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1

Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measuring Thermal Evolution...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

History Facebook icon Twitter icon Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measuring Thermal Evolution in CO2- and Water-Based Geothermal Reservoirs Geothermal Lab Call Project...

2

Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measuring Thermal Evolution in CO2-  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measuring Thermal Evolution in CO2- Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measuring Thermal Evolution in CO2- and Water-Based Geothermal Reservoirs Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measuring Thermal Evolution in CO2- and Water-Based Geothermal Reservoirs Project Type / Topic 1 Laboratory Call for Submission of Applications for Research, Development and Analysis of Geothermal Technologies Project Type / Topic 2 Tracers and Tracer Interpretation Project Description The concepts and theory behind the use of heat-sensitive tracers to study the thermal evolution of geothermal reservoirs was developed in the late 1980's under the Hot Dry Rock Project. Those studies described-conceptually and mathematically-the application of reactive tracers to tracking thermal fronts and to reservoir sizing. Later mathematical treatments focused on application of a single reactive tracer test to recover the temperature profile of a single streamtube. Previous tracer work has mainly focused on identifying conservative tracers. In these studies, chemicals that degraded at reservoir temperatures were discarded. Benzoic acids and dicarboxylic acids, which were found by Adams to degrade, may be useful as reactive tracers. Organic esters and amide tracers that undergo hydrolysis have been investigated and their use as reactive tracers appears feasible over a temperature range of 100ºC to 275ºC. However their reaction rates are pH dependent and sorption reactions have not been evaluated. While reactive tracer parameters have been measured in the lab, reactive tracers have not been extensively tested in the field. Thus, while reactive tracers appear to be a promising means of monitoring the thermal evolution of a geothermal reservoir, the concept has yet to be tested at the scale necessary for successful implementation, and tools for analyzing results of such tracer tests under the non-ideal conditions of an actual geothermal system have yet to be developed.

3

ADVANCING REACTIVE TRACER METHODS FOR MONITORING THERMAL DRAWDOWN IN GEOTHERMAL ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reactive tracers have long been considered a possible means of measuring thermal drawdown in a geothermal system, before significant cooling occurs at the extraction well. Here, we examine the sensitivity of the proposed method to evaluate reservoir cooling and demonstrate that while the sensitivity of the method as generally proposed is low, it may be practical under certain conditions.

Mitchell A. Plummer; Carl D. Palmer; Earl D. Mattson; George D. Redden; Laurence C. Hull

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measurement of Thermal Evolution in Geothermal Reservoirs: Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The injection of cold fluids into engineered geothermal system (EGS) and conventional geothermal reservoirs may be done to help extract heat from the subsurface or to maintain pressures within the reservoir (e.g., Rose et al., 2001). As these injected fluids move along fractures, they acquire heat from the rock matrix and remove it from the reservoir as they are extracted to the surface. A consequence of such injection is the migration of a cold-fluid front through the reservoir (Figure 1) that could eventually reach the production well and result in the lowering of the temperature of the produced fluids (thermal breakthrough). Efficient operation of an EGS as well as conventional geothermal systems involving cold-fluid injection requires accurate and timely information about thermal depletion of the reservoir in response to operation. In particular, accurate predictions of the time to thermal breakthrough and subsequent rate of thermal drawdown are necessary for reservoir management, design of fracture stimulation and well drilling programs, and forecasting of economic return. A potential method for estimating migration of a cold front between an injection well and a production well is through application of reactive tracer tests, using chemical whose rate of degradation is dependent on the reservoir temperature between the two wells (e.g., Robinson 1985). With repeated tests, the rate of migration of the thermal front can be determined, and the time to thermal breakthrough calculated. While the basic theory behind the concept of thermal tracers has been understood for some time, effective application of the method has yet to be demonstrated. This report describes results of a study that used several methods to investigate application of reactive tracers to monitoring the thermal evolution of a geothermal reservoir. These methods included (1) mathematical investigation of the sensitivity of known and hypothetical reactive tracers, (2) laboratory testing of novel tracers that would improve method sensitivity, (3) development of a software tool for design and interpretation of reactive tracer tests and (4) field testing of the reactive tracer temperature monitoring concept.

Mitchell A. Plummer; Carl D. Palmer; Earl D. Mattson; Laurence C. Hull; George D. Redden

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Tracking thermal fronts with temperature-sensitive, chemically reactive tracers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Los Alamos is developing tracer techniques using reactive chemicals to track thermal fronts in fractured geothermal reservoirs. If a nonadsorbing tracer flowing from the injection to production well chemically reacts, its reaction rate will be a strong function of temperature. Thus the extent of chemical reaction will be greatest early in the lifetime of the system, and less as the thermal front progresses from the injection to production well. Early laboratory experiments identified tracers with chemical kinetics suitable for reservoirs in the temperature range of 75 to 100/sup 0/C. Recent kinetics studies have focused on the kinetics of hydrolysis of derivatives of bromobenzene. This class of reactions can be used in reservoirs ranging in temperature from 150 to 275/sup 0/C, which is of greater interest to the geothermal industry. Future studies will include laboratory adsorption experiments to identify possibly unwanted adsorption on granite, development of sensitive analytical techniques, and a field demonstration of the reactive tracer concept.

Robinson, B.A.; Birdsell, S.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Diagnostic Implications of the Reactivity of Fluorescence Tracers  

SciTech Connect

Measurements of fuel concentration distributions with planar laser induced fluorescence of tracer molecules that are added to a base fuel are commonly used in combustion research and development. It usually is assumed that the tracer concentration follows the parent fuel concentration if physical properties such as those determining evaporation are matched. As an example to address this general issue a computational study of combustion of biacetyl/iso-octane mixtures was performed to investigate how well the concentration of biacetyl represents the concentration of iso-octane. For premixed mixture conditions with flame propagation the spatial concentration profiles of the two species in the flame front are separated by 110 {micro}m at 1 bar and by 11 {micro}m at 10 bar. For practical applications this spatial separation is insignificantly small. However, for conditions that mimic ignition and combustion in diesel and HCCI-like operation the differences in tracer and fuel concentration can be significant, exceeding hundreds of percent. At low initial temperature biacetyl was found to be more stable whereas at higher temperature (>1000K) iso-octane is more stable. Similar findings were obtained for a multi-component fuel comprised of iso-octane, n-heptane, methylcyclohexane, and toluene. It may be assumed that similar differences can exist for other tracer/fuel combinations. Caution has therefore to be applied when interpreting PLIF measurements in homogeneous reaction conditions such as in HCCI engine studies.

Sick, V; Westbrook, C

2008-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

7

Chombo-Crunch: Advanced Simulation of Subsurface Flow and Reactive...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chombo-Crunch: Advanced Simulation of Subsurface Flow and Reactive Transport Processes Associated with Carbon Sequestration PI Name: David Trebotich Institution: Lawrence Berkeley...

8

QUANTIFICATION OF FUGITIVE REACTIVE ALKENE EMISSIONS FROM PETROCHEMICAL PLANTS WITH PERFLUOROCARBON TRACERS.  

SciTech Connect

Recent studies demonstrate the impact of fugitive emissions of reactive alkenes on the atmospheric chemistry of the Houston Texas metropolitan area (1). Petrochemical plants located in and around the Houston area emit atmospheric alkenes, such as ethene, propene and 1,3-butadiene. The magnitude of emissions is a major uncertainty in assessing their effects. Even though the petrochemical industry reports that fugitive emissions of alkenes have been reduced to less than 0.1% of daily production, recent measurement data, obtained during the TexAQS 2000 experiment indicates that emissions are perhaps a factor of ten larger than estimated values. Industry figures for fugitive emissions are based on adding up estimated emission factors for every component in the plant to give a total estimated emission from the entire facility. The dramatic difference between estimated and measured rates indicates either that calculating emission fluxes by summing estimates for individual components is seriously flawed, possibly due to individual components leaking well beyond their estimated tolerances, that not all sources of emissions for a facility are being considered in emissions estimates, or that there are known sources of emissions that are not being reported. This experiment was designed to confirm estimates of reactive alkene emissions derived from analysis of the TexAQS 2000 data by releasing perfluorocarbon tracers (PFTs) at a known flux from a petrochemical plant and sampling both the perfluorocarbon tracer and reactive alkenes downwind using the Piper-Aztec research aircraft operated by Baylor University. PFTs have been extensively used to determine leaks in pipelines, air infiltration in buildings, and to characterize the transport and dispersion of air parcels in the atmosphere. Over 20 years of development by the Tracer Technology Center (TTC) has produced a range of analysis instruments, field samplers and PFT release equipment that have been successfully deployed in a large variety of experiments. PFTs are inert, nontoxic, noncombustible and nonreactive. Up to seven unique PFTs can be simultaneously released, sampled and analyzed and the technology is well suited for determining emission fluxes from large petrochemical facilities. The PFT experiment described here was designed to quantitate alkene emissions from a single petrochemical facility, but such experiments could be applied to other industrial sources or groups of sources in the Houston area.

SENUM,G.I.; DIETZ,R.N.

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

9

Using chemically reactive tracers to determine temperature characteristics of geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The rates of most chemical reactions are very sensitive to temperature, and this property can be used to measure temperature patterns in geothermal reservoirs. Two approaches are considered: reverse-flush and flow-through. Both of these can indicate thermal drawdown faster than the measurement of produced-fluid temperature. The reverse-flush approach is more difficult to carry out and interferes more with normal operation, but it gives the earlier indication of thermal drawdown and yields more information when using a single reaction. In both approaches, injecting a suite of reactants can yield bivariate time-temperature distributions which give temperature distributions as functions of fluid residence time. Applications to Hot Dry Rock systems are considered throughout the paper. Results of early kinetics studies of candidate tracer reactions also are reported.

Robinson, B.A.; Tester, J.W.; Brown, L.F.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Inert and Reacting Tracers for Reservoir Sizing in Fractured, Hot Dry Rock Systems  

SciTech Connect

Flow characterization and volumetric sizing techniques using tracers in fractured hot dry rock reservoirs are discussed. Statistical methods for analyzing the residence time distribution (RTD) are presented. Tracer modal volumes and RTD shape are correlated with reservoir performance parameters such as active heat transfer area and dispersion levels. Chemically reactive tracers are proposed for mapping advance rates of cooled regions in HDR reservoirs, providing early warning of thermal drawdown. Important reaction rate parameters are identified for screening potential tracers. Current laboratory research and field work is reviewed.

Tester, J.W.; Robinson, B.A.; Ferguson, J.H.

1986-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

11

Evaluating advanced LMR (liquid metal reactor) reactivity feedbacks using SSC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analyses of the PRISM and SAFR Liquid Metal Reactors with SSC are discussed from a safety and licensing perspective. The PRISM and SAFR reactors with metal fuel are designed for inherent shutdown responses to loss-of-flow and loss-of-heat-sink events. The demonstration of this technology was performed by EBR-II during experiments in April 1986 by ANL (Planchon, et al.). Response to postulated TOPs (control rod withdrawal) are made acceptable largely by reducing reactivity swings, and therefore minimizing the size of possible ractivity insertions. Analyses by DOE and the contractors GE, RI, and ANL take credit for several reactivity feedback mechanisms during transient calculations. These feedbacks include Doppler, sodium density, and thermal expansion of the grid plates, the load pads, the fuel (axial) and the control rod which are now factored into the BNL SSC analyses. The bowing feedback mechanism is not presently modeled in the SSC due to its complexity and subsequent large uncertainty. The analysis is conservative by not taking credit for this negative feedback mechanism. Comparisons of BNL predictions with DOE contractors are provided.

Slovik, G.C.; Van Tuyle, G.J.; Kennett, R.J.; Cheng, H.S.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Advanced hydraulic fracturing methods to create in situ reactive barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes the use of hydraulic fracturing to increase permeability in geologic formations where in-situ remedial action of contaminant plumes will be performed. Several in-situ treatment strategies are discussed including the use of hydraulic fracturing to create in situ redox zones for treatment of organics and inorganics. Hydraulic fracturing methods offer a mechanism for the in-situ treatment of gently dipping layers of reactive compounds. Specialized methods using real-time monitoring and a high-energy jet during fracturing allow the form of the fracture to be influenced, such as creation of assymmetric fractures beneath potential sources (i.e. tanks, pits, buildings) that should not be penetrated by boring. Some examples of field applications of this technique such as creating fractures filled with zero-valent iron to reductively dechlorinate halogenated hydrocarbons, and the use of granular activated carbon to adsorb compounds are discussed.

Murdoch, L. [FRX Inc., Cincinnati, OH (United States)]|[Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences; Siegrist, B.; Meiggs, T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

13

Tracers and Tracer Interpretation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tracers and Tracer Interpretation Tracers and Tracer Interpretation Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Geothermal Lab Call Projects for Tracers and Tracer Interpretation 2 Geothermal ARRA Funded Projects for Tracers and Tracer Interpretation Geothermal Lab Call Projects for Tracers and Tracer Interpretation Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":200,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

14

DOE/EA-1310: Environmental Assessment for Decontamination and Dismantlement of the Advanced Reactivity Measurement Facility and Couples Fast Reactivity Measurements Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 0 March 2000 Environmental Assessment for Decontamination and Dismantlement of the Advanced Reactivity Measurement Facility and Coupled Fast Reactivity Measurements Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory DOE/EA-1310 Environmental Assessment for Decontamination and Dismantlement of the Advanced Reactivity Measurement Facility and Coupled Fast Reactivity Measurements Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Published March 2000 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office iii CONTENTS ACRONYMS ............................................................................................................................... v HELPFUL INFORMATION ........................................................................................................

15

DOE/EA-1310: Finding of No Significant Impact for the Decontamination and Dismantlement of the Advanced Reactivity Measurement Facility and Couples Fast Reactivity Measurements Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FOR THE DECONTAMINATION AND FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FOR THE DECONTAMINATION AND DISMANTLEMENT OF THE ADVANCED REACTIVITY MEASUREMENT FACILITY AND COUPLED FAST REACTIVITY MEASUREMENTS FACILITY AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING AND ENVIRONMENTAL LABORATORY Agency: U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Action: Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) Summary: The DOE prepared a Draft Environmental Assessment (EA) for the proposed "Decontamination and Dismantlement of the Advanced Reactivity Measurement Facility and Coupled Fast Reactivity Measurement Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory" (DOE/EA-1310). The EA was prepared in accordance with the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) Regulations for implementing the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) (40 CFR 1500-1508), and the

16

Biological tracer method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a biological tracer method for characterizing the movement of a material through a medium, comprising the steps of: introducing a biological tracer comprising a microorganism having ice nucleating activity into a medium; collecting at least one sample of the medium from a point removed from the introduction point; and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. The present invention is also a method for using a biological tracer as a label for material identification by introducing a biological tracer having ice nucleating activity into a material, collecting a sample of a portion of the labelled material and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. 2 figs.

Strong-Gunderson, J.M.; Palumbo, A.V.

1998-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

Biological tracer method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a biological tracer method for characterizing the movement of a material through a medium, comprising the steps of: introducing a biological tracer comprising a microorganism having ice nucleating activity into a medium; collecting at least one sample of the medium from a point removed from the introduction point; and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. The present invention is also a method for using a biological tracer as a label for material identification by introducing a biological tracer having ice nucleating activity into a material, collecting a sample of a portion of the labelled material and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer.

Strong-Gunderson, Janet M. (Ten Mile, TN); Palumbo, Anthony V. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Using Thermally Degrading, Partitioning and Nonreactive Tracers...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Type Topic 2 Tracers and Tracer Interpretation Project Description The goal of this project is to provide integrated tracer and tracer interpretation tools to facilitate this...

19

Tracer Testing | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tracer Testing Tracer Testing Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Tracer Testing Details Activities (9) Areas (5) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Testing Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Fracture zones and formation permeability Hydrological: Flow rates, flow direction, hydrologic connections, storativity Thermal: Dictionary.png Tracer Testing: A method based on injecting chemical tracers into the reservoir and monitoring how long it takes and where those tracers travel. The purpose is to model subsurface hydrothermal flow characteristics.

20

Tracer Verification of Trajectory Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Perfluorocarbon tracer data collected during the Cross Appalachian Tracer Experiment (CAPTEX '83) are used to determine the accuracy of three trajectory models: an isentropic, an isobaric, and a dimensional sigma model. The root-mean-square ...

Philip L. Haagenson; Ying-Hwa Kuo; Marina Syumanich; Nelson L. Seaman

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Obtaining Velocities from Tracer Distributions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple advective-diffusive system with uniform, horizontal flow in a channel and fixed boundary concentrations of two tracers is analyzed for the tracer concentrations in the interior. The deduced concentrations are then treated as given ...

Manuel E. Fiadeiro; George Veronis

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Tracers and Tracer Testing: Design, Implementation, Tracer Selection, and Interpretation Methods  

SciTech Connect

Conducting a successful tracer test requires adhering to a set of steps. The steps include identifying appropriate and achievable test goals, identifying tracers with the appropriate properties, and implementing the test as designed. When these steps are taken correctly, a host of tracer test analysis methods are available to the practitioner. This report discusses the individual steps required for a successful tracer test and presents methods for analysis. The report is an overview of tracer technology; the Suggested Reading section offers references to the specifics of test design and interpretation.

G. Michael Shook; Shannon L.; Allan Wylie

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Enteral Feeding During Chemoradiotherapy for Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Single-Institution Experience Using a Reactive Approach  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The optimal method for providing enteral nutrition to patients with head-and-neck cancer is unclear. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of our reactive policy, which consists of the installation of a nasogastric (NG) feeding tube only when required by the patient's nutritional status. Methods and Materials: The records of all patients with Stage III and IV head-and-neck cancer treated with concomitant chemotherapy and radiotherapy between January 2003 and December 2006 were reviewed. The overall and disease-free survival rates were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared with the log-rank test. Results: The present study included 253 patients, and the median follow-up was 33 months. At 3 years, the estimated overall survival and disease-free survival rate was 82.8% and 77.8%, respectively, for the whole population. No survival difference was observed when the patients were compared according to the presence and absence of a NG tube or stratified by weight loss quartile. The mean weight loss during treatment for all patients was 10.4%. The proportion of patients requiring a NG tube was 49.8%, and the NG tube remained in place for a median duration of 40 days. No major complications were associated with NG tube installation. Only 3% of the patients were still dependent on enteral feeding at 6 months. Conclusion: These results suggest that the use of a reactive NG tube with an interdisciplinary team approach is a safe and effective method to manage malnutrition in patients treated with concomitant chemotherapy and radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer.

Clavel, Sebastien, E-mail: sebastien.clavel@umontreal.c [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Fortin, Bernard; Despres, Philippe; Donath, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Soulieres, Denis [Department of Medical Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Khaouam, Nader [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hopital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Montreal, QC (Canada); Charpentier, Danielle [Department of Medical Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Belair, Manon [Department of Radiology, Centre hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Guertin, Louis [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Centre hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Nguyen-Tan, Phuc Felix [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Microsoft PowerPoint - Tracer plume detection-LANL(Fessenden).ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tracer Testing of Plume Movement Tracer Testing of Plume Movement Julianna Fessenden and Paul Reimus, Los Alamos National Laboratory Plume modeling (atmosphere, reservoir, groundwater) Purpose of Tracing Plumes Monitor species of interest within reservoir Monitor species of interest outside reservoir Monitor Flow paths Capture zones Monitor Breaches Extent of movement Desirable Tracer Characteristics (1) Inexpensive (measurement, analytical) (2) Low detection limits, no analytical interferences (3) Quick, easy to sample and measure (4) Non toxic, readily permitted (5) Both sorbing/non-sorbing tracer use Perflorocarbon Tracer deployment NETL facilities Classes of Tracers (1) Gas Phase (2) Liquid Phase (3) Organic, inorganic, aqueous (4) Conservative/nonreacting (5) Reactive with mineral surfaces or soluble in non-carrier phase

25

Tracer Diffusion Databases for ICME  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of a large repository of stable isotopes that can be utilized for tracer diffusion .... Lattice Dynamics and Thermodynamics of Lithium Battery Materials LiMPO4...

26

Development of Models to Simulate Tracer Tests for Characterization of Enhanced Geothermal Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recent report found that power and heat produced from enhanced (or engineered) geothermal systems (EGSs) could have a major impact on the U.S energy production capability while having a minimal impact on the environment. EGS resources differ from high-grade hydrothermal resources in that they lack sufficient temperature distribution, permeability/porosity, fluid saturation, or recharge of reservoir fluids. Therefore, quantitative characterization of temperature distributions and the surface area available for heat transfer in EGS is necessary for the design and commercial development of the geothermal energy of a potential EGS site. The goal of this project is to provide integrated tracer and tracer interpretation tools to facilitate this characterization. This project was initially focused on tracer development with the application of perfluorinated tracer (PFT) compounds, non-reactive tracers used in numerous applications from atmospheric transport to underground leak detection, to geothermal systems, and evaluation of encapsulated PFTs that would release tracers at targeted reservoir temperatures. After the 2011 midyear review and subsequent discussions with the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Technology Program (GTP), emphasis was shifted to interpretive tool development, testing, and validation. Subsurface modeling capabilities are an important component of this project for both the design of suitable tracers and the interpretation of data from in situ tracer tests, be they single- or multi-well tests. The purpose of this report is to describe the results of the tracer and model development for simulating and conducting tracer tests for characterizing EGS parameters.

Williams, Mark D.; Reimus, Paul; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Rose, Peter; Dean, Cynthia A.; Watson, Tom B.; Newell, D.; Leecaster, Kevin; Brauser, Eric

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

BNL | Tracer Technology Group | BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tracer Technology Group Tracer Technology Group Tracer Technology Image The Tracer Technology Group (TTG) developed the use of perfluorocarbon tracers (PFTs) as tools for studying long range atmospheric transport and dispersion in the early 1980s.We are world leaders in the use of PFTs for solving diverse research and engineering problems in the atmospheric sciences, the energy production and utility industries, and building characterization. The unique capabilities of the TTG are derived from our analytical expertise, infrastructure, and experience. We have developed PFT analytical methods that have detection limits at the femtogram level. We can measure global background levels of PFTS at the parts per quadrillion levels. Our scientists and technical staff have extensive experience in

28

Definition: Tracer Testing | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Tracer Testing A method based on injecting chemical tracers into the reservoir and monitoring how long it takes and where those tracers...

29

Innovative techniques for the description of reservoir heterogeneity using tracers. Final report, October 1992--December 1993  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of a three year research project on the use of tracers for reservoir characterization. The objective of this research was to develop advanced, innovative techniques for the description of reservoir characteristics using both single-well backflow and interwell tracer tests. (1) The authors implemented and validated tracer modeling features in a compositional simulator (UTCOMP). (2) They developed and applied a new single well tracer test for estimating reservoir heterogeneity. (3) They developed and applied a new single well tracer test for estimating reservoir wettability in-situ. (4) They developed a new, simple and efficient method to analyze two well tracer tests based upon type curve matching and illustrated its use with actual field tracer data. (5) They developed a new method for deriving an integrated reservoir description based upon combinatorial optimization schemes. (6) They developed a new, interwell tracer test for reservoir heterogeneity called vertical tracer profiling (VTP) and demonstrated its advantages over conventional interwell tracer testing. (7) They developed a simple and easy analytical method to estimate swept pore volume from interwell tracer data and showed both the theoretical basis for this method and its practical utility. (8) They made numerous enhancements to our compositional reservoir simulator such as including the full permeability tensor, adding faster solvers, improving its speed and robustness and making it easier to use (better I/0) for tracer simulation problems. (9) They applied the enhanced version of UTCOMP to the analysis of interwell tracer data using perfluorocarbons at Elks Hill Naval Petroleum Reserve. All of these accomplishments taken together have significantly improved the state of reservoir tracer technology and have demonstrated that it is a far more powerful and useful tool for quantitative reservoir characterization than previously realized or practiced by the industry.

Pope, G.A.; Sepehrnoori, K.; Delshad, M.; Ferreira, L.; Gupta, A.; Maroongroge, V.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Tracer dating and ocean ventilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The interpretation of transient tracer observations depends on difcult to obtain information on the evolution in time of the tracer boundary conditions and interior distributions. Recent studies have attempted to circumvent this problem by making use of a derived quantity, age, based on the simultaneous distribution of two complementary tracers, such as tritium and its daughter, helium 3. The age is defined with reference to the surface such that the boundary condition takes on a constant value of zero. We use a two-dimensional model to explore the circumstances under which such a combination of conservation equations for two complementary tracers can lead to a cancellation of the time derivative terms. An interesting aspect of this approach is that mixing can serve as a source or sink of tracer based age. We define an idealized "ventilation age tracer " that is conservative with respect to mixing, and we explore how its behavior compares with that of the tracer-based ages over a range of advective and diffusive parameters. 1.

G. Thiele; J. L. Sarmiento

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

AN INTEGRATED APPROACH TO CHARACTERIZING BYPASSED OIL IN HETEROGENEOUS AND FRACTURED RESERVOIRS USING PARTITIONING TRACERS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We explore the use of efficient streamline-based simulation approaches for modeling partitioning interwell tracer tests in hydrocarbon reservoirs. Specifically, we utilize the unique features of streamline models to develop an efficient approach for interpretation and history matching of field tracer response. A critical aspect here is the underdetermined and highly ill-posed nature of the associated inverse problems. We have adopted an integrated approach whereby we combine data from multiple sources to minimize the uncertainty and non-uniqueness in the interpreted results. For partitioning interwell tracer tests, these are primarily the distribution of reservoir permeability and oil saturation distribution. A novel approach to multiscale data integration using Markov Random Fields (MRF) has been developed to integrate static data sources from the reservoir such as core, well log and 3-D seismic data. We have also explored the use of a finite difference reservoir simulator, UTCHEM, for field-scale design and optimization of partitioning interwell tracer tests. The finite-difference model allows us to include detailed physics associated with reactive tracer transport, particularly those related with transverse and cross-streamline mechanisms. We have investigated the potential use of downhole tracer samplers and also the use of natural tracers for the design of partitioning tracer tests. Finally, the behavior of partitioning tracer tests in fractured reservoirs is investigated using a dual-porosity finite-difference model.

Akhil Datta-Gupta

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Tracer airflow measurement system (TRAMS)  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for measuring fluid flow in a duct is disclosed. The invention uses a novel high velocity tracer injector system, an optional insertable folding mixing fan for homogenizing the tracer within the duct bulk fluid flow, and a perforated hose sampling system. A preferred embodiment uses CO.sub.2 as a tracer gas for measuring air flow in commercial and/or residential ducts. In extant commercial buildings, ducts not readily accessible by hanging ceilings may be drilled with readily plugged small diameter holes to allow for injection, optional mixing where desired using a novel insertable foldable mixing fan, and sampling hose.

Wang, Duo (Albany, CA)

2007-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

33

Gas tracer composition and method  

SciTech Connect

The invention provides a method for tagging methane by adding thereto one or more of the tracer compounds sulfur hexafluoride and chloropentafluoroethane. The methane being tagged is normally being stored in underground storage fields to provide identity and proof of ownership of the gas. The two tracer compounds are readily detectable at very low concentrations by electron capture gas chromatography apparatus which can be made portable and thus suitable for use in the field.

Malcosky, N. D.; Koziar, G.

1985-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

34

A Tracer Test Using Ethanol as a Two-Phase Tracer and 2-Naphthalene  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tracer Test Using Ethanol as a Two-Phase Tracer and 2-Naphthalene Tracer Test Using Ethanol as a Two-Phase Tracer and 2-Naphthalene Sulfonate as a Liquid-Phase Tracer at the Coso Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: A Tracer Test Using Ethanol as a Two-Phase Tracer and 2-Naphthalene Sulfonate as a Liquid-Phase Tracer at the Coso Geothermal Field Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A tracer test was conducted at the Coso geothermal field in order to characterize the flow patterns of fluid injected into well 68-20RD. A conservative liquid phase tracer, 2-naphthalene sulfonate, and a two-phase tracer, ethanol, were injected into well 68-20RD. Surrounding production wells were sampled over the subsequent 125 days and analyzed for the two tracers. The liquid-phase tracer showed negligible returns, whereas the

35

A Tracer Test Using Ethanol as a Two-Phase Tracer and 2-Naphthalene...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tracer Test Using Ethanol as a Two-Phase Tracer and 2-Naphthalene Sulfonate as a Liquid-Phase Tracer at the Coso Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL...

36

Gas Bubbles as Oceanographic Tracers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air bubbles can be used as oceanographic tracers that indicate the strength of a downwelling current by which they are subducted. In a tidal front in the Fraser Estuary, British Columbia, Canada, vertical currents of up to 0.70 m s?1 subduct ...

Burkard Baschek; David M. Farmer

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

A hypercube Ray-tracer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a hypercube ray-tracing program for rendering computer graphics. For small models, which fit in the memory of a single processor, the ray-tracer uses a scattered decomposition of pixels to balance the load, and achieves a very high efficiency. ...

J. Salmon; J. Goldsmith

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Tracer dispersion in the turbulent convective layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experimental results for passive tracer dispersion in the turbulent surface layer under convective conditions are presented. In this case, the dispersion of tracer particles is determined by the interplay of two mechanisms: buoyancy and advection. ...

Alex Skvortsov; Milan Jamriska; Timothy C. DuBois

39

Meteorological Tracer Techniques for Parameterizing Atmospheric Dispersion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although tracer materials have been used in atmospheric dispersion studies for decades, basic information about meteorological tracer techniques is scattered among a number of different sources. This paper attempts to pull together this ...

Warren B. Johnson

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Propagation of Tracer Signals in Boundary Currents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The propagation of a range of tracer signals in a simple model of the deep western boundary current is examined. Analytical expressions are derived in certain limits for the transit-time distributions and the propagation times (tracer ages) of ...

Darryn W. Waugh; Timothy M. Hall

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Can Paleoceanographic Tracers Constrain Meridional Circulation Rates?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of paleoceanographic tracers to constrain rates of transport is examined using an inverse method to combine idealized observations with a geostrophic model. Considered are the spatial distribution, accuracy, and types of tracers ...

Peter Huybers; Geoffrey Gebbie; Olivier Marchal

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Three-dimensional visualization of reactive flows in complex geometries  

SciTech Connect

The visualization of fluid flows has become more challenging, as recent advancements in computational methods have increased the complexity and size of simulations. Our objective is to develop a flexible flow visualization tool for fluid simulations that include the full physics and geometrical complexities found in modeling practical combustion systems, such as internal combustion engines. The challenges to flow visualization come from: (1) the large simulation output, especially when using massively parallel computers; (2) the increasingly complex geometries that include moving surfaces such as pistons and valves; (3) the complex physical phenomena in realistic problems of fuel injection, combustion fronts, boundary flows, and large scale turbulence; and (4) the numerical complexity of indirect addressing of computational elements, variable mesh connectivity, distorted elements, and moving meshes. We have developed a visualization program that addresses these complexities. The program was developed as a post-processor to the KIVA family of codes for reactive flow simulations. Because of the complexity of the KIVA codes, the visualization program is very versatile and applicable to any code with meshes of arbitrary hexahedrons. No comparable commercial visualization package could be found. To visualize the fluid flow, we use mass-less tracer particles that follow the movement of the fluid as determined from output files from the simulation. The movement of the tracer particles is based on a second-order spatial and temporal interpolation of the fluid velocities from successive simulation output files. The visualization program runs on a Silicon Graphics IRIS GTX workstation.

Fairfield, M.S.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Multiple-tracer gas analyzer  

SciTech Connect

A multi-gas tracer system has been designed, built, and used on an explosively fractured oil shale rubble bed. This paper deals exclusively with the hardware, software, and overall operation of the tracer system. This system is a field portable, self-contained unit, which utilizes a mass spectrometer for gas analysis. The unit has a 20 channel sample port capability and is controlled by a desk top computer. The system is configured to provide a dynamic sensitivity range of up to six orders of magnitude. A roots blower is manifolded to the unit to provide continuous flow in all sample lines. The continuous flow process allows representative samples as well as decreasing the time between each measurement. Typical multiplex cycle time to evaluate four unique gases is approximately 12 seconds.

Uhl, J.E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Three-Dimensional Bayesian Geostatistical Aquifer Characterization at the Hanford 300 Area using Tracer Test Data  

SciTech Connect

Tracer testing under natural or forced gradient flow holds the potential to provide useful information for characterizing subsurface properties, through monitoring, modeling and interpretation of the tracer plume migration in an aquifer. Non-reactive tracer experiments were conducted at the Hanford 300 Area, along with constant-rate injection tests and electromagnetic borehole flowmeter (EBF) profiling. A Bayesian data assimilation technique, the method of anchored distributions (MAD) [Rubin et al., 2010], was applied to assimilate the experimental tracer test data with the other types of data and to infer the three-dimensional heterogeneous structure of the hydraulic conductivity in the saturated zone of the Hanford formation. In this study, the Bayesian prior information on the underlying random hydraulic conductivity field was obtained from previous field characterization efforts using the constant-rate injection tests and the EBF data. The posterior distribution of the conductivity field was obtained by further conditioning the field on the temporal moments of tracer breakthrough curves at various observation wells. MAD was implemented with the massively-parallel three-dimensional flow and transport code PFLOTRAN to cope with the highly transient flow boundary conditions at the site and to meet the computational demands of MAD. A synthetic study proved that the proposed method could effectively invert tracer test data to capture the essential spatial heterogeneity of the three-dimensional hydraulic conductivity field. Application of MAD to actual field data shows that the hydrogeological model, when conditioned on the tracer test data, can reproduce the tracer transport behavior better than the field characterized without the tracer test data. This study successfully demonstrates that MAD can sequentially assimilate multi-scale multi-type field data through a consistent Bayesian framework.

Chen, Xingyuan; Murakami, Haruko; Hahn, Melanie S.; Hammond, Glenn E.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Zachara, John M.; Rubin, Yoram

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Petroleum characterization by perfluorocarbon tracers  

SciTech Connect

Perfluorocarbon tracers (PFTs), a class of six compounds, were used to help characterize the Shallow Oil Zone (SOZ) reservoir at the Naval Petroleum Reserve in California (NPRC) at Elk Hills. The SOZ reservoir is undergoing a pilot gas injection program to assess the technical feasibility and economic viability of injecting gas into the SOZ for improved oil recovery. PFTs were utilized in the pilot gas injection to qualitatively assess the extent of the pilot gas injection so as to determine the degree of gas containment within the SOZ reservoir.

Senum, G.I.; Fajer, R.W. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Harris, B.R. Jr. (USDOE Naval Petroleum Reserves in California, Tupman, CA (United States)); DeRose, W.E. (Bechtel Petroleum Operations, Inc., Tupman, CA (United States)); Ottaviani, W.L. (Chevron U.S.A., Inc., Bakersfield, CA (United States))

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Doublet Tracer Testing in Klamath Falls, Oregon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A tracer test was carried out in a geothermal doublet system to study the injection behavior of a developed reservoir known to be fractured. The doublet produces about 320 gpm of 160 F water that is used for space heating and then injected; the wells are spaced 250 ft apart. Tracer breakthrough was observed in 2 hours and 45 minutes in the production well, indicating fracture flow. However, the tracer concentrations were low and indicated porous media flow; the tracers mixed with a reservoir volume much larger than a fracture.

Gudmundsson, J.S.; Johnson, S.E.; Horne, R.N.; Jackson, P.B.; Culver, G.G.

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

47

Microseismic Tracer Particles for Hydraulic Fracturing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microseismic Tracer Particles for Hydraulic Fracturing Microseismic Tracer Particles for Hydraulic Fracturing Microseismic Tracer Particles for Hydraulic Fracturing Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a method by which microseismic events can be discriminated/detected that correspond to only the portion of the hydraulic fracture that contains the proppant material and can be expected to be conductive to the flow of oil and gas. July 3, 2013 Microseismic Tracer Particles for Hydraulic Fracturing Figure 1: A graph of ionic conductivity as a function of temperature for the anti-perovskite Li3OCl. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Microseismic Tracer Particles for Hydraulic Fracturing Applications: Oil and gas production Geophysical exploration Benefits: Tracks the disposition of material in a hydraulic fracturing

48

Microsoft PowerPoint - Tracer plume detection-LANL(Fessenden...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Artificially introduced or naturally present All tracers will partition into liquid and gas phases -T,P, Depth Dependent Information Gathered from Tracers (1)Reservoir volume...

49

Experiments to Evaluate and Implement Passive Tracer Gas Methods...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Experiments to Evaluate and Implement Passive Tracer Gas Methods to Measure Ventilation Rates in Homes Title Experiments to Evaluate and Implement Passive Tracer Gas Methods to...

50

Experimental Determination of Tracer Dispersivity in Fractures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reinjection of waste hot water is commonly practiced in most geothermal fields, primarily as a means of disposal. Surface discharge of these waste waters is usually unacceptable due to the resulting thermal and chemical pollution. Although reinjection can help to main reservoir pressure and fluid volume, in some cases a decrease in reservoir productivity has been observed. This is caused by rapid flow of the reinjected water through fractures connecting the injector and producers. As a result, the water is not sufficiently heated by the reservoir rock, and a reduction in enthalpy of the produced fluids is seen. Tracer tests have proven to be valuable to reservoir engineers for the design of a successful reinjection program. By injecting a slug of tracer and studying the discharge of surrounding producing wells, an understanding of the fracture network within a reservoir can be provided. In order to quantify the results of a tracer test, a model that accurately describes the mechanisms of tracer transport is necessary. One such mechanism, dispersion, is like a smearing out of a tracer concentration due to the velocity gradients over the cross section of flow. If a dispersion coefficient can be determined from tracer test data, the fracture width can be estimated. The purpose of this project was to design and construct an apparatus to study the dispersion of a chemical tracer in flow through a fracture.

Gilardi, J.; Horns, R.N.

1985-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

51

Tracer Developments: Results of Experimental Studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tracers can be used to monitor the movement of groundwaters and geothermal fluids and they can be used as a reference to quantify changes in fluid chemistry as a result of injection. Despite their potential importance to the geothermal operator, very few tracers are presently available and of those that are, little is known about their stability or behavior at the elevated temperatures that typify resources capable of electric power generation. During the past two years the University of Utah Research Institute has been involved in tracer research and testing, largely through the DOE Injection Research Program. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the results of these laboratory and field investigations.

Adams, M.C.; Ahn, J.H.; Bentley, H.; Moore, J.N.; Veggeberg, S.

1986-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

52

Tracer Leakage from Modeled Agulhas Rings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a numerical, isopycnal, ocean model the mixing is investigated with the environment of two idealized Agulhas rings, one that splits, and one that remains coherent. The evolution of a passive tracer, initially contained within the rings, shows ...

L. de Steur; P. J. van Leeuwen; S. S. Drijfhout

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Tracers and Potential Vorticities in Ocean Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ertel potential vorticity theorem for stratified viscous fluids in a rotating system is analyzed herein. A set of tracers, that is, materially conserved scalar quantities, and the corresponding Ertel potential vorticities are used to obtain ...

Michael V. Kurgansky; Giorgio Budillon; Ettore Salusti

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Determining Velocities and Mixing Coefficients from Tracers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effort to determine oceanic velocities from tracer distributions relies on a knowledge of the effects of mixing. However, the macroscopic diffusion coefficient, K, is generally not known and must be calculated along with the velocity. The ...

