18. Hight-Level Waste & Facilities Disposition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbetand ModelingHigh-Level Waste (HLW) and

  19. ARM - Lesson Plans: Past Sea Level Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDC documentationBarrow, Alaska OutreachMakingPast Sea Level Data

  20. ARM - Sea Level and Climate Change

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP :ProductsVaisala CL51InstrumentsCentralScienceLevel and Climate Change

  1. ARM - Sea Surface and Sea Level

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP :ProductsVaisala CL51InstrumentsCentralScienceLevel and Climate

  2. EM Corporate Performance Metrics, Complex Level

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan Department ofNotices |Notice of38:3:1: FERC2:Collaborates onComplex Level

  3. Energy Level Diagrams A=4-20

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContractElectron-StateEnergyHeavy DutyDistrict |Consumption1Energy Level

  4. Statistical High-Level Synthesis under Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giles, C. Lee

    designers is process variability, which causes considerable fluctu- ations in performance and power with variability has be- come one of the major design focuses for nanoscale VLSI design. Traditionally, performanceStatistical High-Level Synthesis under Process Variability Yuan Xie and Yibo Chen Pennsylvania

  5. Bosnia and Herzegovina Local Level Institutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Bosnia and Herzegovina Local Level Institutions and Social Capital Study Vol. 1 World Bank, ECSSD World Bank Work on Bosnia-Herzegovina 3 Study's Operational Definition of Social Capital 3 Specific Capital 17 B. Social Cleavages and Population Movements 18 Main Social Cleavages in Bosnia-Herzegovina 18

  6. Variable Speed Pumping for Level Control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasel, M.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to describe an application of variable speed pumping to level control of an industrial process. Topics include a comparison of the process using control valves with a variable speed system, an energy savings and cost...

  7. PAIRWISE BLENDING OF HIGH LEVEL WASTE (HLW)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CERTA, P.J.

    2006-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this study is to demonstrate a mission scenario that uses pairwise and incidental blending of high level waste (HLW) to reduce the total mass of HLW glass. Secondary objectives include understanding how recent refinements to the tank waste inventory and solubility assumptions affect the mass of HLW glass and how logistical constraints may affect the efficacy of HLW blending.

  8. Level MRes 2013/14 Materials Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    Level MRes 2013/14 Materials Engineering MRes Materials Engineering Coordinator: Dr. DH Isaac Semester 1 Modules Semester 2 Modules EG-M85 Strategic Project Planning 10 Credits Professor SJ Hardy EGIM16 Communication Skills for Research Engineers 10 Credits Dr. TN Croft EGTM60 Aerospace Materials

  9. 4, 43614387, 2007 Extreme tidal levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    affected by human interferences, e.g. in-channel dredging, sand mining and the construction of levees-intensive dredging. The stations along the coastal regions show significant increasing extreme high/low water level. The coastal regions are not influenced by in-channel dredging, and furthermore,20 sediment loads from upper

  10. Psychometric Impacts of Above-Level Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warne, Russell Thomas

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    education research context and suggestions for further research are included. An appendix to the study gives information about item difficulty indexes for every item in the ITBS/ITED core battery for the eighth, ninth, and tenth grade levels of Form C....

  11. High-level radioactive wastes. Supplement 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLaren, L.H. (ed.)

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This bibliography contains information on high-level radioactive wastes included in the Department of Energy's Energy Data Base from August 1982 through December 1983. These citations are to research reports, journal articles, books, patents, theses, and conference papers from worldwide sources. Five indexes, each preceded by a brief description, are provided: Corporate Author, Personal Author, Subject, Contract Number, and Report Number. 1452 citations.

