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1

Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measuring Thermal Evolution in CO2-  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measuring Thermal Evolution in CO2- Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measuring Thermal Evolution in CO2- and Water-Based Geothermal Reservoirs Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measuring Thermal Evolution in CO2- and Water-Based Geothermal Reservoirs Project Type / Topic 1 Laboratory Call for Submission of Applications for Research, Development and Analysis of Geothermal Technologies Project Type / Topic 2 Tracers and Tracer Interpretation Project Description The concepts and theory behind the use of heat-sensitive tracers to study the thermal evolution of geothermal reservoirs was developed in the late 1980's under the Hot Dry Rock Project. Those studies described-conceptually and mathematically-the application of reactive tracers to tracking thermal fronts and to reservoir sizing. Later mathematical treatments focused on application of a single reactive tracer test to recover the temperature profile of a single streamtube. Previous tracer work has mainly focused on identifying conservative tracers. In these studies, chemicals that degraded at reservoir temperatures were discarded. Benzoic acids and dicarboxylic acids, which were found by Adams to degrade, may be useful as reactive tracers. Organic esters and amide tracers that undergo hydrolysis have been investigated and their use as reactive tracers appears feasible over a temperature range of 100ºC to 275ºC. However their reaction rates are pH dependent and sorption reactions have not been evaluated. While reactive tracer parameters have been measured in the lab, reactive tracers have not been extensively tested in the field. Thus, while reactive tracers appear to be a promising means of monitoring the thermal evolution of a geothermal reservoir, the concept has yet to be tested at the scale necessary for successful implementation, and tools for analyzing results of such tracer tests under the non-ideal conditions of an actual geothermal system have yet to be developed.

2

Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measurement of Thermal Evolution in Geothermal Reservoirs: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The injection of cold fluids into engineered geothermal system (EGS) and conventional geothermal reservoirs may be done to help extract heat from the subsurface or to maintain pressures within the reservoir (e.g., Rose et al., 2001). As these injected fluids move along fractures, they acquire heat from the rock matrix and remove it from the reservoir as they are extracted to the surface. A consequence of such injection is the migration of a cold-fluid front through the reservoir (Figure 1) that could eventually reach the production well and result in the lowering of the temperature of the produced fluids (thermal breakthrough). Efficient operation of an EGS as well as conventional geothermal systems involving cold-fluid injection requires accurate and timely information about thermal depletion of the reservoir in response to operation. In particular, accurate predictions of the time to thermal breakthrough and subsequent rate of thermal drawdown are necessary for reservoir management, design of fracture stimulation and well drilling programs, and forecasting of economic return. A potential method for estimating migration of a cold front between an injection well and a production well is through application of reactive tracer tests, using chemical whose rate of degradation is dependent on the reservoir temperature between the two wells (e.g., Robinson 1985). With repeated tests, the rate of migration of the thermal front can be determined, and the time to thermal breakthrough calculated. While the basic theory behind the concept of thermal tracers has been understood for some time, effective application of the method has yet to be demonstrated. This report describes results of a study that used several methods to investigate application of reactive tracers to monitoring the thermal evolution of a geothermal reservoir. These methods included (1) mathematical investigation of the sensitivity of known and hypothetical reactive tracers, (2) laboratory testing of novel tracers that would improve method sensitivity, (3) development of a software tool for design and interpretation of reactive tracer tests and (4) field testing of the reactive tracer temperature monitoring concept.

Mitchell A. Plummer; Carl D. Palmer; Earl D. Mattson; Laurence C. Hull; George D. Redden

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Advancing reactive tracer methods for measuring thermal evolution in CO2-and water-based geothermal reservoirs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. This project aims to develop reactive tracer method for monitoring thermal drawdown in enhanced geothermal systems.

4

Advancing reactive tracer methods for measuring thermal evolution...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

et al. (2003) - Use simplified geometry of hypothetical fracture system - Develop in MATLAB, to allow distribution to industry via the MATLAB compiler * Conducted 2-D finite...

5

ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, VOL. 25, NO. 5, 2008, 805814 Diagnosing Ocean Tracer Transport from Sellafield  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DRANGE1,2,3,4 , and Eric DELEERSNIJDER5 1 Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Center, Bergen, Norway applications thereof, idealized releases of passive tracers from the nuclear fuel reprocessing plants­814, doi: 10.1007/s00376-008-0805-y. 1. Introduction Estimating the integrated effect of processes acting

Drange, Helge

6

Advanced hydraulic fracturing methods to create in situ reactive barriers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many contaminated areas consist of a source area and a plume. In the source area, the contaminant moves vertically downward from a release point through the vadose zone to an underlying saturated region. Where contaminants are organic liquids, NAPL may accumulate on the water table, or it may continue to migrate downward through the saturated region. Early developments of permeable barrier technology have focused on intercepting horizontally moving plumes with vertical structures, such as trenches, filled with reactive material capable of immobilizing or degrading dissolved contaminants. This focus resulted in part from a need to economically treat the potentially large volumes of contaminated water in a plume, and in part from the availability of construction technology to create the vertical structures that could house reactive compounds. Contaminant source areas, however, have thus far remained largely excluded from the application of permeable barrier technology. One reason for this is the lack of conventional construction methods for creating suitable horizontal structures that would place reactive materials in the path of downward-moving contaminants. Methods of hydraulic fracturing have been widely used to create flat-lying to gently dipping layers of granular material in unconsolidated sediments. Most applications thus far have involved filling fractures with coarse-grained sand to create permeable layers that will increase the discharge of wells recovering contaminated water or vapor. However, it is possible to fill fractures with other compounds that alter the chemical composition of the subsurface. One early application involved development and field testing micro-encapsulated sodium percarbonate, a solid compound that releases oxygen and can create aerobic conditions suitable for biodegradation in the subsurface for several months.

Murdoch, L. [FRx Inc., Cincinnati, OH (United States); [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Siegrist, B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Vesper, S. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States)] [and others

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

7

Advanced hydraulic fracturing methods to create in situ reactive barriers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes the use of hydraulic fracturing to increase permeability in geologic formations where in-situ remedial action of contaminant plumes will be performed. Several in-situ treatment strategies are discussed including the use of hydraulic fracturing to create in situ redox zones for treatment of organics and inorganics. Hydraulic fracturing methods offer a mechanism for the in-situ treatment of gently dipping layers of reactive compounds. Specialized methods using real-time monitoring and a high-energy jet during fracturing allow the form of the fracture to be influenced, such as creation of assymmetric fractures beneath potential sources (i.e. tanks, pits, buildings) that should not be penetrated by boring. Some examples of field applications of this technique such as creating fractures filled with zero-valent iron to reductively dechlorinate halogenated hydrocarbons, and the use of granular activated carbon to adsorb compounds are discussed.

Murdoch, L. [FRX Inc., Cincinnati, OH (United States)]|[Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences; Siegrist, B.; Meiggs, T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

8

DOE/EA-1310: Environmental Assessment for Decontamination and Dismantlement of the Advanced Reactivity Measurement Facility and Couples Fast Reactivity Measurements Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 0 March 2000 Environmental Assessment for Decontamination and Dismantlement of the Advanced Reactivity Measurement Facility and Coupled Fast Reactivity Measurements Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory DOE/EA-1310 Environmental Assessment for Decontamination and Dismantlement of the Advanced Reactivity Measurement Facility and Coupled Fast Reactivity Measurements Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Published March 2000 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office iii CONTENTS ACRONYMS ............................................................................................................................... v HELPFUL INFORMATION ........................................................................................................

9

Tracers and Tracer Interpretation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tracers and Tracer Interpretation Tracers and Tracer Interpretation Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Geothermal Lab Call Projects for Tracers and Tracer Interpretation 2 Geothermal ARRA Funded Projects for Tracers and Tracer Interpretation Geothermal Lab Call Projects for Tracers and Tracer Interpretation Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":200,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

10

DOE/EA-1310: Finding of No Significant Impact for the Decontamination and Dismantlement of the Advanced Reactivity Measurement Facility and Couples Fast Reactivity Measurements Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FOR THE DECONTAMINATION AND FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FOR THE DECONTAMINATION AND DISMANTLEMENT OF THE ADVANCED REACTIVITY MEASUREMENT FACILITY AND COUPLED FAST REACTIVITY MEASUREMENTS FACILITY AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING AND ENVIRONMENTAL LABORATORY Agency: U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Action: Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) Summary: The DOE prepared a Draft Environmental Assessment (EA) for the proposed "Decontamination and Dismantlement of the Advanced Reactivity Measurement Facility and Coupled Fast Reactivity Measurement Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory" (DOE/EA-1310). The EA was prepared in accordance with the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) Regulations for implementing the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) (40 CFR 1500-1508), and the

11

Dysprosium as a resonance absorber and its effect on the coolant void reactivity in Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dysprosium has been used as a slow neutron absorber in the fuel assembly of Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) to achieve a negative coolant void reactivity. Dysprosium as occurring in nature has as many as seven isotopes namely, 156Dy, 158Dy, 160Dy, 161Dy, 162Dy, 163Dy, and 164Dy. Of these, the isotope 164Dy has the largest absorption cross section for thermal neutrons. In the past, nuclear data libraries used in our studies have considered only 164Dy isotope and this was sufficient for performing foil activation studies of Dy. The other isotopes of Dy have significant resonances and could affect the design. The treatment of the dysprosium isotopes with resonance tabulations is required for a more accurate estimation of the lattice characteristics like the coolant void reactivity. The use of resonance tabulations for the dysprosium isotopes and its effect on the coolant void reactivity of AHWR fuel cluster has been studied in this paper. Also, the treatment of the stand-alone structural rod with dysprosium as burnable absorber having resonance tabulations has been done for the first time.

Umasankari Kannan; S. Ganesan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Tracers and Exploration Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Below are the project presentations and respective peer review results for Tracers and Exploration Technologies.

13

Category:Tracer Testing | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tracer Testing page? For detailed information on Tracer Testing, click here. Category:Tracer Testing Add.png Add a new Tracer Testing Technique Pages in category "Tracer Testing"...

14

First Tracer Test After Circulation in Desert Peak 27-15  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Following the successful stimulation of Desert Peak target EGS well 27-15, a circulation test was initiated by injecting a conservative tracer (1,5-nds) in combination with a reactive tracer (7-amino-1,3-naphthalene disulfonate). The closest production well 74-21 was monitored over the subsequent several months.

Peter Rose

15

First Tracer Test After Circulation in Desert Peak 27-15  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Following the successful stimulation of Desert Peak target EGS well 27-15, a circulation test was initiated by injecting a conservative tracer (1,5-nds) in combination with a reactive tracer (7-amino-1,3-naphthalene disulfonate). The closest production well 74-21 was monitored over the subsequent several months.

Rose, Peter

2013-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

16

Tracer Testing | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tracer Testing Tracer Testing Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Tracer Testing Details Activities (9) Areas (5) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Testing Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Fracture zones and formation permeability Hydrological: Flow rates, flow direction, hydrologic connections, storativity Thermal: Dictionary.png Tracer Testing: A method based on injecting chemical tracers into the reservoir and monitoring how long it takes and where those tracers travel. The purpose is to model subsurface hydrothermal flow characteristics.

17

Microsoft PowerPoint - Tracer plume detection-LANL(Fessenden).ppt  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tracer Testing of Plume Movement Tracer Testing of Plume Movement Julianna Fessenden and Paul Reimus, Los Alamos National Laboratory Plume modeling (atmosphere, reservoir, groundwater) Purpose of Tracing Plumes Monitor species of interest within reservoir Monitor species of interest outside reservoir Monitor Flow paths Capture zones Monitor Breaches Extent of movement Desirable Tracer Characteristics (1) Inexpensive (measurement, analytical) (2) Low detection limits, no analytical interferences (3) Quick, easy to sample and measure (4) Non toxic, readily permitted (5) Both sorbing/non-sorbing tracer use Perflorocarbon Tracer deployment NETL facilities Classes of Tracers (1) Gas Phase (2) Liquid Phase (3) Organic, inorganic, aqueous (4) Conservative/nonreacting (5) Reactive with mineral surfaces or soluble in non-carrier phase

18

Heat as a tracer to determine streambed water exchanges Jim Constantz1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heat as a tracer to determine streambed water exchanges Jim Constantz1 Received 13 March 2008 of heat as a tracer of shallow groundwater movement and describes current temperature-based approaches relying on traditional observation wells, and remote sensing and other large-scale advanced temperature

19

BNL | Tracer Technology Group | BNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tracer Technology Group Tracer Technology Group Tracer Technology Image The Tracer Technology Group (TTG) developed the use of perfluorocarbon tracers (PFTs) as tools for studying long range atmospheric transport and dispersion in the early 1980s.We are world leaders in the use of PFTs for solving diverse research and engineering problems in the atmospheric sciences, the energy production and utility industries, and building characterization. The unique capabilities of the TTG are derived from our analytical expertise, infrastructure, and experience. We have developed PFT analytical methods that have detection limits at the femtogram level. We can measure global background levels of PFTS at the parts per quadrillion levels. Our scientists and technical staff have extensive experience in

20

Multispecies Reactive Tracer Test in a Sand and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of water quality in public water systems; remediation of contaminated sites, sediments and ground water Subsurface Protection and Remediation Division National Risk Management Research Laboratory Ada, OK 74820 Agency is charged by Congress with protecting the Nation's land, air, and water resources. Under

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

A Tracer Test Using Ethanol as a Two-Phase Tracer and 2-Naphthalene  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tracer Test Using Ethanol as a Two-Phase Tracer and 2-Naphthalene Tracer Test Using Ethanol as a Two-Phase Tracer and 2-Naphthalene Sulfonate as a Liquid-Phase Tracer at the Coso Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: A Tracer Test Using Ethanol as a Two-Phase Tracer and 2-Naphthalene Sulfonate as a Liquid-Phase Tracer at the Coso Geothermal Field Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A tracer test was conducted at the Coso geothermal field in order to characterize the flow patterns of fluid injected into well 68-20RD. A conservative liquid phase tracer, 2-naphthalene sulfonate, and a two-phase tracer, ethanol, were injected into well 68-20RD. Surrounding production wells were sampled over the subsequent 125 days and analyzed for the two tracers. The liquid-phase tracer showed negligible returns, whereas the

22

A Tracer Test Using Ethanol as a Two-Phase Tracer and 2-Naphthalene...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: A Tracer Test Using Ethanol as a Two-Phase Tracer and 2-Naphthalene Sulfonate as a Liquid-Phase...

23

Reactive Maintenance  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Reactive maintenance follows a run-it-until-it-breaks strategy where no actions or efforts are taken to maintain equipment as intended by the manufacturer. Studies indicate this is still the predominant mode of maintenance for Federal facilities.

24

Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Stimulation in Engineered...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Stimulation in Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS) Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Stimulation in Engineered Geothermal...

25

Hydrological Tracers Using Nanobiotechnology: Proof of Concept  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This new tracer is composed of polylactic acid (PLA) microspheres into which short strands of synthetic DNA and paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are incorporated. ... The synthetic DNA serves as the label or tag in our tracers that allow us to distinguish one tracer from another, and paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are included in the tracer to facilitate magnetic concentration of the tracers in potentially dilute water samples. ... Mahler et al.(30) attached synthetic DNA strands to silica and montmorillonite clay and measured the DNA concentration on the particles and in the supernatant over a three week period. ...

Asha N. Sharma; Dan Luo; M. Todd Walter

2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

26

Microseismic Tracer Particles for Hydraulic Fracturing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Microseismic Tracer Particles for Hydraulic Fracturing Microseismic Tracer Particles for Hydraulic Fracturing Microseismic Tracer Particles for Hydraulic Fracturing Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a method by which microseismic events can be discriminated/detected that correspond to only the portion of the hydraulic fracture that contains the proppant material and can be expected to be conductive to the flow of oil and gas. July 3, 2013 Microseismic Tracer Particles for Hydraulic Fracturing Figure 1: A graph of ionic conductivity as a function of temperature for the anti-perovskite Li3OCl. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Microseismic Tracer Particles for Hydraulic Fracturing Applications: Oil and gas production Geophysical exploration Benefits: Tracks the disposition of material in a hydraulic fracturing

27

Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Creation in Enhanced...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Creation in Enhanced Geothermal Systems; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture...

28

Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Stimulation in Enhanced...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Stimulation in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS); 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Tracer Methods for Characterizing...

29

Validation of Geothermal Tracer Methods in Highly Constrained...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of Research Hypothesis: Smart tracers can measure potential heat exchange between fracture and rock mass Hypothesis Test: A tracer test proving ground System must be simple...

30

Quantum Dot Tracers for Use in Engineered Geothermal | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

tracerspeer2013.pdf More Documents & Publications Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Stimulation in Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS) Quantum Dot Tracers for Use in...

31

Chelated Indium Activable Tracers for Geothermal Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SGP-TR-99 Chelated Indium Activable Tracers for Geothermal Reservoirs Constantinos V. Chrysikopoulos Paul Kruger June 1986 Financial support was provided through the Stanford Geothermal Program under University Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in Engineering and Earth Sciences STANFORD

Stanford University

32

Thermal Stability of Chelated Indium Activable Tracers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermal stability of indium tracer chelated with organic ligands ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) was measured for reservoir temperatures of 150, 200, and 240 C. Measurements of the soluble indium concentration was made as a function of time by neutron activation analysis. From the data, approximate thermal decomposition rates were estimated. At 150 C, both chelated tracers were stable over the experimental period of 20 days. At 200 C, the InEDTA concentration remained constant for 16 days, after which the thermal decomposition occurred at a measured rate constant of k = 0.09 d{sup -1}. The thermal decomposition of InNTA at 200 C showed a first order reaction with a measured rate constant of k = 0.16 d{sup -1}. At 240 C, both indium chelated tracers showed rapid decomposition with rate constants greater than 1.8 d{sup -1}. The data indicate that for geothermal reservoir with temperatures up to about 200 C, indium chelated tracers can be used effectively for transit times of at least 20 days. These experiments were run without reservoir rock media, and do not account for concomitant loss of indium tracer by adsorption processes.

Chrysikopoulos, Costas; Kruger, Paul

1986-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

33

Geologic flow characterization using tracer techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new tracer flow-test system has been developed for in situ characterization of geologic formations. This report describes two sets of test equipment: one portable and one for testing in deep formations. Equations are derived for in situ detector calibration, raw data reduction, and flow logging. Data analysis techniques are presented for computing porosity and permeability in unconfined isotropic media, and porosity, permeability and fracture characteristics in media with confined or unconfined two-dimensional flow. The effects of tracer pulse spreading due to divergence, dispersion, and porous formations are also included.

Klett, R. D.; Tyner, C. E.; Hertel, Jr., E. S.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Method of dispersing particulate aerosol tracer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A particulate aerosol tracer which comprises a particulate carrier of sheet silicate composition having a particle size up to one micron, and a cationic dopant chemically absorbed in solid solution in the carrier. The carrier is preferably selected from the group consisting of natural mineral clays such as bentonite, and the dopant is selected from the group consisting of rare earth elements and transition elements. The tracers are dispersed by forming an aqueous salt solution with the dopant present as cations, dispersing the carriers in the solution, and then atomizing the solution under heat sufficient to superheat the solution droplets at a level sufficient to prevent reagglomeration of the carrier particles.

O'Holleran, Thomas P. (Belleville, MI)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

The Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chemistry Tracers of Diesel Exhaust Emissions and Measurements of Trace gas and Aerosol properties.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chemistry Tracers of Diesel Exhaust exhaust experiment It has previously been difficult to identify the emissions of diesel exhaust until reactive with organic compounds such as alkanes which are present in diesel exhaust emissions. The reaction

Collins, Gary S.

36

Tracer Testing At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tracer Testing At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) Tracer Testing At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Tracer Testing At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Tracer Testing Activity Date 2006 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To characterize the flow patterns of fluid injected into well 68-20RD. Notes A conservative liquid phase tracer, 2-naphthalene sulfonate, and a two-phase tracer, ethanol, were injected into well 68-20RD. Surrounding production wells were sampled over the subsequent 125 days and analyzed for the two tracers. The results demonstrate the efficacy of the simultaneous use of liquid-phase and two-phase tracers in fluid-depleted geothermal

37

Reactivating personal memory 1 RUNNING HEAD: Reactivating personal memory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reactivating personal memory 1 RUNNING HEAD: Reactivating personal memory Modifying memory: Selectively enhancing and updating personal memories for a museum; Reactivating personal memory 2 Abstract Memory can be modified when reactivated

Schacter, Daniel

38

Validation of Geothermal Tracer Methods in Highly Constrained Field Experiments  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Project Summary. This project will test smartdiffusive tracers for measuring heat exchange.

39

Tracer Testing at Dixie Valley, Nevada, Using Pyrene Tetrasulfonate Amino  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tracer Testing at Dixie Valley, Nevada, Using Pyrene Tetrasulfonate Amino Tracer Testing at Dixie Valley, Nevada, Using Pyrene Tetrasulfonate Amino G, and Fluorescein Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Tracer Testing at Dixie Valley, Nevada, Using Pyrene Tetrasulfonate Amino G, and Fluorescein Abstract A series of four tracer tests was recently conducted at the Dixie Valley, Nevada, geothermal reservoir in order to determine fluid-flow processes and to evaluate candidate tracers for use in hydrothermal systems. These tests have resulted in the first successful use of the compounds amino G and pyrenetetrasulfonate as tracers in a geothermal reservoir. The tracer candidates were subjected to simulated hydrothermal conditions in laboratory reactors at temperatures as high as 300°C in order to determine

40

Passive Tracer Gas Methods to Measure  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Experiments to Evaluate and Implement Experiments to Evaluate and Implement Passive Tracer Gas Methods to Measure Ventilation Rates in Homes Melissa Lunden, David Faulkner, Elizabeth Heredia, Sebastian Cohn, Darryl Dickerhoff, Federico Noris, Jennifer Logue, Toshifumi Hotchi, Brett Singer and Max H. Sherman Environmental Energy Technologies Division October 2012 LBNL-5984E 2 Disclaimer: This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Tracer Testing At Coso Geothermal Area (1993) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tracer Testing At Coso Geothermal Area (1993) Tracer Testing At Coso Geothermal Area (1993) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Tracer Testing At Coso Geothermal Area (1993) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Tracer Testing Activity Date 1993 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To determine the steam and water mass flow rate Notes The method involves precisely metered injection of liquid and vapor phase tracers into the two-phase production pipeline and concurrent sampling of each phase downstream of the injection point. Subsequent chemical analysis of the steam and water samples for tracer content enables the calculation of mass flowrate for each phase given the known mass injection rates of

42

Hydrogeology of the Blautopf spring - Tracer tests in Blauhohle cave |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrogeology of the Blautopf spring - Tracer tests in Blauhohle cave Hydrogeology of the Blautopf spring - Tracer tests in Blauhohle cave Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Hydrogeology of the Blautopf spring - Tracer tests in Blauhohle cave Author Andreas Kucha Published Publisher Not Provided, 2012 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Hydrogeology of the Blautopf spring - Tracer tests in Blauhohle cave Citation Andreas Kucha. Hydrogeology of the Blautopf spring - Tracer tests in Blauhohle cave [Internet]. 2012. [cited 2013/10/17]. Available from: http://www.agw.kit.edu/english/blauhoele_cave.php Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Hydrogeology_of_the_Blautopf_spring_-_Tracer_tests_in_Blauhohle_cave&oldid=688895"

43

Tracer Testing At East Mesa Geothermal Area (1984) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Tracer Testing At East Mesa Geothermal Area (1984) Exploration Activity Details Location East Mesa...

44

Tracer Testing at Dixie Valley, Nevada, Using Pyrene Tetrasulfonate...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Tracer Testing at Dixie Valley, Nevada, Using Pyrene Tetrasulfonate Amino G, and Fluorescein...

45

Tracer Testing At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Callahan,...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Tracer Testing At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Callahan, 1996) Exploration Activity Details...

46

Using Thermally-Degrading, Partitioning, and Nonreactive Tracers...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Partitioning, and Nonreactive Tracers to Determine Temperature Distribution and FractureHeat Transfer Surface Area in Geothermal Reservoirs Using Thermally-Degrading,...

47

Integrated Approach to Use Natural Chemical and Isotopic Tracers...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Integrated Approach to Use Natural Chemical and Isotopic Tracers to Estimate Fracture Spacing and Surface Area in EGS Systems Integrated Approach to Use Natural Chemical and...

48

Using Thermally-Degrading, Partitioning, and Nonreactive Tracers...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Partitioning, and Nonreactive Tracers to Determine Temperature Distribution and FractureHeat Transfer Surface Area in Geothermal Reservoirs Track Name May 19, 2010 This...

49

Use of Tracers to Characterize Fractures in Engineered Geothermal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fractures in Engineered Geothermal Systems Project Objectives: Measure interwell fracture surface area and fracture spacing using sorbing tracers; measure fracture surface...

50

Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Creation in Enhanced...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

75 4.6.6 Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Creation in Enhanced Geothermal Systems Presentation Number: 033 Investigator: Rose, Peter (University of Utah) Objectives: To...

51

Quantum Dot Tracers for Use in Engineered Geothermal  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

tracers, colloidal quantum dots, that offer great promise for use in characterizing fracture networks in EGS reservoirs. Since the wavelength of fluorescence (color) of these...

52

Verification of Geothermal Tracer Methods in Highly Constrained...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

tracers of varying rates of molecular diffusion. Exchange of heat energy between fracture and bulk rock (matrix) behaves in the same manner as the exchange of dissolved mass....

53

Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Stimulation in Enhanced...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

80 4.6.7 Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Stimulation in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Presentation Number: 034 Investigator: Pruess, Karsten (Lawrence Berkeley...

54

Integrated Approach to Use Natural Chemical and Isotopic Tracers...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Approach to Use Natural Chemical and Isotopic Tracers to Estimate Fracture Spacing and Surface Area in EGS Systems B. Mack Kennedy (Presenter) and H. H. Liu Lawrence Berkeley...

55

Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Stimulation in Engineered...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Stimulation in Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS) Karsten Pruess Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. May 19, 2010 This presentation does not...

56

Tracer Testing At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Reed, 2007) ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nevada, Using Pyrene Tetrasulfonate Amino G, and Fluorescein Peter E. Rose, Stuart D. Johnson, Phaedra Kilbourn (2001) Tracer Testing at Dixie Valley, Nevada, Using 2-Naphthalene...

57

Novel Multidimensional Tracers for Geothermal Inter-Well Diagnostics  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Novel Multidimensional Tracers for Geothermal Inter-Well Diagnostics presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

58

The ATLAS DDM Tracer monitoring framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The DDM Tracer Service is aimed to trace and monitor the atlas file operations on the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid. The volume of traces has increased significantly since the service started in 2009. Now there are about ~5 million trace messages every day and peaks of greater than 250Hz, with peak rates continuing to climb, which gives the current service structure a big challenge. Analysis of large datasets based on on-demand queries to the relational database management system (RDBMS), i.e. Oracle, can be problematic, and have a significant effect on the database's performance. Consequently, We have investigated some new high availability technologies like messaging infrastructure, specifically ActiveMQ, and key-value stores. The advantages of key value store technology are that they are distributed and have high scalability; also their write performances are usually much better than RDBMS, all of which are very useful for the Tracer service. Indexes and distributed counters have been also tested to improve...

ZANG, D; The ATLAS collaboration; BARISITS, M; LASSNIG, M; Andrew STEWART, G; MOLFETAS, A; BEERMANN, T

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Preliminary Investigation of Tracer Gas Reaeration Method for Shallow Bays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was used with propane for the tracer gas and Rhodamine-WT, a fluorescent dye, for the "conservative" tracer. The propane was injected through porous tile diffusers, and the dye was released simultaneously. The propane acts as a model for the surface...

Baker, Sarah H.; Holley, Edward R.

60

Use of Tracers to Characterize Fractures in Engineered Geothermal Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Project Objectives: Measure interwell fracture surface area and fracture spacing using sorbing tracers; measure fracture surface areas adjacent to a single geothermal well using tracers and injection/backflow techniques; design, fabricate and test a downhole instrument for measuring fracture flow following a hydraulic stimulation experiment.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Parallel Finite Element Simulation of Tracer Injection in Oil Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Parallel Finite Element Simulation of Tracer Injection in Oil Reservoirs Alvaro L.G.A. Coutinho In this work, parallel finite element techniques for the simulation of tracer injection in oil reservoirs. Supercomputers have made it possible to consider global reservoir effects which can not be represented using

Coutinho, Alvaro L. G. A.

62

MIPAS observations of organic tracers for biomass burning and intercontinental transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MIPAS observations of organic tracers for biomass burning and intercontinental transport observations of organic tracers for biomass burning and intercontinental transport Introduction Suite - Oxford - September 2009 #12;MIPAS observations of organic tracers for biomass burning

63

Methods and systems using encapsulated tracers and chemicals for reservoir interrogation and manipulation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus, method, and system of reservoir interrogation. A tracer is encapsulating in a receptacle. The receptacle containing the tracer is injected into the reservoir. The tracer is analyzed for reservoir interrogation.

Roberts, Jeffery; Aines, Roger D; Duoss, Eric B; Spadaccini, Christopher M

2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

64

Tracer Testing At East Mesa Geothermal Area (1983) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tracer Testing At East Mesa Geothermal Area (1983) Tracer Testing At East Mesa Geothermal Area (1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Tracer Testing At East Mesa Geothermal Area (1983) Exploration Activity Details Location East Mesa Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Tracer Testing Activity Date 1983 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Two field experiments were conducted to develop chemical tracer procedures for use with injection-backflow testing, one on the fracture-permeability Raft River reservoir and the other on the matrix-permeability East Mesa reservoir. Results from tests conducted with incremental increases in the injection volume at both East Mesa and Raft River suggests that, for both reservoirs, permeability remained uniform with increasing distance from the

65

Reactive Power Compensator.  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and method for determining and providing reactive power compensation for an inductive load. A reactive power compensator (50,50') monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b, 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. Using signals indicative of the current on each of these lines when the voltage waveform on the line crosses zero, the reactive power compensator determines a reactive power compensator capacitance that must be connected to the lines to maintain a desired VAR level, power factor, or line voltage. Alternatively, an operator can manually select a specific capacitance for connection to each line, or the capacitance can be selected based on a time schedule. The reactive power compensator produces control signals, which are coupled through optical fibers (102/106) to a switch driver (110, 110') to select specific compensation capacitors (112) for connections to each line. The switch driver develops triggering signals that are supplied to a plurality of series-connected solid state switches (350), which control charge current in one direction in respect to ground for each compensation capacitor. During each cycle, current flows from ground to charge the capacitors as the voltage on the line begins to go negative from its positive peak value. The triggering signals are applied to gate the solid state switches into a conducting state when the potential on the lines and on the capacitors reaches a negative peak value, thereby minimizing both the potential difference and across the charge current through the switches when they begin to conduct. Any harmonic distortion on the potential and current carried by the lines is filtered out from the current and potential signals used by the reactive power compensator so that it does not affect the determination of the required reactive compensation. 26 figs.

El-Sharkawi, M.A.; Venkata, S.S.; Chen, M.; Andexler, G.; Huang, T.

1992-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

66

Reactive power compensator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and method for determining and providing reactive power compensation for an inductive load. A reactive power compensator (50,50') monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b, 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. Using signals indicative of the current on each of these lines when the voltage waveform on the line crosses zero, the reactive power compensator determines a reactive power compensator capacitance that must be connected to the lines to maintain a desired VAR level, power factor, or line voltage. Alternatively, an operator can manually select a specific capacitance for connection to each line, or the capacitance can be selected based on a time schedule. The reactive power compensator produces control signals, which are coupled through optical fibers (102/106) to a switch driver (110, 110') to select specific compensation capacitors (112) for connections to each line. The switch driver develops triggering signals that are supplied to a plurality of series-connected solid state switches (350), which control charge current in one direction in respect to ground for each compensation capacitor. During each cycle, current flows from ground to charge the capacitors as the voltage on the line begins to go negative from its positive peak value. The triggering signals are applied to gate the solid state switches into a conducting state when the potential on the lines and on the capacitors reaches a negative peak value, thereby minimizing both the potential difference and across the charge current through the switches when they begin to conduct. Any harmonic distortion on the potential and current carried by the lines is filtered out from the current and potential signals used by the reactive power compensator so that it does not affect the determination of the required reactive compensation.

El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A. (Renton, WA); Venkata, Subrahmanyam S. (Woodinville, WA); Chen, Mingliang (Kirkland, WA); Andexler, George (Everett, WA); Huang, Tony (Seattle, WA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Novel Multi-dimensional Tracers for Geothermal Inter-wall Diagnostics...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Partitioning, and Nonreactive Tracers to Determine Temperature Distribution and FractureHeat Transfer Surface Area in Geothermal Reservoirs Use of Tracers to Characterize...

68

Surface reactivity and oxygen migration in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide films annealed in humid atmosphere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An isotope tracer study, i.e., {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O exchange using {sup 18}O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}{sup 18}O, was performed to determine how post-deposition annealing (PDA) affected surface reactivity and oxygen diffusivity of amorphous indiumgalliumzinc oxide (a-IGZO) films. The oxygen tracer diffusivity was very high in the bulk even at low temperatures, e.g., 200?C, regardless of PDA and exchange conditions. In contrast, the isotope exchange rate, dominated by surface reactivity, was much lower for {sup 18}O{sub 2} than for H{sub 2}{sup 18}O. PDA in a humid atmosphere at 400?C further suppressed the reactivity of O{sub 2} at the a-IGZO film surface, which is attributable to OH-terminated surface formation.

Watanabe, Ken, E-mail: Watanabe.Ken@nims.go.jp [International Center for Young Scientists (ICYS-MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan)] [International Center for Young Scientists (ICYS-MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); Lee, Dong-Hee [Optical and Electronic Materials Unit, NIMS, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan) [Optical and Electronic Materials Unit, NIMS, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); Materials and Structures Laboratory (MSL), Tokyo Institute of Technology, Mailbox R3-4, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-0026 (Japan); Sakaguchi, Isao; Haneda, Hajime [Optical and Electronic Materials Unit, NIMS, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan)] [Optical and Electronic Materials Unit, NIMS, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); Nomura, Kenji [Frontier Research Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Mailbox S2-13, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-0026 (Japan)] [Frontier Research Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Mailbox S2-13, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-0026 (Japan); Kamiya, Toshio [Materials and Structures Laboratory (MSL), Tokyo Institute of Technology, Mailbox R3-4, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-0026 (Japan) [Materials and Structures Laboratory (MSL), Tokyo Institute of Technology, Mailbox R3-4, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-0026 (Japan); Materials Research Center for Element Strategy (MCES), Mailbox S2-13, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-0026 (Japan); Hosono, Hideo [Materials and Structures Laboratory (MSL), Tokyo Institute of Technology, Mailbox R3-4, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-0026 (Japan) [Materials and Structures Laboratory (MSL), Tokyo Institute of Technology, Mailbox R3-4, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-0026 (Japan); Frontier Research Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Mailbox S2-13, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-0026 (Japan); Materials Research Center for Element Strategy (MCES), Mailbox S2-13, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-0026 (Japan); Ohashi, Naoki, E-mail: Ohashi.Naoki@nims.go.jp [Optical and Electronic Materials Unit, NIMS, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan) [Optical and Electronic Materials Unit, NIMS, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); Materials Research Center for Element Strategy (MCES), Mailbox S2-13, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-0026 (Japan)

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

69

Oxyferryl Heme Reactivity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oxyferryl Heme Reactivity Using both Radiation and Photochemical Oxyferryl Heme Reactivity Using both Radiation and Photochemical Techniques A. M. English, T. Fox, G. Tsaprailis, C. W. Fenwick, J. F. Wishart, J. T. Hazzard, and G. Tollin Adv. Chem. Ser. 254, Ch. 6, pp. 81-98 Abstract: Flash photolysis and pulse radiolysis were used to generate reductants in situ to study the electron-transfer (ET) reactivity of the FeIV=O heme centers in myoglobin and cytochrome c peroxidase. Reduction of a5RuIII groups covalently bound to surface histidines allowed intramolecular RuII --> FeIV=O ET rates to be measured. Protonation of the oxene ligand was found to be largely rate determining in myoglobin, consistent with the lack of proton donors in its heme pocket. The large distance (21-23 Å) between surface histidines and the heme in wild-type

70

Reactivity of Acid Generators  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reactivity of Acid Generators for Chemically Amplified Resists with Reactivity of Acid Generators for Chemically Amplified Resists with Low-Energy Electrons Atsuro Nakano, Takahiro Kozawa, Seiichi Tagawa, Tomasz Szreder, James F. Wishart, Toshiyuki Kai and Tsutomu Shimokawa Jpn. J. Appl. Phys., 45, L197-L200 (2006). [Find paper at the Japanese Journal of Applied Physics] Abstract: In chemically amplified resists for ionizing radiations such as electron beams and extreme ultraviolet (EUV), low-energy electrons play an important role in the pattern formation processes. The reactivity of acid generators with low-energy electrons was evaluated using solvated electrons in tetrahydrofuran, which were generated by a pulsed electron beam. The rate constants of acid generators with the solvated electrons ranged from 0.6 to 1.9 x 1011 M-1s-1

71

Tracer Gas Transport under Mixed Convection Conditions in an Experimental  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tracer Gas Transport under Mixed Convection Conditions in an Experimental Tracer Gas Transport under Mixed Convection Conditions in an Experimental Atrium: Comparison Between Experiments and CFD Predictions Title Tracer Gas Transport under Mixed Convection Conditions in an Experimental Atrium: Comparison Between Experiments and CFD Predictions Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2006 Authors Jayaraman, Buvaneswari, Elizabeth U. Finlayson, Michael D. Sohn, Tracy L. Thatcher, Phillip N. Price, Emily E. Wood, Richard G. Sextro, and Ashok J. Gadgil Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 40 Start Page Chapter Pagination 5236-5250 Keywords airflow and pollutant transport group, atria, indoor airflow and pollutant transport, indoor environment department, indoor pollutant dispersion, mixed convection, turbulence model

72

Reactive Power Compensating System.  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The circuit was designed for the specific application of wind-driven induction generators. It has great potential for application in any situation where a varying reactive power load is present, such as with induction motors or generators, or for transmission network compensation.