Jae Hak Lee; George Veronis

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

When Are Eddy Tracer Fluxes Directed Downgradient?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mechanisms controlling the direction of eddy tracer fluxes are examined using eddy-resolving isopycnic experiments for a cyclic zonal channel. Eddy fluxes are directed downgradient on average when either (i) there is a Lagrangian increase in ...

Chris Wilson; Richard G. Williams

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Using Biofuel Tracers to Study Alternative Combustion Regimes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Section B (NIMB) Using Biofuel Tracers to Study Alternativeinjection. We investigate biofuel HCCI combustion, and use

Mack, John Hunter; Flowers, Daniel L.; Buchholz, Bruce A.; Dibble, Robert W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Analysis of tracer and thermal transients during reinjection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work studied tracer and thermal transients during reinjection in geothermal reserviors and developed a new technique which combines the results from interwell tracer tests and thermal injection-backflow tests to estimate the thermal breakthrough times. Tracer tests are essential to determine the degree of connectivity between the injection wells and the producing wells. To analyze the tracer return profiles quantitatively, we employed three mathematical models namely, the convection-dispersion (CD) model, matrix diffusion (MD) model, and the Avodnin (AD) model, which were developed to study tracer and heat transport in a single vertical fracture. We considered three types of tracer tests namely, interwell tracer tests without recirculation, interwell tracer tests with recirculation, and injection-backflow tracer tests. To estimate the model parameters, we used a nonlinear regression program to match tracer return profiles to the solutions.

Kocabas, I.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Thermal Stability of Chelated Indium Activable Tracers  

SciTech Connect

The thermal stability of indium tracer chelated with organic ligands ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) was measured for reservoir temperatures of 150, 200, and 240 C. Measurements of the soluble indium concentration was made as a function of time by neutron activation analysis. From the data, approximate thermal decomposition rates were estimated. At 150 C, both chelated tracers were stable over the experimental period of 20 days. At 200 C, the InEDTA concentration remained constant for 16 days, after which the thermal decomposition occurred at a measured rate constant of k = 0.09 d{sup -1}. The thermal decomposition of InNTA at 200 C showed a first order reaction with a measured rate constant of k = 0.16 d{sup -1}. At 240 C, both indium chelated tracers showed rapid decomposition with rate constants greater than 1.8 d{sup -1}. The data indicate that for geothermal reservoir with temperatures up to about 200 C, indium chelated tracers can be used effectively for transit times of at least 20 days. These experiments were run without reservoir rock media, and do not account for concomitant loss of indium tracer by adsorption processes.

Chrysikopoulos, Costas; Kruger, Paul

1986-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

59

Enhanced Oil Recovery: Aqueous Flow Tracer Measurement  

SciTech Connect

A low detection limit analytical method was developed to measure a suite of benzoic acid and fluorinated benzoic acid compounds intended for use as tracers for enhanced oil recovery operations. Although the new high performance liquid chromatography separation successfully measured the tracers in an aqueous matrix at low part per billion levels, the low detection limits could not be achieved in oil field water due to interference problems with the hydrocarbon-saturated water using the system's UV detector. Commercial instrument vendors were contacted in an effort to determine if mass spectrometry could be used as an alternate detection technique. The results of their work demonstrate that low part per billion analysis of the tracer compounds in oil field water could be achieved using ultra performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry.

Joseph Rovani; John Schabron

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Geologic flow characterization using tracer techniques  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new tracer flow-test system has been developed for in situ characterization of geologic formations. This report describes two sets of test equipment: one portable and one for testing in deep formations. Equations are derived for in situ detector calibration, raw data reduction, and flow logging. Data analysis techniques are presented for computing porosity and permeability in unconfined isotropic media, and porosity, permeability and fracture characteristics in media with confined or unconfined two-dimensional flow. The effects of tracer pulse spreading due to divergence, dispersion, and porous formations are also included.

Klett, R. D.; Tyner, C. E.; Hertel, Jr., E. S.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

A 3-D hydrodynamic dispersion model for modeling tracer transport in Geothermal Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

diffusion of a tracer or a radionuclide. This new module ofsimulate processes of tracer/radionuclide transport using ana) a tracer or a radionuclide is present and transported

Wu, Yu-Shu; Pruess, Karsten

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

An Integrated Approach to Characterizing Bypassed Oil in Heterogeneous and Fractured Reservoirs Using Partitioning Tracers  

SciTech Connect

We explore the use of efficient streamline-based simulation approaches for modeling partitioning interwell tracer tests in hydrocarbon reservoirs. Specifically, we utilize the unique features of streamline models to develop an efficient approach for interpretation and history matching of field tracer response. A critical aspect here is the underdetermined and highly ill-posed nature of the associated inverse problems. We have investigated the relative merits of the traditional history matching ('amplitude inversion') and a novel travel time inversion in terms of robustness of the method and convergence behavior of the solution. We show that the traditional amplitude inversion is orders of magnitude more non-linear and the solution here is likely to get trapped in local minimum, leading to inadequate history match. The proposed travel time inversion is shown to be extremely efficient and robust for practical field applications. The streamline approach is generalized to model water injection in naturally fractured reservoirs through the use of a dual media approach. The fractures and matrix are treated as separate continua that are connected through a transfer function, as in conventional finite difference simulators for modeling fractured systems. A detailed comparison with a commercial finite difference simulator shows very good agreement. Furthermore, an examination of the scaling behavior of the computation time indicates that the streamline approach is likely to result in significant savings for large-scale field applications. We also propose a novel approach to history matching finite-difference models that combines the advantage of the streamline models with the versatility of finite-difference simulation. In our approach, we utilize the streamline-derived sensitivities to facilitate history matching during finite-difference simulation. The use of finite-difference model allows us to account for detailed process physics and compressibility effects. The approach is very fast and avoids much of the subjective judgments and time-consuming trial-and-errors associated with manual history matching. We demonstrate the power and utility of our approach using a synthetic example and two field examples. We have also explored the use of a finite difference reservoir simulator, UTCHEM, for field-scale design and optimization of partitioning interwell tracer tests. The finite-difference model allows us to include detailed physics associated with reactive tracer transport, particularly those related with transverse and cross-streamline mechanisms. We have investigated the potential use of downhole tracer samplers and also the use of natural tracers for the design of partitioning tracer tests. Finally, we discuss several alternative ways of using partitioning interwell tracer tests (PITTs) in oil fields for the calculation of oil saturation, swept pore volume and sweep efficiency, and assess the accuracy of such tests under a variety of reservoir conditions.

Akhil Datta-Gupta

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

63

Advanced Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conducting Materials Negotiable Licensing Microseismic Tracer Particles for Hydraulic Fracturing Negotiable Licensing A Photo-Stimulated Low Electron Temperature High Current...

64

Tracer Test Interpretation Methods for Reservior Properties  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to develop tools that can be used to interpret tracer tests and obtain estimates of reservoir and operational parameters. These tools (mostly in the form of spreadsheet applications) can be used to optimize geothermal resource management.

Shook, George Michael

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Eulerian Simulation of Tracer Distribution during CAPTEX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We compared observed and model-simulated surface concentration on a spatial wale of 1100 km and a temporal scale of 36 h. The Eulerian tracer model calculated advection by the mean winds and gradient transport for subgrid-scale turbulent ...

Richard A. Brost; Philip L. Haagenson; Ying-Hwa Kuo

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Tracer Testing At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tracer Testing At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) Tracer Testing At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Tracer Testing At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Tracer Testing Activity Date 2006 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To characterize the flow patterns of fluid injected into well 68-20RD. Notes A conservative liquid phase tracer, 2-naphthalene sulfonate, and a two-phase tracer, ethanol, were injected into well 68-20RD. Surrounding production wells were sampled over the subsequent 125 days and analyzed for the two tracers. The results demonstrate the efficacy of the simultaneous use of liquid-phase and two-phase tracers in fluid-depleted geothermal

67

A Method of Evaluating Atmospheric Models Using Tracer Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have developed a method that uses tracer measurements as the basis for comparing and evaluating wind fields. An important advantage of the method is that the wind fields are evaluated from the tracer measurements without introducing ...

Darko Kora?in; James Frye; Vlad Isakov

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Constraining North Atlantic circulation with transient tracer observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The capability of transient tracers to constrain the ocean circulation in the North Atlantic is explored. Study of an idealized tracer shows that inferences of circulation properties from transient state distributions are ...

Li, Xingwen, 1968-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

A Continuous Fast-Response Dual-Tracer Analyzer for Halogenated Atmospheric Tracer Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An apparatus for the simultaneous measurement of two tracers, sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and a perfluorocarbon compound, is introduced. The new instrument is a modification of a commercially available fast-response, continuous analyzer for single ...

James P. Rydock; Brian K. Lamb

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Tracer Testing at Dixie Valley, Nevada, Using Pyrene Tetrasulfonate Amino  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tracer Testing at Dixie Valley, Nevada, Using Pyrene Tetrasulfonate Amino Tracer Testing at Dixie Valley, Nevada, Using Pyrene Tetrasulfonate Amino G, and Fluorescein Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Tracer Testing at Dixie Valley, Nevada, Using Pyrene Tetrasulfonate Amino G, and Fluorescein Abstract A series of four tracer tests was recently conducted at the Dixie Valley, Nevada, geothermal reservoir in order to determine fluid-flow processes and to evaluate candidate tracers for use in hydrothermal systems. These tests have resulted in the first successful use of the compounds amino G and pyrenetetrasulfonate as tracers in a geothermal reservoir. The tracer candidates were subjected to simulated hydrothermal conditions in laboratory reactors at temperatures as high as 300°C in order to determine

71

Passive Tracer Gas Methods to Measure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Experiments to Evaluate and Implement Experiments to Evaluate and Implement Passive Tracer Gas Methods to Measure Ventilation Rates in Homes Melissa Lunden, David Faulkner, Elizabeth Heredia, Sebastian Cohn, Darryl Dickerhoff, Federico Noris, Jennifer Logue, Toshifumi Hotchi, Brett Singer and Max H. Sherman Environmental Energy Technologies Division October 2012 LBNL-5984E 2 Disclaimer: This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States

72

Hydrogeology of the Blautopf spring - Tracer tests in Blauhohle cave |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrogeology of the Blautopf spring - Tracer tests in Blauhohle cave Hydrogeology of the Blautopf spring - Tracer tests in Blauhohle cave Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Hydrogeology of the Blautopf spring - Tracer tests in Blauhohle cave Author Andreas Kucha Published Publisher Not Provided, 2012 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Hydrogeology of the Blautopf spring - Tracer tests in Blauhohle cave Citation Andreas Kucha. Hydrogeology of the Blautopf spring - Tracer tests in Blauhohle cave [Internet]. 2012. [cited 2013/10/17]. Available from: http://www.agw.kit.edu/english/blauhoele_cave.php Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Hydrogeology_of_the_Blautopf_spring_-_Tracer_tests_in_Blauhohle_cave&oldid=688895"

73

Tracer Testing At Coso Geothermal Area (1993) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tracer Testing At Coso Geothermal Area (1993) Tracer Testing At Coso Geothermal Area (1993) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Tracer Testing At Coso Geothermal Area (1993) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Tracer Testing Activity Date 1993 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To determine the steam and water mass flow rate Notes The method involves precisely metered injection of liquid and vapor phase tracers into the two-phase production pipeline and concurrent sampling of each phase downstream of the injection point. Subsequent chemical analysis of the steam and water samples for tracer content enables the calculation of mass flowrate for each phase given the known mass injection rates of

74

Tracer populations in the local group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, in good agreement with previous work. I go on to develop a set of tracer mass estimators that build on previous work which make use of actual (and not projected) distance and proper motion data, reflecting the amount and quality of data now available to us... ages range from 1-10 Gyr; the scale height of the population increases with age from 200 kpc to around 700 kpc and the metallicity decreases with age to around 20% solar. The typical content of this disk population are A stars, planetary nebulae...

Watkins, Laura Louise

2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

75

Measurements of waste tank passive ventilation rates using tracer gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of ventilation rate studies of eight passively ventilated high-level radioactive waste tanks using tracer gases. Head space ventilation rates were determined for Tanks A-101, AX-102, AX-103, BY-105, C-107, S-102, U-103, and U-105 using sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) and/or helium (He) as tracer gases. Passive ventilation rates are needed for the resolution of several key safety issues. These safety issues are associated with the rates of flammable gas production and ventilation, the rates at which organic salt-nitrate salt mixtures dry out, and the estimation of organic solvent waste surface areas. This tracer gas study involves injecting a tracer gas into the tank headspace and measuring its concentration at different times to establish the rate at which the tracer is removed by ventilation. Tracer gas injection and sample collection were performed by SGN Eurisys Service Corporation and/or Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation, Characterization Project Operations. Headspace samples were analyzed for He and SF{sub 6} by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The tracer gas method was first demonstrated on Tank S-102. Tests were conducted on Tank S-102 to verify that the tracer gas was uniformly distributed throughout the tank headspace before baseline samples were collected, and that mixing was sufficiently vigorous to maintain an approximately uniform distribution of tracer gas in the headspace during the course of the study. Headspace samples, collected from a location about 4 in away from the injection point and 15, 30, and 60 minutes after the injection of He and SF{sub 6}, indicated that both tracer gases were rapidly mixed. The samples were found to have the same concentration of tracer gases after 1 hour as after 24 hours, suggesting that mixing of the tracer gas was essentially complete within 1 hour.

Huckaby, J.L.; Olsen, K.B.; Sklarew, D.S.; Evans, J.C.; Remund, K.M.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Preferred methods of analysis for chemical tracers in moderate...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Preferred methods of analysis for chemical tracers in moderate- and high-temperature geothermal environments Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report:...

77

Tracer Testing At Raft River Geothermal Area (1984) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

L.; Yorgason, K. R.; Moore, J. N. (1 December 1984) Preferred methods of analysis for chemical tracers in moderate- and high-temperature geothermal environments Retrieved from...

78

Tracer Testing At East Mesa Geothermal Area (1984) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

L.; Yorgason, K. R.; Moore, J. N. (1 December 1984) Preferred methods of analysis for chemical tracers in moderate- and high-temperature geothermal environments Retrieved from...

79

Hydrogeology of the Blautopf spring - Tracer tests in Blauhohle...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2012 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Hydrogeology of the Blautopf spring - Tracer tests in Blauhohle cave...

80

TRACER DETECTION TECHNOLOGY CORP. PRODUCTS AND SERVICES FOR CORPORATE...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TRACER DETECTION TECHNOLOGY CORP. PRODUCTS AND SERVICES FOR CORPORATE AND GOVERNMENT SECURITY 3463 MAGIC DRIVE, SUITE T-19 SAN ANTONIO, TX 78229 March 29, 2009 Office of the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Development of a Set of Inherent Particulate and Gas Tracers...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of results to the number and quality of tracer elements and if new (interfering) sources are detected. * Determine primary and secondary PM 2.5 contributions from power...

82

System for reactivating catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of reactivating a catalyst, such as a solid catalyst or a liquid catalyst is provided. The method comprises providing a catalyst that is at least partially deactivated by fouling agents. The catalyst is contacted with a fluid reactivating agent that is at or above a critical point of the fluid reactivating agent and is of sufficient density to dissolve impurities. The fluid reactivating agent reacts with at least one fouling agent, releasing the at least one fouling agent from the catalyst. The at least one fouling agent becomes dissolved in the fluid reactivating agent and is subsequently separated or removed from the fluid reactivating agent so that the fluid reactivating agent may be reused. A system for reactivating a catalyst is also disclosed.

Ginosar, Daniel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Thompson, David N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Anderson, Raymond P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2010-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

83

Advanced Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Availability Technology Express Licensing Active Terahertz Metamaterial Devices Express Licensing Anion-Conducting Polymer, Composition, And...

84

Tracer Testing At East Mesa Geothermal Area (1983) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tracer Testing At East Mesa Geothermal Area (1983) Tracer Testing At East Mesa Geothermal Area (1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Tracer Testing At East Mesa Geothermal Area (1983) Exploration Activity Details Location East Mesa Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Tracer Testing Activity Date 1983 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Two field experiments were conducted to develop chemical tracer procedures for use with injection-backflow testing, one on the fracture-permeability Raft River reservoir and the other on the matrix-permeability East Mesa reservoir. Results from tests conducted with incremental increases in the injection volume at both East Mesa and Raft River suggests that, for both reservoirs, permeability remained uniform with increasing distance from the

85

Analysis of Passive Tracer Transport as Modeled by an Atmospheric General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tracers without feedback on the atmosphere are used to probe tropospheric transport. Such passive tracers are considered for two important anthropogenic sources, Europe and eastern North America. The linearity of passive tracer continuity allows ...

Mark Holzer

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

National Biomedical Tracer Facility. Project definition study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We request a $25 million government-guaranteed, interest-free loan to be repaid over a 30-year period for construction and initial operations of a cyclotron-based National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF) in North Central Texas. The NBTF will be co-located with a linear accelerator-based commercial radioisotope production facility, funded by the private sector at approximately $28 million. In addition, research radioisotope production by the NBTF will be coordinated through an association with an existing U.S. nuclear reactor center that will produce research and commercial radioisotopes through neutron reactions. The combined facilities will provide the full range of technology for radioisotope production and research: fast neutrons, thermal neutrons, and particle beams (H{sup -}, H{sup +}, and D{sup +}). The proposed NBTF facility includes an 80 MeV, 1 mA H{sup -} cyclotron that will produce proton-induced (neutron deficient) research isotopes.

Schafer, R.

1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

87

Tracer Testing At Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tracer Testing At Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Tracer Testing At Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE GTP)...

88

Tracer Gas Transport under Mixed Convection Conditions in an Experimental  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tracer Gas Transport under Mixed Convection Conditions in an Experimental Tracer Gas Transport under Mixed Convection Conditions in an Experimental Atrium: Comparison Between Experiments and CFD Predictions Title Tracer Gas Transport under Mixed Convection Conditions in an Experimental Atrium: Comparison Between Experiments and CFD Predictions Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2006 Authors Jayaraman, Buvaneswari, Elizabeth U. Finlayson, Michael D. Sohn, Tracy L. Thatcher, Phillip N. Price, Emily E. Wood, Richard G. Sextro, and Ashok J. Gadgil Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 40 Start Page Chapter Pagination 5236-5250 Keywords airflow and pollutant transport group, atria, indoor airflow and pollutant transport, indoor environment department, indoor pollutant dispersion, mixed convection, turbulence model

89

Some design considerations for the proposed Dixie Valley tracer test  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A tracer test for the Dixie Valley, Nevada, geothermal resource is planned for the summer of 1988, in order to study the fluid flow paths that will develop under typical operating conditions. During the test six production wells will provide the power plant with steam sufficient for generation of 60 MWe, requiring fluid production at a rate of approximately 600 kg/sec. Up to 75% by mass of the extracted fluid will be reinjected into the reservoir, using four injection wells. Tracer will be added to the injected fluid for a twenty-minute period, and subsequently the produced fluid will be monitored for the tracer. 5 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

Doughty, C.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

National Biomedical Tracer Facility: Project definition study  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos National Laboratory is an ideal institution and New Mexico is an ideal location for siting the National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF). The essence of the Los Alamos proposal is the development of two complementary irradiation facilities that combined with our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities and waste handling and disposal facilities provide a low cost alternative to other proposals that seek to satisfy the objectives of the NBTF. We propose the construction of a 30 MeV cyclotron facility at the site of the radiochemical facilities, and the construction of a 100 MeV target station at LAMPF to satisfy the requirements and objectives of the NBTF. We do not require any modifications to our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities or our waste treatment and disposal facilities to accomplish the objectives of the NBTF. The total capital cost for the facility defined by the project definition study is $15.2 M. This cost estimate includes $9.9 M for the cyclotron and associated facility, $2.0 M for the 100 MeV target station at LAMPF, and $3.3 M for design.

Heaton, R.; Peterson, E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Smith, P. [Smith (P.A.) Concepts and Designs (United States)

1995-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

91

Catalysis and Reactivity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

understanding of basic principles of surface reactivity and its control by surface modification, on identification of active sites and full characterization of their electronic...

92

Geographic Information Systems- Tools For Geotherm Exploration, Tracers  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Systems- Tools For Geotherm Exploration, Tracers Systems- Tools For Geotherm Exploration, Tracers Data Analysis, And Enhanced Data Distribution, Visualization, And Management Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Geographic Information Systems- Tools For Geotherm Exploration, Tracers Data Analysis, And Enhanced Data Distribution, Visualization, And Management Details Activities (4) Areas (3) Regions (0) Abstract: Geographic information systems (GIS) are an underused resource that can help the geothermal industry in exploration, tracer analysis, infrastructure management, and the general distribution and use of data. GIS systems are highly customizable to specific user needs and can use entire corporate data sets through a visual interface. This paper briefly documents the use of GIS in specific examples of geothermal research at the

93

Preferred methods of analysis for chemical tracers in moderate- and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Preferred methods of analysis for chemical tracers in moderate- and Preferred methods of analysis for chemical tracers in moderate- and high-temperature geothermal environments Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Preferred methods of analysis for chemical tracers in moderate- and high-temperature geothermal environments Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: This report describes the sampling and analytical techniques used for tracer analysis in the Raft River and East Mesa field tests. The collection procedures and sample preservation techniques, analytical methods and possible sources of contamination or error are discussed in detail. Author(s): Kroneman, R. L.; Yorgason, K. R.; Moore, J. N. Published: DOE Information Bridge, 12/1/1984 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: 10.2172/5121460

94

Quantitative interpretation of tracer test data | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Quantitative interpretation of tracer test data Quantitative interpretation of tracer test data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Quantitative interpretation of tracer test data Abstract Geothermal reinjection is an important part of sustainable management of geothermal resources. Reinjection started out as a method of waste-water disposal, but is now also being used to counteract pressure draw-down and to extract more thermal energy from reservoir rocks. The possible cooling of production wells, or thermal breakthrough, is one of the main disadvantages associated with injection. To minimize this danger while maintaining the benefit from reinjection requires careful testing and research. Tracer testing, which is used to study flow-paths and quantify fluid-flow in hydrological systems, is probably the most important tool for

95

A Study of Tracer Distribution Parameter Estimation from Sparse Samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

How do design parameters such as the spacing of sampling stations affect the quality of information obtained from atmospheric dispersion experiments? In large-scale experiments such as the Cross-Appalachian Tracer Experiment (CAPTEX) and the ...

J. Z. Holland

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Morning Transition Tracer Experiments in a Deep Narrow Valley  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three sulfur hexafluoride atmospheric tracer experiments were conducted during the post-sunrise temperature inversion breakup period in the deep, narrow Brush Creek Valley of Colorado. Experiments were conducted under clear, undisturbed weather ...

C. David Whiteman

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Lagrangian Transport Calculations Using UARS Data. Part I. Passive Tracers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The transport of passive tracers observed by the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite is simulated using computed three-dimensional trajectories of ? 100 000 air parcels initialized on a stratosphere grid, with horizontal winds provided by the ...

G.L. Manney; R.W. Zurek; W.A. Lahoz; R.S. Harwood; J.C. Gille; J.B. Kumer; J.L. Mergenthaler; A.E. Roche; A. O'Neill; R. Swinbank; J.W. Waters

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Ventilation Rates Estimated from Tracers in the Presence of Mixing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The intimate relationship among ventilation, transit-time distributions, and transient tracer budgets is analyzed. To characterize the advectivediffusive transport from the mixed layer to the interior ocean in terms of flux we employ a ...

Timothy M. Hall; Thomas W. N. Haine; Darryn W. Waugh; Mark Holzer; Francesca Terenzi; Deborah A. LeBel

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

The Dispersion of Atmospheric Tracers in Nocturnal Drainage Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the results of a series of perfluorocarbon tracer experiments that were carried out in the Brush Creek Valley in western Colorado under the auspices of the Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) program. The results ...

Paul H. Gudiksen; Donald L. Shearer

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Diagnosis of Subtropical Humidity Dynamics Using Tracers of Last Saturation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technique for diagnosing the mechanisms that control the humidity in a general circulation model (GCM) or observationally derived meteorological analysis dataset is presented. The technique involves defining a large number of tracers, each of ...

Joseph Galewsky; Adam Sobel; Isaac Held

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Atmospheric Dispersion and Tracer Ventilation in a Deep Mountain Valley  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During September and October 1984, a major meteorological and tracer study was conducted in Colorado's Brush Creek valley. The characteristics of atmospheric dispersion during the nighttime and morning transition periods are discussed in this ...

K. Jerry Allwine

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

An Automated Sequential Syringe Sampler for Atmospheric Tracer Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design of an improved sampler for the automatic collection of air samples during atmospheric halogenated tracer experiments is described. In this approach, each sample is collected in a small volume (20 to 150 ml) syringe using a rack and ...

Joseph P. Krasnec; David E. Demaray; Brian Lamb; Richard Benner

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Tracer Advection Using Dynamic Grid Adaptation and MM5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dynamic grid adaptation (DGA) technique is used to numerically simulate tracer transport at meso- and regional scales. A gridpoint redistribution scheme is designed to maximize heuristic characteristics of a good grid. The advective solver ...

John P. Iselin; William J. Gutowski; Joseph M. Prusa

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Can a Tracer Field Be Inverted for Velocity?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Determining flow fields and mixing rates from chemical tracer distributions is a challenging and important oceanographic problem. Thus the conclusion, that solutions obtained for underdetermined systems were devoid of physical content, drawn by ...

Carl Wunsch

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Transport of Passive Tracers in Baroclinic Wave Life Cycles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The transport of passive tracers in idealized baroclinic wave life cycles is studied using output from the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate Model (CCM2). Two life cycles, LCn and LCs, are simulated, starting with ...

Elizabeth M. Stone; William J. Randel; John L. Stanford

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Results of Repeat Tracer Tests at Ohaaki, NZ  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During 20 years of tracer testing at Ohaaki a number of wells have been used more than once as tracer injection sites. In studying the various responses obtained it has been necessary to consider variations in the experimental test conditions before making comparisons which relate to field conditions. Some very significant changes have occurred in the field hydrology in recent years and water flow speeds as high as those encountered at Wairakei have been demonstrated.

McCabe, W.J.; Clotworthy, A.W.; Morris, C.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

HYDROGEL TRACER BEADS: THE DEVELOPMENT, MODIFICATION, AND TESTING OF AN INNOVATIVE TRACER FOR BETTER UNDERSTANDING LNAPL TRANSPORT IN KARST AQUIFERS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this specific research task is to develop proxy tracers that mimic contaminant movement to better understand and predict contaminant fate and transport in karst aquifers. Hydrogel tracer beads are transported as a separate phase than water and can used as a proxy tracer to mimic the transport of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL). They can be constructed with different densities, sizes & chemical attributes. This poster describes the creation and optimization of the beads and the field testing of buoyant beads, including sampling, tracer analysis, and quantitative analysis. The buoyant beads are transported ahead of the dissolved solutes, suggesting that light NAPL (LNAPL) transport in karst may occur faster than predicted from traditional tracing techniques. The hydrogel beads were successful in illustrating this enhanced transport.

Amanda Laskoskie, Harry M. Edenborn, and Dorothy J. Vesper

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Thermal single-well injection-withdrawal tracer tests for determining fracture-matrix heat transfer area  

SciTech Connect

Single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) tracer tests involve injection of traced fluid and subsequent tracer recovery from the same well, usually with some quiescent time between the injection and withdrawal periods. SWIW are insensitive to variations in advective processes that arise from formation heterogeneities, because upon withdrawal, fluid parcels tend to retrace the paths taken during injection. However, SWIW are sensitive to diffusive processes, such as diffusive exchange of conservative or reactive solutes between fractures and rock matrix. This paper focuses on SWIW tests in which temperature itself is used as a tracer. Numerical simulations demonstrate the sensitivity of temperature returns to fracture-matrix interaction. We consider thermal SWIW response to the two primary reservoir improvements targeted with stimulation, (1) making additional fractures accessible to injected fluids, and (2) increasing the aperture and permeability of pre-existing fractures. It is found that temperature returns in SWIW tests are insensitive to (2), while providing a strong signal of more rapid temperature recovery during the withdrawal phase for (1).

Pruess, K.; Doughty, C.

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

109

TRACER: an EXCEL workbook to calculate mean residence time in groundwater by use of tracers CFC-11, CFC-12 and tritium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An EXCEL workbook is presented for calculating the mean residence time of groundwater based on the environmental tracers, tritium, CFC-11 and CFC-12. The program TRACER is written in Visual Basic for Application language and uses piston, exponential, ... Keywords: environmental tracer, exit-age distribution, exponential model, piston flow, turnover time

Serdar Bayari

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Natural organic compounds as tracers for biomass combustion in aerosols  

SciTech Connect

Biomass combustion is an important primary source of carbonaceous particles in the global atmosphere. Although various molecular markers have already been proposed for this process, additional specific organic tracers need to be characterized. The injection of natural product organic tracers to smoke occurs primarily by direct volatilization/steam stripping and by thermal alteration based on combustion temperature. The degree of alteration increases as the burn temperature rises and the moisture content of the fuel decreases. Although the molecular composition of organic matter in smoke particles is highly variable, the molecular structures of the tracers are generally source specific. The homologous compound series and biomarkers present in smoke particles are derived directly from plant wax, gum and resin by volatilization and secondarily from pyrolysis of biopolymers, wax, gum and resin. The complexity of the organic components of smoke aerosol is illustrated with examples from controlled burns of temperate and tropical biomass fuels. Burning of biomass from temperate regions (i.e., conifers) yields characteristic tracers from diterpenoids as well as phenolics and other oxygenated species, which are recognizable in urban airsheds. The major organic components of smoke particles from tropical biomass are straight-chain, aliphatic and oxygenated compounds and triterpenoids. The precursor-to-product approach of organic geochemistry can be applied successfully to provide tracers for studying smoke plume chemistry and dispersion.

Simoneit, B.R.T. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). Coll. of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences; Abas, M.R. bin [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[Univ. of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Cass, G.R. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Environmental Engineering Science Dept.; Rogge, W.F. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[Florida International Univ., University Park, FL (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Mazurek, M.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Standley, L.J. [Academy of Natural Sciences, Avondale, PA (United States). Stroud Water Research Center; Hildemann, L.M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Thermal stabilities of aromatic acids as geothermal tracers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports that thirty-nine aromatic acids were tested for their suitability as geothermal tracers. The parameters of the experiments included temperatures up to 300[degrees]C for periods of up to one month in fluids of various salinities, the presence of absence of rocks, and atmospheric levels of molecular oxygen. Of the compounds tested, at least 24 are suitable as tracers in a moderate-temperature geothermal environment while 5 may be used at temperatures as high as 300[degrees]C. The compounds displayed no adsorption on the rocks used in the tests. Some of the compounds were used successfully in a major tracer test at the Dixie Valley, Nevada geothermal system.

Adams, M.C.; Moore, J.N.; Fabry, L.G.; Ahn, J.H. (Utah Univ. Research Inst., Salt Lake City, UT (United States))

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Tracer Testing At Raft River Geothermal Area (1983) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3) 3) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Tracer Testing Activity Date 1983 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To develop chemical tracing procedures for geothermal areas. Notes Two field experiments were conducted to develop chemical tracer procedures for use with injection-backflow testing, one on the fracture-permeability Raft River reservoir and the other on the matrix-permeability East Mesa reservoir. Results from tests conducted with incremental increases in the injection volume at both East Mesa and Raft River suggests that, for both reservoirs, permeability remained uniform with increasing distance from the well bore. Increased mixing during quiescent periods, between injection and

113

Interwell tracer analyses of a hydraulically fractured granitic geothermal reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Field experiments using fluorescent dye and radioactive tracers (Br{sup 82} and I{sup 131}) have been employed to characterize a hot, low-matrix permeability, hydraulically-fractured granitic reservoir at depths of 2440 to 2960 m (8000 to 9700 ft). Tracer profiles and residence time distributions have been used to delineate changes in the fracture system, particularly in diagnosing pathological flow patterns and in identifying new injection and production zones. The effectiveness of one- and two-dimensional theoretical dispersion models utilizing single and multiple porous, fractured zones with velocity and formation dependent effects are discussed with respect to actual field data.

Tester, J.W.; Potter, R.M.; Bivins, R.L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Preliminary assessment of halogenated alkanes as vapor-phase tracers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

New tracers are needed to evaluate the efficiency of injection strategies in vapor-dominated environments. One group of compounds that seems to meet the requirements for vapor-phase tracing are the halogenated alkanes (HCFCs). HCFCs are generally nontoxic, and extrapolation of tabulated thermodynamic data indicate that they will be thermally stable and nonreactive in a geothermal environment. The solubilities and stabilities of these compounds, which form several homologous series, vary according to the substituent ratios of fluorine, chlorine, and hydrogen. Laboratory and field tests that will further define the suitability of HCFCs as vapor-phase tracers are under way.

Adams, Michael C.; Moore, Joseph N.; Hirtz, Paul

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Reactive Power Compensator.  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for determining and providing reactive power compensation for an inductive load. A reactive power compensator (50,50') monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b, 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. Using signals indicative of the current on each of these lines when the voltage waveform on the line crosses zero, the reactive power compensator determines a reactive power compensator capacitance that must be connected to the lines to maintain a desired VAR level, power factor, or line voltage. Alternatively, an operator can manually select a specific capacitance for connection to each line, or the capacitance can be selected based on a time schedule. The reactive power compensator produces control signals, which are coupled through optical fibers (102/106) to a switch driver (110, 110') to select specific compensation capacitors (112) for connections to each line. The switch driver develops triggering signals that are supplied to a plurality of series-connected solid state switches (350), which control charge current in one direction in respect to ground for each compensation capacitor. During each cycle, current flows from ground to charge the capacitors as the voltage on the line begins to go negative from its positive peak value. The triggering signals are applied to gate the solid state switches into a conducting state when the potential on the lines and on the capacitors reaches a negative peak value, thereby minimizing both the potential difference and across the charge current through the switches when they begin to conduct. Any harmonic distortion on the potential and current carried by the lines is filtered out from the current and potential signals used by the reactive power compensator so that it does not affect the determination of the required reactive compensation. 26 figs.

El-Sharkawi, M.A.; Venkata, S.S.; Chen, M.; Andexler, G.; Huang, T.

1992-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

116

Reactive power compensator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for determining and providing reactive power compensation for an inductive load. A reactive power compensator (50,50') monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b, 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. Using signals indicative of the current on each of these lines when the voltage waveform on the line crosses zero, the reactive power compensator determines a reactive power compensator capacitance that must be connected to the lines to maintain a desired VAR level, power factor, or line voltage. Alternatively, an operator can manually select a specific capacitance for connection to each line, or the capacitance can be selected based on a time schedule. The reactive power compensator produces control signals, which are coupled through optical fibers (102/106) to a switch driver (110, 110') to select specific compensation capacitors (112) for connections to each line. The switch driver develops triggering signals that are supplied to a plurality of series-connected solid state switches (350), which control charge current in one direction in respect to ground for each compensation capacitor. During each cycle, current flows from ground to charge the capacitors as the voltage on the line begins to go negative from its positive peak value. The triggering signals are applied to gate the solid state switches into a conducting state when the potential on the lines and on the capacitors reaches a negative peak value, thereby minimizing both the potential difference and across the charge current through the switches when they begin to conduct. Any harmonic distortion on the potential and current carried by the lines is filtered out from the current and potential signals used by the reactive power compensator so that it does not affect the determination of the required reactive compensation.

El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A. (Renton, WA); Venkata, Subrahmanyam S. (Woodinville, WA); Chen, Mingliang (Kirkland, WA); Andexler, George (Everett, WA); Huang, Tony (Seattle, WA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Tracer testing at Soultz-sous-Forts (France) using naphthalene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: · EPS1 fully cored exploration · GPK-1 preliminary injection tests · GPK-3 injection well · GPK-2 and future GPK-4 production wells 3.6 km continuous logs: Caliper, Spectral GR, UBI (5100m) #12;EHDRA-2 (July 2000) > Water injection · 26,800 m3 of fresh water and 1,000 m3 of heavy brine > Tracer

118

Using a combination of two models in tracer simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of a combination of two models, a Lagrangian meso-scale model and a long-range transport Eulerian model, in a model for studying the air pollution caused by a single but strong emission source is discussed. It is explained why it is worthwhile ... Keywords: Accidental releases, Advection, Animation, Chernobyl, Diffusion, ETEX, Tracer models, Visualization

J. Brandt; T. Mikkelsen; S. Thykier-Nielsen; Z. Zlatev

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Dispersion of Perfluorocarbon Tracers within the Salt Lake Valley during VTMX 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Six perfluorocarbon tracer experiments were conducted in Salt Lake City, Utah, during October 2000 as part of the Vertical Transport and Mixing (VTMX) field campaign. Four tracers were released at different sites to obtain information on ...

Jerome D. Fast; K. Jerry Allwine; Russell N. Dietz; Kirk L. Clawson; Joel C. Torcolini

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Relationships between Tracer Ages and Potential Vorticity in Unsteady Wind-Driven Circulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relationships between different tracer ages and between tracer age and potential vorticity are examined by simulating barotropic double-gyre circulations. The unsteady model flow crudely represents aspects of the midlatitude, middepth ocean ...

Hong Zhang; Thomas W. N. Haine; Darryn W. Waugh

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Effective Eddy Diffusivities Inferred from a Point Release Tracer in an Eddy-Resolving Ocean Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study uses tracer experiments in a global eddy-resolving ocean model to examine two diagnostic methods for inferring effective eddy isopycnic diffusivity from point release tracers. The first method is based on the growth rate of the area ...

Mei-Man Lee; A. J. George Nurser; Andrew C. Coward; Beverly A. de Cuevas

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

The Roles of Langmuir Circulations in the Dispersion of Surface Tracers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A hierarchy of theoretical and numerical models for the dispersion of discrete floating tracers on lakes and oceans is presented. Central to these models is the role of Langmuir circulations, which concentrate tracers into narrow windrows this ...

Alan J. Faller; Stephen J. Auer

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Solving Underdetermined Tracer Inverse Problems by Spatial Smoothing and Cross Validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tracer conservation equations may be inverted to determine the flow field and macroscopic diffusion coefficients from known tracer distributions. An underdetermined system leads to an infinite number of possible solutions. The solution that is ...

Peter C. McIntosh; George Veronis

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Numerical Simulations of Airflows and Tracer Transport in the Southwestern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Project MOHAVE (Measurement of Haze and Visual Effects) produced a unique set of tracer data over the southwestern United States. During the summer of 1992, a perfluorocarbon tracer gas was released from the Mohave Power Project (MPP), a large ...

