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1

Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measuring Thermal Evolution...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measuring Thermal Evolution in CO2- and Water-Based Geothermal Reservoirs Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation, search Last...

2

Advancing reactive tracer methods for measuring thermal evolution...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Partitioning, and Nonreactive Tracers to Determine Temperature Distribution and FractureHeat Transfer Surface Area in Geothermal Reservoirs Quantum Dot Tracers for Use in...

3

ADVANCING REACTIVE TRACER METHODS FOR MONITORING THERMAL DRAWDOWN IN GEOTHERMAL ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reactive tracers have long been considered a possible means of measuring thermal drawdown in a geothermal system, before significant cooling occurs at the extraction well. Here, we examine the sensitivity of the proposed method to evaluate reservoir cooling and demonstrate that while the sensitivity of the method as generally proposed is low, it may be practical under certain conditions.

Mitchell A. Plummer; Carl D. Palmer; Earl D. Mattson; George D. Redden; Laurence C. Hull

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measurement of Thermal Evolution in Geothermal Reservoirs: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The injection of cold fluids into engineered geothermal system (EGS) and conventional geothermal reservoirs may be done to help extract heat from the subsurface or to maintain pressures within the reservoir (e.g., Rose et al., 2001). As these injected fluids move along fractures, they acquire heat from the rock matrix and remove it from the reservoir as they are extracted to the surface. A consequence of such injection is the migration of a cold-fluid front through the reservoir (Figure 1) that could eventually reach the production well and result in the lowering of the temperature of the produced fluids (thermal breakthrough). Efficient operation of an EGS as well as conventional geothermal systems involving cold-fluid injection requires accurate and timely information about thermal depletion of the reservoir in response to operation. In particular, accurate predictions of the time to thermal breakthrough and subsequent rate of thermal drawdown are necessary for reservoir management, design of fracture stimulation and well drilling programs, and forecasting of economic return. A potential method for estimating migration of a cold front between an injection well and a production well is through application of reactive tracer tests, using chemical whose rate of degradation is dependent on the reservoir temperature between the two wells (e.g., Robinson 1985). With repeated tests, the rate of migration of the thermal front can be determined, and the time to thermal breakthrough calculated. While the basic theory behind the concept of thermal tracers has been understood for some time, effective application of the method has yet to be demonstrated. This report describes results of a study that used several methods to investigate application of reactive tracers to monitoring the thermal evolution of a geothermal reservoir. These methods included (1) mathematical investigation of the sensitivity of known and hypothetical reactive tracers, (2) laboratory testing of novel tracers that would improve method sensitivity, (3) development of a software tool for design and interpretation of reactive tracer tests and (4) field testing of the reactive tracer temperature monitoring concept.

Mitchell A. Plummer; Carl D. Palmer; Earl D. Mattson; Laurence C. Hull; George D. Redden

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Advancing reactive tracer methods for measuring thermal evolution in CO2-and water-based geothermal reservoirs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. This project aims to develop reactive tracer method for monitoring thermal drawdown in enhanced geothermal systems.

6

Tracking thermal fronts with temperature-sensitive, chemically reactive tracers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos is developing tracer techniques using reactive chemicals to track thermal fronts in fractured geothermal reservoirs. If a nonadsorbing tracer flowing from the injection to production well chemically reacts, its reaction rate will be a strong function of temperature. Thus the extent of chemical reaction will be greatest early in the lifetime of the system, and less as the thermal front progresses from the injection to production well. Early laboratory experiments identified tracers with chemical kinetics suitable for reservoirs in the temperature range of 75 to 100/sup 0/C. Recent kinetics studies have focused on the kinetics of hydrolysis of derivatives of bromobenzene. This class of reactions can be used in reservoirs ranging in temperature from 150 to 275/sup 0/C, which is of greater interest to the geothermal industry. Future studies will include laboratory adsorption experiments to identify possibly unwanted adsorption on granite, development of sensitive analytical techniques, and a field demonstration of the reactive tracer concept.

Robinson, B.A.; Birdsell, S.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Diagnostic Implications of the Reactivity of Fluorescence Tracers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements of fuel concentration distributions with planar laser induced fluorescence of tracer molecules that are added to a base fuel are commonly used in combustion research and development. It usually is assumed that the tracer concentration follows the parent fuel concentration if physical properties such as those determining evaporation are matched. As an example to address this general issue a computational study of combustion of biacetyl/iso-octane mixtures was performed to investigate how well the concentration of biacetyl represents the concentration of iso-octane. For premixed mixture conditions with flame propagation the spatial concentration profiles of the two species in the flame front are separated by 110 {micro}m at 1 bar and by 11 {micro}m at 10 bar. For practical applications this spatial separation is insignificantly small. However, for conditions that mimic ignition and combustion in diesel and HCCI-like operation the differences in tracer and fuel concentration can be significant, exceeding hundreds of percent. At low initial temperature biacetyl was found to be more stable whereas at higher temperature (>1000K) iso-octane is more stable. Similar findings were obtained for a multi-component fuel comprised of iso-octane, n-heptane, methylcyclohexane, and toluene. It may be assumed that similar differences can exist for other tracer/fuel combinations. Caution has therefore to be applied when interpreting PLIF measurements in homogeneous reaction conditions such as in HCCI engine studies.

Sick, V; Westbrook, C

2008-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

8

Advancing reactive tracer methods for measuring thermal evolution...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

et al. (2003) - Use simplified geometry of hypothetical fracture system - Develop in MATLAB, to allow distribution to industry via the MATLAB compiler * Conducted 2-D finite...

9

Semianalytical Solutions of Radioactive or Reactive Tracer Transport in Layered Fractured Media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, semianalytical solutions are developed for the problem of transport of radioactive or reactive tracers (solutes or colloids) through a layered system of heterogeneous fractured media with misaligned fractures. The tracer transport equations in the matrix account for (a) diffusion, (b) surface diffusion (for solutes only), (c) mass transfer between the mobile and immobile water fractions, (d) linear kinetic or equilibrium physical, chemical, or combined solute sorption or colloid filtration, and (e) radioactive decay or first order chemical reactions. Any number of radioactive decay daughter products (or products of a linear, first-order reaction chain) can be tracked. The tracer-transport equations in the fractures account for the same processes, in addition to advection and hydrodynamic dispersion. Additionally, the colloid transport equations account for straining and velocity adjustments related to the colloidal size. The solutions, which are analytical in the Laplace space, are numerically inverted to provide the solution in time and can accommodate any number of fractured and/or porous layers. The solutions are verified using analytical solutions for limiting cases of solute and colloid transport through fractured and porous media. The effect of important parameters on the transport of {sup 3}H, {sup 237}Np and {sup 239}Pu (and its daughters) is investigated in several test problems involving layered geological systems of varying complexity. {sup 239}Pu colloid transport problems in multilayered systems indicate significant colloid accumulations at straining interfaces but much faster transport of the colloid than the corresponding strongly sorbing solute species.

G.J. Moridis; G. S. Bodvarsson

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

QUANTIFICATION OF FUGITIVE REACTIVE ALKENE EMISSIONS FROM PETROCHEMICAL PLANTS WITH PERFLUOROCARBON TRACERS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent studies demonstrate the impact of fugitive emissions of reactive alkenes on the atmospheric chemistry of the Houston Texas metropolitan area (1). Petrochemical plants located in and around the Houston area emit atmospheric alkenes, such as ethene, propene and 1,3-butadiene. The magnitude of emissions is a major uncertainty in assessing their effects. Even though the petrochemical industry reports that fugitive emissions of alkenes have been reduced to less than 0.1% of daily production, recent measurement data, obtained during the TexAQS 2000 experiment indicates that emissions are perhaps a factor of ten larger than estimated values. Industry figures for fugitive emissions are based on adding up estimated emission factors for every component in the plant to give a total estimated emission from the entire facility. The dramatic difference between estimated and measured rates indicates either that calculating emission fluxes by summing estimates for individual components is seriously flawed, possibly due to individual components leaking well beyond their estimated tolerances, that not all sources of emissions for a facility are being considered in emissions estimates, or that there are known sources of emissions that are not being reported. This experiment was designed to confirm estimates of reactive alkene emissions derived from analysis of the TexAQS 2000 data by releasing perfluorocarbon tracers (PFTs) at a known flux from a petrochemical plant and sampling both the perfluorocarbon tracer and reactive alkenes downwind using the Piper-Aztec research aircraft operated by Baylor University. PFTs have been extensively used to determine leaks in pipelines, air infiltration in buildings, and to characterize the transport and dispersion of air parcels in the atmosphere. Over 20 years of development by the Tracer Technology Center (TTC) has produced a range of analysis instruments, field samplers and PFT release equipment that have been successfully deployed in a large variety of experiments. PFTs are inert, nontoxic, noncombustible and nonreactive. Up to seven unique PFTs can be simultaneously released, sampled and analyzed and the technology is well suited for determining emission fluxes from large petrochemical facilities. The PFT experiment described here was designed to quantitate alkene emissions from a single petrochemical facility, but such experiments could be applied to other industrial sources or groups of sources in the Houston area.

SENUM,G.I.; DIETZ,R.N.

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

11

Toward Optimized Bioclogging and Biocementation Through Combining Advanced Geophysical Monitoring and Reactive Transport Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and electrical techniques); (ii) developing and using a reactive transport simulator capable of predicting and Reactive Transport Modeling Approaches Christopher G Hubbard1 , Susan S. Hubbard1 , Yuxin Wu1 , Vikranth heterogeneities at the field scale. Optimization of these strategies requires advances in mechanistic reactive

Hubbard, Susan

12

Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measuring Thermal Evolution in CO2-  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWaterBrasil Jump to:IowaResource Evaluation And Reservoir Management

13

ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, VOL. 25, NO. 5, 2008, 805814 Diagnosing Ocean Tracer Transport from Sellafield  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DRANGE1,2,3,4 , and Eric DELEERSNIJDER5 1 Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Center, Bergen, Norway applications thereof, idealized releases of passive tracers from the nuclear fuel reprocessing plants­814, doi: 10.1007/s00376-008-0805-y. 1. Introduction Estimating the integrated effect of processes acting

Drange, Helge

14

Advanced hydraulic fracturing methods to create in situ reactive barriers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many contaminated areas consist of a source area and a plume. In the source area, the contaminant moves vertically downward from a release point through the vadose zone to an underlying saturated region. Where contaminants are organic liquids, NAPL may accumulate on the water table, or it may continue to migrate downward through the saturated region. Early developments of permeable barrier technology have focused on intercepting horizontally moving plumes with vertical structures, such as trenches, filled with reactive material capable of immobilizing or degrading dissolved contaminants. This focus resulted in part from a need to economically treat the potentially large volumes of contaminated water in a plume, and in part from the availability of construction technology to create the vertical structures that could house reactive compounds. Contaminant source areas, however, have thus far remained largely excluded from the application of permeable barrier technology. One reason for this is the lack of conventional construction methods for creating suitable horizontal structures that would place reactive materials in the path of downward-moving contaminants. Methods of hydraulic fracturing have been widely used to create flat-lying to gently dipping layers of granular material in unconsolidated sediments. Most applications thus far have involved filling fractures with coarse-grained sand to create permeable layers that will increase the discharge of wells recovering contaminated water or vapor. However, it is possible to fill fractures with other compounds that alter the chemical composition of the subsurface. One early application involved development and field testing micro-encapsulated sodium percarbonate, a solid compound that releases oxygen and can create aerobic conditions suitable for biodegradation in the subsurface for several months.

Murdoch, L. [FRx Inc., Cincinnati, OH (United States); [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Siegrist, B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Vesper, S. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States)] [and others

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

15

Advanced hydraulic fracturing methods to create in situ reactive barriers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes the use of hydraulic fracturing to increase permeability in geologic formations where in-situ remedial action of contaminant plumes will be performed. Several in-situ treatment strategies are discussed including the use of hydraulic fracturing to create in situ redox zones for treatment of organics and inorganics. Hydraulic fracturing methods offer a mechanism for the in-situ treatment of gently dipping layers of reactive compounds. Specialized methods using real-time monitoring and a high-energy jet during fracturing allow the form of the fracture to be influenced, such as creation of assymmetric fractures beneath potential sources (i.e. tanks, pits, buildings) that should not be penetrated by boring. Some examples of field applications of this technique such as creating fractures filled with zero-valent iron to reductively dechlorinate halogenated hydrocarbons, and the use of granular activated carbon to adsorb compounds are discussed.

Murdoch, L. [FRX Inc., Cincinnati, OH (United States)]|[Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences; Siegrist, B.; Meiggs, T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

16

Biological tracer method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a biological tracer method for characterizing the movement of a material through a medium, comprising the steps of: introducing a biological tracer comprising a microorganism having ice nucleating activity into a medium; collecting at least one sample of the medium from a point removed from the introduction point; and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. The present invention is also a method for using a biological tracer as a label for material identification by introducing a biological tracer having ice nucleating activity into a material, collecting a sample of a portion of the labelled material and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. 2 figs.

Strong-Gunderson, J.M.; Palumbo, A.V.

1998-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

Biological tracer method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a biological tracer method for characterizing the movement of a material through a medium, comprising the steps of: introducing a biological tracer comprising a microorganism having ice nucleating activity into a medium; collecting at least one sample of the medium from a point removed from the introduction point; and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. The present invention is also a method for using a biological tracer as a label for material identification by introducing a biological tracer having ice nucleating activity into a material, collecting a sample of a portion of the labelled material and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer.