Williams, Timothy J.; El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Venkata, Subrahmanyam S.

1985-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

73

Reactive power compensating system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The reactive power of an induction machine is compensated by providing fixed capacitors on each phase line for the minimum compensation required, sensing the current on one line at the time its voltage crosses zero to determine the actual compensation required for each phase, and selecting switched capacitors on each line to provide the balance of the compensation required.

Williams, Timothy J. (Redondo Beach, CA); El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A. (Renton, WA); Venkata, Subrahmanyam S. (Seattle, WA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Primordial black holes as biased tracers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Primordial black holes (PBHs) are theoretical black holes which may be formed during the radiation dominant era and, basically, caused by the gravitational collapse of radiational overdensities. It has been well known that in the context of the structure formation in our Universe such collapsed objects, e.g., halos/galaxies, could be considered as bias tracers of underlying matter fluctuations and the halo/galaxy bias has been studied well. Employing a peak-background split picture which is known to be a useful tool to discuss the halo bias, we consider the large scale clustering behavior of the PBH and propose an almost mass-independent constraint to the scenario that dark matters (DMs) consist of PBHs. We consider the case where the statistics of the primordial curvature perturbations is almost Gaussian, but with small local-type non-Gaussianity. If PBHs account for the DM abundance, such a large scale clustering of PBHs behaves as nothing but the matter isocurvature perturbation and constrained strictly by...

Tada, Yuichiro

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Thermal single-well injection-withdrawal tracer tests for determining fracture-matrix heat transfer area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) tracer tests involve injection of traced fluid and subsequent tracer recovery from the same well, usually with some quiescent time between the injection and withdrawal periods. SWIW are insensitive to variations in advective processes that arise from formation heterogeneities, because upon withdrawal, fluid parcels tend to retrace the paths taken during injection. However, SWIW are sensitive to diffusive processes, such as diffusive exchange of conservative or reactive solutes between fractures and rock matrix. This paper focuses on SWIW tests in which temperature itself is used as a tracer. Numerical simulations demonstrate the sensitivity of temperature returns to fracture-matrix interaction. We consider thermal SWIW response to the two primary reservoir improvements targeted with stimulation, (1) making additional fractures accessible to injected fluids, and (2) increasing the aperture and permeability of pre-existing fractures. It is found that temperature returns in SWIW tests are insensitive to (2), while providing a strong signal of more rapid temperature recovery during the withdrawal phase for (1).

Pruess, K.; Doughty, C.

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

76

Tracer Testing At Raft River Geothermal Area (1984) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

84 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Tracer testing was undertaken at Raft River geothermal area. References Kroneman, R. L.; Yorgason, K. R.; Moore, J. N. (1...

77

Tracer stirring around a meddy: The formation of layering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The dynamics of the formation of layering surrounding meddy-like vortex lenses is investigated using Primitive Equation (PE), Quasi Geostrophic (QG) and tracer advection models. Recent in situ data inside a meddy confirmed the formation of highly ...

Thomas Meunier; Claire Mnesguen; Richard Schopp; Sylvie Le Gentil

78

Tracer method in numerical simulation of combustion processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fuel-rich laminar flat hydrogen-methane-air flames are studied numerically using the tracer method. It is found that, in the near-limit mixture, hydrogen has an advantage in the oxidation by oxygen. As the sto...

V. A. Bunev; A. V. Baklanov; I. G. Namyatov

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Geographic Information Systems- Tools For Geotherm Exploration, Tracers  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Systems- Tools For Geotherm Exploration, Tracers Systems- Tools For Geotherm Exploration, Tracers Data Analysis, And Enhanced Data Distribution, Visualization, And Management Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Geographic Information Systems- Tools For Geotherm Exploration, Tracers Data Analysis, And Enhanced Data Distribution, Visualization, And Management Details Activities (4) Areas (3) Regions (0) Abstract: Geographic information systems (GIS) are an underused resource that can help the geothermal industry in exploration, tracer analysis, infrastructure management, and the general distribution and use of data. GIS systems are highly customizable to specific user needs and can use entire corporate data sets through a visual interface. This paper briefly documents the use of GIS in specific examples of geothermal research at the

80

Preferred methods of analysis for chemical tracers in moderate- and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Preferred methods of analysis for chemical tracers in moderate- and Preferred methods of analysis for chemical tracers in moderate- and high-temperature geothermal environments Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Preferred methods of analysis for chemical tracers in moderate- and high-temperature geothermal environments Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: This report describes the sampling and analytical techniques used for tracer analysis in the Raft River and East Mesa field tests. The collection procedures and sample preservation techniques, analytical methods and possible sources of contamination or error are discussed in detail. Author(s): Kroneman, R. L.; Yorgason, K. R.; Moore, J. N. Published: DOE Information Bridge, 12/1/1984 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: 10.2172/5121460

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Quantitative interpretation of tracer test data | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Quantitative interpretation of tracer test data Quantitative interpretation of tracer test data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Quantitative interpretation of tracer test data Abstract Geothermal reinjection is an important part of sustainable management of geothermal resources. Reinjection started out as a method of waste-water disposal, but is now also being used to counteract pressure draw-down and to extract more thermal energy from reservoir rocks. The possible cooling of production wells, or thermal breakthrough, is one of the main disadvantages associated with injection. To minimize this danger while maintaining the benefit from reinjection requires careful testing and research. Tracer testing, which is used to study flow-paths and quantify fluid-flow in hydrological systems, is probably the most important tool for

82

Resuspension rates from aged inert-tracer sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wind-caused particle resuspension rates were investigated with molybdenum tracers at two circular resuspension sites in the Hanford area. The tracer particles were calcium molybdate. The radii of each circular tracer-source area were 22.9 m and 29.9 m respectively for tracer deposited on 2 October 1973 and 29 May 1979. Resuspension rates were investigated by sampling resuspended tracer with air sampling equipment mounted as a function of height on a centrally located sampling tower at each site. Sampling equipment was operated as a function of wind speed increments in order to investigate resuspension rates, wind speed dependencies of resuspension rates, and for subsequent comparisons of resuspension rate changes as a function of time for constant wind speed ranges. Experimental results are reported for measurements over several years. Resuspension rates ranged from about 10/sup -13/ to 10/sup -6/ fraction of the tracer source resuspended per second. Resuspension rates tended to increase with increasing wind speed. At one investigation site, resuspension rates were nearly constant, except for seasonal variations, for a four-year time period. Resuspension rates appear higher in the autumn than in the spring and summer.

Sehmel, G.A.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

HYDROGEL TRACER BEADS: THE DEVELOPMENT, MODIFICATION, AND TESTING OF AN INNOVATIVE TRACER FOR BETTER UNDERSTANDING LNAPL TRANSPORT IN KARST AQUIFERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this specific research task is to develop proxy tracers that mimic contaminant movement to better understand and predict contaminant fate and transport in karst aquifers. Hydrogel tracer beads are transported as a separate phase than water and can used as a proxy tracer to mimic the transport of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL). They can be constructed with different densities, sizes & chemical attributes. This poster describes the creation and optimization of the beads and the field testing of buoyant beads, including sampling, tracer analysis, and quantitative analysis. The buoyant beads are transported ahead of the dissolved solutes, suggesting that light NAPL (LNAPL) transport in karst may occur faster than predicted from traditional tracing techniques. The hydrogel beads were successful in illustrating this enhanced transport.

Amanda Laskoskie, Harry M. Edenborn, and Dorothy J. Vesper

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Reactive Air Aluminization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ferritic stainless steels and other alloys are of great interest to SOFC developers for applications such as interconnects, cell frames, and balance of plant components. While these alloys offer significant advantages (e.g., low material and manufacturing cost, high thermal conductivity, and high temperature oxidation resistance), there are challenges which can hinder their utilization in SOFC systems; these challenges include Cr volatility and reactivity with glass seals. To overcome these challenges, protective coatings and surface treatments for the alloys are under development. In particular, aluminization of alloy surfaces offers the potential for mitigating both evaporation of Cr from the alloy surface and reaction of alloy constituents with glass seals. Commercial aluminization processes are available to SOFC developers, but they tend to be costly due to their use of exotic raw materials and/or processing conditions. As an alternative, PNNL has developed Reactive Air Aluminization (RAA), which offers a low-cost, simpler alternative to conventional aluminization methods.

Choi, Jung-Pyung; Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

85

Reactive Maintenance | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Reactive Maintenance Reactive Maintenance Reactive Maintenance October 7, 2013 - 9:40am Addthis Reactive maintenance follows a run-it-until-it-breaks strategy where no actions or efforts are taken to maintain equipment as intended by the manufacturer. Studies indicate this is still the predominant mode of maintenance for Federal facilities. Advantages Reactive maintenance advantages are a double-edged sword. Federal agencies following a purely reactive maintenance strategy can expect little expenditures for manpower or system upkeep until something breaks. However, systems do break. With new equipment, Federal agencies can expect minimal incidents of failure. However, older equipment often experiences higher failure incidents and costlier repairs. Other advantages of reactive maintenance are:

86

New particle transport diagnostics with tracer-encapsulated solid pellet  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new diagnostic method for local particle transport, which is based on injection of the tracer-encapsulated solid pellet (TESPEL), was applied for the first time in experiments on the CHS device. Such a configuration of the pellet allows the lithium hydride tracer to reach the core plasma region and be deposited within a few centimetres in the radial direction, which was confirmed by measurements with photomultipliers and CCD imaging. The radial diffusion of the fully ionized tracer is observed by means of charge exchange recombination spectroscopy with the heating neutral beam as a source. The local tracer deposition and complete ionization of the tracer greatly simplify the transport analysis and allow the use of analytic expressions for deriving the diffusion coefficient, D. With this procedure, the diffusion coefficient was determined for various plasma conditions and was found to be larger for discharges with higher electron temperature. An impurity transport code was also applied to the experimental data, which allowed more precise calculation of the transport coefficients including the pinch velocity, V. It is expected that a higher accuracy will be achieved for the case of TESPEL injection into a larger-scale plasma.

K Khlopenkov; S Sudo

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Tracer Testing At Raft River Geothermal Area (1983) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3) 3) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Tracer Testing Activity Date 1983 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To develop chemical tracing procedures for geothermal areas. Notes Two field experiments were conducted to develop chemical tracer procedures for use with injection-backflow testing, one on the fracture-permeability Raft River reservoir and the other on the matrix-permeability East Mesa reservoir. Results from tests conducted with incremental increases in the injection volume at both East Mesa and Raft River suggests that, for both reservoirs, permeability remained uniform with increasing distance from the well bore. Increased mixing during quiescent periods, between injection and

88

Preliminary assessment of halogenated alkanes as vapor-phase tracers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New tracers are needed to evaluate the efficiency of injection strategies in vapor-dominated environments. One group of compounds that seems to meet the requirements for vapor-phase tracing are the halogenated alkanes (HCFCs). HCFCs are generally nontoxic, and extrapolation of tabulated thermodynamic data indicate that they will be thermally stable and nonreactive in a geothermal environment. The solubilities and stabilities of these compounds, which form several homologous series, vary according to the substituent ratios of fluorine, chlorine, and hydrogen. Laboratory and field tests that will further define the suitability of HCFCs as vapor-phase tracers are under way.

Adams, Michael C.; Moore, Joseph N.; Hirtz, Paul

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Advanced Reduction Processes - A New Class of Treatment Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new class of treatment processes called Advanced Reduction Processes (ARP) has been proposed. The ARPs combine activation methods and reducing agents to form highly reactive reducing radicals that degrade oxidized contaminants. Batch screening...

Vellanki, Bhanu Prakash

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

90

Federal Energy Management Program: Reactive Maintenance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reactive Reactive Maintenance to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Reactive Maintenance on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Reactive Maintenance on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Reactive Maintenance on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Reactive Maintenance on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Reactive Maintenance on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Reactive Maintenance on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Federal Requirements Program Management Commissioning Metering Computerized Maintenance Management Systems Maintenance Types Reactive Preventive Predictive Reliability-Centered Major Equipment Types

91

ANALYSIS OF TRACER AND THERMAL TRANSIENTS DURING REINJECTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and developed a new technique which combines the results from in- terwell tracer tests and thermal injection variables of the injection and backflow periods. Finally we suggested thermal injection-backflow tests for interpreting thermal injection-backflow tests. In fact, the MD model was first developed by Lauwerier to study

Stanford University

92

RADIOGENIC ISOTOPES: TRACERS OF PAST OCEAN CIRCULATION AND EROSIONAL INPUT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the ocean has varied as a function of changes in paleocircu- lation, source provenances, style and intensity-established paleoceano- graphic tracers such as carbon isotopes. INDEX TERMS: 1040 Geochemistry: Isotopic composition Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) according to latest estimates based on results of the World Ocean Circulation

Jellinek, Mark

93

DIVISION S-3-NOTES HYDROLOGIC TRACER EFFECTS ON SOIL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and denitrification (the conversion of NOf to N gas)can be important to the fate of NOf and organic pollutants on microbial activity. These effects could be important whentracers areused instudies of the fate and transport of pollutants in the environment. In such studies, it is important to determine if tracer compounds affect

Gold, Art

94

Calibration of hydraulic and tracer tests in fractured media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Calibration of hydraulic and tracer tests in fractured media represented by a DFN Model L. D. Donado, X. Sanchez-Vila, E. Ruiz* & F. J. Elorza** * Enviros Spain S.L. ** UPM #12;Fractured Media Water flows through fractures (matrix basically impervious ­ though relevant to transport) Fractures at all

Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

95

Partitioning and Interfacial Tracers for Differentiating NAPL Entrapment Configuration:? Column-Scale Investigation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Partitioning and Interfacial Tracers for Differentiating NAPL Entrapment Configuration:? Column-Scale Investigation ... In field investigations, such as partitioning interwell tracer tests (PITTs), tracers are deployed before and after cleanup implementation to assess remedial performance (13, 26?28). ... The use of 222Rn, a naturally occurring radioactive isotope, was investigated as a partitioning tracer to detect and quantify the amt. of non-aq.-phase ...

Dongping Dai; Frank T. Barranco Jr.; Tissa H. Illangasekare

2001-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

96

Goldschmidt Conference Abstracts 2008A888 Advances in elucidating reactivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, ZOJA VUKMANOVI! 2 AND ELMER WIERSMA 2 1 Dept. Geology & Mineralogy, Kyoto University, Japan (spengler@kueps.kyoto-u.ac.jp) 2 Institute Earth Sci, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, NL (gareth.davies@falw.vu.nl, elmer.wiersma

Sparks, Donald L.

97

Metal-based reactive nanomaterials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent developments in materials processing and characterization resulted in the discovery of a new type of reactive materials containing nanoscaled metal components. The well-known high oxidation energies of metallic fuels can now be released very rapidly because of the very high reactive interface areas in such metal-based reactive nanomaterials. Consequently, these materials are currently being examined for an entire range of applications in energetic formulations inappropriate for conventional, micron-sized metal fuels having relatively low reaction rates. New application areas, such as reactive structural materials, are also being explored. Research remains active in manufacturing and characterization of metal-based reactive nanomaterials including elemental metal nanopowders and various nanocomposite material systems. Because of the nanometer scale of the individual particles, or phase domains, and because of the very high enthalpy of reaction between components of the nanocomposite materials, the final phase compositions, morphology, and thermodynamic properties of the reactive nanocomposite materials may be different from those of their micron-scaled counterparts. Ignition mechanisms in such materials can be governed by heterogeneous reactions that are insignificant for materials with less developed reactive interface areas. New combustion regimes are being observed that are affected by very short ignition delays combined with very high metal combustion temperatures. Current progress in this rapidly growing research area is reviewed and some potential directions for the future research are discussed.

Edward L. Dreizin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

COAL SLAGGING AND REACTIVITY TESTING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Union Fenosa's La Robla I Power Station is a 270-MW Foster Wheeler arch-fired system. The unit is located at the mine that provides a portion of the semianthracitic coal. The remaining coals used are from South Africa, Russia, Australia, and China. The challenges at the La Robla I Station stem from the various fuels used, the characteristics of which differ from the design coal. The University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) and the Lehigh University Energy Research Center (LUERC) undertook a program to assess problematic slagging and unburned carbon issues occurring at the plant. Full-scale combustion tests were performed under baseline conditions, with elevated oxygen level and with redistribution of air during a site visit at the plant. During these tests, operating information, observations and temperature measurements, and coal, slag deposit, and fly ash samples were obtained to assess slagging and unburned carbon. The slagging in almost all cases appeared due to elevated temperatures rather than fuel chemistry. The most severe slagging occurred when the temperature at the sampling port was in excess of 1500 C, with problematic slagging where first-observed temperatures exceeded 1350 C. The presence of anorthite crystals in the bulk of the deposits analyzed indicates that the temperatures were in excess of 1350 C, consistent with temperature measurements during the sampling period. Elevated temperatures and ''hot spots'' are probably the result of poor mill performance, and a poor distribution of the coal from the mills to the specific burners causes elevated temperatures in the regions where the slag samples were extracted. A contributing cause appeared to be poor combustion air mixing and heating, resulting in oxygen stratification and increased temperatures in certain areas. Air preheater plugging was observed and reduces the temperature of the air in the windbox, which leads to poor combustion conditions, resulting in unburned carbon as well as slagging. A second phase of the project involved advanced analysis of the baseline coal along with an Australian coal fired at the plant. These analysis results were used in equilibrium thermodynamic modeling along with a coal quality model developed by the EERC to assess slagging, fouling, and opacity for the coals. Bench-scale carbon conversion testing was performed in a drop-tube furnace to assess the reactivity of the coals. The Australian coal had a higher mineral content with significantly more clay minerals present than the baseline coal. The presence of these clay minerals, which tend to melt at relatively low temperatures, indicated a higher potential for problematic slagging than the baseline coal. However, the pyritic minerals, comprising over 25% of the baseline mineral content, may form sticky iron sulfides, leading to severe slagging in the burner region if local areas with reducing conditions exist. Modeling results indicated that neither would present significant fouling problems. The Australian coal was expected to show slagging behavior much more severe than the baseline coal except at very high furnace temperatures. However, the baseline coal was predicted to exhibit opacity problems, as well as have a higher potential for problematic calcium sulfate-based low-temperature fouling. The baseline coal had a somewhat higher reactivity than the Australian coal, which was consistent with both the lower average activation energy for the baseline coal and the greater carbon conversion at a given temperature and residence time. The activation energy of the baseline coal showed some effect of oxygen on the activation energy, with E{sub a} increasing at the lower oxygen concentration, but may be due to the scatter in the baseline coal kinetic values at the higher oxygen level tested.

Donald P. McCollor; Kurt E. Eylands; Jason D. Laumb

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Identification and characterization of conservative organic tracers for use as hydrologic tracers for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Study; Progress report, June 1--December 31, 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ground water tracers are solutes dissolved in or carried by ground water to delineate flow pathways. Tracers provide information on direction and speed of water movement and that of contaminants that might be conveyed by the water. Tracers can also be used to measure effective porosity, hydraulic conductivity, dispersivity and solute distribution coefficients. For most applications tracers should be conservative, that is, move at the same rate as the water and not sorb to aquifer materials. Tracers must have a number of properties to be functional. Regardless of the desired properties, the chemical and physical behavior of a tracer in ground water and the porous medium under study must be understood. Good estimates of tracer behavior can be obtained from laboratory studies. Studies in this proposal will address tracer properties with analytical method development, static sorption and degradation studies and column transport studies, Mutagenicity tests will be performed on promising candidates. The tracers that will be used for these experiments are fluorinated organic acids and other organic compounds that have the chemical and biological stability necessary to be effective in the Yucca Mountain environment. Special emphasis will be placed on compounds that fluoresce or have very large ultraviolet absorption coefficients for very high analytical sensitivity.

Stetzenbach, K.J.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

100

Electrocatalytic Reactivity for Oxygen Reduction of Palladium...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reactivity for Oxygen Reduction of Palladium-Modified Carbon Nanotubes Synthesized in Supercritical Fluid. Electrocatalytic Reactivity for Oxygen Reduction of Palladium-Modified...

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Chemically Reactive Working Fluids | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Chemically Reactive Working Fluids for the Capture and Transport of Concentrated Solar Thermal Energy for Power Generation Chemically Reactive Working Fluids SunShot CSP...

102

Formation, characterization and reactivity of adsorbed oxygen...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Formation, characterization and reactivity of adsorbed oxygen on BaOPt(111). Formation, characterization and reactivity of adsorbed oxygen on BaOPt(111). Abstract: The formation...

103

Conservation of reactive electromagnetic energy in reactive time  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The complex Poynting theorem (CPT) is extended to a canonical time-scale domain $(t,s)$. Time-harmonic phasors are replaced by the positive-frequency parts of general fields, which extend analytically to complex time $t+is$, with $s>0$ interpreted as a time resolution scale. The real part of the extended CPT gives conservation in $t$ of a time-averaged field energy, and its imaginary part gives conservation in $s$ of a time-averaged reactive energy. In both cases, the averaging windows are determined by a Cauchy kernel of width $\\Delta t\\sim \\pm s$. This completes the time-harmonic CPT, whose imaginary part is generally supposed to be vaguely `related to' reactive energy without giving a conservation law, or even an expression, for the latter. The interpretation of $s$ as reactive time, tracking the leads and lags associated with stored capacitative and inductive energy, gives a simple explanation of the volt-ampere reactive (var) unit measuring reactive power: a var is simply one Joule per reactive second. T...

Kaiser, Gerald

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Fuel Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method for measuring the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity in a heterogeneous nuclear reactor is presented. The method, which is used during normal operation, requires that calibrated control rods be oscillated in a special way at a high reactor power level. The value of the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity is found from the measured flux responses to these oscillations. Application of the method in a Savannah River reactor charged with natural uranium is discussed.

Loewe, W.E.

2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

105

An investigation of radial tracer flow in naturally fractured reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study presents a general solution for the radial flow of tracers in naturally fractured reservoirs. Continuous and finite step injection of chemical and radioactive tracers are considered. The reservoir is treated as being composed of two regions: a mobile region where longitudinal dispersion and convection take place and a stagnant region where only diffusion and adsorption are allowed. Radioactive decay is considered in both regions. The model of this study is thoroughly compared to those previously presented in literature by Moench and Ogata, Tang et al., Chen et al., and Hsieh et al. The solution is numerically inverted by means of the Crump algorithm. A detailed validation of the model with respect to solutions previously presented and/or simplified physical conditions solutions (i.e., homogeneous case) or limit solutions (i.e., for short times) was carried out. The influence of various dimensionless parameters that enter into the solution was investigated. A discussion of results obtained through the Crump and Stehfest algorithm is presented, concluding that the Crump method provides more reliable tracer concentrations.

Jetzabeth, Ramirez-Sabag; Fernando, Samaniego V.; Jesus, Rivera R.; Fernando Rodriguez

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Conductivity tracer studies for a fluidized-bed bioreactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An automated conductivity tracer test was developed to measure the residence time distribution (RTD) of a cometabolic fluidized-bed bioreactor (FBBR). The FBBR contained sand-core bioparticles grown with phenol and it provided high (70% to 80%) removal of trichloroethene (TCE) at short (3 minute) detention times. The tracer test apparatus was constructed with off-the-shelf components controlled with a PC-based data acquisition system. Non-disruptive hydrodynamic testing was obtained during normal operation of the FBBR. The conductivity of injected brine pulses was monitored at the reactor inlet and outlet. Dispersion numbers and detention times were computed by fitting the advection-dispersion model to the tracer curves. Typical dispersion numbers attributed to the fluidized-bed of bioparticles ranged from 0.07 to 0.11. In simplified modeling of the FBBR, dispersion was found to have little effect on TCE removal. Based on the dispersion of brine pulses, it was determined that phenol feed pulses injected at inhibitory concentrations over 2 g/L would be rapidly dispersed in the biological bed to non-inhibitory concentrations.

Leung, S.Y.; Segar, R.L. Jr. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

107

Tracer-encapsulated cryogenic pellet production for particle transport diagnostics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A device for producing a tracer-encapsulated cryogenic pellet is constructed for an accurate transport diagnostic system to measure particle transport both parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic-field lines in magnetic confinementdevices. As for the typical configuration of the tracer-encapsulated pellet it is proposed that a 50250 ?m diam tracer made of a light atom such as lithium carbon etc. is encapsulated in the center of a 13 mm diam cylindrical pellet of hydrogen. For demonstration of the device operation a 240 ?m diam carbon sphere is encapsulated in the center of a 3 mm diam cylindrical pellet of hydrogen and accelerated by a light gas gun to velocities of 400800 m/s in a test chamber. The pellet has been photographed simultaneously from two directions and the two two-dimensional images are reconstructed to a three-dimensional image. Thus the proof of principle of the device operation has been demonstrated.

S. Sudo; H. Itoh; K. Khlopenkov

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, What is the skill of ocean tracers in reducing uncertainties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in current Earth system models and (ii) imperfect knowledge of model parameters. Ocean tracers observa- tions

Haran, Murali

109

Advanced Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Express Licensing Active Terahertz Metamaterial Devices Express Licensing Anion-Conducting Polymer, Composition, And Membrane Express Licensing Analysis Of Macromolecule, Liggands And Macromolecule-Lingand Complexes Express Licensing Carbon Microtubes Express Licensing Chemical Synthesis Of Chiral Conducting Polymers Express Licensing Forming Adherent Coatings Using Plasma Processing Express Licensing Hydrogen Scavengers Express Licensing Laser Welding Of Fused Quartz Express Licensing Multiple Feed Powder Splitter Negotiable Licensing Boron-10 Neutron Detectors for Helium-3 Replacement Negotiable Licensing Insensitive Extrudable Explosive Negotiable Licensing Durable Fuel Cell Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA) Express Licensing Method of Synthesis of Proton Conducting Materials

110

Reactivity of surface carbon deposited on supported Rh catalysts by the disproportionation of CO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent investigations on hydrocarbon synthesis from CO and H/sub 2/ over Group VIII metals have proposed that the surface carbon formed by the dissociation of CO is an intermediate for hydrocarbon formation. It implies that metals which dissociate CO readily (e.g., Ni, Co, and Ru) are good catalysts for hydrocarbon synthesis unless the surface carbon is bound too strongly. There is a certain controversy in the literature on whether CO undergoes dissociation on Rh surfaces under UHV conditions. In the present work, the authors have investigated the reactivity of surface carbon deposited on TiO/sub 2/- or SiO/sub 2/-supported Rh catalysts in the presence of molecularly adsorbed CO by means of the isotopic tracer technique and have made a direct comparison of the reactivity of adsorbed CO with that of surface carbon. It has been revealed that three forms of carbon are produced by the disproportionation of CO.

Orita, H.; Naito, S.; Tamaru, K.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Tracer Recovery and Mixing from Two Geothermal Injection-Backflow Studies |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tracer Recovery and Mixing from Two Geothermal Injection-Backflow Studies Tracer Recovery and Mixing from Two Geothermal Injection-Backflow Studies Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Tracer Recovery and Mixing from Two Geothermal Injection-Backflow Studies Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Injection-backflow tracer testing on a single well is not a commonly used procedure for geothermal reservoir evaluation, and, consequently, there is little published information on the character or interpretation of tracer recovery curves. Two field experiments were conducted to develop chemical tracer procedures for use with injection-backflow testing, one on the fracture-permeability Raft River reservoir and the other on the matrix-permeability East Mesa reservoir. Results from tests conducted with incremental increases in the injection

112

Joint Energy and Reactive Power Market Considering Coupled Active and Reactive Reserve Market Ensuring System Security  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reactive power market is usually held as independent from energy and reserved active power markets; however, active and reactive power are ... synchronous generator capacity curve. Therefore, reactive power market

Hamed Ahmadi; Asghar Akbari Foroud

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Advanced Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Systems: Advanced Systems: high Performance fenestration systems Research areas: Research activities to improve the performance of windows and other fenestration products must address window systems issues as well as Glazing Materials research. LBNL activities in the area of Advanced Systems include research at both the product level and the building envelope and building systems levels. Highly insulating windows - using non structural center layers Lower cost solutions to more insulating three layer glazing systems, with the potential to turn windows in U.S. heating dominated residential applications into net-energy gainers. Highly Insulating Window Frames In collaboration with the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, we are researching the potentials for highly insulating window frames. Our initial work examines European frames with reported U-factors under 0.15 Btu/hr-ft2-F. Future research aims to analyze these designs, verify these performance levels and ensure that procedures used to calculate frame performance are accurate.

114

Characterization of four potential laser-induced fluorescence tracers for diesel engine applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Four potential laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) tracers, 1-phenyloctane, 1-phenyldecane, 1-methylnaphthalene, and 2-methylnaphthalene, are characterized for diesel engine applications....

Trost, Johannes; Zigan, Lars; Leipertz, Alfred; Sahoo, Dipankar; Miles, Paul C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Novel Multi-dimensional Tracers for Geothermal Inter-wall Diagnostics  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. The objective of this project is to develop a matrix of the smart geothermal tracer and its interpretation tools.

116

Using Seismic Reflection to Locate a Tracer Testing Complex South of Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Tracer testing in the fractured volcanic aquifer near Yucca Mountain, and in the alluvial aquifer south of Yucca Mountain, Nevada has been conducted in the (more)

Kryder, Levi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Determination of Water Saturation in Relatively Dry Porous Media Using Gas-phase Tracer Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soil desiccation (drying), involving water evaporation induced by dry air injection and extraction, is a potentially robust remediation process to slow migration of inorganic or radionuclide contaminants through the vadose zone. The application of gas-phase partitioning tracer tests has been proposed as a means to estimate initial water volumes and to monitor the progress of the desiccation process at pilot-test and field sites. In this paper, tracer tests have been conducted in porous medium columns with various water saturations using sulfur hexafluoride as the conservative tracer and tricholorofluoromethane and difluoromethane as the water-partitioning tracers. For porous media with minimal silt and/or organic matter fractions, tracer tests provided reasonable saturation estimates for saturations close to zero. However, for sediments with significant silt and/or organic matter fractions, tracer tests only provided satisfactory results when the water saturation was at least 0.1 - 0.2. For dryer conditions, the apparent tracer retardation increases due to air soil sorption, which is not included in traditional retardation coefficients derived from advection-dispersion equations accounting only for air water partitioning and water soil sorption. Based on these results, gas-phase partitioning tracer tests may be used to determine initial water volumes in sediments, provided the initial water saturations are sufficiently large. However, tracer tests are not suitable for quantifying moisture content in desiccated sediments.

Oostrom, Martinus; Tartakovsky, Guzel D.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Truex, Michael J.; Dane, Jacob H.

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

118

Calcium translocation and whole plant transpiration: spatial and temporal measurements using radio-Strontium as tracer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

comparison with zinc, strontium and rubidium. Annals of783- Wasserman RH. 1998. Strontium as a tracer for calciumor inapplicable. As Strontium (Sr) was found to behave in

Seligmann, Ron; Wengrowicz, Udi; Tirosh, Danny; Yermiyahu, Uri; Bar-Tal, Asher; Schwartz, Amnon

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric tracer experiments Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Summary: for incorporating Lagrangian tracer positions into a model of flows (such as ocean currents). Such models... are important in understanding the behaviour of...

120

Tracer Testing At Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area (U.S. Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Tracer Testing At Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area (U.S. Geothermal Inc., 2012) Exploration Activity...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

E-Print Network 3.0 - activity optimal tracers Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AND AMOC Abstract Current projections of the oceanic response... in current Earth system models and (ii) imperfect knowledge of model parameters. Ocean tracers observa- tions...

122

Triclosan Reactivity in Chloraminated Waters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Triclosan Reactivity in Chloraminated Waters ... Triclosan, widely employed as an antimicrobial additive in many household personal care products, has recently been detected in wastewater treatment plant effluents and in source waters used for drinking water supplies. ... Chloramines used either as alternative disinfectants in drinking water treatment or formed during chlorination of nonnitrified wastewater effluents have the potential to react with triclosan. ...

Aimee E. Greyshock; Peter J. Vikesland

2006-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

123

Estimation of tracer diffusion coefficients of ions in aqueous solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Equations are given for estimating tracer diffusion coefficients D/sub i//sup 0/ of ions at infinite dilution in terms of limiting ionic conductances ..lambda../sub i//sup 0/. Also given are generalized Nernst-Hartley equations for binary and multicomponent diffusion coefficients D/sup 0/ and D/sub ij//sup 0/, respectively, at infinite dilution. Data, estimates, and correlations for ..lambda../sub i//sup 0/ at 25/sup 0/C and other temperatures are discussed. Estimated values of ..lambda../sub i//sup 0/ are tabulated from 0-300/sup 0/C for ions of waste isolation interest and for ions of economic interest in geothermal brines. Estimates of their tracer diffusion coefficients at infinite dilution are tabulated. A rule of thumb, good to a factor of 2, is presented. Very limited data (available only at 25/sup 0/C) indicate that D/sub i//D/sub i//sup 0/ generally declines as the concentration of salt or supporting electrolyte increases. 6 figures, 2 tables.

Miller, D.G.

1982-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

124

Spectroscopic diagnostics for ablation cloud of tracer-encapsulated solid pellet in LHD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the Large Helical Device (LHD), various spectroscopic diagnostics have been applied to study the ablation process of an advanced impurity pellet, tracer-encapsulated solid pellet (TESPEL). The total light emission from the ablation cloud of TESPEL is measured by photomultipliers equipped with individual interference filters, which provide information about the TESPEL penetration depth. The spectra emitted from the TESPEL ablation cloud are measured with a 250 mm Czerny-Turner spectrometer equipped with an intensified charge coupled device detector, which is operated in the fast kinetic mode. This diagnostic allows us to evaluate the temporal evolution of the electron density in the TESPEL ablation cloud. In order to gain information about the spatial distribution of the cloud parameters, a nine image optical system that can simultaneously acquire nine images of the TESPEL ablation cloud has recently been developed. Several images of the TESPEL ablation cloud in different spectral domains will give us the spatial distribution of the TESPEL cloud density and temperature.

Tamura, N.; Kalinina, D. V.; Sato, K.; Sudo, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6, Oroshi-cho, Toki-City, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Sergeev, V. Yu.; Miroshnikov, I. V.; Sharov, I. A.; Bakhareva, O. A.; Ivanova, D. M.; Timokhin, V. M. [State Polytechnical University, Politechnicheskaya 29, St. Petersburg 195251 (Russian Federation); Kuteev, B. V. [Nuclear Fusion Institute, RRC 'Kurchatov Institute', Kurchatov square 1, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

Definition: Reactive Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reactive Power Reactive Power Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reactive Power The portion of electricity that establishes and sustains the electric and magnetic fields of alternating-current equipment. Reactive power must be supplied to most types of magnetic equipment, such as motors and transformers. It also must supply the reactive losses on transmission facilities. Reactive power is provided by generators, synchronous condensers, or electrostatic equipment such as capacitors and directly influences electric system voltage. It is usually expressed in kilovars (kvar) or megavars (Mvar).[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition In electric power transmission and distribution, volt-ampere reactive (var) is a unit used to measure reactive power in an AC electric

126

Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and cancer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mitochondria produce reactive oxygen species (mROS) as a natural by-product of electron transport chain activity. While initial studies focused on the damaging effects of reactive oxygen species, a recent paradigm shift ...

Chandel, Navdeep S

127

Reactive Power Support Services in Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reactive Power Support Services in Electricity Markets Costing and Pricing of Ancillary Services Final Project Report Power Systems Engineering Research Center A National Science Foundation Industry Reactive Power Support Services in Electricity Markets Costing and Pricing of Ancillary Services Project

128

Identification and characterization of conservative organic tracers for use as hydrologic tracers for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Study; Progress report, January 1, 1991--June 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies continue on the use of organic acids as tracers in hydrology studies of Yucca Mountain. Work performed during this time period has been concentrated in three main areas: the familiarization with, and optimization of, the LC-MS hardware and data system; the initial development of soil column test procedures, which are used for evaluation of both the columns themselves and the tracer compounds; and continuation of the batch sorption and degradation studies for the potential tracers. All three of these tasks will continue, as the addition of new tracer compounds, analytical information, and equipment will necessitate further evaluation of existing methods and procedures. Also included in this report is the final report on an information system.