Tetsuji Yamada

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Oxyferryl Heme Reactivity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxyferryl Heme Reactivity Using both Radiation and Photochemical Oxyferryl Heme Reactivity Using both Radiation and Photochemical Techniques A. M. English, T. Fox, G. Tsaprailis, C. W. Fenwick, J. F. Wishart, J. T. Hazzard, and G. Tollin Adv. Chem. Ser. 254, Ch. 6, pp. 81-98 Abstract: Flash photolysis and pulse radiolysis were used to generate reductants in situ to study the electron-transfer (ET) reactivity of the FeIV=O heme centers in myoglobin and cytochrome c peroxidase. Reduction of a5RuIII groups covalently bound to surface histidines allowed intramolecular RuII --> FeIV=O ET rates to be measured. Protonation of the oxene ligand was found to be largely rate determining in myoglobin, consistent with the lack of proton donors in its heme pocket. The large distance (21-23 Å) between surface histidines and the heme in wild-type

126

Reactivity of Acid Generators  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactivity of Acid Generators for Chemically Amplified Resists with Reactivity of Acid Generators for Chemically Amplified Resists with Low-Energy Electrons Atsuro Nakano, Takahiro Kozawa, Seiichi Tagawa, Tomasz Szreder, James F. Wishart, Toshiyuki Kai and Tsutomu Shimokawa Jpn. J. Appl. Phys., 45, L197-L200 (2006). [Find paper at the Japanese Journal of Applied Physics] Abstract: In chemically amplified resists for ionizing radiations such as electron beams and extreme ultraviolet (EUV), low-energy electrons play an important role in the pattern formation processes. The reactivity of acid generators with low-energy electrons was evaluated using solvated electrons in tetrahydrofuran, which were generated by a pulsed electron beam. The rate constants of acid generators with the solvated electrons ranged from 0.6 to 1.9 x 1011 M-1s-1

127

Chemical tracer test at the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada. Geothermal Reservoir Technology research program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the injection test described, chemical tracers established the fluid flow between one injection well and one production well. Measured tracer concentrations, calculated flow rates, sampling schedules, and the daily events of the tracer test are documented. This experiment was designed to test the application of organic tracers, to further refine the predictive capability of the reservoir model, and to improve the effectiveness of Oxbow`s injection strategy.

Adams, M.C.; Moore, J.N. [Utah Univ. Research Inst., Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Benoit, W.R. [Oxbow Geothermal Corp., Reno, NV (United States); Doughty, C.; Bodvarsson, G.S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

A toolkit for groundwater mean residence time interpretation with gaseous tracers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analytical Excel-based toolkit called Gas-Tracer-Interpretation (GTI) was developed for determining mean residence time (MRT) of groundwater samples and for validating conceptual model assumptions. This novel data interpretation toolkit improves data ... Keywords: Environmental tracer, Environmental tracers concentrations in water, Groundwater dating, Lumped-parameter modeling, Water age

Pablo Fernando Dvila, Christoph Klls, Markus Weiler

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Advanced Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Gasification Carbon feedstock gasification is a promising pathway for high-efficiency, low-pollutant power generation and chemical production. The inability, however, to...

130

Advanced Ceramics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 3   Raw materials for advanced structural and magnetic (ferrite) ceramics...conductivity Wear resistance Oxygen sensors, fuel cells (potential), high-temperature

131

Advanced Manufacturing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... new metrologically-based methods for industry as well ... for Advanced Catalyst Development and Durability ... Electron-Beam Irradiation of Solar Cells. ...

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

132

Reactive Power Compensating System.  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The circuit was designed for the specific application of wind-driven induction generators. It has great potential for application in any situation where a varying reactive power load is present, such as with induction motors or generators, or for transmission network compensation.

Williams, Timothy J.; El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Venkata, Subrahmanyam S.

1985-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

133

Reactive power compensating system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The reactive power of an induction machine is compensated by providing fixed capacitors on each phase line for the minimum compensation required, sensing the current on one line at the time its voltage crosses zero to determine the actual compensation required for each phase, and selecting switched capacitors on each line to provide the balance of the compensation required.

Williams, Timothy J. (Redondo Beach, CA); El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A. (Renton, WA); Venkata, Subrahmanyam S. (Seattle, WA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Modeling of CBM production, CO{sub 2} injection, and tracer movement at a field CO{sub 2} sequestration site  

SciTech Connect

Sequestration of carbon dioxide in unmineable coal seams is a potential technology mainly because of the potential for simultaneous enhanced coalbed methane production (ECBM). Several pilot tests have been performed around the globe leading to mixed results. Numerous modeling efforts have been carried out successfully to model methane production and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection. Sensitivity analyses and history matching along with several optimization tools were used to estimate reservoir properties and to investigate reservoir performance. Geological and geophysical techniques have also been used to characterize field sequestration sites and to inspect reservoir heterogeneity. The fate and movement of injected CO{sub 2} can be determined by using several monitoring techniques. Monitoring of perfluorocarbon (PFC) tracers is one of these monitoring technologies. As a part of this monitoring technique, a small fraction of a traceable fluid is added to the injection wellhead along with the CO{sub 2} stream at different times to monitor the timing and location of the breakthrough in nearby monitoring wells or offset production wells. A reservoir modeling study was performed to simulate a pilot sequestration site located in the San Juan coal basin of northern New Mexico. Several unknown reservoir properties at the field site were estimated by modeling the coal seam as a dual porosity formation and by history matching the methane production and CO{sub 2} injection. In addition to reservoir modeling of methane production and CO{sub 2} injection, tracer injection was modeled. Tracers serve as a surrogate for determining potential leakage of CO{sub 2}. The tracer was modeled as a non-reactive gas and was injected into the reservoir as a mixture along with CO{sub 2}. Geologic and geometric details of the field site, numerical modeling details of methane production, CO{sub 2} injection, and tracer injection are presented in this paper. Moreover, the numerical predictions of the tracer arrival times were compared with the measured field data. Results show that tracer modeling is useful in investigating movement of injected CO{sub 2} into the coal seam at the field site. Also, such new modeling techniques can be utilized to determine potential leakage pathways, and to investigate reservoir anisotropy and heterogeneity.

Siriwardane, Hema J.; Bowes, Benjamin D.; Bromhal, Grant S.; Gondle, Raj K.; Wells, Arthur W.; Strazisar, Brian R.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Grid Shunt Reactive Power Compensation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides essential information on transmission grid shunt reactive power compensation, with particular focus on controllable reactive power sources such as the static var controller (SVC). Applying the information presented in this report can help electric utilities planning grid shunt reactive power compensation strategies or operating shunt reactive power compensation equipment to increase grid reliability, improve grid performance and prevent costly cascading outages. The report is intende...

2008-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

136

Reactive Air Aluminization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ferritic stainless steels and other alloys are of great interest to SOFC developers for applications such as interconnects, cell frames, and balance of plant components. While these alloys offer significant advantages (e.g., low material and manufacturing cost, high thermal conductivity, and high temperature oxidation resistance), there are challenges which can hinder their utilization in SOFC systems; these challenges include Cr volatility and reactivity with glass seals. To overcome these challenges, protective coatings and surface treatments for the alloys are under development. In particular, aluminization of alloy surfaces offers the potential for mitigating both evaporation of Cr from the alloy surface and reaction of alloy constituents with glass seals. Commercial aluminization processes are available to SOFC developers, but they tend to be costly due to their use of exotic raw materials and/or processing conditions. As an alternative, PNNL has developed Reactive Air Aluminization (RAA), which offers a low-cost, simpler alternative to conventional aluminization methods.

Choi, Jung-Pyung; Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

137

Advanced Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Express Licensing Active Terahertz Metamaterial Devices Express Licensing Anion-Conducting Polymer, Composition, And Membrane Express Licensing Analysis Of Macromolecule, Liggands And Macromolecule-Lingand Complexes Express Licensing Carbon Microtubes Express Licensing Chemical Synthesis Of Chiral Conducting Polymers Express Licensing Forming Adherent Coatings Using Plasma Processing Express Licensing Hydrogen Scavengers Express Licensing Laser Welding Of Fused Quartz Express Licensing Multiple Feed Powder Splitter Negotiable Licensing Boron-10 Neutron Detectors for Helium-3 Replacement Negotiable Licensing Insensitive Extrudable Explosive Negotiable Licensing Durable Fuel Cell Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA) Express Licensing Method of Synthesis of Proton Conducting Materials

138

Advanced Ceramics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 2   Classification of advanced ceramics...solid electrolytes, piezoelectrics, dielectrics, superconductors Optical Low absorption coefficient Lamps, windows, fiber optics, infrared optics Nuclear Irradiation resistance, high absorption coefficient,

139

Microfluidic Investigation of Tracer Dye Diffusion in Alumina Nanofluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nanofluids, a new class of fluids engineered by suspending nanometer-sized particles in a host liquid, are offered as a new strategy in order to improve heat and mass transfer efficiency. My research was motivated by previous exciting studies on enhanced mass diffusion and the possibility of tailoring mass transport by direct manipulation of molecular diffusion. Therefore, a microfluidic approach capable of directly probing tracer diffusion between nanoparticle-laden fluid streams was developed. Under conditions matching previously reported studies, strong complexation interactions between the dye and nanoparticles at the interface between fluid streams was observed. When the tracer dye and surfactant were carefully chosen to minimize the collective effects of the interactions, no significant change in tracer dye diffusivity was observed in the presence of nanoparticles. Next, adapting tracer dyes for studies involving colloidal nanomaterials was explored. Addition of these charged tracers poses a myriad of challenges because of their propensity to disrupt the delicate balance among physicochemical interactions governing suspension stability. Here it was shown how important it is to select the compatible combinations of dye, nanoparticle, and stabilizing surfactant to overcome these limitations in low volume fraction (< 1 vol%) aqueous suspensions of Al2O3 nanoparticles. A microfluidic system was applied as a stability probe that unexpectedly revealed how rapid aggregation could be readily triggered in the presence of local chemical gradients. Suspension stability was also assessed in conjunction with coordinated measurements of zeta potential, steady shear viscosity and bulk thermal conductivity. These studies also guided our efforts to prepare new refrigerant formulations containing dispersed nanomaterials, including graphene nanosheets, carbon nanotubes and metal oxide and nitride. The influence of key parameters such as particle type, size and volume fraction on the suspension's thermal conductivity was investigated using a standard protocol. Our findings showed that thermal conductivity values of carbon nanotube and graphene nanosheet suspensions were higher than TiO2 nanoparticles, despite some nanoparticles with large particle sizes provided noticeable thermal conductivity enhancements. Significantly, the graphene containing suspensions uniquely matched the thermal conductivity enhancements attained in nanotube suspensions without accompanying viscosity, thus making them an attractive new coolant for demanding applications such as electronics and reactor cooling.

Ozturk, Serdar 1979-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Advanced Manufacturing Office: Solicitations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solicitations on Twitter Bookmark Advanced Manufacturing Office: Solicitations on Google Bookmark Advanced Manufacturing Office: Solicitations on Delicious Rank Advanced...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Advanced Manufacturing Office: Webcasts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office: Webcasts on Twitter Bookmark Advanced Manufacturing Office: Webcasts on Google Bookmark Advanced Manufacturing Office: Webcasts on Delicious Rank Advanced...

142

Advanced Manufacturing Office: Subscribe  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office: Subscribe on Twitter Bookmark Advanced Manufacturing Office: Subscribe on Google Bookmark Advanced Manufacturing Office: Subscribe on Delicious Rank Advanced...

143

Advanced Manufacturing Office: Workshops  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office: Workshops on Twitter Bookmark Advanced Manufacturing Office: Workshops on Google Bookmark Advanced Manufacturing Office: Workshops on Delicious Rank Advanced...

144

Reactive Maintenance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactive Maintenance Reactive Maintenance Reactive Maintenance October 7, 2013 - 9:40am Addthis Reactive maintenance follows a run-it-until-it-breaks strategy where no actions or efforts are taken to maintain equipment as intended by the manufacturer. Studies indicate this is still the predominant mode of maintenance for Federal facilities. Advantages Reactive maintenance advantages are a double-edged sword. Federal agencies following a purely reactive maintenance strategy can expect little expenditures for manpower or system upkeep until something breaks. However, systems do break. With new equipment, Federal agencies can expect minimal incidents of failure. However, older equipment often experiences higher failure incidents and costlier repairs. Other advantages of reactive maintenance are:

145

Fluorescent Nanoparticle Tracers for Oil Exploration and Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2013 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Advanced Materials and Reservoir Engineering for Extreme Oil & Gas...

146

Advanced Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Systems: Advanced Systems: high Performance fenestration systems Research areas: Research activities to improve the performance of windows and other fenestration products must address window systems issues as well as Glazing Materials research. LBNL activities in the area of Advanced Systems include research at both the product level and the building envelope and building systems levels. Highly insulating windows - using non structural center layers Lower cost solutions to more insulating three layer glazing systems, with the potential to turn windows in U.S. heating dominated residential applications into net-energy gainers. Highly Insulating Window Frames In collaboration with the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, we are researching the potentials for highly insulating window frames. Our initial work examines European frames with reported U-factors under 0.15 Btu/hr-ft2-F. Future research aims to analyze these designs, verify these performance levels and ensure that procedures used to calculate frame performance are accurate.

147

Tracer Recovery and Mixing from Two Geothermal Injection-Backflow Studies |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tracer Recovery and Mixing from Two Geothermal Injection-Backflow Studies Tracer Recovery and Mixing from Two Geothermal Injection-Backflow Studies Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Tracer Recovery and Mixing from Two Geothermal Injection-Backflow Studies Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Injection-backflow tracer testing on a single well is not a commonly used procedure for geothermal reservoir evaluation, and, consequently, there is little published information on the character or interpretation of tracer recovery curves. Two field experiments were conducted to develop chemical tracer procedures for use with injection-backflow testing, one on the fracture-permeability Raft River reservoir and the other on the matrix-permeability East Mesa reservoir. Results from tests conducted with incremental increases in the injection

148

COMPARISON OF THREE TRACER TESTS AT THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SITE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three conservative tracer tests have been conducted through the Bridge Fault fracture zone at the Raft River Geothermal (RRG) site. All three tests were conducted between injection well RRG-5 and production wells RRG-1 (790 m distance) and RRG-4 (740 m distance). The injection well is used during the summer months to provide pressure support to the production wells. The first test was conducted in 2008 using 136 kg of fluorescein tracer. Two additional tracers were injected in 2010. The first 2010 tracer injected was 100 kg fluorescein disodium hydrate salt on June, 21. The second tracer (100 kg 2,6-naphthalene disulfonic acid sodium salt) was injected one month later on July 21. Sampling of the two productions wells is still being performed to obtain the tail end of the second 2010 tracer test. Tracer concentrations were measured using HPLC with a fluorescence detector. Results for the 2008 test, suggest 80% tracer recover at the two production wells. Of the tracer recovered, 85% of tracer mass was recovered in well RRG-4 indicating a greater flow pathway connection between injection well and RRG-4 than RRG-1. Fluorescein tracer results appear to be similar between the 2008 and 2010 tests for well RRG-4 with peak concentrations arriving approximately 20 days after injection despite the differences between the injection rates for the two tests (~950 gpm to 475 gpm) between the 2008 and 2010. The two 2010 tracer tests will be compared to determine if the results support the hypothesis that rock contraction along the flow pathway due to the 55 oC cooler water injection alters the flow through the ~140 oC reservoir.

Earl D Mattson; Mitchell Plummer; Carl Palmer; Larry Hull; Samantha Miller; Randy Nye

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Rapid measurements and mapping of tracer gas concentrations in a large indoor space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurements of tracer gas dispersion are useful as a meansvisualization measurements of gas dispersion in large indoorcharacteristics of the gas dispersion. Figure 4 shows the

Fischer, M.L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

USE OF PERFLUOROCARBON TRACER (PFT) TECHNOLOGY FOR SUBSURFACE BARRIER INTEGRITY VERIFICATION AT THE WALDO TEST SITE.  

SciTech Connect

Testing of perfluorocarbon gas tracers (PFT) on a subsurface barrier with known flaws was conducted at the Waldo Test Site operated by Science and Engineering Associates, Inc (SEA). The tests involved the use of five unique PFTs with a different tracer injected along the interior of each wall of the barrier. A fifth tracer was injected exterior to the barrier to examine the validity of diffusion controlled transport of the PFTs. The PFTs were injected for three days at a nominal flow rate of 15 cm{sup 3}/min and concentrations in the range of a few hundred ppm. Approximately 65 liters of air laced with tracer was injected for each tracer. The tracers were able to accurately detect the presence of the engineered flaws. Two flaws were detected on the north and east walls, and one flaw was detected on the south and west walls. In addition, one non-engineered flaw at the seam between the north and east walls was also detected. The use of multiple tracers provided independent confirmation of the flaws and permitted a distinction between tracers arriving at a monitoring port after being released from a nearby flaw and non-engineered flaws. The PFTs detected the smallest flaw, 0.5 inches in diameter. Visual inspection of the data showed excellent agreement with the known flaw locations and the relative size of the flaws was accurately estimated. Simultaneous with the PFT tests, SEA conducted tests with another gas tracer sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}).

SULLIVAN,T.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

USE OF NATURALLY-OCCURRING TRACERS TO MONITOR TWO-PHASE CONDITIONS...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

USE OF NATURALLY-OCCURRING TRACERS TO MONITOR TWO-PHASE CONDITIONS IN THE COSO EGS PROJECT Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: USE...

152

Advanced converter reactors  

SciTech Connect

Advanced converter reactors (ACRs) of primary US interest are those which can be commercialized within about 20 years, and are: Advanced Light-Water Reactors, Spectral-Shift-Control Reactors, Heavy-Water Reactors (CANDU type), and High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. These reactors can operate on uranium, thorium, or uranium-thorium fuel cycles, but have the greatest fuel utilization on thorium type cycles. The water reactors tend to operate more economically on uranium cycles, while the HTGR is more economical on thorium cycles. Thus, the HTGR had the greatest practical potential for improving fuel utilization. If the US has 3.4 to 4 million tons U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ at reasonable costs, ACRs can make important contributions to maintaining a high nuclear power level for many decades; further, they work well with fast breeder reactors in the long term under symbiotic fueling conditions. Primary nuclear data needs of ACRs are integral measurements of reactivity coefficients and resonance absorption integrals.

Kasten, P.R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Single well tracer method to evaluate enhanced recovery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Data useful to evaluate the effectiveness of or to design an enhanced recovery process (the recovery process involving mobilizing and moving hydrocarbons through a hydrocarbon-bearing subterranean formation from an injection well to a production well by injecting a mobilizing fluid into the injection well) are obtained by a process which comprises sequentially: determining hydrocarbon saturation in the formation in a volume in the formation near a well bore penetrating the formation, injecting sufficient of the mobilizing fluid to mobilize and move hydrocarbons from a volume in the formation near the well bore penetrating the formation, and determining by the single well tracer method a hydrocarbon saturation profile in a volume from which hydrocarbons are moved. The single well tracer method employed is disclosed by U.S. Pat. No. 3,623,842. The process is useful to evaluate surfactant floods, water floods, polymer floods, CO.sub.2 floods, caustic floods, micellar floods, and the like in the reservoir in much less time at greatly reduced costs, compared to conventional multi-well pilot test.

Sheely, Jr., Clyde Q. (Ponca City, OK); Baldwin, Jr., David E. (Ponca City, OK)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Estimation of tracer diffusion coefficients of ions in aqueous solution  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Equations are given for estimating tracer diffusion coefficients D/sub i//sup 0/ of ions at infinite dilution in terms of limiting ionic conductances ..lambda../sub i//sup 0/. Also given are generalized Nernst-Hartley equations for binary and multicomponent diffusion coefficients D/sup 0/ and D/sub ij//sup 0/, respectively, at infinite dilution. Data, estimates, and correlations for ..lambda../sub i//sup 0/ at 25/sup 0/C and other temperatures are discussed. Estimated values of ..lambda../sub i//sup 0/ are tabulated from 0-300/sup 0/C for ions of waste isolation interest and for ions of economic interest in geothermal brines. Estimates of their tracer diffusion coefficients at infinite dilution are tabulated. A rule of thumb, good to a factor of 2, is presented. Very limited data (available only at 25/sup 0/C) indicate that D/sub i//D/sub i//sup 0/ generally declines as the concentration of salt or supporting electrolyte increases. 6 figures, 2 tables.

Miller, D.G.

1982-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

155

Advanced Combustion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Systems Systems Advanced Combustion Background Conventional coal-fired power plants utilize steam turbines to generate electricity, which operate at efficiencies of 35-37 percent. Operation at higher temperatures and pressures can lead to higher efficiencies, resulting in reduced fuel consumption and lower greenhouse gas emissions. Higher efficiency also reduces CO2 production for the same amount of energy produced, thereby facilitating a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. When combined, oxy-combustion comes with an efficiency hit, so it will actually increase the amount of CO2 to be captured. But without so much N2 in the flue gas, it will be easier and perhaps more efficient to capture, utilize and sequester. NETL's Advanced Combustion Project and members of the NETL-Regional University

156

Advanced Search  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications Publications Advanced Search Most publications by Environmental Energy Technologies Division authors are searchable from this page, including peer-reviewed publications, book chapters, conference proceedings and LBNL reports. Filter Advanced Search Publications list This publications database is an ongoing project, and not all Division publications are represented here yet. For additional help see the bottom of this page. Documents Found: 4418 Title Keyword LBNL Number Author - Any - Abadie, Marc O Abbey, Chad Abdolrazaghi, Mohamad Aberg, Annika Abhyankar, Nikit Abraham, Marvin M Abshire, James B Abushakra, Bass Acevedo-Ruiz, Manuel Aceves, Salvador Ache, Hans J Ackerly, David D Ackerman, Andrew S Adamkiewicz, Gary Adams, J W Adams, Carl Adamson, Bo Addy, Nathan Addy, Susan E Aden, Nathaniel T Adesola, Bunmi Adhikari,

157

Reactive rules on the web  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reactive rules are used for programming rule-based, reactive systems, which have the ability to detect events and respond to them automatically in a timely manner. Such systems are needed on the Web for bridging the gap between the existing, passive ...

Bruno Berstel; Philippe Bonnard; Franois Bry; Michael Eckert; Paula-Lavinia P?trnjan

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Advanced Combustion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The activity reported in this presentation is to provide the mechanical and physical property information needed to allow rational design, development and/or choice of alloys, manufacturing approaches, and environmental exposure and component life models to enable oxy-fuel combustion boilers to operate at Ultra-Supercritical (up to 650{degrees}C & between 22-30 MPa) and/or Advanced Ultra-Supercritical conditions (760{degrees}C & 35 MPa).

Holcomb, Gordon R. [NETL

2013-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

159

Federal Energy Management Program: Reactive Maintenance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactive Reactive Maintenance to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Reactive Maintenance on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Reactive Maintenance on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Reactive Maintenance on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Reactive Maintenance on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Reactive Maintenance on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Reactive Maintenance on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Federal Requirements Program Management Commissioning Metering Computerized Maintenance Management Systems Maintenance Types Reactive Preventive Predictive Reliability-Centered Major Equipment Types

160

A Tariff for Reactive Power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two kinds of power are required to operate an electric power system: real power, measured in watts, and reactive power, measured in volt-amperes reactive or VARs. Reactive power supply is one of a class of power system reliability services collectively known as ancillary services, and is essential for the reliable operation of the bulk power system. Reactive power flows when current leads or lags behind voltage. Typically, the current in a distribution system lags behind voltage because of inductive loads such as motors. Reactive power flow wastes energy and capacity and causes voltage droop. To correct lagging power flow, leading reactive power (current leading voltage) is supplied to bring the current into phase with voltage. When the current is in phase with voltage, there is a reduction in system losses, an increase in system capacity, and a rise in voltage. Reactive power can be supplied from either static or dynamic VAR sources. Static sources are typically transmission and distribution equipment, such as capacitors at substations, and their cost has historically been included in the revenue requirement of the transmission operator (TO), and recovered through cost-of-service rates. By contrast, dynamic sources are typically generators capable of producing variable levels of reactive power by automatically controlling the generator to regulate voltage. Transmission system devices such as synchronous condensers can also provide dynamic reactive power. A class of solid state devices (called flexible AC transmission system devices or FACTs) can provide dynamic reactive power. One specific device has the unfortunate name of static VAR compensator (SVC), where 'static' refers to the solid state nature of the device (it does not include rotating equipment) and not to the production of static reactive power. Dynamic sources at the distribution level, while more costly would be very useful in helping to regulate local voltage. Local voltage regulation would reduce system losses, increase circuit capacity, increase reliability, and improve efficiency. Reactive power is theoretically available from any inverter-based equipment such as photovoltaic (PV) systems, fuel cells, microturbines, and adjustable-speed drives. However, the installation is usually only economical if reactive power supply is considered during the design and construction phase. In this report, we find that if the inverters of PV systems or the generators of combined heat and power (CHP) systems were designed with capability to supply dynamic reactive power, they could do this quite economically. In fact, on an annualized basis, these inverters and generators may be able to supply dynamic reactive power for about $5 or $6 per kVAR. The savings from the local supply of dynamic reactive power would be in reduced losses, increased capacity, and decreased transmission congestion. The net savings are estimated to be about $7 per kVAR on an annualized basis for a hypothetical circuit. Thus the distribution company could economically purchase a dynamic reactive power service from customers for perhaps $6/kVAR. This practice would provide for better voltage regulation in the distribution system and would provide an alternate revenue source to help amortize the cost of PV and CHP installations. As distribution and transmission systems are operated under rising levels of stress, the value of local dynamic reactive supply is expected to grow. Also, large power inverters, in the range of 500 kW to 1 MW, are expected to decrease in cost as they become mass produced. This report provides one data point which shows that the local supply of dynamic reactive power is marginally profitable at present for a hypothetical circuit. We expect that the trends of growing power flow on the existing system and mass production of inverters for distributed energy devices will make the dynamic supply of reactive power from customers an integral component of economical and reliable system operation in the future.

Kueck, John D [ORNL; Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL; Li, Fangxing [ORNL; Tufon, Christopher [Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Isemonger, Alan [California Independent System Operator

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

High-power I-V curve tracer employing a capacitive load  

SciTech Connect

A portable, photovoltaic voltage versus current curve tracer is discussed. The curve tracer employs a capacitive load to provide automatic sweeping of the array voltage. The unit is capable of measuring arrays up to 10 kW, but is similar and lighter than a conventional 2.5-kW dissipative load.

Warner, T.H.; Cox, C.H. III

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Saline tracer visualized with three-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography: Field-scale spatial moment analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) was used to monitor the migration of a saline tracer in a two-well pumping-injection experiment conducted of the bulk media changes as the tracer migrates from the pumping to the injection well. The local Figure 2 as in (c) a photograph of the site (not aligned to schematics). ERT wells are labeled A-D. Injection

Singha, Kamini

163

High-performance high-resolution semi-Lagrangian tracer transport on a sphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current climate models have a limited ability to increase spatial resolution because numerical stability requires the time step to decrease. We describe a semi-Lagrangian method for tracer transport that is stable for arbitrary Courant numbers, and we ... Keywords: Cubed sphere, High resolution, High-performance computing, Semi-Lagrangian, Spherical geometry, Tracer transport

J. B. White, III; J. J. Dongarra

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Baroclinic Flow and Transient-Tracer Fields in the CanaryCape Verde Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulated transient-tracer distributions (tritium, 3H3, freons) on the isopycnal horizons ?0=26.5 and 26.8 kg m?3 are presented for the East Atlantic, 10 ?40N. Tracer transport is modeled by employing a baroclinic flow field based on empirical ...

Gerhard Thiele; Wolfgang Roether; Peter Schlosser; Reinhard Kuntz; Gerold Siedler; Lothar Stramma

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Feasibility of perfluorocarbon tracers (PFTs) in atmospheric source-receptor experiments  

SciTech Connect

A brief description of the perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) system, which includes the tracers and the release equipment, the air samplers and the analyzers, is presented along with details on the research needs to provide a viable system for MATEX-scenario experiments. The present family of 2 viable PFTs needs to be increased to 5 to 6. Given the present precision of the analysis system, a one year long tracer experiment consisting of 4 hour releases every 60 hours from 5 different sites would require nearly 150 metric tons of PFTs at a cost of $15,000,000. Shortcomings in the programmable sampler include the pump, the sampling sequence control flexibility, data storage and retrieval, and the lack of remote communication capability; sampler adsorbent studies are also needed. The analytical system, including the catalyst processing bed, the chromatography column resolution, and the linearity of the detector, is in need of significant improvement. A higher resolution analysis system could significantly reduce analysis time but, more importantly, reduce tracer requirements more than 10-fold, for a cost savings potential of more than $13,000,000. A model is presented to demonstrate the feasibility of tracer material balances. Assessment of earlier long-range tracer experiments indicates the need for possibly 400 ground sampling sites requiring $8 to $14 million worth of samplers for a one-year tracer experiment. As many as six aircraft would be needed to conduct airborne model validation and material balance studies for each tracer plume.

Dietz, R.N.; Senum, G.I.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

The Advection of High-Resolution Tracers by Low-Resolution Winds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The usefulness of any simulation of atmospheric tracers using low-resolution winds relies on both the dominance of large spatial scales in the strain and time dependence that results in a cascade in tracer scales. Here, a quantitative study on ...

John Methven; Brian Hoskins

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Rates and Mechanisms of Water Mass Transformation in the Labrador Sea as Inferred from Tracer Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Time series of hydrographic and transient tracer (3H and 3He) observations from the central Labrador Sea collected between 1991 and 1996 are presented to document the complex changes in the tracer fields as a result of variations in convective ...

Samar Khatiwala; Peter Schlosser; Martin Visbeck

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Highly enriched multiply-labeled stable isotopic compounds as atmospheric tracers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Compounds multiply-labeled with stable isotopes and highly enriched in these isotopes are readily capable of detection in tracer experiments involving high dilutions. Thus, for example, /sup 13/C/sup 18/O/sub 2/ provides a useful tracer for following atmospheric pol lution produced as a result of fossil fuel burning. (Official Gazette)

Goldblatt, M.; McInteer, B.B.

1974-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

169

COAL SLAGGING AND REACTIVITY TESTING  

SciTech Connect

Union Fenosa's La Robla I Power Station is a 270-MW Foster Wheeler arch-fired system. The unit is located at the mine that provides a portion of the semianthracitic coal. The remaining coals used are from South Africa, Russia, Australia, and China. The challenges at the La Robla I Station stem from the various fuels used, the characteristics of which differ from the design coal. The University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) and the Lehigh University Energy Research Center (LUERC) undertook a program to assess problematic slagging and unburned carbon issues occurring at the plant. Full-scale combustion tests were performed under baseline conditions, with elevated oxygen level and with redistribution of air during a site visit at the plant. During these tests, operating information, observations and temperature measurements, and coal, slag deposit, and fly ash samples were obtained to assess slagging and unburned carbon. The slagging in almost all cases appeared due to elevated temperatures rather than fuel chemistry. The most severe slagging occurred when the temperature at the sampling port was in excess of 1500 C, with problematic slagging where first-observed temperatures exceeded 1350 C. The presence of anorthite crystals in the bulk of the deposits analyzed indicates that the temperatures were in excess of 1350 C, consistent with temperature measurements during the sampling period. Elevated temperatures and ''hot spots'' are probably the result of poor mill performance, and a poor distribution of the coal from the mills to the specific burners causes elevated temperatures in the regions where the slag samples were extracted. A contributing cause appeared to be poor combustion air mixing and heating, resulting in oxygen stratification and increased temperatures in certain areas. Air preheater plugging was observed and reduces the temperature of the air in the windbox, which leads to poor combustion conditions, resulting in unburned carbon as well as slagging. A second phase of the project involved advanced analysis of the baseline coal along with an Australian coal fired at the plant. These analysis results were used in equilibrium thermodynamic modeling along with a coal quality model developed by the EERC to assess slagging, fouling, and opacity for the coals. Bench-scale carbon conversion testing was performed in a drop-tube furnace to assess the reactivity of the coals. The Australian coal had a higher mineral content with significantly more clay minerals present than the baseline coal. The presence of these clay minerals, which tend to melt at relatively low temperatures, indicated a higher potential for problematic slagging than the baseline coal. However, the pyritic minerals, comprising over 25% of the baseline mineral content, may form sticky iron sulfides, leading to severe slagging in the burner region if local areas with reducing conditions exist. Modeling results indicated that neither would present significant fouling problems. The Australian coal was expected to show slagging behavior much more severe than the baseline coal except at very high furnace temperatures. However, the baseline coal was predicted to exhibit opacity problems, as well as have a higher potential for problematic calcium sulfate-based low-temperature fouling. The baseline coal had a somewhat higher reactivity than the Australian coal, which was consistent with both the lower average activation energy for the baseline coal and the greater carbon conversion at a given temperature and residence time. The activation energy of the baseline coal showed some effect of oxygen on the activation energy, with E{sub a} increasing at the lower oxygen concentration, but may be due to the scatter in the baseline coal kinetic values at the higher oxygen level tested.

Donald P. McCollor; Kurt E. Eylands; Jason D. Laumb

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Advanced Energy Storage Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Energy Storage Publications Reports: Advanced Technology Development Program For Lithium-Ion Batteries: Gen 2 Performance Evaluation Final Report Advanced Technology...

171

Advanced Manufacturing Office: News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Manufacturing Office: News on Twitter Bookmark Advanced Manufacturing Office: News on Google Bookmark Advanced Manufacturing Office: News on Delicious Rank Advanced Manufacturing...

172

Tracer Testing at Dixie Valley, Nevada, Using 2-Naphthalene Sulfonate and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tracer Testing at Dixie Valley, Nevada, Using 2-Naphthalene Sulfonate and Tracer Testing at Dixie Valley, Nevada, Using 2-Naphthalene Sulfonate and 2,7-Naphthalene Disulfonate Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Tracer Testing at Dixie Valley, Nevada, Using 2-Naphthalene Sulfonate and 2,7-Naphthalene Disulfonate Abstract The decay kinetics of the candidate tracers 2-naphthalene sulfonate and 2,7-naphthalenedisulfonate was studied under laboratory conditionsthat simulate a hydrothermal environment, withneither compound exhibiting any decay after oneweek at 330�C. These data indicate that thesecompounds are more thermally stable than any of thepreviously studied polyaromatic sulfonates. Both ofthe tracer candidates were successfully tested in afield study at the Dixie Valley, Nevada, geothermalreservoir. In addition to

173

Tracer Testing At Coso Geothermal Area (2004) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Area (2004) Coso Geothermal Area (2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Tracer Testing Activity Date 2004 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To determine the EGS potential of the Coso Geothermal Field Notes A dramatic decrease in the ratio of chloride to boron was observed in the liquid discharge of a well proposed for EGS development. The decrease appears to be related to the transformation of some feed zones in the well from liquid-dominated to vapor-dominated. High concentrations of boron are transported to the wellbore in the steam, where it fractionates to the liquid phase flowing in from liquid-dominated feed zones. The high-boron steam is created when the reservoir liquid in some of the feed zones boils

174

Mission Advancing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NETL Accomplishments NETL Accomplishments - the lab 2 Mission Advancing energy options to fuel our economy, strengthen our security, and improve our environment. Renewed Prosperity Through Technological Innovation - Letter from the Director NETL: the ENERGY lab 4 6 3 Contents Technology Transfer Patents and Commercialization Sharing Our Expertise Noteworthy Publications 60 62 63 64 66 Environment, Economy, & Supply Carbon Capture and Storage Partnerships Work to Reduce Atmospheric CO 2 Demand-Side Efficiencies New NETL Facility Showcases Green Technologies Environment & Economy Materials Mercury Membranes NETL Education Program Produces Significant Achievement Monitoring Water Economy & Supply NETL's Natural Gas Prediction Tool Aids Hurricane Recovery Energy Infrastructure

175

Advanced Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ductility EnhancEmEnt of molybDEnum Ductility EnhancEmEnt of molybDEnum PhasE by nano-sizED oxiDE DisPErsions Description Using computational modeling techniques, this research aims to develop predictive capabilities to facilitate the design and optimization of molybdenum (Mo), chromium (Cr), and other high-temperature structural materials to enable these materials to withstand the harsh environments of advanced power generation systems, such as gasification-based systems. These types of materials are essential to the development of highly efficient, clean energy technologies such as low-emission power systems that use coal or other fossil fuels.

176

Advanced Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Super HigH-TemperaTure alloyS and Super HigH-TemperaTure alloyS and CompoSiTeS From nb-W-Cr SySTemS Description The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (DOE-FE) has awarded a three-year grant to the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to jointly explore the high-temperature properties of alloys composed of niobium (Nb), tungsten (W), and chromium (Cr). The grant is administered by the Advanced Research (AR) program of the National

177

Using Biofuel Tracers to Study Alternative Combustion Regimes  

SciTech Connect

Interest in the use of alternative fuels and combustion regimes is increasing as the price of petroleum climbs. The inherently higher efficiency of Diesel engines has led to increased adoption of Diesels in Europe, capturing approximately 40% of the new passenger car market. Unfortunately, lower CO{sub 2} emissions are countered with higher nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions, and higher noise. Noise and PM have traditionally been the obstacles toward consumer acceptance of Diesel passenger cars in North America, while NOx (a key component in photochemical smog) has been more of an engineering challenge. Diesels are lean burning (combustion with excess oxygen) and reducing NOx to N2 in an oxygen rich environment is difficult. Adding oxygenated compounds to the fuel helps reduce PM emissions, but relying on fuel alone to reduce PM is unrealistic. Keeping peak combustion temperature below 1700 K prevents NOx formation. Altering the combustion regime to burn at temperatures below the NOx threshold and accept a wide variety of fuels seems like a promising alternative for future engines. Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) is a possible solution. Fuel and air are well mixed prior to intake into a cylinder (homogeneous charge) and ignition occurs by compression of the fuel-air mixture by the piston. HCCI is rapid and relatively cool, producing little NOx and PM. Unfortunately, it is hard to control since HCCI is initiated by temperature and pressure instead of a spark or direct fuel injection. We investigate biofuel HCCI combustion, and use intrinsically labeled biofuels as tracers of HCCI combustion. Data from tracer experiments are used to validate combustion modeling.

Mack, J H; Flowers, D L; Buchholz, B A; Dibble, R W

2006-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

178

Reactivity of heat treated chars  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reactivities of a number of chars produced from American coals varying in rank from lignite to anthracite have been measured in air, CO/sub 2/, steam and H/sub 2/. The variables chosen for the study were: rank of the parent coal, inorganic matter content, particle size, reaction temperature and pressure as well as heat treatment conditions used during char preparation. In all gasification atmospheres studied, reactivity plots for different chars are essentially of the same general shape and have three distinct regions. The reaction rate first increases slowly with time. The plot then goes through a maximum in slope, followed by a lengthy region of decreasing slope as burn-off approaches 100 percent. The shape of the burn-off curves can be explained on the basis of what is known about the development of porosity and surface area in microporous chars as they undergo gasification. Using an adjustable time parameter, equations have been developed which successfully correlate the reactivity data. Char reactivity decreases, in general, with increase in rank of the parent coal. Reactivities of chars in air, CO/sub 2/ and steam increase over 150-fold in going from a low volatile bituminous to a lignite parent coal; the spread in char reactivities in H/sub 2/ is only 30-fold. Removal of inorganic matter from coal precursors prior to their charring or from chars produced from the raw coals has a marked effect on char reactivity and surface area. Removal of inorganic matter (by acid washing) decreases, in general, reactivity of chars produced from lower rank coals, whereas reactivities of chars derived from higher rank coals increase.