Strong-Gunderson, Janet M. (Ten Mile, TN); Palumbo, Anthony V. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

First Tracer Test After Circulation in Desert Peak 27-15  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Following the successful stimulation of Desert Peak target EGS well 27-15, a circulation test was initiated by injecting a conservative tracer (1,5-nds) in combination with a reactive tracer (7-amino-1,3-naphthalene disulfonate). The closest production well 74-21 was monitored over the subsequent several months.

Rose, Peter

19

First Tracer Test After Circulation in Desert Peak 27-15  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Following the successful stimulation of Desert Peak target EGS well 27-15, a circulation test was initiated by injecting a conservative tracer (1,5-nds) in combination with a reactive tracer (7-amino-1,3-naphthalene disulfonate). The closest production well 74-21 was monitored over the subsequent several months.

Rose, Peter

2013-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

20

Tracers and Tracer Testing: Design, Implementation, Tracer Selection, and Interpretation Methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conducting a successful tracer test requires adhering to a set of steps. The steps include identifying appropriate and achievable test goals, identifying tracers with the appropriate properties, and implementing the test as designed. When these steps are taken correctly, a host of tracer test analysis methods are available to the practitioner. This report discusses the individual steps required for a successful tracer test and presents methods for analysis. The report is an overview of tracer technology; the Suggested Reading section offers references to the specifics of test design and interpretation.

G. Michael Shook; Shannon L.; Allan Wylie

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Advances  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the BuildingInnovation PortalScienceScripting forAdvances in

22

Development of Models to Simulate Tracer Tests for Characterization of Enhanced Geothermal Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A recent report found that power and heat produced from enhanced (or engineered) geothermal systems (EGSs) could have a major impact on the U.S energy production capability while having a minimal impact on the environment. EGS resources differ from high-grade hydrothermal resources in that they lack sufficient temperature distribution, permeability/porosity, fluid saturation, or recharge of reservoir fluids. Therefore, quantitative characterization of temperature distributions and the surface area available for heat transfer in EGS is necessary for the design and commercial development of the geothermal energy of a potential EGS site. The goal of this project is to provide integrated tracer and tracer interpretation tools to facilitate this characterization. This project was initially focused on tracer development with the application of perfluorinated tracer (PFT) compounds, non-reactive tracers used in numerous applications from atmospheric transport to underground leak detection, to geothermal systems, and evaluation of encapsulated PFTs that would release tracers at targeted reservoir temperatures. After the 2011 midyear review and subsequent discussions with the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Technology Program (GTP), emphasis was shifted to interpretive tool development, testing, and validation. Subsurface modeling capabilities are an important component of this project for both the design of suitable tracers and the interpretation of data from in situ tracer tests, be they single- or multi-well tests. The purpose of this report is to describe the results of the tracer and model development for simulating and conducting tracer tests for characterizing EGS parameters.

Williams, Mark D.; Reimus, Paul; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Rose, Peter; Dean, Cynthia A.; Watson, Tom B.; Newell, D.; Leecaster, Kevin; Brauser, Eric

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Heat as a tracer to determine streambed water exchanges Jim Constantz1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heat as a tracer to determine streambed water exchanges Jim Constantz1 Received 13 March 2008 of heat as a tracer of shallow groundwater movement and describes current temperature-based approaches relying on traditional observation wells, and remote sensing and other large-scale advanced temperature

24

AN INTEGRATED APPROACH TO CHARACTERIZING BYPASSED OIL IN HETEROGENEOUS AND FRACTURED RESERVOIRS USING PARTITIONING TRACERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We explore the use of efficient streamline-based simulation approaches for modeling partitioning interwell tracer tests in hydrocarbon reservoirs. Specifically, we utilize the unique features of streamline models to develop an efficient approach for interpretation and history matching of field tracer response. A critical aspect here is the underdetermined and highly ill-posed nature of the associated inverse problems. We have adopted an integrated approach whereby we combine data from multiple sources to minimize the uncertainty and non-uniqueness in the interpreted results. For partitioning interwell tracer tests, these are primarily the distribution of reservoir permeability and oil saturation distribution. A novel approach to multiscale data integration using Markov Random Fields (MRF) has been developed to integrate static data sources from the reservoir such as core, well log and 3-D seismic data. We have also explored the use of a finite difference reservoir simulator, UTCHEM, for field-scale design and optimization of partitioning interwell tracer tests. The finite-difference model allows us to include detailed physics associated with reactive tracer transport, particularly those related with transverse and cross-streamline mechanisms. We have investigated the potential use of downhole tracer samplers and also the use of natural tracers for the design of partitioning tracer tests. Finally, the behavior of partitioning tracer tests in fractured reservoirs is investigated using a dual-porosity finite-difference model.

Akhil Datta-Gupta

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Tracer airflow measurement system (TRAMS)  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for measuring fluid flow in a duct is disclosed. The invention uses a novel high velocity tracer injector system, an optional insertable folding mixing fan for homogenizing the tracer within the duct bulk fluid flow, and a perforated hose sampling system. A preferred embodiment uses CO.sub.2 as a tracer gas for measuring air flow in commercial and/or residential ducts. In extant commercial buildings, ducts not readily accessible by hanging ceilings may be drilled with readily plugged small diameter holes to allow for injection, optional mixing where desired using a novel insertable foldable mixing fan, and sampling hose.

Wang, Duo (Albany, CA)

2007-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

26

E-Print Network 3.0 - accumulate reactive oxygen Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

reactive oxygen Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: accumulate reactive oxygen Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 CLINICAL CONCEPTS AND...

27

Reactive Maintenance  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Reactive maintenance follows a run-it-until-it-breaks strategy where no actions or efforts are taken to maintain equipment as intended by the manufacturer. Studies indicate this is still the predominant mode of maintenance for Federal facilities.

28

Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Stimulation in Engineered...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Stimulation in Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS) Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Stimulation in Engineered Geothermal...

29

Comparison of Conventional Diesel and Reactivity Controlled Compressio...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of Advanced Diesel Engine Combustion Strategies Effect of Compression Ratio and Piston Geometry on RCCI load limit High Efficiency Fuel Reactivity Controlled Compression...

30

Multiple-tracer gas analyzer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multi-gas tracer system has been designed, built, and used on an explosively fractured oil shale rubble bed. This paper deals exclusively with the hardware, software, and overall operation of the tracer system. This system is a field portable, self-contained unit, which utilizes a mass spectrometer for gas analysis. The unit has a 20 channel sample port capability and is controlled by a desk top computer. The system is configured to provide a dynamic sensitivity range of up to six orders of magnitude. A roots blower is manifolded to the unit to provide continuous flow in all sample lines. The continuous flow process allows representative samples as well as decreasing the time between each measurement. Typical multiplex cycle time to evaluate four unique gases is approximately 12 seconds.

Uhl, J.E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Reactive Gliosis Reactive Oxygen Species: Superoxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. By sensing the electric signals generated by other 3368 Reactive Gliosis #12;individuals, mormyrids are alsoReactive Gliosis Glial Scar Reactive Oxygen Species: Superoxide Anions Neuroinflammation motor output. Reafferent Control in Electric Communication Reafferent Control in Electric Communication

32

A Tracer Test Using Ethanol as a Two-Phase Tracer and 2-Naphthalene...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Test Using Ethanol as a Two-Phase Tracer and 2-Naphthalene Sulfonate as a Liquid-Phase Tracer at the Coso Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd...

33

Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Creation in Enhanced...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Creation in Enhanced Geothermal Systems; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture...

34

Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Stimulation in Enhanced...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Stimulation in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS); 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Tracer Methods for Characterizing...

35

Validation of Geothermal Tracer Methods in Highly Constrained...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of Research Hypothesis: Smart tracers can measure potential heat exchange between fracture and rock mass Hypothesis Test: A tracer test proving ground System must be simple...

36

Guidance Document Reactive Chemicals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

showers and chillers. Health Hazards: The reactive chemicals are grouped primarily because of the physical

37

Using Biofuel Tracers to Study Alternative Combustion Regimes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Section B (NIMB) Using Biofuel Tracers to Study Alternativeinjection. We investigate biofuel HCCI combustion, and use

Mack, John Hunter; Flowers, Daniel L.; Buchholz, Bruce A.; Dibble, Robert W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

E-Print Network 3.0 - atom-diatom reactive scattering Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

diatom reactive scattering Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: atom-diatom reactive scattering Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Eur. Phys....

39

Tracer measurements during long-term circulation of the Rosemanowes HDR geothermal system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Circulation experiments have been in operation for over two years in the artificially stimulated hot dry rock (HDR) doublet of the Camborne School of Mines (CSM) research facility in Cornwall, England. During that period tracer tests have been run at intervals using inert and reactive compounds. Initially, the results of the inert tracer investigations showed that the active volume (indicated by modal and median volumes) of the circulating system was dormant. Then, after a period of sustained oscillation, notable increases in active volume were observed which depended on both the subsequent flow rate changes and circulation time. these dynamic changes had almost reached optimum values when a downhole pump was introduced in the production well. The drawdown in the production well caused a reduction of the modal volume, whilst the median volume remained almost the same. Since then, the active volume has remained unchanged and irresponsive to circulation time and flow rate. The results of the reactive tracer tests confirm increasing chemical reaction with increasing circulation time and correlate qualitatively with the opening of newer and hotter pathways within the reservoir. However, repeated production logs throughout the circulation have identified flow paths that have depleted thermally; a discrepancy that can be explained by the geometry of the system and the preferential downward reservoir growth.

Kwakwa, K.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Thermal Stability of Chelated Indium Activable Tracers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermal stability of indium tracer chelated with organic ligands ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) was measured for reservoir temperatures of 150, 200, and 240 C. Measurements of the soluble indium concentration was made as a function of time by neutron activation analysis. From the data, approximate thermal decomposition rates were estimated. At 150 C, both chelated tracers were stable over the experimental period of 20 days. At 200 C, the InEDTA concentration remained constant for 16 days, after which the thermal decomposition occurred at a measured rate constant of k = 0.09 d{sup -1}. The thermal decomposition of InNTA at 200 C showed a first order reaction with a measured rate constant of k = 0.16 d{sup -1}. At 240 C, both indium chelated tracers showed rapid decomposition with rate constants greater than 1.8 d{sup -1}. The data indicate that for geothermal reservoir with temperatures up to about 200 C, indium chelated tracers can be used effectively for transit times of at least 20 days. These experiments were run without reservoir rock media, and do not account for concomitant loss of indium tracer by adsorption processes.

Chrysikopoulos, Costas; Kruger, Paul

1986-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

An Integrated Approach to Characterizing Bypassed Oil in Heterogeneous and Fractured Reservoirs Using Partitioning Tracers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We explore the use of efficient streamline-based simulation approaches for modeling partitioning interwell tracer tests in hydrocarbon reservoirs. Specifically, we utilize the unique features of streamline models to develop an efficient approach for interpretation and history matching of field tracer response. A critical aspect here is the underdetermined and highly ill-posed nature of the associated inverse problems. We have investigated the relative merits of the traditional history matching ('amplitude inversion') and a novel travel time inversion in terms of robustness of the method and convergence behavior of the solution. We show that the traditional amplitude inversion is orders of magnitude more non-linear and the solution here is likely to get trapped in local minimum, leading to inadequate history match. The proposed travel time inversion is shown to be extremely efficient and robust for practical field applications. The streamline approach is generalized to model water injection in naturally fractured reservoirs through the use of a dual media approach. The fractures and matrix are treated as separate continua that are connected through a transfer function, as in conventional finite difference simulators for modeling fractured systems. A detailed comparison with a commercial finite difference simulator shows very good agreement. Furthermore, an examination of the scaling behavior of the computation time indicates that the streamline approach is likely to result in significant savings for large-scale field applications. We also propose a novel approach to history matching finite-difference models that combines the advantage of the streamline models with the versatility of finite-difference simulation. In our approach, we utilize the streamline-derived sensitivities to facilitate history matching during finite-difference simulation. The use of finite-difference model allows us to account for detailed process physics and compressibility effects. The approach is very fast and avoids much of the subjective judgments and time-consuming trial-and-errors associated with manual history matching. We demonstrate the power and utility of our approach using a synthetic example and two field examples. We have also explored the use of a finite difference reservoir simulator, UTCHEM, for field-scale design and optimization of partitioning interwell tracer tests. The finite-difference model allows us to include detailed physics associated with reactive tracer transport, particularly those related with transverse and cross-streamline mechanisms. We have investigated the potential use of downhole tracer samplers and also the use of natural tracers for the design of partitioning tracer tests. Finally, we discuss several alternative ways of using partitioning interwell tracer tests (PITTs) in oil fields for the calculation of oil saturation, swept pore volume and sweep efficiency, and assess the accuracy of such tests under a variety of reservoir conditions.

Akhil Datta-Gupta

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

42

Enhanced Oil Recovery: Aqueous Flow Tracer Measurement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A low detection limit analytical method was developed to measure a suite of benzoic acid and fluorinated benzoic acid compounds intended for use as tracers for enhanced oil recovery operations. Although the new high performance liquid chromatography separation successfully measured the tracers in an aqueous matrix at low part per billion levels, the low detection limits could not be achieved in oil field water due to interference problems with the hydrocarbon-saturated water using the system's UV detector. Commercial instrument vendors were contacted in an effort to determine if mass spectrometry could be used as an alternate detection technique. The results of their work demonstrate that low part per billion analysis of the tracer compounds in oil field water could be achieved using ultra performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry.

Joseph Rovani; John Schabron

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced pwr fuel Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced nuclear reactor theory... equations, prompt jump approximation; subcritical reactor kinetics, circulating fuel reactor dynamics 5... Short-term Reactivity...

44

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric tracer experiments Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Geosciences 11 The University of Reading Helen Dacre Evaluating pollution transport in Summary: study Tracer experiments NAME tracer analysis UM tracer...