  12. x Integration Level x CAN Controller Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kozak, Victor R.

    x Integration Level x CAN Controller Architecture x Message Handling x Acceptance Filtering x-offs between stand-alone and integrated CAN peripherals. The integrated CAN peripheral is cheaper not only developed for an integrated CAN peripheral may not function on another CPU with on-chip CAN. © CiA x Am

  13. Level 2 2013/14 Materials Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harman, Neal.A.

    Level 2 2013/14 Materials Engineering BEng Materials Science and Engineering[J500,J502,J505] BEng Materials Science and Engineering with a year abroad[J510] MEng Materials Science and Engineering[J504] MEng Materials Science and Engineering (Enhanced with year in industry)[J503] Coordinator: Dr. M Evans Semester 1

  14. POSTGRADUATE Upper Level, Otto Beit Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jarrett, Thomas H.

    FUNDING YOUR POSTGRADUATE STUDIES AT UCT Upper Level, Otto Beit Building University Avenue North, the Postgraduate Funding Office and Postgraduate Centre were established at the University of Cape Town to provide apply for funding from both the University and from as many other sources of support as possible

  15. Designing A High Level Test Specification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Jing

    Designing A High Level Test Specification Language For iec 61499 function block diagram formulae. introduction Mohamad Farid Jaafar Iec 61499 Function block IEC 61499 is one of the standards((input=accelPressed) & (label=throttle.ACCEL))) Figure 1. The IEC 61499 Function Block Notation. (a) Basic Blocks (b) Composite

  16. Keep new concepts Check cognition level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Surajit

    point "cold" topic "hot" topicTop HealthScience Nuclear Energy Safety& Accidents Concepts at time point· Keep new concepts · Check cognition level = number of news {Japan, nuclear, disaster · Multilingual Wikipedia history analysis Japan footballteam national nuclear disaster Set of candidates per time

  17. Variable Speed Pumping for Level Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasel, M.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to describe an application of variable speed pumping to level control of an industrial process. Topics include a comparison of the process using control valves with a variable speed system, an energy savings and cost...

  18. The Science of Level Design Kenneth Hullett

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    elements and gameplay. The next step is to validate this theory with a series of experiments that test]: Human factors, K.8.0 [Personal Computing]: Games General Terms Design, Human Factors Keywords level propose to conduct a series of experiments. A combination of qualitative and quantitative assessments

  19. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides highlights from the 1995 summer meeting of the Low Level radioactive Waste Forum. Topics included: new developments in state and compacts; federal waste management; DOE plans for Greater-Than-Class C waste management; mixed wastes; commercial mixed waste management; international export of rad wastes for disposal; scintillation cocktails; license termination; pending legislation; federal radiation protection standards.

  20. Steam Reforming of Low-Level Mixed Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under DOE Contract No. DE-AR21-95MC32091, Steam Reforming of Low-Level Mixed Waste, ThermoChem has successfully designed, fabricated and operated a nominal 90 pound per hour Process Development Unit (PDU) on various low-level mixed waste surrogates. The design construction, and testing of the PDU as well as performance and economic projections for a 500- lb/hr demonstration and commercial system are described. The overall system offers an environmentally safe, non-incinerating, cost-effective, and publicly acceptable method of processing LLMW. The steam-reforming technology was ranked the No. 1 non-incineration technology for destruction of hazardous organic wastes in a study commissioned by the Mixed Waste Focus Area published April 1997.1 The ThermoChem steam-reforming system has been developed over the last 13 years culminating in this successful test campaign on LLMW surrogates. Six surrogates were successfidly tested including a 750-hour test on material simulating a PCB- and Uranium- contaminated solid waste found at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The test results indicated essentially total (>99.9999oA) destruction of RCRA and TSCA hazardous halogenated organics, significant levels of volume reduction (> 400 to 1), and retention of radlonuclides in the volume-reduced solids. Cost studies have shown the steam-reforming system to be very cost competitive with more conventional and other emerging technologies.