Mahajan, O. P.; Walker, Jr., P. L.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Advanced Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

05/2007 05/2007 NitrogeN evolutioN aNd CorrosioN MeChaNisMs With oxyCoMbustioN of Coal Description Under a grant from the University Coal Research (UCR) program, Brigham Young University (BYU) is leading a three-year research effort to investigate the physical processes that several common types of coal undergo during oxy-fuel combustion. Specifically, research addresses the mixture of gases emitted from burning, particularly such pollutants as nitrogen oxides (NO X ) and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), and the potential for corrosion at the various stages of combustion. The UCR program is administered by the Advanced Research Program at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), under the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of

180

Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas Title Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2004 Authors Kristoffersen, Astrid H., Ashok J. Gadgil, and David M. Lorenzetti Conference Name 9th International Conference on Air Distribution in Rooms - RoomVent 2004, Pagination pp 6 Date Published September 5-8, 2 Conference Location Coimbra, Portugal Abstract Tracer gas measurements are commonly used to estimate the fresh air exchange rate in a room or building. Published tracer decay methods account for fresh air supply, infiltration, and leaks in ductwork. However, the time delay associated with a ventilation system recirculating tracer back to the room also affects the decay rate. We present an analytical study of tracer gas decay in a well-mixed, mechanically-ventilated room with recirculation. The analysis shows that failing to account for delays can lead to under- or over-estimates of the fresh air supply, depending on whether the decay rate calculation includes the duct volume

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181

Analysis of an interwell tracer test in a depleted heavy oilreservoir  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents field data and analyses of an interwell tracer test conducted in the Niitsu oil field which is a fully depleted heavy oil reservoir of unconsolidated sand formation. The purpose of the tracer test is to diagnose reservoir heterogeneity at a location where a micellar/ polymer field test is planned. Water containing a chemical tracer was injected at a constant rate into an injector surrounded by three production wells. Effluent analyses showed very early breakthrough of injected water at two of the producing wells, no tracer, however, was detected at the third producer thoughout the test period. In addition, tracer production profiles at two wells after breakthrough differed much from each other. These test results suggest a strong areal heterogeneity of the tested formation. An appropriate analytical model was used to obtain a preliminary interpretation of the results. A modified three-dimensional black oil model developed to simulate polymer flood process was then utilized for analyzing the data in more detail. The model treats tracer solution as a fourth component, and can also account for adsorption of tracer.

Ohno, K.; Horne, R.N.; Nanba, T.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas concentration Title Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas concentration Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2007 Authors Lorenzetti, David M., Astrid H. Kristoffersen, and Ashok J. Gadgil Journal Indoor Air Pagination 7 Keywords recirculating ventilation, tracer decay rate Abstract Tracer gas measurements are used to estimate the flow rate of fresh air into a room or building. These methods commonly account for the decay of tracer gas concentration as the result of ventilation air supply and infiltration, using a well-mixed model of the space. Some researchers also have considered the effect of leakage in the ventilation ductwork. This paper considers the effect of recirculation through ventilation ducts on the calculated fresh air supply rate. Transport delay in the ducts can significantly alter the time evolution of tracer concentration, and hence alter the estimated air change rate.

183

THE NEW YORK CITY URBAN DISPERSION PROGRAM MARCH 2005 FIELD STUDY: TRACER METHODS AND RESULTS.  

SciTech Connect

The Urban Dispersion Program March 2005 Field Study tracer releases, sampling, and analytical methods are described in detail. There were two days where tracer releases and sampling were conducted. A total of 16.0 g of six tracers were released during the first test day or Intensive Observation Period (IOP) 1 and 15.7 g during IOP 2. Three types of sampling instruments were used in this study. Sequential air samplers, or SAS, collected six-minute samples, while Brookhaven atmospheric tracer samplers (BATS) and personal air samplers (PAS) collected thirty-minute samples. There were a total of 1300 samples resulting from the two IOPs. Confidence limits in the sampling and analysis method were 20% as determined from 100 duplicate samples. The sample recovery rate was 84%. The integrally averaged 6-minute samples were compared to the 30-minute samples. The agreement was found to be good in most cases. The validity of using a background tracer to calculate sample volumes was examined and also found to have a confidence level of 20%. Methods for improving sampling and analysis are discussed. The data described in this report are available as Excel files. An additional Excel file of quality assured tracer data for use in model validation efforts is also available. The file consists of extensively quality assured BATS tracer data with background concentrations subtracted.

WATSON, T.B.; HEISER, J.; KALB, P.; DIETZ, R.N.; WILKE, R.; WIESER, R.; VIGNATO, G.

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Greatly Enhanced Detectability of Geothermal Tracers Through Laser-Induced Fluorescence  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

WE have successfully completed a four-year R and D project to greatly reduce the detection limit of fluorescent tracers through the use of emerging laser-excitation, optical fiber, and CCD-spectroscopy technologies. Whereas the efforts over the first two years were directed at demonstrating a reduction in the detection limit of fluorescent compounds by a factor of 100 and at identifying several new fluorescein-derived tracer candidates, our recent efforts were focused primarily on the field demonstration of new tracers having detection limits in the low parts-per-quadrillion range. During the summer of 2001, we initiated field tests at the Dixie Valley, Nevada and at the Beowawe, Nevada geothermal fields using very small quantities of the fluorescein-derivative 6-carboxyfluorescein. Subsequently, we succeeded in measuring sub-part-per-trillion quantities of that candidate tracer at both the Beowawe and Dixie Valley geothermal reservoirs-using approximately 530 g of tracer at each setting. Our studies indicate that we could have observed a breakthrough using only 0.53 g of 6-carboxyfluorescein. This represents a reduction by a factor of 170,000 below the mass of tracer used in a previous tracer test at Beowawe.

Peter Rose; Joel Harris; Phaedra Kilbourn; James Kleimeyer; Troy Carter

2002-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

185

Predictive value of tracer studies for /sup 131/I treatment in hyperthyroid cats  

SciTech Connect

In 76 cats with hyperthyroidism, peak thyroidal radioiodine (/sup 131/I) uptakes and effective half-lives were determined after administration of tracer and therapeutic activities of /sup 131/I. In 6 additional hyperthyroid cats, only peak thyroidal uptakes after administration of tracer and therapeutic activities of /sup 131/I were determined. Good correlation was found between peak thyroidal uptakes of tracer and therapeutic /sup 131/I; however, only fair correlation was observed between effective half-lives. In 79% of the cats, the effective half-life for therapeutic /sup 131/I was longer than that for tracer /sup 131/I. After administration of therapeutic activity of /sup 131/I, monoexponential and biphasic decay curves were observed in 51 and 16 cats, respectively. Using therapeutic kinetic data, radiation doses to the thyroid gland were calculated retrospectively on the basis of 2 methods for determining the activity of /sup 131/I administered: (1) actual administration of tracer-compensated activity and (2) hypothetic administration of uniform activity (3 mCi). Because of the good predictive ability of tracer kinetic data for the therapeutic kinetic data, the tracer-compensated radiation doses came significantly (P = 0.008) closer to the therapeutic goal than did the uniform-activity doses. In addition, the use of tracer kinetic information reduced the extent of the tendency for consistently high uniform-activity doses. A manual method for acquiring tracer kinetic data was developed and was an acceptable alternative to computerized techniques. Adoption of this method gives individuals and institutions with limited finances the opportunity to characterize the iodine kinetics in cats before proceeding with administration of therapeutic activities of /sup 131/I.

Broome, M.R.; Turrel, J.M.; Hays, M.T.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy for conducting gas tracer tests and measuring water saturations in landfills  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy tested for measuring tracer gas in landfills. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Measurement errors for tracer gases were 1-3% in landfill gas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Background signals from landfill gas result in elevated limits of detection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Technique is much less expensive and easier to use than GC. - Abstract: Gas tracer tests can be used to determine gas flow patterns within landfills, quantify volatile contaminant residence time, and measure water within refuse. While gas chromatography (GC) has been traditionally used to analyze gas tracers in refuse, photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) might allow real-time measurements with reduced personnel costs and greater mobility and ease of use. Laboratory and field experiments were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of PAS for conducting gas tracer tests in landfills. Two tracer gases, difluoromethane (DFM) and sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}), were measured with a commercial PAS instrument. Relative measurement errors were invariant with tracer concentration but influenced by background gas: errors were 1-3% in landfill gas but 4-5% in air. Two partitioning gas tracer tests were conducted in an aerobic landfill, and limits of detection (LODs) were 3-4 times larger for DFM with PAS versus GC due to temporal changes in background signals. While higher LODs can be compensated by injecting larger tracer mass, changes in background signals increased the uncertainty in measured water saturations by up to 25% over comparable GC methods. PAS has distinct advantages over GC with respect to personnel costs and ease of use, although for field applications GC analyses of select samples are recommended to quantify instrument interferences.

Jung, Yoojin; Han, Byunghyun; Mostafid, M. Erfan; Chiu, Pei [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Yazdani, Ramin [Yolo County Planning and Public Works Department, Division of Integrated Waste Management, Yolo County, 44090 County Rd. 28H, Woodland, CA 95776 (United States); Imhoff, Paul T., E-mail: imhoff@udel.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

187

Novel Application of Single-Well Tracer Tests to Evaluate Hydraulic Stimulation Effectiveness  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a graphical method by which one can identify the number of fractures and their permeability distribution in the near-well region from single-well tracer tests. The method is an extension of tracer analysis methods developed previously to estimate flow geometry and relies on caluclating the relative fluid velocity from F-__ plots. A number of numerical examples show that high flow zones (fractures) are readily identified from the derivatives of an F-___ curve. The method can be used in evaluating well stimulation efforts by conducting a tracer test before and after the stimulation and comparing the velocity distributions.

G. M. Shook; Gopi Nalla

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

The NPE gas tracer test and the development of on-site inspection techniques  

SciTech Connect

Tracer gases emplaced in or near the detonation cavity of the 1-kiloton NonProliferation Event required 1.5 and 13.5 months for sulfur hexaflouride and helium-3, respectively, to reach the surface of Rainier Mesa from an emplacement depth of 400 meters. The sites that first produced tracer gases are those located in known faults and fractures. Numerical modeling suggests that transport to the surface is accomplished within this time frame through atmospheric pumping along high permeability pathways such as fractures. The difference in travel time between the two tracers is due to differences in gas diffusivity and can also be explained by our numerical modeling.

Carrigan, C.; Heinle, R.; Zucca, J.J.

1995-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

189

GASEOUS CO ABUNDANCE-AN EVOLUTIONARY TRACER FOR MOLECULAR CLOUDS  

SciTech Connect

Planck cold clumps are among the most promising objects to investigate the initial conditions of the evolution of molecular clouds. In this work, by combing the dust emission data from the survey of the Planck satellite with the molecular data of {sup 12}CO/{sup 13}CO/C{sup 18}O (1-0) lines from observations with the Purple Mountain Observatory 13.7 m telescope, we investigate the CO abundance, CO depletion, and CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor of 674 clumps in the early cold cores sample. The median and mean values of the CO abundance are 0.89 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} and 1.28 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}, respectively. The mean and median of CO depletion factor are 1.7 and 0.9, respectively. The median value of X{sub CO-to-H{sub 2}} for the whole sample is 2.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} cm{sup -2} K{sup -1} km{sup -1} s. The CO abundance, CO depletion factor, and CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor are strongly (anti-)correlated to other physical parameters (e.g., dust temperature, dust emissivity spectral index, column density, volume density, and luminosity-to-mass ratio). To conclude, the gaseous CO abundance can be used as an evolutionary tracer for molecular clouds.

Liu Tie; Wu Yuefang; Zhang Huawei, E-mail: liutiepku@gmail.com, E-mail: ywu@pku.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

190

Identification and characterization of conservative organic tracers for use as hydrologic tracers for the Yucca Mountain site characterization study. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extensive tracer testing is expected to take place at the C-well complex in the Nevada Test Site as part of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. The C-well complex consists of one pumping well, C3, and two injection wells, C1 and C2 into which tracer will be introduced. The goal of this research was to provide USGS with numerous tracers to completed these tests. Several classes of fluorinated organic acids have been evaluated. These include numerous isomers of fluorinated benzoic acids, cinnamic acids, and salicylic acids. Also several derivatives of 2-hydroxy nicotinic acid (pyridone) have been tested. The stability of these compounds was determined using batch and column tests. Ames testing (mutagenicity/carcinogenicity) was conducted on the fluorinated benzoic acids and a literature review of toxicity of the fluorobenzoates and three perfluoro aliphatic acids was prepared. Solubilities were measured and method development work was performed to optimize the detection of these compounds. A Quality Assurance (QA) Program was developed under existing DOE and USGS guidelines. The program includes QA procedures and technical standard operating procedures. A tracer test, using sodium iodide, was performed at the C-well complex. HRC chemists performed analyses on site, to provide real time data for the USGS hydrologists and in the laboratories at UNLV. Over 2,500 analyses were performed. This report provides the results of the laboratory experiments and literature reviews used to evaluate the potential tracers and reports on the results of the iodide C-well tracer test.

Stetzenbach, K.; Farnham, I.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Identification and characterization of conservative organic tracers for use as hydrologic tracers for the Yucca Mountain Site characterization study; Progress report, April 1, 1993--June 30, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is in two parts one for the fluorinated benzoic acids and one for the fluorinated aliphatic acids. The assumptions made in the report regarding the amount of tracer that will be used, dilution of the tracer during the test and the length of exposure (if any) to individuals drinking the water were made by the authors. These assumptions must really come from the USGS hydrologists in charge of the c-well tracer testing program. Accurate estimates of dilution of the tracer during the test are also important because of solubility limitations of some of the tracers. Three of the difluorobenzoic acids have relatively low solubilities and may not be usable if the dilution estimates are large. The toxicologist that reviewed the document agreed with our conclusion that the fluorinated benzoic and toluic acids do not represent a health hazard if used under the conditions as outlined in the report. We are currently testing 15 of these compounds, and if even if three difluorobenzoic acids cannot be used because of solubility limitations we will still have 12 tracers. The toxicologist felt that the aliphatic fluorinated acids potentially present more of a health risk than the aromatic. This assessment was based on the fact of a known allergic response to halothane anesthetic. This risk, although minimal, is known and he felt that was enough reason to recommend against their use. The authors feel that the toxicologists interpretation of this risk was overly conservative, however, we will not go against his recommendation at this time for the following reasons. First, without the aliphatic compounds we still have 12 to 15 fluorinated aromatic acids which, should be enough for the c-well tests. Second, to get a permit to use aliphatic compounds would undoubtedly require a hearing which could be quite lengthy.

Dombrowski, T.; Stetzenbach, K.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

A Modified Tracer Selection and Tracking Procedure to Derive Winds Using Water Vapor Imagers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The remotely sensed upper-tropospheric water vapor wind information has been of increasing interest for operational meteorology. A new tracer selection based on a local image anomaly and tracking procedure, itself based on NashSutcliffe model ...

S. K. Deb; C. M. Kishtawal; P. K. Pal; P. C. Joshi

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Evaluation of Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Models with Measurements from Controlled Tracer Releases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three widely used Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Models (LPDMs), HYSPLIT, STILT and FLEXPART are evaluated with measurements from the controlled tracer release experiments CAPTEX and ANATEX. The LPDMs are run forward in time driven by identical ...

Jennifer Hegarty; Roland R. Draxler; Ariel F. Stein; Jerome Brioude; Marikate Mountain; Janusz Eluszkiewicz; Thomas Nehrkorn; Fong Ngan; Arlyn Andrews

194

The Bolus Velocity in the Stochastic Theory of Ocean Turbulent Tracer Transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A stochastic theory of tracer transport in compressible turbulence has recently been developed and then applied to the ocean case because stratified flow in isopycnal coordinates is analogous to compressible flow with the isopycnal layer ...

John K. Dukowicz; Richard J. Greatbatch

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Atmospheric Dispersion from Elevated Sources in an Urban Area: Comparison between Tracer Experiments and Model Calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric dispersion experiments were carried out in the Copenhagen area under neutral and unstable conditions. The tracer sulphurhexafluoride was released without buoyancy from a tower at a height of 115 m and then collected at ground-level ...

Sven-Erik Gryning; Erik Lyck

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Adjoint-Based Estimation of Eddy-Induced Tracer Mixing Parameters in the Global Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the German Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean (GECCO) synthesis framework, four separate eddy tracer mixing coefficients are adjusted jointly with external forcing fields, such as to reduce a global misfit between the model ...

Chuanyu Liu; Armin Khl; Detlef Stammer

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Sensitivity of the Global Ocean Circulation to Parameterizations of Mesoscale Tracer Transports  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The isopycnal transport parameterization of Gent and Mc Williams has been implemented in the GFDL ocean general circulation model, replacing the physically unjustifiable horizontal mixing of tracers. The effects of this parameterization are ...

Gokhan Danabasoglu; James C. Mc Williams

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

The Influence of Eddies on Tracer Transport in the Abyssal Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tracer transport mechanisms in a deep western boundary current (DWBC) are explored using a three-layer, eddy-resolving quasigeostrophic model. The model is forced with a steady, sinusoidal wind stress. The effects of the wind stress, coupled with ...

Carol Ladd; Lu Anne Thompson

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Transport of a Power Plant Tracer Plume over Grand Canyon National Park  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Meteorological and air-quality data, as well as surface tracer concentration values, were collected during 1990 to assess the impacts of Navajo Generating Station (NGS) emissions on Grand Canyon National Park (GCNP) air quality. These data have ...

Jun Chen; Robert Bornstein; Charles G. Lindsey

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Interpretation of Measured Tracer Concentration Fluctuations Using a Sinusoidal Meandering Plume Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simultaneous instantaneous concentration and wind velocity fluctuations were measured 100 to 752 m downwind of a point source release of SF6 tracer during two field studies conducted amid rolling wheat fields and at a flat desert site in eastern ...

Holly Peterson; Brian Lamb; David Stock

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Truncation Effects on Estimated Parameters of Tracer Distributions Sampled on Finite Domains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods are presented and demonstrated for compensating for the apparent effect of truncation of the sampled crosswind distribution of a tracer, at either or both boundaries of a surface sampling grid downwind from the point of release. Errors ...

J. Z. Holland

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

The use of tracers to analyze the effects of reinjection into fractured geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper discusses the use of tracers as a reservoir engineering tool in fractured geothermal reservoirs. The principle concern in injecting cooler spent fluids into a fractured reservoir is that the fluids may move through high permeability channels and return to the production wells after contacting a relatively small volume of rock. As a consequence of this rapid transport, the fluids will be only partially reheated and after a short period time will effectively mine the heat from the limited volume of rock. The production wells will then experience a rapid and premature reduction in thermal output. Tracers can be used to infer the existence of high mobility conduits between injection and production wells and to monitor chemical changes of an injected fluid. Since tracer arrival precedes thermal breakthrough, tracer tests are a very useful forecasting tool.

Horne, R.N.; Johns, R.A.; Adams, M.C.; Moore, J.N.; Stiger, S.G.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Use of a Large Crane for Wind and Tracer Profiles in an Urban Setting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although measured vertical profiles of wind, turbulence, and tracer concentrations are critical for understanding the urban boundary layer, it is problematic to field a sounding system or a tall structure to support anemometers in a densely ...

Frank J. Gouveia; Martin J. Leach; Joseph H. Shinn; William E. Ralph

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Eddy Resolution versus Eddy Diffusion in a Double Gyre GCM. Part II: Mixing of Passive Tracers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The parameterization of the effect of the unresolved scales of motion on a passive tracer field in large-scale numerical ocean models is analyzed through a combination of Lagrangian and Eulerian velocities. The primitive equation isopycnal model ...

Horacio A. Figueroa

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Dispersion of a Passive Tracer in Buoyancy- and Shear-Driven Boundary Layers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By means of finescale modeling [large-eddy simulation (LES)], the combined effect of thermal and mechanical forcing on the dispersion of a plume in a convective boundary layer is investigated. Dispersion of a passive tracer is studied in various ...

Alessandro Dosio; Jordi Vil-Guerau de Arellano; Albert A. M. Holtslag; Peter J. H. Builtjes

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

The AdvectionDiffusion Problem for Stratospheric Flow. Part II: Probability Distribution Function of Tracer Gradients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is a continuation of the study of the advectiondiffusion problem for stratospheric flow, and deals with the probability distribution function (PDF) of gradients of a freely decaying passive tracer. Theoretical arguments are reviewed ...

Yongyun Hu; Raymond T. Pierrehumbert

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Design and Validation of an Offline Oceanic Tracer Transport Model for a Carbon Cycle Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An offline passive tracer transport model with self-operating diagnostic-mode vertical mixing and horizontal diffusion parameterizations is used with assimilated ocean currents to find the chlorofluorocarbon (CFC-11) cycle in oceans. This model ...

Vinu Valsala; Shamil Maksyutov; Ikeda Motoyoshi

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Sensitivity of the Ventilation Process in the North Pacific to Eddy-Induced Tracer Transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coarse-resolution isopycnal model coupled with a bulk mixed layer model is used to examine the effect of isopycnal thickness diffusion, which parameterizes the subgrid-scale eddy-induced tracer transport, on ventilation of the North Pacific ...

Takahiro Endoh; Yanli Jia; Kelvin J. Richards

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

On Ocean Transport Diagnostics: The Idealized Age Tracer and the Age Spectrum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The idealized age tracer is commonly used to diagnose transport in ocean models and to help interpret ocean measurements. In most studies only the steady-state distribution, the result of many centuries of model integration, has been presented ...

Timothy M. Hall; Thomas W. N. Haine

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Graphical Analysis of PET Data Applied to Reversible and Irreversible Tracers  

SciTech Connect

Graphical analysis refers to the transformation of multiple time measurements of plasma and tissue uptake data into a linear plot, the slope of which is related to the number of available tracer binding sites. This type of analysis allows easy comparisons among experiments. No particular model structure is assumed, however it is assumed that the tracer is given by bolus injection and that both tissue uptake and the plasma concentration of unchanged tracer are monitored following tracer injection. The requirement of plasma measurements can be eliminated in some cases when a reference region is available. There are two categories of graphical methods which apply to two general types of ligands--those which bind reversibly during the scanning procedure and those which are irreversible or trapped during the time of the scanning procedure.

Logan, Jean

1999-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

211

A Tracer-Contour Inverse Method for Estimating Ocean Circulation and Mixing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is developed for estimating the along-isopycnal and vertical mixing coefficients (K and D) and the absolute velocity from time-averaged hydrographic data. The method focuses directly on transports down tracer gradients on isopycnals. ...

Jan D. Zika; Trevor J. McDougall; Bernadette M. Sloyan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Simulation of Tracer Concentration Data in the Brush Creek Drainage Flow Using an Integrated Puff Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the 1984 ASCOT field study in Brush Creek Valley, two perfluorocarbon tracers were released into the nocturnal drainage flow at two different heights. The resulting surface concentrations were sampled at 90 sites, and vertical ...

K. Shankar Rao; Richard M. Eckman; Rayford P. Hosker Jr.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Development of Models to Simulate Tracer Behavior in Enhanced Geothermal Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A recent report found that power and heat produced from engineered (or enhanced) geothermal systems (EGSs) could have a major impact on the United States while incurring minimal environmental impacts. EGS resources differ from high-grade hydrothermal resources in that they lack sufficient temperature distributions, permeability/porosity, fluid saturation, or recharge of reservoir fluids. Therefore, quantitative characterization of temperature distributions and the surface area available for heat transfer in EGS is necessary for commercial development of geothermal energy. The goal of this project is to provide integrated tracer and tracer interpretation tools to facilitate this characterization. Modeling capabilities are being developed as part of this project to support laboratory and field testing to characterize engineered geothermal systems in single- and multi-well tests using tracers. The objective of this report is to describe the simulation plan and the status of model development for simulating tracer tests for characterizing EGS.

Williams, Mark D.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Reimus, P. W.; Newell, D.; Watson, Tom B.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

High-Resolution Stratospheric Tracer Fields Reconstructed with Lagrangian Techniques: A Comparative Analysis of Predictive Skill  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical experiments and statistical analyses are conducted to determine the skill of different Lagrangian techniques for the construction of tracer distributions. High-resolution potential vorticity (PV) maps are calculated from simulations of ...

R. Dragani; G. Redaelli; G. Visconti; A. Mariotti; V. Rudakov; A. R. MacKenzie; L. Stefanutti

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

The Adjoint of the Semi-Lagrangian Treatment of the Passive Tracer Equation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A semi-Lagrangian treatment of the 1D passive tracer equation using prescribed piecewise-continuous interpolating functions is considered. Whether the process of localizing the upstream position affects the adjoint counterpart of the associated ...

M. Tanguay; S. Polavarapu

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Tracer Transport in Deep Convective Updrafts: Plume Ensemble versus Bulk Formulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two widely used approaches for parameterizing tracer transport based on convective mass fluxes are the plume ensemble formulation (PEF) and the bulk formulation (BF). Here the behavior of these two is contrasted for the specific case in which the ...

Mark G. Lawrence; Philip J. Rasch

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Analysis of Tracer Data Collected during the SCCCAMP 1985 Intensive Measurement Periods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper contains an analysis of data obtained from measurements of the concentration of tracer gases released during the four intensive measurement periods of the 1985 South-Central Coast Cooperative Air Monitoring Program (SCCCAMP). These ...

David G. Strimaitis; Gary E. Moore; Sharon G. Douglas

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Lagrangian Particle Simulation of Tracer Dispersion in the Lee of a Schematic Two-Dimensional Hill  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spray, a 3D Lagrangian particle model for the simulation of complex flow dispersion, is presented. Its performance is tested against the Environmental Protection Agency wind tunnel concentration distribution of passive tracer released from ...

G. Tinarelli; D. Anfossi; G. Brusasca; E. Ferrero; U. Giostra; M. G. Morselli; J. Moussafir; F. Trombetti; F. Tampieri

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Vertical Tracer Concentration Profiles Measured during the Joint Urban 2003 Dispersion Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An atmospheric tracer dispersion study known as Joint Urban 2003 was conducted in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, during July of 2003. As part of this field program, vertical concentration profiles were measured at approximately 1 km from the downtown ...

Julia E. Flaherty; Brian Lamb; K. Jerry Allwine; Eugene Allwine

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Wintertime Dispersion in a Mountainous Basin at Roanoke, Virginia: Tracer Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During January 1989, five nighttime SF6 tracer experiments were conducted in Roanoke, Virginia. The experiments were designed to help identify and understand the dispersion characteristics of a basin atmosphere during winter stagnation ...

K. Jerry Allwine; Brian K. Lamb; Robert Eskridge

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Collection of Water Samples from an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle for Tracer Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A compact water sampler rated to full ocean depth has been deployed from an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) to enable oceanographic tracer measurements. Techniques developed to allow the instrument to collect up to 49 samples of sufficient ...

Paul A. Dodd; Martin R. Price; Karen J. Heywood; Miles Pebody

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

DETERMINATION OF SPECIFIC NEUTRONIC REACTIVITY  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for production-line determination of the specific neutronic reactivity of such objects as individual nuclear fuel or neutron absorber elements and is notable for rapidity and apparatus simplicity. The object is incorporated in a slightly sub-critical chain fission reactive assembly having a discrete neutron source, thereby establishing a K/sub eff/ within the crucial range of 0.95 to 0.995. The range was found to afford, uniquely, flux- transient damped response in a niatter of seconds simultaneously with acceptable analytical sensitivity. The resulting neutron flux measured at a situs spaced from both object and source within the assembly serves as a calibrable indication of said reactivity.

Dessauer, G.

1960-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

223

Analytic solutions of tracer transport in fractured rock associated with precipitation-dissolution reactions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Precipitation-dissolution reactions are important for a number of applications such as isotopic tracer transport in the subsurface. Analytical solutions have been developed for tracer transport in both single-fracture and multiple-fracture systems associated with these reactions under transient and steady-state transport conditions. These solutions also take into account advective transport in fractures and molecular diffusion in the rock matrix. For studying distributions of disturbed tracer concentration (the difference between actual concentration and its equilibrium value), effects of precipitation-dissolution reactions are mathematically equivalent to a 'decay' process with a decay constant proportional to the corresponding bulk reaction rate. This important feature significantly simplifies the derivation procedure by taking advantage of the existence of analytical solutions for tracer transport associated with radioactive decay in fractured rock. It is also useful for interpreting tracer breakthrough curves, because the impact of a decay process is relatively easy to analyze. Several illustrative examples are presented, which show that the results are sensitive to fracture spacing, matrix diffusion coefficient (fracture surface area), and bulk reaction rate (or 'decay' constant), indicating that the relevant flow and transport parameters may be estimated by analyzing tracer signals.

Liu, H.H.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Spycher, N.; Kennedy, B.

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

Analysis of an interwell tracer test in a depleted heavy-oil reservoir  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents field data and analyses of an interwell tracer test conducted in the Niitsu oil field, which is a fully depleted heavy-oil reservoir of unconsolidated sand formation. Water containing a chemical tracer was injected at a constant rate into an injector surrounded by three production wells. Effluent analyses showed very early breakthrough of injected water at two of the producing wells. The test results suggest a strong areal heterogeneity of the tested formation. An appropriate analytic model was used to obtain a preliminary interpretation of the results. A modified three-dimensional (3D) black-oil model developed to simulate th polymer flood process was then used for analyzing the data in more detail. The model treats tracer solution as a fourth component and can also account for adsorption of tracer. Simulation efforts were concentrated on matching the breakthrough times and tracer profiles after breakthrough. Through both the analytic and the simulation work, the reservoir is characterized by a highly heterogeneous distribution of horizontal permeability, a thin layer of high permeability, and a natural waterdrive that cause a preferential flow trend in a direction toward one producer. The authors conclude that the interwell tracer test is an effective tool for evaluating reservoir heterogeneities and a quantitative analysis of test data is done with the polymer option of a black-oil simulator.

Ohno, K.; Nanba, T.; Horne, R.N.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Lvy Fluctuations and Tracer Diffusion in Dilute Suspensions of Algae and Bacteria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Swimming microorganisms rely on effective mixing strategies to achieve efficient nutrient influx. Recent experiments, probing the mixing capability of unicellular biflagellates, revealed that passive tracer particles exhibit anomalous non-Gaussian diffusion when immersed in a dilute suspension of self-motile Chlamydomonas reinhardtii algae. Qualitatively, this observation can be explained by the fact that the algae induce a fluid flow that may occasionally accelerate the colloidal tracers to relatively large velocities. A satisfactory quantitative theory of enhanced mixing in dilute active suspensions, however, is lacking at present. In particular, it is unclear how non-Gaussian signatures in the tracers' position distribution are linked to the self-propulsion mechanism of a microorganism. Here, we develop a systematic theoretical description of anomalous tracer diffusion in active suspensions, based on a simplified tracer-swimmer interaction model that captures the typical distance scaling of a microswimmer's flow field. We show that the experimentally observed non-Gaussian tails are generic and arise due to a combination of truncated L\\'evy statistics for the velocity field and algebraically decaying time correlations in the fluid. Our analytical considerations are illustrated through extensive simulations, implemented on graphics processing units to achieve the large sample sizes required for analyzing the tails of the tracer distributions.

Irwin M. Zaid; Jrn Dunkel; Julia M. Yeomans

2010-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

226

Interpretations of Tracer Tests Performed in the Culebra Dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides (1) an overview of all tracer testing conducted in the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WPP) site, (2) a detailed description of the important information about the 1995-96 tracer tests and the current interpretations of the data, and (3) a summary of the knowledge gained to date through tracer testing in the Culebra. Tracer tests have been used to identify transport processes occurring within the Culebra and quantify relevant parameters for use in performance assessment of the WIPP. The data, especially those from the tests performed in 1995-96, provide valuable insight into transport processes within the Culebra. Interpretations of the tracer tests in combination with geologic information, hydraulic-test information, and laboratory studies have resulted in a greatly improved conceptual model of transport processes within the Culebra. At locations where the transmissivity of the Culebra is low ( 4 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s), we conceptualize the Culebra as a heterogeneous, layered, fractured medium in which advection occurs largely through fractures and solutes diffuse between fractures and matrix at multiple rates. The variations in diffusion rate can be attributed to both variations in fracture spacing (or the spacing of advective pathways) and matrix heterogeneity. Flow and transport appear to be concentrated in the lower Culebra. At all locations, diffusion is the dominant transport process in the portions of the matrix that tracer does not access by flow.

MEIGS,LUCY C.; BEAUHEIM,RICHARD L.; JONES,TOYA L.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Utility of Bromide and Heat Tracers for Aquifer Characterization Affected by Highly Transient Flow Conditions  

SciTech Connect

A tracer test using both bromide and heat tracers conducted at the Integrated Field Research Challenge site in Hanford 300 Area (300A), Washington, provided an instrument for evaluating the utility of bromide and heat tracers for aquifer characterization. The bromide tracer data were critical to improving the calibration of the flow model complicated by the highly dynamic nature of the flow field. However, most bromide concentrations were obtained from fully screened observation wells, lacking depth-specific resolution for vertical characterization. On the other hand, depth-specific temperature data were relatively simple and inexpensive to acquire. However, temperature-driven fluid density effects influenced heat plume movement. Moreover, the temperature data contained noise caused by heating during fluid injection and sampling events. Using the hydraulic conductivity distribution obtained from the calibration of the bromide transport model, the temperature depth profiles and arrival times of temperature peaks simulated by the heat transport model were in reasonable agreement with observations. This suggested that heat can be used as a cost-effective proxy for solute tracers for calibration of the hydraulic conductivity distribution, especially in the vertical direction. However, a heat tracer test must be carefully designed and executed to minimize fluid density effects and sources of noise in temperature data. A sensitivity analysis also revealed that heat transport was most sensitive to hydraulic conductivity and porosity, less sensitive to thermal distribution factor, and least sensitive to thermal dispersion and heat conduction. This indicated that the hydraulic conductivity remains the primary calibration parameter for heat transport.

Ma, Rui; Zheng, Chunmiao; Zachara, John M.; Tonkin, Matthew J.

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

228

Tracer test analysis of the Klamath Falls geothermal resource: a comparison of models  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two tracer tests on doublet systems in a fractured geothermal system were carried out in Klamath Falls, Oregon. The purpose of the tests were to obtain data which would lead to information about the reservoir and to test the applicability of current tracer flow models. The results show rapid breakthrough times and indicate fracture flow with vigorous mixing of injector fluid before production of same. This leads to the idea that thermal breakthrough is not directly related to tracer breakthrough in the Klamath Union doublet system. There has been no long-term enthalpy loss from exploiting the resource for 40 years. In order to reduce the data, models were developed to analyze the results. Along with a porous media flow model two mathematical models developed to analyze fractured geothermal systems are used to help decipher the various tracer return curves. The flow of tracers in doublet systems was investigated. A mathematical description is used for tracer flow through fractures as a function of time and various nonlinear parameters which can be found using a curve fitting technique. This allows the reservoir to be qualitatively defined. These models fit the data well, but point to the fact that future improvement needs to be considered for a clearer and more quantitative understanding of fractured geothermal systems. 22 refs., 32 figs., 11 tabs.

Johnson, S.E.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Urban Dispersion Program MSG05 Field Study: Summary of Tracer and Meteorological Measurements  

SciTech Connect

The Urban Dispersion Program is a multi-year project, funded by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, to better understand the flow and dispersion of airborne contaminants through and around the deep street canyons of New York City. The first tracer and meteorological field study was a limited study conducted during March 2005 near the Madison Square Garden in midtown Manhattan. Six safe, inert, gaseous perfluorocarbon tracers were released simultaneously at five street-level locations during two experimental days. In addition to collecting tracer data, meteorological data were also collected. Brookhaven National Laboratory conducted the bulk of the tracer and meteorological field efforts with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Stevens Institute of Technology assisting by measuring the vertical profile of winds. The Environmental Protection Agency worked with Brookhaven National Laboratory in accomplishing the personal exposure component of the study. This report presents some results from this analysis. In general, different release locations showed vastly different plume footprints for tracer materials, and the situation was made very complex with upwind and/or crosswind transport of tracer near street-level for the different release locations. Overall wind speeds and directions upwind and over the city were generally constant throughout each of the two experimental periods.

Allwine, K Jerry; Flaherty, Julia E.

2006-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

230

Low-rank coal research: Volume 2, Advanced research and technology development: Final report  

SciTech Connect

Volume II contains articles on advanced combustion phenomena, combustion inorganic transformation; coal/char reactivity; liquefaction reactivity of low-rank coals, gasification ash and slag characterization, and fine particulate emissions. These articles have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

Mann, M.D.; Swanson, M.L.; Benson, S.A.; Radonovich, L.; Steadman, E.N.; Sweeny, P.G.; McCollor, D.P.; Kleesattel, D.; Grow, D.; Falcone, S.K.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

II.AdvancedTcl Advanced Tcl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

119 P A R T II.AdvancedTcl II Advanced Tcl Part II describes advanced programming techniques that support sophisticated applications. The Tcl interfaces remain simple, so you can quickly construct pow- erful applications. Chapter 10 describes eval, which lets you create Tcl programs on the fly

Chen, Yuanzhu Peter

232

Treating water-reactive wastes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some compounds and elements, such as lithium hydride, magnesium, sodium, and calcium react violently with water to generate much heat and produce hydrogen. The hydrogen can ignite or even form an explosive mixture with air. Other metals may react rapidly only if they are finely divided. Some of the waste produced at Los Alamos National Laboratory includes these metals that are contaminated with radioactivity. By far the greatest volume of water-reactive waste is lithium hydride contaminated with depleted uranium. Reactivity of the water-reactive wastes is neutralized with an atmosphere of humid nitrogen, which prevents the formation of an explosive mixture of hydrogen and air. When we adjust the temperature of the nitrogen and the humidifier, the nitrogen can be more or less humid, and the rate of reaction can be adjusted and controlled. Los Alamos has investigated the rates of reaction of lithium hydride as a function of the temperature and humidity, and, as anticipated, they in with in temperature and humidity. Los Alamos will investigate other variables. For example, the nitrogen flow will be optimized to conserve nitrogen and yet keep the reaction rates high. Reaction rates will be determined for various forms of lithium waste, from small chips to powder. Bench work will lead to the design of a skid-mounted process for treating wastes. Other water-reactive wastes will also be investigated.

Lussiez, G.W.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Treating water-reactive wastes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some compounds and elements, such as lithium hydride, magnesium, sodium, and calcium react violently with water to generate much heat and produce hydrogen. The hydrogen can ignite or even form an explosive mixture with air. Other metals may react rapidly only if they are finely divided. Some of the waste produced at Los Alamos National Laboratory includes these metals that are contaminated with radioactivity. By far the greatest volume of water-reactive waste is lithium hydride contaminated with depleted uranium. Reactivity of the water-reactive wastes is neutralized with an atmosphere of humid nitrogen, which prevents the formation of an explosive mixture of hydrogen and air. When we adjust the temperature of the nitrogen and the humidifier, the nitrogen can be more or less humid, and the rate of reaction can be adjusted and controlled. Los Alamos has investigated the rates of reaction of lithium hydride as a function of the temperature and humidity, and, as anticipated, they in with in temperature and humidity. Los Alamos will investigate other variables. For example, the nitrogen flow will be optimized to conserve nitrogen and yet keep the reaction rates high. Reaction rates will be determined for various forms of lithium waste, from small chips to powder. Bench work will lead to the design of a skid-mounted process for treating wastes. Other water-reactive wastes will also be investigated.

Lussiez, G.W.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Alternative and Advanced Fuels  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

There are a variety of alternative and advanced fuels available, which are used to fuel alternative and advanced vehicles. Learn more about:

235

Help - Advanced Search  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Search The advanced search form will help you create a more specific search in the Publications database. First, specify your search criteria. You can search by author,...