45

Method of dispersing particulate aerosol tracer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A particulate aerosol tracer which comprises a particulate carrier of sheet silicate composition having a particle size up to one micron, and a cationic dopant chemically absorbed in solid solution in the carrier. The carrier is preferably selected from the group consisting of natural mineral clays such as bentonite, and the dopant is selected from the group consisting of rare earth elements and transition elements. The tracers are dispersed by forming an aqueous salt solution with the dopant present as cations, dispersing the carriers in the solution, and then atomizing the solution under heat sufficient to superheat the solution droplets at a level sufficient to prevent reagglomeration of the carrier particles.

O'Holleran, Thomas P. (Belleville, MI)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Geologic flow characterization using tracer techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new tracer flow-test system has been developed for in situ characterization of geologic formations. This report describes two sets of test equipment: one portable and one for testing in deep formations. Equations are derived for in situ detector calibration, raw data reduction, and flow logging. Data analysis techniques are presented for computing porosity and permeability in unconfined isotropic media, and porosity, permeability and fracture characteristics in media with confined or unconfined two-dimensional flow. The effects of tracer pulse spreading due to divergence, dispersion, and porous formations are also included.

Klett, R. D.; Tyner, C. E.; Hertel, Jr., E. S.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Chelated Indium Activable Tracers for Geothermal Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center (SLAC), for providing the califclmiurh-252 neutron source. Appreciation is extended to Lew, rock size, and temperature on the tracer adsoqjtion and ther- mal degradation. The rock employed for these measurements was gragwacke, a prek valent rock type at The Geysers, California geothermal field. The re

Stanford University

48

Tracer Interpretation Using Temporal Moments on a Spreadsheet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a method for interpreting geothermal tracer tests. The method is based on the first temporal moment (mean residence time) of the tracer in the subsurface. The individual steps required to interpret a tracer test are reviewed and discussed. And an example tracer test directs the user through the interpretation method. An Excel spreadsheet application of the interpretation method is a companion document to this report.

G. Michael Shook; J. Hope Forsmann

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Validation of Geothermal Tracer Methods in Highly Constrained Field Experiments  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Project Summary. This project will test smartdiffusive tracers for measuring heat exchange.

50

Asian Tracer Experiment and Atmospheric Modeling (TEAM) Project: Draft Field Work Plan for the Asian Long-Range Tracer Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an experimental plan for a proposed Asian long-range tracer study as part of the international Tracer Experiment and Atmospheric Modeling (TEAM) Project. The TEAM partners are China, Japan, South Korea and the United States. Optimal times of year to conduct the study, meteorological measurements needed, proposed tracer release locations, proposed tracer sampling locations and the proposed durations of tracer releases and subsequent sampling are given. Also given are the activities necessary to prepare for the study and the schedule for completing the preparation activities leading to conducting the actual field operations. This report is intended to provide the TEAM members with the information necessary for planning and conducting the Asian long-range tracer study. The experimental plan is proposed, at this time, to describe the efforts necessary to conduct the Asian long-range tracer study, and the plan will undoubtedly be revised and refined as the planning goes forward over the next year.

Allwine, K Jerry; Flaherty, Julia E.

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Using Thermally-Degrading, Partitioning, and Nonreactive Tracers...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Partitioning, and Nonreactive Tracers to Determine Temperature Distribution and FractureHeat Transfer Surface Area in Geothermal Reservoirs Using Thermally-Degrading,...

52

Integrated Approach to Use Natural Chemical and Isotopic Tracers...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Integrated Approach to Use Natural Chemical and Isotopic Tracers to Estimate Fracture Spacing and Surface Area in EGS Systems Integrated Approach to Use Natural Chemical and...

53

Using Thermally-Degrading, Partitioning, and Nonreactive Tracers...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Partitioning, and Nonreactive Tracers to Determine Temperature Distribution and FractureHeat Transfer Surface Area in Geothermal Reservoirs Track Name May 19, 2010 This...

54

Use of Tracers to Characterize Fractures in Engineered Geothermal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fractures in Engineered Geothermal Systems Project Objectives: Measure interwell fracture surface area and fracture spacing using sorbing tracers; measure fracture surface...

55

Quantum Dot Tracers for Use in Engineered Geothermal  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

tracers, colloidal quantum dots, that offer great promise for use in characterizing fracture networks in EGS reservoirs. Since the wavelength of fluorescence (color) of these...

56

Verification of Geothermal Tracer Methods in Highly Constrained...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

tracers of varying rates of molecular diffusion. Exchange of heat energy between fracture and bulk rock (matrix) behaves in the same manner as the exchange of dissolved mass....

57

Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Stimulation in Enhanced...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

80 4.6.7 Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Stimulation in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Presentation Number: 034 Investigator: Pruess, Karsten (Lawrence Berkeley...

58

Integrated Approach to Use Natural Chemical and Isotopic Tracers...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Approach to Use Natural Chemical and Isotopic Tracers to Estimate Fracture Spacing and Surface Area in EGS Systems B. Mack Kennedy (Presenter) and H. H. Liu Lawrence Berkeley...

59

Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Stimulation in Engineered...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Stimulation in Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS) Karsten Pruess Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. May 19, 2010 This presentation does not...

60

The ATLAS DDM Tracer monitoring framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The DDM Tracer Service is aimed to trace and monitor the atlas file operations on the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid. The volume of traces has increased significantly since the service started in 2009. Now there are about ~5 million trace messages every day and peaks of greater than 250Hz, with peak rates continuing to climb, which gives the current service structure a big challenge. Analysis of large datasets based on on-demand queries to the relational database management system (RDBMS), i.e. Oracle, can be problematic, and have a significant effect on the database's performance. Consequently, We have investigated some new high availability technologies like messaging infrastructure, specifically ActiveMQ, and key-value stores. The advantages of key value store technology are that they are distributed and have high scalability; also their write performances are usually much better than RDBMS, all of which are very useful for the Tracer service. Indexes and distributed counters have been also tested to improve...

ZANG, D; The ATLAS collaboration; BARISITS, M; LASSNIG, M; Andrew STEWART, G; MOLFETAS, A; BEERMANN, T

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Reactive power compensator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and method for determining and providing reactive power compensation for an inductive load. A reactive power compensator (50,50') monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b, 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. Using signals indicative of the current on each of these lines when the voltage waveform on the line crosses zero, the reactive power compensator determines a reactive power compensator capacitance that must be connected to the lines to maintain a desired VAR level, power factor, or line voltage. Alternatively, an operator can manually select a specific capacitance for connection to each line, or the capacitance can be selected based on a time schedule. The reactive power compensator produces control signals, which are coupled through optical fibers (102/106) to a switch driver (110, 110') to select specific compensation capacitors (112) for connections to each line. The switch driver develops triggering signals that are supplied to a plurality of series-connected solid state switches (350), which control charge current in one direction in respect to ground for each compensation capacitor. During each cycle, current flows from ground to charge the capacitors as the voltage on the line begins to go negative from its positive peak value. The triggering signals are applied to gate the solid state switches into a conducting state when the potential on the lines and on the capacitors reaches a negative peak value, thereby minimizing both the potential difference and across the charge current through the switches when they begin to conduct. Any harmonic distortion on the potential and current carried by the lines is filtered out from the current and potential signals used by the reactive power compensator so that it does not affect the determination of the required reactive compensation.

El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A. (Renton, WA); Venkata, Subrahmanyam S. (Woodinville, WA); Chen, Mingliang (Kirkland, WA); Andexler, George (Everett, WA); Huang, Tony (Seattle, WA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Reactive Power Compensator.  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and method for determining and providing reactive power compensation for an inductive load. A reactive power compensator (50,50') monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b, 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. Using signals indicative of the current on each of these lines when the voltage waveform on the line crosses zero, the reactive power compensator determines a reactive power compensator capacitance that must be connected to the lines to maintain a desired VAR level, power factor, or line voltage. Alternatively, an operator can manually select a specific capacitance for connection to each line, or the capacitance can be selected based on a time schedule. The reactive power compensator produces control signals, which are coupled through optical fibers (102/106) to a switch driver (110, 110') to select specific compensation capacitors (112) for connections to each line. The switch driver develops triggering signals that are supplied to a plurality of series-connected solid state switches (350), which control charge current in one direction in respect to ground for each compensation capacitor. During each cycle, current flows from ground to charge the capacitors as the voltage on the line begins to go negative from its positive peak value. The triggering signals are applied to gate the solid state switches into a conducting state when the potential on the lines and on the capacitors reaches a negative peak value, thereby minimizing both the potential difference and across the charge current through the switches when they begin to conduct. Any harmonic distortion on the potential and current carried by the lines is filtered out from the current and potential signals used by the reactive power compensator so that it does not affect the determination of the required reactive compensation. 26 figs.

El-Sharkawi, M.A.; Venkata, S.S.; Chen, M.; Andexler, G.; Huang, T.

1992-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

63

Use of Tracers to Characterize Fractures in Engineered Geothermal Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Project Objectives: Measure interwell fracture surface area and fracture spacing using sorbing tracers; measure fracture surface areas adjacent to a single geothermal well using tracers and injection/backflow techniques; design, fabricate and test a downhole instrument for measuring fracture flow following a hydraulic stimulation experiment.

64

Preliminary Investigation of Tracer Gas Reaeration Method for Shallow Bays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was used with propane for the tracer gas and Rhodamine-WT, a fluorescent dye, for the "conservative" tracer. The propane was injected through porous tile diffusers, and the dye was released simultaneously. The propane acts as a model for the surface...

Baker, Sarah H.; Holley, Edward R.

65

Parallel Finite Element Simulation of Tracer Injection in Oil Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Parallel Finite Element Simulation of Tracer Injection in Oil Reservoirs Alvaro L.G.A. Coutinho In this work, parallel finite element techniques for the simulation of tracer injection in oil reservoirs. Supercomputers have made it possible to consider global reservoir effects which can not be represented using

Coutinho, Alvaro L. G. A.

66

MIPAS observations of organic tracers for biomass burning and intercontinental transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MIPAS observations of organic tracers for biomass burning and intercontinental transport observations of organic tracers for biomass burning and intercontinental transport Introduction Suite - Oxford - September 2009 #12;MIPAS observations of organic tracers for biomass burning

67

Methods and systems using encapsulated tracers and chemicals for reservoir interrogation and manipulation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus, method, and system of reservoir interrogation. A tracer is encapsulating in a receptacle. The receptacle containing the tracer is injected into the reservoir. The tracer is analyzed for reservoir interrogation.

Roberts, Jeffery; Aines, Roger D; Duoss, Eric B; Spadaccini, Christopher M

2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

68

When do tracer particles dominate the Lyapunov spectrum?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamical instability is studied in a deterministic dynamical system of Hamiltonian type composed of a tracer particle in a fluid of many particles. The tracer and fluid particles are hard balls (disks, in two dimensions, or spheres, in three dimensions) undergoing elastic collisions. The dynamical instability is characterized by the spectrum of Lyapunov exponents. The tracer particle is shown to dominate the Lyapunov spectrum in the neighborhoods of two limiting cases: the Lorentz-gas limit in which the tracer particle is much lighter than the fluid particles and the Rayleigh-flight limit in which the fluid particles have a vanishing radius and form an ideal gas. In both limits, a gap appears in the Lyapunov spectrum between the few largest Lyapunov exponents associated with the tracer and the rest of the Lyapunov spectrum.

Pierre Gaspard; Henk van Beijeren

2002-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

69

National Biomedical Tracer Facility. Project definition study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We request a $25 million government-guaranteed, interest-free loan to be repaid over a 30-year period for construction and initial operations of a cyclotron-based National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF) in North Central Texas. The NBTF will be co-located with a linear accelerator-based commercial radioisotope production facility, funded by the private sector at approximately $28 million. In addition, research radioisotope production by the NBTF will be coordinated through an association with an existing U.S. nuclear reactor center that will produce research and commercial radioisotopes through neutron reactions. The combined facilities will provide the full range of technology for radioisotope production and research: fast neutrons, thermal neutrons, and particle beams (H{sup -}, H{sup +}, and D{sup +}). The proposed NBTF facility includes an 80 MeV, 1 mA H{sup -} cyclotron that will produce proton-induced (neutron deficient) research isotopes.

Schafer, R.

1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

70

Introduction of the Development ofIntroduction of the Development of New PET TracersNew PET Tracers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction of the Development ofIntroduction of the Development of New PET TracersNew PET Tracers The Center for Translational Neuroimaging KunKun--EekEek KilKil #12;Principles of PET-1 PET: Positron Emission Tomography #12;Principles of PET-2 Cyclotron Scanner #12;Principles of PET-3 0 0.01 0.02 0.03 0

71

Surface reactivity and oxygen migration in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide films annealed in humid atmosphere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An isotope tracer study, i.e., {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O exchange using {sup 18}O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}{sup 18}O, was performed to determine how post-deposition annealing (PDA) affected surface reactivity and oxygen diffusivity of amorphous indium–gallium–zinc oxide (a-IGZO) films. The oxygen tracer diffusivity was very high in the bulk even at low temperatures, e.g., 200?°C, regardless of PDA and exchange conditions. In contrast, the isotope exchange rate, dominated by surface reactivity, was much lower for {sup 18}O{sub 2} than for H{sub 2}{sup 18}O. PDA in a humid atmosphere at 400?°C further suppressed the reactivity of O{sub 2} at the a-IGZO film surface, which is attributable to –OH-terminated surface formation.