Stetzenbach, K.J.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

129

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS (ACCEPTED NOVEMBER 8, 2014) 1 Stochastic Reactive Power Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

response, and electric vehicles. Advances in photovoltaic (PV) inverters offer new opportunitiesIEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS (ACCEPTED NOVEMBER 8, 2014) 1 Stochastic Reactive Power are being challenged by reverse power flows and voltage fluctuations due to renewable generation, demand

Giannakis, Georgios

130

Advanced Search  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Publications Publications Advanced Search Most publications by Environmental Energy Technologies Division authors are searchable from this page, including peer-reviewed publications, book chapters, conference proceedings and LBNL reports. Filter Advanced Search Publications list This publications database is an ongoing project, and not all Division publications are represented here yet. For additional help see the bottom of this page. Documents Found: 4418 Title Keyword LBNL Number Author - Any - Abadie, Marc O Abbey, Chad Abdolrazaghi, Mohamad Aberg, Annika Abhyankar, Nikit Abraham, Marvin M Abshire, James B Abushakra, Bass Acevedo-Ruiz, Manuel Aceves, Salvador Ache, Hans J Ackerly, David D Ackerman, Andrew S Adamkiewicz, Gary Adams, J W Adams, Carl Adamson, Bo Addy, Nathan Addy, Susan E Aden, Nathaniel T Adesola, Bunmi Adhikari,

131

Advanced Combustion  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Systems Systems Advanced Combustion Background Conventional coal-fired power plants utilize steam turbines to generate electricity, which operate at efficiencies of 35-37 percent. Operation at higher temperatures and pressures can lead to higher efficiencies, resulting in reduced fuel consumption and lower greenhouse gas emissions. Higher efficiency also reduces CO2 production for the same amount of energy produced, thereby facilitating a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. When combined, oxy-combustion comes with an efficiency hit, so it will actually increase the amount of CO2 to be captured. But without so much N2 in the flue gas, it will be easier and perhaps more efficient to capture, utilize and sequester. NETL's Advanced Combustion Project and members of the NETL-Regional University

132

SAND TRACER MOVEMENT MEASURED IN A STRONG RIP CURRENT Nicholas C. Kraus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

exceeding 50 cm/sec in areas where instruments could be placed. Three colors of sand tracer were injected the diver's signal, a float tied to the diver's wrist was released and allowed to flow with the current because of the cold water, placed instruments, injected the tracer, and sampled the bottom with ropes tied

US Army Corps of Engineers

133

IAEA-CN-80/66 ISOTOPE TRACERS IN GLOBAL WATER AND CLIMATE STUDIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

comprehensive source of data for evaluating the modern global isotope field generated by atmospheric generalIAEA-CN-80/66 ISOTOPE TRACERS IN GLOBAL WATER AND CLIMATE STUDIES OF THE PAST AND PRESENT T Agency, Wagramer Strasse 5, P.O. Box 100, A-1400 Vienna, AUSTRIA Abstract ISOTOPE TRACERS IN GLOBAL WATER

Edwards, Thomas W.D.

134

Globally synchronous ice core volcanic tracers and abrupt cooling during the last glacial period  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Globally synchronous ice core volcanic tracers and abrupt cooling during the last glacial period R (2006), Globally synchronous ice core volcanic tracers and abrupt cooling during the last glacial period histories from ice coring of Greenland and Antarctica over the period 2 to 45 ka, using SO4 anomalies

Price, P. Buford

135

Stochastic inversion of tracer test and electrical geophysical data to estimate hydraulic conductivities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MonteCarlo (McMC) methodology to jointly invert the dynamic resistivity data, together with borehole tracer heterogeneity with respect to wellbore separation, where flow and transport are largely controlled by highly of drill cores and/or the results of tracer and pumping experiments; however, these techniques are often

Singha, Kamini

136

Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Stimulation in Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Project objectives: identify tracers with sorption properties favorable for EGS applications; apply reversibly sorbing tracers to determine the fracture-matrix interface area available for heat transfer; and; explore the feasibility of obtaining fracture-matrix interface area from non-isothermal; single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) tests.

137

Saline tracer visualized with three-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography: Field-scale spatial moment analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Saline tracer visualized with three-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography: Field; accepted 14 February 2005; published 24 May 2005. [1] Cross-well electrical resistivity tomography (ERT., and S. M. Gorelick (2005), Saline tracer visualized with three-dimensional electrical resistivity

Singha, Kamini

138

Reactive Ion Benjamin A. Small  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(torr) plasma etching reactive ion etching ion milling m cm 100µm µm #12;5 Mechanics ~40 mTorrE380 kHz, 13.56 MHz ~30 sccm #12;6 Chemistry X X X X F- F- F-F- X F-F- F- F- F- R++ R++ R++ #12;7 Chemistry before opening · Silanes are explosive in the atmosphere #12;13 Bibliography Campbell, Stephen A

Garmestani, Hamid

139

Degradation of Vinyl Chloride and 1,2-Dichloroethane by Advanced Reduction Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new treatment technology, called Advanced Reduction Process (ARP), was developed by combining UV irradiation with reducing reagents to produce highly reactive species that degrade contaminants rapidly. Vinyl chloride (VC) and 1,2-dichloroethane (1...

Liu, Xu

2013-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

140

Advanced combustion methods for simultaneous reduction of emissions and fuel consumption of compression ignition engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work, advanced combustion modes i.e. improved low-temperature combustion (LTC) and reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) have been achieved in a diesel engine. LTC mode has been improved us...

P. Brijesh; A. Chowdhury; S. Sreedhara

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Tracer Testing at Dixie Valley, Nevada, Using 2-Naphthalene Sulfonate and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tracer Testing at Dixie Valley, Nevada, Using 2-Naphthalene Sulfonate and Tracer Testing at Dixie Valley, Nevada, Using 2-Naphthalene Sulfonate and 2,7-Naphthalene Disulfonate Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Tracer Testing at Dixie Valley, Nevada, Using 2-Naphthalene Sulfonate and 2,7-Naphthalene Disulfonate Abstract The decay kinetics of the candidate tracers 2-naphthalene sulfonate and 2,7-naphthalenedisulfonate was studied under laboratory conditionsthat simulate a hydrothermal environment, withneither compound exhibiting any decay after oneweek at 330�C. These data indicate that thesecompounds are more thermally stable than any of thepreviously studied polyaromatic sulfonates. Both ofthe tracer candidates were successfully tested in afield study at the Dixie Valley, Nevada, geothermalreservoir. In addition to

142

Tracer Testing At Coso Geothermal Area (2004) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Area (2004) Coso Geothermal Area (2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Tracer Testing Activity Date 2004 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To determine the EGS potential of the Coso Geothermal Field Notes A dramatic decrease in the ratio of chloride to boron was observed in the liquid discharge of a well proposed for EGS development. The decrease appears to be related to the transformation of some feed zones in the well from liquid-dominated to vapor-dominated. High concentrations of boron are transported to the wellbore in the steam, where it fractionates to the liquid phase flowing in from liquid-dominated feed zones. The high-boron steam is created when the reservoir liquid in some of the feed zones boils

143

Low-rank coal research: Volume 2, Advanced research and technology development: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume II contains articles on advanced combustion phenomena, combustion inorganic transformation; coal/char reactivity; liquefaction reactivity of low-rank coals, gasification ash and slag characterization, and fine particulate emissions. These articles have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

Mann, M.D.; Swanson, M.L.; Benson, S.A.; Radonovich, L.; Steadman, E.N.; Sweeny, P.G.; McCollor, D.P.; Kleesattel, D.; Grow, D.; Falcone, S.K.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Reactive composite compositions and mat barriers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hazardous material storage area has a reactive multi-layer composite mat which lines an opening into which a reactive backfill and hazardous material are placed. A water-inhibiting cap may cover the hazardous material storage area. The reactive multi-layer composite mat has a backing onto which is placed an active layer which will neutralize or stabilize hazardous waste and a fronting layer so that the active layer is between the fronting and backing layers. The reactive backfill has a reactive agent which can stabilize or neutralize hazardous material and inhibit the movement of the hazardous material through the hazardous material storage area.

Langton, Christine A. (Aiken, SC); Narasimhan, Rajendran (Evans, GA); Karraker, David G. (Aiken, SC)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Predictions of PuO{sub 2} and tracer compound release from ISV melts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two field tests were conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to assess in situ vitrification (ISV) suitability for long-term stabilization of buried radioactive waste. Both tests contained rare-earth oxide tracers (DY{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Tb{sub 4}O{sub 7}) to simulate the presence of plutonium in the form of PuO{sub 2}. In the first test, Intermediate Field Test (IFT)-l, approximately 4-% release of tracer material occurred during soil melting and associated off-gassing, while essentially nil release was observed for the second experiment (IFT-2) for which off-gassing was much reduced. This report presents an evaluation of the IFT test data in terms of governing release processes. Prediction of tracer release during ISV melting centered on an assessment of three potential transport mechanisms, (a) tracer diffusion through stagnant pool, (b) tracer transport by convective currents, and (c) tracer carry-off by escaping gas bubbles. Analysis indicates that tracer release by escaping gas is the dominant release mechanism, which is consistent with video records of gas bubble escape from the ISV melt surface. Quantitative mass transport predictions were also made for the IFT-I test conditions, indicating similarity between the 4-% release data and calculational results at viscosities of {approx} poise and tracer diffusivities of {approx}10{sub {minus}6} CM{sup 2}/s. Since PuO{sub 2} has similar chemical and transport (diffusivity) properties as the rare-earth tracers used in the rare earth tracers used in the IFT experiments, release of PuO{sub 2} is predicted for similar off-gassing conditions. Reduced off-gassing during ISV would thus be expected to improve the overall retention of heavy-oxides within vitrified soil.

Cronenberg, A.W. [Engineering Science and Analysis, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Callow, R.A. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Predictions of PuO sub 2 and tracer compound release from ISV melts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two field tests were conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to assess in situ vitrification (ISV) suitability for long-term stabilization of buried radioactive waste. Both tests contained rare-earth oxide tracers (DY{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Tb{sub 4}O{sub 7}) to simulate the presence of plutonium in the form of PuO{sub 2}. In the first test, Intermediate Field Test (IFT)-l, approximately 4-% release of tracer material occurred during soil melting and associated off-gassing, while essentially nil release was observed for the second experiment (IFT-2) for which off-gassing was much reduced. This report presents an evaluation of the IFT test data in terms of governing release processes. Prediction of tracer release during ISV melting centered on an assessment of three potential transport mechanisms, (a) tracer diffusion through stagnant pool, (b) tracer transport by convective currents, and (c) tracer carry-off by escaping gas bubbles. Analysis indicates that tracer release by escaping gas is the dominant release mechanism, which is consistent with video records of gas bubble escape from the ISV melt surface. Quantitative mass transport predictions were also made for the IFT-I test conditions, indicating similarity between the 4-% release data and calculational results at viscosities of {approx} poise and tracer diffusivities of {approx}10{sub {minus}6} CM{sup 2}/s. Since PuO{sub 2} has similar chemical and transport (diffusivity) properties as the rare-earth tracers used in the rare earth tracers used in the IFT experiments, release of PuO{sub 2} is predicted for similar off-gassing conditions. Reduced off-gassing during ISV would thus be expected to improve the overall retention of heavy-oxides within vitrified soil.

Cronenberg, A.W. (Engineering Science and Analysis, Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Callow, R.A. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Scienti#12;c Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC-3) Partnership Project Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Applying Computationally Efficient Schemes for BioGeochemical Cycles ACES4BGC Project is advancing the predictive capabilities of Earth System Models (ESMs) by reducing two of the largest sources of uncertainty, aerosols and biospheric feedbacks, with a highly e#14;cient computational approach. In particular, this project is implementing and optimizing new computationally e#14;cient tracer advection algorithms for large numbers of tracer species; adding important biogeochemical interactions between the atmosphere, land, and ocean models; and applying uncertainty quanti#12;cation (UQ) techniques to constrain process parameters and evaluate uncertainties in feedbacks between biogeochemical cycles and the climate system.

Forest M. Hoffman; Pavel B. Bochev; Philip J. Cameron-Smith; Richard C. Easter, Jr.; Scott M. Elliott; Steven J. Ghan; Xiaohong Liu; Robert B. Lowrie; Donald D. Lucas; Po-lun Ma, William J Sacks; Manish Shrivastava; Balwinder Singh; Timothy J. Tautges; Mark A. Taylor; Mariana Vertenstein; Patrick H. Worley; and; Kai Zhang

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

148

Permeable Reactive Barriers | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Permeable Reactive Barriers Permeable Reactive Barriers Permeable Reactive Barriers Permeable Reactive Barrier Field Projects Durango, Colorado DOE installed a PRB in October 1995 to treat ground water from a uranium mill tailings disposal site at Durango, Colorado Read more Cañon City, Colorado ESL personnel conduct tests and help evaluate performance at other PRB sites, such as Cotter Corporation's Cañon City site in Colorado. Read more Monticello, Utah Installation of a PRB hydraulically downgradient of the Monticello, Utah, millsite was completed June 30, 1999, as an Interim Remedial Action. Read more A permeable reactive barrier (PRB) is a zone of reactive material placed underground to intercept and react with a contaminant plume in ground water. Typically, PRBs are emplaced by replacing soils with reactive

149

Reactive capability limits of wind farms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wind Energy Conversion Systems (WECS) technology can be classified into two main types: fixed speed and variable speed. Fixed speed WECS use an induction generator connected directly to the grid while variable speed WECS use a power converter to connect the generator to the grid. Fixed speed WECS require shunt capacitors for reactive power compensation, while variable speed WECS have reactive power capability. Under the Spanish grid code, wind farms have to operate in a range of power factor values. This paper determines the reactive power capability of wind farms equipped with both fixed and variable speed WECS. The reactive power capability can be represented as a reactive capability curve. In this paper, the reactive capability curve is used to calculate the additional reactive power compensation needed to meet the requirements of the Spanish grid code.

Alberto Rios Villacorta; Santiago Arnaltes Gomez; Jose Luis Rodriguez-Amenedo

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Advanced Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ductility EnhancEmEnt of molybDEnum Ductility EnhancEmEnt of molybDEnum PhasE by nano-sizED oxiDE DisPErsions Description Using computational modeling techniques, this research aims to develop predictive capabilities to facilitate the design and optimization of molybdenum (Mo), chromium (Cr), and other high-temperature structural materials to enable these materials to withstand the harsh environments of advanced power generation systems, such as gasification-based systems. These types of materials are essential to the development of highly efficient, clean energy technologies such as low-emission power systems that use coal or other fossil fuels.

151

Advanced Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Super HigH-TemperaTure alloyS and Super HigH-TemperaTure alloyS and CompoSiTeS From nb-W-Cr SySTemS Description The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (DOE-FE) has awarded a three-year grant to the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to jointly explore the high-temperature properties of alloys composed of niobium (Nb), tungsten (W), and chromium (Cr). The grant is administered by the Advanced Research (AR) program of the National

152

Mission Advancing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NETL Accomplishments NETL Accomplishments - the lab 2 Mission Advancing energy options to fuel our economy, strengthen our security, and improve our environment. Renewed Prosperity Through Technological Innovation - Letter from the Director NETL: the ENERGY lab 4 6 3 Contents Technology Transfer Patents and Commercialization Sharing Our Expertise Noteworthy Publications 60 62 63 64 66 Environment, Economy, & Supply Carbon Capture and Storage Partnerships Work to Reduce Atmospheric CO 2 Demand-Side Efficiencies New NETL Facility Showcases Green Technologies Environment & Economy Materials Mercury Membranes NETL Education Program Produces Significant Achievement Monitoring Water Economy & Supply NETL's Natural Gas Prediction Tool Aids Hurricane Recovery Energy Infrastructure

153

Probing Material Reactivity Using X-ray Pair Distribution Function Methods  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Material Reactivity Using X-ray Pair Distribution Material Reactivity Using X-ray Pair Distribution Function Methods Karena W. Chapman X-ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439, USA Understanding how advanced functional materials react and transform, at an atomic scale, is a characterization challenge with many diverse phenomena possible; components with varying particle size, morphology, and microstructure can evolve from multi-atom clusters to multi-million atom crystals. The pair distribution function (PDF) method shows great promise for providing quantitative insight such reactions. Recent advances in experimental methods, have improved the efficiency of X-ray PDF measurements, to allow time-resolved experiments with sufficient resolution to study reactions in solid

154

Advanced Vehicle Testing & Evaluation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Provide benchmark data for advanced technology vehicles Develop lifecycle cost data for production vehicles utilizing advanced power trains Provide fleet...

155

Advanced LIGO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are second generation instruments designed and built for the two LIGO observatories in Hanford, WA and Livingston, LA. The two instruments are identical in design, and are specialized versions of a Michelson interferometer with 4 km long arms. As in initial LIGO, Fabry-Perot cavities are used in the arms to increase the interaction time with a gravitational wave, and power recycling is used to increase the effective laser power. Signal recycling has been added in Advanced LIGO to improve the frequency response. In the most sensitive frequency region around 100 Hz, the design strain sensitivity is a factor of 10 better than initial LIGO. In addition, the low frequency end of the sensitivity band is moved from 40 Hz down to 10 Hz. All interferometer components have been replaced with improved technologies to achieve this sensitivity gain. Much better seismic isolation and test mass suspensions are responsible for the gains at lower frequencies. Higher laser power, larger test masses and improved mirror coatings lead to the improved sensitivity at mid- and high- frequencies. Data collecting runs with these new instruments are planned to begin in mid-2015.

The LIGO Scientific Collaboration

2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

156

Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas concentration Title Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas concentration Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2007 Authors Lorenzetti, David M., Astrid H. Kristoffersen, and Ashok J. Gadgil Journal Indoor Air Pagination 7 Keywords recirculating ventilation, tracer decay rate Abstract Tracer gas measurements are used to estimate the flow rate of fresh air into a room or building. These methods commonly account for the decay of tracer gas concentration as the result of ventilation air supply and infiltration, using a well-mixed model of the space. Some researchers also have considered the effect of leakage in the ventilation ductwork. This paper considers the effect of recirculation through ventilation ducts on the calculated fresh air supply rate. Transport delay in the ducts can significantly alter the time evolution of tracer concentration, and hence alter the estimated air change rate.

157

Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas Title Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2004 Authors Kristoffersen, Astrid H., Ashok J. Gadgil, and David M. Lorenzetti Conference Name 9th International Conference on Air Distribution in Rooms - RoomVent 2004, Pagination pp 6 Date Published September 5-8, 2 Conference Location Coimbra, Portugal Abstract Tracer gas measurements are commonly used to estimate the fresh air exchange rate in a room or building. Published tracer decay methods account for fresh air supply, infiltration, and leaks in ductwork. However, the time delay associated with a ventilation system recirculating tracer back to the room also affects the decay rate. We present an analytical study of tracer gas decay in a well-mixed, mechanically-ventilated room with recirculation. The analysis shows that failing to account for delays can lead to under- or over-estimates of the fresh air supply, depending on whether the decay rate calculation includes the duct volume

158

Layered reactive particles with controlled geometries, energies, and reactivities, and methods for making the same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An energetic composite having a plurality of reactive particles each having a reactive multilayer construction formed by successively depositing reactive layers on a rod-shaped substrate having a longitudinal axis, dividing the reactive-layer-deposited rod-shaped substrate into a plurality of substantially uniform longitudinal segments, and removing the rod-shaped substrate from the longitudinal segments, so that the reactive particles have a controlled, substantially uniform, cylindrically curved or otherwise rod-contoured geometry which facilitates handling and improves its packing fraction, while the reactant multilayer construction controls the stability, reactivity and energy density of the energetic composite.

Fritz, Gregory M; Knepper, Robert Allen; Weihs, Timothy P; Gash, Alexander E; Sze, John S

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

159

Predictions of tracer transport in interwell tracer tests at the C-Hole complex. Yucca Mountain site characterization project report milestone 4077  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents predictions of tracer transport in interwell tracer tests that are to be conducted at the C-Hole complex at the Nevada Test Site on behalf of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. The predictions are used to make specific recommendations about the manner in which the tracer test should be conducted to best satisfy the needs of the Project. The objective of he tracer tests is to study flow and species transport under saturated conditions in the fractured tuffs near Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the site of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository. The potential repository will be located in the unsaturated zone within Yucca Mountain. The saturated zone beneath and around the mountain represents the final barrier to transport to the accessible environment that radionuclides will encounter if they breach the engineered barriers within the repository and the barriers to flow and transport provided by the unsaturated zone. Background information on the C-Holes is provided in Section 1.1, and the planned tracer testing program is discussed in Section 1.2.

Reimus, P.W.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Tracers for monitoring the activity of sodium/glucose cotransporters in health and disease  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Radiolabeled tracers for sodium/glucose cotransporters (SGLTs), their synthesis, and their use are provided. The tracers are methyl or ethyl pyranosides having an equatorial hydroxyl group at carbon-2 and a C 1 preferred conformation, radiolabeled with .sup.18F, .sup.123I, or .sup.124I, or free hexoses radiolabeled with .sup.18F, .sup.123I, or .sup.124. Also provided are in vivo and in vitro techniques for using these and other tracers as analytical and diagnostic tools to study glucose transport, in health and disease, and to evaluate therapeutic interventions.

Wright, Ernest M; Barrio, Jorge R; Hirayama, Bruce A; Kepe, Vladimir

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Advanced Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

05/2007 05/2007 NitrogeN evolutioN aNd CorrosioN MeChaNisMs With oxyCoMbustioN of Coal Description Under a grant from the University Coal Research (UCR) program, Brigham Young University (BYU) is leading a three-year research effort to investigate the physical processes that several common types of coal undergo during oxy-fuel combustion. Specifically, research addresses the mixture of gases emitted from burning, particularly such pollutants as nitrogen oxides (NO X ) and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), and the potential for corrosion at the various stages of combustion. The UCR program is administered by the Advanced Research Program at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), under the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of

162

Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical Flushing  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Final Report:Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical Flushing,U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 8 Support.August 2004

163

Exploring the reactivity of bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 1. Introduction: The Reactivity of Bacterial Multicomponent Monooxygenases Bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases constitute a remarkable family of enzymes that oxidize small, inert hydrocarbon substrates using ...

Tinberg, Christine Elaine

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Project definition study for the National Biomedical Tracer Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) has conducted a study of the proposed National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF). In collaboration with General Atomics, RUST International, Coleman Research Corporation (CRC), IsoMed, Ernst and Young and the advisory committees, they have examined the issues relevant to the NBTF in terms of facility design, operating philosophy, and a business plan. They have utilized resources within UAB, CRC and Chem-Nuclear to develop recommendations on environmental, safety and health issues. The Institute of Medicine Panel`s Report on Isotopes for Medicine and the Life Sciences took the results of prior workshops further in developing recommendations for the mission of the NBTF. The IOM panel recommends that the NBTF accelerator have the capacity to accelerate protons to 80 MeV and a minimum of 750 microamperes of current. The panel declined to recommend a cyclotron or a linac. They emphasized a clear focus on research and development for isotope production including target design, separation chemistry and generator development. The facility needs to emphasize education and training in its mission. The facility must focus on radionuclide production for the research and clinical communities. The formation of a public-private partnership resembling the TRIUMF-Nordion model was encouraged. An advisory panel should assist with the NBTF operations and prioritization.

Roozen, K.

1995-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

165

Tracer diffusion in compacted, water-saturated bentonite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Compacted Na-bentonite clay barriers, widely used in theisolation of solid-waste landfills and other contaminated sites, havebeen proposed for a similar use in the disposal of high-level radioactivewaste. Molecular diffusion through the pore space in these barriers playsa key role in their performance, thus motivating recent measurements ofthe apparent diffusion coefficient tensor of water tracers in compacted,water-saturated Na-bentonites. In the present study, we introduce aconceptual model in which the pore space of water-saturated bentonite isdivided into 'macropore' and 'interlayer nanopore' compartments. Withthis model we determine quantitatively the relative contributions ofpore-network geometry (expressed as a geometric factor) and of thediffusive behavior of water molecules near montmorillonite basal surfaces(expressed as a contristivity factor) to the apparent diffusioncoefficient tensor. Our model predicts, in agreement with experiment,that the mean principal value of the apparent diffusion coefficienttensor follows a single relationship when plotted against the partialmontmorillonite dry density (mass of montmorillonite per combined volumeof montmorillonite and pore space). Using a single fitted parameter, themean principal geometric factor, our model successfully describes thisrelationship for a broad range of bentonite-water system, from dilute gelto highly-compacted bentonite with 80 percent of its pore water ininterlayer nanopores.

Bourg, Ian C.; Sposito, Garrison; Bourg, Alain C.M.

2005-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

166

Method for reactivating catalysts and a method for recycling supercritical fluids used to reactivate the catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of reactivating a catalyst, such as a solid catalyst or a liquid catalyst. The method comprises providing a catalyst that is at least partially deactivated by fouling agents. The catalyst is contacted with a fluid reactivating agent that is at or above a critical point of the fluid reactivating agent and is of sufficient density to dissolve impurities. The fluid reactivating agent reacts with at least one fouling agent, releasing the at least one fouling agent from the catalyst. The at least one fouling agent becomes dissolved in the fluid reactivating agent and is subsequently separated or removed from the fluid reactivating agent so that the fluid reactivating agent may be reused. A system for reactivating a catalyst is also disclosed.

Ginosar, Daniel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Thompson, David N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Anderson, Raymond P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

167

Simulation of single well tracer tests for surfactantpolymer flooding  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A single well tracer test (SWTT) is a method to investigate the residual oil saturation near the wellbore. It presents an important tool to evaluate enhanced oil recovery (EOR) processes. For EOR evaluation, ...

Peter X. Bu; Abdulkareem M. AlSofi; Jim Liu

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Wintertime Dispersion in a Mountainous Basin at Roanoke, Virginia: Tracer Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During January 1989, five nighttime SF6 tracer experiments were conducted in Roanoke, Virginia. The experiments were designed to help identify and understand the dispersion characteristics of a basin atmosphere during winter stagnation ...

K. Jerry Allwine; Brian K. Lamb; Robert Eskridge

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Glass mixing theory and tracer study results from the SF-10 run  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A general, partial differential equation governing glass mixing in the Slurry Fed Ceramic Melter (SFCM) was derived and a solution obtained based upon certain simplifying assumptions. Tracer studies were then conducted in the SFCM during the SF-10 run to test the theory and characterize glass mixing in this melter. Analysis of the tracer data shows that glass mixing in the SFCM can be explained by use of a model of two, well-mixed tanks in series.

Bowman, B.W.; Routt, K.R.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Utility of Bromide and Heat Tracers for Aquifer Characterization Affected by Highly Transient Flow Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A tracer test using both bromide and heat tracers conducted at the Integrated Field Research Challenge site in Hanford 300 Area (300A), Washington, provided an instrument for evaluating the utility of bromide and heat tracers for aquifer characterization. The bromide tracer data were critical to improving the calibration of the flow model complicated by the highly dynamic nature of the flow field. However, most bromide concentrations were obtained from fully screened observation wells, lacking depth-specific resolution for vertical characterization. On the other hand, depth-specific temperature data were relatively simple and inexpensive to acquire. However, temperature-driven fluid density effects influenced heat plume movement. Moreover, the temperature data contained noise caused by heating during fluid injection and sampling events. Using the hydraulic conductivity distribution obtained from the calibration of the bromide transport model, the temperature depth profiles and arrival times of temperature peaks simulated by the heat transport model were in reasonable agreement with observations. This suggested that heat can be used as a cost-effective proxy for solute tracers for calibration of the hydraulic conductivity distribution, especially in the vertical direction. However, a heat tracer test must be carefully designed and executed to minimize fluid density effects and sources of noise in temperature data. A sensitivity analysis also revealed that heat transport was most sensitive to hydraulic conductivity and porosity, less sensitive to thermal distribution factor, and least sensitive to thermal dispersion and heat conduction. This indicated that the hydraulic conductivity remains the primary calibration parameter for heat transport.

Ma, Rui; Zheng, Chunmiao; Zachara, John M.; Tonkin, Matthew J.

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

171

Reactivity of calcium sulfate from FBC systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A relative estimate of the reactivity of calcium sulfate in a number of coal combustion ash samples was obtained, using the rate of solution in water as a parameter. Measurements were also performed on standard samples of calcium sulfate prepared in different ways, for comparison. The temperature of previous treatment appeared as the most important factor determining the reactivity of CaSO4; the grain size distribution was less important, and the duration of heating (even to 105 days) had very little influence. No correlation between specific surface of ash samples and their reactivity was apparent. Calcium sulfate in FBC ash samples was much more reactive than that contained in high-temperature ashes, and than calcium sulfate heated, alone or with various additions, at 850C for 2 days. Of the six FBC samples tested, five showed similar behaviour, including a sample from a pressurized system; only a deposit from 96 days operation of an industrial CFBC boiler burning petroleum coke showed considerably less reactivity. Surprisingly, CaSO4 from two FBC samples placed in an oven for 60 days under sulfating conditions showed a very similar rate of solution to that of the other FBC samples, while a third sample kept in the oven for 105 days also showed no decrease in reactivity. Only when one of these samples had agglomerated (which occurred between 60 and 105 days) did it show decreased reactivity, suggesting that the agglomeration process rather than duration is significant in promoting sintering and reducing the sulfate reactivity.

Agripanea P. Iribarne; Julio V. Iribarne; Edward J. Anthony

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Advanced gray rod control assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An advanced gray rod control assembly (GRCA) for a nuclear reactor. The GRCA provides controlled insertion of gray rod assemblies into the reactor, thereby controlling the rate of power produced by the reactor and providing reactivity control at full power. Each gray rod assembly includes an elongated tubular member, a primary neutron-absorber disposed within the tubular member said neutron-absorber comprising an absorber material, preferably tungsten, having a 2200 m/s neutron absorption microscopic capture cross-section of from 10 to 30 barns. An internal support tube can be positioned between the primary absorber and the tubular member as a secondary absorber to enhance neutron absorption, absorber depletion, assembly weight, and assembly heat transfer characteristics.

Drudy, Keith J; Carlson, William R; Conner, Michael E; Goldenfield, Mark; Hone, Michael J; Long, Jr., Carroll J; Parkinson, Jerod; Pomirleanu, Radu O

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

173

Advanced Editor Usage Advanced Editor Usage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced Editor Usage Advanced Editor Usage Log in and click the edit icon How to navigate of the events will seek the video to where that event starts Page 1 of 11 #12;Advanced Editor Usage How Editor Usage 3. Type in the new caption name, enter any searchable metadata and click OK (the thumbnail

Benos, Panayiotis "Takis"

174

Validation of ATR SINDA using SPERT-3 reactivity-initiated transient test data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal-hydraulic analyses of Special Power Excursion Reactor Test-3 (SPERT-3) reactivity-initiated accident (RIA) test data are presented to validate ATR SINDA, a three-dimensional thermal-hydraulic computer code used to conduct transient analysis of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) fuel plates. Because SPERT-3-C core test results are the only existing data of reactivity insertions for plate-type reactors, validating ATR SINDA is important for safety analysis of postulated reactivity initiated accidents (RIAs) for the plate-type ATR operated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The SPERT-3 facility was designed to study the kinetic behavior and safety of pressurized, light water-moderated reactors.

Oh, C.H.; Ambrosek, R.G.; Wadkins, R.P. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Chemistry & Physics at Interfaces | Advanced Materials | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oxide Interfaces Chemical Imaging Grain Boundaries Related Research Materials Synthesis from Atoms to Systems Materials Characterization Materials Theory and Simulation Energy Frontier Research Centers Advanced Materials Home | Science & Discovery | Advanced Materials | Research Areas | Chemistry and Physics at Interfaces SHARE Chemistry and Physics at Interfaces Chemical transformations and physical phenomena at gas, liquid and solid interfaces lie at the heart of today's energy technologies. They underpin ORNL's research strategies to deliver scientific discoveries and technical breakthroughs that will accelerate the development and deployment of solutions in clean energy. Understanding, predicting and controlling the structure, transport and reactivity at interfaces will lead to advances in

176

Advanced Manufacturing Office Overview  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Overview presentation by the Advanced Manufacturing Office for the Microwave (MW) and Radio Frequency (RF) as Enabling Technologies for Advanced Manufacturing

177

In Situ Reactivity and TOF SIMS Analysis of Surfaces Prepared...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reactivity and TOF SIMS Analysis of Surfaces Prepared by Soft and Reactive Landing of Mass Selected Ions. In Situ Reactivity and TOF SIMS Analysis of Surfaces Prepared by Soft and...

178

Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing More Documents & Publications Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical Flushing Final Report - Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical

179

Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update More Documents & Publications Variation in Hydraulic Conductivity Over Time at the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium

180

Characterization of Dual-Fuel Reactivity Controlled Compression...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Dual-Fuel Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) Using Hydrated Ethanol and Diesel Fuel Characterization of Dual-Fuel Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI)...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Laboratory testing and modeling to evaluate perfluorocarbon compounds as tracers in geothermal systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermal stability and adsorption characteristics of three perfluorinated hydrocarbon compounds were evaluated under geothermal conditions to determine the potential to use these compounds as conservative or thermally-degrading tracers in Engineered (or Enhanced) Geothermal Systems (EGS). The three compounds tested were perfluorodimethyl-cyclobutane (PDCB), perfluoromethylcyclohexane (PMCH), and perfluorotrimethylcyclohexane (PTCH), which are collectively referred to as perfluorinated tracers, or PFTs. Two sets of duplicate tests were conducted in batch mode in gold-bag reactors, with one pair of reactors charged with a synthetic geothermal brine containing the PFTs and a second pair was charged with the brine-PFT mixture plus a mineral assemblage chosen to be representative of activated fractures in an EGS reservoir. A fifth reactor was charged with deionized water containing the three PFTs. The experiments were conducted at {approx}100 bar, with temperatures ranging from 230 C to 300 C. Semi-analytical and numerical modeling was also conducted to show how the PFTs could be used in conjunction with other tracers to interrogate surface area to volume ratios and temperature profiles in EGS reservoirs. Both single-well and cross-hole tracer tests are simulated to illustrate how different suites of tracers could be used to accomplish these objectives. The single-well tests are especially attractive for EGS applications because they allow the effectiveness of a stimulation to be evaluated without drilling a second well.

Reimus, Paul W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

182

Production and acceleration of tracer encapsulated solid pellets for particle transport diagnostics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new method for producing a tracer-encapsulated solid pellet (TESPEL) has been developed for a local deposition of the tracer ions in the core plasma and an accurate measurement of the particle transport. The method allows manufacturing of TESPELs in the form of polystyrene shells containing lithium hydride inside as a tracer. The TESPEL acceleration has been successfully performed and photos of the pellets in flight confirmed the TESPEL integrity. For the pellets with diameter 300400 ? m and wall thickness 4050 ? m the pellet fragility becomes insignificant. Calculation of the TESPEL ablation rate has showed that the achieved pellet velocities and sizes are appropriate for the injection into a medium size plasma. It was proposed to fractionate the tracer contents in order to provide better localization of the deposited tracer ions in the plasma. The data obtained in these experiments have proved that injection of the TESPEL made from the plastic shells can be a promising tool for the particle transport diagnostics.

K. V. Khlopenkov; S. Sudo

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Consideration of spatial effects in reactivity measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various methods of considering spatial effects in reactivity measurements are presented. These methods are employed both at the critical (mainly fast-neutron) facilities and at the BN-600 reactor.

Matveenko, I. P., E-mail: matveenko@ippe.ru; Lititskii, V. A.; Shokod'ko, A. G. [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (Russian Federation)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

184

Systematic approach for chemical reactivity evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Screening Tool (RSST) and the Automatic Pressure Tracking Adiabatic Calorimeter (APTAC) were employed to evaluate the reactive systems experimentally. The RSST detected exothermic behavior and measured the overall liberated energy. The APTAC simulated...

Aldeeb, Abdulrehman Ahmed

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

185

Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor comprises supports stacked above reactor core for holding control rods. Couplers associated with the supports and a vertically movable drive shaft have lugs at their lower ends for engagement with the supports.

Bollinger, Lawrence R. (Schenectady, NY)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Fossil plant layup and reactivation conference: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fossil Plant Layup and Reactivation Conference was held in New Orleans, Louisiana on April 14--15, 1992. The Conference was sponsored by EPRI and hosted by Entergy Services, Inc. to bring together representatives from utilities, consulting firms, manufacturers and architectural engineers. Eighteen papers were presented in three sessions. These sessions were devoted to layup procedures and practices, and reactivation case studies. A panel discussion was held on the second day to interactively discuss layup and reactivation issues. More than 80 people attended the Conference. This report contains technical papers and a summary of the panel discussion. Of the eighteen papers, three are related to general, one is related to regulatory issues, three are related to specific equipment, four are related to layup procedures and practices, and seven are layup and reactivation case studies.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Groundwater well with reactive filter pack  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for the remediation of contaminated soil and ground water wherein a reactive pack material is added to the annular fill material utilized in standard well construction techniques.

Gilmore, Tyler J. (Pasco, WA); Holdren, Jr., George R. (Kennewick, WA); Kaplan, Daniel I. (Richland, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Groundwater well with reactive filter pack  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus are disclosed for the remediation of contaminated soil and ground water wherein a reactive pack material is added to the annular fill material utilized in standard well construction techniques. 3 figs.

Gilmore, T.J.; Holdren, G.R. Jr.; Kaplan, D.I.

1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

189

A Tariff for Reactive Power - IEEE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a suggested tariff or payment for the local supply of reactive power from distributed energy resources. The authors consider four sample customers, and estimate the cost of supply of reactive power for each customer. The power system savings from the local supply of reactive power are also estimated for a hypothetical circuit. It is found that reactive power for local voltage regulation could be supplied to the distribution system economically by customers when new inverters are installed. The inverter would be supplied with a power factor of 0.8, and would be capable of local voltage regulation to a schedule supplied by the utility. Inverters are now installed with photovoltaic systems, fuel cells and microturbines, and adjustable-speed motor drives.

Kueck, John D [ORNL; Tufon, Christopher [Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Isemonger, Alan [California Independent System Operator; Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Reactive Attachment Disorder: Concepts, Treatment, and Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reactive Attachment Disorder (RAD) is a disorder characterized by controversy, both with respect to its definition and its treatment. By definition, the RAD diagnosis attempts to characterize and explain the origin of ...

Walter, Uta M.; Petr, Chris

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

USE OF NATURALLY-OCCURRING TRACERS TO MONITOR TWO-PHASE CONDITIONS IN THE  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NATURALLY-OCCURRING TRACERS TO MONITOR TWO-PHASE CONDITIONS IN THE NATURALLY-OCCURRING TRACERS TO MONITOR TWO-PHASE CONDITIONS IN THE COSO EGS PROJECT Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: USE OF NATURALLY-OCCURRING TRACERS TO MONITOR TWO-PHASE CONDITIONS IN THE COSO EGS PROJECT Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A dramatic decrease in the ratio of chloride to boron was observed in the liquid discharge of a well proposed for EGS development in the Coso geothermal field. The decrease appears to be related to the transformation of some feed zones in the well from liquid-dominated to vapor-dominated. High concentrations of boron are transported to the wellbore in the steam, where it fractionates to the liquid phase flowing in from liquid-dominated feed zones. The high-boron steam is created when the

192

Enthalpy and mass flowrate measurements for two-phase geothermal production by Tracer dilution techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new technique has been developed for the measurement of steam mass flowrate, water mass flowrate and total enthalpy of two-phase fluids produced from geothermal wells. The method involves precisely metered injection of liquid and vapor phase tracers into the two-phase production pipeline and concurrent sampling of each phase downstream of the injection point. Subsequent chemical analysis of the steam and water samples for tracer content enables the calculation of mass flowrate for each phase given the known mass injection rates of tracer. This technique has now been used extensively at the Coso geothermal project, owned and operated by California Energy Company. Initial validation of the method was performed at the Roosevelt Hot Springs geothermal project on wells producing to individual production separators equipped with orificeplate flowmeters for each phase.