  1. Prioritizing Acquisition Pathways in the State Level Concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Chantell L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Budlong-Sylvester, Kory [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pilat, Joseph F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) Department of Safeguards has launched a project to further develop the State-level concept for the planning, implementation, and evaluation of safeguards activities. In order to further evolve the safeguards system an emphasis is placed on integrating inspection-related activities and the State evaluation process to draw safeguards conclusions in the most efficient way. The credible implementation of acquisition pathway analysis is central to the success of the IAEA's State-level concept. NNSA's Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security (NA-241) The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) is sponsoring Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to produce a study that will examine the use of acquisition pathway analysis in: (1) Developing a State-specific, State-level approach (SLA) and Annual Implementation Plan (AIP); (2) Maximizing the utility of the physical model; and (3) Supporting resource allocation decisions through a pathway prioritization. To deal with the challenge of developing an effective and efficient SLA, this study looks at: (1) Prioritizing proliferation pathways based on an assessment of a State's capabilities and assumed proliferation strategies; and (2) Relevant State behavior (e.g., transparency, cooperation, etc.) while avoiding subjective judgments about States themselves. The study makes use of case studies and concrete examples in order to illustrate how new concepts and approaches will be implemented, and how they may differ from more traditional safeguards approaches.

  2. Advanced Technology Vehicle Lab Benchmarking - Level 1

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    US06 (City driving) (Highway driving) (Aggressive driving) UDDS Accomplishments: Temperature Effects on BEV Range 68% 81% 90% 43% 54% 68% 73% 100% 60% 68% 81% 90% 92.4 miles...

  3. Risk Group and Biosafety Level Definitions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cause severe human disease and present a serious hazard to workers; it may present a risk of spreading to the community, but there is usually effective prophylaxis or treatment...

  4. Assessing effects of highway bridge deck runoff on near-by recieving waters in coastal margins using remote monitoring techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nwaneshiudu, Oke

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    point sources), highway runnoff can be considered a serious problem if not handeled properly (FHWA 1999). If the required best management practices are not taken for excess contaminant removal, highway runnoff can have adverse effects. The most... waters, is rainfall. The main objective of this runoff study was to characterize and assess the quantity and quality of the storm water runoff of a bridge deck that discharged into a receiving water body. The bridge deck and the creek were located...

  5. Electronic multi-purpose material level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1997-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The present electronic multi-purpose material level sensor is based on time domain reflectometry (TDR) of very short electrical pulses. Pulses are propagated along a transmission line that is partially immersed in a liquid, powder, or other substance such as grain in a silo. The time difference of the reflections at the start of the transmission line and the air/liquid interface are used to determine levels to better than 0.01 inch. The sensor is essentially independent of circuit element and temperature variations, and can be mass produced at an extremely low price. The transmission line may be a Goubau line, microstrip, coaxial cable, twin lead, CPS or CPW, and may typically be a strip placed along the inside wall of a tank. The reflected pulses also contain information about strata within the liquid such as sludge-build-up at the bottom of an oil tank. 9 figs.

  6. Electronic multi-purpose material level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present electronic multi-purpose material level sensor is based on time domain reflectometry (TDR) of very short electrical pulses. Pulses are propagated along a transmission line that is partially immersed in a liquid, powder, or other substance such as grain in a silo. The time difference of the reflections at the start of the transmission line and the air/liquid interface are used to determine levels to better than 0.01 inch. The sensor is essentially independent of circuit element and temperature variations, and can be mass produced at an extremely low price. The transmission line may be a Goubau line, microstrip, coaxial cable, twin lead, CPS or CPW, and may typically be a strip placed along the inside wall of a tank. The reflected pulses also contain information about strata within the liquid such as sludge-build-up at the bottom of an oil tank.

  7. High-Level Waste Melter Study Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez, Joseph M.; Bickford, Dennis F.; Day, Delbert E.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Lambert, Steven L.; Marra, Sharon L.; Peeler, David K.; Strachan, Denis M.; Triplett, Mark B.; Vienna, John D.; Wittman, Richard S.

    2001-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, the path to site cleanup involves vitrification of the majority of the wastes that currently reside in large underground tanks. A Joule-heated glass melter is the equipment of choice for vitrifying the high-level fraction of these wastes. Even though this technology has general national and international acceptance, opportunities may exist to improve or change the technology to reduce the enormous cost of accomplishing the mission of site cleanup. Consequently, the U.S. Department of Energy requested the staff of the Tanks Focus Area to review immobilization technologies, waste forms, and modifications to requirements for solidification of the high-level waste fraction at Hanford to determine what aspects could affect cost reductions with reasonable long-term risk. The results of this study are summarized in this report.