Watanabe, Ken, E-mail: Watanabe.Ken@nims.go.jp [International Center for Young Scientists (ICYS-MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan)] [International Center for Young Scientists (ICYS-MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); Lee, Dong-Hee [Optical and Electronic Materials Unit, NIMS, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan) [Optical and Electronic Materials Unit, NIMS, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); Materials and Structures Laboratory (MSL), Tokyo Institute of Technology, Mailbox R3-4, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-0026 (Japan); Sakaguchi, Isao; Haneda, Hajime [Optical and Electronic Materials Unit, NIMS, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan)] [Optical and Electronic Materials Unit, NIMS, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); Nomura, Kenji [Frontier Research Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Mailbox S2-13, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-0026 (Japan)] [Frontier Research Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Mailbox S2-13, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-0026 (Japan); Kamiya, Toshio [Materials and Structures Laboratory (MSL), Tokyo Institute of Technology, Mailbox R3-4, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-0026 (Japan) [Materials and Structures Laboratory (MSL), Tokyo Institute of Technology, Mailbox R3-4, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-0026 (Japan); Materials Research Center for Element Strategy (MCES), Mailbox S2-13, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-0026 (Japan); Hosono, Hideo [Materials and Structures Laboratory (MSL), Tokyo Institute of Technology, Mailbox R3-4, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-0026 (Japan) [Materials and Structures Laboratory (MSL), Tokyo Institute of Technology, Mailbox R3-4, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-0026 (Japan); Frontier Research Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Mailbox S2-13, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-0026 (Japan); Materials Research Center for Element Strategy (MCES), Mailbox S2-13, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-0026 (Japan); Ohashi, Naoki, E-mail: Ohashi.Naoki@nims.go.jp [Optical and Electronic Materials Unit, NIMS, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan) [Optical and Electronic Materials Unit, NIMS, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); Materials Research Center for Element Strategy (MCES), Mailbox S2-13, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-0026 (Japan)

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

72

Novel Multi-dimensional Tracers for Geothermal Inter-wall Diagnostics...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Partitioning, and Nonreactive Tracers to Determine Temperature Distribution and FractureHeat Transfer Surface Area in Geothermal Reservoirs Use of Tracers to Characterize...

73

Reactive Power Compensating System.  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The circuit was designed for the specific application of wind-driven induction generators. It has great potential for application in any situation where a varying reactive power load is present, such as with induction motors or generators, or for transmission network compensation.

Williams, Timothy J.; El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Venkata, Subrahmanyam S.

1985-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

74

Primordial black holes as biased tracers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Primordial black holes (PBHs) are theoretical black holes which may be formed during the radiation dominant era and, basically, caused by the gravitational collapse of radiational overdensities. It has been well known that in the context of the structure formation in our Universe such collapsed objects, e.g., halos/galaxies, could be considered as bias tracers of underlying matter fluctuations and the halo/galaxy bias has been studied well. Employing a peak-background split picture which is known to be a useful tool to discuss the halo bias, we consider the large scale clustering behavior of the PBH and propose an almost mass-independent constraint to the scenario that dark matters (DMs) consist of PBHs. We consider the case where the statistics of the primordial curvature perturbations is almost Gaussian, but with small local-type non-Gaussianity. If PBHs account for the DM abundance, such a large scale clustering of PBHs behaves as nothing but the matter isocurvature perturbation and constrained strictly by...

Tada, Yuichiro

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Thermal single-well injection-withdrawal tracer tests for determining fracture-matrix heat transfer area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) tracer tests involve injection of traced fluid and subsequent tracer recovery from the same well, usually with some quiescent time between the injection and withdrawal periods. SWIW are insensitive to variations in advective processes that arise from formation heterogeneities, because upon withdrawal, fluid parcels tend to retrace the paths taken during injection. However, SWIW are sensitive to diffusive processes, such as diffusive exchange of conservative or reactive solutes between fractures and rock matrix. This paper focuses on SWIW tests in which temperature itself is used as a tracer. Numerical simulations demonstrate the sensitivity of temperature returns to fracture-matrix interaction. We consider thermal SWIW response to the two primary reservoir improvements targeted with stimulation, (1) making additional fractures accessible to injected fluids, and (2) increasing the aperture and permeability of pre-existing fractures. It is found that temperature returns in SWIW tests are insensitive to (2), while providing a strong signal of more rapid temperature recovery during the withdrawal phase for (1).

Pruess, K.; Doughty, C.

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

76

Mass spectral characterization of petroleum dyes, tracers, and additives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Petroleum dyes, additives, and tracers are important for identifying gasolines in spill and contamination problems. High-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) was used for the characterization of 21 commercial petroleum dyes. Many contained common chromophores, typically azo or anthraquinone groups, and often differed only in their degree of alkyl substitution. Few dyes were pure and typically contained several chromogens with homologous series of substituents. A separation method was developed to concentrate the polar fractions containing the additives. Subsequent characterization of the polar fraction by GC/MS showed distinct differences between different gasolines. Various colorless tracers were evaluated in terms of detectability, soil adsorption, and cost. Many tracers exhibited soil adsorption and interferences which limited their detectability. Alcohols in the C8-C10 range were found to be the most suitable tracers with GC/MS detection limits of 1 ppm. 22 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

Youngless, T.L.; Swansiger, J.T.; Danner, D.A.; Greco, M.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Inverse modeling of partitioning interwell tracer tests: A streamline approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

computations, inverse modeling 1. Introduction [2] It is recognized that the presence of nonaqueous phaseInverse modeling of partitioning interwell tracer tests: A streamline approach Akhil Datta orders of magnitude. INDEX TERMS: 1832 Hydrology: Groundwater transport; 1829 Hydrology: Groundwater

Datta-Gupta, Akhil

78

HYDROGEL TRACER BEADS: THE DEVELOPMENT, MODIFICATION, AND TESTING OF AN INNOVATIVE TRACER FOR BETTER UNDERSTANDING LNAPL TRANSPORT IN KARST AQUIFERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this specific research task is to develop proxy tracers that mimic contaminant movement to better understand and predict contaminant fate and transport in karst aquifers. Hydrogel tracer beads are transported as a separate phase than water and can used as a proxy tracer to mimic the transport of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL). They can be constructed with different densities, sizes & chemical attributes. This poster describes the creation and optimization of the beads and the field testing of buoyant beads, including sampling, tracer analysis, and quantitative analysis. The buoyant beads are transported ahead of the dissolved solutes, suggesting that light NAPL (LNAPL) transport in karst may occur faster than predicted from traditional tracing techniques. The hydrogel beads were successful in illustrating this enhanced transport.

Amanda Laskoskie, Harry M. Edenborn, and Dorothy J. Vesper

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Spectral analysis for evaluation of myocardial tracers for medical imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kinetic analysis of dynamic tracer data is performed with the goal of evaluating myocardial radiotracers for cardiac nuclear medicine imaging. Data from experiments utilizing the isolated rabbit heart model are acquired by sampling the venous blood after introduction of a tracer of interest and a reference tracer. We have taken the approach that the kinetics are properly characterized by an impulse response function which describes the difference between the reference molecule (which does not leave the vasculature) and the molecule of interest which is transported across the capillary boundary and is made available to the cell. Using this formalism we can model the appearance of the tracer of interest in the venous output of the heart as a convolution of the appearance of the reference tracer with the impulse response. In this work we parameterize the impulse response function as the sum of a large number of exponential functions whose predetermined decay constants form a spectrum, and each is required only to have a nonnegative coefficient. This approach, called spectral analysis, has the advantage that it allows conventional compartmental analysis without prior knowledge of the number of compartments which the physiology may require or which the data will support.

Huesman, Ronald H.; Reutter, Bryan W.; Marshall, Robert C.

2000-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

80

Preliminary assessment of halogenated alkanes as vapor-phase tracers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New tracers are needed to evaluate the efficiency of injection strategies in vapor-dominated environments. One group of compounds that seems to meet the requirements for vapor-phase tracing are the halogenated alkanes (HCFCs). HCFCs are generally nontoxic, and extrapolation of tabulated thermodynamic data indicate that they will be thermally stable and nonreactive in a geothermal environment. The solubilities and stabilities of these compounds, which form several homologous series, vary according to the substituent ratios of fluorine, chlorine, and hydrogen. Laboratory and field tests that will further define the suitability of HCFCs as vapor-phase tracers are under way.

Adams, Michael C.; Moore, Joseph N.; Hirtz, Paul

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

A Tariff for Reactive Power  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two kinds of power are required to operate an electric power system: real power, measured in watts, and reactive power, measured in volt-amperes reactive or VARs. Reactive power supply is one of a class of power system reliability services collectively known as ancillary services, and is essential for the reliable operation of the bulk power system. Reactive power flows when current leads or lags behind voltage. Typically, the current in a distribution system lags behind voltage because of inductive loads such as motors. Reactive power flow wastes energy and capacity and causes voltage droop. To correct lagging power flow, leading reactive power (current leading voltage) is supplied to bring the current into phase with voltage. When the current is in phase with voltage, there is a reduction in system losses, an increase in system capacity, and a rise in voltage. Reactive power can be supplied from either static or dynamic VAR sources. Static sources are typically transmission and distribution equipment, such as capacitors at substations, and their cost has historically been included in the revenue requirement of the transmission operator (TO), and recovered through cost-of-service rates. By contrast, dynamic sources are typically generators capable of producing variable levels of reactive power by automatically controlling the generator to regulate voltage. Transmission system devices such as synchronous condensers can also provide dynamic reactive power. A class of solid state devices (called flexible AC transmission system devices or FACTs) can provide dynamic reactive power. One specific device has the unfortunate name of static VAR compensator (SVC), where 'static' refers to the solid state nature of the device (it does not include rotating equipment) and not to the production of static reactive power. Dynamic sources at the distribution level, while more costly would be very useful in helping to regulate local voltage. Local voltage regulation would reduce system losses, increase circuit capacity, increase reliability, and improve efficiency. Reactive power is theoretically available from any inverter-based equipment such as photovoltaic (PV) systems, fuel cells, microturbines, and adjustable-speed drives. However, the installation is usually only economical if reactive power supply is considered during the design and construction phase. In this report, we find that if the inverters of PV systems or the generators of combined heat and power (CHP) systems were designed with capability to supply dynamic reactive power, they could do this quite economically. In fact, on an annualized basis, these inverters and generators may be able to supply dynamic reactive power for about $5 or $6 per kVAR. The savings from the local supply of dynamic reactive power would be in reduced losses, increased capacity, and decreased transmission congestion. The net savings are estimated to be about $7 per kVAR on an annualized basis for a hypothetical circuit. Thus the distribution company could economically purchase a dynamic reactive power service from customers for perhaps $6/kVAR. This practice would provide for better voltage regulation in the distribution system and would provide an alternate revenue source to help amortize the cost of PV and CHP installations. As distribution and transmission systems are operated under rising levels of stress, the value of local dynamic reactive supply is expected to grow. Also, large power inverters, in the range of 500 kW to 1 MW, are expected to decrease in cost as they become mass produced. This report provides one data point which shows that the local supply of dynamic reactive power is marginally profitable at present for a hypothetical circuit. We expect that the trends of growing power flow on the existing system and mass production of inverters for distributed energy devices will make the dynamic supply of reactive power from customers an integral component of economical and reliable system operation in the future.

Kueck, John D [ORNL; Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL; Li, Fangxing [ORNL; Tufon, Christopher [Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Isemonger, Alan [California Independent System Operator

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

TECHNICAL ADVANCE Minitags for small molecules: detecting targets of reactive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

@mpiz-koeln.mpg.de). Present address: Chemie der Biopolymere, Technical University Munich, Weihenstephanerberg 3, Freising

Bogyo, Matthew

83

36Cl as a tracer in geothermal systems- Example from Valles Caldera...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cl as a tracer in geothermal systems- Example from Valles Caldera, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: 36Cl as a tracer...

84

Time-scales of passive tracers in the ocean with paleoapplications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantifying time-responses of the ocean to passive and active tracers is critical when interpreting paleodata from sediment cores. Surface-injected tracers are not spreading instantaneously or uniformly throughout the ...

Siberlin, Charlotte

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

RADIOGENIC ISOTOPES: TRACERS OF PAST OCEAN CIRCULATION AND EROSIONAL INPUT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the ocean has varied as a function of changes in paleocircu- lation, source provenances, style and intensity-established paleoceano- graphic tracers such as carbon isotopes. INDEX TERMS: 1040 Geochemistry: Isotopic composition Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) according to latest estimates based on results of the World Ocean Circulation

Jellinek, Mark

86

DIVISION S-3-NOTES HYDROLOGIC TRACER EFFECTS ON SOIL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and denitrification (the conversion of NOf to N gas)can be important to the fate of NOf and organic pollutants on microbial activity. These effects could be important whentracers areused instudies of the fate and transport of pollutants in the environment. In such studies, it is important to determine if tracer compounds affect

Gold, Art

87

The feasibility of ethyl iodide as an atmospheric tracer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The CCl? was dissolved in toluene and measured with an electron-capture detector. The differences between the two tracers appeared in the lateral distribution measurements where the CC1, showed higher values than the HTO. The HTO results were described...