236

Advanced gray rod control assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An advanced gray rod control assembly (GRCA) for a nuclear reactor. The GRCA provides controlled insertion of gray rod assemblies into the reactor, thereby controlling the rate of power produced by the reactor and providing reactivity control at full power. Each gray rod assembly includes an elongated tubular member, a primary neutron-absorber disposed within the tubular member said neutron-absorber comprising an absorber material, preferably tungsten, having a 2200 m/s neutron absorption microscopic capture cross-section of from 10 to 30 barns. An internal support tube can be positioned between the primary absorber and the tubular member as a secondary absorber to enhance neutron absorption, absorber depletion, assembly weight, and assembly heat transfer characteristics.

Drudy, Keith J; Carlson, William R; Conner, Michael E; Goldenfield, Mark; Hone, Michael J; Long, Jr., Carroll J; Parkinson, Jerod; Pomirleanu, Radu O

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

237

Definition: Reactive Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reactive Power Reactive Power Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reactive Power The portion of electricity that establishes and sustains the electric and magnetic fields of alternating-current equipment. Reactive power must be supplied to most types of magnetic equipment, such as motors and transformers. It also must supply the reactive losses on transmission facilities. Reactive power is provided by generators, synchronous condensers, or electrostatic equipment such as capacitors and directly influences electric system voltage. It is usually expressed in kilovars (kvar) or megavars (Mvar).[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition In electric power transmission and distribution, volt-ampere reactive (var) is a unit used to measure reactive power in an AC electric

238

Particle Swarm Optimization Based Reactive Power Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reactive power plays an important role in supporting the real power transfer by maintaining voltage stability and system reliability. It is a critical element for a transmission operator to ensure the reliability of an electric system while minimizing the cost associated with it. The traditional objectives of reactive power dispatch are focused on the technical side of reactive support such as minimization of transmission losses. Reactive power cost compensation to a generator is based on the incurred cost of its reactive power contribution less the cost of its obligation to support the active power delivery. In this paper an efficient Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) based reactive power optimization approach is presented. The optimal reactive power dispatch problem is a nonlinear optimization problem with several constraints. The objective of the proposed PSO is to minimize the total support cost from generators and reactive compensators. It is achieved by maintaining the whole system power loss as minimum...

Sujin, P R; Linda, M Mary

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Engine combustion control via fuel reactivity stratification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A compression ignition engine uses two or more fuel charges having two or more reactivities to control the timing and duration of combustion. In a preferred implementation, a lower-reactivity fuel charge is injected or otherwise introduced into the combustion chamber, preferably sufficiently early that it becomes at least substantially homogeneously dispersed within the chamber before a subsequent injection is made. One or more subsequent injections of higher-reactivity fuel charges are then made, and these preferably distribute the higher-reactivity matter within the lower-reactivity chamber space such that combustion begins in the higher-reactivity regions, and with the lower-reactivity regions following thereafter. By appropriately choose the reactivities of the charges, their relative amounts, and their timing, combustion can be tailored to achieve optimal power output (and thus fuel efficiency), at controlled temperatures (and thus controlled NOx), and with controlled equivalence ratios (and thus controlled soot).

Reitz, Rolf Deneys; Hanson, Reed M; Splitter, Derek A; Kokjohn, Sage L

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

240

Advanced Materials in MML  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Advanced Materials Characterization. Fusion Wall Development Research by Neutron Depth Profiling. < Previous 1 2 3 Next . ...

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Reactive and Catalytic Air Purification Materials - Energy ...  

Biomass and Biofuels; Building Energy Efficiency; Electricity Transmission; ... Target selectivity can be controlled through selection of reactive components.

242

Directional Reactive Power Ground Plane Transmission  

Directional Reactive Power Ground Plane Transmission Technology Summary ... The invention can transmit electrical power through the surface of the ...

243

Partnering Today: Technology Transfer Highlights Reactive ...  

THE LLNL TECHNOLOGY COMPANY PRODUCT Partnering Today: Technology Transfer Highlights Reactive NanoTechnologies Inc.: Temperature-controlled Precision Bonding

244

Gamma Survey of a Permeable Reactive Barrier at Monticello, Utah...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gamma Survey of a Permeable Reactive Barrier at Monticello, Utah Gamma Survey of a Permeable Reactive Barrier at Monticello, Utah Gamma Survey of a Permeable Reactive Barrier at...

245

Laboratory testing and modeling to evaluate perfluorocarbon compounds as tracers in geothermal systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermal stability and adsorption characteristics of three perfluorinated hydrocarbon compounds were evaluated under geothermal conditions to determine the potential to use these compounds as conservative or thermally-degrading tracers in Engineered (or Enhanced) Geothermal Systems (EGS). The three compounds tested were perfluorodimethyl-cyclobutane (PDCB), perfluoromethylcyclohexane (PMCH), and perfluorotrimethylcyclohexane (PTCH), which are collectively referred to as perfluorinated tracers, or PFTs. Two sets of duplicate tests were conducted in batch mode in gold-bag reactors, with one pair of reactors charged with a synthetic geothermal brine containing the PFTs and a second pair was charged with the brine-PFT mixture plus a mineral assemblage chosen to be representative of activated fractures in an EGS reservoir. A fifth reactor was charged with deionized water containing the three PFTs. The experiments were conducted at {approx}100 bar, with temperatures ranging from 230 C to 300 C. Semi-analytical and numerical modeling was also conducted to show how the PFTs could be used in conjunction with other tracers to interrogate surface area to volume ratios and temperature profiles in EGS reservoirs. Both single-well and cross-hole tracer tests are simulated to illustrate how different suites of tracers could be used to accomplish these objectives. The single-well tests are especially attractive for EGS applications because they allow the effectiveness of a stimulation to be evaluated without drilling a second well.

Reimus, Paul W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

246

Single well surfactant test to evaluate surfactant floods using multi tracer method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Data useful for evaluating the effectiveness of or designing an enhanced recovery process said process involving mobilizing and moving hydrocarbons through a hydrocarbon bearing subterranean formation from an injection well to a production well by injecting a mobilizing fluid into the injection well, comprising (a) determining hydrocarbon saturation in a volume in the formation near a well bore penetrating formation, (b) injecting sufficient mobilizing fluid to mobilize and move hydrocarbons from a volume in the formation near the well bore, and (c) determining the hydrocarbon saturation in a volume including at least a part of the volume of (b) by an improved single well surfactant method comprising injecting 2 or more slugs of water containing the primary tracer separated by water slugs containing no primary tracer. Alternatively, the plurality of ester tracers can be injected in a single slug said tracers penetrating varying distances into the formation wherein the esters have different partition coefficients and essentially equal reaction times. The single well tracer method employed is disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 3,623,842. This method designated the single well surfactant test (SWST) is useful for evaluating the effect of surfactant floods, polymer floods, carbon dioxide floods, micellar floods, caustic floods and the like in subterranean formations in much less time and at much reduced cost compared to conventional multiwell pilot tests.

Sheely, Clyde Q. (Ponca City, OK)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Heat as a Tracer to Examine Hydraulic Conductance Near the Russian River Bank Filtration Facility, Sonoma County, CA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to examine streambed hydraulic conductance near the Russianas a tracer to determine the hydraulic conductance of themodel requires that key hydraulic parameters be identified,

Constantz, Jim; Su, Grace; Hatch, Christine

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Chemistry & Physics at Interfaces | Advanced Materials | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxide Interfaces Chemical Imaging Grain Boundaries Related Research Materials Synthesis from Atoms to Systems Materials Characterization Materials Theory and Simulation Energy Frontier Research Centers Advanced Materials Home | Science & Discovery | Advanced Materials | Research Areas | Chemistry and Physics at Interfaces SHARE Chemistry and Physics at Interfaces Chemical transformations and physical phenomena at gas, liquid and solid interfaces lie at the heart of today's energy technologies. They underpin ORNL's research strategies to deliver scientific discoveries and technical breakthroughs that will accelerate the development and deployment of solutions in clean energy. Understanding, predicting and controlling the structure, transport and reactivity at interfaces will lead to advances in

249

USE OF NATURALLY-OCCURRING TRACERS TO MONITOR TWO-PHASE CONDITIONS IN THE  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NATURALLY-OCCURRING TRACERS TO MONITOR TWO-PHASE CONDITIONS IN THE NATURALLY-OCCURRING TRACERS TO MONITOR TWO-PHASE CONDITIONS IN THE COSO EGS PROJECT Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: USE OF NATURALLY-OCCURRING TRACERS TO MONITOR TWO-PHASE CONDITIONS IN THE COSO EGS PROJECT Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A dramatic decrease in the ratio of chloride to boron was observed in the liquid discharge of a well proposed for EGS development in the Coso geothermal field. The decrease appears to be related to the transformation of some feed zones in the well from liquid-dominated to vapor-dominated. High concentrations of boron are transported to the wellbore in the steam, where it fractionates to the liquid phase flowing in from liquid-dominated feed zones. The high-boron steam is created when the

250

The use of air as a natural tracer infractured hydrothermal systems, Los Azufres, Mexico, case study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Injection of atmospheric air mixed with cold water has been occurring since 1982 at the Los Azufres geothermal field. Several chemical and thermodynamical evidences show that air injection into this fractured hydrothermal system could be considered as a long term natural tracer test. Nitrogen and Argon separated from the air mixture migrate, under the action of the induced injection-extraction gradient, from reinjection sectors to production zones following preferential paths closely related to high permeability conduits. A coarse numerical estimation of the average permeability tensor existing at Tejamaniles, the southern sector, explains the unsuccessful recovery of the artificial tracer tests performed in past years: the anisotropic nature of the fractured volcanic rock would demand considerably quantities of tracer in order to be detected at the producing wells, especially when fluid extraction was low. At the same time concentrations of calcium, cesium, chloride, potassium, rubidium and sodium, are increasing in the liquid produced by the oldest wells of this field's sector.

Mario Cesar Sudrez Arriaga; Hector Gutierrez Puente, Josefina Moreno Ochoa

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Kinetics of fluorescein decay and its application as a geothermal tracer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on fluorescent which is a dye used to trace the path of injected fluids through geothermal reservoirs. The authors have measured its thermal stability at temperatures up to 300{degrees} C in hydrothermal autoclaves at various fluid compositions, pHs, and oxygen concentrations. The results of these experiments indicate that fluorescein will decay less than 10% during a one month tracer test in geothermal reservoirs with temperatures below 210{degrees} C. For tracer test involving longer times and/or higher temperatures, the activation parameters presented in this study can be used to correct for thermal decay. These parameters were applied to a tracer test conducted at the Dixie Valley, Nevada geothermal system to correct for the thermal decay of fluorescein and to deduce the effective temperature of the injection-production flow path.

Adams, M.C.; Davis, J. (Univ. of Utah Research Inst., Salt Lake City, UT (US))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Enthalpy and mass flowrate measurements for two-phase geothermal production by Tracer dilution techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new technique has been developed for the measurement of steam mass flowrate, water mass flowrate and total enthalpy of two-phase fluids produced from geothermal wells. The method involves precisely metered injection of liquid and vapor phase tracers into the two-phase production pipeline and concurrent sampling of each phase downstream of the injection point. Subsequent chemical analysis of the steam and water samples for tracer content enables the calculation of mass flowrate for each phase given the known mass injection rates of tracer. This technique has now been used extensively at the Coso geothermal project, owned and operated by California Energy Company. Initial validation of the method was performed at the Roosevelt Hot Springs geothermal project on wells producing to individual production separators equipped with orificeplate flowmeters for each phase.

Hirtz, Paul; Lovekin, Jim; Copp, John; Buck, Cliff; Adams, Mike

1993-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

253

Probing Material Reactivity Using X-ray Pair Distribution Function Methods  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Material Reactivity Using X-ray Pair Distribution Material Reactivity Using X-ray Pair Distribution Function Methods Karena W. Chapman X-ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439, USA Understanding how advanced functional materials react and transform, at an atomic scale, is a characterization challenge with many diverse phenomena possible; components with varying particle size, morphology, and microstructure can evolve from multi-atom clusters to multi-million atom crystals. The pair distribution function (PDF) method shows great promise for providing quantitative insight such reactions. Recent advances in experimental methods, have improved the efficiency of X-ray PDF measurements, to allow time-resolved experiments with sufficient resolution to study reactions in solid

254

Permeable Reactive Barriers | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Permeable Reactive Barriers Permeable Reactive Barriers Permeable Reactive Barriers Permeable Reactive Barrier Field Projects Durango, Colorado DOE installed a PRB in October 1995 to treat ground water from a uranium mill tailings disposal site at Durango, Colorado Read more Cañon City, Colorado ESL personnel conduct tests and help evaluate performance at other PRB sites, such as Cotter Corporation's Cañon City site in Colorado. Read more Monticello, Utah Installation of a PRB hydraulically downgradient of the Monticello, Utah, millsite was completed June 30, 1999, as an Interim Remedial Action. Read more A permeable reactive barrier (PRB) is a zone of reactive material placed underground to intercept and react with a contaminant plume in ground water. Typically, PRBs are emplaced by replacing soils with reactive

255

Single-well tracer methods for hydrogeologic evaluation of target aquifers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Designing an efficient well field for an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) project requires measuring local groundwater flow parameters as well as estimating horizontal and vertical inhomogeneity. Effective porosity determines the volume of aquifer needed to store a given volume of heated or chilled water. Ground-water flow velocity governs the migration of the thermal plume, and dispersion and heat exchange along the flow path reduces the thermal intensity of the recovered plume. Stratigraphic variations in the aquifer will affect plume dispersion, may bias the apparent rate of migration of the plume, and can prevent efficient hydraulic communication between wells. Single-well tracer methods using a conservative flow tracer such as bromide, along with pumping tests and water-level measurements, provide a rapid and cost-effective means for estimating flow parameters. A drift-and-pumpback tracer test yields effective porosity and flow velocity. Point-dilution tracer testing, using new instrumentation for downhole tracer measurement and a new method for calibrating the point-dilution test itself, yields depth-discrete hydraulic conductivity as it is affected by stratigraphy, and can be used to estimate well transmissivity. Experience in conducting both drift-and-pumpback and point-dilution tests at three different test sites has yielded important information that highlights both the power and the limitations of the single-well tracer methods. These sites are the University of Alabama Student Recreation Center (UASRC) ATES well field and the VA Medical Center (VA) ATES well field, both located in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, and the Hanford bioremediation test site north of Richland, Washington.

Hall, S.H.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Interpretations of Tracer Tests Performed in the Culebra Dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site  

SciTech Connect

This report provides (1) an overview of all tracer testing conducted in the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WPP) site, (2) a detailed description of the important information about the 1995-96 tracer tests and the current interpretations of the data, and (3) a summary of the knowledge gained to date through tracer testing in the Culebra. Tracer tests have been used to identify transport processes occurring within the Culebra and quantify relevant parameters for use in performance assessment of the WIPP. The data, especially those from the tests performed in 1995-96, provide valuable insight into transport processes within the Culebra. Interpretations of the tracer tests in combination with geologic information, hydraulic-test information, and laboratory studies have resulted in a greatly improved conceptual model of transport processes within the Culebra. At locations where the transmissivity of the Culebra is low (< 4 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s), we conceptualize the Culebra as a single-porosity medium in which advection occurs largely through the primary porosity of the dolomite matrix. At locations where the transmissivity of the Culebra is high (> 4 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s), we conceptualize the Culebra as a heterogeneous, layered, fractured medium in which advection occurs largely through fractures and solutes diffuse between fractures and matrix at multiple rates. The variations in diffusion rate can be attributed to both variations in fracture spacing (or the spacing of advective pathways) and matrix heterogeneity. Flow and transport appear to be concentrated in the lower Culebra. At all locations, diffusion is the dominant transport process in the portions of the matrix that tracer does not access by flow.

MEIGS,LUCY C.; BEAUHEIM,RICHARD L.; JONES,TOYA L.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Nitrate Removal in NITREXTM Permeable Reactive Barriers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was originally the injection site for our tracer solution, but instead it became our lone up-gradient well) and ~48 hours (low tide) after injection. At every time point, samples were collected from all wells and nitrate concentrations were estimated from samples taken from the injection well right before the solution

Vallino, Joseph J.

258

The Dispersion of Tracer Plumes in Mountainous Regions in Central Arizona: Comparisons between Observations and Modeling Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-dimensional, time-dependent, nested-grid model is used to calculate the targeting of tracer or Seeding material over complex terrain in northern Arizona. Good agreement with measurements of SF6 tracer is reported in three case studies. ...

Roelof T. Bruintjes; Terry L. Clark; William D. Hall

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Southeast Geyers Cooperative Tracer Evaluation and Testing Program for the Purpose of Estimating The Efficiency of Injection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Southeast Geysers Cooperative Tracer Evaluation Program has been a joint project located in the SE part of the Geysers geothermal field, in Lake and Sonoma Counties, California. A new generation of environmentally benign vapor-phase tracers has been used to estimate the varying degrees to which injectate is being recovered following the significant increase of injected volumes within the Southeast Geysers.

J.L. (Bill) Smith

2001-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

260

Tracer Conservation for Three-Dimensional, Finite-Element, Free-Surface, Ocean Modeling on Moving Prismatic Meshes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large-scale free-surface ocean models designed to run over climatic time scales are required to globally conserve the volume and any tracer up to machine precision. In addition, local consistency is critical and requires that the discrete tracer ...

Laurent White; Vincent Legat; Eric Deleersnijder

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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261

Nuclear fusion advances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The last decade has seen advances in the shaping and confinement of plasmas, and in approaches to noninductive current drive. Here, the author presents an overview of nuclear fusion advances between 1983-93 examining: fusion milestones; plasma shaping; ...

W. Sweet

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

AdvAnced  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AdvAnced test reActor At the InL advanced Unlike large, commercial power reactors, ATR is a low- temperature, low-pressure reactor. A nuclear reactor is basically an elaborate tool...

263

ADVANCED DATA SECURITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ADVANCED DATA SECURITY. NVLAP Lab Code: 200968-0. Address and Contact Information: 1933 O'Toole Avenue San ...

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

264

Fatigue of Advanced Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 19, 2011... isolate the internal components from the external environment while ... overall thermal efficiency of advanced internal combustion engines...

265

Advancement of Electrochromic Windows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

advanced spectrally selective low-e double-pane windows and the same type of daylighting control system

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Advanced High Frequency Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... External agencies, including the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the Office of Naval Research (ONR), have ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

267

Supporting Advanced Communications Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... it will rely on revolutionary advances in network architecture. ... telemedicine), sensor and control networks (eg, Smart Grid, environmental monitoring ...

2012-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

268

Preferred methods of analysis for chemical tracers in moderate- and high-temperature geothermal environments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the sampling and analytical techniques used for tracer analysis in the Raft River and East Mesa field tests. The collection procedures and sample preservation techniques, analytical methods and possible sources of contamination or error are discussed in detail. 6 refs.

Kroneman, R.L.; Yorgason, K.R.; Moore, J.N.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

SF6-3He Tracer Release Experiment: A New Method of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Gas Transfer Velocities. In addition to the longitudinal dispersion coefficient, gas transferSF6-3He Tracer Release Experiment: A New Method of Determining Longitudinal Dispersion Coefficients, Columbia University, Palisades, New York 10964 Longitudinal dispersion coefficients have been determined

Clark, Jordan

270

Assimilation of Stratospheric Chemical Tracer Observations Using a Kalman Filter. Part I: Formulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first part of this two-part article describes the formulation of a Kalman filter system for assimilating limb-sounding observations of stratospheric chemical constituents into a tracer transport model. The system is based on a two-dimensional ...

Richard Mnard; Stephen E. Cohn; Lang-Ping Chang; Peter M. Lyster

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

A Wavelet-Based Reduced Rank Kalman Filter for Assimilation of Stratospheric Chemical Tracer Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A suboptimal Kalman filter system that evolves error covariances in terms of a truncated set of wavelet coefficients has been developed for the assimilation of chemical tracer observations of CH4. The truncation is carried out in such a way that ...

Ludovic Auger; Andrew V. Tangborn

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Three-Dimensional Tracer Structure and Behavior as Simulated in Two Ozone Precursor Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The GFDL 11-level general circulation/tracer model is used for two experiments designed to prepare the way for a self-consistent model of atmospheric ozone. The first experiment invokes a very simple condition at the top model level, an ...

J. D. Mahlman; H. Levy; W. J. Moxim

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

The Obduction of Equatorial 13C Water in the Pacific Identified by a Simulated Passive Tracer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The obduction of equatorial 13C Water in the Pacific is investigated using a simulated passive tracer of the Consortium for Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean (ECCO). The result shows that the 13C Water initialized in the ...

Tangdong Qu; Shan Gao; Ichiro Fukumori; Rana A. Fine; Eric J. Lindstrom

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Use of Passive Tracers as a Diagnostic Tool in Coupled Model SimulationsNorthern Hemisphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study focuses on the uptake of a passive idealized tracer in the Northern Hemisphere oceans from two coupled oceanatmosphere simulations: a standard horizontal diffusion case and the second case including the Gent and McWilliams (GM) eddy ...

Siobhan P. O'Farrell

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Quantification of the Lateral Boundary Forcing of a Regional Climate Model Using an Aging Tracer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present work introduces a new and useful tool to quantify the lateral boundary forcing of a regional climate model (RCM). This tool, an aging tracer, computes the time the air parcels spend inside the limited-area domain of an RCM. The aging ...

Philippe Lucas-Picher; Daniel Caya; Sbastien Biner; Ren Laprise

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

On parameterization of the inverse problem for estimating aquifer properties using tracer data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for estimating aquifer properties using tracer data, Water Resour. Res., 48, W06535, doi:10.1029/2011WR011203. 1. However, the calibration of distributed ground- water models based on limited measurements is generally or smoothing in the property of interest, to make underdetermined inverse problems well posed [Yeh, 1986

Hubbard, Susan

277

Hydrogeophysical tracking of three-dimensional tracer migration: The concept and application of apparent  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conductivity and water content [e.g., Binley et al., 2002; Yeh et al., 2002], and has been successfully used, Water Resour. Res., 42, W06422, doi:10.1029/2005WR004568. 1. Introduction [2] We use cross the geophysical parameter values measured in the field to properties such as water content or tracer concentration

Singha, Kamini

278

Using chemical tracers in hillslope soils to estimate the importance of chemical denudation under  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using chemical tracers in hillslope soils to estimate the importance of chemical denudation under mass. The model includes both sediment transport and chemical denudation. A simplified two-phase model is developed; the two phases are a chemically immobile phase, which has far lower solubility than the bulk soil

279

Lagrangian and Tracer Evolution in the Vicinity of an Unstable Jet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamics of Lagrangian particles and tracers in the vicinity of a baroclinically unstable zonal jet are investigated in a simple two-layer model with an initially quiescent lower layer. The presence of a growing wave induces a particle drift ...

Emmanuel Boss; Lu Anne Thompson

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Advanced Manufacturing Office: Better Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Better Plants on Twitter Bookmark Advanced Manufacturing Office: Better Plants on Google Bookmark Advanced Manufacturing Office: Better Plants on Delicious Rank Advanced...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Advanced Manufacturing Office: Pump Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pump Systems on Twitter Bookmark Advanced Manufacturing Office: Pump Systems on Google Bookmark Advanced Manufacturing Office: Pump Systems on Delicious Rank Advanced...

282

Session: CSP Advanced Systems -- Advanced Overview (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project description is: (1) it supports crosscutting activities, e.g. advanced optical materials, that aren't tied to a single CSP technology and (2) it supports the 'incubation' of new concepts in preliminary stages of investigation.

Mehos, M.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Benchmarks for Quantifying Fuel Reactivity Depletion Uncertainty  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analytical methods, described in this report, are used to systematically determine experimental fuel sub-batch reactivities as a function of burnup. Fuel sub-batch reactivities are inferred using more than 600 in-core pressurized water reactor (PWR) flux maps taken during 44 cycles of operation at the Catawba and McGuire nuclear power plants. The analytical methods systematically search for fuel sub-batch reactivities that minimize differences between measured and computed reaction rates, using Studsvik ...

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

284

Locating of leaks in water-cooled generator stator bars using perfluorocarbon tracers  

SciTech Connect

Water cooled stator bars in power plant generators often fail during the maintenance cycle due to water leakage. After the hydrogen pressure in the generator shell has been released water can leak through cracks in the copper and through the insulation. Leaking bars, but not the leaks themselves, are detected with so-called ``hi-pot`` (high potential) tests where direct electrical current is applied to the stator bar windings. A study initiated by ConEd and Brookhaven`s Tracer Technology Center to explore the cause of these leakage problems to determine if the failures originate in the manufacturing process or are created in service by phase related torque stresses. To this purpose bars that had failed the hi-pot test were investigated first with the insulation in place and then stripped to the bare copper. The bars were pressurized with gases containing perfluorocarbon tracers and the magnitude and location of the leaks was detected by using tracers technology principles and instruments such as the ``double source`` method and the Dual Trap Analyzer. In the second part of the project the windings within a generator were tested in-situ for leaks during an outage using tracer principles. Recommendations are given suggesting the shut down of stator bar cooling water before hydrogen bleeding during outages and a revision of the current vent flow rate. The new standard should establish a reasonable leak rate for the stator bar windings proper and exclude leakage of pump seals and connections. Testing during the maintenance cycle in generators should include routine tracer leak detection following the hi-pot test.

Loss, W.M.; Dietz, R.N.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Locating of leaks in water-cooled generator stator bars using perfluorocarbon tracers  

SciTech Connect

Water cooled stator bars in power plant generators often fail during the maintenance cycle due to water leakage. After the hydrogen pressure in the generator shell has been released water can leak through cracks in the copper and through the insulation. Leaking bars, but not the leaks themselves, are detected with so-called hi-pot'' (high potential) tests where direct electrical current is applied to the stator bar windings. A study initiated by ConEd and Brookhaven's Tracer Technology Center to explore the cause of these leakage problems to determine if the failures originate in the manufacturing process or are created in service by phase related torque stresses. To this purpose bars that had failed the hi-pot test were investigated first with the insulation in place and then stripped to the bare copper. The bars were pressurized with gases containing perfluorocarbon tracers and the magnitude and location of the leaks was detected by using tracers technology principles and instruments such as the double source'' method and the Dual Trap Analyzer. In the second part of the project the windings within a generator were tested in-situ for leaks during an outage using tracer principles. Recommendations are given suggesting the shut down of stator bar cooling water before hydrogen bleeding during outages and a revision of the current vent flow rate. The new standard should establish a reasonable leak rate for the stator bar windings proper and exclude leakage of pump seals and connections. Testing during the maintenance cycle in generators should include routine tracer leak detection following the hi-pot test.

Loss, W.M.; Dietz, R.N.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical Flushing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Final Report:Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical Flushing,U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 8 Support.August 2004

287

ENGINE COMBUSTION CONTROL VIA FUEL REACTIVITY ...  

A compression ignition engine uses two or more fuel charges having two or more reactivities to control the timing and duration of combustion. In a ...

288

Electrochemistry of Enargite: Reactivity in Alkaline Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The reactivity of enargite samples from Montana, US and Quiruvilca, Peru were studied under alkaline conditions, pH range of 8-13, using a cyclic voltammetry...

289

Reactive Air Aluminizing - Energy Innovation Portal  

Reactive Air Aluminizing is a process for applying a protective coating on steel components in solid oxide fuel ... Building Energy Efficiency; ...

290

Reactive Air Aluminizing - Energy Innovation Portal  

Reactive Air Aluminizing is a process for applying a protective coating on steel components in solid oxide fuel cells and other high temperature electrochemical devices.

291

Advanced Manufacturing Office: Technical Assistance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assistance on Twitter Bookmark Advanced Manufacturing Office: Technical Assistance on Google Bookmark Advanced Manufacturing Office: Technical Assistance on Delicious Rank...

292

Advanced Manufacturing Office: Financial Opportunities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on Twitter Bookmark Advanced Manufacturing Office: Financial Opportunities on Google Bookmark Advanced Manufacturing Office: Financial Opportunities on Delicious Rank...

293

Proceedings: Fossil Plant Layup and Reactivation Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, the layup and reactivation of fossil-fired power plants has become more important as increasing numbers of utilities develop a need for retaining capacity not currently needed. A 1992 EPRI conference highlighted key technical issues, focusing on proven layup procedures, descriptions of layup equipment and preservation methods, layup and reactivation case studies, and summaries of regulatory issues.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

ADVANCED HIGH PERFORMANCE SOLID WALL BLANKET CONCEPTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OAK A271 ADVANCED HIGH PERFORMANCE SOLID WALL BLANKET CONCEPTS. First wall and blanket (FW/blanket) design is a crucial element in the performance and acceptance of a fusion power plant. High temperature structural and breeding materials are needed for high thermal performance. A suitable combination of structural design with the selected materials is necessary for D-T fuel sufficiency. Whenever possible, low afterheat, low chemical reactivity and low activation materials are desired to achieve passive safety and minimize the amount of high-level waste. Of course the selected fusion FW/blanket design will have to match the operational scenarios of high performance plasma. The key characteristics of eight advanced high performance FW/blanket concepts are presented in this paper. Design configurations, performance characteristics, unique advantages and issues are summarized. All reviewed designs can satisfy most of the necessary design goals. For further development, in concert with the advancement in plasma control and scrape off layer physics, additional emphasis will be needed in the areas of first wall coating material selection, design of plasma stabilization coils, consideration of reactor startup and transient events. To validate the projected performance of the advanced FW/blanket concepts the critical element is the need for 14 MeV neutron irradiation facilities for the generation of necessary engineering design data and the prediction of FW/blanket components lifetime and availability.

WONG, CPC; MALANG, S; NISHIO, S; RAFFRAY, R; SAGARA, S

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

TRACER STABILITY AND CHEMICAL CHANGES IN AN INJECTED GEOTHERMAL FLUID DURING INJECTION-BACKFLOW TESTING AT THE EAST MESA GEOTHERMAL FIELD  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The stabilities of several tracers were tested under geothermal conditions while injection-backflow tests were conducted at East Mesa. The tracers I and Br were injected continuously while SCN (thiocyanate), B, and disodium fluorescein were each injected as a point source (slug). The tracers were shown to be stable, except where the high concentrations used during slug injection induced adsorption of the slug tracers. However, adsorption of the slug tracers appeared to ''armor'' the formation against adsorption during subsequent tests. Precipitation behavior of calcite and silica as well as Na/K shifts during injection are also discussed.

Adams, M.C.

1985-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

296

Advanced Concepts Breakout Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Workshop Workshop Advanced Concepts Working Group Facilitator: John J. Petrovic Scribe: Sherry Marin Advanced Storage Techniques/ Approaches in Priority Order 1. Crystalline Nanoporous Materials (15) 2. Polymer Microspheres (12) Self-Assembled Nanocomposites (12) 3. Advanced Hydrides (11) Metals - Organic (11) 4. BN Nanotubes (5) Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon (5) 5. Mesoporous materials (4) Bulk Amorphous Materials (BAMs) (4) 6. Iron Hydrolysis (3) 7. Nanosize powders (2) 8. Metallic Hydrogen (1) Hydride Alcoholysis (1) Overarching R&D Questions for All Advanced Materials * Maximum storage capacity - theoretical model * Energy balance / life cycle analysis * Hydrogen absorption / desorption kinetics * Preliminary cost analysis - potential for low cost, high

297

Institute for Advanced Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Institute for Advanced Studies Institute for Advanced Studies Institute for Advanced Studies NMC leverages the strengths of three research universities to build joint programs, develop strategic partnerships, provide common organization and facilities. Contact Leader TBD LANL Program Administrator Pam Hundley (505) 663-5453 Email Building regional partnerships in education, leveraging strengths of three research universities The Institute for Advanced Studies (IAS) works with the three New Mexico research universities (University of New Mexico, New Mexico Tech, and New Mexico State University) to develop research and educational collaborations and partnerships. To facilitate interactions between the universities and LANL, the three New Mexico schools established the New Mexico Consortium (NMC), a nonprofit

298

Advanced Materials | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Areas Research Areas Research Highlights Facilities and Capabilities Science to Energy Solutions News & Awards Events and Conferences Supporting Organizations Directionally Solidified Materials Using high-temperature optical floating zone furnace to produce monocrystalline molybdenum alloy micro-pillars Home | Science & Discovery | Advanced Materials Advanced Materials | Advanced Materials SHARE ORNL has the nation's most comprehensive materials research program and is a world leader in research that supports the development of advanced materials for energy generation, storage, and use. We have core strengths in three main areas: materials synthesis, characterization, and theory. In other words, we discover and make new materials, we study their structure,

299

Advanced Research Materials Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

materials requirements for all fossil energy systems, including materials for advanced power generation and coal fuels technologies. Examples of these technologies include coal...

300

Project: Advanced Fire Detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... residential fire deaths through development of measurement ... Beyond advances in sensing technologies, a key ... data will be used to develop and test ...

2013-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

advance meeting brochure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 23, 1999 ... Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida, USA. ADVANCE PROGRAM ..... but she has two enclosed glass-sided decks, an out- side balcony and the...

302

Brochures | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Podcasts Image Gallery external site Video Library Syndicated Feeds (RSS) The Advanced Photon Source: Lighting the Way to a Better Tomorrow aps brochure The APS helps...

303

Divisions | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chart Argonne Research Divisions APS Research Divisions In May 2002, The Advanced Photon Source was reorganized into three divisions: the Accelerator Systems Division...

304

Advanced Mixing Models  

Propose mixing indicators. Turbulence kinetic energy ... (Turbulence intensity observed at Point 8 in Tank B & C) Advanced Mixing Models. Computational Sciences. 13.

305

Advancement in Battery Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 18, 2010 ... Advanced Electrochemical Storage for Renewable Integration and Utility Applications: Zhenguo "Gary" Yang1; Dawon Choi1; Gordon Graff1;...

306

OpenADR Advances  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Volume 54 Issue 11 Date Published 112012 Keywords communication and standards, openadr, smart grid Abstract An important goal for the advancement of smart grid deployments is to...

307

DOE Advanced Protection Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Task 3 - Advanced Protection - Evaluate measures - 2009 - Design, model Irvine Smart Grid Demo protection system - 2010 6 Copyright 2010, Southern California Edison Task 1 -...

308

Advanced Laser Diagnostics Development for the Characterization of Gaseous High Speed Flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The study of high-speed flows represents a challenging problem in the fluid dynamics field due to the presence of chemical reactions and non-equilibrium effects. Hypersonic flights, where speeds reach Mach 5 and above, are particularly influenced by these effects, resulting in a direct impact on the flow and consequently on the aerodynamic performance of a vehicle traveling at these speeds. The study of hypersonic flow conditions requires the experimental capability of determining local temperatures, pressures and velocities using non-intrusive techniques. Furthermore, the simultaneous measurement of two or more variables in a complex flow boosts the amount of information that is obtained since valuable correlations can be established. This research includes the design, construction and characterization of a hypersonic flow apparatus explicitly intended as a tool for advanced laser diagnostics development. This apparatus is characterized by its pulsed operation mode that translates into a significant reduction in mass flow rates and can be operated for long periods at Mach numbers ranging from 2.8 to 6.2. The flow conditions during the uniform flow time interval of each pulse vary by less than 1%, generating a flow of sufficient quality for quantitative measurements. The development of a laser diagnostic technique, the VENOM technique, which is a non-intrusive method to provide simultaneous 2-D measurements of the mean and instantaneous fluctuations in two-component velocity and temperature is also presented. This technique represents the first single diagnostic capable of instantaneous two-component velocimetry and thermometry in a gaseous flow field by combining two Nitric Oxide Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence methods: two-component Molecular Tagging Velocimetry and two-line thermometry, employing the nascent NO(v"=1) arising from the NO2 photodissociation as a molecular tracer. The VENOM technique is expected to be not only applicable to cold high-speed flows, which is the focus of the present work, but also to combustion and other reactive or high-enthalpy flow fields.

Sanchez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Simulations of highly reactive fluids  

SciTech Connect

We report density functional molecular dynamics simulations to determine the early chemical events of hot (T = 3000 K) and dense (1.97 g/cm{sup 3}, V/V{sub 0} = 0.68) nitromethane (CH{sub 3}NO{sub 2}). The first step in the decomposition process is an intermolecular proton abstraction mechanism that leads to the formation of CH{sub 3}NO{sub 2}H and the aci ion H{sub 2}CNO{sub 2}{sup -}, in support of evidence from static high-pressure and shock experiments. An intramolecular hydrogen transfer that transforms nitromethane into the aci acid form, CH{sub 2}NO{sub 2}H, accompanies this event. This is the first confirmation of chemical reactivity with bond selectivity for an energetic material near the condition of fully reacted specimen. We also report the decomposition mechanism followed up to the formation of H{sub 2}O as the first stable product.

Fried, L E; Manaa, M R; Reed, E J

2005-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

310

TRACER DETECTION TECHNOLOGY CORP. PRODUCTS AND SERVICES FOR CORPORATE AND GOVERNMENT SECURITY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TRACER DETECTION TECHNOLOGY CORP. TRACER DETECTION TECHNOLOGY CORP. PRODUCTS AND SERVICES FOR CORPORATE AND GOVERNMENT SECURITY 3463 MAGIC DRIVE, SUITE T-19 SAN ANTONIO, TX 78229 March 29, 2009 Office of the Assistant General Counsel for Technology Transfer and Intellectual Property U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW. Washington, DC 20585. GC-62@hq.doe.gov ATTN: TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER QUESTIONS. Response to Request for Information - Federal Register "The Costs and Benefits of Dealing with Federal Laboratories" This "white paper" is intended to deal constructively with issues relating to technology transfer and interaction of small businesses with federal laboratories, and should be considered a response to #6 (other). As a small businessman and entrepreneur engaged in the

311

Evaluation of Tracers for Use in the International Field Experiment on CO2 Ocean Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tracers for Use in the International Field Experiment Tracers for Use in the International Field Experiment on CO 2 Ocean Sequestration E. Eric Adams (eeadams@mit.edu; 617-253-6595) Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, MA 02139 USA Introduction An international field experiment is scheduled to take place off of the west coast of the big island of Hawaii during the second half of 2001 (Adams, et al., 1999; Herzog, et al., 2000). Scientists representing some dozen institutions in five countries on four continents are expected to participate. The experiment will involve several sub-experiments in which CO 2 will be released at a depth of 800 m as a buoyant liquid at rates of 0.1 to 1.0 kg/s. The releases will each be made for a duration of about one hour using nozzles with differing diameters and numbers of ports.