Hirtz, Paul; Lovekin, Jim; Copp, John; Buck, Cliff; Adams, Mike

1993-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

193

A comprehensive study of the analysis and economic benefits of radioactive tracer engineered simulation procedures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydraulic Fracturing is an important technology to enhance production from tight gas reservoirs. Several techniques have been utilized to attempt to evaluate the effectiveness of hydraulic fracturing treatments. One technique, radioactive tracers, is currently used on over 15 % of the stimulation treatments performed in the U.S. With proper materials, design, and execution, tracers can be used to locate the presence and concentration of proppant at the wellbore in order to evaluate vertical and radial proppant distribution. A comprehensive study of over 100 fracture treatments has been completed in which radioactive tracers were used along with production logs, stress logs, post-fracturing completion reports, and production history to analyze completion effectiveness in four different reservoirs. Additionally, an economic benefit model was constructed to evaluate the benefit/cost ratio of applying the technology.

Fisher, K.; Robinson, B.M.; Voneiff, G.W.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

194

The Elemental Composition of High-Energy Cosmic Rays: Measurements with TRACER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TRACER ('Transition Radiation Array for Cosmic Energetic Radiation') is a balloon borne instrument that has been developed to directly measure the composition and energy spectra of individual heavy elements up to 10^15 eV per particle. TRACER achieves a large geometric factor (5 m^2 sr) through the use of a Transition Radiation Detector utilizing arrays of single wire proportional tubes. TRACER has measured the energy spectra of the elements O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ar, Ca, and Fe. The energy spectra reach energies in excess of 10^14 eV per particle and exhibit nearly the same spectral index (2.65 +/- 0.05) for all elements.

P. J. Boyle

2008-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

195

Interpretations of Tracer Tests Performed in the Culebra Dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides (1) an overview of all tracer testing conducted in the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WPP) site, (2) a detailed description of the important information about the 1995-96 tracer tests and the current interpretations of the data, and (3) a summary of the knowledge gained to date through tracer testing in the Culebra. Tracer tests have been used to identify transport processes occurring within the Culebra and quantify relevant parameters for use in performance assessment of the WIPP. The data, especially those from the tests performed in 1995-96, provide valuable insight into transport processes within the Culebra. Interpretations of the tracer tests in combination with geologic information, hydraulic-test information, and laboratory studies have resulted in a greatly improved conceptual model of transport processes within the Culebra. At locations where the transmissivity of the Culebra is low (< 4 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s), we conceptualize the Culebra as a single-porosity medium in which advection occurs largely through the primary porosity of the dolomite matrix. At locations where the transmissivity of the Culebra is high (> 4 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s), we conceptualize the Culebra as a heterogeneous, layered, fractured medium in which advection occurs largely through fractures and solutes diffuse between fractures and matrix at multiple rates. The variations in diffusion rate can be attributed to both variations in fracture spacing (or the spacing of advective pathways) and matrix heterogeneity. Flow and transport appear to be concentrated in the lower Culebra. At all locations, diffusion is the dominant transport process in the portions of the matrix that tracer does not access by flow.

MEIGS,LUCY C.; BEAUHEIM,RICHARD L.; JONES,TOYA L.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing U. S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 8 Support January 2004 Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing More Documents & Publications Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical Flushing

197

Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update More Documents & Publications Variation in Hydraulic Conductivity Over Time at the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium

198

Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing More Documents & Publications Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Final Report - Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical Flushing, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 8 Support

199

Advanced Critical Advanced Energy Retrofit Education and Training...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Critical Advanced Energy Retrofit Education and Training and Credentialing - 2014 BTO Peer Review Advanced Critical Advanced Energy Retrofit Education and Training and...

200

Chemical Imaging and Dynamical Studies of Reactivity and Emergent Behavior in Complex Interfacial Systems. Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research program explored the efficacy of using molecular-level manipulation, imaging and scanning tunneling spectroscopy in conjunction with supersonic molecular beam gas-surface scattering to significantly enhance our understanding of chemical processes occurring on well-characterized interfaces. One program focus was on the spatially-resolved emergent behavior of complex reaction systems as a function of the local geometry and density of adsorbate-substrate systems under reaction conditions. Another focus was on elucidating the emergent electronic and related reactivity characteristics of intentionally constructed single and multicomponent atom- and nanoparticle-based materials. We also examined emergent chirality and self-organization in adsorbed molecular systems where collective interactions between adsorbates and the supporting interface lead to spatial symmetry breaking. In many of these studies we combined the advantages of scanning tunneling (STM) and atomic force (AFM) imaging, scanning tunneling local electronic spectroscopy (STS), and reactive supersonic molecular beams to elucidate precise details of interfacial reactivity that had not been observed by more traditional surface science methods. Using these methods, it was possible to examine, for example, the differential reactivity of molecules adsorbed at different bonding sites in conjunction with how reactivity is modified by the local configuration of nearby adsorbates. At the core of this effort was the goal of significantly extending our understanding of interfacial atomic-scale interactions to create, with intent, molecular assemblies and materials with advanced chemical and physical properties. This ambitious program addressed several key topics in DOE Grand Challenge Science, including emergent chemical and physical properties in condensed phase systems, novel uses of chemical imaging, and the development of advanced reactivity concepts in combustion and catalysis including carbon management. These activities directly benefitted national science objectives in the areas of chemical energy production and advanced materials development.

Sibener, Steven J. [University of Chicago, IL (United States)] [University of Chicago, IL (United States)

2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

AdvAnced  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AdvAnced test reActor At the InL advanced Unlike large, commercial power reactors, ATR is a low- temperature, low-pressure reactor. A nuclear reactor is basically an elaborate...

202

Using Thermally-Degrading, Partitioning, and Nonreactive Tracers to Determine Temperature Distribution and Fracture/Heat Transfer Surface Area in Geothermal Reservoirs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Project Summary. The goal of this project is to provide integrated tracer and tracer interpretation tools to facilitate quantitative characterization of temperature distributions and surface area available for heat transfer in EGS.

203

Project EARTH-14-SHELLDP1: Developing Metal Isotope Tracers for Understanding Sediment Depositional Environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project EARTH-14-SHELLDP1: Developing Metal Isotope Tracers for Understanding Sediment Depositional and the mechanisms behind temporal and spatial variations in organic matter quantity and quality. The project work will involve becoming proficient in clean room procedures, chemical separation techniques

Henderson, Gideon

204

Lignin biomarkers as tracers of mercury sources in lakes water column  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lignin biomarkers as tracers of mercury sources in lakes water column Jean-Franc¸ois Ouellet ? Marc the autochthonous from the allochthonous organic matter (OM), lignin derived biomarker signa- tures [Lambda, S/V, C/V, P/(V ? S), 3,5-Bd/V and (Ad/Al)v] were used. Since lignin is exclusively produced by terrigenous

Long, Bernard

205

USING LIDAR TO MEASURE PERFLUOROCARBON TRACERS FOR THE VERIFICATION AND MONITORING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

USING LIDAR TO MEASURE PERFLUOROCARBON TRACERS FOR THE VERIFICATION AND MONITORING OF CAP AND COVER to detect PMCH (perfluoromethylcyclohexane, one of a group of PFTs used at BNL). Laboratory measurements then measured down to 1 ppb-m. These results are very promising and show great potential for monitoring

206

New Tracers Identify Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids and Accidental Releases from Oil and Gas Operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New Tracers Identify Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids and Accidental Releases from Oil and Gas fingerprints of fluids that return to the surface after high volume hydraulic fracturing of unconventional oil the hydraulic fracturing process, resulting in the relative enrichment of boron and lithium in HFFF

Jackson, Robert B.

207

Physical causes and modeling challenges of anomalous diffusion of sediment tracers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physical causes and modeling challenges of anomalous diffusion of sediment tracers Douglas Jerolmack Earth & Environmental Science, UPenn [sediment@sas.upenn.edu] "Bridging the Gap", Princeton U., 2" describable by: 1. Particle volume, v [L3 ]. 2.Average velocity, us , of bed load sediment [L/T]. 3. Surface

208

Ca and 87/86 Sr isotopes as tracers of silicate weathering in small  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

44/40 Ca and 87/86 Sr isotopes as tracers of silicate weathering in small catchments of the Massif, Laboratory Division, Orléans, France 2 U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Menlo Park, CA 94025).Measurements of 44/40 Ca isotope ratios (44/40 Ca measured by the double spike method on TIMS and normalized

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

209

Evaluating the ability of a numerical weather prediction model to forecast tracer concentrations during ETEX 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluating the ability of a numerical weather prediction model to forecast tracer concentrations an operational numerical weather prediction model to forecast air quality are also investigated. These potential a numerical weather prediction (NWP) model independently of the CTM. The NWP output is typically archived

Dacre, Helen

210

Dynamic Reservoir Characterization Of Naturally Fractured Reservoirs From An Inter-Well Tracer Test  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-spot pattern and breakthrough time of the injected tracer. Once the model became capable of matching historical field production, a 1-year prediction run was conducted for optimization. Cumulative oil production was increased by 8,000 bbl by allocating more...

Kilicaslan, Ufuk

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

211

An Improved Gas Chromatographic Method for the Determination of Perfluorocarbon Tracers in the Atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......U.S. Department of Energy, New York, New York...U.S. Department of Energy, New York, New York...quantity, hence the cost, of the tracer required...experiments in the geysers geothermal area. RH. Gudiksen...U. S. Department of Energy, New York, NY(1991......

Raymond J. Lagomarsino

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Seasonal Variation in Monthly Average Air Change Rates Using Passive Tracer Gas Measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of indoor air pollution sources. Concurrently, great efforts are made to make buildings energy efficient 1970s, while less attention has been paid to IAQ. Insufficient venting of indoor air pollutantsSeasonal Variation in Monthly Average Air Change Rates Using Passive Tracer Gas Measurements Marie

Hansen, René Rydhof

213

Analysis of tracer responses in the BULLION Forced-Gradient Experiment at Pahute Mesa, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents an analysis of the tracer data from the BULLION forced-gradient experiment (FGE) conducted on Pahute Mesa at the Nevada Test Site from June 2, 1997 through August 28, 1997, for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Program. It also serves to document the polystyrene microsphere data from the FGE. The FGE involved the injection of solute and colloid tracers into wells ER-20-6 No. 1 and ER-20-6 No. 2 while ER-20-6 No. 3 was pumped at approximately 116 gallons per minute (gpm). The experimental configuration and test design are described briefly in this report; more details are provided elsewhere (IT, 1996, 1997, 1998). The tracer responses in the various wells yielded valuable information about transport processes such as longitudinal dispersion, matrix diffusion and colloid transport in the hydrogeologic system in the vicinity of the BULLION nuclear test cavity. Parameter values describing these processes are derived from the semi-analytical model interpretations presented in this report. A companion report (IT, 1998) presents more detailed numerical modeling interpretations of the solute tracer responses.

Paul W. Reimus; Marc J. Haga

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Supporting BioMedical Information Retrieval: The BioTracer Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supporting BioMedical Information Retrieval: The BioTracer Approach Heri Ramampiaro1 and Chen Li2 1 biomedical in- formation has put a high demand on existing search systems. Such a tool should be able the relevant ones the highest rank- ing. Focusing on biomedical information, this work investigates how

Li, Chen

215

Advanced Search Search Tips  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced Search Search Tips Advanced Search Search Tips springerlink.com SpringerLink 2,000 40,000 20,000 2010 11 Please visit 7 http://www.springerlink.com GO 1997 1997 SpringerLink Advanced Search Search Tips CONTENT DOI CITATION DOI ISSN ISBN CATEGORY AND DATE LIMITERS Journals Books Protocols

Kinosita Jr., Kazuhiko

216

Evidence of Multi-Process Matrix Diffusion in a Single Fracturefrom a Field Tracer Test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Compared to values inferred from laboratory tests on matrix cores, many field tracer tests in fractured rock have shown enhanced matrix diffusion coefficient values (obtained using a single-process matrix-diffusion model with a homogeneous matrix diffusion coefficient). To investigate this phenomenon, a conceptual model of multi-process matrix diffusion in a single-fracture system was developed. In this model, three matrix diffusion processes of different diffusion rates were assumed to coexist: (1) diffusion into stagnant water and infilling materials within fractures, (2) diffusion into a degraded matrix zone, and (3) further diffusion into an intact matrix zone. The validity of the conceptual model was then demonstrated by analyzing a unique tracer test conducted using a long-time constant-concentration injection. The tracer-test analysis was conducted using a numerical model capable of tracking the multiple matrix-diffusion processes. The analysis showed that in the degraded zone, a diffusion process with an enhanced diffusion rate controlled the steep rising limb and decay-like falling limb in the observed breakthrough curve, whereas in the intact matrix zone, a process involving a lower diffusion rate affected the long-term middle platform of slowly increasing tracer concentration. The different matrix-diffusion-coefficient values revealed from the field tracer test are consistent with the variability of matrix diffusion coefficient measured for rock cores with different degrees of fracture coating at the same site. By comparing to the matrix diffusion coefficient calibrated using single-process matrix diffusion, we demonstrated that this multi-process matrix diffusion may contribute to the enhanced matrix-diffusion-coefficient values for single-fracture systems at the field scale.

Zhou, Quanlin; Liu, Hui-Hai; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur; Molz, Fred J.

2005-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

217

Design and synthesis of reactive separation systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the last decade there has been a rapid upturn in interest in reactive distillation. The chemical process industry recognizes the favorable economics of carrying out reaction simultaneously with distillation for certain classes of reacting systems, and many new processes have been built based on this technology. Interest is also increasing by academics and software vendors. Systematic design methods for reactive distillation systems have only recently begun to emerge. In this report we survey the available design techniques and point out the contributions made by our group at the University of Massachusetts.

Doherty, M.F.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Water reactive hydrogen fuel cell power system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes devices and methods to combine reactant fuel materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The generated hydrogen is converted in a fuel cell to provide electricity. The water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes a fuel cell, a water feed tray, and a fuel cartridge to generate power for portable power electronics. The removable fuel cartridge is encompassed by the water feed tray and fuel cell. The water feed tray is refillable with water by a user. The water is then transferred from the water feed tray into the fuel cartridge to generate hydrogen for the fuel cell which then produces power for the user.

Wallace, Andrew P; Melack, John M; Lefenfeld, Michael

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

219

Water reactive hydrogen fuel cell power system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes devices and methods to combine reactant fuel materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The generated hydrogen is converted in a fuel cell to provide electricity. The water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes a fuel cell, a water feed tray, and a fuel cartridge to generate power for portable power electronics. The removable fuel cartridge is encompassed by the water feed tray and fuel cell. The water feed tray is refillable with water by a user. The water is then transferred from the water feed tray into a fuel cartridge to generate hydrogen for the fuel cell which then produces power for the user.

Wallace, Andrew P; Melack, John M; Lefenfeld, Michael

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

220

Session: CSP Advanced Systems -- Advanced Overview (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project description is: (1) it supports crosscutting activities, e.g. advanced optical materials, that aren't tied to a single CSP technology and (2) it supports the 'incubation' of new concepts in preliminary stages of investigation.

Mehos, M.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Low Reactivity SI Engine Lubricant Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Results showed that lubricant improvement allowed up to 4 degree improvement in spark advance at knock limited conditions resulting in potentially over 3 percent indicated efficiency improvement

222

Overview of SIMS-Based Experimental Studies of Tracer Diffusion in Solids and Application to Mg Self-Diffusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tracer diffusivities provide the most fundamental information on diffusion in materials and are the foundation of robust diffusion databases. Compared to traditional radiotracer techniques that utilize radioactive isotopes, the secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) based thin-film technique for tracer diffusion is based on the use of enriched stable isotopes that can be accurately profiled using SIMS. Experimental procedures & techniques that are utilized for the measurement of tracer diffusion coefficients are presented for pure magnesium, which presents some unique challenges due to the ease of oxidation. The development of a modified Shewmon-Rhines diffusion capsule for annealing Mg and an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) system for sputter deposition of Mg isotopes are discussed. Optimized conditions for accurate SIMS depth profiling in polycrystalline Mg are provided. An automated procedure for the correction of heat-up and cool-down times during tracer diffusion annealing is discussed. The non-linear fitting of a SIMS depth profile data using the thin film Gaussian solution to obtain the tracer diffusivity along with the background tracer concentration and tracer film thickness is discussed. An Arrhenius fit of the Mg self-diffusion data obtained using the low-temperature SIMS measurements from this study and the high-temperature radiotracer measurements of Shewmon and Rhines (1954) was found to be a good representation of both types of diffusion data that cover a broad range of temperatures between 250 - 627 C (523 900 K).

Kulkarni, Nagraj S [ORNL; Warmack, Robert J Bruce [ORNL; Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam [ORNL; HunterJr., Jerry [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Sohn, Yong Ho [University of Central Florida; Coffey, Kevin [University of Central Florida; Murch, Prof. Graeme [University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia; Belova, Irina [University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Formation and Reactivity of Biogenic Iron Microminerals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall purpose of the project is to explore and quantify the processes that control the formation and reactivity of biogenic iron microminerals and their impact on the solubility of metal contaminants. The research addresses how surface components of bacterial cells, extracellular organic material, and the aqueous geochemistry of the DIRB microenvironment impacts the mineralogy, chemical state and micromorphology of reduced iron phases.

Beveridge, Terrance J.; Glasauer, Susan; Korenevsky, Anton; Ferris, F. Grant

2000-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

224

Controlling uranium reactivity March 18, 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the last decade. Most of their work involves depleted uranium, a more common form of uraniumMarch 2008 Controlling uranium reactivity March 18, 2008 Uranium is an often misunderstood metal uranium research. In reality, uranium presents a wealth of possibilities for funda- mental chemistry. Many

Meyer, Karsten

225

Identification and characterization of conservative organic tracers for use as hydrologic tracers for the Yucca Mountain site characterization project: Quality Assurance Project Plan, Revision 1; Quarterly progress report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this work is to identify and characterize candidate conservative organic tracers for use as hydrologic tracers for experiments to be conducted at the Yucca Mountain C-well complex. During this quarter the main effort was directed towards rewriting the quality assurance program in preparation for a review and audit by the USGS. However, due to budget constraints the review and audit were not carried out. The tracer QA plan and standard operating procedures (SOPs) were revised and copies are included in the report. Instrumental problems were encountered and corrected with the addition of new integration and sample control software. In the sampling, there was an unexplained peak in the chromatograms of the tracers being tested in the light tuff. This was not correctable and these experiments will be repeated in the next quarter.

Stetzenbach, K.J.

1993-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

226

Cell Comp't Thermal Reactivity & Improvements | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Comp't Thermal Reactivity & Improvements Cell Comp't Thermal Reactivity & Improvements Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on...

227

Isotope effects in methanol synthesis and the reactivity of copper...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Isotope effects in methanol synthesis and the reactivity of copper formates on a CuSiO2 catalyst. Isotope effects in methanol synthesis and the reactivity of copper formates on a...

228

Design of processes with reactive distillation line diagrams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On the basis of the transformation of concentration coordinates, the concept of reactive distillation lines is developed. It is applied to study the feasibility of a reactive distillation with an equilibrium reaction on all trays of a distillation column. The singular points in the distillation line diagrams are characterized in terms of nodes and saddles. Depending on the characterization of the reactive distillation line diagrams, it can be decided whether a column with two feed stages is required. On the basis of the reaction space concept, a procedure for identification of reactive distillation processes is developed, in which the reactive distillation column has to be divided into reactive and nonreactive sections. This can be necessary to overcome the limitations in separation which result from the chemical equilibrium. The concentration profile of this combined reactive/nonreactive distillation column is estimated using combined reactive/nonreactive distillation lines.

Bessling, B. [BASF Ludwigshafen (Germany). Engineering Research and Development] [BASF Ludwigshafen (Germany). Engineering Research and Development; Schembecker, G.; Simmrock, K.H. [Univ. of Dortmund (Germany). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [Univ. of Dortmund (Germany). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Advanced Materials | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research Areas Research Areas Research Highlights Facilities and Capabilities Science to Energy Solutions News & Awards Events and Conferences Supporting Organizations Directionally Solidified Materials Using high-temperature optical floating zone furnace to produce monocrystalline molybdenum alloy micro-pillars Home | Science & Discovery | Advanced Materials Advanced Materials | Advanced Materials SHARE ORNL has the nation's most comprehensive materials research program and is a world leader in research that supports the development of advanced materials for energy generation, storage, and use. We have core strengths in three main areas: materials synthesis, characterization, and theory. In other words, we discover and make new materials, we study their structure,

230

Advanced Concepts Breakout Group  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Workshop Workshop Advanced Concepts Working Group Facilitator: John J. Petrovic Scribe: Sherry Marin Advanced Storage Techniques/ Approaches in Priority Order 1. Crystalline Nanoporous Materials (15) 2. Polymer Microspheres (12) Self-Assembled Nanocomposites (12) 3. Advanced Hydrides (11) Metals - Organic (11) 4. BN Nanotubes (5) Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon (5) 5. Mesoporous materials (4) Bulk Amorphous Materials (BAMs) (4) 6. Iron Hydrolysis (3) 7. Nanosize powders (2) 8. Metallic Hydrogen (1) Hydride Alcoholysis (1) Overarching R&D Questions for All Advanced Materials * Maximum storage capacity - theoretical model * Energy balance / life cycle analysis * Hydrogen absorption / desorption kinetics * Preliminary cost analysis - potential for low cost, high

231

Institute for Advanced Studies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Institute for Advanced Studies Institute for Advanced Studies Institute for Advanced Studies NMC leverages the strengths of three research universities to build joint programs, develop strategic partnerships, provide common organization and facilities. Contact Leader TBD LANL Program Administrator Pam Hundley (505) 663-5453 Email Building regional partnerships in education, leveraging strengths of three research universities The Institute for Advanced Studies (IAS) works with the three New Mexico research universities (University of New Mexico, New Mexico Tech, and New Mexico State University) to develop research and educational collaborations and partnerships. To facilitate interactions between the universities and LANL, the three New Mexico schools established the New Mexico Consortium (NMC), a nonprofit

232

Advanced Cathode Catalysts  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation, which focuses on advanced cathode catalysts, was given by Piotr Zelenay of Los Alamos National laboratory at a February 2007 meeting on new fuel cell projects.

233

Advance Care Planning Safeguards  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Regardless of which goals of advance care planning are featured, safeguards, as reviewed in my article and by...5 we inadvertently may be doing harm.

J. Andrew Billings MD

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Advanced Reciprocating Engine Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Advanced Reciprocating Engine Systems (ARES) program is designed to promote separate but parallel engine development between the major stationary, gaseous fueled engine manufacturers in the...

235

Advanced Fuel Cycle Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Working with INL Community Outreach Visitor Information Calendar of Events ATR National Scientific User Facility Center for Advanced Energy Studies Light Water Reactor...

236

Advances in Physical Chemistry  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hindawi Publishing Corporation Advances in Physical Chemistry Volume 2011, Article ID 907129, 18 pages doi:10.11552011907129 Review Article Contrast and Synergy between...

237

People | Advanced Photon Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

User Office Floor Coordinators Beamline Phones Sectors Directory Media Contact Rick Fenner (630) 252-5280 Webmaster Kelly Cunningham (630) 252-0619 Mailing Address Advanced...

238

Advances in photosynthesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advances in photosynthesis ... This article emphasizes the relation between photosynthetic chemistry and the molecular architecture of the photosynthetic center in plant cells. ...

Roderic B. Park

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

TRACER DETECTION TECHNOLOGY CORP. PRODUCTS AND SERVICES FOR CORPORATE AND GOVERNMENT SECURITY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

TRACER DETECTION TECHNOLOGY CORP. TRACER DETECTION TECHNOLOGY CORP. PRODUCTS AND SERVICES FOR CORPORATE AND GOVERNMENT SECURITY 3463 MAGIC DRIVE, SUITE T-19 SAN ANTONIO, TX 78229 March 29, 2009 Office of the Assistant General Counsel for Technology Transfer and Intellectual Property U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW. Washington, DC 20585. GC-62@hq.doe.gov ATTN: TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER QUESTIONS. Response to Request for Information - Federal Register "The Costs and Benefits of Dealing with Federal Laboratories" This "white paper" is intended to deal constructively with issues relating to technology transfer and interaction of small businesses with federal laboratories, and should be considered a response to #6 (other). As a small businessman and entrepreneur engaged in the

240

TRACER DETECTION TECHNOLOGY CORP. PRODUCTS AND SERVICES FOR CORPORATE AND GOVERNMENT SECURITY  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

TRACER DETECTION TECHNOLOGY CORP. TRACER DETECTION TECHNOLOGY CORP. PRODUCTS AND SERVICES FOR CORPORATE AND GOVERNMENT SECURITY 3463 MAGIC DRIVE, SUITE T-19 SAN ANTONIO, TX 78229 March 29, 2009 Office of the Assistant General Counsel for Technology Transfer and Intellectual Property U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW. Washington, DC 20585. GC-62@hq.doe.gov ATTN: TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER QUESTIONS. Response to Request for Information - Federal Register "The Costs and Benefits of Dealing with Federal Laboratories" This "white paper" is intended to deal constructively with issues relating to technology transfer and interaction of small businesses with federal laboratories, and should be considered a response to #6 (other). As a small businessman and entrepreneur engaged in the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Evaluation of Tracers for Use in the International Field Experiment on CO2 Ocean Sequestration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tracers for Use in the International Field Experiment Tracers for Use in the International Field Experiment on CO 2 Ocean Sequestration E. Eric Adams (eeadams@mit.edu; 617-253-6595) Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, MA 02139 USA Introduction An international field experiment is scheduled to take place off of the west coast of the big island of Hawaii during the second half of 2001 (Adams, et al., 1999; Herzog, et al., 2000). Scientists representing some dozen institutions in five countries on four continents are expected to participate. The experiment will involve several sub-experiments in which CO 2 will be released at a depth of 800 m as a buoyant liquid at rates of 0.1 to 1.0 kg/s. The releases will each be made for a duration of about one hour using nozzles with differing diameters and numbers of ports.

242

Flux Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds from an Urban Tower Platform in Houston, Texas: Trends and Tracers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and traffic counts except during variable working hours. To assign measured fluxes to local sources, we tested a bulk flux footprint model (Kormann and Meixner model) designed for uniform emission surface areas in this urban, heterogeneous landscape. Tracer...

Hale, Martin C

2014-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

243

Integrated Approach to Use Natural Chemical and Isotopic Tracers to Estimate Fracture Spacing and Surface Area in EGS Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. This objective of this project is to develop an innovative approach to estimate fracture surface area and spacing through interpretation of signals of natural chemical and isotopic tracers.

244

Field studies of streamflow generation using natural and injected tracers on Bickford and Walker Branch Watersheds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Field studies of streamflow generation were undertaken on two forested watersheds, the West Road subcatchment of Bickford Watershed in central Massachusetts and the West Fork of Walker Branch Watershed in eastern Tennessee. A major component of the research was development of a two-stage methodology for the use of naturally-occurring {sup 222}Rn as a tracer. The first of the two stages was solving a mass-balance equation for {sup 222}Rn around a stream reach of interest in order to calculate Rn{sub q}, the {sup 222}Rn content of the lateral inflow to the reach; a conservative tracer (chloride) and a volatile tracer (propane) were injected into the study stream to account for lateral inflow to, and volatilization from, the study reach. The second stage involved quantitative comparison of Rn{sub q} to the measured {sup 222}Rn concentrations of different subsurface waters in order to assess how important these waters were in contributing lateral inflow to the stream reach.

Genereux, D.; Hemond, H. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering); Mulholland, P. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Comparison of observed and predicted short-term tracer gas concentrations in the atmosphere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Laboratory is in the process of conducting a series of atmospheric tracer studies. The inert gas sulfurhexafluoride is released from a height of 62 m for 15 min and concentrations in air are measured on sampling arcs up to 30 km downwind of the release point. Maximum 15 min. air concentrations from 14 of these tracer tests have been compared with the ground-level, centerline air concentration predicted with a Gaussian plume atmospheric transport model using eight different sets of atmospheric dispersion parameters. Preliminary analysis of the results from these comparisons indicates that the dispersion parameters developed at Juelich, West Germany, based on tracers released from a height of 50 m, give the best overall agreement between the predicted and observed values. The median value of the ratio of predicted to observed air concentrations for this set of parameters is 1.3, and the correlation coefficient between the log of the predictions and the log of the observations is 0.72. For the commonly used Pasquill-Gifford dispersion parameters, the values of these same statistics are 4.4 and 0.68, respectively. The Gaussian plume model is widely used to predict air concentrations resulting from short-term radionuclide release to the atmosphere. The results of comparisons such as these must be considered whenever the Gaussian model is used for such purposes. 22 references, 3 tables.

Cotter, S.J.; Miller, C.W.; Lin, W.C.T.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

High-resolution stratospheric tracer fields estimated from satellite observations using Lagrangian trajectory calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A technique is introduced by which high-resolution tracer fields may be constructed from low-resolution satellite observations. The technique relies upon the continual cascade of tracer variance from large to small scales and makes use of wind fields generated by a data assimilation scheme. To demonstrate its usefulness, the technique has been applied in a study of isentropic distributions of nitrous oxide in the winter midstratosphere, using measurements made by the Improved Stratospheric and Mesospheric Sounder (ISAMS) instrument on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS). The results show that the high-resolution fields significantly increase the amount of information that is available from the satellite observations. The fields give insights into the characteristic structure and evolution of tracer distributions at scales that are normally obscured from view. Two results are particularly noteworthy. First, at the interface between low and middle latitudes there is evidence of active mixing. This mixing occurs on the eastern, equatorward side of air that is being drawn toward high latitudes around the polar vortex. Second, in the anticyclone, a complex pattern of transport is revealed. Air drawn in from low latitudes spirals together with ambient midlatitude air. Small scales are generated relatively slowly in the organized flow, and persistent filamentary structures, with transverse scales of hundreds of kilometers or greater, are seen.

Sutton, R.T.; Maclean, H.; Swinbank, R.; O`Neill, A.; Taylor, F.W. [Oxford Univ., Oxford (United Kingdom)] [Oxford Univ., Oxford (United Kingdom); [Meteorological Office, Bracknell, Berkshire (United Kingdom); [Univ. of Reading, Reading (United Kingdom)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Uncertainties in Air Exchange using Continuous-Injection, Long-Term Sampling Tracer-Gas Methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The PerFluorocarbon Tracer (PFT) method is a low-cost approach commonly used for measuring air exchange in buildings using tracer gases. It is a specific application of the more general Continuous-Injection, Long-Term Sampling (CILTS) method. The technique is widely used but there has been little work on understanding the uncertainties (both precision and bias) associated with its use, particularly given that it is typically deployed by untrained or lightly trained people to minimize experimental costs. In this article we will conduct a first-principles error analysis to estimate the uncertainties and then compare that analysis to CILTS measurements that were over-sampled, through the use of multiple tracers and emitter and sampler distribution patterns, in three houses. We find that the CILTS method can have an overall uncertainty of 10-15percent in ideal circumstances, but that even in highly controlled field experiments done by trained experimenters expected uncertainties are about 20percent. In addition, there are many field conditions (such as open windows) where CILTS is not likely to provide any quantitative data. Even avoiding the worst situations of assumption violations CILTS should be considered as having a something like a ?factor of two? uncertainty for the broad field trials that it is typically used in. We provide guidance on how to deploy CILTS and design the experiment to minimize uncertainties.

Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.; Lunden, Melissa M.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Sensitivity analysis of reactivity responses using one-dimensional discrete ordinates and three-dimensional Monte Carlo methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The TSUNAMI computational sequences currently in the SCALE 5 code system provide an automated approach to performing sensitivity and uncertainty analysis for eigenvalue responses, using either one-dimensional discrete ordinates or three-dimensional Monte Carlo methods. This capability has recently been expanded to address eigenvalue-difference responses such as reactivity changes. This paper describes the methodology and presents results obtained for an example advanced CANDU reactor design. (authors)

Williams, M. L.; Gehin, J. C.; Clarno, K. T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Bldg. 5700, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6170 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor. [LMFBR  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention, which resulted from a contact with the United States Department of Energy, relates to a control mechanism for a nuclear reactor and, more particularly, to an assembly for selectively shifting different numbers of reactivity modifying rods into and out of the core of a nuclear reactor. It has been proposed heretofore to control the reactivity of a breeder reactor by varying the depth of insertion of control rods (e.g., rods containing a fertile material such as ThO/sub 2/) in the core of the reactor, thereby varying the amount of neutron-thermalizing coolant and the amount of neutron-capturing material in the core. This invention relates to a mechanism which can advantageously be used in this type of reactor control system.

Bollinger, L.R.

1982-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

250

Mined land reclamation by biological reactivation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mine reclamation technique, developed in Europe, restores land to full productivity within two years without topsoil replacement. The method deliberately reestablishes within one year following mining, the required biological balance between microbes, enzymes, and trace elements in the rock spoil rather than waiting five or more years for natural processes to restore balance. The technique is called Biological Reactivation (BR). This paper discusses the feasibility of BR reclamation after surface mining operations in the US. Staff of the Ohio Mining and Mineral Resources Research Institute completed an OSM-sponsored research project on BR in which physical and chemical tests characterized 140 spoil samples obtained from 10 surface mining operations. Test results indicated that Biological Reactivation technology could be effectively applied, at least in the test areas sampled within Appalachia. Preliminary estimates make clear that the new technique reduces reclamation costs on prime farmland by approximately 95% compared to topsoil segregation and replacement methods.

Gozon, J.S.; Konya, C.J.; Lukovic, S.S.; Lundquist, R.G.; Olah, J.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

KASP (Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project) completed the new Layer 0 upgrade for D0, assumed key electronics projects for the US CMS project, finished important new physics measurements with the D0 experiment at Fermilab, made substantial contributions to detector studies for the proposed e+e- international linear collider (ILC), and advanced key initiatives in non-accelerator-based neutrino physics.

Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Bolton, T.; Horton-Smith, G.; Maravin, Y.; Ratra, B.; Stanton, N.; von Toerne, E.; Wilson, G.

2007-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

252

Advanced Windows Test Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Exterior of Advanced Windows Test Facility Exterior of Advanced Windows Test Facility Advanced Windows Test Facility This multi-room laboratory's purpose is to test the performance and properties of advanced windows and window systems such as electrochromic windows, and automatically controlled shutters and blinds. The lab simulates real-world office spaces. Embedded instrumentation throughout the lab records solar gains and losses for specified time periods, weather conditions, energy use, and human comfort indicators. Electrochromic glazings promise to be a major advance in energy-efficient window technology, helping to achieve the goal of transforming windows and skylights from an energy liability in buildings to an energy source. The glazing can be reversibly switched from a clear to a transparent, colored

253

Advanced Fuels Synthesis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Fuels Synthesis Advanced Fuels Synthesis Coal and Coal/Biomass to Liquids Advanced Fuels Synthesis The Advanced Fuels Synthesis Key Technology is focused on catalyst and reactor optimization for producing liquid hydrocarbon fuels from coal/biomass mixtures, supports the development and demonstration of advanced separation technologies, and sponsors research on novel technologies to convert coal/biomass to liquid fuels. Active projects within the program portfolio include the following: Fischer-Tropsch fuels synthesis Small Scale Coal Biomass Liquids Production Using Highly Selective Fischer Tropsch Catalyst Small Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal/Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels Via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Coal Fuels Alliance: Design and Construction of Early Lead Mini Fischer-Tropsch Refinery

254

SSC analysis of the GEMs for reactivity control in PRISM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The performance of three Gas Expansion Modules (GEMS) utilized the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) concept, PRISM, was analyzed using the computer code, SSC. GE has submitted the PRISM design for a Preapplication Safety Evaluation Report (PSER). The draft PSER indicated a potential weakness in the Unscrammed Loss of Flow (ULOF) event, and GE modified the design by adding three GEMs. The PRISM design was analyzed by SSC for two cases. First, the design`s original response to a ULOF where one Electro Magnetic (EM) pump fails to produce a coastdown was analyzed. Then the revised design with the GEMs included was analyzed. The original design had little or no safety margin for this case. The peak fuel temperature in the hot channel was predicted to be 1358K, which is above the solidus temperature of the fuel. However, after the GEMs were added, the loss of one EM pump coastdown became a benign event. The GEM feedback was predicted by SSC to dominate the other reactivity feedbacks and the GEMS, essentially, responded like passive control rods. The fuel temperature quickly dropped below operating temperatures, while the margin to sodium boiling was predicted to be greater than 350K.

Slovik, G.C.; Rodnizki, J.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

255

SSC analysis of the GEMs for reactivity control in PRISM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The performance of three Gas Expansion Modules (GEMS) utilized the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) concept, PRISM, was analyzed using the computer code, SSC. GE has submitted the PRISM design for a Preapplication Safety Evaluation Report (PSER). The draft PSER indicated a potential weakness in the Unscrammed Loss of Flow (ULOF) event, and GE modified the design by adding three GEMs. The PRISM design was analyzed by SSC for two cases. First, the design's original response to a ULOF where one Electro Magnetic (EM) pump fails to produce a coastdown was analyzed. Then the revised design with the GEMs included was analyzed. The original design had little or no safety margin for this case. The peak fuel temperature in the hot channel was predicted to be 1358K, which is above the solidus temperature of the fuel. However, after the GEMs were added, the loss of one EM pump coastdown became a benign event. The GEM feedback was predicted by SSC to dominate the other reactivity feedbacks and the GEMS, essentially, responded like passive control rods. The fuel temperature quickly dropped below operating temperatures, while the margin to sodium boiling was predicted to be greater than 350K.