Everett, Joe Vincent

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

ANALYSIS OF TRACER AND THERMAL TRANSIENTS DURING REINJECTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and developed a new technique which combines the results from in- terwell tracer tests and thermal injection variables of the injection and backflow periods. Finally we suggested thermal injection-backflow tests for interpreting thermal injection-backflow tests. In fact, the MD model was first developed by Lauwerier to study

Stanford University

89

Diss. ETH Nr. 10714 Helium und Tritium als Tracer fr  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diss. ETH Nr. 10714 Helium und Tritium als Tracer für physikalische Prozesse in Seen ABHANDLUNG zur Zürich 1994 #12;Kurzfassung ix Kurzfassung Der radioaktive Zerfall von 3H (Tritium) zu 3He mit einer Fluide aus dem Erdinnern. Helium und Tritium werden massenspektrometrisch analysiert. Im Rahmen dieser Ar

Aeschbach-Hertig, Werner

90

Calibration of hydraulic and tracer tests in fractured media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Calibration of hydraulic and tracer tests in fractured media represented by a DFN Model L. D. Donado, X. Sanchez-Vila, E. Ruiz* & F. J. Elorza** * Enviros Spain S.L. ** UPM #12;Fractured Media Water flows through fractures (matrix basically impervious ­ though relevant to transport) Fractures at all

Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

91

COAL SLAGGING AND REACTIVITY TESTING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Union Fenosa's La Robla I Power Station is a 270-MW Foster Wheeler arch-fired system. The unit is located at the mine that provides a portion of the semianthracitic coal. The remaining coals used are from South Africa, Russia, Australia, and China. The challenges at the La Robla I Station stem from the various fuels used, the characteristics of which differ from the design coal. The University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) and the Lehigh University Energy Research Center (LUERC) undertook a program to assess problematic slagging and unburned carbon issues occurring at the plant. Full-scale combustion tests were performed under baseline conditions, with elevated oxygen level and with redistribution of air during a site visit at the plant. During these tests, operating information, observations and temperature measurements, and coal, slag deposit, and fly ash samples were obtained to assess slagging and unburned carbon. The slagging in almost all cases appeared due to elevated temperatures rather than fuel chemistry. The most severe slagging occurred when the temperature at the sampling port was in excess of 1500 C, with problematic slagging where first-observed temperatures exceeded 1350 C. The presence of anorthite crystals in the bulk of the deposits analyzed indicates that the temperatures were in excess of 1350 C, consistent with temperature measurements during the sampling period. Elevated temperatures and ''hot spots'' are probably the result of poor mill performance, and a poor distribution of the coal from the mills to the specific burners causes elevated temperatures in the regions where the slag samples were extracted. A contributing cause appeared to be poor combustion air mixing and heating, resulting in oxygen stratification and increased temperatures in certain areas. Air preheater plugging was observed and reduces the temperature of the air in the windbox, which leads to poor combustion conditions, resulting in unburned carbon as well as slagging. A second phase of the project involved advanced analysis of the baseline coal along with an Australian coal fired at the plant. These analysis results were used in equilibrium thermodynamic modeling along with a coal quality model developed by the EERC to assess slagging, fouling, and opacity for the coals. Bench-scale carbon conversion testing was performed in a drop-tube furnace to assess the reactivity of the coals. The Australian coal had a higher mineral content with significantly more clay minerals present than the baseline coal. The presence of these clay minerals, which tend to melt at relatively low temperatures, indicated a higher potential for problematic slagging than the baseline coal. However, the pyritic minerals, comprising over 25% of the baseline mineral content, may form sticky iron sulfides, leading to severe slagging in the burner region if local areas with reducing conditions exist. Modeling results indicated that neither would present significant fouling problems. The Australian coal was expected to show slagging behavior much more severe than the baseline coal except at very high furnace temperatures. However, the baseline coal was predicted to exhibit opacity problems, as well as have a higher potential for problematic calcium sulfate-based low-temperature fouling. The baseline coal had a somewhat higher reactivity than the Australian coal, which was consistent with both the lower average activation energy for the baseline coal and the greater carbon conversion at a given temperature and residence time. The activation energy of the baseline coal showed some effect of oxygen on the activation energy, with E{sub a} increasing at the lower oxygen concentration, but may be due to the scatter in the baseline coal kinetic values at the higher oxygen level tested.

Donald P. McCollor; Kurt E. Eylands; Jason D. Laumb

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Electrocatalytic Reactivity for Oxygen Reduction of Palladium...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reactivity for Oxygen Reduction of Palladium-Modified Carbon Nanotubes Synthesized in Supercritical Fluid. Electrocatalytic Reactivity for Oxygen Reduction of Palladium-Modified...

93

Formation, characterization and reactivity of adsorbed oxygen...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Formation, characterization and reactivity of adsorbed oxygen on BaOPt(111). Formation, characterization and reactivity of adsorbed oxygen on BaOPt(111). Abstract: The formation...

94

DYES AS TRACERS FOR VADOSE ZONE HYDROLOGY Markus Flury and Nu Nu Wai  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DYES AS TRACERS FOR VADOSE ZONE HYDROLOGY Markus Flury and Nu Nu Wai Department of Crop and Soil tracers have provided clues about the hydrological cycle as well as flow and transport processes information on dyes used as hydrological tracers, with particular emphasis on vadose zone hydrol- ogy. We

Flury, Markus

95

Conservation of reactive electromagnetic energy in reactive time  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The complex Poynting theorem (CPT) is extended to a canonical time-scale domain $(t,s)$. Time-harmonic phasors are replaced by the positive-frequency parts of general fields, which extend analytically to complex time $t+is$, with $s>0$ interpreted as a time resolution scale. The real part of the extended CPT gives conservation in $t$ of a time-averaged field energy, and its imaginary part gives conservation in $s$ of a time-averaged reactive energy. In both cases, the averaging windows are determined by a Cauchy kernel of width $\\Delta t\\sim \\pm s$. This completes the time-harmonic CPT, whose imaginary part is generally supposed to be vaguely `related to' reactive energy without giving a conservation law, or even an expression, for the latter. The interpretation of $s$ as reactive time, tracking the leads and lags associated with stored capacitative and inductive energy, gives a simple explanation of the volt-ampere reactive (var) unit measuring reactive power: a var is simply one Joule per reactive second. The related 'complex radiation impedance density' is introduced to represent the field's local reluctance to radiate.

Gerald Kaiser

2015-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

96

Conservation of reactive electromagnetic energy in reactive time  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The complex Poynting theorem (CPT) is extended to a canonical time-scale domain $(t,s)$. Time-harmonic phasors are replaced by the positive-frequency parts of general fields, which extend analytically to complex time $t+is$, with $s>0$ interpreted as a time resolution scale. The real part of the extended CPT gives conservation in $t$ of a time-averaged field energy, and its imaginary part gives conservation in $s$ of a time-averaged reactive energy. In both cases, the averaging windows are determined by a Cauchy kernel of width $\\Delta t\\sim \\pm s$. This completes the time-harmonic CPT, whose imaginary part is generally supposed to be vaguely `related to' reactive energy without giving a conservation law, or even an expression, for the latter. The interpretation of $s$ as reactive time, tracking the leads and lags associated with stored capacitative and inductive energy, gives a simple explanation of the volt-ampere reactive (var) unit measuring reactive power: a var is simply one Joule per reactive second. T...

Kaiser, Gerald

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Modeling of CBM production, CO{sub 2} injection, and tracer movement at a field CO{sub 2} sequestration site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sequestration of carbon dioxide in unmineable coal seams is a potential technology mainly because of the potential for simultaneous enhanced coalbed methane production (ECBM). Several pilot tests have been performed around the globe leading to mixed results. Numerous modeling efforts have been carried out successfully to model methane production and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection. Sensitivity analyses and history matching along with several optimization tools were used to estimate reservoir properties and to investigate reservoir performance. Geological and geophysical techniques have also been used to characterize field sequestration sites and to inspect reservoir heterogeneity. The fate and movement of injected CO{sub 2} can be determined by using several monitoring techniques. Monitoring of perfluorocarbon (PFC) tracers is one of these monitoring technologies. As a part of this monitoring technique, a small fraction of a traceable fluid is added to the injection wellhead along with the CO{sub 2} stream at different times to monitor the timing and location of the breakthrough in nearby monitoring wells or offset production wells. A reservoir modeling study was performed to simulate a pilot sequestration site located in the San Juan coal basin of northern New Mexico. Several unknown reservoir properties at the field site were estimated by modeling the coal seam as a dual porosity formation and by history matching the methane production and CO{sub 2} injection. In addition to reservoir modeling of methane production and CO{sub 2} injection, tracer injection was modeled. Tracers serve as a surrogate for determining potential leakage of CO{sub 2}. The tracer was modeled as a non-reactive gas and was injected into the reservoir as a mixture along with CO{sub 2}. Geologic and geometric details of the field site, numerical modeling details of methane production, CO{sub 2} injection, and tracer injection are presented in this paper. Moreover, the numerical predictions of the tracer arrival times were compared with the measured field data. Results show that tracer modeling is useful in investigating movement of injected CO{sub 2} into the coal seam at the field site. Also, such new modeling techniques can be utilized to determine potential leakage pathways, and to investigate reservoir anisotropy and heterogeneity.

Siriwardane, Hema J.; Bowes, Benjamin D.; Bromhal, Grant S.; Gondle, Raj K.; Wells, Arthur W.; Strazisar, Brian R.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Fuel Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method for measuring the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity in a heterogeneous nuclear reactor is presented. The method, which is used during normal operation, requires that calibrated control rods be oscillated in a special way at a high reactor power level. The value of the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity is found from the measured flux responses to these oscillations. Application of the method in a Savannah River reactor charged with natural uranium is discussed.

Loewe, W.E.

2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

99

Quantitative interpretation of tracer test data | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: EnergyPotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVCapacityPulaski County, Kentucky:County, Georgia: Energy79.tracer test data

100

Reactivity of surface carbon deposited on supported Rh catalysts by the disproportionation of CO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent investigations on hydrocarbon synthesis from CO and H/sub 2/ over Group VIII metals have proposed that the surface carbon formed by the dissociation of CO is an intermediate for hydrocarbon formation. It implies that metals which dissociate CO readily (e.g., Ni, Co, and Ru) are good catalysts for hydrocarbon synthesis unless the surface carbon is bound too strongly. There is a certain controversy in the literature on whether CO undergoes dissociation on Rh surfaces under UHV conditions. In the present work, the authors have investigated the reactivity of surface carbon deposited on TiO/sub 2/- or SiO/sub 2/-supported Rh catalysts in the presence of molecularly adsorbed CO by means of the isotopic tracer technique and have made a direct comparison of the reactivity of adsorbed CO with that of surface carbon. It has been revealed that three forms of carbon are produced by the disproportionation of CO.

Orita, H.; Naito, S.; Tamaru, K.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, What is the skill of ocean tracers in reducing uncertainties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in current Earth system models and (ii) imperfect knowledge of model parameters. Ocean tracers observa- tions

Haran, Murali

102

COMPARISON OF THREE TRACER TESTS AT THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three conservative tracer tests have been conducted through the Bridge Fault fracture zone at the Raft River Geothermal (RRG) site. All three tests were conducted between injection well RRG-5 and production wells RRG-1 (790 m distance) and RRG-4 (740 m distance). The injection well is used during the summer months to provide pressure support to the production wells. The first test was conducted in 2008 using 136 kg of fluorescein tracer. Two additional tracers were injected in 2010. The first 2010 tracer injected was 100 kg fluorescein disodium hydrate salt on June, 21. The second tracer (100 kg 2,6-naphthalene disulfonic acid sodium salt) was injected one month later on July 21. Sampling of the two productions wells is still being performed to obtain the tail end of the second 2010 tracer test. Tracer concentrations were measured using HPLC with a fluorescence detector. Results for the 2008 test, suggest 80% tracer recover at the two production wells. Of the tracer recovered, 85% of tracer mass was recovered in well RRG-4 indicating a greater flow pathway connection between injection well and RRG-4 than RRG-1. Fluorescein tracer results appear to be similar between the 2008 and 2010 tests for well RRG-4 with peak concentrations arriving approximately 20 days after injection despite the differences between the injection rates for the two tests (~950 gpm to 475 gpm) between the 2008 and 2010. The two 2010 tracer tests will be compared to determine if the results support the hypothesis that rock contraction along the flow pathway due to the 55 oC cooler water injection alters the flow through the ~140 oC reservoir.

Earl D Mattson; Mitchell Plummer; Carl Palmer; Larry Hull; Samantha Miller; Randy Nye

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Use of tracers in materials-holdup study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Holdup measurements of special nuclear materials in large processing facilities offer considerable challenges to conventional nondestructive-assay techniques. The use of judiciously chosen radioactive tracers offer a unique method of overcoming this difficulty. Three examples involving the use of /sup 46/Sc and fission products from activated uranium in large-scale experimental studies of uranium holdup are discussed. A justification for the method and its advantages along with examples of successful applications of this technique for large-sale experimental studies are presented.

Pillay, K.K.S.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Determination of water saturation using gas phase partitioning tracers and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData FilesShape, Density,TiO2(110). |Gas-phase Tracer

105

Sandia National Laboratories: tracer studies integrated with geophysical  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1developmentturbineredox-activeNational SolartSSLPV materialsmethods tracer

106

Determination of Water Saturation in Relatively Dry Porous Media Using Gas-phase Tracer Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soil desiccation (drying), involving water evaporation induced by dry air injection and extraction, is a potentially robust remediation process to slow migration of inorganic or radionuclide contaminants through the vadose zone. The application of gas-phase partitioning tracer tests has been proposed as a means to estimate initial water volumes and to monitor the progress of the desiccation process at pilot-test and field sites. In this paper, tracer tests have been conducted in porous medium columns with various water saturations using sulfur hexafluoride as the conservative tracer and tricholorofluoromethane and difluoromethane as the water-partitioning tracers. For porous media with minimal silt and/or organic matter fractions, tracer tests provided reasonable saturation estimates for saturations close to zero. However, for sediments with significant silt and/or organic matter fractions, tracer tests only provided satisfactory results when the water saturation was at least 0.1 - 0.2. For dryer conditions, the apparent tracer retardation increases due to air – soil sorption, which is not included in traditional retardation coefficients derived from advection-dispersion equations accounting only for air – water partitioning and water – soil sorption. Based on these results, gas-phase partitioning tracer tests may be used to determine initial water volumes in sediments, provided the initial water saturations are sufficiently large. However, tracer tests are not suitable for quantifying moisture content in desiccated sediments.