  8. Criteria for releases and disposal of low level and intermediate level waste in Sweden

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindbom, G. [Swedish Radiation Protection Inst., Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Waste Management and Environmental Protection

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In Sweden there exists a complete system for management, including final disposal, of all radioactive wastes which are not classified as long-lived or high-level waste. This paper will present the disposal options and the requirements set on the waste categories as well as Sweden`s four different engineered shallow land disposals. The advantages of having a shallow land disposal together with exemption of waste and a final storage facility for low-level and intermediate-level waste are discussed. Finally, the paper will give a summary of why Sweden has succeeded in establishing a full system for low-level and intermediate-level waste. The discussion is from regulatory point of view.

  9. Water with a Nebulous Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : they are not good at taking into account how global warming affects clouds and, conversely, how changes in different that they greatly impact the rate at which the Earth radiatively cools. But low-level clouds are more compact than at more than 6,000 meters above sea level. The altitude of the clouds deter- mines their effect

  10. High level indole signalling in Escherichia coli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaimster, Hannah Dorne

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    indole signalling in Escherichia coli Abstract Indole is a small signalling molecule, produced by many species of bacteria, including Escherichia coli. It is made by the enzyme tryptophanase, which converts tryptophan into indole, pyruvate and ammonia... . Indole has diverse roles in E. coli, including regulation of biofilm formation, acid resistance and pathogenicity. In these cases, E. coli responds to a low, persistent level of indole (0.5-1 mM), similar to the concentration found in an E. coli...

  11. Very Fast Chip-level Thermal Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Nakabayashi; T. Nakabayashi; K. Nakajima

    2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new technique of VLSI chip-level thermal analysis. We extend a newly developed method of solving two dimensional Laplace equations to thermal analysis of four adjacent materials on a mother board. We implement our technique in C and compare its performance to that of a commercial CAD tool. Our experimental results show that our program runs 5.8 and 8.9 times faster while keeping smaller residuals by 5 and 1 order of magnitude, respectively.

  12. Review of APR+ Level 2 PSA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehner, J.R.; Mubayi, V.; Pratt, W. T.

    2012-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) assisted the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) in reviewing the Level 2 Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) of the APR+ Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) prepared by the Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power Co., Ltd (KHNP) and KEPCO Engineering & Construction Co., Inc. (KEPCO-E&C). The work described in this report involves a review of the APR+ Level 2 PSA submittal [Ref. 1]. The PSA and, therefore, the review is limited to consideration of accidents initiated by internal events. As part of the review process, the review team also developed three sets of Requests for Additional Information (RAIs). These RAIs were provided to KHNP and KEPCO-E&C for their evaluation and response. This final detailed report documents the review findings for each technical element of the PSA and includes consideration of all of the RAIs made by the reviewers as well as the associated responses. This final report was preceded by an interim report [Ref. 2] that focused on identifying important issues regarding the PSA. In addition, a final meeting on the project was held at BNL on November 21-22, 2011, where BNL and KINS reviewers discussed their preliminary review findings with KHNP and KEPCO-E&C staffs. Additional information obtained during this final meeting was also used to inform the review findings of this final report. The review focused not only on the robustness of the APR+ design to withstand severe accidents, but also on the capability and acceptability of the Level 2 PSA in terms of level of detail and completeness. The Korean nuclear regulatory authorities will decide whether the PSA is acceptable and the BNL review team is providing its comments for KINS consideration. Section 2.0 provides the basis for the BNL review. Section 3.0 presents the review of each technical element of the PSA. Conclusions and a summary are presented in Section 4.0. Section 5.0 contains the references.