Slovik, G.C.; Rodnizki, J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Quantification of multiple methane emission sources at landfills using a double tracer technique  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research highlights: > Precise and reliable measurements of emissions from landfills are needed. > A tracer technique involving simultaneous release of two tracers was proven successful. > Measurements to be performed at times with low changing trends in barometric pressure. - Abstract: A double tracer technique was used successfully to quantify whole-site methane (CH{sub 4}) emissions from Fakse Landfill. Emissions from different sections of the landfill were quantified by using two different tracers. A scaled-down version of the tracer technique measuring close-by to localized sources having limited areal extent was also used to quantify emissions from on-site sources at the landfill facility, including a composting area and a sewage sludge storage pit. Three field campaigns were performed. At all three field campaigns an overall leak search showed that the CH{sub 4} emissions from the old landfill section were localized to the leachate collection wells and slope areas. The average CH{sub 4} emissions from the old landfill section were quantified to be 32.6 {+-} 7.4 kg CH{sub 4} h{sup -1}, whereas the source at the new section was quantified to be 10.3 {+-} 5.3 kg CH{sub 4} h{sup -1}. The CH{sub 4} emission from the compost area was 0.5 {+-} 0.25 kg CH{sub 4} h{sup -1}, whereas the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) flux was quantified to be in the order of 332 {+-} 166 kg CO{sub 2} h{sup -1} and 0.06 {+-} 0.03 kg N{sub 2}O h{sup -1}, respectively. The sludge pit located west of the compost material was quantified to have an emission of 2.4 {+-} 0.63 kg h{sup -1} CH{sub 4}, and 0.03 {+-} 0.01 kg h{sup -1} N{sub 2}O.

Scheutz, C., E-mail: chs@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljovej, Building 113, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Samuelsson, J., E-mail: jerker.samuelsson@fluxsense.se [Chalmers University of Technology/FluxSense AB, SE-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); Fredenslund, A.M., E-mail: amf@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljovej, Building 113, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Kjeldsen, P., E-mail: pk@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljovej, Building 113, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

257

Chemistry 685 (CHE 685) Advanced Organic Chemistry: Organic Reaction Mechanisms and Molecular Interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry 685 (CHE 685) Advanced Organic Chemistry: Organic Reaction Mechanisms and Molecular and physical chemistry Course description and rationale CHE685 is a graduate-level organic chemistry course. These two courses focus on physical organic chemistry, which deals with the structure and reactivity

Mather, Patrick T.

258

Water: Advanced Irrigation Technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Limited opportunities to further expand the volume of global freshwaters allocated to irrigation means that advanced irrigation technologies, aiming to improve efficiency of existing systems, are timely needed and are of paramount importance. This article Advanced Irrigation Technologies describes the latest advances in irrigation application methods, irrigation management, and other novel developments. It provides a vision for the future, including emerging risks, opportunities, and technical challenges, as the world gears up to supply 50% more food to an additional 2 billion people by 2050.

C.B. Hedley; J.W. Knox; S.R. Raine; R. Smith

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced reactivity measurement facility...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

< 1 2 3 4 5 > >> Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 41 STANDARDS FOR MEASUREMENTS AND TESTING OF WIND TURBINE POWER QUALITY Poul Srensen, Ris National Laboratory, P.O.Box 49, DK-4000...

260

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced reactivity measurement Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

< 1 2 3 4 5 > >> Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 41 STANDARDS FOR MEASUREMENTS AND TESTING OF WIND TURBINE POWER QUALITY Poul Srensen, Ris National Laboratory, P.O.Box 49, DK-4000...

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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Advances in Transportation Technologies | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Advances in Transportation Technologies Advances in Transportation Technologies Advances in Transportation Technologies More Documents & Publications TEC Working Group Topic Groups...

262

Draft Advanced Nuclear Energy Projects Solicitation | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Projects Solicitation Draft Advanced Nuclear Energy Projects Solicitation Federal loan guarantee solicitation announcement -- Advanced Nuclear Energy Projects. Draft Advanced...

263

Advanced Nuclear Energy Projects Solicitation | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Advanced Nuclear Energy Projects Solicitation Advanced Nuclear Energy Projects Solicitation INFORMATIONAL MATERIALS ADVANCED NUCLEAR ENERGY PROJECTS SOLICITATION Solicitation...

264

Draft Advanced Nuclear Energy Projects Solicitation | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Draft Advanced Nuclear Energy Projects Solicitation Draft Advanced Nuclear Energy Projects Solicitation INFORMATIONAL MATERIALS DRAFT ADVANCED NUCLEAR ENERGY PROJECTS SOLICITATION...

265

Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Incentive Program...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Incentive Program Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Incentive Program A fact sheet detailling the advanced technology vehicles...

266

Treatment of reactive dyes and textile finishing wastewater using Fenton's oxidation for reuse  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fenton's oxidation (FO) was used to decolourise and degrade some reactive dyes (Remazol Black 5, Remazol Red, Remazol Blue, Remazol Yellow) and raw textile finishing industry effluents (S1, S2, S3) containing mainly reactive dyes. The operational conditions for pH varied between 2.5 and 4.0 while temperature ranged from 30°C to 50°C. The concentrations of FeSO4 and H2O2 varied to a wide range (200??600 mg/l of FeSO4, 300??1000 mg/l of H2O2) depending on the type of the dyes and their mixture and textile additives used in the process. FO is highly effective for colour removal (>99%) for reactive dyes and (87??94%) for textile finishing wastewater. It can be applied as a pretreatment and the remaining total dissolved solids (TDS) can be removed by an additional advanced process, e.g. membrane process.

Sureyya Meric; Giusy Lofrano; Vincenzo Belgiorno

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

NETL: Advanced Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AR AR Coal and Power Systems Advanced Research 12.11.13: Request for Information entitled "Novel Crosscutting Research and Development to Support Advanced Energy Systems". Application due date is January 15, 2014. The RFI and/or instructions can be found on the FedConnect site at FedConnect. Achieving Successes in High Performance Materials, Coal Utilization Sciences, Sensors & Controls Innovations, Computational Energy Sciences, Cooperative Research and Development, and sponsoring Education Initiatives. The Advanced Research (AR) program within NETL's Office of Coal and Power Systems fosters the development of innovative, cost-effective technologies for improving the efficiency and environmental performance of advanced coal and power systems. In addition, AR bridges the gap between fundamental

268

Advanced Hydraulic Wind Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, has developed a novel advanced hydraulic wind energy design, which has up to 23% performance improvement over conventional wind turbine and conventional hydraulic wind energy systems ... Keywords: wind, tide, energy, power, hydraulic

Jack A. Jones; Allan Bruce; Adrienne S. Lam

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

The Advanced Manufacturing Partnership  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;ve Manufacturing Technologies (led by Dow, Honeywell and MIT) Manufacturing Ins;tutes (led, Honeywell and MIT GOALS § To launch public-private ini:a:ves to advance transforma

Das, Suman

270

Advance Care Planning Safeguards  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To the Editors:We read with interest the recent article by Dr. Billings.1...In the article, Dr. Billings defines the goal of advance care planning as promoting the autonomy of decisionally incapac...

Sangeeta C. Ahluwalia PhD; MPH; Howard S. Gordon MD

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Search Asia Advanced Search  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Asia Times Search Asia Times Advanced Search Southeast Asia Malaysia tackles illegal logging:52:14 AM Search #12;Asia Times illegal logging," he said, adding that nine Malaysians had been arrested

272

Search Asia Advanced Search  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Asia Times Search Asia Times Advanced Search Southeast Asia Indonesia looks to curb log smuggling.html (1 of 2)9/4/2007 12:59:34 PM Search #12;Asia Times No material from Asia Times Online may

273

Advanced Review Geometry optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced Review Geometry optimization H. Bernhard Schlegel Geometry optimization is an important part of most quantum chemical calcu- lations. This article surveys methods for optimizing equilibrium geometries, lo- cating transition structures, and following reaction paths. The emphasis is on optimizations

Schlegel, H. Bernhard

274

People | Advanced Photon Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

apsuser@aps.anl.gov (630) 252-9090 8:30 am - 5:30 pm, Monday-Friday Media Contact Rick Fenner (630) 252-5280 Webmaster Kelly Cunningham (630) 252-0619 Mailing Address Advanced...

275

Reactive sticking coefficients of silane on silicon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reactive sticking coefficients (RSCs) were measured for silane and disilane on polycrystalline silicon for a wide range of temperature and flux (pressure) conditions. The data were obtained from deposition rate measurements using molecular beam scattering and a very low pressure cold wall reactor. The RSCs have non-Arrhenius temperature dependences and decreases with increasing flux at low (710/sup 0/) temperatures. A simple model involving dissociative adsorption of silane is consistent with these results. The results are compared with previous studies of the SiH/sub 4//Si(s) reaction.

Buss, R.J.; Ho, P.; Breiland, W.G.; Coltrin, M.E.

1988-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

276

Cellular-automaton model for reactive systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method for constructing a variety of probabilistic lattice-gas cellular automata for chemically reacting systems is described. The microscopic reactive dynamics give rise to a general fourth-order polynomial rate law for the average particle density. The reduction of the microdynamical equations to a discrete or continuous Boltzmann equation is presented. Connection between the linearized Boltzmann equations and a reaction-diffusion macroscopic equation is discussed. As an example of the general formalism a set of cellular automata rules that yield the Schlgl phenomenological model is constructed. Simulation results are presented.

David Dab; Anna Lawniczak; Jean-Pierre Boon; Raymond Kapral

1990-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

277

Theoretical and Experimental Evaluation of Chemical Reactivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

released and the rate of energy released for a specific reactive chemical. 2.1 DSC DSC is a popular screening tool (safe and fast) and can provide an overall indication of exothermic activity of the chemical being tested. In a DSC, a sample and a... endothermic or exothermic reaction. When the rate of heat generation in the sample exceeds a particular value, the heat supply to the sample is cut off and this additional heat gain is attributed to exothermic activity within the sample.17 From the DSC...

Wang, Qingsheng

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

278

Preparation of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to the preparation of fine particles of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate by means of a solid state process which comprises firing a mixture of calcium sulfate, silica and a reducing additive selected from the group consisting of calcium sulfide, carbon, carbon monoxide, methane and hydrogen, at a temperature of about 850.degree.-1000.degree. C. A carrier gas such as nitrogen or carbon dioxide may also be added, if desired. A high concentration of sulfur dioxide is a by-product of this process.

Shen, Ming-Shing (Laramie, WY, NJ); Chen, James M. (Rahway, NJ); Yang, Ralph T. (Amherst, NY)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

IAEA sodium void reactivity benchmark calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, the IAEA-1 992 ``Benchmark Calculation of Sodium Void Reactivity Effect in Fast Reactor Core`` problem is evaluated. The proposed design is a large axially heterogeneous oxide-fueled fast reactor as described in Section 2; the core utilizes a sodium plenum above the core to enhance leakage effects. The calculation methods used in this benchmark evaluation are described in Section 3. In Section 4, the calculated core performance results for the benchmark reactor model are presented; and in Section 5, the influence of steel and interstitial sodium heterogeneity effects is estimated.

Hill, R.N.; Finck, P.J.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

IAEA sodium void reactivity benchmark calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, the IAEA-1 992 Benchmark Calculation of Sodium Void Reactivity Effect in Fast Reactor Core'' problem is evaluated. The proposed design is a large axially heterogeneous oxide-fueled fast reactor as described in Section 2; the core utilizes a sodium plenum above the core to enhance leakage effects. The calculation methods used in this benchmark evaluation are described in Section 3. In Section 4, the calculated core performance results for the benchmark reactor model are presented; and in Section 5, the influence of steel and interstitial sodium heterogeneity effects is estimated.

Hill, R.N.; Finck, P.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

A new statistical dispersion model for tracer tests and contaminant spread in porous media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dispersion of solutes moving in permeable media is an essential control to describe fluid flow in permeable media. Dispersion can be thought of as a spreading of a solute caused by the presence of microscopic inhomogeneities. An accurate model for dispersion is needed for accurate estimation of oil recovery efficiencies and clean up costs of subsurface contaminants. Current approaches utilizing the fickian assumption fall short in describing the real physics of spreading during a solute transport process. Numerous field investigations have shown that dispersivities measured in the field are much larger than those measured in the lab for the same type of porous material. Moreover, field measured dispersivities have been shown to be scale dependent, that is, a tracer test conducted over a longer travel path will yield a larger dispersivity value than a tracer test conducted in the same geologic formation over a shorter travel path. Numerous approaches to address this problem have been developed yet none attempted to go beyond the Fickian dispersion assumption. In this study, a convective dispersivity is introduced. New model assumes that dispersion is dimensionless and mainly determined by pore size distribution. The new model results in a spread that increases linearly with time contrary to conventional model, which predicts a mixing zone length that increases with square root of time. Therefore, new model explains the field test results that indicate increasing dispersivity with distance. The model validations are in perfect agreement with experimental results, which include; Ganapathy et al.`s slug experiment on Antolini sandstone, Handy`s radioactive tracer experiment on Alhambra sandstone, and CT experiment conducted at BDM-OK/NIPER facilities on Tallant sandstone.

Ates, H.; Kasap, E. [Univ. of Tulsa, OK (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

282

Atmospheric reactivity of gaseous dimethyl sulfate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The atmospheric reactivity of dimethyl sulfate (DMS) with a series of atmospheric species has been investigated. Upper limits to the rate constants for the homogeneous gas-phase reactions of DMS with O{sub 3}, NH{sub 3}, and H{sub 2}O have been determined by using FTIR spectroscopy and are <1.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}21}, <1.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}21}, and <1.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}23} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}, respectively. The reactivity of DMS toward ON radicals and Cl atoms has been determined by using relative rate techniques, and the rate constants for those reactions are <5 {times} 10{sup {minus}13} and (4.2 {plus minus} 0.5) {times} 10{sup {minus}13} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}, respectively. These rate constants correspond to atmospheric lifetimes ranging from >23 days with respect to reaction with OH radicals to >33 years with respect to reaction with ozone. With the possible exception of its reaction with water, for which the calculated lifetime of DMS is >2 days, these results indicate that the atmospheric fate of DMS is not determined by its homogeneous gas-phase reactions with any of the atmosphere species studied.

Japar, S.M.; Wallington, T.J.; Andino, J.M.; Ball, J.C. (Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (USA))

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Measurement of VOC reactivities using a photochemical flow reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A commercial ambient air monitoring instrument, the Airtrak 2000, has been modified for use as a photochemical flow reactor and used to measure the absolute and incremental reactivity of 18 single test VOCs and the incremental reactivity of six multicomponent VOC mixtures. A flow technique is a useful supplement to traditional static chamber experiments. The static chamber technique involves periodic sampling of an irradiated mixture in a photochemical chamber. Under these conditions, the irradiated mixture is always in transition. Using a flow system, a steady-state condition is established within the flow reactor that is representative, in this case, of the early stages of the smog forming process in the atmosphere. The measurement technique also allows changes in the background chamber reactivity to be monitored and taken into account. The incremental reactivity of 13 of the 18 test compounds measured is compared with previously reported results from a static chamber experiment, and the two data sets are generally in good agreement. The additivity of reactivity was tested by measuring the incremental reactivity of six multicomponent mixtures, the components being compounds measured individually in this study. The measured reactivity of a mixture was compared to that calculated from the sum of the measured reactivity of the mixture`s individual components. The results show that reactivity is additive for the concentration range studied.

Hurley, M.D.; Chang, T.Y.; Japar, S.M.; Wallington, T.J. [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States). Ford Research Lab.] [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States). Ford Research Lab.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Reactive Dehydration technology for Production of Fuels and Chemicals...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Catalytic and Reactive Distillation) for compact, inexpensive production of biomass-based chemicals from complex aqueous mixtures. SeparationPurification of Biomass...

285

Airborne measurement of OH reactivity during INTEX-B  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plus OH sign), reactiv- propane ing different gases gases atisoprene (plus sign), propane (star) and propene (triangle).NMHC includes ethane, ethene, propane, propene, i-butane, n-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Reactive Landing of Peptide Ions on Self-Assembled Monolayer...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

were characterized ex situ using time of flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS). We demonstrate that reactive...

287

Probing the structure and reactivity of gaseous ions.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Studying ions in the gas phase provides the opportunity to observe their intrinsic structure and reactivity without extraneous perturbations such as solvent effects, aggregation or (more)

Meyer, Matthew Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Chemically Reactive Working Fluids for the Capture and Transport...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Optical Waveguide Coupler Transformers for High-Power Solar Enegy Collection and Transmission Chemically Reactive Working Fluids Low-Cost Light Weigh Thin Film Solar Concentrators...

289

Monitoring Single Molecule Reactivity On a Carbon Nanotube  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LETTERS Monitoring Single-Molecule Reactivity on a Carbondevice directly transduces single-molecule attachments andoptical methods in single-molecule research. Compared to

Collins, Philip G

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Physical Organic Chemistry of Reactive Intermediates | The Ames...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Physical Organic Chemistry of Reactive Intermediates The Jenks group specializes in physical organic chemistry, the "how" of organic reactions. Much of the work has centered on...

291

Chemical Analysis of Complex Organic Mixtures Using Reactive...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mass Spectrometry. Abstract: Reactive nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) combined with high-resolution mass spectrometry was utilized for the analysis of...

292

Neural network approaches to tracer identification as related to PIV research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neural networks have become very powerful tools in many fields of interest. This thesis examines the application of neural networks to another rapidly growing field flow visualization. Flow visualization research is used to experimentally determine how fluids behave and to verify computational results obtained analytically. A form of flow visualization, particle image velocimetry (PIV). determines the flow movement by tracking neutrally buoyant particles suspended in the fluid. PIV research has begun to improve rapidly with the advent of digital imagers, which can quickly digitize an image into arrays of grey levels. These grey level arrays are analyzed to determine the location of the tracer particles. Once the particles positions have been determined across multiple image frames, it is possible to track their movements, and hence, the flow of the fluid. This thesis explores the potential of several different neural networks to identify the positions of the tracer particles. Among these networks are Backpropagation, Kohonen (counter-propagation), and Cellular. Each of these algorithms were employed in their basic form, and training and testing were performed on a synthetic grey level array. Modifications were then made to them in attempts to improve the results.

Seeley, C.H. Jr.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

NETL: Advanced Research - Successes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Successes Successes Advanced Research Successes Sensors & Controls "...Optical grade single-crystal sapphire optical fiber waveguides are especially attractive for fabricating sensors for the harsh high-temperature, corrosive environments found in gasifiers." Read More... "Industry adoption of CCADS will open the door to a new generation of more efficient, ultra-low emission turbines in advanced energy systems" Read More... Bioprocessing " Successful development and commercial application of this environmentally safe bacterial toxin will allow power plants to reduce or eliminate the use of chlorination, reducing the risk of harmful effects on aquatic ecosystems." Advanced Materials " This project will benefit gasification technology development and deployment by improving materials to contain and monitor gasification processes." Read More...

294

Geothermal: Advanced Search  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Search Advanced Search Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection Help/FAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On Home/Basic Search About Publications Advanced Search New Hot Docs News Related Links You may need to turn on Javascript in your browser to use the Find Subject and Find Author features. Sort By: Relevance Publication Date System Entry Date Document Type Title Research Org Sponsoring Org OSTI Identifier Report Number DOE Contract Number Ascending Descending Enter search criteria into as few or as many fields as desired. Search In For Term(s) (Place phrase in "double quotes") All Fields: Bibliographic Data: Full Text: Creator/Author Select : Title: Subject Select : Identifier Numbers: Journal Info.: Conference Info.: Patent Info.: Research Org.: Sponsoring Org.:

295

NIST's Advanced Technology Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NIST's Advanced NIST's Advanced Technology Program NIST's Advanced Technology Program DOE Workshop on Hydrogen Separation and Purification Technologies Arlington, VA, Sept. 8-9, 2004 Jason Huang 301-975-4197 National Institute of Standards and Technology 100 Bureau Drive Stop 4730 Gaithersburg, MD 20899-4730 http://www.atp.nist.gov National Institute of Standards and Technology * Technology Administration * U.S. Department of Commerce ATP is part of NIST Helping America Measure Up NIST Mission ATP is part of NIST NIST Mission: Strengthen the U.S. economy and improve the quality of life by working with industry to develop and apply technology, measurements, and standards. * * * * * * 3,000 employees $771 million annual budget 2,000 field agents 1,800 guest researchers $2.2 billion co-funding of

296

Revolutionizing Clean Energy Technology with Advanced Composites...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Revolutionizing Clean Energy Technology with Advanced Composites Revolutionizing Clean Energy Technology with Advanced Composites Addthis...

297

Advanced Vehicle Electrification and Transportation Sector Electrifica...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Advanced Vehicle Electrification and Transportation Sector Electrification Advanced Vehicle Electrification & Transportation Sector...

298

Advances in Animal Biotechnology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Animal biotechnology is used to improve food resources, to make biomedical advances and for industrial and commercial purposes. Today, the intersection of technology (genomic sequencing and computing) and biology (including cloning and regenerative medicine) bring a new sense of animal biotechnology, in which new products and experimental models can be imagined and realized. With these advances come challenges regarding product safety and animal welfare, as well as proper regulation. Animal biotechnology is a continually evolving field. Regulations will continue to develop as the field develops.

L.B. Schook; L.A. Rund; W. Hu; K.A. Darfour-Oduro; L.A. Knapp; F.M. Rodrigues; K.M. Schachtschneider

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Advanced Simulation and Computing  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NA-ASC-117R-09-Vol.1-Rev.0 NA-ASC-117R-09-Vol.1-Rev.0 Advanced Simulation and Computing PROGRAM PLAN FY09 October 2008 ASC Focal Point Robert Meisner, Director DOE/NNSA NA-121.2 202-586-0908 Program Plan Focal Point for NA-121.2 Njema Frazier DOE/NNSA NA-121.2 202-586-5789 A Publication of the Office of Advanced Simulation & Computing, NNSA Defense Programs i Contents Executive Summary ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1 I. Introduction -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 2 Realizing the Vision ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 2 The Future of the Nuclear Weapons Complex ---------------------------------------------------------------- 2

300

Advanced fuel chemistry for advanced engines.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Autoignition chemistry is central to predictive modeling of many advanced engine designs that combine high efficiency and low inherent pollutant emissions. This chemistry, and especially its pressure dependence, is poorly known for fuels derived from heavy petroleum and for biofuels, both of which are becoming increasingly prominent in the nation's fuel stream. We have investigated the pressure dependence of key ignition reactions for a series of molecules representative of non-traditional and alternative fuels. These investigations combined experimental characterization of hydroxyl radical production in well-controlled photolytically initiated oxidation and a hybrid modeling strategy that linked detailed quantum chemistry and computational kinetics of critical reactions with rate-equation models of the global chemical system. Comprehensive mechanisms for autoignition generally ignore the pressure dependence of branching fractions in the important alkyl + O{sub 2} reaction systems; however we have demonstrated that pressure-dependent 'formally direct' pathways persist at in-cylinder pressures.

Taatjes, Craig A.; Jusinski, Leonard E.; Zador, Judit; Fernandes, Ravi X.; Miller, James A.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Instrumentation @ Catalysis: Reactivity and Structure Group | Chemistry  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Instrumentation Instrumentation The Catalysis Group at BNL is leading research initiatives into the development of new tools and techniques that focus on the characterization of heterogeneous catalytic reactions and catalysts using imaging, spectroscopy and scattering techniques and integrated combinations of them under reaction conditions to unravel the morphology, chemical and structural properties, of catalysts, respectively. These efforts revolve around the use of synchrotron radiation (NSLS), electrons (CFN) and quantum tunneling tools with particular thrusts into imaging, spectroscopy and scattering. Groups Instrumentation(BNL) Three UHV chambers with diverse instrumentation for surface characterization: LEED, UPS, XPS, AES, TPD, ISS, PM-AP-IRRAS, Reactivity Cell. All the systems include ancillary instrumentation such as sputtering guns and metal evaporators. The IRRAS system was retrofitted with an ambient pressure (AP) cell on top of the UHV system. The sample can be prepared and characterized in UHV and then transfer in vacuum to the AP cell.

302

Review of existing reactive transport software  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simulations of thermal and hydrological evolution following the potential emplacement of a subterranean nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, NV provide data that suggest the inevitability of dependent, simultaneous chemical evolution in this system. These chemical changes will modify significantly both the magnitude and structure of local porosity and permeability; hence, they will have a dynamic feedback effect on the evolving thermal and hydrological regime. Yet, despite this intimate interdependence of transport and chemical processes, a rigorous quantitative analysis of the post- emplacement environment that incorporates this critical feedback mechanism has not been completed to date. As an initial step in this direction, the present document outlines the fundamental chemical and transport processes that must be accounted for in such an analysis, and reviews the inventory of existing software that encodes these processed in explicitly coupled form. A companion report describes the prioritization of specific capabilities that are needed for modeling post-emplacement reactive transport at Yucca Mountain.

Glassley, W., LLNL

1998-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

303

Advanced Combustion Operation in a Compression Ignition Engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, advanced combustion operating modes were investigated on a DDC/VM Motori 2.5 L, four-cylinder, turbocharged, common rail, direct-injection light-duty diesel engine, with exhaust emission being the main focus. ... This process is based on work from Al-Qurashi et al., who conducted fundamental flame studies that showed that the thermal effect of EGR enhances the oxidative reactivity of diesel soot. ... Heywood, J. B. Internal Combustion Engine Fundamentals; McGraw-Hill Book Company: New York, 1988; p 930. ...

Gregory K. Lilik; Jos Martn Herreros; Andr L. Boehman

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

advancing ou r intellectual  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Grand Challenge: Energy, Environment, and Infrastructure Grand Challenge: Health 2. Investing in Faculty ambition to transform Lehigh University by advanc- ing our intellectual footprint. The students and future' ability to compete in that world. · Globalization · Energy, environment, and infrastructure · Health Adv

Napier, Terrence

305

Advanced Test Reactor Tour  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory is the foremost nuclear materials test reactor in the world. This virtual tour describes the reactor, how experiments are conducted, and how spent nuclear fuel is handled and stored. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

Miley, Don

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

International for Advanced Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Technology at the University of Ulm ICAS-Affiliations The International Center for Advanced Studies in Health in medical technology and pharma- ceutical industry. The International Advisory Panel of ICAS consists, transfer of state-of-the-art clinical technologies, and utilization of methodologies appropriate

Pfeifer, Holger

307

Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Training and Technology Transfer 43 Lectures and Seminars 44 CABM Lecture Series 45 Annual Retreat 46 15th An Advanced Technology Center of The New Jersey Commission on Science and Technology Jointly Administered from CABM laboratories have appeared in high impact international journals including Development, Genes

308

Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shatkin 41 Education, Training and Technology Transfer 43 Lectures and Seminars 44 CABM Lecture Series 45 An Advanced Technology Center of The New Jersey Commission on Science and Technology Jointly Administered for the improvement of human health. In 2002 peer-reviewed CABM studies were published in leading international

309

Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vikas Nanda 63 Protein Crystallography Ann Stock 67 Education, Training and Technology Transfer 71 Report An Advanced Technology Center of the New Jersey Commission on Science and Technology Jointly, the CIPR will house the Rutgers-based Protein Data Bank (PDB), an international repository directed

310

Advanced Drivetrain Manufacturing  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) supports advanced manufacturing techniques that are leading to the "next-generation" of more reliable, affordable, and efficient wind turbine drivetrains. As turbines continue to increase in size, each and every component must also be scaled to meet the demands for renewable energy.

311

RECENT ADVANCES COMPUTATIONAL METHODS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RECENT ADVANCES ON COMPUTATIONAL METHODS FOR STRUCTURED INVERSE QUADRATIC EIGENVALUE PROBLEMS by Biswa Nath Datta Department of Mathematical Sciences Northern Illinois University DeKalb, IL 60115 E-Element Model Updating in Aerospace and Au- tomobile Industries. 10 #12;Quadratic Inverse Eigenvalue Problems

Datta, Biswa

312

Advanced Test Reactor Tour  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory is the foremost nuclear materials test reactor in the world. This virtual tour describes the reactor, how experiments are conducted, and how spent nuclear fuel is handled and stored. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

Miley, Don

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

313

Standard version Advanced version  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: gasoline, jet fuel, and heating oil. The average octane levels must be: Gasoline Jet fuel Heating oil Distilled 2 Naphtha Distill (barrels) 0.25 0.25 0.5 Distilled naphtha can be used only to produce gasoline version Advanced version Margaret Oil - basic (3) Crude Distill Naphtha Gasoline Distilled 1 Jet fuel

Hall, Julian

314

A Learning-Based Approach to Reactive Security  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Terms--Reactive security, risk management, attack graphs, online learning, adversarial learning, game vulnerability is plugged, CISOs typically perform a cost- benefit analysis to identify which risks to address of reactive strategies in an economic model of the CISO's security cost-benefit trade- offs. Unlike previously

Song, Dawn

315

A Reactive Measurement Framework Mark Allman and Vern Paxson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Reactive Measurement Framework Mark Allman and Vern Paxson International Computer Science Institute Abstract. Often when assessing complex network behavior a single measure- ment is not enough for thinking about "measurement" as a process rather than an event. We introduce reactive measurement (REM

Paxson, Vern

316

Tropospheric Reactive Nitrogen Speciation, Deposition, and Chemistry at Harvard Forest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and absolute contributions of nitric acid (HNO3) and NOx (nitric oxide (NO) + nitrogen dioxide (NO2)) to totalTropospheric Reactive Nitrogen Speciation, Deposition, and Chemistry at Harvard Forest A thesis. Steven C. Wofsy Cassandra Volpe Horii Tropospheric Reactive Nitrogen Speciation, Deposition

317

A Reactive Control Approach for Pipeline Inspection with an AUV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Reactive Control Approach for Pipeline Inspection with an AUV Pedro K. Paim, Bruno Jouvencel and research activities, performing tasks such as survey, inspection of sub-sea pipelines and object recovery of mission. This paper proposes a reactive control approach for pipeline following by a torpedo- like

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

318

From Teleo-Reactive specifications to architectural components: A model-driven approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Teleo-Reactive approach designed by N.J. Nilsson offers a high-level programming model that permits the development of reactive systems, such as robotic vehicles. Teleo-Reactive programs are written in a manner that allows engineers to define the ... Keywords: Component-based software development, Model-driven software development, Reactive systems, Robotics, Teleo-Reactive programs

Pedro SNchez; Diego Alonso; Jos Miguel Morales; Pedro Javier Navarro

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Overview  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Overview to Overview to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Overview on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Overview on Twitter Bookmark Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Overview on Google Bookmark Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Overview on Delicious Rank Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Overview on Digg Find More places to share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Overview on AddThis.com... Home Overview Light-Duty Vehicles Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles Publications Overview The marketplace for advanced transportation technologies and the focus, direction, and funding of transportation programs are continually changing. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity's "2005 Overview of Advanced Technology Transportation" (PDF 736 KB) gives the latest information about

320

First results of operating and monitoring an innovative design of a permeable reactive barrier for the remediation of chromate contaminated groundwater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An innovative setup of a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) was installed in Willisau, Switzerland to remediate chromate contaminated groundwater. Instead of a conventional continuous barrier, this PRB consists of cylinders installed in rows: a single row for lower expected CrVI-concentrations and an offset double row for higher expected CrVI-concentrations. The cylinders are filled with reactive grey cast-Fe shavings mixed with gravel to prevent extensive precipitation of secondary phases in the pore space. The treatment of the contaminants takes place both within the cylinders and in the dissolved FeII plume generated downstream of the barrier. Monitoring of the contamination situation over a period of 3 a provided evidence of the mobilization, transport and behavior of the contaminants in the aquifer. Groundwater and reactive material were sampled upstream, within and downstream of the barrier by a Multi-Port Sampling System (MPSS) that revealed the geochemical processes as a function of time and space. Comprehensive chemical analyses included sensitive parameters such as CrVI, FeII/FeIII, redox potential, dissolved O2 and pH. Several campaigns using multiple optical tracers revealed a rather complex hydrological regime at different scales, thereby complicating the barrier performance. Results from the large 3D hydrogeochemical dataset show that the double row of cylinders successfully treated the chromate contamination. Remediation by the single row was not effective enough due to insufficient lateral overlap of the cylinders and their FeII-plumes. The low amount of precipitated secondary phases observed in the pore space of the reactive material reduced the risk of clogging the system and suggested a favorable longevity of the barrier. Limiting factors for the long-term operation are inferred to be the availability and accessibility of FeII within the cylinders and the concentration within the generated FeII-plume.

Bettina Flury; Urs Eggenberger; Urs Mder

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Biodiesel Fuel Property Effects on Particulate Matter Reactivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Controlling diesel particulate emissions to meet the 2007 U.S. standard requires the use of a diesel particulate filter (DPF). The reactivity of soot, or the carbon fraction of particulate matter, in the DPF and the kinetics of soot oxidation are important in achieving better control of aftertreatment devices. Studies showed that biodiesel in the fuel can increase soot reactivity. This study therefore investigated which biodiesel fuel properties impact reactivity. Three fuel properties of interest included fuel oxygen content and functionality, fuel aromatic content, and the presence of alkali metals. To determine fuel effects on soot reactivity, the performance of a catalyzed DPF was measured with different test fuels through engine testing and thermo-gravimetric analysis. Results showed no dependence on the aromatic content or the presence of alkali metals in the fuel. The presence and form of fuel oxygen was the dominant contributor to faster DPF regeneration times and soot reactivity.

Williams, A.; Black, S.; McCormick, R. L.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

NICTA Advanced Course Advanced Topics in Software Verification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.g. c) § Have syntax 'a :: c for: type 'a supports the operations of c § Can write abstract polymorphicCOMP 4161 NICTA Advanced Course Advanced Topics in Software Verification Gerwin Klein, June

Klein, Gerwin

323

Early maturation processes in coal. Part 2: Reactive dynamics simulations using the ReaxFF reactive force field on Morwell Brown coal structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Early maturation processes in coal. Part 2: Reactive dynamics simulations using the ReaxFF reactive force field on Morwell Brown coal structures Elodie Salmon a , Adri C.T. van Duin b , François Lorant Brown coal using the ReaxFF reactive force field. We find that these reactive MD simulations

Goddard III, William A.

324

CO2 tracer gas concentration decay method for measuring air change rate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The measure of air change rate (ACR) in building is a difficult and usually expensive task. The tracer gas method is the reference technique but its implementation is difficult and the interpretation of results is not straightforward. In the present work, the concentration decay method by multiple CO2 transmitters is experimentally validated in the case of cross-ventilation. It is observed that in-situ CO2 transmitters lead to ACR values in good agreement with reference measurements obtained from mechanically controlled values. Whereas multiple transmitters in different sampling positions show the imperfect mixing, a sensor located at the outlet or an averaged value of all sensors can provide an accurate measure of the ACR. Moreover, the spatial variation of CO2 concentration can be used to assess the ventilation efficiency in the test chamber. Different measures and calculation methods are discussed, and the uncertainty analysis of each method is carried out.

Shuqing Cui; Michal Cohen; Pascal Stabat; Dominique Marchio

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Mixing properties in the advection of passive tracers via recurrences and extreme value theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we characterize the mixing properties in the advection of passive tracers by exploiting the extreme value theory for dynamical systems. With respect to classical techniques directly related to the Poincar\\'e recurrences analysis, our method provides reliable estimations of the characteristic mixing times and distinguishes between barriers and unstable fixed points. The method is based on a check of convergence for extreme value laws on finite datasets. We define the mixing times in terms of the shortest time intervals such that extremes converge to the asymptotic (known) parameters of the Generalized Extreme Value distribution. Our technique is suitable for applications in the analysis of other systems where mixing time scales need to be determined and limited datasets are available.

Davide Faranda; Xavier Leoncini; Sandro Vaienti

2014-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

326

Using conversions of chemically reacting tracers for numerical determination of temperature profiles in flowing systems and temperature histories in batch systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the mathematical bases for measuring internal temperatures within batch and flowing systems using chemically reacting tracers. This approach can obtain temperature profiles of plug-flow systems and temperature histories within batch systems. The differential equations for reactant conversion can be converted into Fredholm integral equations of the first kind. The experimental variable is the tracer-reaction activation energy. When more than one tracer is used, the reactions must have different activation energies to gain information. In systems with temperature extrema, multiple solutions for the temperature profiles or histories can exist, When a single parameter in the temperature distribution is needed, a single-tracer test may furnish this information. For multi-reaction tracer tests, three Fredholm equations are developed. Effects of tracer-reaction activation energy, number of tracers used, and error in the data are evaluated. The methods can determine temperature histories and profiles for many existing systems, and can be a basis for analysis of the more complicated dispersed-flow systems. An alternative to using the Fredholm-equation approach is the use of an assumed temperature- distribution function and incorporation of this function into the basic integral equation describing tracer behavior. The function contains adjustable parameters which are optimized to give the temperature distribution. The iterative Fredholm equation method is tested to see what is required to discriminate between two models of the temperature behavior of Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal reservoirs. Experimentally, ester and amide hydrolyses are valid HDR tracer reactions for measuring temperatures in the range 75-100{degrees}C. Hydrolyses of bromobenzene derivatives are valid HDR tracer reactions for measuring temperatures in the range 150-275{degrees}C.