Oostrom, Martinus; Tartakovsky, Guzel D.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Truex, Michael J.; Dane, Jacob H.

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

107

Calcium translocation and whole plant transpiration: spatial and temporal measurements using radio-Strontium as tracer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

comparison with zinc, strontium and rubidium. Annals of783- Wasserman RH. 1998. Strontium as a tracer for calciumor inapplicable. As Strontium (Sr) was found to behave in

Seligmann, Ron; Wengrowicz, Udi; Tirosh, Danny; Yermiyahu, Uri; Bar-Tal, Asher; Schwartz, Amnon

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Novel Multi-dimensional Tracers for Geothermal Inter-wall Diagnostics  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. The objective of this project is to develop a matrix of the smart geothermal tracer and its interpretation tools.

109

E-Print Network 3.0 - activity optimal tracers Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AND AMOC Abstract Current projections of the oceanic response... in current Earth system models and (ii) imperfect knowledge of model parameters. Ocean tracers observa- tions...

110

Steam tracer experiment at the Hoe Creek No. 3 underground coal gasification field test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water plays an important role in in-situ coal gasification. To better understand this role, we conducted a steam tracer test during the later stages of the Hoe Creek No. 3 underground coal gasification field test. Deuterium oxide was used as the tracer. This report describes the tracer test and the analysis of the data obtained. The analysis indicates that at Hoe Creek the injected steam interacts with a large volume of water as it passes through the underground system. We hypothesize that this water is undergoing continual reflux in the underground system, resulting in a tracer response typical of a well-stirred tank.

Thorsness, C.B.

1980-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

111

Particle Swarm Optimization Based Reactive Power Optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reactive power plays an important role in supporting the real power transfer by maintaining voltage stability and system reliability. It is a critical element for a transmission operator to ensure the reliability of an electric system while minimizing the cost associated with it. The traditional objectives of reactive power dispatch are focused on the technical side of reactive support such as minimization of transmission losses. Reactive power cost compensation to a generator is based on the incurred cost of its reactive power contribution less the cost of its obligation to support the active power delivery. In this paper an efficient Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) based reactive power optimization approach is presented. The optimal reactive power dispatch problem is a nonlinear optimization problem with several constraints. The objective of the proposed PSO is to minimize the total support cost from generators and reactive compensators. It is achieved by maintaining the whole system power loss as minimum...

Sujin, P R; Linda, M Mary

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Reactive Power Support Services in Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reactive Power Support Services in Electricity Markets Costing and Pricing of Ancillary Services Final Project Report Power Systems Engineering Research Center A National Science Foundation Industry Reactive Power Support Services in Electricity Markets Costing and Pricing of Ancillary Services Project

113

Engine combustion control via fuel reactivity stratification  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compression ignition engine uses two or more fuel charges having two or more reactivities to control the timing and duration of combustion. In a preferred implementation, a lower-reactivity fuel charge is injected or otherwise introduced into the combustion chamber, preferably sufficiently early that it becomes at least substantially homogeneously dispersed within the chamber before a subsequent injection is made. One or more subsequent injections of higher-reactivity fuel charges are then made, and these preferably distribute the higher-reactivity matter within the lower-reactivity chamber space such that combustion begins in the higher-reactivity regions, and with the lower-reactivity regions following thereafter. By appropriately choose the reactivities of the charges, their relative amounts, and their timing, combustion can be tailored to achieve optimal power output (and thus fuel efficiency), at controlled temperatures (and thus controlled NOx), and with controlled equivalence ratios (and thus controlled soot).

Reitz, Rolf Deneys; Hanson, Reed M; Splitter, Derek A; Kokjohn, Sage L

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

114

Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and cancer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mitochondria produce reactive oxygen species (mROS) as a natural by-product of electron transport chain activity. While initial studies focused on the damaging effects of reactive oxygen species, a recent paradigm shift ...

Chandel, Navdeep S

115

{yjoh, jmcho, jbyoo, sdcha}@salmosa.kaist.ac.kr A Technique to Specify and Analyze Reactive and Real-Time Software  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Analyze Reactive and Real-Time Software Younju Oh, Jaemyoung Cho, Junbeom Yoo, Sungdeok Cha Div. of CS, Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology requirements specification (SRS). Many specification languages are suggested to specify reactive and real

116

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS (ACCEPTED NOVEMBER 8, 2014) 1 Stochastic Reactive Power Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

response, and electric vehicles. Advances in photovoltaic (PV) inverters offer new opportunitiesIEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS (ACCEPTED NOVEMBER 8, 2014) 1 Stochastic Reactive Power are being challenged by reverse power flows and voltage fluctuations due to renewable generation, demand

Giannakis, Georgios

117

Estimation of tracer diffusion coefficients of ions in aqueous solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Equations are given for estimating tracer diffusion coefficients D/sub i//sup 0/ of ions at infinite dilution in terms of limiting ionic conductances ..lambda../sub i//sup 0/. Also given are generalized Nernst-Hartley equations for binary and multicomponent diffusion coefficients D/sup 0/ and D/sub ij//sup 0/, respectively, at infinite dilution. Data, estimates, and correlations for ..lambda../sub i//sup 0/ at 25/sup 0/C and other temperatures are discussed. Estimated values of ..lambda../sub i//sup 0/ are tabulated from 0-300/sup 0/C for ions of waste isolation interest and for ions of economic interest in geothermal brines. Estimates of their tracer diffusion coefficients at infinite dilution are tabulated. A rule of thumb, good to a factor of 2, is presented. Very limited data (available only at 25/sup 0/C) indicate that D/sub i//D/sub i//sup 0/ generally declines as the concentration of salt or supporting electrolyte increases. 6 figures, 2 tables.

Miller, D.G.

1982-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

118

Advanced Combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The activity reported in this presentation is to provide the mechanical and physical property information needed to allow rational design, development and/or choice of alloys, manufacturing approaches, and environmental exposure and component life models to enable oxy-fuel combustion boilers to operate at Ultra-Supercritical (up to 650{degrees}C & between 22-30 MPa) and/or Advanced Ultra-Supercritical conditions (760{degrees}C & 35 MPa).

Holcomb, Gordon R. [NETL

2013-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

119

Degradation of Vinyl Chloride and 1,2-Dichloroethane by Advanced Reduction Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new treatment technology, called Advanced Reduction Process (ARP), was developed by combining UV irradiation with reducing reagents to produce highly reactive species that degrade contaminants rapidly. Vinyl chloride (VC) and 1,2-dichloroethane (1...

Liu, Xu

2013-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

120

Low-rank coal research: Volume 2, Advanced research and technology development: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume II contains articles on advanced combustion phenomena, combustion inorganic transformation; coal/char reactivity; liquefaction reactivity of low-rank coals, gasification ash and slag characterization, and fine particulate emissions. These articles have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

Mann, M.D.; Swanson, M.L.; Benson, S.A.; Radonovich, L.; Steadman, E.N.; Sweeny, P.G.; McCollor, D.P.; Kleesattel, D.; Grow, D.; Falcone, S.K.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Identification and characterization of conservative organic tracers for use as hydrologic tracers for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Study; Progress report, January 1, 1991--June 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies continue on the use of organic acids as tracers in hydrology studies of Yucca Mountain. Work performed during this time period has been concentrated in three main areas: the familiarization with, and optimization of, the LC-MS hardware and data system; the initial development of soil column test procedures, which are used for evaluation of both the columns themselves and the tracer compounds; and continuation of the batch sorption and degradation studies for the potential tracers. All three of these tasks will continue, as the addition of new tracer compounds, analytical information, and equipment will necessitate further evaluation of existing methods and procedures. Also included in this report is the final report on an information system.

Stetzenbach, K.J.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

122

Numerical study of the diapycnal flow through a tidal front with passive tracers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This qualitatively agrees with a recent field experiment using a dye tracer on Georges Bank. Additional experiments are performed to investigate the sensitivity of the tracer dispersion to the tidal phase and the location, the previous studies indicated Eulerian cross-front mean circu- lation maybe is in a multiple-cell structure

Dong, Changming "Charles"

123

SOURCES AND EFFECTS OF MINING-RELATED AND NATURAL ACID ROCK DRAINAGE QUANTIFIED USING TRACER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SOURCES AND EFFECTS OF MINING-RELATED AND NATURAL ACID ROCK DRAINAGE QUANTIFIED USING TRACER, and Architectural Engineering 2006 #12;ii This thesis entitled: Sources and Effects of Mining-Related and Natural Acid Rock Drainage Quantified Using Tracer Dilution, Coal Creek Watershed, Gunnison County, Colorado

Ryan, Joe

124

A dye tracer reveals cross-shelf dispersion and interleaving on the Oregon shelf  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A dye tracer reveals cross-shelf dispersion and interleaving on the Oregon shelf A. C. Dale,1 M. D December 2005; published 3 February 2006. [1] A fluorescent dye tracer was injected into the pycnocline the other in the water column, split by interleaving dye-free water. The vertical scale of these layers

Kurapov, Alexander

125

Verification of flow processes in soils with combined sprinkling and dye tracer experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Verification of flow processes in soils with combined sprinkling and dye tracer experiments with sprinkling experiments and dye tracing under different rainfall intensities and soil moisture conditions. The dye tracer was continuously applied with the sprinkling water on 1 m2 plots. After the sprinkling

Weiler, Markus

126

Globally synchronous ice core volcanic tracers and abrupt cooling during the last glacial period  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Globally synchronous ice core volcanic tracers and abrupt cooling during the last glacial period R (2006), Globally synchronous ice core volcanic tracers and abrupt cooling during the last glacial period histories from ice coring of Greenland and Antarctica over the period 2 to 45 ka, using SO4 anomalies

Price, P. Buford

127

Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Stimulation in Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Project objectives: identify tracers with sorption properties favorable for EGS applications; apply reversibly sorbing tracers to determine the fracture-matrix interface area available for heat transfer; and; explore the feasibility of obtaining fracture-matrix interface area from non-isothermal; single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) tests.

128

Slew-rate dependence of tracer magnetization response in magnetic particle imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a new biomedical imaging technique that produces real-time, high-resolution tomographic images of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle tracers. Currently, 25?kHz and 20?mT/?{sub 0} excitation fields are common in MPI, but lower field amplitudes may be necessary for patient safety in future designs. Here, we address fundamental questions about MPI tracer magnetization dynamics and predict tracer performance in future scanners that employ new combinations of excitation field amplitude (H{sub o}) and frequency (?). Using an optimized, monodisperse MPI tracer, we studied how several combinations of drive field frequencies and amplitudes affect the tracer's response, using Magnetic Particle Spectrometry and AC hysteresis, for drive field conditions at 15.5, 26, and 40.2?kHz, with field amplitudes ranging from 7 to 52?mT/?{sub 0}. For both fluid and immobilized nanoparticle samples, we determined that magnetic response was dominated by Néel reversal. Furthermore, we observed that the peak slew-rate (?H{sub o}) determined the tracer magnetic response. Smaller amplitudes provided correspondingly smaller field of view, sometimes resulting in excitation of minor hysteresis loops. Changing the drive field conditions but keeping the peak slew-rate constant kept the tracer response almost the same. Higher peak slew-rates led to reduced maximum signal intensity and greater coercivity in the tracer response. Our experimental results were in reasonable agreement with Stoner-Wohlfarth model based theories.

Shah, Saqlain A.; Krishnan, K. M., E-mail: kannanmk@uw.edu [Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Ferguson, R. M. [LodeSpin Labs, P.O. Box 95632, Seattle, Washington 98145 (United States)

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

129

SAND TRACER MOVEMENT MEASURED IN A STRONG RIP CURRENT Nicholas C. Kraus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

exceeding 50 cm/sec in areas where instruments could be placed. Three colors of sand tracer were injected the diver's signal, a float tied to the diver's wrist was released and allowed to flow with the current because of the cold water, placed instruments, injected the tracer, and sampled the bottom with ropes tied

US Army Corps of Engineers

130

Scienti#12;c Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC-3) Partnership Project Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Applying Computationally Efficient Schemes for BioGeochemical Cycles ACES4BGC Project is advancing the predictive capabilities of Earth System Models (ESMs) by reducing two of the largest sources of uncertainty, aerosols and biospheric feedbacks, with a highly e#14;cient computational approach. In particular, this project is implementing and optimizing new computationally e#14;cient tracer advection algorithms for large numbers of tracer species; adding important biogeochemical interactions between the atmosphere, land, and ocean models; and applying uncertainty quanti#12;cation (UQ) techniques to constrain process parameters and evaluate uncertainties in feedbacks between biogeochemical cycles and the climate system.

Hoffman, Forest M [ORNL; Bochev, Pavel B [SNL; Cameron-Smith, Philip J [LLNL; Easter, Richard C [PNNL; Elliott, Scott M [LANL; Ghan, Steven J [PNNL; Liu, Xiaohong [formerly PNNL, U. Wyoming; Lowrie, Robert B [LANL; Lucas, Donald D [LLNL; Shrivastava, Manish [PNNL; Singh, Balwinder [PNNL; Tautges, Timothy J [ANL; Taylor, Mark A [SNL; Vertenstein, Mariana [NCAR; Worley, Patrick H [ORNL; and,; Zhang, Kai [PNNL

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

131

Curvature Induced Activation of a Passive Tracer in an Active Bath  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use numerical simulations to study the motion of a large asymmetric tracer immersed in a low density suspension of self-propelled nanoparticles in two dimensions. Specifically, we analyze how the curvature of the tracer affects its translational and rotational motion in an active environment. We find that even very small amounts of curvature are sufficient for the active bath to impart directed motion to the tracer which results in its effective activation. We propose simple scaling arguments to characterize this induced activity in terms of the curvature of the tracer and the strength of the self-propelling force. Our results suggest new ways of controlling the transport properties of passive tracers in an active medium by carefully tailoring their geometry.