  13. High {sup 222}Rn levels, enhanced plateout, increased diffusion coefficient

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard, B.E.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In a previous study of plateout and resuspension effects for {sup 222}Rn progeny, an unexpected suppression of the airborne {sup 218}Po and {sup 214}Po levels, which is total unrelated and not predicted by theory or other works, was observed when high {sup 222}Rn concentrations were utilized in a 0.283-m{sup 3} test chamber. Two separate time-dependent methods were used and are reported here to measure this airborne progeny suppression effect to attempt to possibly determine the magnitude and cause of the effect and possible consequences on prior and current ongoing radon research by others. The earlier buildup method was used to observe the buildup phase of {sup 222} Rn and its daughters from a constant emanation source, a constant air change rate (ACH), and initially zero concentrations Rn and progeny. The data were compared with theory using Leonard`s solutions to the Bateman equations to determine the magnitude of the suppression. The second method, referred to as the {open_quotes}down{close_quotes} method, was to measure the decrease in {sup 222}Rn and progeny concentrations from an initially injected high {sup 222}Rn activity concentration in the test chamber, the decrease resulting from a constant ACH of {approximately}0.1 h{sup -1} imposed by the gradual removal of air from the chamber at a constant rate of {approximately}0.5 l/min. No {sup 222}Rn emanation source was present during the second method after the initial injection so that the level of the {sup 222}Rn underwent a monotonic decrease in concentration.

  14. Solid low-level waste forecasting guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Templeton, K.J.; Dirks, L.L.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Guidance for forecasting solid low-level waste (LLW) on a site-wide basis is described in this document. Forecasting is defined as an approach for collecting information about future waste receipts. The forecasting approach discussed in this document is based solely on hanford`s experience within the last six years. Hanford`s forecasting technique is not a statistical forecast based upon past receipts. Due to waste generator mission changes, startup of new facilities, and waste generator uncertainties, statistical methods have proven to be inadequate for the site. It is recommended that an approach similar to Hanford`s annual forecasting strategy be implemented at each US Department of Energy (DOE) installation to ensure that forecast data are collected in a consistent manner across the DOE complex. Hanford`s forecasting strategy consists of a forecast cycle that can take 12 to 30 months to complete. The duration of the cycle depends on the number of LLW generators and staff experience; however, the duration has been reduced with each new cycle. Several uncertainties are associated with collecting data about future waste receipts. Volume, shipping schedule, and characterization data are often reported as estimates with some level of uncertainty. At Hanford, several methods have been implemented to capture the level of uncertainty. Collection of a maximum and minimum volume range has been implemented as well as questionnaires to assess the relative certainty in the requested data.

  15. Managing low-level radioactive waste in a democratic society: Requirements and accommodations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortciger, T. [Illinois Dept. of Nuclear Safety, Springfield, IL (United States); Ayers, M. [Sangamon State Univ., Springfield, IL (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper will focus on public policy needs to ensure the involvement of the general public in effective decision-making related to the handling of low-level radioactive waste. It highlights difficulties experienced in involving the public in siting low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. It reviews the process recently developed by Illinois to locate a disposal facility and discusses that process`s potential as a general model for siting such facilities and involving citizens in a democratic fashion.

  16. Supernovae, Landau Levels, and Pulsar Kicks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard S. Kisslinger

    2006-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the energy asymmetry given the proto-neutronstar during the time when the neutrino sphere is near the surface of the proto-neutron star, using the modified URCA process. The electrons produced with the anti-neutrinos are in Landau levels due to the strong magnetic field, and this leads to asymmetry in the neutrino momentum, and a pulsar kick. Our main prediction is that the large pulsar kicks start at about 10 s and last for about 10 s, with the corresponding neutrinos correlated in the direction of the magnetic field.

  17. Lid design for low level waste container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holbrook, R.H.; Keener, W.E.

    1995-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A container for low level waste includes a shell and a lid. The lid has a frame to which a planar member is welded. The lid frame includes a rectangular outer portion made of square metal tubing, a longitudinal beam extending between axial ends of the rectangular outer portion, and a transverse beam extending between opposite lateral sides of the rectangular outer portion. Two pairs of diagonal braces extend between the longitudinal beam and the four corners of the rectangular outer portion of the frame. 6 figs.