Brown, L.F.; Chemburkar, R.M.; Robinson, B.A.; Travis, B.J.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Reactive barriers for {sup 137}Cs retention  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

{sup 137}Cs was dispersed globally by cold war activities and, more recently, by the Chernobyl accident. Engineered extraction of {sup 137}Cs from soils and groundwaters is exceedingly difficult. Because the half life of {sup 137}Cs is only 30.2 years, remediation might be more effective (and less costly) if {sup 137}Cs bioavailability could be demonstrably limited for even a few decades by use of a reactive barrier. Essentially permanent isolation must be demonstrated in those few settings where high nuclear level wastes contaminated the environment with {sup 135}Cs (half life 2.3x10{sup 6} years) in addition to {sup 137}Cs. Clays are potentially a low-cost barrier to Cs movement, though their long-term effectiveness remains untested. To identify optimal clays for Cs retention Cs resorption was measured for five common clays: Wyoming Montmorillonite (SWy-1), Georgia Kaolinites (KGa-1 and KGa-2), Fithian Illite (F-Ill), and K-Metabentonite (K-Mbt). Exchange sites were pre-saturated with 0.16 M CsCl for 14 days and readily exchangeable Cs was removed by a series of LiNO{sub 3} and LiCl washes. Washed clay were then placed into dialysis bags and the Cs release to the deionized water outside the bags measured. Release rates from 75 to 139 days for SWy-1, K-Mbt and F- 111 were similar; 0.017 to 0.021% sorbed Cs released per day. Both kaolinites released Cs more rapidly (0.12 to 0.05% of the sorbed Cs per day). In a second set of experiments, clays were doped for 110 days and subjected to an extreme and prolonged rinsing process. All the clays exhibited some capacity for irreversible Cs uptake so most soils have some limited ability to act as a natural barrier to Cs migration. However, the residual loading was greatest on K-Mbt ({approximately} 0.33 wt% Cs). Thus, this clay would be the optimal material for constructing artificial reactive barriers.

KRUMHANSL,JAMES L.; BRADY,PATRICK V.; ANDERSON,HOWARD L.

2000-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

328

Comparison of the optoacoustic and Hg tracer methods for the study of energy-transfer processes in gas mixtures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rates of energy transfer from vibrationally excited SF/sub 6/ and pentafluorobenzene to argon in the gas phase have been studied by using the Hg tracer technique and time-resolved optoacoustics. These two techniques which rely on fundamentally different physical principles were found to give equivalent results. The implications for the study of energy-transfer processes in gas mixtures are discussed.

Wallington, T.J.; Braun, W.; Beck, K.M.; Gordon, R.J.

1988-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

329

{sup 41}Ca as a tracer for calcium uptake and deposition in heart tissue during ischemia and reperfusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed techniques and are commencing experiments using enriched {sup 41}Ca as a tracer in isolated rabbit heart preparations. The aims of the study are to measure calcium uptake and deposition in response to cardiac ischemia and reperfusion, and to investigate events and mechanism leading to irreversible myocyte injury.

Southon, J.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Bishop, M.S.; Kost, G.J. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Medical Pathology and Biomedical Engineering

1993-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

330

Herty Advanced Materials Development Center  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Session 1-B: Advancing Alternative Fuels for the Military and Aviation Sector Breakout Session 1: New Developments and Hot Topics Jill Stuckey, Acting Director, Herty Advanced Materials Development Center

331

Search Advanced Search Home > News  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Search Advanced Search Home > News [-] Text [+] Email Print tweet 0 tweets RSS Feeds Newsletters with bodily tissues, "these approaches might have the potential to redefine design strategies for advanced

Rogers, John A.

332

Overview | Advanced Photon Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

APS Overview: APS Overview: Introduction APS Systems Map LINAC Booster Synchrotron Storage Ring Insertion Devices Experiment Hall LOMs & Beamlines Overview of the APS The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory provides this nation's (in fact, this hemisphere's) brightest storage ring-generated x-ray beams for research in almost all scientific disciplines. Photo: Aerial Photo of APS Aerial photo of the Advanced Photon Source These x-rays allow scientists to pursue new knowledge about the structure and function of materials in the center of the Earth and in outer space, and all points in between. The knowledge gained from this research can impact the evolution of combustion engines and microcircuits, aid in the development of new pharmaceuticals, and pioneer nanotechnologies whose

333

NETL: Advanced Research - Ultrasupercritical  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

High Performance Materials > Ultrasupercritical High Performance Materials > Ultrasupercritical Advanced Research High Performance Materials Ultrasupercritical Increasing the temperature and pressure of steam improves the efficiency of boilers and turbines that use steam as the working fluid. These higher efficiency boilers and turbines require less coal and produce less greenhouse gases. Identifying materials that can operate for long periods of time at extreme temperatures and pressures is a major goal of NETL's Advanced Research Materials Program. Phase diagram of water Figure 1: Phase diagram of water To understand the terminology of boilers and turbines, it is first necessary to understand the basics of the water/steam phase diagram (see Figure 1). The normal boiling point (nbp) of water occurs at 1 atmosphere

334

Advanced Photon Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tomography Interest Group Contact: Robert Winarski, Center for Nanoscale Materials winarski@anl.gov Contact: Francesco De Carlo, Advanced Photon Source decarlo@aps.anl.gov The tomography special interest group of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory has been created to promote awareness of the tomography facilities at the APS and to foster communications between the various research groups. Through this group, we believe we can build a strong user community for tomography. The following beamlines have active tomography research programs: 2-BM-B (XOR) http://www.aps.anl.gov/Xray_Science_Division/Xray_Microscopy_and_Imaging/Science_and_Research/Techniques/Tomography/index.html Information about the beamline: http://beam.aps.anl.gov/pls/apsweb/beamline_display_pkg.display_beamline?p_beamline_num_c=31

335

Posters | Advanced Photon Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Your Cart (0 Posters) Your Cart (0 Posters) Your cart is empty. checkout Subtotal: $0.00 update empty Posters Order a printed APS poster! 11 in. x 17 in. prints will be mailed in the order requests are received. 36 in. x 36 in. posters will be sent to school addresses once all orders are processed. The Advanced Photon Source Is The Advanced Photon Source Is Qty: 1 add to cart Technologies from Materials Science Technologies from Materials Science Qty: 1 add to cart Materials Under Extreme Pressure Materials Under Extreme Pressure Qty: 1 add to cart Biological Macromolecules in Action Biological Macromolecules in Action Qty: 1 add to cart Journey to the Center of the Earth Journey to the Center of the Earth Qty: 1 add to cart Earthshaking Monitor Earthshaking Monitor Qty: 1 add to cart Imaging with X-rays

336

Advanced Simulation Capability for  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Simulation Capability for Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) ASCEM is being developed to provide a tool and approach to facilitate robust and standardized development of perfor- mance and risk assessments for cleanup and closure activi- ties throughout the EM complex. The ASCEM team is composed of scientists from eight National Laboratories. This team is leveraging Department of Energy (DOE) investments in basic science and applied research including high performance computing codes developed through the Advanced Scientific Computing Research and Advanced Simulation & Computing pro- grams as well as collaborating with the Offices of Science, Fossil Energy, and Nuclear Energy. Challenge Current groundwater and soil remediation challenges that will continue to be addressed in the next decade include

337

Advanced Technology Vehicle Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) is to increase the body of knowledge as well as the awareness and acceptance of electric drive and other advanced technology vehicles (ATV). The AVTA accomplishes this goal by testing ATVs on test tracks and dynamometers (Baseline Performance testing), as well as in real-world applications (Fleet and Accelerated Reliability testing and public demonstrations). This enables the AVTA to provide Federal and private fleet managers, as well as other potential ATV users, with accurate and unbiased information on vehicle performance and infrastructure needs so they can make informed decisions about acquiring and operating ATVs. The ATVs currently in testing include vehicles that burn gaseous hydrogen (H2) fuel and hydrogen/CNG (H/CNG) blended fuels in internal combustion engines (ICE), and hybrid electric (HEV), urban electric, and neighborhood electric vehicles. The AVTA is part of DOE's FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program.

James Francfort

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Advanced Separation Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was formed in 2001 under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy to conduct fundamental research in advanced separation and to develop technologies that can be used to produce coal and minerals in an efficient and environmentally acceptable manner. The CAST consortium consists of seven universities - Virginia Tech, West Virginia University, University of Kentucky, Montana Tech, University of Utah, University of Nevada-Reno, and New Mexico Tech. The consortium brings together a broad range of expertise to solve problems facing the US coal industry and the mining sector in general. At present, a total of 60 research projects are under way. The article outlines some of these, on topics including innovative dewatering technologies, removal of mercury and other impurities, and modelling of the flotation process. 1 photo.

NONE

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Advanced steel reheat furnace  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy and Environmental Research Corp. (EER) under a contract from the Department of Energy is pursuing the development and demonstration of an Advanced Steel Reheating Furnace. This paper reports the results of Phase 1, Research, which has evaluated an advanced furnace concept incorporating two proven and commercialized technologies previously applied to other high temperature combustion applications: EER`s gas reburn technology (GR) for post combustion NOx control; and Air Product`s oxy-fuel enrichment air (OEA) for improved flame heat transfer in the heating zones of the furnace. The combined technologies feature greater production throughput with associated furnace efficiency improvements; lowered NOx emissions; and better control over the furnace atmosphere, whether oxidizing or reducing, leading to better control over surface finish.

Moyeda, D.; Sheldon, M.; Koppang, R. [Energy and Environmental Research Corp., Irvine, CA (United States); Lanyi, M.; Li, X.; Eleazer, B. [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Advanced Photon Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 Advanced Photon Source 0 Advanced Photon Source A U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences national synchrotron x-ray research facility Search Button About Welcome Overview Visiting the APS Mission & Goals Find People Organization Charts Committees Job Openings User Information Prospective Users New Users Current Users APS User Portal Macromolecular Crystallographers Administrators Find a Beamline Apply for Beam Time Contacts Calendars Community Scientific Access Site Access Training Science & Education Science & Research Highlights Conferences Seminars Publications Annual Reports APS Upgrade Courses and Schools Graduate Programs Scientific Software Media Center Calendar of Events APS News User News Argonne/APS Press Releases Argonne/APS Feature Stories Argonne/APS In The News

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Advanced Energy Guides  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Guides Energy Guides Shanti Pless National Renewable Energy Laboratory shanti.pless@nrel.gov 303-384-6365 April 4 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Advanced Energy Design Guides Provide prescriptive energy savings guidance and recommendations by building type and geographic location: * Design packages and strategies to help owners and designers achieve 50% site energy savings over Standard 90.1 * Two series: - 30% savings over 90.1-1999

342

Advanced Energy Guides  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Guides Energy Guides Shanti Pless National Renewable Energy Laboratory shanti.pless@nrel.gov 303-384-6365 April 4 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Advanced Energy Design Guides Provide prescriptive energy savings guidance and recommendations by building type and geographic location: * Design packages and strategies to help owners and designers achieve 50% site energy savings over Standard 90.1 * Two series: - 30% savings over 90.1-1999

343

ADVANCED CHEMISTRY BASINS MODEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The advanced Chemistry Basin Model project has been operative for 48 months. During this period, about half the project tasks are on projected schedule. On average the project is somewhat behind schedule (90%). Unanticipated issues are causing model integration to take longer then scheduled, delaying final debugging and manual development. It is anticipated that a short extension will be required to fulfill all contract obligations.

William Goddard III; Lawrence Cathles III; Mario Blanco; Paul Manhardt; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Reactive sticking coefficients of silane on silicon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have investigated the reaction of room-temperature silane and disilane on a hot polycrystalline silicon surface using both a collision-free molecular beam and a very low pressure CVD cell. Reactive sticking coefficients were obtained from deposition rate data over a wide range of temperatures and silane (disilane) fluxes. The RSCs are substantially less than one, ranging from 6 x 10/sup -5/ to 4 x 10/sup -2/. For silane we observed curved Arrhenius plots with slopes decreasing from approx.60 kcal mol/sup -1/ at low temperatures to approx.2 kcal mol/sup -1/ at higher temperatures. The RSCs are independent of flux (pressure) at 1040/sup 0/C, but vary as flux to the approx.-1/2 power at 710/sup 0/C. A model comprised of a dissociative adsorption mechanism with competing associative desorption and reaction was found to give reasonable agreement. For disilane, we observed RSCs that were roughly ten times higher than those for silane. We also observed a curved Arrhenius plot and a flux dependence at 710/sup 0/C for disilane. 22 refs., 5 figs.

Buss, R.J.; Ho, P.; Breiland, W.G.; Coltrin, M.E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Advancing Next-Generation Vehicles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) lead laboratory for researching advanced vehicle technologies, including hy- the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) lead laboratory for researching advanced vehicle technologies, including hy- brid, plug-in hybrid, battery electric, and alternative fuel vehicles, Argonne provides transportation research critical to advancing the development of next-generation vehicles. Central to this effort is the Lab's Advanced Powertrain Research Facility (APRF), an integrated four-wheel drive chassis dynamometer and component test facility.

346

Advanced Microturbine Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dept. of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement DE-FC02-00-CH11061 was originally awarded to Honeywell International, Inc. ?? Honeywell Power Systems Inc. (HPSI) division located in Albuquerque, NM in October 2000 to conduct a program titled Advanced Microturbine Systems (AMS). The DOE Advanced Microturbines Systems Program was originally proposed as a five-year program to design and develop a high efficiency, low emissions, durable microturbine system. The period of performance was to be October 2000 through September 2005. Program efforts were underway, when one year into the program Honeywell sold the intellectual property of Honeywell Power Systems Inc. and HPSI ceased business operations. Honeywell made an internal decision to restructure the existing program due to the HPSI shutdown and submitted a formal request to DOE on September 24, 2001 to transfer the Cooperative Agreement to Honeywell Engines, Systems and Services (HES&S) in Phoenix, AZ in order to continue to offer support for DOE's Advanced Microturbine Program. Work continued on the descoped program under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-00-CH11061 and has been completed.

None

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

347

Advancement of Electrochromic Windows  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advancement of Electrochromic Windows Advancement of Electrochromic Windows Title Advancement of Electrochromic Windows Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-59821 Year of Publication 2006 Authors Lee, Eleanor S., Stephen E. Selkowitz, Robert D. Clear, Dennis L. DiBartolomeo, Joseph H. Klems, Luis L. Fernandes, Gregory J. Ward, Vorapat Inkarojrit, and Mehry Yazdanian Date Published 04/2006 Other Numbers CEC-500-2006-052 Keywords commercial buildings, daylight, daylighting controls, Electrochromic windows, energy efficiency, human factors, peak demand, switchable windows, visual comfort Abstract This guide provides consumer-oriented information about switchable electrochromic (EC) windows. Electrochromic windows change tint with a small applied voltage, providing building owners and occupants with the option to have clear or tinted windows at any time, irrespective of whether it's sunny or cloudy. EC windows can be manually or automatically controlled based on daylight, solar heat gain, glare, view, energy-efficiency, peak electricity demand response, or other criteria. Window controls can be integrated with other building systems, such as lighting and heating/cooling mechanical systems, to optimize interior environmental conditions, occupant comfort, and energy-efficiency.

348

Fossil Energy Advanced Technologies (2008 - 2009) | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fossil Energy Advanced Technologies (2008 - 2009) Fossil Energy Advanced Technologies (2008 - 2009) Fossil Energy Advanced Technologies (2008 - 2009) Amendment: Energy and...

349

E-Print Network 3.0 - ameliorating reactive oxygen Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

structure and surface relaxation Summary: reactivity of each type of oxygen the adsorption of hydrogen over different oxygen sites is studied. Full... oxygen is the reactive...

350

Pertechnetate (TcO4-) reduction by reactive ferrous iron forms...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

reduction by reactive ferrous iron forms in naturally anoxic, redox transition zone sediments from the Pertechnetate (TcO4-) reduction by reactive ferrous iron forms in naturally...

351

Metal-Pyrrolide Complexes in Three-fold Symmetry: Synthesis, Structure, Reactivity and Magnetism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structure, Reactivity and Magnetism by William Hill Harman AStructure, Reactivity and Magnetism by William Hill Harmanlost time. Dave taught me magnetism and what it takes to win

Harman, William Hill

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Synthesis, characterization, and reactivity studies of iridium complexes bearing the ligand diphenylphosphidoboratabenzene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The synthesis, structure, and reactivity properties of three iridium square planar complexes bearing the anionic phosphine ligand diphenylphosphidoboratabenzene (DPB) are described. Reactivity studies show a rate enhancement ...

Arizpe, Luis (Luis Alfredo)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Aging Enhances the Production of Reactive Oxygen Species andBactericid...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Enhances the Production of Reactive Oxygen Species andBactericidal Activity in Peritoneal Macrophages by Aging Enhances the Production of Reactive Oxygen Species andBactericidal...

354

Effect of burnup on ACR-700 3-D reactivity devices cross sections  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Full core analysis of typical power reactors being generally performed using few groups diffusion theory, it is necessary to generate beforehand, using a lattice code, the required few group cross sections and diffusion coefficients associated with each region in the core. For CANDU-type reactors including the Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACR), the problem is more complex because these reactors contain vertical reactivity devices that are located between two horizontal fuel bundles. The usual calculation scheme relies in this case on a 2-D fuel cell calculation to generate the few group fuel properties and on a 3-D supercell calculation for the analysis of the reactivity devices present in the core. Because of its complexity, the supercell calculations are generally performed using simplified fuel geometries. In this paper, the different stages involved in the reactor physics simulations for ACR will be explained focusing particularly on a study of the burnup dependence of the incremental cross section associated with zone control units (ZCU). The use of these incremental cross sections for finite core calculations will also be presented. (authors)

Dahmani, M.; Marleau, G.; Varin, E. [Institut de Genie Nucleaire, Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, 2900 Boulevard Edouard-Montpetit, Montreal, Que. H3T 1J4 (Canada)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

3D Field-Scale Reactive Transport Modeling of In Situ Immobilization of Uranium in Structured Porous Media via Biostimulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A several-month-long ethanol injection experiment is being conducted to study the impacts of porous media structure (i.e., heterogeneity existing at multiple scales) on the effectiveness of metal/radionuclide bioremediation in a highly heterogeneous unconfined aquifer near Oak Ridge, TN, USA. We have constructed a 3D field-scale groundwater flow and multicomponent reactive transport model to simulate the experimental observations. The model incorporates a suite of abiotic reactions and microbially-mediated redox reactions for multiple terminal electron accepting processes (TEAPs) including soluble oxygen, nitrate, U(VI) and sulfate and solid-phase electron acceptors. Different biomass populations are considered in the model. Growth of these populations is derived from the bioenergetics-based approach in which the partitioning of electron flow between energy generation and cell biomass production is dependent on the free energy of the corresponding TEAP. TEAP reaction rates were free energy constrained. The TEAP model and reaction system have been formulated and used to simulate laboratory batch experimental observations. We conducted the field-scale simulation starting with the reaction system and parameters obtained from the batch experiment and hydrologic parameters estimated from the results of pumping tests, water level monitoring and model interpretation of a tracer test conducted in August 2004. Reaction parameters were investigated to compare simulation results and field experiment observations.

Fang, Yilin; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Roden, Eirc E.; Kamolpornwijit, Wiwat; Brooks, Scott C.

2006-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

356

Photo of the Week: Reactive Ion Etching | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Reactive Ion Etching Reactive Ion Etching Photo of the Week: Reactive Ion Etching October 17, 2013 - 1:26pm Addthis Have you ever heard of Laue lenses? These multilayer lenses are used to focus high-intensity x-ray beams to show the details of nano material structures. In this photo, the drop-like domes were carved through a process called reactive ion etching, which produced the striped bubbles you see in the Laue lens. The prototype in this image helped scientists perfect the process of creating lenses so precise that scientists are able to focus x-rays to within a single nanometer. | Photo courtesy of Brookhaven National Laboratory. Have you ever heard of Laue lenses? These multilayer lenses are used to focus high-intensity x-ray beams to show the details of nano material

357

Radiation Chemistry of Ionic Liquids: Reactivity of Primary Species  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Liquids: Reactivity of Primary Species Liquids: Reactivity of Primary Species James F. Wishart In "Ionic Liquids as Green Solvents: Progress and Prospects" Rogers, R. D. and Seddon, K. R. , Eds.; ACS Symp. Ser. 856, Ch. 31, pp. 381-395, American Chemical Society, Washington, DC, 2003. (ISBN 0-84123-856-1) [Information about the book] Abstract: An understanding of the radiation chemistry of ionic liquids is important for development of their applications in radioactive material processing and for the application of pulse radiolysis techniques to the general study of chemical reactivity in ionic liquids. The distribution of primary radiolytic species and their reactivities determine the yields of ultimate products and the radiation stability of a particular ionic liquid. This chapter introduces some principles of radiation chemistry and the

358

Detoxification of hydrolysate by reactive-extraction for generating biofuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We introduce a reactive extraction to detoxify hydrolysate before fermentation to biofuels. In the selection of diluents, n-octanol showed the highest removal yield of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) and levulini...

Gwi-Taek Jeong; Sung-Koo Kim; Don-Hee Park

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Cooperative Strategies and Reactive Search: A Hybrid Model Proposal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cooperative strategies and reactive search are very promising techniques for solving hard optimization problems, since they reduce human intervention required to set up a method when the resolution of an unknown instance is needed. However, as far as ...

Antonio D. Masegosa; Franco Mascia; David Pelta; Mauro Brunato

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Mechanisms of Photochemistry and Reactive Oxygen Production by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

photosensitizer that produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the presence of light; however, its properties medical and environmental contexts as well as the potential applications implied for industrial or water of transferring light energy to chemical oxidation potential in theformof

Alvarez, Pedro J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Reactivity of the Quinone Methide of Butylated hydroxytoluene in Solution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BHT is a common antioxidant in pharmaceutical formulations and when oxidized it forms a quinone methide (QM). QM is a highly reactive electrophilic species which can undergo nucleophilic addition. This research investigated ...

Willcockson, Maren Gulsrud

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

362

The Safe Storage Study for Autocatalytic Reactive Chemicals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the U.S. Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board (CSB) report, Improving Reactive Hazard Management, there are 37 out of 167 accidents, which occurred in a storage tank or a storage area. This fact demonstrates that thermal runaway...

Liu, Lijun

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

363

Reactive Power Compensation Strategy of DGIF Wind Park  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this chapter, two different wind park reactive power compensation strategies for the DFIG wind park connected to the sub-transmission level are proposed. Except considering DFIG wind turbines as dynamic reacti...

JingJing Zhao; Yang Fu; DongDong Li

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Evolution of Memory in Reactive Artificial Neural Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the context of evolution: how reactive agents could have evolved into cognitive ones with internalized memory? This study strives to find an answer to the question by simulating neuroevolution on artificial neural networks, with the hypothesis...

Chung, Ji Ryang

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

365

Reactive Support and Voltage Control Service: Key Issues and Challenges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reactive Support and Voltage Control Service: Key Issues and Challenges George Gross^, Paolo of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA, e-mail gross@uiuc.edu ° Dipartimento di Ingegneria

Gross, George

366

Analytical methods for determining the reactivity of pyrochemical salts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pyrochemical processes used for the purification of plutonium have generated quantities of residue that contain varying amounts of reactive metals such as potassium, sodium, calcium, and magnesium. These residues are currently considered hazardous and are being managed under RCRA because of the reactivity characteristic. This designation is based solely on process knowledge. Currently there is no approved procedure for determining the reactivity of a solid with water. A method is being developed to rapidly evaluate the reactivity of pyrochemical salts with water by measuring the rate of hydrogen generation. The method was initially tested with a magnesium containing pyrochemical salt. A detection limit of approximately 0.004 g of magnesium was established. A surrogate molten salt extraction residue was also tested. Extrapolation of test data resulted in a hydrogen generation rate of 4.4 mg/(g min).

Phillips, A.G.; Stakebake, J.L.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Reactive oxygen species: a breath of life or death?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AP1, activator protein-1; ODD, oxygen-dependent degradationSignaling response when oxygen levels decrease (Fig. 1C;3. Halliwell B. Reactive oxygen species in living sys- tems:

Fruehauf, John P; Meyskens, Frank L Jr

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Local Control of Reactive Power by Distributed Photovoltaic Generators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High penetration levels of distributed photovoltaic (PV) generation on an electrical distribution circuit may severely degrade power quality due to voltage sags and swells caused by rapidly varying PV generation during cloud transients coupled with the slow response of existing utility compensation and regulation equipment. Although not permitted under current standards for interconnection of distributed generation, fast-reacting, VAR-capable PV inverters may provide the necessary reactive power injection or consumption to maintain voltage regulation under difficult transient conditions. As side benefit, the control of reactive power injection at each PV inverter provides an opportunity and a new tool for distribution utilities to optimize the performance of distribution circuits, e.g. by minimizing thermal losses. We suggest a local control scheme that dispatches reactive power from each PV inverter based on local instantaneous measurements of the real and reactive components of the consumed power and the re...

Turitsyn, Konstantin S; Backhaus, Scott; Chertkov, Misha

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Assessing low power reactivity levels in subcritical CANDU reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new technique has been developed for monitoring slow reactivity changes in Canadian deuterium uranium (CANDU) nuclear reactors during low power operation, following a sustained period of high power operation. The power doubling halving worth (PDHW) test tracks slow reactivity changes by evaluating the reactivity perturbation required by the power regulating system to halve and double reactor power over time. During low power operation of a CANDU reactor, the PDHW test is used to monitor the decay of the photoneutron precursors, so that the reactor power can be lowered using a preset amount of reactivity. The PDHW test is described in this paper and is validated by using computer simulations and operating data from a CANDU reactor.

Teare, S.W. [Corporation of the City of Mississauga, Ontario (Canada)] [Corporation of the City of Mississauga, Ontario (Canada); Shanes, F.C. [Ontario Hydro, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Ontario Hydro, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Hersey, M.W. [Pickering Nuclear Generating Station, Ontario (Canada)] [Pickering Nuclear Generating Station, Ontario (Canada)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

ADVANCED SULFUR CONTROL CONCEPTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conventional sulfur removal in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants involves numerous steps: COS (carbonyl sulfide) hydrolysis, amine scrubbing/regeneration, Claus process, and tail-gas treatment. Advanced sulfur removal in IGCC systems involves typically the use of zinc oxide-based sorbents. The sulfides sorbent is regenerated using dilute air to produce a dilute SO{sub 2} (sulfur dioxide) tail gas. Under previous contracts the highly effective first generation Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) for catalytic reduction of this SO{sub 2} tail gas to elemental sulfur was developed. This process is currently undergoing field-testing. In this project, advanced concepts were evaluated to reduce the number of unit operations in sulfur removal and recovery. Substantial effort was directed towards developing sorbents that could be directly regenerated to elemental sulfur in an Advanced Hot Gas Process (AHGP). Development of this process has been described in detail in Appendices A-F. RTI began the development of the Single-step Sulfur Recovery Process (SSRP) to eliminate the use of sorbents and multiple reactors in sulfur removal and recovery. This process showed promising preliminary results and thus further process development of AHGP was abandoned in favor of SSRP. The SSRP is a direct Claus process that consists of injecting SO{sub 2} directly into the quenched coal gas from a coal gasifier, and reacting the H{sub 2}S-SO{sub 2} mixture over a selective catalyst to both remove and recover sulfur in a single step. The process is conducted at gasifier pressure and 125 to 160 C. The proposed commercial embodiment of the SSRP involves a liquid phase of molten sulfur with dispersed catalyst in a slurry bubble-column reactor (SBCR).

Apostolos A. Nikolopoulos; Santosh K. Gangwal; William J. McMichael; Jeffrey W. Portzer

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Advanced Biofuels Workshop  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

August 1, 2012 August 1, 2012 In Attendance U.S. Energy Information Administration 1000 Independence Ave. SW, Room 2E-069 Washington, DC 20585 Adam Sieminski EIA Terry Higgins Hart Downstream Energy Services Peter Ryus RSB Services Foundation Zia Haq DOE Robert Kozak Atlantic Biomass Conversion Leticia Phillips UNICA/Brazillian Sugarecane Industry Assoc. Paul Kamp Leifmark, LLC/Inbicon Biomass Steve Gerber Fiberight Joanne Ivancic Advanced Biofuels USA John G. Cowie Agenda 2020 Technology Alliance Jeff Hazle American Fuel & Petrochemical Manufacturers Bryan Just American Petroleum Institute Barry Bernfeld Bunge Global Agribusiness Michael Corbin CLF Partners International LLC Paul Grabowski DOE, Office of Biomass Program

372

Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Demand Demand Responsive Lighting Host: Francis Rubinstein Demand Response Research Center Technical Advisory Group Meeting August 31, 2007 10:30 AM - Noon Meeting Agenda * Introductions (10 minutes) * Main Presentation (~ 1 hour) * Questions, comments from panel (15 minutes) Project History * Lighting Scoping Study (completed January 2007) - Identified potential for energy and demand savings using demand responsive lighting systems - Importance of dimming - New wireless controls technologies * Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting (commenced March 2007) Objectives * Provide up-to-date information on the reliability, predictability of dimmable lighting as a demand resource under realistic operating load conditions * Identify potential negative impacts of DR lighting on lighting quality Potential of Demand Responsive Lighting Control

373

Advanced Remediation Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for the cleanup of nation's nuclear weapons program legacy wastes, along with waste associated with nuclear energy programs and research. The EM cleanup efforts continue to progress, however the cleanup continues to be technologically complex, heavily regulated, long-term; and the effort also has a high life cycle cost estimate (LCCE) effort. Over the past few years, the EM program has undergone several changes to accelerate its cleanup efforts with varying degrees of success. This article will provide some insight into the Advanced Remediation Technologies (ART) projects that may enhance cleanup efforts and reduce life cycle costs. (authors)

Krahn, St.; Miller, C.E. [The United States Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Washington, D.C. (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Advanced NTR options. [Ta  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advanced NTR concepts which offer performance improvements over the ROVER/NERVA designs have been investigated. In addition, the deliverable performance of low pressure operation and materials issues have been investigated. Based on current experience, a maximum exit gas temperature of 3200 K is likely achievable with a ZrC based PBR design. At 3200 K a low pressure NTR would have marginal performance advantage (Isp) over a high pressure system. If tantalum or other high melting point carbides are used then an exit gas temperature of 3500 K may be feasible. At 3500 K low pressure operation offers more significant performance improvements which could outweigh associated size and mass penalties.

Davis, J.W.; Mills, J.C.; Glass, J.F.; Tu, W. (Rockwell International/Rocketdyne Division, 6633 Canoga Avenue, MS HB23 Canoga Park, California 81303 (US))

1991-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

375

Horizontal Advanced Tensiometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An horizontal advanced tensiometer is described that allows the monitoring of the water pressure of soil positions, particularly beneath objects or materials that inhibit the use of previous monitoring wells. The tensiometer includes a porous cup, a pressure transducer (with an attached gasket device), an adaptive chamber, at least one outer guide tube which allows access to the desired horizontal position, a transducer wire, a data logger and preferably an inner guide tube and a specialized joint which provides pressure on the inner guide tube to maintain the seal between the gasket of the transducer and the adaptive chamber.

Hubbell, Joel M.; Sisson, James B.

2004-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

376

Advanced Manufacture of Reflectors  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Advance Manufacture of Reflectors fact sheet describes a SunShot Initiative project being conducted research team led by the University of Arizona, which is working to develop a novel method for shaping float glass. The technique developed by this research team can drastically reduce the time required for the shaping step. By enabling mass production of solar concentrating mirrors at high speed, this project should lead to improved performance and as much as a 40% reduction in manufacturing costs for reflectors made in very high volume.

377

Using CO2 Lidar for Standoff Detection of a Perfluorocarbon Tracer in Air  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Tag, Track and Location System Program (TTL) is investigating the use of PFTs as tracers for tagging and tracking items of interest or fallen soldiers. In order for the tagging and tracking to be valuable there must be a location system that can detect the PFTs. This report details the development of an infrared lidar platform for standoff detection of PFTs released into the air from a tagged object or person. Furthering work performed using a table top lidar system in an indoor environment; a mobile mini lidar platform was assembled using an existing Raman lidar platform, a grating tunable CO{sub 2} IR laser, Judson HgCdTe detector and miscellaneous folding optics and electronics. The lidar achieved {approx}200 ppb-m sensitivity in laboratory and indoor testing and was then successfully demonstrated at an outdoor test. The lidar system was able to detect PFTs released into a vehicle from a distance of 100 meters. In its final, fully optimized configuration the lidar was capable of repeatedly detecting PFTs in the air released from tagged vehicles. Responses were immediate and clear. This report details the results of a proof-of-concept demonstration for standoff detection of a perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) using infrared lidar. The project is part of the Tag, Track and Location System Program and was performed under a contract with Tracer Detection Technology Corp. with funding from the Office of Naval Research. A lidar capable of detecting PFT releases at distance was assembled by modifying an existing Raman lidar platform by incorporating a grating tunable CO{sub 2} IR laser, Judson HgCdTe detector and miscellaneous folding optics and electronics. The lidar achieved {approx}200 ppb-m sensitivity in laboratory and indoor testing and was successfully demonstrated at an outdoor test. The demonstration test (scripted by the sponsor) consisted of three parked cars, two of which were tagged with the PFT. The cars were located 70 (closest) to 100 meters (farthest) from the lidar (the lidar beam path was limited by site constraints and was {approx}100 meters). When one door of each of the cars was opened (sequentially), the lidar was clearly able to determine which vehicles had been tagged and which one was not. The lidar is probably capable of greater than 0.5 kilometer standoff distances based on the extreme amount of signal return achieved (so much that the system had to be de-tuned). The BNL lidar system, while optimized to the extent possible with available parts and budget, was not as sensitive as it could be. Steps to improve the lidar are detailed in this report and include using a better laser system (for more stable power output), dual wavelengths (to improve the sensitivity and allow common mode noise reduction and to allow the use of the lidar in a scanning configuration), heterodyning (for range resolved PFT detection) and an off-axis optical configuration (for improved near field sensitivity).

Heiser,J.H.; Smith, S.; Sedlacek, A.

2008-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

378

(Electronic structure and reactivities of transition metal clusters)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following are reported: theoretical calculations (configuration interaction, relativistic effective core potentials, polyatomics, CASSCF); proposed theoretical studies (clusters of Cu, Ag, Au, Ni, Pt, Pd, Rh, Ir, Os, Ru; transition metal cluster ions; transition metal carbide clusters; bimetallic mixed transition metal clusters); reactivity studies on transition metal clusters (reactivity with H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, hydrocarbons; NO and CO chemisorption on surfaces). Computer facilities and codes to be used, are described. 192 refs, 13 figs.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Quantitative determination of collateral anterior olfactory nucleus projections using a fluorescent tracer with an algebraic solution to the problem of double retrograde labeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The bilateral projections of the rat anterior olfactory nucleus (AON) were evaluated using retrograde fluorescent tracers. Competitive effects of these tracers led to severe underestimation of bilaterally projecting neurons, when double-labeled cells were counted. The underestimate was corrected using a numerical approach, which is of general utility for problems in double labeling and requires only a single tracer. With this method we estimated that approximately 63% of AON neurons project bilaterally to the olfactory bulbs, except for the external part which projects exclusively to the contralateral olfactory bulb. No other AON neurons project only to the contralateral bulb.

George F. Alheid; Jrn Carlsen; Jose de Olmos; Lennart Heimer

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Combustion Engines  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Combustion Advanced Combustion Engines to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Combustion Engines on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Combustion Engines on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Combustion Engines on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Combustion Engines on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Combustion Engines on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Combustion Engines on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines Advanced Combustion Engines Combustion Engines Emission Control Waste Heat Recovery Fuels & Lubricants Materials Technologies Advanced Combustion Engines

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Advanced Reactor Technologies | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced Reactor Advanced Reactor Technologies Advanced Reactor Technologies Advanced Reactor Technologies Advanced Reactor Technologies The Office of Advanced Reactor Technologies (ART) sponsors research, development and deployment (RD&D) activities through its Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), Advanced Reactor Concepts (ARC), and Advanced Small Modular Reactor (aSMR) programs to promote safety, technical, economical, and environmental advancements of innovative Generation IV nuclear energy technologies. The Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) will pursue these advancements through RD&D activities at the Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories and U.S. universities, as well as through collaboration with industry and international partners. These activities will focus on advancing scientific

382

SCR Performance Optimization Through Advancements in Aftertreatment...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Performance Optimization Through Advancements in Aftertreatment Packaging SCR Performance Optimization Through Advancements in Aftertreatment Packaging The impact of improved urea...

383

Advanced Vehicle Electrification and Transportation Sector Electrifica...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Advanced Vehicle Electrification and Transportation Sector Electrification Plug-in Hybrid (PHEV) Vehicle Technology Advancement and...

384

Smith Electric Vehicles: Advanced Vehicle Electrification + Transporta...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Smith Electric Vehicles: Advanced Vehicle Electrification + Transportation Sector Electrification Smith Electric Vehicles: Advanced Vehicle Electrification + Transportation Sector...