S. A. Mallory; C. Valeriani; A. Cacciuto

2014-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

132

L\\'evy Fluctuations and Tracer Diffusion in Dilute Suspensions of Algae and Bacteria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Swimming microorganisms rely on effective mixing strategies to achieve efficient nutrient influx. Recent experiments, probing the mixing capability of unicellular biflagellates, revealed that passive tracer particles exhibit anomalous non-Gaussian diffusion when immersed in a dilute suspension of self-motile Chlamydomonas reinhardtii algae. Qualitatively, this observation can be explained by the fact that the algae induce a fluid flow that may occasionally accelerate the colloidal tracers to relatively large velocities. A satisfactory quantitative theory of enhanced mixing in dilute active suspensions, however, is lacking at present. In particular, it is unclear how non-Gaussian signatures in the tracers' position distribution are linked to the self-propulsion mechanism of a microorganism. Here, we develop a systematic theoretical description of anomalous tracer diffusion in active suspensions, based on a simplified tracer-swimmer interaction model that captures the typical distance scaling of a microswimmer'...

Zaid, Irwin M; Yeomans, Julia M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Advanced Combustion  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the Building TechnologiesS1!4T opAddress:AdolphusAdvanced Energy

134

Advanced Vehicle Testing & Evaluation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Provide benchmark data for advanced technology vehicles Develop lifecycle cost data for production vehicles utilizing advanced power trains Provide fleet...

135

Using Biofuel Tracers to Study Alternative Combustion Regimes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Interest in the use of alternative fuels and combustion regimes is increasing as the price of petroleum climbs. The inherently higher efficiency of Diesel engines has led to increased adoption of Diesels in Europe, capturing approximately 40% of the new passenger car market. Unfortunately, lower CO{sub 2} emissions are countered with higher nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions, and higher noise. Noise and PM have traditionally been the obstacles toward consumer acceptance of Diesel passenger cars in North America, while NOx (a key component in photochemical smog) has been more of an engineering challenge. Diesels are lean burning (combustion with excess oxygen) and reducing NOx to N2 in an oxygen rich environment is difficult. Adding oxygenated compounds to the fuel helps reduce PM emissions, but relying on fuel alone to reduce PM is unrealistic. Keeping peak combustion temperature below 1700 K prevents NOx formation. Altering the combustion regime to burn at temperatures below the NOx threshold and accept a wide variety of fuels seems like a promising alternative for future engines. Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) is a possible solution. Fuel and air are well mixed prior to intake into a cylinder (homogeneous charge) and ignition occurs by compression of the fuel-air mixture by the piston. HCCI is rapid and relatively cool, producing little NOx and PM. Unfortunately, it is hard to control since HCCI is initiated by temperature and pressure instead of a spark or direct fuel injection. We investigate biofuel HCCI combustion, and use intrinsically labeled biofuels as tracers of HCCI combustion. Data from tracer experiments are used to validate combustion modeling.

Mack, J H; Flowers, D L; Buchholz, B A; Dibble, R W

2006-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

136

Advanced LIGO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are second generation instruments designed and built for the two LIGO observatories in Hanford, WA and Livingston, LA. The two instruments are identical in design, and are specialized versions of a Michelson interferometer with 4 km long arms. As in initial LIGO, Fabry-Perot cavities are used in the arms to increase the interaction time with a gravitational wave, and power recycling is used to increase the effective laser power. Signal recycling has been added in Advanced LIGO to improve the frequency response. In the most sensitive frequency region around 100 Hz, the design strain sensitivity is a factor of 10 better than initial LIGO. In addition, the low frequency end of the sensitivity band is moved from 40 Hz down to 10 Hz. All interferometer components have been replaced with improved technologies to achieve this sensitivity gain. Much better seismic isolation and test mass suspensions are responsible for the gains at lower frequencies. Higher laser power, larger test masses and improved mirror coatings lead to the improved sensitivity at mid- and high- frequencies. Data collecting runs with these new instruments are planned to begin in mid-2015.

The LIGO Scientific Collaboration

2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

137

Deep Reactive Ion Etching | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: CrudeOffice ofINL isSeparationsRelevantDeep Reactive Ion

138

Innovative techniques for the description of reservoir heterogeneity using tracers. Second technical annual progress report, October 1991--September 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This second annual report on innovative uses of tracers for reservoir characterization contains four sections each describing a novel use of oilfield tracers. The first section describes and illustrates the use of a new single-well tracer test to estimate wettability. This test consists of the injection of brine containing tracers followed by oil containing tracers, a shut-in period to allow some of the tracers to react, and then production of the tracers. The inclusion of the oil injection slug with tracers is unique to this test, and this is what makes the test work. We adapted our chemical simulator, UTCHEM, to enable us to study this tracer method and made an extensive simulation study to evaluate the effects of wettability based upon characteristic curves for relative permeability and capillary pressure for differing wetting states typical of oil reservoirs. The second section of this report describes a new method for analyzing interwell tracer data based upon a type-curve approach. Theoretical frequency response functions were used to build type curves of ``transfer function`` and ``phase spectrum`` that have dimensionless heterogeneity index as a parameter to characterize a stochastic permeability field. We illustrate this method by analyzing field tracer data. The third section of this report describes a new theory for interpreting interwell tracer data in terms of channeling and dispersive behavior for reservoirs. Once again, a stochastic approach to reservoir description is taken. The fourth section of this report describes our simulation of perfluorocarbon gas tracers. This new tracer technology developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory is being tested at the Elk Hills Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 in California. We report preliminary simulations made of these tracers in one of the oil reservoirs under evaluation with these tracers in this field. Our compostional simulator (UTCOMP) was used for this simulation study.

Pope, G.A.; Sepehrnoori, K.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

139

Layered reactive particles with controlled geometries, energies, and reactivities, and methods for making the same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An energetic composite having a plurality of reactive particles each having a reactive multilayer construction formed by successively depositing reactive layers on a rod-shaped substrate having a longitudinal axis, dividing the reactive-layer-deposited rod-shaped substrate into a plurality of substantially uniform longitudinal segments, and removing the rod-shaped substrate from the longitudinal segments, so that the reactive particles have a controlled, substantially uniform, cylindrically curved or otherwise rod-contoured geometry which facilitates handling and improves its packing fraction, while the reactant multilayer construction controls the stability, reactivity and energy density of the energetic composite.

Fritz, Gregory M; Knepper, Robert Allen; Weihs, Timothy P; Gash, Alexander E; Sze, John S

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

140

Estimates of Tracer-Based Piston-Flow Ages of Groundwater From Selected Sites: National Water-Quality Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimates of Tracer-Based Piston-Flow Ages of Groundwater From Selected Sites: National Water;Estimates of Tracer-Based Piston-Flow Ages of Groundwater from Selected Sites: National Water.N., Busenberg, Eurybiades, Widman, P.K., Casile, G.C., and Wayland, J.E., 2010, Estimates of tracer-based piston

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Anisotropic reactive ion etching of vanadium dioxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Weichold Vanadium dioxide (V02) was anisotropically reactive ion etched using carbon tetrafluoride (CF4) . CF4, as an etch gas, provided the chemistry along with the control needed to achieve an anisotropic etch. This chemistry was practically inert... with vanadium quite easily. This leads to interest in using a fluorine- based chemistry. The goal of this research is to produce a selective anisotropic reactive ion etch for VO2 /photoresist using only carbon tetrafluoride (CFq) . Reactive ion etching...

Radle, Byron K

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

THE NEW YORK CITY URBAN DISPERSION PROGRAM MARCH 2005 FIELD STUDY: TRACER METHODS AND RESULTS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Urban Dispersion Program March 2005 Field Study tracer releases, sampling, and analytical methods are described in detail. There were two days where tracer releases and sampling were conducted. A total of 16.0 g of six tracers were released during the first test day or Intensive Observation Period (IOP) 1 and 15.7 g during IOP 2. Three types of sampling instruments were used in this study. Sequential air samplers, or SAS, collected six-minute samples, while Brookhaven atmospheric tracer samplers (BATS) and personal air samplers (PAS) collected thirty-minute samples. There were a total of 1300 samples resulting from the two IOPs. Confidence limits in the sampling and analysis method were 20% as determined from 100 duplicate samples. The sample recovery rate was 84%. The integrally averaged 6-minute samples were compared to the 30-minute samples. The agreement was found to be good in most cases. The validity of using a background tracer to calculate sample volumes was examined and also found to have a confidence level of 20%. Methods for improving sampling and analysis are discussed. The data described in this report are available as Excel files. An additional Excel file of quality assured tracer data for use in model validation efforts is also available. The file consists of extensively quality assured BATS tracer data with background concentrations subtracted.

WATSON, T.B.; HEISER, J.; KALB, P.; DIETZ, R.N.; WILKE, R.; WIESER, R.; VIGNATO, G.

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Analysis of Injection-Backflow Tracer Tests in Fractured Geothermal Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tracer tests have been an important technique for determining the flow and reservoir characteristics in various rock matrix systems. While the interwell tracer tests are aimed at the characterization of the regions between the wells, single-well injection-backflow tracer tests may be useful tools of preliminary evaluation, before implementing long term interwell tracer tests. This work is concerned with the quantitative evaluation of the tracer return profiles obtained from single well injection-backflow tracer tests. First, two mathematical models of tracer transport through fractures, have been reviewed. These two models are based on two different principles: Taylor Dispersion along the fracture and simultaneous diffusion in and out of the adjacent matrix. Then the governing equations for the transport during the injection-backflow tests have been solved. Finally the results were applied to field data obtained from Raft River and East Mesa geothermal fields. In order to determine the values of the parameters of the models that define the transport mechanisms through fractures a non-linear optimization technique was employed. 26 refs., 10 figs.

Kocabas, I.; Horne, R.N.

1987-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

144

Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical Flushing  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Final Report:Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical Flushing,U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 8 Support.August 2004

145

Exploring the reactivity of bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 1. Introduction: The Reactivity of Bacterial Multicomponent Monooxygenases Bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases constitute a remarkable family of enzymes that oxidize small, inert hydrocarbon substrates using ...

Tinberg, Christine Elaine

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Permeable Reactive Barriers | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

react with a contaminant plume in ground water. Typically, PRBs are emplaced by replacing soils with reactive material in a trench cut through a contaminated ground water aquifer....

147

Method for reactivating catalysts and a method for recycling supercritical fluids used to reactivate the catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of reactivating a catalyst, such as a solid catalyst or a liquid catalyst. The method comprises providing a catalyst that is at least partially deactivated by fouling agents. The catalyst is contacted with a fluid reactivating agent that is at or above a critical point of the fluid reactivating agent and is of sufficient density to dissolve impurities. The fluid reactivating agent reacts with at least one fouling agent, releasing the at least one fouling agent from the catalyst. The at least one fouling agent becomes dissolved in the fluid reactivating agent and is subsequently separated or removed from the fluid reactivating agent so that the fluid reactivating agent may be reused. A system for reactivating a catalyst is also disclosed.

Ginosar, Daniel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Thompson, David N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Anderson, Raymond P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

148

Tracers for monitoring the activity of sodium/glucose cotransporters in health and disease  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Radiolabeled tracers for sodium/glucose cotransporters (SGLTs), their synthesis, and their use are provided. The tracers are methyl or ethyl pyranosides having an equatorial hydroxyl group at carbon-2 and a C 1 preferred conformation, radiolabeled with .sup.18F, .sup.123I, or .sup.124I, or free hexoses radiolabeled with .sup.18F, .sup.123I, or .sup.124. Also provided are in vivo and in vitro techniques for using these and other tracers as analytical and diagnostic tools to study glucose transport, in health and disease, and to evaluate therapeutic interventions.

Wright, Ernest M; Barrio, Jorge R; Hirayama, Bruce A; Kepe, Vladimir

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

149

Environmental Tracers for Determining Water Resource Vulnerability to Climate Change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Predicted changes in the climate will have profound impacts on water availability in the Western US, but large uncertainties exist in our ability to predict how natural and engineered hydrological systems will respond. Most predictions suggest that the impacts of climate change on California water resources are likely to include a decrease in the percentage of precipitation that falls as snow, earlier onset of snow-pack melting, and an increase in the number of rain on snow events. These processes will require changes in infrastructure for water storage and flood control, since much of our current water supply system is built around the storage of winter precipitation as mountain snow pack. Alpine aquifers play a critical role by storing and releasing snowmelt as baseflow to streams long after seasonal precipitation and the disappearance of the snow pack, and in this manner significantly impact the stream flow that drives our water distribution systems. Mountain groundwater recharge and, in particular, the contribution of snowmelt to recharge and baseflow, has been identified as a potentially significant effect missing from current climate change impact studies. The goal of this work is to understand the behavior of critical hydrologic systems, with an emphasis on providing ground truth for next generation models of climate-water system interactions by implementing LLNL capabilities in environmental tracer and isotopic science. We are using noble gas concentrations and multiple isotopic tracers ({sup 3}H/{sup 3}He, {sup 35}S, {sup 222}Rn, {sup 2}H/{sup 1}H, {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O, and {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C) in groundwater and stream water in a small alpine catchment to (1) provide a snapshot of temperature, altitude, and physical processes at the time of recharge, (2) determine subsurface residence times (over time scales ranging from months to decades) of different groundwater age components, and (3) deconvolve the contribution of these different groundwater components to alpine stream baseflow. This research is showing that groundwater in alpine areas spends between a few years to several decades in the saturated zone below the surface, before feeding into streams or being pumped for use. This lag time may act to reduce the impact on water resources from extreme wet or dry years. Furthermore, our measurements show that the temperature of water when it reaches the water table during recharge is 4 to 9 degrees higher than would be expected for direct influx of snowmelt, and that recharge likely occurs over diffuse vegetated areas, rather than along exposed rock faces and fractures. These discoveries have implications for how alpine basins will respond to climate effects that lead to more rain than snow and earlier snow pack melting.