  18. Lid design for low level waste container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holbrook, Richard H. (Clinton, TN); Keener, Wendell E. (Lenior City, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A container for low level waste includes a shell and a lid. The lid has a frame to which a planar member is welded. The lid frame includes a rectangular outer portion made of square metal tubing, a longitudinal beam extending between axial ends of the rectangular outer portion, and a transverse beam extending between opposite lateral sides of the rectangular outer portion. Two pairs of diagonal braces extend between the longitudinal beam and the four corners of the rectangular outer portion of the frame.

  19. Service Oriented Architecture for High Level Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, Chungming; Chevtsov, Sergei; Wu, Juhao; /SLAC; Shen, Guobao; /Brookhaven

    2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Standalone high level applications often suffer from poor performance and reliability due to lengthy initialization, heavy computation and rapid graphical update. Service-oriented architecture (SOA) is trying to separate the initialization and computation from applications and to distribute such work to various service providers. Heavy computation such as beam tracking will be done periodically on a dedicated server and data will be available to client applications at all time. Industrial standard service architecture can help to improve the performance, reliability and maintainability of the service. Robustness will also be improved by reducing the complexity of individual client applications.

  20. The structure of energy levels in ¹?²RU 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouttchenko, Sviatoslav Olegovich

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (1968). [21] C. Flaum, D. Cline, A. W. Sunyar, and O. C. Kistner, Phys. Rev. Lett. 33, 973 (1974). [22] O. Scholton, F. Iachello, and A. Arima, Ann. Phys. 115, 325 (1978); F. Iachello and A. Arima, in The Interacting Boson Model (Cambridge University... Level splitting in the two-band mixing model. 19 Total energy for Ru as a function of s for 7 = 0 and e4 ? 0 for different moments of inertia. 26 Total energy for ' Ru as a function of 7 for E = 0. 22 and E'y = 0 for different moments of inertia. 27...

  1. High-level waste qualification: Managing uncertainty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pulsipher, B.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Qualification of high-level waste implies specifications driven by risk against which performance can be assessed. The inherent uncertainties should be addressed in the specifications and statistical methods should be employed to appropriately manage these uncertainties. Uncertainties exist whenever measurements are obtained, sampling is employed, or processes are affected by systematic or random perturbations. This paper presents the approach and statistical methods currently employed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and West Valley Nuclear Services (WVNS) to characterize, minimize, and control uncertainties pertinent to a waste-form acceptance specification concerned with product consistency.

  2. The structure of energy levels in ¹?²RU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouttchenko, Sviatoslav Olegovich

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (1968). [21] C. Flaum, D. Cline, A. W. Sunyar, and O. C. Kistner, Phys. Rev. Lett. 33, 973 (1974). [22] O. Scholton, F. Iachello, and A. Arima, Ann. Phys. 115, 325 (1978); F. Iachello and A. Arima, in The Interacting Boson Model (Cambridge University... Level splitting in the two-band mixing model. 19 Total energy for Ru as a function of s for 7 = 0 and e4 ? 0 for different moments of inertia. 26 Total energy for ' Ru as a function of 7 for E = 0. 22 and E'y = 0 for different moments of inertia. 27...

  3. sea level rise | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindey Wind Home Rmckeel'slinkedpolicyreview Homesea level rise

  4. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25,9,1996 N Y MDomesticDomestic

  5. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25,9,1996 N Y MDomesticDomesticHost and

  6. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25,9,1996 N Y MDomesticDomesticHostFAQs 1

  7. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 Oil demand8)Commercial U.S.137571 July

  8. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 Oil demand8)Commercial U.S.137571 July

  9. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 Oil demand8)Commercial U.S.137571

  10. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 Oil demand8)Commercial

  11. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 Oil demand8)Commercial5 1 April 2015

  12. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 Oil demand8)Commercial5 1 April 2015

  13. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 Oil demand8)Commercial5 1 April 2015

  14. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 Oil demand8)Commercial5 1 April 2015

  15. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 Oil demand8)Commercial5 1 April 20151

  16. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 Oil demand8)Commercial5 1 April

  17. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 Oil demand8)Commercial5 1 April Market

  18. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 Oil demand8)Commercial5 1 April Market

  19. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 Oil demand8)Commercial5 1 April Market

  20. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 Oil demand8)Commercial5 1 April Market