312

TRACER DETECTION TECHNOLOGY CORP. PRODUCTS AND SERVICES FOR CORPORATE AND GOVERNMENT SECURITY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TRACER DETECTION TECHNOLOGY CORP. TRACER DETECTION TECHNOLOGY CORP. PRODUCTS AND SERVICES FOR CORPORATE AND GOVERNMENT SECURITY 3463 MAGIC DRIVE, SUITE T-19 SAN ANTONIO, TX 78229 March 29, 2009 Office of the Assistant General Counsel for Technology Transfer and Intellectual Property U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW. Washington, DC 20585. GC-62@hq.doe.gov ATTN: TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER QUESTIONS. Response to Request for Information - Federal Register "The Costs and Benefits of Dealing with Federal Laboratories" This "white paper" is intended to deal constructively with issues relating to technology transfer and interaction of small businesses with federal laboratories, and should be considered a response to #6 (other). As a small businessman and entrepreneur engaged in the

313

REAL-TIME TRACER MONITORING OF RESERVOIR STIMULATION PROCEDURES VIA ELECTRONIC WIRELINE AND TELEMETRY DATA TRANSMISSION  

SciTech Connect

Ongoing Phase 2-3 work comprises the final development and field-testing of two complementary real-time reservoir technologies; a stimulation process and a tracer fracturing diagnostic system. Initial DE-FC26-99FT40129 project work included research, development, and testing of the patented gamma tracer fracturing diagnostic system. This process was field-proven to be technically useful in providing tracer measurement of fracture height while fracturing; however, technical licensing restrictions blocked Realtimezone from fully field-testing this real-time gamma diagnostic system, as originally planned. Said restrictions were encountered during Phase 2 field test work as result of licensing limitations and potential conflicts between service companies participating in project work, as related to their gamma tracer logging tool technology. Phase 3 work principally demonstrated field-testing of Realtimezone (RTZ) and NETL's Downhole-mixed Reservoir Stimulation process. Early on, the simplicity of and success of downhole-mixing was evident from well tests, which were made commercially productive. A downhole-mixed acid stimulation process was tested successfully and is currently commercially used in Canada. The fourth well test was aborted due to well bore conditions, and an alternate test project is scheduled April, 2004. Realtimezone continues to effectuate ongoing patent protection in the United States and foreign markets. In 2002, Realtimezone and the NETL licensed their United States patent to Halliburton Energy Services (HES). Additional licensing arrangements with other industry companies are anticipated in 2004-2005. Ongoing Phase 2 and Phase 3 field-testing continues to confirm applications of both real-time technologies. Technical data transfer to industry is ongoing via Internet tech-transfer and various industry presentations and publications including Society of Petroleum Engineers. These real-time enhanced stimulation procedures should significantly increase future petroleum well recoveries in the United States, onshore and offshore, and in vertical and horizontal wells.

George Scott III

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Wear Measurement of Highly Cross-linked UHMWPE using a 7Be Tracer Implantation Technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The very low wear rates achieved with the current highly cross-linked ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylenes (UHMWPE) used in joint prostheses have proven to be difficult to measure accurately by gravimetry. Tracer methods are there- fore being explored. The purpose of this study was to perform a proof-of-concept experiment on the use of the radioactive tracer beryllium-7 (7Be) for the determination of in vitro wear in a highly cross-linked orthopedic UHMWPE. Three cross-linked and four conventional UHMWPE pins made from compression- molded GUR 1050, were activated with 109 to 1010 7Be nuclei using a new implantation setup that produced a homogenous distribution of implanted nuclei up to 8.5 lm below the surface. The pins were tested for wear in a six-station pin-on-flat appara- tus for up to 7.1 million cycles (178 km). A Germanium gamma detector was employed to determine activity loss of the UHMWPE pins at preset intervals during the wear test. The wear of the cross-linked UHMWPE pins was readily detected and esti- mated to be 17 6 3 lg per million cycles. The conventional-to- cross-linked ratio of the wear rates was 13.1 6 0.8, in the expected range for these materials. Oxidative degradation dam- age from implantation was negligible; however, a weak depend- ence of wear on implantation dose was observed limiting the number of radioactive tracer atoms that can be introduced. Future applications of this tracer technology may include the analysis of location-specific wear, such as loss of material in the post or backside of a tibial insert.

Wimmer, Markus A. [Rush Uniiv. Medical Center; Laurent, Michael P. [Rush Univ. Medical Center; Dwivedi, Yasha [Rush Univ. Medical Center; Gallardo, Luis A. [Rush Univ. Medical Center; Chipps, K. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Blackmon, Jeffery C [Louisiana State University; Kozub, R. L. [Tennessee Technological University; Bardayan, Daniel W [ORNL; Gross, Carl J [ORNL; Stracener, Daniel W [ORNL; Smith, Michael Scott [ORNL; Nesaraja, Caroline D [ORNL; Erikson, Luke [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Patel, Nidhi [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Rehm, Karl E. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Ahmad, Irshad [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Greene, John P. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Greife, Uwe [Colorado School of Mines, Golden

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Reactive Power Measurement Using the Wavelet Transform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AbstractThis paper provides the theoretical basis for the measurement of reactive and distortion powers from the wavelet transforms. The measurement of reactive power relies on the use of broad-band phase-shift networks to create concurrent in-phase currents and quadrature voltages. The wavelet real power computation resulting from these 90 phase-shift networks yields the reactive power associated with each wavelet frequency level or subband. The distortion power at each wavelet subband is then derived from the real, reactive and apparent powers of the subband, where the apparent power is the product of the v; i element pair's subband rms voltage and current. The advantage of viewing the real and reactive powers in the wavelet domain is that the domain preserves both the frequency and time relationship of these powers. In addition, the reactive power associated with each wavelet subband is a signed quantity and thus has a direction associated with it. This permits tracking the reactive power flow in each subband through the power system. Index TermsDigital signal processing, phase shift networks, measurement, power, RMS, subband, wavelets. I.

Weon-ki Yoon; Michael J. Devaney

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Comparison of biomass and coal char reactivities  

SciTech Connect

Char combustion is typically the rate limiting step during the combustion of solid fuels. The magnitude and variation of char reactivity during combustion are, therefore, of primary concern when comparing solid fuels such as coal and biomass. In an effort to evaluate biomass` potential as a sustainable and renewable energy source, the reactivities of both biomass and coal chars were compared using Sandia`s Captive Particle Imaging (CPI) apparatus. This paper summarizes the experimental approach used to determine biomass and coal reactivities and presents results from CPT experiments. The reactivity of six types of char particles, two high-rank coal chars, two low-rank coal chars, and two biomass chars, were investigated using the CPT apparatus. Results indicate that both of the high-rank coal chars have relatively low reactivities when compared with the higher reactivities measured for the low-rank coal and the biomass chars. In addition, extinction behavior of the chars support related investigations that suggest carbonaceous structural ordering is an important consideration in understanding particle reactivity as a function of extent of burnout. High-rank coal chars were found to have highly ordered carbon structures, where as, both low-rank coal and biomass chars were found to have highly disordered carbon structures.

Huey, S.P. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Davis, K.A. [Reaction Engineering International, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Hurt, R.H. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States). Div. of Engineering

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project  

SciTech Connect

KASP (Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project) completed the new Layer 0 upgrade for D0, assumed key electronics projects for the US CMS project, finished important new physics measurements with the D0 experiment at Fermilab, made substantial contributions to detector studies for the proposed e+e- international linear collider (ILC), and advanced key initiatives in non-accelerator-based neutrino physics.

Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Bolton, T.; Horton-Smith, G.; Maravin, Y.; Ratra, B.; Stanton, N.; von Toerne, E.; Wilson, G.

2007-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

318

Retention of Tracer Gas from Instantaneous Releases of SF6 in an Urban Environment  

SciTech Connect

Data from a series of instantaneous releases of SF6 tracer during the Joint Urban 2003 study in Oklahoma City have been analyzed to determine characteristic retention times for puffs in an urban environment. Results from nine real-time tracer detectors with a time response of 0.5 seconds were used in the analysis. Distances from the source ranged from less than 200 m to over 1 km. For each individual intensive operating period (IOP), the detector locations were adjusted so that, given the expected wind directions during the releases, the detectors would lie generally downwind of the release point. As a result, building characteristics upwind of the detectors varied from one IOP to the next. Animations of the tracer concentrations show clear evidence of channeling along street canyons approximately parallel to the prevailing wind directions, trapping in street canyons perpendicular to the flow, and other complex circulation patterns. Retention times for individual puffs ranged from a few minutes to over 20 minutes, with a strong mode in the distribution around 11 minutes. There was surprisingly little correlation with wind speed or direction. Comparisons with simple puff models are presented.

Doran, J. C.; Allwine, K Jerry; Clawson, Kirk L.; Carter, Roger G.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

STRATEGIES FOR QUANTIFYING PET IMAGING DATA FROM TRACER STUDIES OF BRAIN RECEPTORS AND ENZYMES.  

SciTech Connect

A description of some of the methods used in neuroreceptor imaging to distinguish changes in receptor availability has been presented in this chapter. It is necessary to look beyond regional uptake of the tracer since uptake generally is affected by factors other than the number of receptors for which the tracer has affinity. An exception is the infusion method producing an equilibrium state. The techniques vary in complexity some requiring arterial blood measurements of unmetabolized tracer and multiple time uptake data. Others require only a few plasma and uptake measurements and those based on a reference region require no plasma measurements. We have outlined some of the limitations of the different methods. Laruelle (1999) has pointed out that test/retest studies to which various methods can be applied are crucial in determining the optimal method for a particular study. The choice of method will also depend upon the application. In a clinical setting, methods not involving arterial blood sampling are generally preferred. In the future techniques for externally measuring arterial plasma radioactivity with only a few blood samples for metabolite correction will extend the modeling options of clinical PET. Also since parametric images can provide information beyond that of ROI analysis, improved techniques for generating such images will be important, particularly for ligands requiring more than a one-compartment model. Techniques such as the wavelet transform proposed by Turkheimer et al. (2000) may prove to be important in reducing noise and improving quantitation.

Logan, J.

2001-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

320

Subduction of South Pacific Tropical Water and Its Equatorward Pathways as Shown by a Simulated Passive Tracer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the subduction of South Pacific Tropical Water (SPTW) and its equatorward pathways using a simulated passive tracer of the consortium Estimating the Circulation & Climate of the Ocean (ECCO). The results show that ...

Tangdong Qu; Shan Gao; Rana A. Fine

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Origin and Pathway of Equatorial 13C Water in the Pacific Identified by a Simulated Passive Tracer and Its Adjoint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The origin and pathway of the thermostad water in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean, often referred to as the equatorial 13C Water, are investigated using a simulated passive tracer and its adjoint, based on circulation estimates of a global ...

Tangdong Qu; Shan Gao; Ichiro Fukumori; Rana A. Fine; Eric J. Lindstrom

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Nocturnal Low-Level Jet in a Mountain Basin Complex. Part II: Transport and Diffusion of Tracer under Stable Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Differences in nighttime transport and diffusion of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer in an urban complex-terrain setting (Salt Lake City, Utah) are investigated using surface and Doppler lidar wind data and large-scale surface pressure ...

Lisa S. Darby; K. Jerry Allwine; Robert M. Banta

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Systematic approach for chemical reactivity evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Under certain conditions, reactive chemicals may proceed into uncontrolled chemical reaction pathways with rapid and significant increases in temperature, pressure, and/or gas evolution. Reactive chemicals have been involved in many industrial incidents, and have harmed people, property, and the environment. Evaluation of reactive chemical hazards is critical to design and operate safer chemical plant processes. Much effort is needed for experimental techniques, mainly calorimetric analysis, to measure thermal reactivity of chemical systems. Studying all the various reaction pathways experimentally however is very expensive and time consuming. Therefore, it is essential to employ simplified screening tools and other methods to reduce the number of experiments and to identify the most energetic pathways. A systematic approach is presented for the evaluation of reactive chemical hazards. This approach is based on a combination of computational methods, correlations, and experimental thermal analysis techniques. The presented approach will help to focus the experimental work to the most hazardous reaction scenarios with a better understanding of the reactive system chemistry. Computational methods are used to predict reaction stoichiometries, thermodynamics, and kinetics, which then are used to exclude thermodynamically infeasible and non-hazardous reaction pathways. Computational methods included: (1) molecular group contribution methods, (2) computational quantum chemistry methods, and (3) correlations based on thermodynamic-energy relationships. The experimental techniques are used to evaluate the most energetic systems for more accurate thermodynamic and kinetics parameters, or to replace inadequate numerical methods. The Reactive System Screening Tool (RSST) and the Automatic Pressure Tracking Adiabatic Calorimeter (APTAC) were employed to evaluate the reactive systems experimentally. The RSST detected exothermic behavior and measured the overall liberated energy. The APTAC simulated near-adiabatic runaway scenarios for more accurate thermodynamic and kinetic parameters. The validity of this approach was investigated through the evaluation of potentially hazardous reactive systems, including decomposition of di-tert-butyl peroxide, copolymerization of styrene-acrylonitrile, and polymerization of 1,3-butadiene.

Aldeeb, Abdulrehman Ahmed

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Theoretical and Experimental Evaluation of Chemical Reactivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reactive chemicals are presented widely in the chemical and petrochemical process industry. Their chemical reactivity hazards have posed a significant challenge to the industries of manufacturing, storage and transportation. The accidents due to reactive chemicals have caused tremendous loss of properties and lives, and damages to the environment. In this research, three classes of reactive chemicals (unsaturated hydrocarbons, self-reacting chemicals, energetic materials) were evaluated through theoretical and experimental methods. Methylcyclopentadiene (MCP) and Hydroxylamine (HA) are selected as representatives of unsaturated hydrocarbons and self-reacting chemicals, respectively. Chemical reactivity of MCP, including isomerization, dimerization, and oxidation, is investigated by computational chemistry methods and empirical thermodynamicenergy correlation. Density functional and ab initio methods are used to search the initial thermal decomposition steps of HA, including unimolecular and bimolecular pathways. In addition, solvent effects are also examined using water cluster methods and Polarizable Continuum Models (PCM) for aqueous solution of HA. The thermal stability of a basic energetic material, Nitroethane, is investigated through both theoretical and experimental methods. Density functional methods are employed to explore the initial decomposition pathways, followed by developing detailed reaction networks. Experiments with a batch reactor and in situ GC are designed to analyze the distribution of reaction products and verify reaction mechanisms. Overall kinetic model is also built from calorimetric experiments using an Automated Pressure Tracking Adiabatic Calorimeter (APTAC). Finally, a general evaluation approach is developed for a wide range of reactive chemicals. An index of thermal risk is proposed as a preliminary risk assessment to screen reactive chemicals. Correlations are also developed between reactivity parameters, such as onset temperature, activation energy, and adiabatic time to maximum rate based on a limited number, 37 sets, of Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC) data. The research shows broad applications in developing reaction mechanisms at the molecular level. The methodology of reaction modeling in combination with molecular modeling can also be used to study other reactive chemical systems.

Wang, Qingsheng

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Advanced Windows Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exterior of Advanced Windows Test Facility Exterior of Advanced Windows Test Facility Advanced Windows Test Facility This multi-room laboratory's purpose is to test the performance and properties of advanced windows and window systems such as electrochromic windows, and automatically controlled shutters and blinds. The lab simulates real-world office spaces. Embedded instrumentation throughout the lab records solar gains and losses for specified time periods, weather conditions, energy use, and human comfort indicators. Electrochromic glazings promise to be a major advance in energy-efficient window technology, helping to achieve the goal of transforming windows and skylights from an energy liability in buildings to an energy source. The glazing can be reversibly switched from a clear to a transparent, colored

326

Advanced Fuels Synthesis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Fuels Synthesis Advanced Fuels Synthesis Coal and Coal/Biomass to Liquids Advanced Fuels Synthesis The Advanced Fuels Synthesis Key Technology is focused on catalyst and reactor optimization for producing liquid hydrocarbon fuels from coal/biomass mixtures, supports the development and demonstration of advanced separation technologies, and sponsors research on novel technologies to convert coal/biomass to liquid fuels. Active projects within the program portfolio include the following: Fischer-Tropsch fuels synthesis Small Scale Coal Biomass Liquids Production Using Highly Selective Fischer Tropsch Catalyst Small Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal/Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels Via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Coal Fuels Alliance: Design and Construction of Early Lead Mini Fischer-Tropsch Refinery

327

Advanced Voltage Control Strategies for High Penetration of Distributed Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research addresses advanced voltage control strategies for inverter-connected distributed generation. The emphasis is on photovoltaic (PV) generation, and results also apply to distributed wind, fuel cells, micro-turbines, and battery systems that are connected to the grid through an inverter. In related work, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) identified a set of high-priority functions for distributed generation. These included reactive power control such as intelligent and autonomous vo...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

328

Quantification of multiple methane emission sources at landfills using a double tracer technique  

SciTech Connect

Research highlights: > Precise and reliable measurements of emissions from landfills are needed. > A tracer technique involving simultaneous release of two tracers was proven successful. > Measurements to be performed at times with low changing trends in barometric pressure. - Abstract: A double tracer technique was used successfully to quantify whole-site methane (CH{sub 4}) emissions from Fakse Landfill. Emissions from different sections of the landfill were quantified by using two different tracers. A scaled-down version of the tracer technique measuring close-by to localized sources having limited areal extent was also used to quantify emissions from on-site sources at the landfill facility, including a composting area and a sewage sludge storage pit. Three field campaigns were performed. At all three field campaigns an overall leak search showed that the CH{sub 4} emissions from the old landfill section were localized to the leachate collection wells and slope areas. The average CH{sub 4} emissions from the old landfill section were quantified to be 32.6 {+-} 7.4 kg CH{sub 4} h{sup -1}, whereas the source at the new section was quantified to be 10.3 {+-} 5.3 kg CH{sub 4} h{sup -1}. The CH{sub 4} emission from the compost area was 0.5 {+-} 0.25 kg CH{sub 4} h{sup -1}, whereas the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) flux was quantified to be in the order of 332 {+-} 166 kg CO{sub 2} h{sup -1} and 0.06 {+-} 0.03 kg N{sub 2}O h{sup -1}, respectively. The sludge pit located west of the compost material was quantified to have an emission of 2.4 {+-} 0.63 kg h{sup -1} CH{sub 4}, and 0.03 {+-} 0.01 kg h{sup -1} N{sub 2}O.

Scheutz, C., E-mail: chs@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljovej, Building 113, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Samuelsson, J., E-mail: jerker.samuelsson@fluxsense.se [Chalmers University of Technology/FluxSense AB, SE-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); Fredenslund, A.M., E-mail: amf@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljovej, Building 113, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Kjeldsen, P., E-mail: pk@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljovej, Building 113, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing More Documents & Publications Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical Flushing Final Report - Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical

330

Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update More Documents & Publications Variation in Hydraulic Conductivity Over Time at the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium

331

Efficient and Reliable Reactive Power Supply and Consumption...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Efficient and Reliable Reactive Power Supply and Consumption - Insights from an Integrated Program of Engineering and Economics Research Title Efficient and Reliable Reactive Power...

332

Olefin production via reactive distillation based Olefin metathesis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Reactive distillation is a combination of a traditional multi-stage distillation column with a chemical reaction. The primary benefits of a reactive distillation process are reduced (more)

Morrison, Ryan Frederick

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

A Parametric Reactive Distillation Study: Economic Feasibility and Design Heuristics.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The integration of reaction and distillation into a single column is called reactive distillation or catalytic distillation. Reactive distillation provides many benefits such as reduced (more)

Hoyme, Craig Alan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Observations on the Coke Air Reactivity Test - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coke air reactivities are strongly dependent on coke calcination levels and it is possible to drive air reactivities lower by increasing calcining temperatures.

335

Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor comprises supports stacked above reactor core for holding control rods. Couplers associated with the supports and a vertically movable drive shaft have lugs at their lower ends for engagement with the supports.

Bollinger, Lawrence R. (Schenectady, NY)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

A Tariff for Reactive Power - IEEE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes a suggested tariff or payment for the local supply of reactive power from distributed energy resources. The authors consider four sample customers, and estimate the cost of supply of reactive power for each customer. The power system savings from the local supply of reactive power are also estimated for a hypothetical circuit. It is found that reactive power for local voltage regulation could be supplied to the distribution system economically by customers when new inverters are installed. The inverter would be supplied with a power factor of 0.8, and would be capable of local voltage regulation to a schedule supplied by the utility. Inverters are now installed with photovoltaic systems, fuel cells and microturbines, and adjustable-speed motor drives.

Kueck, John D [ORNL; Tufon, Christopher [Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Isemonger, Alan [California Independent System Operator; Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Mild coal pretreatment to improve liquefaction reactivity  

SciTech Connect

This report describes work completed during the fourth quarter of a three year project to study the effects of mild chemical pretreatment on coal dissolution reactivity during low severity liquefaction or coal/oil coprocessing. The overall objective of this research is to elucidate changes in the chemical and physical structure of coal by pretreating with methanol or other simple organic solvent and a trace amount of hydrochloric acid and measure the influence of these changes on coal dissolution reactivity. This work is part of a larger effort to develop a new coal liquefaction or coal/oil coprocessing scheme consisting of three main process steps: (1) mile pretreatment of the feed coal to enhance dissolution reactivity and dry the coal, (2) low severity thermal dissolution of the pretreated coal to obtain a very reactive coal-derived residual material amenable to upgrading, and (3) catalytic upgrading of the residual products to distillate liquids.

Miller, R.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Groundwater well with reactive filter pack  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for the remediation of contaminated soil and ground water wherein a reactive pack material is added to the annular fill material utilized in standard well construction techniques.

Gilmore, Tyler J. (Pasco, WA); Holdren, Jr., George R. (Kennewick, WA); Kaplan, Daniel I. (Richland, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Fossil plant layup and reactivation conference: Proceedings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fossil Plant Layup and Reactivation Conference was held in New Orleans, Louisiana on April 14--15, 1992. The Conference was sponsored by EPRI and hosted by Entergy Services, Inc. to bring together representatives from utilities, consulting firms, manufacturers and architectural engineers. Eighteen papers were presented in three sessions. These sessions were devoted to layup procedures and practices, and reactivation case studies. A panel discussion was held on the second day to interactively discuss layup and reactivation issues. More than 80 people attended the Conference. This report contains technical papers and a summary of the panel discussion. Of the eighteen papers, three are related to general, one is related to regulatory issues, three are related to specific equipment, four are related to layup procedures and practices, and seven are layup and reactivation case studies.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Oxidation Resistance of Reactive Atoms in Graphene  

SciTech Connect

We have found that reactive elements that are normally oxidized at room temperature are present as individual atoms or clusters on and in graphene. Oxygen is present in these samples but it is only detected in the thicker amorphous carbon layers present in the graphene specimens we have examined. However, we have seen no evidence that oxygen reacts with the impurity atoms and small clusters of these normally reactive elements when they are incorporated in the graphene layers. First principles calculations suggest that the oxidation resistance is due to kinetic effects such as preferential bonding of oxygen to nonincorporated atoms and H passivation. The observed oxidation resistance of reactive atoms in graphene may allow the use of these incorporated metals in catalytic applications. It also opens the possibility of designing and producing electronic, opto-electronic, and magnetic devices based on these normally reactive atoms.

Chisholm, Matthew F [ORNL; Duscher, Gerd [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Windl, Wolfgang [Ohio State University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Radiative Forcing Due to Reactive Gas Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reactive gas emissions (CO, NOx, VOC) have indirect radiative forcing effects through their influences on tropospheric ozone and on the lifetimes of methane and hydrogenated halocarbons. These effects are quantified here for the full set of ...

T. M. L. Wigley; S. J. Smith; M. J. Prather

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Enhanced Oxidative Reactivity for Anthracite Coal via a Reactive Ball Milling Pretreatment Step  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reactive ball milling in a cyclohexene solvent significantly increases the oxidative reactivity of an anthracite coal, due to the combined effects of particle size reduction, metal introduction, introduction of volatile matter, and changes in carbon structure. Metals introduced during milling can be easily removed via a subsequent demineralization process, and the increased reactivity is retained. Solvent addition alters the morphological changes that occur during pyrolysis and leads to a char with significantly increased reactivity. When the solvent is omitted, similar effects are seen for the milled product, but a significant fraction of the char is resistant to oxidation. 33 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Angela D. Lueking; Apurba Sakti; Dania Alvarez-Fonseca; Nichole Wonderling [Pennsylvania State University, PA (United States). Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

343

NETL: Advanced Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AR AR Coal and Power Systems Advanced Research 12.11.13: Request for Information entitled "Novel Crosscutting Research and Development to Support Advanced Energy Systems". Application due date is January 15, 2014. The RFI and/or instructions can be found on the FedConnect site at FedConnect. Achieving Successes in High Performance Materials, Coal Utilization Sciences, Sensors & Controls Innovations, Computational Energy Sciences, Cooperative Research and Development, and sponsoring Education Initiatives. The Advanced Research (AR) program within NETL's Office of Coal and Power Systems fosters the development of innovative, cost-effective technologies for improving the efficiency and environmental performance of advanced coal and power systems. In addition, AR bridges the gap between fundamental

344

Advanced Chlorophyll Fluorometer  

To advance miniaturization of the AquaSentinel environmental monitoring technology, ORNL and the University of Tennessee researchers developed a microfluidics-based pulse amplitude modulation (PAM) chlorophyll fluorometerthe first of its ...

345

Advancement of Electrochromic Windows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Energy Systems Integration Advancement ofintegration issues related to using EC windows within a whole building energy efficient systemenergy- savings benefit with EC-daylighting-HVAC integration (assuming a conventional VAV system

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Advanced Cathode Catalysts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Research 1 HFCIT Program Kick-off Meeting, Arlington, VA, February 13-14, 2007 Program Kick-off Meeting Arlington, Virginia, February 13-14, 2007 Advanced Cathode...

347

Search Asia Advanced Search  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Asia Times Search Asia Times Advanced Search Southeast Asia Malaysia tackles illegal logging:52:14 AM Search #12;Asia Times illegal logging," he said, adding that nine Malaysians had been arrested

348

Search Asia Advanced Search  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Asia Times Search Asia Times Advanced Search Southeast Asia Indonesia looks to curb log smuggling.html (1 of 2)9/4/2007 12:59:34 PM Search #12;Asia Times No material from Asia Times Online may

349

About | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the APS Welcome to the Advanced Photon Source Here you will find an introduction and tour of the facility, as well as information about the organizations and opportunities at...

350

Nanostructured Materials for Advanced  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of electric vehicles (EVs) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). High energy and high power densitiesT Nanostructured Materials for Advanced Li-Ion Rechargeable Batteries THE RECENT INCREASE IN demand

Cao, Guozhong

351

Advanced Distribution Monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced Distribution Automation (ADA) is a concept for a fully controllable and flexible distribution system that will facilitate the exchange of electrical energy AND information between participants and system components. Advances in the monitoring of system parameters like voltages, currents and breaker/switch positions as well as environmental variables like temperature and wind speed will be required in order to fully implement ADA. This report presents background information on distribution monito...

2005-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

352

Advanced drilling systems study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work was initiated as part of the National Advanced Drilling and Excavation Technologies (NADET) Program. It is being performed through joint finding from the Department of Energy Geothermal Division and the Natural Gas Technology Branch, Morgantown Energy Technology Center. Interest in advanced drilling systems is high. The Geothermal Division of the Department of Energy has initiated a multi-year effort in the development of advanced drilling systems; the National Research Council completed a study of drilling and excavation technologies last year; and the MIT Energy Laboratory recently submitted a proposal for a national initiative in advanced drilling and excavation research. The primary reasons for this interest are financial. Worldwide expenditures on oil and gas drilling approach $75 billion per year. Also, drilling and well completion account for 25% to 50% of the cost of producing electricity from geothermal energy. There is incentive to search for methods to reduce the cost of drilling. Work on ideas to improve or replace rotary drilling technology dates back at least to the 1930`s. There was a significant amount of work in this area in the 1960`s and 1970`s; and there has been some continued effort through the 1980`s. Undoubtedly there are concepts for advanced drilling systems that have yet to be studied; however, it is almost certain that new efforts to initiate work on advanced drilling systems will build on an idea or a variation of an idea that has already been investigated. Therefore, a review of previous efforts coupled with a characterization of viable advanced drilling systems and the current state of technology as it applies to those systems provide the basis for the current study of advanced drilling.

Pierce, K.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Livesay, B.J. [Livesay Consultants, San Diego, CA (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

NETL: Advanced NOx Emissions Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Advanced NOx Emissions Control Innovations for Existing Plants Advanced NOx Emissions Control Adv....

354

Advance Electronics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Advance Electronics Jump to: navigation, search Name Advance Electronics Place United Kingdom Zip LL14 3YR Product Develop and deliver power conditioners, transient suppressors,...

355

review of extraction, processing, properties & applications of reactive ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

REVIEW OF EXTRACTION,. PROCESSING, PROPERTIES. & APPLICATIONS OF. REACTIVE METALS. Edited by. Brajendra Mishra...

356

Advanced Vehicle Technologies Awards | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Vehicle Technologies Awards Advanced Vehicle Technologies Awards Microsoft Word - VTP 175 Advanced Vehicle Tech project descriptions draft v5 8-2-11 AdvancedVehiclesTechn...

357

CS4353 Course Outline Advanced Graphics ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduce advanced interactive computer graphics concepts Introduce advanced architecture of computer graphics devices Introduce advanced mathematical representation of graphic images Develop advanced graphics programming skills

Instructor John; E. Howl

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Trip Report for the 2005 Sino-American SF6 Tracer Experiment  

SciTech Connect

The Chinese Institute for Radiation Protection (CIRP) conducted an SF6 atmospheric tracer experiment in July 2005 in the vicinity of the Qinshan Nuclear Power Company complex on the coast of the East China Sea. The experiment was partially sponsored by the US Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration, under the NA-23 International Emergency Management and Cooperation Program. NA-23 sent a delegation of five scientists to observe the experiment; four of the observers were from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and one was from the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). CIRP's cooperation with the US-Japanese delegation was excellent, and the project was very successful from the international cooperation perspective. Although the experiment was modest in scope, it may provide one or more data sets that can be used for international dispersion model validation and intercomparison projects. Several areas for procedural improvements were noted by the US and Japanese observers, and a more concise measure of the experiment's scientific value will be available after CIRP completes and delivers the database of the experiment results by the end of the fiscal year. The consensus recommendation of the observers is that CIRP and DOE/NNSA NA-23 build on the experience and personal contacts gained during the experiment to plan and conduct an even more effective experiment in the future, perhaps as early as next year (2006). If the decision is made to conduct a follow-on experiment, we strongly recommend that the LLNL and JAERI representatives work cooperatively with CIRP throughout the entire planning phase of the experiment. As discussed in Section V, a 2006 China tracer experiment could serve as a springboard to a 2007 long-range international tracer experiment involving South Korea.

Bradley, M M; Sullivan, T J; Keating II, G A; Leach, M J

2005-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

359

Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing More Documents & Publications Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Final Report - Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical Flushing, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 8 Support

360

Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing U. S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 8 Support January 2004 Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing More Documents & Publications Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical Flushing

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update More Documents & Publications Variation in Hydraulic Conductivity Over Time at the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium

362

Transport Modeling of Reactive and Non-Reactive Constituents from Summitville,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Survey (USGS) began water- quality investigations at Summitville, Terrace #12;Figure 2. Aerial photographTransport Modeling of Reactive and Non- Reactive Constituents from Summitville, Colorado in the Wightman Fork/Alamosa River system downstream of the Summitville Mine, south-central Colorado, were

363

Advance Materials & Innovative Solutions for Oil and Gas I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 6, 2013 ... Fluorescent Nanoparticle Tracers for Oil Exploration and Production: Emmanuel Giannelis1; 1Cornell University Nanoparticle technology has...

364

Field and numerical studies of tracer gas transport and surface gas tranfer in laterally uniform, partially stratified estuaries  

SciTech Connect

Techniques for determination of reaeration rates in natural waterbodies are reviewed. The tracer gas technique for reaeration rate determination offers many advantages over other existing methods and is widely used in rivers and streams. The tracer gas method seems to be the most promising of available techniques for estuarine reaeration rate determination. The two-dimensional late-rally averaged equations describing flow and transport in estuaries are derived and discussed. A laterally averaged numerical model of estaurine hydrodynamics and transport is modified so that tracer gas releases may be simulated. Field studies conducted as a part of the study are described. Two dye releases were made in the upper Houston Ship Channel; two dye tracer gas releases were later made in the same region. The data from these studies are presented and analyzed. Mechanical mixing by shipping traffic proved to be the predominant mixing mechanism and a hindrance to further studies at that site. An intensive field study was conducted in the Colorado River estuary. Field data included velocities, salinity profiles, water surface elevations, and dye concentration data from three dye releases. The data from this study are used to calibrate and test the numerical model of estuarine tracer gas transport.

Bales, J.D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Advanced Hot-Gas Desulfurization Sorbents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power systems are being advanced worldwide for generating electricity from coal due to their superior environmental performance, economics, and efficiency in comparison to conventional coal-based power plants. Hot gas cleanup offers the potential for higher plant thermal efficiencies and lower cost. A key subsystem of hot-gas cleanup is hot-gas desulfurization using regenerable sorbents. Sorbents based on zinc oxide are currently the leading candidates and are being developed for moving- and fluidized- bed reactor applications. Zinc oxide sorbents can effectively reduce the H{sub 2}S in coal gas to around 10 ppm levels and can be regenerated for multicycle operation. However, all current first-generation leading sorbents undergo significant loss of reactivity with cycling, as much as 50% or greater loss in only 25-50 cycles. Stability of the hot-gas desulfurization sorbent over 100`s of cycles is essential for improved IGCC economics over conventional power plants. This project aims to develop hot-gas cleanup sorbents for relatively lower temperature applications, 343 to 538{degrees}C with emphasis on the temperature range from 400 to 500{degrees}. Recent economic evaluations have indicated that the thermal efficiency of IGCC systems increases rapidly with the temperature of hot-gas cleanup up to 350{degrees}C and then very slowly as the temperature is increased further. This suggests that the temperature severity of the hot-gas cleanup devices can be reduced without significant loss of thermal efficiency. The objective of this study is to develop attrition-resistant advanced hot-gas desulfurization sorbents which show stable and high sulfidation reactivity at 343{degrees}C (650{degrees}F) to 538{degrees}C(1OOO{degrees}F) and regenerability at lower temperatures than leading first generation sorbents.

Jothimurugesan, K.; Gangwal, S.K.; Gupta, R.; Turk, B.S.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

NETL: Advanced Research - Successes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Successes Successes Advanced Research Successes Sensors & Controls "...Optical grade single-crystal sapphire optical fiber waveguides are especially attractive for fabricating sensors for the harsh high-temperature, corrosive environments found in gasifiers." Read More... "Industry adoption of CCADS will open the door to a new generation of more efficient, ultra-low emission turbines in advanced energy systems" Read More... Bioprocessing " Successful development and commercial application of this environmentally safe bacterial toxin will allow power plants to reduce or eliminate the use of chlorination, reducing the risk of harmful effects on aquatic ecosystems." Advanced Materials " This project will benefit gasification technology development and deployment by improving materials to contain and monitor gasification processes." Read More...

367

Geothermal: Advanced Search  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Search Advanced Search Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection Help/FAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On Home/Basic Search About Publications Advanced Search New Hot Docs News Related Links You may need to turn on Javascript in your browser to use the Find Subject and Find Author features. Sort By: Relevance Publication Date System Entry Date Document Type Title Research Org Sponsoring Org OSTI Identifier Report Number DOE Contract Number Ascending Descending Enter search criteria into as few or as many fields as desired. Search In For Term(s) (Place phrase in "double quotes") All Fields: Bibliographic Data: Full Text: Creator/Author Select : Title: Subject Select : Identifier Numbers: Journal Info.: Conference Info.: Patent Info.: Research Org.: Sponsoring Org.:

368

NIST's Advanced Technology Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NIST's Advanced NIST's Advanced Technology Program NIST's Advanced Technology Program DOE Workshop on Hydrogen Separation and Purification Technologies Arlington, VA, Sept. 8-9, 2004 Jason Huang 301-975-4197 National Institute of Standards and Technology 100 Bureau Drive Stop 4730 Gaithersburg, MD 20899-4730 http://www.atp.nist.gov National Institute of Standards and Technology * Technology Administration * U.S. Department of Commerce ATP is part of NIST Helping America Measure Up NIST Mission ATP is part of NIST NIST Mission: Strengthen the U.S. economy and improve the quality of life by working with industry to develop and apply technology, measurements, and standards. * * * * * * 3,000 employees $771 million annual budget 2,000 field agents 1,800 guest researchers $2.2 billion co-funding of

369

Advanced Hydride Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Metal hydrides have been used at the Savannah River Tritium Facilities since 1984. However, the most extensive application of metal hydride technology at the Savannah River Site is being planned for the Replacement Tritium Facility, a $140 million facility schedules for completion in 1990 and startup in 1991. In the new facility, metal hydride technology will be used to store, separate, isotopically purify, pump, and compress hydrogen isotopes. In support of the Replacement Tritium Facility, a $3.2 million, cold,'' process demonstration facility, the Advanced Hydride Laboratory began operation in November of 1987. The purpose of the Advanced Hydride Laboratory is to demonstrate the Replacement Tritium Facility's metal hydride technology by integrating the various unit operations into an overall process. This paper will describe the Advanced Hydride Laboratory, its role and its impact on the application of metal hydride technology to tritium handling.

Motyka, T.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Nuclear engine flow reactivity shim control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear engine control system is provided which automatically compensates for reactor reactivity uncertainties at the start of life and reactivity losses due to core corrosion during the reactor life in gas-cooled reactors. The coolant gas flow is varied automatically by means of specially provided control apparatus so that the reactor control drums maintain a predetermined steady state position throughout the reactor life. This permits the reactor to be designed for a constant drum position and results in a desirable, relatively flat temperature profile across the core. (Official Gazette)

Walsh, J.M.

1973-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

371

Advanced fuel chemistry for advanced engines.  

SciTech Connect

Autoignition chemistry is central to predictive modeling of many advanced engine designs that combine high efficiency and low inherent pollutant emissions. This chemistry, and especially its pressure dependence, is poorly known for fuels derived from heavy petroleum and for biofuels, both of which are becoming increasingly prominent in the nation's fuel stream. We have investigated the pressure dependence of key ignition reactions for a series of molecules representative of non-traditional and alternative fuels. These investigations combined experimental characterization of hydroxyl radical production in well-controlled photolytically initiated oxidation and a hybrid modeling strategy that linked detailed quantum chemistry and computational kinetics of critical reactions with rate-equation models of the global chemical system. Comprehensive mechanisms for autoignition generally ignore the pressure dependence of branching fractions in the important alkyl + O{sub 2} reaction systems; however we have demonstrated that pressure-dependent 'formally direct' pathways persist at in-cylinder pressures.

Taatjes, Craig A.; Jusinski, Leonard E.; Zador, Judit; Fernandes, Ravi X.; Miller, James A.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

A Microsoft Excel Program for Two-Well Tracer Test Data Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two-well tracer tests are often conducted to investigate subsurface solute transport in the field. Analyzing breakthrough curves in the extraction and monitoring wells using numerical methods is nontrivial due to highly nonuniform flow conditions. We extended, and implemented analytical solutions for the convection-dispersion equation for an injection-extraction well-duplet in a homogeneous confined aquifer under steady state conditions. Functions were provided to calculate the concentrations in the extraction and monitoring wells at any location due to a step or pulse injection. Type curves for a step injection were compared with those calculated by numerically integrating the solution for a pulse injection. The results from the two approaches are similar when the dispersivity is small. As the dispersivity increases, the latter was found to be more accurate but requires more computing time. The code was verified by comparing the results with published type curves and applied to analyze data from the literature. It can be used as a first approximation for two-well tracer test data analysis, and to check accuracy of numerical solutions. The code and example files are publically-available.