385

NETL: Advanced Research - Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

High Performance Materials > Chrome Oxide Refractory High Performance Materials > Chrome Oxide Refractory Advanced Research High Performance Materials Chrome Oxide Refractory One notable NETL success is the development of a chrome oxide refractory material capable of working in slagging gasifier conditions. In this project, researchers first determined that one of the major failure mechanisms for chrome oxide refractories exposed to the intense heat and corrosive environment was spalling, or the chipping or flaking of refractory material from an exposed face. They used this information to formulate a high-chrome oxide refractory composition that resists spalling, resulting in a refractory with a longer service life in the gasifier. Inside an ultrasupercritical (USC) pulverized coal power plant, materials are exposed to temperatures up to 760°C and pressures up to 5,000 psi. Operating a USC system can improve power plant efficiency up to 47% and reduce emissions. However, finding boiler and turbine materials that can hold up under extreme conditions requires new high-temperature metal alloys and ceramic coatings, as well as computational modeling research to optimize the processing of these materials. Advanced Research Materials Development program successes in this area include the following:

386

Advanced Metering Infrastructure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report provides an overview of the development of Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI). Metering has historically served as the cash register for the utility industry. It measured the amount of energy used and supported the billing of customers for that usage. However, utilities are starting to look at meters in a whole different way, viewing them as the point of contact with customers in supporting a number of operational imperatives. The combination of smart meters and advanced communications has opened up a variety of methods for utilities to reduce operating costs while offering new services to customers. A concise look is given at what's driving interest in AMI, the components of AMI, and the creation of a business case for AMI. Topics covered include: an overview of AMI including the history of metering and development of smart meters; a description of the key technologies involved in AMI; a description of key government initiatives to support AMI; an evaluation of the current market position of AMI; an analysis of business case development for AMI; and, profiles of 21 key AMI vendors.

NONE

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

387

Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009 Paper 336 Time-Scale Analysis for Reactive Deposition of Ozone via Passive Reactive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009 Paper 336 Time-Scale Analysis for Reactive Deposition) homogeneous reactions with indoor pollutants. The #12;Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009 Paper 336 latter

Siegel, Jeffrey

388

Monitoring of saline tracer movement with vertically distributed self-potential measurements at the HOBE agricultural test site, Voulund, Denmark  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The self-potential (SP) method is sensitive to water fluxes in saturated and partially saturated porous media, such as those associated with rainwater infiltration and groundwater recharge. We present a field-based study at the Voulund agricultural test site, Denmark, that is, to the best of our knowledge, the first to focus on the vertical self-potential distribution prior to and during a saline tracer test. A coupled hydrogeophysical modeling framework is used to simulate the SP response to precipitation and saline tracer infiltration. A layered hydrological model is first obtained by inverting dielectric and matric potential data. The resulting model that compares favorably with electrical resistance tomography models is subsequently used to predict the SP response. The electrokinetic contribution (caused by water fluxes in a charged porous soil) is modeled by an effective excess charge approach that considers both water saturation and pore water salinity. Our results suggest that the effective excess char...

Jougnot, Damien; Haarder, Eline B; Looms, Majken C

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Preliminary Interpretation of a Radionuclide and Colloid Tracer Test in a Granodiorite Shear Zone at the Grimsel Test Site, Switzerland  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In February and March 2012, a tracer test involving the injection of a radionuclide-colloid cocktail was conducted in the MI shear zone at the Grimsel Test Site, Switzerland, as part of the Colloids Formation and Migration (CFM) project. The colloids were derived from FEBEX bentonite, which is mined in Spain and is being considered as a potential waste package backfill in a Spanish nuclear waste repository. The tracer test, designated test 12-02 (second test in 2012), involved the injection of the tracer cocktail into borehole CFM 06.002i2 and extraction from the Pinkel surface packer at the main access tunnel wall approximately 6.1 m from the injection interval. The test configuration is depicted in Figure 1. This configuration has been used in several conservative tracer tests and two colloid-homologue tracer tests since 2007, and it is will be employed in an upcoming test involving the emplacement of a radionuclide-doped bentonite plug into CFM 06.002i2 to evaluate the swelling and erosion of the bentonite and the transport of bentonite colloids and radionuclides from the source to the extraction point at the tunnel wall. Interpretive analyses of several of the previous tracer tests, from 09-01 through 12-02 were provided in two previous Used Fuel Disposition Program milestone reports (Arnold et al., 2011; Kersting et al., 2012). However, only the data for the conservative tracer Amino-G Acid was previously analyzed from test 12-02 because the other tracer data from this test were not available at the time. This report documents the first attempt to quantitatively analyze the radionuclide and colloid breakthrough curves from CFM test 12-02. This report was originally intended to also include an experimental assessment of colloid-facilitated transport of uranium by bentonite colloids in the Grimsel system, but this assessment was not conducted because it was reported by German collaborators at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) that neither uranium nor neptunium adsorbed appreciably to FEBEX bentonite colloids in Grimsel groundwater (Huber et al., 2011). The Grimsel groundwater has a relatively high pH of {approx}9, so the lack of uranium and neptunium adsorption to clay is not surprising given the tendency for these actinides to form very stable negative or neutrally-charged uranyl- or calcium-uranyl-carbonate complexes at these pH, particularly in a water that is effectively saturated with respect to calcite. It was also observed in testing conducted at LANL earlier in 2012 that uranium did not adsorb measurably to Grimsel granodiorite in a synthetic Grimsel groundwater at pH {approx}8.5 (Kersting et al., 2012). Thus, the planned experimental work was not pursued because all the available information clearly pointed to an expected result that uranium transport would not be facilitated by clay colloids in the Grimsel system.

Reimus, Paul W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

390

Applications of radioactive tracer technology in the real-time measurement of wear and corrosion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radioactive tracer technology has been used for many years as a tool to make highly sensitive real-time measurements of wear and corrosion. With this technique, the material of interest is tagged with radioactive isotopes through either direct activation of a relatively small number of atoms in the component itself, or implantation of radioactive isotopes. As the component wears or corrodes under test, radioactive atoms are transported from the surface in the form of wear particles or corrosion products. Wear or corrosion is measured in real-time through either interrogation of the buildup of radioactivity in the transport fluid, or by the reduction in activity of the labeled wear component. The process involves selection of an appropriate labeling technique, labeling of a component or components of interest, calibration, testing and data reduction and analysis. Although the majority of the work performed has been in the automotive engine and lubricant industry, Southwest Research Institute has recently extended the application into other fields, such as hydraulic pump wear, prosthetic hip joint wear, wear in marine engines and crude oil corrosivity. This paper discusses the various techniques employed to label components of interest, the advantages of the techniques, and gives several examples of current applications of this technology.

D.C. Eberle; C.M. Wall; M.B. Treuhaft

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Reservoir characterization based on tracer response and rank analysis of production and injection rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantification of the spatial distribution of properties is important for many reservoir-engineering applications. But, before applying any reservoir-characterization technique, the type of problem to be tackled and the information available should be analyzed. This is important because difficulties arise in reservoirs where production records are the only information for analysis. This paper presents the results of a practical technique to determine preferential flow trends in a reservoir. The technique is a combination of reservoir geology, tracer data, and Spearman rank correlation coefficient analysis. The Spearman analysis, in particular, will prove to be important because it appears to be insightful and uses injection/production data that are prevalent in circumstances where other data are nonexistent. The technique is applied to the North Buck Draw field, Campbell County, Wyoming. This work provides guidelines to assess information about reservoir continuity in interwell regions from widely available measurements of production and injection rates at existing wells. The information gained from the application of this technique can contribute to both the daily reservoir management and the future design, control, and interpretation of subsequent projects in the reservoir, without the need for additional data.

Refunjol, B.T. [Lagoven, S.A., Pdvsa (Venezuela); Lake, L.W. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Tracer method to measure landfill gas emissions from leachate collection systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes a method developed for quantification of gas emissions from the leachate collection system at landfills and present emission data measured at two Danish landfills with no landfill gas collection systems in place: Fakse landfill and AV Milj. Landfill top covers are often designed to prevent infiltration of water and thus are made from low permeable materials. At such sites a large part of the gas will often emit through other pathways such as the leachate collection system. These point releases of gaseous constituents from these locations cannot be measured using traditional flux chambers, which are often used to measure gas emissions from landfills. Comparing tracer measurements of methane (CH4) emissions from leachate systems at Fakse landfill and AV Milj to measurements of total CH4 emissions, it was found that approximately 47% (351kg CH4 d?1) and 27% (211kg CH4 d?1), respectively, of the CH4 emitting from the sites occurred from the leachate collection systems. Emission rates observed from individual leachate collection wells at the two landfills ranged from 0.1 to 76kg CH4 d?1. A strong influence on emission rates caused by rise and fall in atmospheric pressure was observed when continuously measuring emission from a leachate well over a week. Emission of CH4 was one to two orders of magnitude higher during periods of decreasing pressure compared to periods of increasing pressure.

Anders M. Fredenslund; Charlotte Scheutz; Peter Kjeldsen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Mapping subsurface radionuclide migration and groundwater flow with organic tracers. [Shallow-land burial  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At Pacific Northwest Laboratory we have had the opportunity to study the subsurface migration of radionuclides at the Maxey Flats burial site. We constructed an experimental study area adjacent to one of the waste-filled trenches at the site. In this report we describe some preliminary results of organic research currently underway at Maxey Flats. This research is aimed at: (1) elucidating the role of organic species in the subsurface migration of radionuclides; and (2) testing the usefulness of artificial and in situ organic groundwater tracers for mapping radionuclide migration and groundwater flow. We also describe two analytical procedures developed for this research. First, as part of a survey study of organics in Maxey Flats groundwater we have developed a procedure for the isolation and characterization of trace levels of organics in radioactive groundwaters. Second, for a detailed chemical speciation study we developed a procedure based on steric exclusion chromatography for testing whether or not organics are chelated to radionuclides. 1 figure, 1 table.

Toste, A.P.; Kirby, L.J.; Pahl, T.R.; Myers, R.B.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Research on fuzzy logic based dynamic boundary voltage and reactive power integrated control method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Aiming at the existing problems of conventional substation voltage and reactive power integrated control method, a new fuzzy logic based dynamic reactive power boundary voltage and reactive power integrated control method is proposed. Fuzzy logic control ... Keywords: dynamic boundary, fuzzy logic, reactive power, voltage

Zigang Xu; Fei Wang

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Development and Evaluation of a State-of-the-Science Reactive Plume  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for plume rise, plume visibility, and stack opacity (5). Examples of other reactive plume models include

Zhang, Yang

396

Third (March 2006) Coring and Analysis of Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barrier, Monticello, Utah  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Third (March 2006) Coring and Analysis of Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barrier, Monticello, Utah

397

ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural gas combustion turbines are rapidly becoming the primary technology of choice for generating electricity. At least half of the new generating capacity added in the US over the next twenty years will be combustion turbine systems. The Department of Energy has cosponsored with Siemens Westinghouse, a program to maintain the technology lead in gas turbine systems. The very ambitious eight year program was designed to demonstrate a highly efficient and commercially acceptable power plant, with the ability to fire a wide range of fuels. The main goal of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program was to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost effective competitive gas turbine systems for base load application in utility, independent power producer and industrial markets. Performance targets were focused on natural gas as a fuel and included: System efficiency that exceeds 60% (lower heating value basis); Less than 10 ppmv NO{sub x} emissions without the use of post combustion controls; Busbar electricity that are less than 10% of state of the art systems; Reliability-Availability-Maintainability (RAM) equivalent to current systems; Water consumption minimized to levels consistent with cost and efficiency goals; and Commercial systems by the year 2000. In a parallel effort, the program was to focus on adapting the ATS engine to coal-derived or biomass fuels. In Phase 1 of the ATS Program, preliminary investigators on different gas turbine cycles demonstrated that net plant LHV based efficiency greater than 60% was achievable. In Phase 2 the more promising cycles were evaluated in greater detail and the closed-loop steam-cooled combined cycle was selected for development because it offered the best solution with least risk for achieving the ATS Program goals for plant efficiency, emissions, cost of electricity and RAM. Phase 2 also involved conceptual ATS engine and plant design and technology developments in aerodynamics, sealing, combustion, cooling, materials, coatings and casting development. The market potential for the ATS gas turbine in the 2000-2014 timeframe was assessed for combined cycle, simple cycle and integrated gasification combined cycle, for three engine sizes. The total ATS market potential was forecasted to exceed 93 GW. Phase 3 and Phase 3 Extension involved further technology development, component testing and W501ATS engine detail design. The technology development efforts consisted of ultra low NO{sub x} combustion, catalytic combustion, sealing, heat transfer, advanced coating systems, advanced alloys, single crystal casting development and determining the effect of steam on turbine alloys. Included in this phase was full-load testing of the W501G engine at the McIntosh No. 5 site in Lakeland, Florida.

Gregory Gaul

2004-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

398

Advanced Manufacturing Office: Motor Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Motor Systems to Motor Systems to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Manufacturing Office: Motor Systems on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Manufacturing Office: Motor Systems on Twitter Bookmark Advanced Manufacturing Office: Motor Systems on Google Bookmark Advanced Manufacturing Office: Motor Systems on Delicious Rank Advanced Manufacturing Office: Motor Systems on Digg Find More places to share Advanced Manufacturing Office: Motor Systems on AddThis.com... Quick Links Energy Resource Center Technical Publications by Energy System Energy-Efficient Technologies Incentives & Resources by Zip Code Better Plants Superior Energy Performance Contacts Motor Systems Photo of Man Checking Motor Performance Motor-driven equipment accounts for 54% of manufacturing electricity use. Dramatic energy and cost savings can be achieved in motor systems by

399

Accelerating development of advanced inverters : evaluation of anti-islanding schemes with grid support functions and preliminary laboratory demonstration.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high penetration of utility interconnected photovoltaic (PV) systems is causing heightened concern over the effect that variable renewable generation will have on the electrical power system (EPS). These concerns have initiated the need to amend the utility interconnection standard to allow advanced inverter control functionalities that provide: (1) reactive power control for voltage support, (2) real power control for frequency support and (3) better tolerance of grid disturbances. These capabilities are aimed at minimizing the negative impact distributed PV systems may have on EPS voltage and frequency. Unfortunately, these advanced control functions may interfere with island detection schemes, and further development of advanced inverter functions requires a study of the effect of advanced functions on the efficacy of antiislanding schemes employed in industry. This report summarizes the analytical, simulation and experimental work to study interactions between advanced inverter functions and anti-islanding schemes being employed in distributed PV systems.

Neely, Jason C.; Gonzalez, Sigifredo; Ropp, Michael [Northern Plains Power Technologies, Brookings, SD] [Northern Plains Power Technologies, Brookings, SD; Schutz, Dustin [Northern Plains Power Technologies, Brookings, SD] [Northern Plains Power Technologies, Brookings, SD

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Wear Measurement of Highly Cross-linked UHMWPE using a 7Be Tracer Implantation Technique  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The very low wear rates achieved with the current highly cross-linked ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylenes (UHMWPE) used in joint prostheses have proven to be difficult to measure accurately by gravimetry. Tracer methods are there- fore being explored. The purpose of this study was to perform a proof-of-concept experiment on the use of the radioactive tracer beryllium-7 (7Be) for the determination of in vitro wear in a highly cross-linked orthopedic UHMWPE. Three cross-linked and four conventional UHMWPE pins made from compression- molded GUR 1050, were activated with 109 to 1010 7Be nuclei using a new implantation setup that produced a homogenous distribution of implanted nuclei up to 8.5 lm below the surface. The pins were tested for wear in a six-station pin-on-flat appara- tus for up to 7.1 million cycles (178 km). A Germanium gamma detector was employed to determine activity loss of the UHMWPE pins at preset intervals during the wear test. The wear of the cross-linked UHMWPE pins was readily detected and esti- mated to be 17 6 3 lg per million cycles. The conventional-to- cross-linked ratio of the wear rates was 13.1 6 0.8, in the expected range for these materials. Oxidative degradation dam- age from implantation was negligible; however, a weak depend- ence of wear on implantation dose was observed limiting the number of radioactive tracer atoms that can be introduced. Future applications of this tracer technology may include the analysis of location-specific wear, such as loss of material in the post or backside of a tibial insert.

Wimmer, Markus A. [Rush Uniiv. Medical Center; Laurent, Michael P. [Rush Univ. Medical Center; Dwivedi, Yasha [Rush Univ. Medical Center; Gallardo, Luis A. [Rush Univ. Medical Center; Chipps, K. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Blackmon, Jeffery C [Louisiana State University; Kozub, R. L. [Tennessee Technological University; Bardayan, Daniel W [ORNL; Gross, Carl J [ORNL; Stracener, Daniel W [ORNL; Smith, Michael Scott [ORNL; Nesaraja, Caroline D [ORNL; Erikson, Luke [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Patel, Nidhi [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Rehm, Karl E. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Ahmad, Irshad [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Greene, John P. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Greife, Uwe [Colorado School of Mines, Golden

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

129 Iodine: A New Hydrologic Tracer for Aquifer Recharge Conditions Influenced by River Flow Rate and Evapotranspiration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

County using boron isotopes and general geochemistry, In Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory UCRL-ID-133529 (pp. 44). ? Davisson, M.L., Hudson, G.B., Herndon, R., & Woodside, G. (1999b). Report on isotope tracer investigations in the Forebay... of the Orange County Groundwater Basin: Fiscal years 1996 and 1997, In Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory UCRL-ID- 133531 (pp. 44). ? Dissanayake, C.B. & Chandrajith, R. (1999). Medical geochemistry of tropical environments. Earth-Science Reviews 47, 219...

Schwehr, K. A.; Santschi, P. H.; Moran, J. E.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Characterization of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in Asian and north American pollution plumes during INTEX-B: identification of specific Chinese air mass tracers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coal and biofuel combustion and biomass burning (Khalil andcombustion products ethyne and benzene, and of the biomass/combustion tracer ethyne, the industrial solvent CH 2 Cl 2 , and the two coal/biomass

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Visiting | Advanced Photon Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Visiting the APS Visiting the APS If you have questions or need assistance planning your visit, please contact the APS User Office. Obtaining site access: General info: Visitors and new users | Non-U.S. Citizens Visitor registration: request access as a visitor who will not do hands-on work (guests, family members, students, etc.) Traveling to the APS: Transportation: Resources | University of Chicago Shuttle external link Directions: to Argonne | to the APS User Office Maps: Argonne Campus external link | Conference Center (402) | APS Facility & Beamlines | Parking Currency: The hotels and banks near Argonne do not exchange currency. Plan on using major credit cards, U.S. traveler's checks, or exchange currency in advance at the airport. See also: The Universal Currency Converter(tm) external link

404

Welcome | Advanced Photon Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Welcome Welcome Aerial view of APS Aerial view of the APS Welcome to the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory. Whether you are a current or potential scientific user of our unique facility or are simply interested in learning more about the APS, we are delighted that you are visiting our website. The APS is funded by the Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy. We operate a National User Facility that is open to everyone who has a need for extremely brilliant x-ray photon beams. The APS is one of the most technologically complex machines in the world. This premier national research facility provides the brightest x-ray beams in the Western Hemisphere to more than 5,000 (and growing) scientists from

405

Advanced Photon Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Home Home Group Members Accelerator Magnets Insertion Devices Facilities Presentations & Publications Internal Magnetic Devices Group The primary mission of the Magnetic Devices (MD) Group is to design, build, and maintain Insertion Devices (IDs) that are reliable and transparent to the electron beam at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The majority of IDs at the APS are conventional planar hybrid undulators, but an essential part of the mission is to develop novel IDs, such as short-period superconducting undulators and long-period electromagnetic undulators. The capabilities of APS IDs are matched to users' experimental needs. The mission also includes magnetic tuning of the IDs to ensure their near-ideal performance as x-ray sources and calculations to predict the radiation

406

ADVANCED HYBRID PARTICULATE COLLECTOR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new concept in particulate control, called an advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC), is being developed under funding from the US Department of Energy. The AHPC combines the best features of electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and baghouses in a manner that has not been done before. The AHPC concept consists of a combination of fabric filtration and electrostatic precipitation in the same housing, providing major synergism between the two collection methods, both in the particulate collection step and in the transfer of dust to the hopper. The AHPC provides ultrahigh collection efficiency, overcoming the problem of excessive fine-particle emission with conventional ESPs, and it solves the problem of reentrainment and collection of dust in conventional baghouses. The AHPC is currently being tested at the 2.7-MW scale at the Big Stone power station.

Stanley Miller; Rich Gebert; William Swanson

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Advanced drilling systems study.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the results of a study of advanced drilling concepts conducted jointly for the Natural Gas Technology Branch and the Geothermal Division of the U.S. Department of Energy. A number of alternative rock cutting concepts and drilling systems are examined. The systems cover the range from current technology, through ongoing efforts in drilling research, to highly speculative concepts. Cutting mechanisms that induce stress mechanically, hydraulically, and thermally are included. All functions necessary to drill and case a well are considered. Capital and operating costs are estimated and performance requirements, based on comparisons of the costs for alternative systems to conventional drilling technology, are developed. A number of problems common to several alternatives and to current technology are identified and discussed.

Pierce, Kenneth G.; Livesay, Billy Joe; Finger, John Travis (Livesay Consultants, Encintas, CA)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Advanced servo manipulator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An advanced servo manipulator has modular parts. Modular motor members drive individual input gears to control shoulder roll, shoulder pitch, elbow pitch, wrist yaw, wrist pitch, wrist roll, and tong spacing. The modules include a support member, a shoulder module for controlling shoulder roll, and a sleeve module attached to the shoulder module in fixed relation thereto. The shoulder roll sleeve module has an inner cylindrical member rotatable relative to the outer cylindrical member, and upon which a gear pod assembly is mounted. A plurality of shafts are driven by the gears, which are in turn driven by individual motor modules to transmit rotary power to control elbow pitch as well as to provide four different rotary shafts across the bendable elbow joint to supply rotary motive power to a wrist member and tong member.

Holt, William E. (Knoxville, TN); Kuban, Daniel P. (Oak Ridge, TN); Martin, H. Lee (Knoxville, TN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Advanced servo manipulator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An advanced servo manipulator has modular parts. Modular motor members drive individual input gears to control shoulder roll, shoulder pitch, elbow pitch, wrist yaw, wrist pitch, wrist roll, and tong spacing. The modules include a support member, a shoulder module for controlling shoulder roll, and a sleeve module attached to the shoulder module in fixed relation thereto. The shoulder roll sleeve module has an inner cylindrical member rotatable relative to the outer cylindrical member, and upon which a gear pod assembly is mounted. A plurality of shafts are driven by the gears, which are in turn driven by individual motor modules to transmit rotary power to control elbow pitch as well as to provide four different rotary shafts across the bendable elbow joint to supply rotary motive power to a wrist member and tong member. 41 figs.

Holt, W.E.; Kuban, D.P.; Martin, H.L.

1988-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

410

ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report includes a review of the progress made in ACTF Flow Loop development and research during 90 days pre-award period (May 15-July 14, 1999) and the following three months after the project approval date (July15-October 15, 1999) The report presents information on the following specific subjects; (a) Progress in Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility design and development, (b) Progress report on the research project ''Study of Flow of Synthetic Drilling Fluids Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (c) Progress report on the research project ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (d) Progress report on the research project ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Muds Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (e) Progress report on the research project ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions'', (f) Progress report on the instrumentation tasks (Tasks 11 and 12) (g) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with oil and service company members.

Ergun Kuru; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Len Volk; Mark Pickell; Evren Ozbayoglu; Barkim Demirdal; Paco Vieira; Affonso Lourenco

1999-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

411

Interpretation of Colloid-Homologue Tracer Test 10-03, Including Comparisons to Test 10-01  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation covers the interpretations of colloid-homologue tracer test 10-03 conducted at the Grimsel Test Site, Switzerland, in 2010. It also provides a comparison of the interpreted test results with those of tracer test 10-01, which was conducted in the same fracture flow system and using the same tracers than test 10-03, but at a higher extraction flow rate. A method of correcting for apparent uranine degradation in test 10-03 is presented. Conclusions are: (1) Uranine degradation occurred in test 10-03, but not in 10-01; (2) Uranine correction based on apparent degradation rate in injection loop in test 11-02 seems reasonable when applied to data from test 10-03; (3) Colloid breakthrough curves quite similar in the two tests with similar recoveries relative to uranine (after correction); and (4) Much slower apparent desorption of homologues in test 10-03 than in 10-01 (any effect of residual homologues from test 10-01 in test 10-03?).

Reimus, Paul W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

412

Advanced isotope separation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Study Group briefly reviewed the technical status of the three Advanced Isotope Separation (AIS) processes. It also reviewed the evaluation work that has been carried out by DOE's Process Evaluation Board (PEB) and the Union Carbide Corporation-Nuclear Division (UCCND). The Study Group briefly reviewed a recent draft assessment made for DOE staff of the nonproliferation implications of the AIS technologies. The staff also very briefly summarized the status of GCEP and Advanced Centrifuge development. The Study Group concluded that: (1) there has not been sufficient progress to provide a firm scientific, technical or economic basis on which to select one of the three competing AIS processes for full-scale engineering development at this time; and (2) however, should budgetary restraints or other factors force such a selection, we believe that the evaluation process that is being carried out by the PEB provides the best basis available for making a decision. The Study Group recommended that: (1) any decisions on AIS processes should include a comparison with gas centrifuge processes, and should not be made independently from the plutonium isotope program; (2) in evaluating the various enrichment processes, all applicable costs (including R and D and sales overhead) and an appropriate discounting approach should be included in order to make comparisons on a private industry basis; (3) if the three AIS programs continue with limited resources, the work should be reoriented to focus only on the most pressing technical problems; and (4) if a decision is made to develop the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation process, the solid collector option should be pursued in parallel to alleviate the potential program impact of liquid collector thermal control problems.

Not Available

1982-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

413

Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Biofuels  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Biofuels Biofuels Blend Right In: Researchers Show Ionic Liquids Effective for Pretreating Mixed Blends of Biofuel Feedstocks On February 26, 2013, in Biofuels, Biomass,...

414

Advanced Bioeconomy Leadership Conference 2015  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Advanced Bioeconomy Leadership Conference will be held on March 1113, at the Capital Hilton in Washington, D.C.

415

Advanced Materials Research Highlights | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Materials | Research Highlights Research Highlights 1-10 of 93 Results Prev 12345 Next Single Supported Atoms Participate in Catalytic Processes December 04, 2014 -...

416

The Advance of Norwegian Glaciers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... doubt, is an account of the very remarkable advance of the Buerbr (br is Norsk for glacier) near Odde, on the Srfjrd. I visited the place in 1874, ...

J. INNES ROGERS

1882-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

417

Advance Electronics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

suppressors, automatic voltage stablisers, voltmeters oscilloscopes, and signal generators. References: Advance Electronics1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

418

Advanced Integrated Systems Technology Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conditioning in buildings featuring integrated design withconditioning in buildings featuring integrated design withof a building with advanced integrated design involving one

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Video Library | Advanced Photon Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Video Library Related Links: APS Colloquium APS Podcasts APS Today More videos: Introduction to the APS Physics of the Blues Now Playing: Building the Advanced Photon Source This...

420

Advanced Telemetry | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Telemetry Jump to: navigation, search Name: Advanced Telemetry Place: San Diego, California Zip: 92131-2435 Sector: Buildings Product: San Diego-based provider of energy management...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Advanced Combustion | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Combustion Advanced Combustion Combustion engines drive a large percentage of our nation's transportation vehicles and power generation and manufacturing facilities. Today's...

422

ARIES-AT: An Advanced Tokamak, Advanced Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ARIES-AT: An Advanced Tokamak, Advanced Technology Fusion Power Plant Farrokh Najmabadi University & Technical Achievements Periodic Input from Energy Industry Goals and Requirements Evaluation Based Options Balanced Assessment of Attractiveness & Feasibility R&D Needs and Development Plan No: Redesign

423

NICTA Advanced Course Advanced Topics in Software Verification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMP 4161 NICTA Advanced Course Advanced Topics in Software Verification Gerwin Klein, June: § Declare a set of functions with signatures (e.g. plus, zero) § give them a name (e.g. c) § Have syntax 'a :: c for: type 'a supports the operations of c § Can write abstract polymorphic functions that use plus

Klein, Gerwin

424

Assessment of natural and anthropogenic hydrocarbon inputs using PAHs as tracers.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to produce liquid hydrocarbons and water. -- Coal-to-liquids (CTLs) are derived either by pyrolysis of coal authors accept that conventional oil resources are at an advanced stage of depletion and that liquid fuels is a heterogeneous mix of hydrocarbons that remain in liquid phase when extracted to the surface. -- Condensate

425

Development of an Optimum Tracer Set for Apportioning Emissions of Individual Power Plants Using Highly Time-Resolved Measurements and Advanced Receptor Modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In previous studies, 11 elements (Al, As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Se, and Zn) were determined in 30-minute aerosol samples collected with the University of Maryland Semicontinuous Elements in Aerosol Sampler (SEAS; Kidwell and Ondov, 2001, 2004; SEAS-II) in several locations in which air quality is influenced by emissions from coal- or oil-fired power plants. At this time resolution, plumes from stationary high temperature combustion sources are readily detected as large excursions in ambient concentrations of elements emitted by these sources (Pancras et al. ). Moreover, the time-series data contain intrinsic information on the lateral diffusion of the plume (e.g., {sigma}{sub y}), which Park et al. (2005 and 2006) have exploited in their Pseudo-Deterministic Receptor Model (PDRM), to calculate emission rates of SO{sub 2} and 11 elements (mentioned above) from four individual coal- and oil-fired power plants in the Tampa Bay area. In the current project, we proposed that the resolving power of source apportionment methods might be improved by expanding the set of maker species and that there exist some optimum set of marker species that could be used. The ultimate goal was to determine the utility of using additional elements to better identify and isolate contributions of individual power plants to ambient levels of PM and its constituents. And, having achieved better resolution, achieve, also, better emission rate estimates. In this study, we optimized sample preparation and instrumental protocols for simultaneous analysis of 28 elements in dilute slurry samples collected with the SEAS with a new state-of-the-art Thermo-Systems, Inc., X-series II, Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS), and reanalyzed the samples previously collected in Tampa during the modeling period studied by Park et al. (2005) in which emission rates from four coal- and oil-fired power plants affected air quality at the sampling site. In the original model, Park et al. (2005), included 6 sources. Herein, we reassessed the number of contributing sources in light of the new data. A comprehensive list of sources was prepared and both our Gaussian Plume model and PMF were used to identify and predict the relative strengths of source contributions at the receptor sites. Additionally, PDRM was modified to apply National Inventory Emissions, Toxic Release Inventory, and Chemical Mass Balance source profile data to further constrain solutions. Both the original Tampa data set (SO{sub 2} plus 11 elements) and the new expanded data set (SO{sub 2} plus 23 elements) were used to resolve the contributions of particle constituents and PM to sources using Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) and PDRM.

John Ondov; Gregory Beachley

2007-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

426

ADVANCED MIXING MODELS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The process of recovering the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank with one to four dual-nozzle jet mixers located within the tank. The typical criteria to establish a mixed condition in a tank are based on the number of pumps in operation and the time duration of operation. To ensure that a mixed condition is achieved, operating times are set conservatively long. This approach results in high operational costs because of the long mixing times and high maintenance and repair costs for the same reason. A significant reduction in both of these costs might be realized by reducing the required mixing time based on calculating a reliable indicator of mixing with a suitably validated computer code. The work described in this report establishes the basis for further development of the theory leading to the identified mixing indicators, the benchmark analyses demonstrating their consistency with widely accepted correlations, and the application of those indicators to SRS waste tanks to provide a better, physically based estimate of the required mixing time. Waste storage tanks at SRS contain settled sludge which varies in height from zero to 10 ft. The sludge has been characterized and modeled as micron-sized solids, typically 1 to 5 microns, at weight fractions as high as 20 to 30 wt%, specific gravities to 1.4, and viscosities up to 64 cp during motion. The sludge is suspended and mixed through the use of submersible slurry jet pumps. To suspend settled sludge, water is added to the tank as a slurry medium and stirred with the jet pump. Although there is considerable technical literature on mixing and solid suspension in agitated tanks, very little literature has been published on jet mixing in a large-scale tank. If shorter mixing times can be shown to support Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) or other feed requirements, longer pump lifetimes can be achieved with associated operational cost and schedule savings. The focus of the present work is to establish mixing criteria associated with the waste processing at SRS and to quantify the mixing time required to suspend sludge particles with the submersible jet pump. Literature results for a turbulent jet flow are reviewed briefly, since the decay of the axial jet velocity and the evolution of the jet flow patterns are important phenomena affecting sludge suspension and mixing operations. One of the main objectives in the waste processing is to provide the DWPF a uniform slurry composition at a certain weight percentage (typically {approx}13 wt%) over an extended period of time. In preparation of the sludge for slurrying to DWPF, several important questions have been raised with regard to sludge suspension and mixing of the solid suspension in the bulk of the tank: (1) How much time is required to prepare a slurry with a uniform solid composition for DWPF? (2) How long will it take to suspend and mix the sludge for uniform composition in any particular waste tank? (3) What are good mixing indicators to answer the questions concerning sludge mixing stated above in a general fashion applicable to any waste tank/slurry pump geometry and fluid/sludge combination? Grenville and Tilton (1996) investigated the mixing process by giving a pulse of tracer (electrolyte) through the submersible jet nozzle and by monitoring the conductivity at three locations within the cylindrical tank. They proposed that the mixing process was controlled by the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate in the region far away from the jet entrance. They took the energy dissipation rates in the regions remote from the nozzle to be proportional to jet velocity and jet diameter at that location. The reduction in the jet velocity was taken to be proportional to the nozzle velocity and distance from the nozzle. Based on their analysis, a correlation was proposed. The proposed correlation was shown to be valid over a wide range of Reynolds numbers (50,000 to 300,000) with a relative standard deviation of {+-} 11.83%. An improved correlat

Lee, S; Richard Dimenna, R; David Tamburello, D

2008-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

427

Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Siemens has developed a roadmap to achieve the DOE goals for efficiency, cost reduction, and emissions through innovative approaches and novel technologies which build upon worldwide IGCC operational experience, platform technology, and extensive experience in G-class operating conditions. In Phase 1, the technologies and concepts necessary to achieve the program goals were identified for the gas turbine components and supporting technology areas and testing plans were developed to mitigate identified risks. Multiple studies were conducted to evaluate the impact in plant performance of different gas turbine and plant technologies. 2015 gas turbine technologies showed a significant improvement in IGCC plant efficiency, however, a severe performance penalty was calculated for high carbon capture cases. Thermodynamic calculations showed that the DOE 2010 and 2015 efficiency targets can be met with a two step approach. A risk management process was instituted in Phase 1 to identify risk and develop mitigation plans. For the risks identified, testing and development programs are in place and the risks will be revisited periodically to determine if changes to the plan are necessary. A compressor performance prediction has shown that the design of the compressor for the engine can be achieved with additional stages added to the rear of the compressor. Tip clearance effects were studied as well as a range of flow and pressure ratios to evaluate the impacts to both performance and stability. Considerable data was obtained on the four candidate combustion systems: diffusion, catalytic, premix, and distributed combustion. Based on the results of Phase 1, the premixed combustion system and the distributed combustion system were chosen as having the most potential and will be the focus of Phase 2 of the program. Significant progress was also made in obtaining combustion kinetics data for high hydrogen fuels. The Phase 1 turbine studies indicate initial feasibility of the advanced hydrogen turbine that meets the aggressive targets set forth for the advanced hydrogen turbine, including increased rotor inlet temperature (RIT), lower total cooling and leakage air (TCLA) flow, higher pressure ratio, and higher mass flow through the turbine compared to the baseline. Maintaining efficiency with high mass flow Syngas combustion is achieved using a large high AN2 blade 4, which has been identified as a significant advancement beyond the current state-of-the-art. Preliminary results showed feasibility of a rotor system capable of increased power output and operating conditions above the baseline. In addition, several concepts were developed for casing components to address higher operating conditions. Rare earth modified bond coat for the purpose of reducing oxidation and TBC spallation demonstrated an increase in TBC spallation life of almost 40%. The results from Phase 1 identified two TBC compositions which satisfy the thermal conductivity requirements and have demonstrated phase stability up to temperatures of 1850 C. The potential to join alloys using a bonding process has been demonstrated and initial HVOF spray deposition trials were promising. The qualitative ranking of alloys and coatings in environmental conditions was also performed using isothermal tests where significant variations in alloy degradation were observed as a function of gas composition. Initial basic system configuration schematics and working system descriptions have been produced to define key boundary data and support estimation of costs. Review of existing materials in use for hydrogen transportation show benefits or tradeoffs for materials that could be used in this type of applications. Hydrogen safety will become a larger risk than when using natural gas fuel as the work done to date in other areas has shown direct implications for this type of use. Studies were conducted which showed reduced CO{sub 2} and NOx emissions with increased plant efficiency. An approach to maximize plant output is needed in order to address the DOE turbine goal for 20-30% reduction o

Joesph Fadok

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Technology advances for magnetic bearings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes the state?of?the?art in magnetic bearing technology and applications and some of advances under development through the joint efforts of Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International and Auburn University. Advances in the areas of nonlinear control systems design digital controller implementation and power electronics are discussed.

Steve Nolan; John Y. Hung

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Advanced LBB methodology and considerations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

LBB applications have existed in many industries and more recently have been applied in the nuclear industry under limited circumstances. Research over the past 10 years has evolved the technology so that more advanced consideration of LBB can now be given. Some of the advanced considerations for nuclear plants subjected to seismic loading evaluations are summarized in this paper.

Olson, R.; Rahman, S.; Scott, P. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)] [and others

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Tracer transport in the Greenland Ice Sheet: constraints on ice cores and glacial history  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The climate history and dynamics of the Greenland Ice Sheet are studied using a coupled model of the depositional provenance and transport of glacier ice, allowing simultaneous prediction of the detailed isotopic stratigraphy of ice cores at all the major Greenland sites. Adopting a novel method for reconstructing the agedepth relationship, we greatly improve the accuracy of semi-Lagrangian tracer tracking schemes and can readily incorporate an age-dependent ice rheology. The larger aim of our study is to impose new constraints on the glacial history of the Greenland Ice Sheet. Leading sources of uncertainty in the climate and dynamic history are encapsulated in a small number of parameters: the temperature and elevation isotopic sensitivities, the glacialinterglacial precipitation contrast and the effective viscosity of ice in the flow law. Comparing predicted and observed ice layering at ice core sites, we establish plausible ranges for the key model parameters, identify climate and dynamic histories that are mutually consistent and recover the past depositional elevation of ice cores to ease interpretation of their climatic records. With the coupled three-dimensional model of ice dynamics and provenance transport we propose a method to place all the ice core records on a common time scale and use discrepancies to adjust the reconstructed climate history. Analysis of simulated GRIP ice layering and borehole temperature profiles confirms that the GRIP record is sensitive to the dynamic as well as to the climatic history, but not enough to strongly limit speculation on the state of the Greenland Ice Sheet during the Eemian. In contrast, our study indicates that the Dye 3 and Camp Century ice cores are extremely sensitive to ice dynamics and greatly constrain Eemian ice sheet reconstructions. We suggest that the maximum Eemian sea-level contribution of the ice sheet was in the range of 3.54.5m.