Tang, Guoping [ORNL; Watson, David B [ORNL; Parker, Jack C. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Brooks, Scott C [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

A Spreadsheet Program for Two-Well Tracer Test Data Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two-well tracer tests are often conducted to investigate subsurface solute transport in the field. Analyzing breakthrough curves in extraction and monitoring wells using numerical methods is nontrivial due to highly nonuniform flow conditions. We extended approximate analytical solutions for the advection-dispersion equation for an injection-extraction well doublet in a homogeneous confined aquifer under steady-state flow conditions for equal injection and extraction rates with no transverse dispersion and negligible ambient flow, and implemented the solutions in Microsoft Excel using Visual Basic for Application (VBA). Functions were implemented to calculate concentrations in extraction and monitoring wells at any location due to a step or pulse injection. Type curves for a step injection were compared with those calculated by numerically integrating the solution for a pulse injection. The results from the two approaches are similar when the dispersivity is small. As the dispersivity increases, the latter was found to be more accurate but requires more computing time. The code was verified by comparing the results with published-type curves and applied to analyze data from the literature. The method can be used as a first approximation for two-well tracer test design and data analysis, and to check accuracy of numerical solutions. The code and example files are publicly available.

Tang, Guoping [ORNL; Watson, David [ORNL; Parker, Jack C. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Brooks, Scott C [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Advanced Simulation and Computing  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NA-ASC-117R-09-Vol.1-Rev.0 NA-ASC-117R-09-Vol.1-Rev.0 Advanced Simulation and Computing PROGRAM PLAN FY09 October 2008 ASC Focal Point Robert Meisner, Director DOE/NNSA NA-121.2 202-586-0908 Program Plan Focal Point for NA-121.2 Njema Frazier DOE/NNSA NA-121.2 202-586-5789 A Publication of the Office of Advanced Simulation & Computing, NNSA Defense Programs i Contents Executive Summary ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1 I. Introduction -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 2 Realizing the Vision ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 2 The Future of the Nuclear Weapons Complex ---------------------------------------------------------------- 2

375

Advanced Containment System  

SciTech Connect

An advanced containment system for containing buried waste and associated leachate. The advanced containment system comprises a plurality of casing sections with each casing section interlocked to an adjacent casing section. Each casing section includes a complementary interlocking structure that interlocks with the complementary interlocking structure on an adjacent casing section. A barrier filler substantially fills the casing sections and may substantially fill the spaces of the complementary interlocking structure to form a substantially impermeable barrier. Some of the casing sections may include sensors so that the casing sections and the zone of interest may be remotely monitored after the casing sections are emplaced in the ground.

Kostelnik, Kevin M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kawamura, Hideki (Tokyo, JP); Richardson, John G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Noda, Masaru (Tokyo, JP)

2005-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

376

Advanced Monitoring systems initiative  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Monitoring Systems Initiative (AMSI) actively searches for promising technologies and aggressively moves them from the research bench into DOE/NNSA end-user applications. There is a large unfulfilled need for an active element that reaches out to identify and recruit emerging sensor technologies into the test and evaluation function. Sensor research is ubiquitous, with the seeds of many novel concepts originating in the university systems, but at present these novel concepts do not move quickly and efficiently into real test environments. AMSI is a widely recognized, self-sustaining ''business'' accelerating the selection, development, testing, evaluation, and deployment of advanced monitoring systems and components.

R.J. Venedam; E.O. Hohman; C.F. Lohrstorfer; S.J. Weeks; J.B. Jones; W.J. Haas

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

377

REAL-TIME TRACER MONITORING OF RESERVOIR STIMULATION PROCEDURES VIA ELECTRONIC WIRELINE AND TELEMETRY DATA TRANSMISSION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Finalized Phase 2-3 project work has field-proven two separate real-time reservoir processes that were co-developed via funding by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Both technologies are presently patented in the United States and select foreign markets; a downhole-commingled reservoir stimulation procedure and a real-time tracer-logged fracturing diagnostic system. Phase 2 and early Phase 3 project work included the research, development and well testing of a U.S. patented gamma tracer fracturing diagnostic system. This stimulation logging process was successfully field-demonstrated; real-time tracer measurement of fracture height while fracturing was accomplished and proven technically possible. However, after the initial well tests, there were several licensing issues that developed between service providers that restricted and minimized Realtimezone's (RTZ) ability to field-test the real-time gamma diagnostic system as was originally outlined for this project. Said restrictions were encountered after when one major provider agreed to license their gamma logging tools to another. Both of these companies previously promised contributory support toward Realtimezone's DE-FC26-99FT40129 project work, however, actual support was less than desired when newly-licensed wireline gamma logging tools from one company were converted by the other from electric wireline into slickline, batter-powered ''memory'' tools for post-stimulation logging purposes. Unfortunately, the converted post-fracture measurement memory tools have no applications in experimentally monitoring real-time movement of tracers in the reservoir concurrent with the fracturing treatment. RTZ subsequently worked with other tracer gamma-logging tool companies for basic gamma logging services, but with lessened results due to lack of multiple-isotope detection capability. In addition to real-time logging system development and well testing, final Phase 2 and Phase 3 project work included the development of a real-time reservoir stimulation procedure, which was successfully field-demonstrated and is presently patented in the U.S. and select foreign countries, including Venezuela, Brazil and Canada. Said patents are co-owned by RTZ and the National Energy Technology Lab (NETL). In 2002, Realtimezone and the NETL licensed said patents to Halliburton Energy Services (HES). Additional licensing agreements (LA) are anticipated with other service industry companies in 2005. Final Phase 3 work has led to commercial applications of the real-time reservoir stimulation procedure. Four successfully downhole-mixed well tests were conducted with commercially expected production results. The most recent, fourth field test was a downhole-mixed stimulated well completed in June, 2004, which currently produces 11 BOPD with 90 barrels of water per day. Conducted Phase 2 and Phase 3 field-test work to date has resulted in the fine-tuning of a real-time enhanced stimulation system that will significantly increase future petroleum well recoveries in the United States and foreign petroleum fields, both onshore and offshore, and in vertical and horizontal wells.

George L. Scott III

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Development of X-ray Tracer Diagnostics for Radiatively-Driven Copper-Doped Beryllium Ablators. NLUF FY1999 Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the fiscal year 1999 portion of our ongoing project to develop tracer spectral diagnostics of ablator conditions in the hohlraum radiation environment. The overall goal of the experimental campaign is to measure the turn-on times of K{sub a} absorption features from tracers buried in planar witness plates. The tracers are thin and at a specific, known depth in the witness plates so that the turn-on times are indicators of the arrival of the Marshak wave at the specified depths. Ultimately, we intend to compare the delay in the turn-on times of the tracer signals between doped and undoped ablator materials, and thus study the effect of ablator dopants on the Marshak wave velocity. During FY 1999, our primary goal was to simply measure an absorption signal, matching tracer depth to drive temperature and testing the overall feasibility of our experimental scheme. In indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) energy is deposited rapidly on the outside of a spherical capsule, ablating the outer layers of the capsule and compressing the interior. If this process is carefully controlled, then hydrogen fuel at the center of the capsule can be compressed and heated such that fusion reactions may proceed. The efficiency of the compression depends crucially on the time-dependent energy deposition onto the ablator material on the outside of the capsule. The nature of this coupling can be controlled through the use of ablator dopants, which modify the density and opacity of the ablator layer. Clearly, it is crucial to the success of indirect-drive ICF to have a means for testing the effects of ablator dopants, and more generally for having a diagnostic that is capable of determining time-dependent ablator properties. To this end, we are adapting tracer spectroscopy techniques to make time-dependent measurements of the ionization state of planar ablator materials mounted on the sides of hohlraums. Specifically, we are doing backlighter point-projection spectroscopy of K{sub a} features from tracers placed in the interiors of planar witness plates made of ablator materials. As the radiation wave, or Marshak wave, diffuses into the ablator material it drives a shock ahead of it. When the shock arrives at a given point in the witness plate it heats the tracer to roughly 20 eV. Soon after, the radiation wave arrives, heating the tracer to well above 100 eV nearly instantaneously. Thus, the ''turn-on'' of tracer absorption from high ionization states is an indicator that the radiation wave has arrived at the tracer. Furthermore, the time-dependent ionization balance in the tracer is, our simulations show, indicative of the efficiency with which the radiation field couples to the ablator material. Note that this technique holds out the possibility of making a determination of the instantaneous impact of the radiation field on the ablator physics, as opposed to something like a shock breakout measurement, in which the observed signal reflects the integrated time-history of the impact of the radiation field on the ablator.

Cohen, David H.; MacFarlane, Joseph J.; Wang, Ping; Jaanimagi, Paul A.; Oertel, John; Magelssen, Glenn; Landen, Otto L.; Back, Christina A.; Olson, Richard E.; Bailey, James E.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Two-tracer spectroscopy diagnostics of temperature profile in the conduction layer of a laser-ablated plastic foil  

SciTech Connect

A technique that combines the diagnostics of electron temperature history and the measurements of ablation velocity with two-tracer x-ray spectroscopy has been developed for diagnosing the temperature profiles in the thermal conduction layers of laser-ablated plastic foils. The electron temperature in the plastic ablator was diagnosed using the isoelectronic line ratios of Al Ly{alpha} line to Mg Ly{alpha} line, emitted from a tracer layer of Al/Mg mixture buried under the ablator. The ablation velocity was inferred from the time delay between the onset time of x-ray line emissions from Al and Mg tracer layers buried at two depths in the ablator, respectively. From the measured electron temperatures and ablation velocity, the electron temperature profile in the conduction layer was inferred. The measured temperature profile was compared with the simulated one and reasonable agreement was found.

Zhang Jiyan; Yang Guohong; Hu Xin; Yang Jiamin; Ding Yaonan; Ding Yongkun; Zhang Baohan; Zheng Zhijian [Research Center of Laser Fusion, P. O. Box 919-986, Mianyang 621900 (China); Xu Yan; Yan Jun; Pei Wenbin [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

380

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

feasibility of combining wind farms with advanced coalfeasibility of combining wind farms with advanced coal

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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381

Advanced turbine systems program  

SciTech Connect

In accordance with the goals of the DOE program, improvements in the gas turbine are the primary focus of Allison activity during Phase I. To this end Allison conducted a survey of potentially applicable gas turbine cycles and selected the advanced combined cycle as reference system. Extensive analysis of two versions of the advanced combined cycle was performed against the requirement for a 60% thermal efficiency (LHV) utility-sized, natural gas fired system. This analysis resulted in technology requirements for this system. Additional analysis determined emissions potential for the system, established a coal-fueled derivative system and a commercialization plan. This report deals with the technical requirements for a system that meets the thermal efficiency goal. Allison initially investigated four basic thermodynamic cycles: Humid air turbine, intercalate-recuperated systems, advanced combined cycle, chemically recuperated cycle. Our survey and cycle analysis indicated that au had the potential of reaching 60% thermal efficiency. We also concluded that engine hot section technology would be a critical technology regardless of which cycle was chosen. Based on this result Allison chose to concentrate on the advanced combined cycle. This cycle is well known and understood by the utility turbine user community and is therefore likely to be acceptable to users.

Wilkes, C.; Mukavetz, D.W.; Knickerbocker, T.K.; Ali, S.A.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

382

Advanced turbine systems program  

SciTech Connect

In accordance with the goals of the DOE program, improvements in the gas turbine are the primary focus of Allison activity during Phase I. To this end Allison conducted a survey of potentially applicable gas turbine cycles and selected the advanced combined cycle as reference system. Extensive analysis of two versions of the advanced combined cycle was performed against the requirement for a 60% thermal efficiency (LHV) utility-sized, natural gas fired system. This analysis resulted in technology requirements for this system. Additional analysis determined emissions potential for the system, established a coal-fueled derivative system and a commercialization plan. This report deals with the technical requirements for a system that meets the thermal efficiency goal. Allison initially investigated four basic thermodynamic cycles: Humid air turbine, intercalate-recuperated systems, advanced combined cycle, chemically recuperated cycle. Our survey and cycle analysis indicated that au had the potential of reaching 60% thermal efficiency. We also concluded that engine hot section technology would be a critical technology regardless of which cycle was chosen. Based on this result Allison chose to concentrate on the advanced combined cycle. This cycle is well known and understood by the utility turbine user community and is therefore likely to be acceptable to users.

Wilkes, C.; Mukavetz, D.W.; Knickerbocker, T.K.; Ali, S.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Advanced fossil energy utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This special issue of Fuel is a selection of papers presented at the symposium Advanced Fossil Energy Utilization co-sponsored by the Fuels and Petrochemicals Division and Research and New Technology Committee in the 2009 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) Spring National Meeting Tampa, FL, on April 2630, 2009.

Shekhawat, D.; Berry, D.; Spivey, J.; Pennline, H.; Granite, E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Advanced thermally stable jet fuels. Technical progress report, January 1996--March 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A reactive structure index was developed to correlate the molecular structures of saturated hydrocarbons with their reactivities using a linear group contribution method. The index is composed of several sub-indices determined from the structure, including carbon group indices, ring index, and conformation index. The effects on decomposition of ring structure, side-chain length, steric isomers, and branching were examined. Good correlations were obtained for two sets of saturated hydrocarbons. The reactivity of alkanes and cycloalkanes increases with increasing chain or side-chain length. Cycloalkanes are desirable components of advanced jet fuels, in terms of having higher thermal stability and density than n-alkanes of the same carbon number. The cis-isomer is usually more reactive than the trans-isomer, except for cis-1,3-dimethylcyclohexane. which is more stable than its trans-isomer. The presence of a branch or branches appears to decrease the decomposition rate compared to n-alkanes.

Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C. [and others

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Neutron Radiography Reactor Reactivity -- Focused Lessons Learned  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative, the Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) was converted from using highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. After the conversion, NRAD resumed operations and is meeting operational requirements. Radiography image quality and the number of images that can be produced in a given time frame match pre-conversion capabilities. However, following the conversion, NRADs excess reactivity with the LEU fuel was less than it had been with the HEU fuel. Although some differences between model predictions and actual performance are to be expected, the lack of flexibility in NRADs safety documentation prevented adjusting the reactivity by adding more fuel, until the safety documentation could be modified. To aid future reactor conversions, a reactivity-focused Lessons Learned meeting was held. This report summarizes the findings of the lessons learned meeting and addresses specific questions posed by DOE regarding NRADs conversion and reactivity.

Eric Woolstenhulme; Randal Damiana; Kenneth Schreck; Ann Marie Phillips; Dana Hewit

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

LES algorithm for turbulent reactive flows simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents the development and implementation of a Large Eddy Simulation numerical algorithm for simulating turbulent reactive flows. The numerical algorithm is based on a 5 step modified Runge - Kutta numerical scheme with a dual time stepping ... Keywords: Runge - Kutta numerical scheme, large eddy simulation, linear eddy model

Ionut Porumbel; Cristian Crl?nescu; Florin Gabriel Florean; Constantin Eusebiu Hritcu

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

[Reactive collisions of high-temperature systems]. [Technical progress report 1990  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The object of this research is to study reactivity at superthermal collision energies using a fast neutral beam that is generated by photodetachment. Systems scheduled for initial study include basic oxygen-hydrogen reactions. Unfortunately, we can not yet report realization of this goal, but during this funding period we have made advances that are anticipated to lead to successful measurements during the next year. The parameters described below refer to the model system O + H{sub 2} {yields} OH + H. The basic design involves the collision of fast neutrals, created by photodetachment of the corresponding negative molecular ion, with a stable reactant gas in a collision cell. Products are detected by ionization and mass analysis. We are equipped to study rotational effects on reactivity by comparing results for rotational levels J = 0 and 1 of H{sub 2}. Highlights during the funding period are given in this report.

Graff, M.M.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

388

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview to Overview to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Overview on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Overview on Twitter Bookmark Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Overview on Google Bookmark Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Overview on Delicious Rank Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Overview on Digg Find More places to share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Overview on AddThis.com... Home Overview Light-Duty Vehicles Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles Publications Overview The marketplace for advanced transportation technologies and the focus, direction, and funding of transportation programs are continually changing. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity's "2005 Overview of Advanced Technology Transportation" (PDF 736 KB) gives the latest information about

389

Reactive Air Aluminizing of Nicrofer-6025HT for Use in Advanced Coal-Based Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

The present work demonstrated the feasibility of preparing RAA coatings on Nicrofer and compared the effect of aluminum powder size on the RAA process.

Joshi, Vineet V.; Choi, Jung-Pyung; Darsell, Jens T.; Meier, Alan; Weil, K. Scott

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Method for generating a highly reactive plasma for exhaust gas after treatment and enhanced catalyst reactivity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent application describes a method and apparatus of exhaust gas remediation that enhance the reactivity of the material catalysts found within catalytic converters of cars, trucks, and power stations.

Whealton, John H.; Hanson, Gregory R.; Storey, John M.; Raridon, Richard J.; Armfield, Jeffrey S.; Bigelow, Timothy S.; Graves, Ronald L.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Development of advanced hot-gas desulfurization sorbents. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop hot-gas desulfurization sorbent formulations for relatively lower temperature application, with emphasis on the temperature range from 343--538 C. The candidate sorbents include highly dispersed mixed metal oxides of zinc, iron, copper, cobalt, nickel and molybdenum. The specific objective was to develop suitable sorbents, that would have high and stable surface area and are sufficiently reactive and regenerable at the relatively lower temperatures of interest in this work. Stability of surface area during regeneration was achieved by adding stabilizers. To prevent sulfation, catalyst additives that promote the light-off of the regeneration reaction at lower temperature was considered. Another objective of this study was to develop attrition-resistant advanced hot-gas desulfurization sorbents which show stable and high sulfidation reactivity at 343 to 538 C and regenerability at lower temperatures than leading first generation sorbents.

Jothimurugesan, K.; Adeyiga, A.A.; Gangwal, S.K.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Motorola's Exhaust Optimization Program: Tracer Gas Application for Gas Panel Enclosures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Motorola Exhaust Optimization Program strives toward identifying the optimum exhaust requirements for gas panel enclosures to help conserve energy and provide future exhaust capacity for new tools. Various Motorola studies have shown that at least 20% of total fab electrical usage is attributed to make-up air fans, exhaust fans, and chilled water systems for recirculation and make-up air. This is equivalent to over 35 million kWh per a year for a typical Motorola Semiconductor Products Sector (SPS) fab. These obtained studies have prompted Motorola to focus on a broad range of energy conservation projects. This paper will focus on exhaust optimization through tracer gas testing. Testing has resulted in exhaust and make-up air reductions of as high as 70% of manufacturer's specifications per gas enclosure. This approach leads to energy conservation and infrastructure cost avoidance for new exhaust fans, ductwork, abatement equipment, and make-up air systems.

Myart, H. R.; Camacho, R.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Posters | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Your Cart (0 Posters) Your Cart (0 Posters) Your cart is empty. checkout Subtotal: $0.00 update empty Posters Order a printed APS poster! 11 in. x 17 in. prints will be mailed in the order requests are received. 36 in. x 36 in. posters will be sent to school addresses once all orders are processed. The Advanced Photon Source Is The Advanced Photon Source Is Qty: 1 add to cart Technologies from Materials Science Technologies from Materials Science Qty: 1 add to cart Materials Under Extreme Pressure Materials Under Extreme Pressure Qty: 1 add to cart Biological Macromolecules in Action Biological Macromolecules in Action Qty: 1 add to cart Journey to the Center of the Earth Journey to the Center of the Earth Qty: 1 add to cart Earthshaking Monitor Earthshaking Monitor Qty: 1 add to cart Imaging with X-rays

394

Advanced Simulation Capability for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Simulation Capability for Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) ASCEM is being developed to provide a tool and approach to facilitate robust and standardized development of perfor- mance and risk assessments for cleanup and closure activi- ties throughout the EM complex. The ASCEM team is composed of scientists from eight National Laboratories. This team is leveraging Department of Energy (DOE) investments in basic science and applied research including high performance computing codes developed through the Advanced Scientific Computing Research and Advanced Simulation & Computing pro- grams as well as collaborating with the Offices of Science, Fossil Energy, and Nuclear Energy. Challenge Current groundwater and soil remediation challenges that will continue to be addressed in the next decade include

395

Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 Advanced Photon Source 0 Advanced Photon Source A U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences national synchrotron x-ray research facility Search Button About Welcome Overview Visiting the APS Mission & Goals Find People Organization Charts Committees Job Openings User Information Prospective Users New Users Current Users APS User Portal Macromolecular Crystallographers Administrators Find a Beamline Apply for Beam Time Contacts Calendars Community Scientific Access Site Access Training Science & Education Science & Research Highlights Conferences Seminars Publications Annual Reports APS Upgrade Courses and Schools Graduate Programs Scientific Software Media Center Calendar of Events APS News User News Argonne/APS Press Releases Argonne/APS Feature Stories Argonne/APS In The News

396

Overview | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

APS Overview: APS Overview: Introduction APS Systems Map LINAC Booster Synchrotron Storage Ring Insertion Devices Experiment Hall LOMs & Beamlines Overview of the APS The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory provides this nation's (in fact, this hemisphere's) brightest storage ring-generated x-ray beams for research in almost all scientific disciplines. Photo: Aerial Photo of APS Aerial photo of the Advanced Photon Source These x-rays allow scientists to pursue new knowledge about the structure and function of materials in the center of the Earth and in outer space, and all points in between. The knowledge gained from this research can impact the evolution of combustion engines and microcircuits, aid in the development of new pharmaceuticals, and pioneer nanotechnologies whose

397

NETL: Advanced Research - Ultrasupercritical  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Performance Materials > Ultrasupercritical High Performance Materials > Ultrasupercritical Advanced Research High Performance Materials Ultrasupercritical Increasing the temperature and pressure of steam improves the efficiency of boilers and turbines that use steam as the working fluid. These higher efficiency boilers and turbines require less coal and produce less greenhouse gases. Identifying materials that can operate for long periods of time at extreme temperatures and pressures is a major goal of NETL's Advanced Research Materials Program. Phase diagram of water Figure 1: Phase diagram of water To understand the terminology of boilers and turbines, it is first necessary to understand the basics of the water/steam phase diagram (see Figure 1). The normal boiling point (nbp) of water occurs at 1 atmosphere

398

Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tomography Interest Group Contact: Robert Winarski, Center for Nanoscale Materials winarski@anl.gov Contact: Francesco De Carlo, Advanced Photon Source decarlo@aps.anl.gov The tomography special interest group of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory has been created to promote awareness of the tomography facilities at the APS and to foster communications between the various research groups. Through this group, we believe we can build a strong user community for tomography. The following beamlines have active tomography research programs: 2-BM-B (XOR) http://www.aps.anl.gov/Xray_Science_Division/Xray_Microscopy_and_Imaging/Science_and_Research/Techniques/Tomography/index.html Information about the beamline: http://beam.aps.anl.gov/pls/apsweb/beamline_display_pkg.display_beamline?p_beamline_num_c=31

399

Advanced Technology Vehicle Testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) is to increase the body of knowledge as well as the awareness and acceptance of electric drive and other advanced technology vehicles (ATV). The AVTA accomplishes this goal by testing ATVs on test tracks and dynamometers (Baseline Performance testing), as well as in real-world applications (Fleet and Accelerated Reliability testing and public demonstrations). This enables the AVTA to provide Federal and private fleet managers, as well as other potential ATV users, with accurate and unbiased information on vehicle performance and infrastructure needs so they can make informed decisions about acquiring and operating ATVs. The ATVs currently in testing include vehicles that burn gaseous hydrogen (H2) fuel and hydrogen/CNG (H/CNG) blended fuels in internal combustion engines (ICE), and hybrid electric (HEV), urban electric, and neighborhood electric vehicles. The AVTA is part of DOE's FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program.

James Francfort

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Advanced drilling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Drilling is ubiquitous in oil, gas, geothermal, minerals, water well, and mining industries. Drilling and well completion account for 25% to 50% of the cost of producing power from geothermal energy. Reduced drilling costs will reduce the cost of electricity produced from geothermal resources. Undoubtedly, there are concepts for advanced drilling systems that have yet to be studied. However, the breadth and depth of previous efforts in this area almost guarantee that any new efforts will at least initially build on an idea or a variation of an idea that has already been investigated. Therefore, a review of previous efforts, coupled with a characterization of viable advanced drilling systems and the current state of technology as it applies to those systems, provide the basis for this study.

Pierce, K.G.; Finger, J.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Livesay, B.J. [Livesay Consultants, San Diego, CA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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401

Advanced far infrared detectors  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in photoconductive and bolometric semiconductor detectors for wavelength 1 mm > {lambda} > 50 {mu}m are reviewed. Progress in detector performance in this photon energy range has been stimulated by new and stringent requirements for ground based, high altitude and space-borne telescopes for astronomical and astrophysical observations. The paper consists of chapters dealing with the various types of detectors: Be and Ga doped Ge photoconductors, stressed Ge:Ga devices and neutron transmutation doped Ge thermistors. Advances in the understanding of basic detector physics and the introduction of modern semiconductor device technology have led to predictable and reliable fabrication techniques. Integration of detectors into functional arrays has become feasible and is vigorously pursued by groups worldwide.

Haller, E.E.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Advanced Separation Consortium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was formed in 2001 under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy to conduct fundamental research in advanced separation and to develop technologies that can be used to produce coal and minerals in an efficient and environmentally acceptable manner. The CAST consortium consists of seven universities - Virginia Tech, West Virginia University, University of Kentucky, Montana Tech, University of Utah, University of Nevada-Reno, and New Mexico Tech. The consortium brings together a broad range of expertise to solve problems facing the US coal industry and the mining sector in general. At present, a total of 60 research projects are under way. The article outlines some of these, on topics including innovative dewatering technologies, removal of mercury and other impurities, and modelling of the flotation process. 1 photo.

NONE

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

ENVIRONMENTAL REACTIVITY OF SOLID STATE HYDRIDE MATERIALS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In searching for high gravimetric and volumetric density hydrogen storage systems, it is inevitable that higher energy density materials will be used. In order to make safe and commercially acceptable condensed phase hydrogen storage systems, it is important to understand quantitatively the risks involved in using and handling these materials and to develop appropriate mitigation strategies to handle potential material exposure events. A crucial aspect of the development of risk identification and mitigation strategies is the development of rigorous environmental reactivity testing standards and procedures. This will allow for the identification of potential risks and implementation of risk mitigation strategies. Modified testing procedures for shipping air and/or water sensitive materials, as codified by the United Nations, have been used to evaluate two potential hydrogen storage materials, 2LiBH{sub 4} {center_dot} MgH{sub 2} and NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3}. The modified U.N. procedures include identification of self-reactive substances, pyrophoric substances, and gas-emitting substances with water contact. The results of these tests for air and water contact sensitivity will be compared to the pure material components where appropriate (e.g. LiBH{sub 4} and MgH{sub 2}). The water contact tests are divided into two scenarios dependent on the hydride to water mole ratio and heat transport characteristics. Air contact tests were run to determine whether a substance will spontaneously react with air in a packed or dispersed form. In the case of the 2LiBH{sub 4} {center_dot} MgH{sub 2} material, the results from the hydride mixture compared to the pure materials results showed the MgH{sub 2} to be the least reactive component and LiBH{sub 4} the more reactive. The combined 2LiBH{sub 4} {center_dot} MgH{sub 2} resulted in a material having environmental reactivity between these two materials. Relative to 2LiBH{sub 4} {center_dot} MgH{sub 2}, the chemical hydride NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3} was observed to be less environmentally reactive.

Gray, J; Donald Anton, D

2009-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

404

Sensitivity analysis of reactivity responses using one-dimensional discrete ordinates and three-dimensional Monte Carlo methods  

SciTech Connect

The TSUNAMI computational sequences currently in the SCALE 5 code system provide an automated approach to performing sensitivity and uncertainty analysis for eigenvalue responses, using either one-dimensional discrete ordinates or three-dimensional Monte Carlo methods. This capability has recently been expanded to address eigenvalue-difference responses such as reactivity changes. This paper describes the methodology and presents results obtained for an example advanced CANDU reactor design. (authors)

Williams, M. L.; Gehin, J. C.; Clarno, K. T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Bldg. 5700, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6170 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Advanced Energy Guides  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Guides Energy Guides Shanti Pless National Renewable Energy Laboratory shanti.pless@nrel.gov 303-384-6365 April 4 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Advanced Energy Design Guides Provide prescriptive energy savings guidance and recommendations by building type and geographic location: * Design packages and strategies to help owners and designers achieve 50% site energy savings over Standard 90.1 * Two series: - 30% savings over 90.1-1999

406

Advanced geothermal technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research and development in advanced technologies for geothermal energy production continue to increase the energy production options for the Nation. The high-risk investment over the past few years by the US Department of Energy in geopressured, hot dry rock, and magma energy resources is producing new means to lower production costs and to take advantage of these resources. The Nation has far larger and more regionally extensive geothermal resources than heretofore realized. At the end of a short 30-day closed-loop flow test, the manmade hot dry rock reservoir at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, was producing 10 MW thermal - and still climbing - proving the technical feasibility of this new technology. The scientific feasibility of magma energy extraction has been demonstrated, and new field tests to evaluate this technology are planned. Analysis and field tests confirm the viability of geopressured-geothermal energy and the prospect that many dry-hole or depleted petroleum wells can be turned into producing geopressured-geothermal wells. Technological advances achieved through hot dry rock, magma, geopressured, and other geothermal research are making these resources and conventional hydrothermal resources more competitive. Noteworthy among these technological advances are techniques in computer simulation of geothermal reservoirs, new means for well stimulation, new high-temperature logging tools and packers, new hard-rock penetration techniques, and new methods for mapping fracture flow paths across large underground areas in reservoirs. In addition, many of these same technological advances can be applied by the petroleum industry to help lower production costs in domestic oil and gas fields. 5 refs., 4 figs.

Whetten, J.T.; Murphy, H.D.; Hanold, R.J.; Myers, C.W.; Dunn, J.C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Advanced Energy Guides  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Guides Energy Guides Shanti Pless National Renewable Energy Laboratory shanti.pless@nrel.gov 303-384-6365 April 4 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Advanced Energy Design Guides Provide prescriptive energy savings guidance and recommendations by building type and geographic location: * Design packages and strategies to help owners and designers achieve 50% site energy savings over Standard 90.1 * Two series: - 30% savings over 90.1-1999

408

Advanced Metering Infrastructure Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Revenue security is a major concern for utilities. Theft of electric service in the United States is widespread. In 2006, the revenue estimate for non-technical losses was 6.5 billion. Non-technical losses are associated with unidentified and uncollected revenue from pilferage, tampering with meters, defective meters, and errors in meter reading. In this report, revenue security describes the use of advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) technology to minimize non-technical losses.

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

409

Advanced Turbine Design Program  

SciTech Connect

The prime objective of this project task is to select a natural gas fired as Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) capable of reaching 60% cycle efficiency. Several cycles were compared and evaluated under all different kind of aspects, to determine the one with the highest potential and, at the same time, the best overall fit within and experience base to guarantee project goals. The combined cycle with multistep development potential was identified as the system to reach the 60% or greater thermal efficiency.

van der Linden, S.; Gnaedig, G.; Kreitmeier, F.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Advanced Turbine Design Program  

SciTech Connect

The prime objective of this project task is to select a natural gas fired as Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) capable of reaching 60% cycle efficiency. Several cycles were compared and evaluated under all different kind of aspects, to determine the one with the highest potential and, at the same time, the best overall fit within and experience base to guarantee project goals. The combined cycle with multistep development potential was identified as the system to reach the 60% or greater thermal efficiency.

van der Linden, S.; Gnaedig, G.; Kreitmeier, F.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

411

Advanced Manufacturing Partnership  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

AMO leads DOE's participation in the national interagency Advanced Manufacturing Partnership (AMP). AMO joins with other Federal agencies investing in innovation and cost-shared R&D projects, supporting manufacturing infrastructure, and facilitating job creation. These actions save energy and provide benefits to U.S. industry and the national economy. AMO contributes more broadly to the AMP with activities in Technology Development, Shared Infrastructure and Facilities, Education and Workforce Development.

412

Advanced Polymer Processing Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Radiation-assisted nanotechnology applications will continue to grow; (2) The APPF will provide a unique focus for radiolytic processing of nanomaterials in support of DOE-DP, other DOE and advanced manufacturing initiatives; (3) {gamma}, X-ray, e-beam and ion beam processing will increasingly be applied for 'green' manufacturing of nanomaterials and nanocomposites; and (4) Biomedical science and engineering may ultimately be the biggest application area for radiation-assisted nanotechnology development.

Muenchausen, Ross E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

413

Advanced Lighting Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report continues the technical assessment of advanced lighting technologies in the following product areasdimmable light-emitting diode (LED) screw-in replacement lamp, hybrid compact fluorescent lamp/halogen screw-in replacement lamp, replacement recessed can LED downlight, organic LED (OLED) disc, replacement mini high-intensity discharge (HID) lamp and ballast system, and solid-state plasma lighting (miniature HID technology) high-bay fixture. The research in this project helps to demonstrate how...

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

414

An Integrated Approach to Characterizing Bypassed Oil in Heterogeneous and Fractured Reservoirs Using Partitioning Tracers  

SciTech Connect

We explore the use of efficient streamline-based simulation approaches for modeling and analysis partitioning interwell tracer tests in heterogeneous and fractured hydrocarbon reservoirs. We compare the streamline-based history matching techniques developed during the first two years of the project with the industry standard assisted history matching. We enhance the widely used assisted history matching in two important aspects that can significantly improve its efficiency and effectiveness. First, we utilize streamline-derived analytic sensitivities to relate the changes in reservoir properties to the production response. These sensitivities can be computed analytically and contain much more information than that used in the assisted history matching. Second, we utilize the sensitivities in an optimization procedure to determine the spatial distribution and magnitude of the changes in reservoir parameters needed to improve the history-match. By intervening at each iteration during the optimization process, we can retain control over the history matching process as in assisted history matching. This allows us to accept, reject, or modify changes during the automatic history matching process. We demonstrate the power of our method using two field examples with model sizes ranging from 10{sup 5} to 10{sup 6} grid blocks and with over one hundred wells. We have also extended the streamline-based production data integration technique to naturally fractured reservoirs using the dual porosity approach. The principal features of our method are the extension of streamline-derived analytic sensitivities to account for matrix-fracture interactions and the use of our previously proposed generalized travel time inversion for history matching. Our proposed workflow has been demonstrated by using both a dual porosity streamline simulator and a commercial finite difference simulator. Our approach is computationally efficient and well suited for large scale field applications in naturally fractured reservoirs with changing field conditions. This considerably broadens the applicability of the streamline-based analysis of tracer data and field production history for characterization of heterogeneous and fractured reservoirs.

Akhil Datta-Gupta

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Advancement of Electrochromic Windows  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advancement of Electrochromic Windows Advancement of Electrochromic Windows Title Advancement of Electrochromic Windows Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-59821 Year of Publication 2006 Authors Lee, Eleanor S., Stephen E. Selkowitz, Robert D. Clear, Dennis L. DiBartolomeo, Joseph H. Klems, Luis L. Fernandes, Gregory J. Ward, Vorapat Inkarojrit, and Mehry Yazdanian Date Published 04/2006 Other Numbers CEC-500-2006-052 Keywords commercial buildings, daylight, daylighting controls, Electrochromic windows, energy efficiency, human factors, peak demand, switchable windows, visual comfort Abstract This guide provides consumer-oriented information about switchable electrochromic (EC) windows. Electrochromic windows change tint with a small applied voltage, providing building owners and occupants with the option to have clear or tinted windows at any time, irrespective of whether it's sunny or cloudy. EC windows can be manually or automatically controlled based on daylight, solar heat gain, glare, view, energy-efficiency, peak electricity demand response, or other criteria. Window controls can be integrated with other building systems, such as lighting and heating/cooling mechanical systems, to optimize interior environmental conditions, occupant comfort, and energy-efficiency.

416

Advanced Technology Vehicle Testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The light-duty vehicle transportation sector in the United States depends heavily on imported petroleum as a transportation fuel. The Department of Energys Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) is testing advanced technology vehicles to help reduce this dependency, which would contribute to the economic stability and homeland security of the United States. These advanced technology test vehicles include internal combustion engine vehicles operating on 100% hydrogen (H2) and H2CNG (compressed natural gas) blended fuels, hybrid electric vehicles, neighborhood electric vehicles, urban electric vehicles, and electric ground support vehicles. The AVTA tests and evaluates these vehicles with closed track and dynamometer testing methods (baseline performance testing) and accelerated reliability testing methods (accumulating lifecycle vehicle miles and operational knowledge within 1 to 1.5 years), and in normal fleet environments. The Arizona Public Service Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant and H2-fueled vehicles are demonstrating the feasibility of using H2 as a transportation fuel. Hybrid, neighborhood, and urban electric test vehicles are demonstrating successful applications of electric drive vehicles in various fleet missions. The AVTA is also developing electric ground support equipment (GSE) test procedures, and GSE testing will start during the fall of 2003. All of these activities are intended to support U.S. energy independence. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory manages these activities for the AVTA.

James Francfort

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Advanced Microturbine Systems  

SciTech Connect

Dept. of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement DE-FC02-00-CH11061 was originally awarded to Honeywell International, Inc. ?? Honeywell Power Systems Inc. (HPSI) division located in Albuquerque, NM in October 2000 to conduct a program titled Advanced Microturbine Systems (AMS). The DOE Advanced Microturbines Systems Program was originally proposed as a five-year program to design and develop a high efficiency, low emissions, durable microturbine system. The period of performance was to be October 2000 through September 2005. Program efforts were underway, when one year into the program Honeywell sold the intellectual property of Honeywell Power Systems Inc. and HPSI ceased business operations. Honeywell made an internal decision to restructure the existing program due to the HPSI shutdown and submitted a formal request to DOE on September 24, 2001 to transfer the Cooperative Agreement to Honeywell Engines, Systems and Services (HES&S) in Phoenix, AZ in order to continue to offer support for DOE's Advanced Microturbine Program. Work continued on the descoped program under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-00-CH11061 and has been completed.

None

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

418

Environmental assessment of the use of radionuclides as tracers in the enhanced recovery of oil and gas. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An environmental assessment of the use of radioisotopes as interwell tracers in field flooding for the enhanced recovery of oil and natural gas was performed. A typical operation using radioisotopes for interwell tracing was analyzed from the standpoint of three stages of operation: aboveground, subsurface, and recovery and disposal. Doses to workers who handle radioactive tracers and to members of the public were estimated for normal and accidental exposure scenarios. On the basis of estimates of the total quantity of tracer radionuclides injected in a year, the annual number of projects, the average number of injections per project, and assumed values of accident frequency, the collective dose equivalent is estimated to be 1.1 man-rem/y to workers and 15 man-rem/y to members of the public. The national radiological impact of the use of radioisotopes as interwell tracers in EOR projects is estimated to be a total collective dose equivalent of <16 man-rem/y. Accidential exposures are estimated to contribute relatively little to the total. 47 references, 8 figures, 43 tables.

Ng, Y.C.; Cederwall, R.T.; Anspaugh, L.R.

1983-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

419

An SF6 Tracer Study of the Flow Dynamics in the Stockton Deep Water Ship Channel: Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by determining the net velocity, the dispersion coefficient, and gas exchange rates from changes in tracer is the dispersion coefficient, and l is the first order loss rate for processes such as gas exchange. In order to all loses such as advection, dispersion, and gas exchange (Fig. 9). This translated into a PRT of 7

Ho, David

420

Nitrogen geochemistry as a tracer of fluid flow in a hydrothermal vent complex in the Karoo Basin, South Africa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nitrogen geochemistry as a tracer of fluid flow in a hydrothermal vent complex in the Karoo Basin and hydrothermal vent complexes (HVC) in the Karoo Basin in South Africa. The HVC formed during phreatic eruptions from the lower stratigraphic units of the Karoo Basin shows that the vitrinite reflectance and d15 N

Svensen, Henrik

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Assessing Tracer Transport Algorithms and the Impact of Vertical Resolution in a Finite-Volume Dynamical Core  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modeling the transport of trace gases is an essential part of any atmospheric model. The tracer transport scheme in the Community Atmosphere Model finite-volume dynamical core (CAM-FV), which is part of the National Center for Atmospheric Research...

James Kent; Christiane Jablonowski; Jared P. Whitehead; Richard B. Rood

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Effects from influent boundary conditions on tracer migration and spatial variability features in intermediate-scale experiments  

SciTech Connect

In previous unsaturated transport studies at Los Alamos dispersion coefficients were estimated to be higher close to the tracer source than at greater distances from the source. Injection of tracers through discrete influent outlets could have accounted for those higher dispersions. Also, a lack of conservation of mass of the tracers was observed and suspected to be due to spatial variability in transport. In the present study experiments were performed under uniform influent (ponded) conditions in which breakthrough of tracers was monitored at four locations at each of four depths. All other conditions were similar to those of the unsaturated transport experiments. A comparison of results from these two sets of experiments indicates differences in the parameter estimates. Estimates were made for the dispersion coefficient and the retardation factor by the one-dimensional steady flow computer code, CFITIM. Estimates were also made for mass and for velocity and the dispersion coefficient by the method of moments. The dispersion coefficient decreased with depth under discrete influent application and increased with depth under ponded influent application. Retardation was predicted better under the discrete influent application than under ponded influent application. Differences in breakthroughs and in estimated parameters among locations at the same depth were observed under ponded influent application. Those differences indicate that there is a lack of conservation of mass as well as significant spatial variability across the experimental domain. 14 refs., 9 figs., 8 tabs.

Fuentes, H.R.; Polzer, W.L.; Springer, E.P.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Behavior of Laminate Reactive Materials under Dynamic Loading ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Behavior of Laminate Reactive Materials under Dynamic Loading ... Atomistically-Informed Dislocation Dynamics Simulations of High Rate ...

424

SIC Manufature via Reactive Infiltration - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2013. Symposium, Ceramic Matrix Composites. Presentation Title, SIC Manufature via Reactive...

425

Multiple Steady States in Azeotropic and Reactive Distillation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction . Motivation Overview on the Contributions MSS in Reactive Distillation Conclusions Outline Multiple Steady States (MSS) Overview on the Contributions . The Starting Point . Consolidation . Industrial Applications . Incorporating Reactions MSS in Reactive Distillation Conclusions Outline Multiple Steady States (MSS) Overview on the Contributions MSS in Reactive Distillation . Prediction Method . MTBE Process Conclusions Outline Multiple Steady States (MSS) Overview on the Contributions MSS in Reactive Distillation Conclusions Distillation Overview . Ideal binary / multicomponent distillation . Homogeneous azeotropic distillation -- Heavy entrainer (extractive distillation) -- Intermediate entrainer -- "Boundary scheme" (ligh

Thomas E. Gttinger

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Advancing Next-Generation Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) lead laboratory for researching advanced vehicle technologies, including hy- the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) lead laboratory for researching advanced vehicle technologies, including hy- brid, plug-in hybrid, battery electric, and alternative fuel vehicles, Argonne provides transportation research critical to advancing the development of next-generation vehicles. Central to this effort is the Lab's Advanced Powertrain Research Facility (APRF), an integrated four-wheel drive chassis dynamometer and component test facility.

427

Advanced Developments in Electron Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Symposium. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2011. Symposium, Advanced Developments in Electron Microscopy. Sponsorship, MS&T...

428

Materials Characterization | Advanced Materials | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization Nuclear Forensics Scanning Probes Related Research Materials Theory and Simulation Energy Frontier Research Centers Advanced Materials Home | Science &...

429

Nuclear reactivity control using laser induced polarization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control element for reactivity control of a fission source provides an atomic density of .sup.3 He in a control volume which is effective to control criticality as the .sup.3 He is spin-polarized. Spin-polarization of the .sup.3 He affects the cross section of the control volume for fission neutrons and hence, the reactivity. An irradiation source is directed within the .sup.3 He for spin-polarizing the .sup.3 He. An alkali-metal vapor may be included with the .sup.3 He where a laser spin-polarizes the alkali-metal atoms which in turn, spin-couple with .sup.3 He to spin-polarize the .sup.3 He atoms.

Bowman, Charles D. (Los Alamos, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Nuclear reactivity control using laser induced polarization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control element for reactivity control of a fission source provides an atomic density of .sup.3 He in a control volume which is effective to control criticality as the .sup.3 He is spin-polarized. Spin-polarization of the .sup.3 He affects the cross section of the control volume for fission neturons and hence, the reactivity. An irradiation source is directed within the .sup.3 He for spin-polarizing the .sup.3 He. An alkali-metal vapor may be included with the .sup.3 He where a laser spin-polarizes the alkali-metal atoms which in turn, spin-couple with .sup.3 He to spin-polarize the .sup.3 He atoms.

Bowman, Charles D. (Los Alamos, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor. [LMFBR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention, which resulted from a contact with the United States Department of Energy, relates to a control mechanism for a nuclear reactor and, more particularly, to an assembly for selectively shifting different numbers of reactivity modifying rods into and out of the core of a nuclear reactor. It has been proposed heretofore to control the reactivity of a breeder reactor by varying the depth of insertion of control rods (e.g., rods containing a fertile material such as ThO/sub 2/) in the core of the reactor, thereby varying the amount of neutron-thermalizing coolant and the amount of neutron-capturing material in the core. This invention relates to a mechanism which can advantageously be used in this type of reactor control system.

Bollinger, L.R.

1982-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

432

Treatment of Radioactive Reactive Mixed Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PacificEcoSolutions, Inc. (PEcoS) has installed a plasma gasification system that was recently modified and used to destroy a trimethyl-aluminum mixed waste stream from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL.) The unique challenge in handling reactive wastes like trimethyl-aluminum is their propensity to flame instantly on contact with air and to react violently with water. To safely address this issue, PacificEcoSolutions has developed a new feed system to ensure the safe containment of these radioactive reactive wastes during transfer to the gasification unit. The plasma gasification system safely processed the radioactively contaminated trimethyl-metal compounds into metal oxides. The waste stream came from LANL research operations, and had been in storage for seven years, pending treatment options. (authors)

Colby, S.; Turner, Z.; Utley, D. [Pacific EcoSolutions, Inc., 2025 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States); Duy, C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory - LA-UR-05-8410, Post Office Box 1663 MS J595, Los Alamos, New Mexico 97545 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Nuclear reactivity control using laser induced polarization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control element for reactivity control of a fission source provides an atomic density of {sup 3}He in a control volume which is effective to control criticality as the {sup 3}He is spin-polarized. Spin-polarization of the {sup 3}He affects the cross section of the control volume for fission neutrons and hence, the reactivity. An irradiation source is directed within the {sup 3}He for spin-polarizing the {sup 3}He. An alkali-metal vapor may be included with the {sup 3}He where a laser spin-polarizes the alkali-metal atoms which in turn, spin-couple with {sup 3}He to spin-polarize the {sup 3}He atoms. 5 figs.

Bowman, C.D.

1989-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

434

Real time reactive programming in lucid enriched with contexts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a synchronous approach to real-time reactive programming in Lucid enriched with contexts as first class objects. The declarative intensional approach allows real-time reactive programs to manipulate both events and state-based representations ... Keywords: contexts, formal verification, intensional programming, real-time reactive programming

Kaiyu Wan; Vasu Alagar; Joey Paquet

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Advanced Research Robert R. Romanosky  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in advanced ultra supercritical (USC) coal-fired power plants. The advanced materials developed in this project are essential for construction of coal-fired boilers with advanced steam cycles involving much higher temperatures and pressures than those presently used in conventional pulverized coal (PC) power

436

Prognostic Prediction of Tracer Dispersion for the Diablo Canyon Experiments on August 31, September 2, and September 4, 1986  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

COAMPS/LODI simulations of the tracer experiments at Diablo Canyon on August 31, September 2, and September 4, 1986 had mixed results. Simulated tracer concentrations on August 31 differed significantly from the measured concentrations. The model transported SF{sub 6} too far south and did not predict transport of SF{sub 6} north along highway 101 or into See Canyon. Early in the day the model rapidly transported SF{sub 6} away from the release point while observations suggested the tracer stayed close to Diablo Canyon for 1-2 hours. For September 2, simulations agreed very well with the measurements. The model accurately predicted the change of wind direction from north northwest to east northeast at the release point. It also predicted the advection of tracer over Mot-r-0 Bay and through the Los Osos Valley toward San Luis Obispo in excellent agreement with the observations. On September 4, the calculated transport of SF{sub 6} from Diablo Canyon had defects similar to those on August 31, a trajectory too far south and limited intrusion of tracer north along highway 101. Conversely, simulations of the Freon release from Los Osos Cemetery on September 4 corresponded well with observations. Since the simulations used only global meteorological data and no local winds for input, even the limited success of COAMPS/LODI is a favorable result. COAMPS's inability to generate southerly winds through the highway 101 corridor on August 31 and September 4 is a symptom of its underestimate of the sea breeze. The weak sea breeze correlates with a small diurnal range of air temperature possibly associated with underestimates of surface solar heating and/or overestimates of surface wetness. Improvement of COAMPS/LODI simulations requires development of new data assimilation techniques to use the local surface and low altitude wind and temperature measurements. Also, quantitative methods are needed to assess the accuracy of the models.

Molenkamp, C.R.

1999-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

437

Implementing Distribution Performance Optimization Functions That Integrate with Advanced Metering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a study of how the data and networks of advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) might be used to benefit Volt/Volt-ampere-reactive (VAR) control. It includes a detailed overview of integrated Volt/VAR control and an in-depth assessment of how the use of AMI might be able to assist in the performance of the common tasks required. Sample case studies are provided, showing practical examples of systems currently implemented. Providers of Volt/VAR control systems were invit...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

438

Advanced Green Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Advanced Green Technologies Place Fort Lauderdale, Florida Zip 33311 Product Advanced Green Technologies is a US-based distributor of PV systems. It is owned by Advanced Roofing...

439

Draft Advanced Fossil Solicitation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Fossil Solicitation Federal loan guarantee solicitation announcement -- Advanced Fossil Energy Projects. Microsoft Word - Draft Advanced Fossil Solicitation Final Draft.1...

440

Manufacturing Science and Technology: Advanced Manufacturing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts Advanced Manufacturing Trades Training Program Business Program Lead Yvonne Baros Advanced Manufacturing Trades Training Program Tom Souther Advanced Technology Academy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Advanced Manufacturing Office: NewsDetail  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office: NewsDetail on Twitter Bookmark Advanced Manufacturing Office: NewsDetail on Google Bookmark Advanced Manufacturing Office: NewsDetail on Delicious Rank Advanced...

442

Advanced Biofuels Workshop  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

August 1, 2012 August 1, 2012 In Attendance U.S. Energy Information Administration 1000 Independence Ave. SW, Room 2E-069 Washington, DC 20585 Adam Sieminski EIA Terry Higgins Hart Downstream Energy Services Peter Ryus RSB Services Foundation Zia Haq DOE Robert Kozak Atlantic Biomass Conversion Leticia Phillips UNICA/Brazillian Sugarecane Industry Assoc. Paul Kamp Leifmark, LLC/Inbicon Biomass Steve Gerber Fiberight Joanne Ivancic Advanced Biofuels USA John G. Cowie Agenda 2020 Technology Alliance Jeff Hazle American Fuel & Petrochemical Manufacturers Bryan Just American Petroleum Institute Barry Bernfeld Bunge Global Agribusiness Michael Corbin CLF Partners International LLC Paul Grabowski DOE, Office of Biomass Program

443

Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Demand Responsive Lighting Host: Francis Rubinstein Demand Response Research Center Technical Advisory Group Meeting August 31, 2007 10:30 AM - Noon Meeting Agenda * Introductions (10 minutes) * Main Presentation (~ 1 hour) * Questions, comments from panel (15 minutes) Project History * Lighting Scoping Study (completed January 2007) - Identified potential for energy and demand savings using demand responsive lighting systems - Importance of dimming - New wireless controls technologies * Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting (commenced March 2007) Objectives * Provide up-to-date information on the reliability, predictability of dimmable lighting as a demand resource under realistic operating load conditions * Identify potential negative impacts of DR lighting on lighting quality Potential of Demand Responsive Lighting Control

444

Horizontal Advanced Tensiometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An horizontal advanced tensiometer is described that allows the monitoring of the water pressure of soil positions, particularly beneath objects or materials that inhibit the use of previous monitoring wells. The tensiometer includes a porous cup, a pressure transducer (with an attached gasket device), an adaptive chamber, at least one outer guide tube which allows access to the desired horizontal position, a transducer wire, a data logger and preferably an inner guide tube and a specialized joint which provides pressure on the inner guide tube to maintain the seal between the gasket of the transducer and the adaptive chamber.

Hubbell, Joel M.; Sisson, James B.

2004-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

445

NETL: Advanced Research - Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Performance Materials > Chrome Oxide Refractory High Performance Materials > Chrome Oxide Refractory Advanced Research High Performance Materials Chrome Oxide Refractory One notable NETL success is the development of a chrome oxide refractory material capable of working in slagging gasifier conditions. In this project, researchers first determined that one of the major failure mechanisms for chrome oxide refractories exposed to the intense heat and corrosive environment was spalling, or the chipping or flaking of refractory material from an exposed face. They used this information to formulate a high-chrome oxide refractory composition that resists spalling, resulting in a refractory with a longer service life in the gasifier. Inside an ultrasupercritical (USC) pulverized coal power plant, materials are exposed to temperatures up to 760°C and pressures up to 5,000 psi. Operating a USC system can improve power plant efficiency up to 47% and reduce emissions. However, finding boiler and turbine materials that can hold up under extreme conditions requires new high-temperature metal alloys and ceramic coatings, as well as computational modeling research to optimize the processing of these materials. Advanced Research Materials Development program successes in this area include the following:

446

Advanced PFBC transient analysis  

SciTech Connect

Transient modeling and analysis of advanced Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) systems is a research area that is currently under investigation by the US Department of Energy`s Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC). The object of the effort is to identify key operating parameters that affect plant performance and then quantify the basic response of major sub-systems to changes in operating conditions. PC-TRAX{trademark}, a commercially available dynamic software program, was chosen and applied in this modeling and analysis effort. This paper describes the development of a series of TRAX-based transient models of advanced PFBC power plants. These power plants burn coal or other suitable fuel in a PFBC, and the high temperature flue gas supports low-Btu fuel gas or natural gas combustion in a gas turbine topping combustor. When it is utilized, the low-Btu fuel gas is produced in a bubbling bed carbonizer. High temperature, high pressure combustion products exiting the topping combustor are expanded in a modified gas turbine to generate electrical power. Waste heat from the system is used to raise and superheat steam for a reheat steam turbine bottoming cycle that generates additional electrical power. Basic control/instrumentation models were developed and modeled in PC-TRAX and used to investigate off-design plant performance. System performance for various transient conditions and control philosophies was studied.

White, J.S. [Parsons Power Group, Inc., Reading, PA (United States); Bonk, D.L. [USDOE Federal Energy Technology Center, Morgantown, WV (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Advanced PFBC transient analysis  

SciTech Connect

Transient modeling and analysis of Advanced Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) systems is a research area that is currently under investigative study by the United States Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). The object of the effort is to identify key operating parameters affecting plant performance and then quantify the basic response of major sub-systems to changes in operating conditions. PC-TRAX, a commercially available dynamic software program, was chosen and applied in this modeling and analysis effort. This paper summarizes and describes the development of a series of TRAX-based transient models of Advanced PFBC power plants. These power plants generate a high temperature flue gas by burning coal or other suitable fuel in a PFBC. The high temperature flue gas supports low-Btu fuel gas or natural gas combustion in a gas turbine topping combustor. When utilized, low-Btu fuel gas is produced in a bubbling bed carbonizer. High temperature, high pressure combustion products exiting the topping combustor are expanded in a modified gas turbine to generate electrical power. Waste heat from the system is used to generate and superheat steam for a reheat steam turbine bottoming cycle that generates additional electrical power. Basic control/instrumentation models were developed and modeled in PC-TRAX and used to investigate off-design plant performance. System performance for various transient conditions and control philosophies was studied.

White, J.S. [Parsons Power Group, Inc., Reading, PA (United States); Bonk, D.L.; Rogers, L. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

448

Advanced Metering Infrastructure  

SciTech Connect

The report provides an overview of the development of Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI). Metering has historically served as the cash register for the utility industry. It measured the amount of energy used and supported the billing of customers for that usage. However, utilities are starting to look at meters in a whole different way, viewing them as the point of contact with customers in supporting a number of operational imperatives. The combination of smart meters and advanced communications has opened up a variety of methods for utilities to reduce operating costs while offering new services to customers. A concise look is given at what's driving interest in AMI, the components of AMI, and the creation of a business case for AMI. Topics covered include: an overview of AMI including the history of metering and development of smart meters; a description of the key technologies involved in AMI; a description of key government initiatives to support AMI; an evaluation of the current market position of AMI; an analysis of business case development for AMI; and, profiles of 21 key AMI vendors.

NONE

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

449

Advanced desiccant materials research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The long-range goal of this task is to understand the role of surface phenomena in desiccant cooling materials. The background information includes a brief introduction to desiccant cooling systems (DCS) and the role of the desiccant as a system component. The purpose, background, rationale, and long-term technical approach for studying advanced desiccant materials are then treated. Experimental methods for measuring water vapor sorption by desiccants are described, and the rationale is then given for choosing a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) for measuring sorption isotherms, rates, and cyclic stability. Background information is given about the QCM, including the quartz crystal resonator itself, the support structure for the quartz crystal, and the advantages and limitations of a QCM. The apparatus assembled and placed into operation during CY 1985 is described. The functions of the principal components of the equipment, i.e., the QCM, vacuum system, pressure gauges, residual gas analyzer, constant temperature bath, and data acquisition system, are described as they relate to the water vapor sorption measurements now under way. The criteria for narrowing the potential candidates as advanced desiccant materials for the initial studies are given. Also given is a list of 20 principal candidate materials identified based on the criteria and data available in the literature.

Czanderna, A.W.; Thomas, T.M.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Using CO2 Lidar for Standoff Detection of a Perfluorocarbon Tracer in Air  

SciTech Connect

The Tag, Track and Location System Program (TTL) is investigating the use of PFTs as tracers for tagging and tracking items of interest or fallen soldiers. In order for the tagging and tracking to be valuable there must be a location system that can detect the PFTs. This report details the development of an infrared lidar platform for standoff detection of PFTs released into the air from a tagged object or person. Furthering work performed using a table top lidar system in an indoor environment; a mobile mini lidar platform was assembled using an existing Raman lidar platform, a grating tunable CO{sub 2} IR laser, Judson HgCdTe detector and miscellaneous folding optics and electronics. The lidar achieved {approx}200 ppb-m sensitivity in laboratory and indoor testing and was then successfully demonstrated at an outdoor test. The lidar system was able to detect PFTs released into a vehicle from a distance of 100 meters. In its final, fully optimized configuration the lidar was capable of repeatedly detecting PFTs in the air released from tagged vehicles. Responses were immediate and clear. This report details the results of a proof-of-concept demonstration for standoff detection of a perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) using infrared lidar. The project is part of the Tag, Track and Location System Program and was performed under a contract with Tracer Detection Technology Corp. with funding from the Office of Naval Research. A lidar capable of detecting PFT releases at distance was assembled by modifying an existing Raman lidar platform by incorporating a grating tunable CO{sub 2} IR laser, Judson HgCdTe detector and miscellaneous folding optics and electronics. The lidar achieved {approx}200 ppb-m sensitivity in laboratory and indoor testing and was successfully demonstrated at an outdoor test. The demonstration test (scripted by the sponsor) consisted of three parked cars, two of which were tagged with the PFT. The cars were located 70 (closest) to 100 meters (farthest) from the lidar (the lidar beam path was limited by site constraints and was {approx}100 meters). When one door of each of the cars was opened (sequentially), the lidar was clearly able to determine which vehicles had been tagged and which one was not. The lidar is probably capable of greater than 0.5 kilometer standoff distances based on the extreme amount of signal return achieved (so much that the system had to be de-tuned). The BNL lidar system, while optimized to the extent possible with available parts and budget, was not as sensitive as it could be. Steps to improve the lidar are detailed in this report and include using a better laser system (for more stable power output), dual wavelengths (to improve the sensitivity and allow common mode noise reduction and to allow the use of the lidar in a scanning configuration), heterodyning (for range resolved PFT detection) and an off-axis optical configuration (for improved near field sensitivity).

Heiser,J.H.; Smith, S.; Sedlacek, A.

2008-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

451

Future Transient Testing of Advanced Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The transient in-reactor fuels testing workshop was held on May 45, 2009 at Idaho National Laboratory. The purpose of this meeting was to provide a forum where technical experts in transient testing of nuclear fuels could meet directly with technical instrumentation experts and nuclear fuel modeling and simulation experts to discuss needed advancements in transient testing to support a basic understanding of nuclear fuel behavior under off-normal conditions. The workshop was attended by representatives from Commissariat l'nergie Atomique CEA, Japanese Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Department of Energy (DOE), AREVA, General Electric Global Nuclear Fuels (GE-GNF), Westinghouse, Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), universities, and several DOE national laboratories. Transient testing of fuels and materials generates information required for advanced fuels in future nuclear power plants. Future nuclear power plants will rely heavily on advanced computer modeling and simulation that describes fuel behavior under off-normal conditions. TREAT is an ideal facility for this testing because of its flexibility, proven operation and material condition. The opportunity exists to develop advanced instrumentation and data collection that can support modeling and simulation needs much better than was possible in the past. In order to take advantage of these opportunities, test programs must be carefully designed to yield basic information to support modeling before conducting integral performance tests. An early start of TREAT and operation at low power would provide significant dividends in training, development of instrumentation, and checkout of reactor systems. Early start of TREAT (2015) is needed to support the requirements of potential users of TREAT and include the testing of full length fuel irradiated in the FFTF reactor. The capabilities provided by TREAT are needed for the development of nuclear power and the following benefits will be realized by the refurbishment and restart of TREAT. TREAT is an absolute necessity in the suite of reactor fuel test capabilities TREAT yields valuable information on reactivity effects, margins to failure, fuel dispersal, and failure propagation Most importantly, interpretation of TREAT experiment results is a stringent test of the integrated understanding of fuel performance.

Jon Carmack

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Rate-limited U(VI) desorption during a small-scale tracer test in a hetereogeneous uranium contaminated aquifer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reactive transport modeling of uranium bioremediation fieldof calcium on aqueous uranium(VI) speciation and adsorptiontransport modeling of a uranium bioremediation field

Fox, P.M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Trends vs. reactor size of passive reactivity shutdown and control performance  

SciTech Connect

The focus of the US advanced reactor program since the cancellation of CRBR has been on inherent safety and cost reduction. The notion is to so design the reactor that in the event of an off normal condition, it brings itself to a safe shutdown condition and removes decay heat by reliance on ''inherent processes'' i.e., without reliance on devices requiring switching and outside sources of power. Such a reactor design would offer the potential to eliminate costly ''Engineered Safety Features,'' to lower capital costs, and to assuage public unease concerning reactor safety. For LMR concepts, the goal of passive reactivity shutdown has been approached in the US by designing the reactors for favorable relationships among the power, power/flow, and inlet temperature coefficients of reactivity, for high internal conversion ratio (yielding small burnup control swing), and for a primary pump coastdown time appropriately matched to the delayed neutron hold back of power decay upon negative reactivity input. The use of sodium bonded metallic fuel pins has facilitated the achievement of the passive shutdown design goals as a consequence of their high thermal conductivity and high effective heavy metal density. Alternately, core designs based on derated oxide pins may be able to achieve the passive shutdown features at the cost of larger core volume and increased initial fissile inventory. 8 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

Wade, D.C.; Fujita, E.K.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Combustion Engines  

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Advanced Combustion Advanced Combustion Engines to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Combustion Engines on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Combustion Engines on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Combustion Engines on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Combustion Engines on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Combustion Engines on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Combustion Engines on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines Advanced Combustion Engines Combustion Engines Emission Control Waste Heat Recovery Fuels & Lubricants Materials Technologies Advanced Combustion Engines

455

Advanced Reactor Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Reactor Advanced Reactor Technologies Advanced Reactor Technologies Advanced Reactor Technologies Advanced Reactor Technologies The Office of Advanced Reactor Technologies (ART) sponsors research, development and deployment (RD&D) activities through its Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), Advanced Reactor Concepts (ARC), and Advanced Small Modular Reactor (aSMR) programs to promote safety, technical, economical, and environmental advancements of innovative Generation IV nuclear energy technologies. The Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) will pursue these advancements through RD&D activities at the Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories and U.S. universities, as well as through collaboration with industry and international partners. These activities will focus on advancing scientific

456

Chemistry & Physics at Interfaces | Advanced Materials | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from Atoms to Systems Materials Characterization Materials Theory and Simulation Energy Frontier Research Centers Advanced Materials Home | Science & Discovery | Advanced...

457

Advanced Materials and Processes for Extreme Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Advanced Materials and Reservoir Engineering for Extreme Oil & Gas Environments. Presentation Title, Advanced Materials and Processes for...

458

Advanced Materials Technologies - Energy Innovation Portal  

Advanced Materials Technology Marketing Summaries Here youll find marketing summaries of advanced materials technologies available for licensing from ...

459

Irradiation Performance of Advanced and Model Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 14, 2012 ... Mechanical Performance of Materials for Current and Advanced Nuclear Reactors: Irradiation Performance of Advanced and Model Alloys

460

Advanced Metering Infrastructure Security Considerations | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Metering Infrastructure Security Considerations Advanced Metering Infrastructure Security Considerations The purpose of this report is to provide utilities implementing Advanced...

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461

News and Awards | Advanced Materials | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Events and Conferences Supporting Organizations Advanced Materials Home | Science & Discovery | Advanced Materials | News & Awards SHARE News and Awards Latest News...

462

Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Incentive Program...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Incentive Program Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Incentive Program A fact sheet detailling the advanced technology vehicles...

463

Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ALS and the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The LDLR crystals,Director for the Advanced Photon Source (APS), and Steven

Duque editor, Theresa; Greiner editor, Annette; Moxon editor, Elizabeth; Robinson editor, Arthur; Tamura editor, Lori

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas combustion turbines are rapidly becoming the primary technology of choice for generating electricity. At least half of the new generating capacity added in the US over the next twenty years will be combustion turbine systems. The Department of Energy has cosponsored with Siemens Westinghouse, a program to maintain the technology lead in gas turbine systems. The very ambitious eight year program was designed to demonstrate a highly efficient and commercially acceptable power plant, with the ability to fire a wide range of fuels. The main goal of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program was to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost effective competitive gas turbine systems for base load application in utility, independent power producer and industrial markets. Performance targets were focused on natural gas as a fuel and included: System efficiency that exceeds 60% (lower heating value basis); Less than 10 ppmv NO{sub x} emissions without the use of post combustion controls; Busbar electricity that are less than 10% of state of the art systems; Reliability-Availability-Maintainability (RAM) equivalent to current systems; Water consumption minimized to levels consistent with cost and efficiency goals; and Commercial systems by the year 2000. In a parallel effort, the program was to focus on adapting the ATS engine to coal-derived or biomass fuels. In Phase 1 of the ATS Program, preliminary investigators on different gas turbine cycles demonstrated that net plant LHV based efficiency greater than 60% was achievable. In Phase 2 the more promising cycles were evaluated in greater detail and the closed-loop steam-cooled combined cycle was selected for development because it offered the best solution with least risk for achieving the ATS Program goals for plant efficiency, emissions, cost of electricity and RAM. Phase 2 also involved conceptual ATS engine and plant design and technology developments in aerodynamics, sealing, combustion, cooling, materials, coatings and casting development. The market potential for the ATS gas turbine in the 2000-2014 timeframe was assessed for combined cycle, simple cycle and integrated gasification combined cycle, for three engine sizes. The total ATS market potential was forecasted to exceed 93 GW. Phase 3 and Phase 3 Extension involved further technology development, component testing and W501ATS engine detail design. The technology development efforts consisted of ultra low NO{sub x} combustion, catalytic combustion, sealing, heat transfer, advanced coating systems, advanced alloys, single crystal casting development and determining the effect of steam on turbine alloys. Included in this phase was full-load testing of the W501G engine at the McIntosh No. 5 site in Lakeland, Florida.

Gregory Gaul

2004-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

465

Preparation of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to the preparation of fine particles of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate by means of a solid state process which comprises firing a mixture of calcium sulfate, silica and a reducing additive selected from the group consisting of calcium sulfide, carbon, carbon monoxide, methane and hydrogen, at a temperature of about 850.degree.-1000.degree. C. A carrier gas such as nitrogen or carbon dioxide may also be added, if desired. A high concentration of sulfur dioxide is a by-product of this process.

Shen, Ming-Shing (Laramie, WY, NJ); Chen, James M. (Rahway, NJ); Yang, Ralph T. (Amherst, NY)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Preparation of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to the preparation of fine particles of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate by means of a solid state process which comprises firing a mixture of calcium sulfate, silica, and a reducing additive selected from the group consisting of calcium sulfide, carbon, carbon monoxide, methane, and hydrogen, at a temperature of about 850 to 1000/sup 0/C. A carrier gas such as nitrogen or carbon dioxide may also be added, if desired. A high concentration of sulfur dioxide is a by-product of this process.

Shen, M.S.; Chen, J.M.; Yang, R.T.

1980-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

467

Reactive sticking coefficients of silane on silicon  

SciTech Connect

Reactive sticking coefficients (RSCs) were measured for silane and disilane on polycrystalline silicon for a wide range of temperature and flux (pressure) conditions. The data were obtained from deposition rate measurements using molecular beam scattering and a very low pressure cold wall reactor. The RSCs have non-Arrhenius temperature dependences and decreases with increasing flux at low (710/sup 0/) temperatures. A simple model involving dissociative adsorption of silane is consistent with these results. The results are compared with previous studies of the SiH/sub 4//Si(s) reaction.

Buss, R.J.; Ho, P.; Breiland, W.G.; Coltrin, M.E.

1988-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

468

Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Home Group Members Accelerator Magnets Insertion Devices Facilities Presentations & Publications Internal Magnetic Devices Group The primary mission of the Magnetic Devices (MD) Group is to design, build, and maintain Insertion Devices (IDs) that are reliable and transparent to the electron beam at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The majority of IDs at the APS are conventional planar hybrid undulators, but an essential part of the mission is to develop novel IDs, such as short-period superconducting undulators and long-period electromagnetic undulators. The capabilities of APS IDs are matched to users' experimental needs. The mission also includes magnetic tuning of the IDs to ensure their near-ideal performance as x-ray sources and calculations to predict the radiation

469

Visiting | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Visiting the APS Visiting the APS If you have questions or need assistance planning your visit, please contact the APS User Office. Obtaining site access: General info: Visitors and new users | Non-U.S. Citizens Visitor registration: request access as a visitor who will not do hands-on work (guests, family members, students, etc.) Traveling to the APS: Transportation: Resources | University of Chicago Shuttle external link Directions: to Argonne | to the APS User Office Maps: Argonne Campus external link | Conference Center (402) | APS Facility & Beamlines | Parking Currency: The hotels and banks near Argonne do not exchange currency. Plan on using major credit cards, U.S. traveler's checks, or exchange currency in advance at the airport. See also: The Universal Currency Converter(tm) external link

470

Welcome | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Welcome Welcome Aerial view of APS Aerial view of the APS Welcome to the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory. Whether you are a current or potential scientific user of our unique facility or are simply interested in learning more about the APS, we are delighted that you are visiting our website. The APS is funded by the Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy. We operate a National User Facility that is open to everyone who has a need for extremely brilliant x-ray photon beams. The APS is one of the most technologically complex machines in the world. This premier national research facility provides the brightest x-ray beams in the Western Hemisphere to more than 5,000 (and growing) scientists from

471

Advanced Containment System  

SciTech Connect

An advanced containment system for containing buried waste and associated leachate. A trench is dug on either side of the zone of interest containing the buried waste so as to accommodate a micro tunnel boring machine. A series of small diameter tunnels are serially excavated underneath the buried waste. The tunnels are excavated by the micro tunnel boring machine at a consistent depth and are substantially parallel to each other. As tunneling progresses, steel casing sections are connected end to end in the excavated portion of the tunnel so that a steel tube is formed. Each casing section has complementary interlocking structure running its length that interlocks with complementary interlocking structure on the adjacent casing section. Thus, once the first tube is emplaced, placement of subsequent tubes is facilitated by the complementary interlocking structure on the adjacent, previously placed, casing sections.

Kostelnik, Kevin M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kawamura, Hideki (Tokyo, JP); Richardson, John G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Noda, Masaru (Tokyo, JP)

2005-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

472

Advanced Containment System  

SciTech Connect

An advanced containment system for containing buried waste and associated leachate. A trench is dug on either side of the zone of interest containing the buried waste so as to accommodate a micro tunnel boring machine. A series of small diameter tunnels are serially excavated underneath the buried waste. The tunnels are excavated by the micro tunnel boring machine at a consistent depth and are substantially parallel to each other. As tunneling progresses, steel casing sections are connected end to end in the excavated portion of the tunnel so that a steel tube is formed. Each casing section has complementary interlocking structure running its length that interlocks with complementary interlocking structure on the adjacent casing section. Thus, once the first tube is emplaced, placement of subsequent tubes is facilitated by the complementary interlocking structure on the adjacent, previously placed, casing sections.

Kostelnik, Kevin M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kawamura, Hideki (Tokyo, JP); Richardson, John G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Noda, Masaru (Tokyo, JP)

2004-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

473

Advanced drilling systems study.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the results of a study of advanced drilling concepts conducted jointly for the Natural Gas Technology Branch and the Geothermal Division of the U.S. Department of Energy. A number of alternative rock cutting concepts and drilling systems are examined. The systems cover the range from current technology, through ongoing efforts in drilling research, to highly speculative concepts. Cutting mechanisms that induce stress mechanically, hydraulically, and thermally are included. All functions necessary to drill and case a well are considered. Capital and operating costs are estimated and performance requirements, based on comparisons of the costs for alternative systems to conventional drilling technology, are developed. A number of problems common to several alternatives and to current technology are identified and discussed.

Pierce, Kenneth G.; Livesay, Billy Joe; Finger, John Travis (Livesay Consultants, Encintas, CA)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report includes a review of the progress made in ACTF Flow Loop development and research during 90 days pre-award period (May 15-July 14, 1999) and the following three months after the project approval date (July15-October 15, 1999) The report presents information on the following specific subjects; (a) Progress in Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility design and development, (b) Progress report on the research project ''Study of Flow of Synthetic Drilling Fluids Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (c) Progress report on the research project ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (d) Progress report on the research project ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Muds Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (e) Progress report on the research project ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions'', (f) Progress report on the instrumentation tasks (Tasks 11 and 12) (g) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with oil and service company members.

Ergun Kuru; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Len Volk; Mark Pickell; Evren Ozbayoglu; Barkim Demirdal; Paco Vieira; Affonso Lourenco

1999-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

475

Advanced Telemetry Data Capturing  

SciTech Connect

This project developed a new generation or advanced data capturing process specifically designed for use in future telemetry test systems at the Kansas City Plant (KCP). Although similar data capturing processes are performed both commercially and at other DOE weapon facilities, the equipment used is not specifically designed to perform acceptance testing requirements unique to the KCP. Commercially available equipment, despite very high cost (up to $125,000), is deficient in reliability and long-term maintainability necessary in test systems at this facility. There are no commercial sources for some requirements, specifically Terminal Data Analyzer (TDA) data processing. Although other custom processes have been developed to satisfy these test requirements, these designs have become difficult to maintain and upgrade.

Paschke, G.A.

2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

476

Advancing Residential Energy Retrofits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To advance the market penetration of residential retrofits, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Southface Energy Institute (Southface) partnered to provide technical assistance on nine home energy retrofits in metropolitan Atlanta with simulated source energy savings of 30% to 50%. Retrofit measures included duct sealing, air infiltration reductions, attic sealing and roofline insulation, crawlspace sealing, HVAC and water heating equipment replacement, and lighting and appliance upgrades. This paper will present a summary of these measures and their associated impacts on important home performance metrics, such as air infiltration and duct leakage. The average estimated source energy savings for the homes is 33%, and the actual heating season average savings is 32%. Additionally, a case study describing expected and realized energy savings of completed retrofit measures of one of the homes is described in this paper.

Jackson, Roderick K [ORNL; Boudreaux, Philip R [ORNL; Kim, Eyu-Jin [Southface Energy Institute; Roberts, Sydney [Southface Energy Institute

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Advanced Manufacturing Office: Motor Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Motor Systems to Motor Systems to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Manufacturing Office: Motor Systems on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Manufacturing Office: Motor Systems on Twitter Bookmark Advanced Manufacturing Office: Motor Systems on Google Bookmark Advanced Manufacturing Office: Motor Systems on Delicious Rank Advanced Manufacturing Office: Motor Systems on Digg Find More places to share Advanced Manufacturing Office: Motor Systems on AddThis.com... Quick Links Energy Resource Center Technical Publications by Energy System Energy-Efficient Technologies Incentives & Resources by Zip Code Better Plants Superior Energy Performance Contacts Motor Systems Photo of Man Checking Motor Performance Motor-driven equipment accounts for 54% of manufacturing electricity use. Dramatic energy and cost savings can be achieved in motor systems by

478

Alternative High-z Cosmic Tracers and the Dark Energy Equation of State  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose to use alternative cosmic tracers to measure the dark energy equation of state and the matter content of the Universe [w(z) & \\Omega_m]. Our proposed method consists of two components: (a) tracing the Hubble relation using HII-like starburst galaxies, as an alternative to SNIa, which can be detected up to very large redshifts, z~4, and (b) measuring the clustering pattern of X-ray selected AGN at a median redshift of ~1. Each component of the method can in itself provide interesting constraints on the cosmological parameters, especially under our anticipation that we will reduce the corresponding random and systematic errors significantly. However, by joining their likelihood functions we will be able to put stringent cosmological constraints and break the known degeneracies between the dark energy equation of state (whether it is constant or variable) and the matter content of the universe and provide a powerful and alternative rute to measure the contribution to the global dynamics, and the e...

Plionis, M; Basilakos, S; Bresolin, F; Terlevich, E; Melnick, J; Georgantopoulos, I

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Constraining the Dark Energy Equation of State using Alternative High-z Cosmic Tracers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose to use alternative cosmic tracers to measure the dark energy equation of state and the matter content of the Universe [w(z) & Omega_m]. Our proposed method consists of two components: (a) tracing the Hubble relation using HII galaxies which can be detected up to very large redshifts, z~4, as an alternative to supernovae type Ia, and (b) measuring the clustering pattern of X-ray selected AGN at a median redshift of z~1. Each component of the method can in itself provide interesti