Nicolas Lhomme; Garry K.C. Clarke; Shawn J. Marshall

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Modeling The GRB Host Galaxy Mass Distribution: Are GRBs Unbiased Tracers of Star Formation?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We model the mass distribution of long gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxies given recent results suggesting that GRBs occur in low metallicity environments. By utilizing measurements of the redshift evolution of the mass-metallicity (M-Z) relationship for galaxies, along with a sharp host metallicity cut-off suggested by Modjaz and collaborators, we estimate an upper limit on the stellar mass of a galaxy that can efficiently produce a GRB as a function of redshift. By employing consistent abundance indicators, we find that sub-solar metallicity cut-offs effectively limit GRBs to low stellar mass spirals and dwarf galaxies at low redshift. At higher redshifts, as the average metallicity of galaxies in the Universe falls, the mass range of galaxies capable of hosting a GRB broadens, with an upper bound approaching the mass of even the largest spiral galaxies. We compare these predicted limits to the growing number of published GRB host masses and find that extremely low metallicity cut-offs of 0.1 to 0.5 Z{sub {circle_dot}} are effectively ruled out by a large number of intermediate mass galaxies at low redshift. A mass function that includes a smooth decrease in the efficiency of producing GRBs in galaxies of metallicity above 12+log(O/H){sub KK04} = 8.7 can, however, accommodate a majority of the measured host galaxy masses. We find that at z {approx} 1, the peak in the observed GRB host mass distribution is inconsistent with the expected peak in the mass of galaxies harboring most of the star formation. This suggests that GRBs are metallicity biased tracers of star formation at low and intermediate redshifts, although our model predicts that this bias should disappear at higher redshifts due to the evolving metallicity content of the universe.

Kocevski, Daniel; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; West, Andrew A.; /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /MIT, MKI; Modjaz, Maryam; /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept.

2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

432

Internal structure, hygroscopic and reactive properties of mixed sodium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Internal structure, hygroscopic and Internal structure, hygroscopic and reactive properties of mixed sodium methanesulfonate-sodium chloride particles Internal structure, hygroscopic and reactive properties of mixed sodium methanesulfonate-sodium chloride particles Print Friday, 13 May 2011 00:00 Scientists recently combined experimental approaches and molecular dynamics modeling to gain new insights into the internal structure of sea salt particles and relate it to their fundamental chemical reactivity in the atmosphere. This research shows that surface enhancement or depletion of chemical components in marine particles can occur because of the difference in the chemical nature of the species. Because the atmospheric chemistry of the salt particles takes place at the gas-particle interface, understanding their complex surfaces provides new insights about their effect on the environment and climate change. Article Link.

433

Ionic Liquids and Ionizing Radiation: Reactivity of Highly Energetic  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ionizing Radiation: Reactivity of Highly Energetic Ionizing Radiation: Reactivity of Highly Energetic Species James F. Wishart J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 1, 3225-3231 (2010). [Find paper at ACS Publications] or use ACS Articles on Request View the video on this Perspective article at The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters (5:03) Selected for the ACS Special Virtual Issue on Ionic Liquids (March 2011). Abstract: Due to their unique properties, ionic liquids present many opportunities for basic research on the interactions of radiation with materials under conditions not previously available. At the same time, there are practical applied reasons for characterizing, understanding, and being able to predict how ionic-liquid-based devices and industrial-scale systems will perform under conditions of extreme reactivity, including radiation. This

434

Environmentally stable reactive alloy powders and method of making same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus and method are disclosed for making powder from a metallic melt by atomizing the melt to form droplets and reacting the droplets downstream of the atomizing location with a reactive gas. The droplets are reacted with the gas at a temperature where a solidified exterior surface is formed thereon and where a protective refractory barrier layer (reaction layer) is formed whose penetration into the droplets is limited by the presence of the solidified surface so as to avoid selective reduction of key reactive alloys needed to achieve desired powder end use properties. The barrier layer protects the reactive powder particles from environmental constituents such as air and water in the liquid or vapor form during subsequent fabrication of the powder to end-use shapes and during use in the intended service environment. 7 figs.

Anderson, I.E.; Lograsso, B.K.; Terpstra, R.L.

1998-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

435

Options for Control of Reactive Power by Distributed Photovoltaic Generators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High penetration levels of distributed photovoltaic(PV) generation on an electrical distribution circuit present several challenges and opportunities for distribution utilities. Rapidly varying irradiance conditions may cause voltage sags and swells that cannot be compensated by slowly responding utility equipment resulting in a degradation of power quality. Although not permitted under current standards for interconnection of distributed generation, fast-reacting, VAR-capable PV inverters may provide the necessary reactive power injection or consumption to maintain voltage regulation under difficult transient conditions. As side benefit, the control of reactive power injection at each PV inverter provides an opportunity and a new tool for distribution utilities to optimize the performance of distribution circuits, e.g. by minimizing thermal losses. We discuss and compare via simulation various design options for control systems to manage the reactive power generated by these inverters. An important design de...

Sulc, Petr; Backhaus, Scott; Chertkov, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Advanced Light Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Next >> Next >> Visitors Access to the ALS Gate Access guest-house Guest House lab-shuttles Lab Shuttles maps-and-directions Maps and Directions Parking Safety Safety for Users safety-for-staff Safety for Staff In Case of Emergency Resources Acronyms Multimedia Employment staff-intranet Staff Intranet Site Map Contact Digg: ALSBerkeleyLab Facebook Page: 208064938929 Flickr: advancedlightsource Twitter: ALSBerkeleyLab YouTube: AdvancedLightSource January 2014 Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Recent Science Highlights Minding the Gap Makes for More Efficient Solar Cells Using novel materials to develop thin, flexible, and more efficient photovoltaic cells is one of the hottest topics in current materials research. A class of transition metals undergo a dramatic change that makes them ideal for solar energy applications.

437

Advanced robot locomotion.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the results of a research effort on advanced robot locomotion. The majority of this work focuses on walking robots. Walking robot applications include delivery of special payloads to unique locations that require human locomotion to exo-skeleton human assistance applications. A walking robot could step over obstacles and move through narrow openings that a wheeled or tracked vehicle could not overcome. It could pick up and manipulate objects in ways that a standard robot gripper could not. Most importantly, a walking robot would be able to rapidly perform these tasks through an intuitive user interface that mimics natural human motion. The largest obstacle arises in emulating stability and balance control naturally present in humans but needed for bipedal locomotion in a robot. A tracked robot is bulky and limited, but a wide wheel base assures passive stability. Human bipedal motion is so common that it is taken for granted, but bipedal motion requires active balance and stability control for which the analysis is non-trivial. This report contains an extensive literature study on the state-of-the-art of legged robotics, and it additionally provides the analysis, simulation, and hardware verification of two variants of a proto-type leg design.

Neely, Jason C.; Sturgis, Beverly Rainwater; Byrne, Raymond Harry; Feddema, John Todd; Spletzer, Barry Louis; Rose, Scott E.; Novick, David Keith; Wilson, David Gerald; Buerger, Stephen P.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Advanced Chemistry Basins Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE-funded Advanced Chemistry Basin model project is intended to develop a public domain, user-friendly basin modeling software under PC or low end workstation environment that predicts hydrocarbon generation, expulsion, migration and chemistry. The main features of the software are that it will: (1) afford users the most flexible way to choose or enter kinetic parameters for different maturity indicators; (2) afford users the most flexible way to choose or enter compositional kinetic parameters to predict hydrocarbon composition (e.g., gas/oil ratio (GOR), wax content, API gravity, etc.) at different kerogen maturities; (3) calculate the chemistry, fluxes and physical properties of all hydrocarbon phases (gas, liquid and solid) along the primary and secondary migration pathways of the basin and predict the location and intensity of phase fractionation, mixing, gas washing, etc.; and (4) predict the location and intensity of de-asphaltene processes. The project has be operative for 36 months, and is on schedule for a successful completion at the end of FY 2003.

William Goddard; Mario Blanco; Lawrence Cathles; Paul Manhardt; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang

2002-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

439

ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the first quarterly progress report for Year 2 of the ACTS project. It includes a review of progress made in Flow Loop development and research during the period of time between July 14, 2000 and September 30, 2000. This report presents information on the following specific tasks: (a) Progress in Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility design and development (Task 2), (b) Progress on research project (Task 8): ''Study of Flow of Synthetic Drilling Fluids Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (c) Progress on research project (Task 6): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (d) Progress on research project (Task 7): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Muds Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (e) Progress on research project (Task 9): ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions'', (f) Initiate research on project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (g) Progress on instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution (Tasks 11), and Foam properties (Task 12), (h) Initiate a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. Since the previous Task 1 has been completed, we will now designate this new task as: (Task 1S). (i) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Barkim Demirdal; Affonso Lourenco; Evren Ozbayoglu; Paco Vieira

2000-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

440

ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the second quarterly progress report for Year 3 of the ACTS project. It includes a review of progress made in: (1) Flow Loop development and (2) research tasks during the period of time between Oct 1, 2001 and Dec. 31, 2001. This report presents a review of progress on the following specific tasks: (a) Design and development of an Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility (Task 3: Addition of a Cuttings Injection/Collection System), (b) Research project (Task 6): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (c) Research project (Task 9): ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions'', (d) Research project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (e) Research on instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution in a flowing slurry (Task 11), and Foam properties while transporting cuttings. (Task 12), (f) Development of a Safety program for the ACTS Flow Loop. Progress on a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. (Task 1S). (g) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Affonso Lourenco; Evren Ozbayoglu; Lei Zhou

2002-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the third quarterly progress report for Year 3 of the ACTS Project. It includes a review of progress made in: (1) Flow Loop construction and development and (2) research tasks during the period of time between Jan. 1, 2002 and Mar. 31, 2002. This report presents a review of progress on the following specific tasks: (a) Design and development of an Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility (Task 3: Addition of a Cuttings Injection/Separation System), (b) Research project (Task 6): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (c) Research project (Task 9b): ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions'', (d) Research project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (e) Research on three instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution in a flowing slurry (Task 11), Foam texture while transporting cuttings. (Task 12), and Viscosity of Foam under EPET (Task 9b); (f) Development of a Safety program for the ACTS Flow Loop, progress on a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. (Task 1S); and (g) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Evren Ozbayoglu; Lei Zhou

2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

442

ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the fourth quarterly progress report for Year-3 of the ACTS Project. It includes a review of progress made in: (1) Flow Loop construction and development and (2) research tasks during the period of time between April 1, 2002 and June 30, 2002. This report presents a review of progress on the following specific tasks: (a) Design and development of an Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility (Task 3: Addition of a Cuttings Injection/Separation System), (b) Research project (Task 6): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)''; (c) Research project (Task 9b): ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions''; (d) Research project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions''; (e) Research on three instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution in a flowing slurry (Task 11), Foam texture while transporting cuttings. (Task 12), and Viscosity of Foam under EPET (Task 9b); (f) Development of a Safety program for the ACTS Flow Loop. Progress on a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. (Task 1S); (g) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Evren Ozbayoglu; Lei Zhou

2002-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

443

ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the second quarterly progress report for Year 2 of the ACTS project. It includes a review of progress made in Flow Loop development and research during the period of time between Oct 1, 2000 and December 31, 2000. This report presents a review of progress on the following specific tasks: (a) Design and development of an Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility (Task 2: Addition of a foam generation and breaker system), (b) Research project (Task 6): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (c) Research project (Task 7): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Muds Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (d) Research project (Task 8): ''Study of Flow of Synthetic Drilling Fluids Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (e) Research project (Task 9): ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions'', (f) Research project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (g) Research on instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution in a flowing slurry (Task 11), and Foam properties while transporting cuttings. (Task 12), (h) Development of a Safety program for the ACTS Flow Loop. Progress on a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. (Task 1S). (i) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members. The tasks Completed During This Quarter are Task 7 and Task 8.

Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Barkim Demirdal; Affonso Lourenco; Evren Ozbayoglu; Paco Vieira; Lei Zhou

2000-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

444

Progress Report for Advanced Automotive Fuels  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Energy Energy Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, DC 20585-0121 FY 1999 FY 1999 FY 1999 FY 1999 Progress Report for Advanced Automotive Fuels Progress Report for Advanced Automotive Fuels Progress Report for Advanced Automotive Fuels Progress Report for Advanced Automotive Fuels Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of Transportation Technologies Office of Transportation Technologies Office of Transportation Technologies Office of Transportation Technologies Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies

445

Design and synthesis of reactive separation systems. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the last decade there has been a rapid upturn in interest in reactive distillation. The chemical process industry recognizes the favorable economics of carrying out reaction simultaneously with distillation for certain classes of reacting systems, and many new processes have been built based on this technology. Interest is also increasing by academics and software vendors. Systematic design methods for reactive distillation systems have only recently begun to emerge. In this report we survey the available design techniques and point out the contributions made by our group at the University of Massachusetts.

Doherty, M.F.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

446

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY SOUTHERN COMPANY SERVICES, INC. FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SOUTHERN COMPANY SERVICES, INC. FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER SOUTHERN COMPANY SERVICES, INC. FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS UNDER DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NO. DE-FC02-05CH11327 ENTITLED "DEVELOPMENT OF THE UPGRADE OF THE GENERATOR VOLT AMPERE REACTIVE RESERVE (GENVARR) SYSTEM;" W(A)-05-051; CH-1338 As set out in the attached waiver petition and in subsequent discussions with DOE Patent Counsel, Southern Company Service, Inc. has requested an advance waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights for all subject inventions made under the above-identified cooperative agreement by its employees and its subawardees' employees, regardless of tier, except inventions made by subawardees eligible to retain title to inventions pursuant to P.L. 96-517, as amended, and National Laboratories.

447

Advanced Powertrain Research Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

95F 95F Vehicle Setup Information Vehicle architecture PHEV Test cell location Front Advanced Powertrain Research Facility Document date 10/18/2013 Vehicle dynamometer Input Revision Number 1 Test weight [lb] 3518 Notes: Target A [lb] 21.47 Target B [lb/mph] 0.21588 Target C [lb/mph^2] 0.012508 Test Fuel Information Revision Number 1 Test weight [lb] 3518 Test Fuel Information Fuel type EPA Tier II EEE HF0437 Fuel density [g/ml] 0.742 Fuel Net HV [BTU/lbm] 18475 Fuel type EPA Tier II EEE HF0437 T e s t I D [ # ] C y c l e C o l d s t a r t ( C S t ) H o t s t a r t [ H S t ] D a t e T e s t C e l l T e m p [ C ] T e s t C e l l R H [ % ] T e s t C e l l B a r o [ i n / H g ] V e h i c l e c o o l i n g f a n s p e e d : S p e e d M a t c h [ S M ] o r c o n s t a n t s p e e d [ C S ] S o l a r L a m p s [ W / m 2 ] V e i c l e C l i m a t e C o n t r o l s e t t i n g s H o o d P o s i t i o n [ U p ] o r [ C l o s e d ] W i n d o w P o s i t i o n [ C l o s e d ] o r [ D o w n ] C y

448

Advanced Geothermal Turbodrill  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approximately 50% of the cost of a new geothermal power plant is in the wells that must be drilled. Compared to the majority of oil and gas wells, geothermal wells are more difficult and costly to drill for several reasons. First, most U.S. geothermal resources consist of hot, hard crystalline rock formations which drill much slower than the relatively soft sedimentary formations associated with most oil and gas production. Second, high downhole temperatures can greatly shorten equipment life or preclude the use of some technologies altogether. Third, producing viable levels of electricity from geothermal fields requires the use of large diameter bores and a high degree of fluid communication, both of which increase drilling and completion costs. Optimizing fluid communication often requires creation of a directional well to intersect the best and largest number of fracture capable of producing hot geothermal fluids. Moineau motor stators made with elastomers cannot operate at geothermal temperatures, so they are limited to the upper portion of the hole. To overcome these limitations, Maurer Engineering Inc. (MEI) has developed a turbodrill that does not use elastomers and therefore can operate at geothermal temperatures. This new turbodrill uses a special gear assembly to reduce the output speed, thus allowing a larger range of bit types, especially tri-cone roller bits, which are the bits of choice for drilling hard crystalline formations. The Advanced Geothermal Turbodrill (AGT) represents a significant improvement for drilling geothermal wells and has the potential to significantly reduce drilling costs while increasing production, thereby making geothermal energy less expensive and better able to compete with fossil fuels. The final field test of the AGT will prepare the tool for successful commercialization.

W. C. Maurer

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

NETL: Advanced Research - The Advanced Research (AR) Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AR Program AR Program Advanced Research The Advanced Research (AR) Program Advanced Research Program Diagram CLICK ON GRAPHIC TO ENLARGE CLICK ON GRAPHIC TO ENLARGE AR pursues projects in several key areas that are considered to be of greatest relevance and potential benefit to advanced coal and power systems. Many of AR's projects focus on "breakthrough" technologies or novel applications, striving to balance high risk against the prospect of high payoff in terms of measurable benefits to coal and power systems technologies - improved efficiencies, lower costs, new materials, and new processes. AR manages a portfolio that includes pre-commercial projects that rely on NETL's in-house facilities and depth of expertise, as well as collaborative external arrangements that draw upon diverse outside

450

Non-Energetic Reactive Armor (NERA) and Semi-Energetic Reactive Armor (SERA) FY13 Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

INL researchers have proposed prototypes for future lightweight armor systems that reside in a technology gap between explosive reactive armor and passive armor. The targets were designed to react under impact and throw a steel front plate into the path of the projectile, forcing the projectile to engage more of the front plate during its penetration process. These prototypes are intended to exhibit the enhanced efficiency of explosive reactive armor without the collateral damage often associated with explosive reactive armor. One of the prototype systems, Semi Energetic Reactive Armor (SERA), functions similarly to explosive reactive armor, but features a reactive material that reacts much slower than explosive reactive armor. Two different SERA test groups were built and featuring different ratios of aluminum Teflon(copyright) powders pressed into 0.5 in. thick energetic tiles and sandwiched between 0.25 in. thick RHA plates. The other prototype system, Non Energetic Reactive Armor (NERA), utilizes the strain energy in compressed rubber to launch a front flyer plate into the path of an incoming projectile. It is comprised of a 1 in. thick rubber layer sandwiched between two 0.25 in. thick RHA plates with bolt holes around the perimeter. Bolts are inserted through the entire target and tightened to compress the rubber sheet to significant strain levels (approximately 40%). A fourth group of targets was tested as a control group. It featured a 0.5 in. thick rubber sheet sandwiched between two 0.25 in. thick RHA plates, similar to the NERA test articles, but the rubber is uncompressed. The four test groups (uncompressed rubber, compressed rubber, 70/30 Al/PTFE, 50/50 Al/PTFE) were each fabricated with three identical test articles in each group. All twelve targets were subjected to ballistic testing at the National Security Test Range on July 17, 2013. They were tested with 0.5 in. diameter steel rods shot at a consistent velocity at each target. In order to characterize the energetic materials, break wires were embedded in the targets and burn velocities were measured. The residual mass method was used to compare the target performance of each group and final performance data is presented below.

Ben Langhorst; Nikki Rasmussen; Andrew Robinson

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

The Superpower behind Iron Oxyfluoride Battery Electrodes | Advanced Photon  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Watching a Protein as it Functions Watching a Protein as it Functions Shedding Light on Chemistry with a Biological Twist Teasing Out the Nature of Structural Instabilities in Ceramic Compounds Doubling Estimates of Light Elements in the Earth's Core A New Material for Warm-White LEDs Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed The Superpower behind Iron Oxyfluoride Battery Electrodes APRIL 2, 2013 Bookmark and Share Structural changes probed using operando PDF analysis indicates a partitioning of a FeOF-based electrode into fluorine- and oxygen-rich phases with different reactivity for each component. Innovative materials chemistries continue to drive advances in lithium-ion

452

Development of a system model for advanced small modular reactors.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a system model that can be used to analyze three advance small modular reactor (SMR) designs through their lifetime. Neutronics of these reactor designs were evaluated using Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX/6). The system models were developed in Matlab and Simulink. A major thrust of this research was the initial scoping analysis of Sandia's concept of a long-life fast reactor (LLFR). The inherent characteristic of this conceptual design is to minimize the change in reactivity over the lifetime of the reactor. This allows the reactor to operate substantially longer at full power than traditional light water reactors (LWRs) or other SMR designs (e.g. high temperature gas reactor (HTGR)). The system model has subroutines for lifetime reactor feedback and operation calculations, thermal hydraulic effects, load demand changes and a simplified SCO2 Brayton cycle for power conversion.

Lewis, Tom Goslee,; Holschuh, Thomas Vernon,

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Electric Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

InfrastructureAdvanced Electric Systems Advanced Electric Systems grid-slide1 grid-slide2 grid-slide3 grid-slide4 Advanced Electric Systems Integrating Renewable Energy into the...

454

Reactive Search Optimization: Learning while Roberto Battiti and Mauro Brunato  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reactive Search Optimization: Learning while Optimizing Roberto Battiti and Mauro Brunato 1, Universit`a di Trento, Italy, e-mail: roberto.battiti@unitn.it Mauro Brunato LION Lab, Universit`a di Trento, Italy, e-mail: mauro.brunato@unitn.it 1 #12;2 Roberto Battiti and Mauro Brunato in the loop between

Battiti, Roberto

455

Toward a new paradigm for reactive flow modeling.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Traditional reactive flow modeling provides a computational representation of shock initiation of energetic materials. Most reactive flow models require ad hoc assumptions to obtain robust simulations, assumptions that result from partitioning energy and volume change between constituents in a reactive mixture. For example, most models assume pressure and/or temperature equilibrium for the mixture. Many mechanical insults to energetic materials violate these approximations. Careful analysis is required to ensure that the model assumptions and limitations are not exceeded. One limitation is that the shock to detonation transition is replicated only for strong planar shocks. Many models require different parameters to match data from thin pulse, ramp wave, or multidimensional loading, an approach that fails for complex loading. To accurately simulate reaction under non-planar shock impact scenarios a new formalism is required. The continuum mixture theory developed by Baer and Nunziato is used to eliminate ad hoc assumptions and limitations of current reactive flow models. This modeling paradigm represents the multiphase nature of reacting condensed/gas mixtures. Comparisons between simulations and data are presented.

Schmitt, Robert Gerard

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Resilient Intrusion Tolerance through Proactive and Reactive Recovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

system's correct operation. We design a proactive- reactive recovery service based on a hybrid the resilience of an intrusion-tolerant firewall adequate for the protection of critical infrastructures infras- tructures like the Power grid. One approach that promises to satisfy this requirement

Neves, Nuno

457

Voltage Regulation through Smart Utilization of Potential Reactive Power Resources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The introduction of demand response concept, in addition to increment of penetration of distributed generation (DG) based on renewable energies, make opportunities for the novel control schemes to be integrated in power system on a smart grid framework. ... Keywords: Demand response, distributed generation, reactive power, renewable energy, smart grid, voltage control

H. Kazari; A. Abbaspour-Tehrani Fard; A. S. Dobakhshari; A. M. Ranjbar

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Substituent Effects on the Reactivity of the Silicon-Carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Canada L8S 4M1 Received April 28, 2000 ABSTRACT Laser flash photolysis of various organosilicon compounds as a reactive intermediate in the high-temperature pyrolysis of a silacyclobutane deriva- tive.9 Hundreds describes our efforts to employ these techniquess laser flash photolysis methods in particularsto study

Leigh, William J.

459

Surface tension in a reactive binary mixture of incompressible fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Surface tension in a reactive binary mixture of incompressible fluids Henning Struchtrup Institute with a distributed form of surface tension. The model describes chemistry, diffusion, viscosity and heat transfer tension at the front. Keywords: Binary mixtures, Surface tension, Irreversible thermodynamics, Hele

Struchtrup, Henning

460

Dependency Analysis for Control Flow Cycles in Reactive Communicating Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the system. The way in which cycle executions are combined is not ar- bitrary since cycles may depend are combined is certainly not arbitrary. For instance, the repetition of one cycle may rely on the repetitionsDependency Analysis for Control Flow Cycles in Reactive Communicating Processes Stefan Leue1 , Alin

Leue, Stefan

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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Dependency Analysis for Control Flow Cycles in Reactive Communicating Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

processes of the system. The way in which cycle executions are combined is not ar- bitrary since cycles may in which cycle executions are combined is certainly not arbitrary. For instance, the repetition of oneDependency Analysis for Control Flow Cycles in Reactive Communicating Processes Stefan Leue1 , Alin

Reiterer, Harald

462

Effect of Number of Fractionating Trays on Reactive Distillation Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of Number of Fractionating Trays on Reactive Distillation Performance Muhammad A. Al and rectifying sec- tions of a reacti®e distillation column can degrade performance. This effect, if true®e distillation columns cannot use conser®ati®e estimates of tray numbers, that is, we cannot simply add excess

Al-Arfaj, Muhammad A.

463

Reactive materials can quickly form plugs for blowout control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various types of reactive materials, or gunk, can react directly with produced fluids (oil, condensate, or brine) or with an additionally injected fluid to form a plug to kill blowout wells or shut off large flow paths. Several recent blowouts were successfully controlled with reactive plugs; other conventional methods would have been more difficult operationally and cost more. Several plug mixtures are available on the market and can be made to suit the type of application and any particular environmental concerns. With proper planning and application, reactive plugs should be considered as a prime well control method when injection into the blowout flow path is available. This method of blowout control can save significant time and expense. The paper discusses the two basic methods of using reactive fluids depending on the flow path available, the use of cements, application steps, environmental concerns, and three case histories: a horizontal well in Texas, a high pressure, high temperature well offshore Louisiana, and a gas blowout in Argentina.

Flak, L.H. [Wright Boots and Coots, Houston, TX (United States)

1995-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

464

Neutron economic reactivity control system for light water reactors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A neutron reactivity control system for a LWBR incorporating a stationary seed-blanket core arrangement. The core arrangement includes a plurality of contiguous hexagonal shaped regions. Each region has a central and a peripheral blanket area juxapositioned an annular seed area. The blanket areas contain thoria fuel rods while the annular seed area includes seed fuel rods and movable thoria shim control rods.

Luce, Robert G. (Glenville, NY); McCoy, Daniel F. (Latham, NY); Merriman, Floyd C. (Rotterdam, NY); Gregurech, Steve (Scotia, NY)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Generalized Chemical Reactivity of Curved Surfaces: Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Following the decomposition, the total reaction energy Etotal, which is the index of chemical reactivity, can be divided into three terms: strain energy Estrain, C-X binding energy EC-X, and global relaxation in a CNT can enhance the hydrogenation energy at the location of the excess deformation so

Srivastava, Deepak

466

Local control of reactive power by distributed photovoltaic generators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High penetration levels of distributed photovoltaic (PV) generation on an electrical distribution circuit may severely degrade power quality due to voltage sags and swells caused by rapidly varying PV generation during cloud transients coupled with the slow response of existing utility compensation and regulation equipment. Although not permitted under current standards for interconnection of distributed generation, fast-reacting, VAR-capable PV inverters may provide the necessary reactive power injection or consumption to maintain voltage regulation under difficult transient conditions. As side benefit, the control of reactive power injection at each PV inverter provides an opportunity and a new tool for distribution utilities to optimize the performance of distribution circuits, e.g. by minimizing thermal losses. We suggest a local control scheme that dispatches reactive power from each PV inverter based on local instantaneous measurements of the real and reactive components of the consumed power and the real power generated by the PVs. Using one adjustable parameter per circuit, we balance the requirements on power quality and desire to minimize thermal losses. Numerical analysis of two exemplary systems, with comparable total PV generation albeit a different spatial distribution, show how to adjust the optimization parameter depending on the goal. Overall, this local scheme shows excellent performance; it's capable of guaranteeing acceptable power quality and achieving significant saving in thermal losses in various situations even when the renewable generation in excess of the circuit own load, i.e. feeding power back to the higher-level system.

Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Turitsyn, Konstantin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sulc, Petr [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Backhaus, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Sleep & Memory/Review Memory reactivation and consolidation during sleep  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sleep & Memory/Review Memory reactivation and consolidation during sleep Ken A. Paller1 and Joel L, Illinois 60208-2710, USA Do our memories remain static during sleep, or do they change? We argue here that memory change is not only a natural result of sleep cognition, but further, that such change constitutes

Paller, Ken

468

Draft Advanced Nuclear Energy Solicitation Public Meeting Presentation...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Draft Advanced Nuclear Energy Solicitation Public Meeting Presentation Draft Advanced Nuclear Energy Solicitation Public Meeting Presentation Draft Advanced Nuclear Solicitation...

469

Advanced Mud System for Microhole Coiled Tubing Drilling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An advanced mud system was designed and key components were built that augment a coiled tubing drilling (CTD) rig that is designed specifically to drill microholes (less than 4-inch diameter) with advanced drilling techniques. The mud system was tailored to the hydraulics of the hole geometries and rig characteristics required for microholes and is capable of mixing and circulating mud and removing solids while being self contained and having zero discharge capability. Key components of this system are two modified triplex mud pumps (High Pressure Slurry Pumps) for advanced Abrasive Slurry Jetting (ASJ) and a modified Gas-Liquid-Solid (GLS) Separator for well control, flow return and initial processing. The system developed also includes an additional component of an advanced version of ASJ which allows cutting through most all materials encountered in oil and gas wells including steel, cement, and all rock types. It includes new fluids and new ASJ nozzles. The jetting mechanism does not require rotation of the bottom hole assembly or drill string, which is essential for use with Coiled Tubing (CT). It also has low reactive forces acting on the CT and generates cuttings small enough to be easily cleaned from the well bore, which is important in horizontal drilling. These cutting and mud processing components and capabilities compliment the concepts put forth by DOE for microhole coiled tubing drilling (MHTCTD) and should help insure the reality of drilling small diameter holes quickly and inexpensively with a minimal environmental footprint and that is efficient, compact and portable. Other components (site liners, sump and transfer pumps, stacked shakers, filter membranes, etc.. ) of the overall mud system were identified as readily available in industry and will not be purchased until we are ready to drill a specific well.

Kenneth Oglesby

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Core follow calculation with the nTRACER numerical reactor and verification using power reactor measurement data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nTRACER direct whole core transport code employing the planar MOC solution based 3-D calculation method, the subgroup method for resonance treatment, the Krylov matrix exponential method for depletion, and a subchannel thermal/hydraulic calculation solver was developed for practical high-fidelity simulation of power reactors. Its accuracy and performance is verified by comparing with the measurement data obtained for three pressurized water reactor cores. It is demonstrated that accurate and detailed multi-physic simulation of power reactors is practically realizable without any prior calculations or adjustments. (authors)

Jung, Y. S.; Joo, H. G. [Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, J. I. [KEPCO Nuclear Fuel, 1047 Daedukdae-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Advances in Metallic Nuclear Fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Metallic nuclear fuels have generated renewed interest for advanced ... operations is excellent. Ongoing irradiation tests in Argonne-Wests Idaho-based Experimental Breeder Reactor ... fast reactor (IFR) concept...

B. R. Seidel; L. C. Walters; Y. I. Chang

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation Newsletter  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation (ASI) newsletter will be released periodically to inform program stakeholders about new developments and achievements in the area of sensors, instrumentation and related technologies across the Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) R&D programs.

473

advanced search Economist.com  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEARCH advanced search » Economist.com RESEARCH TOOLS Choose a research tool... Help their movements cause? A company is paying them to do a job, so why should it not read their e-mails when

Nissenbaum, Helen

474

Advanced Policy Practice Spring 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced Policy Practice Spring 2014 SW 548-001 Instructor course that focuses on the theory and evidence-based skill sets of policy analysis, development, implementation, and change. The course focuses on policy

Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

475

Sandia National Laboratories: advanced materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Renewable Energy, Solar, Systems Engineering On May 21st, the Department of Energy SunShot Initiative announced 10M for six new R&D projects that will advance innovative...

476

Nanobiocatalyst advancements and bioprocessing applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...develop a synergistic biocatalyst-medicine device. They used a cleavable enzyme-linker...innovative discovery reported in Nature Nanotechnology [32]. The authors characterized...integrates two advanced technologies: nanotechnology and biotechnology. The perspectives...

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

February 2000 Advanced Technology Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF COMMERCE Economic Assessment Office Technology Administration Advanced Technology Program National .................................................................................................6 V. IIH Focused Program Project Selection Process information infrastructure in healthcare. A discussion of the ATP "white paper" process4 notes differences

478

Recent Advances in Petroleum Microbiology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

American Society for Microbiology ARTICLE REVIEWS Recent Advances in Petroleum Microbiology Jonathan D. Van Hamme...177: 2615-2621. 218 Gilbert, S. C., J. Morton...desulfurization pathway. Microbiology 144: 2545-2553. 219...

Jonathan D. Van Hamme; Ajay Singh; Owen P. Ward

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Advanced Process Management and Implementation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced Process Management is a method to achieve optimum process performance during the life cycle of a plant through proper design, effective automation, and adequate operator decision support. Developing a quality process model is an effective...

Robinson, J.

480

SCANNING THE TECHNOLOGY Scanning Advanced  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

state of refinement. This has been made possible by advancements in a wide spec- trum of scientific economy, lower emissions and improved safety. The availability of computers on board the vehicle

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Advanced Supply System Validation Workshop  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) is hosting the Advanced Supply System Validation Workshop on February 3-4, 2015, in Golden, Colorado. The purpose of the workshop is to bring together a...

482

Building Technologies Office: Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Energy Retrofit Guides to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities 179d Tax Calculator Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides Building Energy Data Exchange Specification Buildings Performance Database Data Centers Energy Asset Score

483

Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Materials Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Materials Laboratory Sandia Researchers Win CSP:ELEMENTS Funding Award On June 4, 2014, in Advanced Materials Laboratory, Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Energy...

484

Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Advanced Vehicle Technology...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

8 Advanced Vehicle Technology Analysis and Evaluation Activities and Heavy Vehicle Systems Optimization Program Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Advanced...

485

Advanced Hybrid Water Heater using Electrochemical Compressor...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Advanced Hybrid Water Heater using Electrochemical Compressor Advanced Hybrid Water Heater using Electrochemical Compressor Xergy is using its Electro Chemical Compression (ECC)...

486

Polymer Electrolytes for Advanced Lithium Batteries | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced Lithium Batteries Polymer Electrolytes for Advanced Lithium Batteries 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

487

Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines (ARES) - Presentation...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines (ARES) - Presentation by Caterpillar, Inc., June 2011 Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines (ARES) - Presentation by Caterpillar,...

488

Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines (ARES) - Presentation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Cummins, Inc., June 2011 Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines (ARES) - Presentation by Cummins, Inc., June 2011 Presentation on Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines...

489

Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines (ARES) - Presentation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Dresser Waukesha, June 2011 Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines (ARES) - Presentation by Dresser Waukesha, June 2011 Presentation on Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating...

490

Optimization of Advanced Diesel Engine Combustion Strategies...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Optimization of Advanced Diesel Engine Combustion Strategies Optimization of Advanced Diesel Engine Combustion Strategies 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual...

491

Vehicle Technologies Office: 2012 Advanced Power Electronics...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

2 Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2012 Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors R&D Annual Progress...

492

Advanced Electric Drive Vehicle Education Program | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced Electric Drive Vehicle Education Program Advanced Electric Drive Vehicle Education Program 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer...

493

Advanced Electric Drive Vehicles ? A Comprehensive Education...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

D.C. tiarravt034ferdowsi2010o.pdf More Documents & Publications Advanced Electric Drive Vehicles A Comprehensive Education, Training, and Outreach Program Advanced...

494

Advanced Electric Drive Vehicles ? A Comprehensive Education...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Meeting arravt034tiferdowsi2012o.pdf More Documents & Publications Advanced Electric Drive Vehicles A Comprehensive Education, Training, and Outreach Program Advanced...

495

Advanced Electric Drive Vehicles ? A Comprehensive Education...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Evaluation arravt034tiferdowsi2011p.pdf More Documents & Publications Advanced Electric Drive Vehicles A Comprehensive Education, Training, and Outreach Program Advanced...

496

Advanced Electric Drive Vehicles | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

D.C. tiarravt039schwendeman2010o.pdf More Documents & Publications Advanced Electric Drive Vehicles Advanced Electric Drive Vehicles Energy & Manufacturing Workforce...

497

Advancing Transportation Through Vehicle Electrification - PHEV...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Meeting arravt067vssbazzi2012o.pdf More Documents & Publications Advancing Transportation Through Vehicle Electrification - PHEV Advancing Plug In Hybrid Technology and...

498

The Ohio Advanced Transportation Partnership (OATP) | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

The Ohio Advanced Transportation Partnership (OATP) The Ohio Advanced Transportation Partnership (OATP) 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program...

499

Funding Opportunity Webinar - Advancing Solutions To Improve...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Funding Opportunity Webinar - Advancing Solutions To Improve the Energy Efficiency of US Commercial Buildings Funding Opportunity Webinar - Advancing Solutions To Improve the...

500

Advanced Manufacturing Initiative Improves Turbine Blade Productivity...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Advanced Manufacturing Initiative Improves Turbine Blade Productivity Advanced Manufacturing Initiative Improves Turbine Blade Productivity May 20, 2011 - 2:56pm Addthis This is an...