Singleton, M

2009-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

150

Chemical tracers of episodic accretion in low-mass protostars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aims: Accretion rates in low-mass protostars can be highly variable in time. Each accretion burst is accompanied by a temporary increase in luminosity, heating up the circumstellar envelope and altering the chemical composition of the gas and dust. This paper aims to study such chemical effects and discusses the feasibility of using molecular spectroscopy as a tracer of episodic accretion rates and timescales. Methods: We simulate a strong accretion burst in a diverse sample of 25 spherical envelope models by increasing the luminosity to 100 times the observed value. Using a comprehensive gas-grain network, we follow the chemical evolution during the burst and for up to 10^5 yr after the system returns to quiescence. The resulting abundance profiles are fed into a line radiative transfer code to simulate rotational spectra of C18O, HCO+, H13CO+, and N2H+ at a series of time steps. We compare these spectra to observations taken from the literature and to previously unpublished data of HCO+ and N2H+ 6-5 from th...

Visser, Ruud; Jorgensen, Jes K

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Tracer diffusion in compacted, water-saturated bentonite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Compacted Na-bentonite clay barriers, widely used in theisolation of solid-waste landfills and other contaminated sites, havebeen proposed for a similar use in the disposal of high-level radioactivewaste. Molecular diffusion through the pore space in these barriers playsa key role in their performance, thus motivating recent measurements ofthe apparent diffusion coefficient tensor of water tracers in compacted,water-saturated Na-bentonites. In the present study, we introduce aconceptual model in which the pore space of water-saturated bentonite isdivided into 'macropore' and 'interlayer nanopore' compartments. Withthis model we determine quantitatively the relative contributions ofpore-network geometry (expressed as a geometric factor) and of thediffusive behavior of water molecules near montmorillonite basal surfaces(expressed as a contristivity factor) to the apparent diffusioncoefficient tensor. Our model predicts, in agreement with experiment,that the mean principal value of the apparent diffusion coefficienttensor follows a single relationship when plotted against the partialmontmorillonite dry density (mass of montmorillonite per combined volumeof montmorillonite and pore space). Using a single fitted parameter, themean principal geometric factor, our model successfully describes thisrelationship for a broad range of bentonite-water system, from dilute gelto highly-compacted bentonite with 80 percent of its pore water ininterlayer nanopores.

Bourg, Ian C.; Sposito, Garrison; Bourg, Alain C.M.

2005-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

152

REACTIVE LOAD MODELINGIMPACTS ONNODAL PRICESINPOOL MODELELECTRICITYMARKETS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REACTIVE LOAD MODELINGIMPACTS ONNODAL PRICESINPOOL MODELELECTRICITYMARKETS EttoreBompard, Enrico of the nodal prices in competitive electricity markets based on the Pool paradigm. Such prices focus of the paper is on the explicit evaluation of the impactsof the reactive load onthenodal real

Gross, George

153

REACTIVE ENVIRONMENTS AND AUGMENTED MEDIA SPACES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REACTIVE ENVIRONMENTS AND AUGMENTED MEDIA SPACES by Jeremy R. Cooperstock A thesis submitted in conformity with the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy Graduate Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Toronto © Copyright by Jeremy R. Cooperstock, 1996 #12;ii REACTIVE

Cooperstock, Jeremy R.

154

Radium isotopes as tracers of coastal circulation pathways in the Mid-Atlantic Blight  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pathways of exchange between the shelf and slope in the Mid-Atlantic Bight were investigated using a combination of radiochemical tracer and hydrographic measurements. The motivation was to provide evidence of transport ...

Rasmussen, Linda L

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

The use of tracers to analyze the effects of reinjection into fractured geothermal reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the use of tracers as a reservoir engineering tool in fractured geothermal reservoirs. The principle concern in injecting cooler spent fluids into a fractured reservoir is that the fluids may move through high permeability channels and return to the production wells after contacting a relatively small volume of rock. As a consequence of this rapid transport, the fluids will be only partially reheated and after a short period time will effectively mine the heat from the limited volume of rock. The production wells will then experience a rapid and premature reduction in thermal output. Tracers can be used to infer the existence of high mobility conduits between injection and production wells and to monitor chemical changes of an injected fluid. Since tracer arrival precedes thermal breakthrough, tracer tests are a very useful forecasting tool.

Horne, R.N.; Johns, R.A.; Adams, M.C.; Moore, J.N.; Stiger, S.G.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Dynamic Reservoir Characterization Of Naturally Fractured Reservoirs From An Inter-Well Tracer Test  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

After field redevelopment in the Sherrod Unit of the Spraberry Trend Area, an inter-well tracer test was conducted at the field scale in order to understand the fracture system, which forms preferential flow paths for better management...

Kilicaslan, Ufuk

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

157

Development of Models to Simulate Tracer Behavior in Enhanced Geothermal Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A recent report found that power and heat produced from engineered (or enhanced) geothermal systems (EGSs) could have a major impact on the United States while incurring minimal environmental impacts. EGS resources differ from high-grade hydrothermal resources in that they lack sufficient temperature distributions, permeability/porosity, fluid saturation, or recharge of reservoir fluids. Therefore, quantitative characterization of temperature distributions and the surface area available for heat transfer in EGS is necessary for commercial development of geothermal energy. The goal of this project is to provide integrated tracer and tracer interpretation tools to facilitate this characterization. Modeling capabilities are being developed as part of this project to support laboratory and field testing to characterize engineered geothermal systems in single- and multi-well tests using tracers. The objective of this report is to describe the simulation plan and the status of model development for simulating tracer tests for characterizing EGS.

Williams, Mark D.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Reimus, P. W.; Newell, D.; Watson, Tom B.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Author's personal copy Thorium-234 as a tracer of spatial, temporal and vertical variability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Author's personal copy Thorium-234 as a tracer of spatial, temporal and vertical variability 2009 Accepted 6 April 2009 Available online 16 April 2009 Keywords: Thorium-234 Particle flux Sediment

Buesseler, Ken

159

CHEMICAL TRACER RETENTION IN POROUS MEDIA Submitted to the Department of Petroleum Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

* CHEMICAL TRACER RETENTION IN POROUS MEDIA A Report Submitted to the Department of Petroleum Engineering of Stanford University in Fulfillment of the Requirement for the Degree of Master of Science

Stanford University

160

Advanced gray rod control assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An advanced gray rod control assembly (GRCA) for a nuclear reactor. The GRCA provides controlled insertion of gray rod assemblies into the reactor, thereby controlling the rate of power produced by the reactor and providing reactivity control at full power. Each gray rod assembly includes an elongated tubular member, a primary neutron-absorber disposed within the tubular member said neutron-absorber comprising an absorber material, preferably tungsten, having a 2200 m/s neutron absorption microscopic capture cross-section of from 10 to 30 barns. An internal support tube can be positioned between the primary absorber and the tubular member as a secondary absorber to enhance neutron absorption, absorber depletion, assembly weight, and assembly heat transfer characteristics.

Drudy, Keith J; Carlson, William R; Conner, Michael E; Goldenfield, Mark; Hone, Michael J; Long, Jr., Carroll J; Parkinson, Jerod; Pomirleanu, Radu O

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Assessment of Controlling Processes for Field-Scale Uranium Reactive...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

at the 300A site. However, the model simulations also revealed that the groundwater chemistry was relatively stable during the uranium tracer experiment and therefore...

162

Glass mixing theory and tracer study results from the SF-10 run  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A general, partial differential equation governing glass mixing in the Slurry Fed Ceramic Melter (SFCM) was derived and a solution obtained based upon certain simplifying assumptions. Tracer studies were then conducted in the SFCM during the SF-10 run to test the theory and characterize glass mixing in this melter. Analysis of the tracer data shows that glass mixing in the SFCM can be explained by use of a model of two, well-mixed tanks in series.

Bowman, B.W.; Routt, K.R.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Validation of ATR SINDA using SPERT-3 reactivity-initiated transient test data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal-hydraulic analyses of Special Power Excursion Reactor Test-3 (SPERT-3) reactivity-initiated accident (RIA) test data are presented to validate ATR SINDA, a three-dimensional thermal-hydraulic computer code used to conduct transient analysis of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) fuel plates. Because SPERT-3-C core test results are the only existing data of reactivity insertions for plate-type reactors, validating ATR SINDA is important for safety analysis of postulated reactivity initiated accidents (RIAs) for the plate-type ATR operated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The SPERT-3 facility was designed to study the kinetic behavior and safety of pressurized, light water-moderated reactors.

Oh, C.H.; Ambrosek, R.G.; Wadkins, R.P. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Lévy Fluctuations and Tracer Diffusion in Dilute Suspensions of Algae and Bacteria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Swimming microorganisms rely on effective mixing strategies to achieve efficient nutrient influx. Recent experiments, probing the mixing capability of unicellular biflagellates, revealed that passive tracer particles exhibit anomalous non-Gaussian diffusion when immersed in a dilute suspension of self-motile Chlamydomonas reinhardtii algae. Qualitatively, this observation can be explained by the fact that the algae induce a fluid flow that may occasionally accelerate the colloidal tracers to relatively large velocities. A satisfactory quantitative theory of enhanced mixing in dilute active suspensions, however, is lacking at present. In particular, it is unclear how non-Gaussian signatures in the tracers' position distribution are linked to the self-propulsion mechanism of a microorganism. Here, we develop a systematic theoretical description of anomalous tracer diffusion in active suspensions, based on a simplified tracer-swimmer interaction model that captures the typical distance scaling of a microswimmer's flow field. We show that the experimentally observed non-Gaussian tails are generic and arise due to a combination of truncated L\\'evy statistics for the velocity field and algebraically decaying time correlations in the fluid. Our analytical considerations are illustrated through extensive simulations, implemented on graphics processing units to achieve the large sample sizes required for analyzing the tails of the tracer distributions.

Irwin M. Zaid; Jörn Dunkel; Julia M. Yeomans

2010-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

165

Reactive Support and Voltage Control Service: Key Issues and Challenges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reactive support and voltage control services. Keywords ­ Competitive Electricity Markets, Reactive PowerReactive Support and Voltage Control Service: Key Issues and Challenges George Gross^, Paolo Marannino° and Gianfranco Chicco* ^ Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University

Gross, George

166

Characterization of Dual-Fuel Reactivity Controlled Compression...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Dual-Fuel Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) Using Hydrated Ethanol and Diesel Fuel Characterization of Dual-Fuel Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI)...

167

A smoothed particle hydrodynamics model for reactive transport...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A smoothed particle hydrodynamics model for reactive transport and mineral precipitation in porous and fractured porous media. A smoothed particle hydrodynamics model for reactive...

168

Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor comprises supports stacked above reactor core for holding control rods. Couplers associated with the supports and a vertically movable drive shaft have lugs at their lower ends for engagement with the supports.

Bollinger, Lawrence R. (Schenectady, NY)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Fossil plant layup and reactivation conference: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fossil Plant Layup and Reactivation Conference was held in New Orleans, Louisiana on April 14--15, 1992. The Conference was sponsored by EPRI and hosted by Entergy Services, Inc. to bring together representatives from utilities, consulting firms, manufacturers and architectural engineers. Eighteen papers were presented in three sessions. These sessions were devoted to layup procedures and practices, and reactivation case studies. A panel discussion was held on the second day to interactively discuss layup and reactivation issues. More than 80 people attended the Conference. This report contains technical papers and a summary of the panel discussion. Of the eighteen papers, three are related to general, one is related to regulatory issues, three are related to specific equipment, four are related to layup procedures and practices, and seven are layup and reactivation case studies.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Groundwater well with reactive filter pack  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for the remediation of contaminated soil and ground water wherein a reactive pack material is added to the annular fill material utilized in standard well construction techniques.

Gilmore, Tyler J. (Pasco, WA); Holdren, Jr., George R. (Kennewick, WA); Kaplan, Daniel I. (Richland, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

A Tariff for Reactive Power - IEEE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a suggested tariff or payment for the local supply of reactive power from distributed energy resources. The authors consider four sample customers, and estimate the cost of supply of reactive power for each customer. The power system savings from the local supply of reactive power are also estimated for a hypothetical circuit. It is found that reactive power for local voltage regulation could be supplied to the distribution system economically by customers when new inverters are installed. The inverter would be supplied with a power factor of 0.8, and would be capable of local voltage regulation to a schedule supplied by the utility. Inverters are now installed with photovoltaic systems, fuel cells and microturbines, and adjustable-speed motor drives.

Kueck, John D [ORNL; Tufon, Christopher [Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Isemonger, Alan [California Independent System Operator; Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Consideration of spatial effects in reactivity measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various methods of considering spatial effects in reactivity measurements are presented. These methods are employed both at the critical (mainly fast-neutron) facilities and at the BN-600 reactor.

Matveenko, I. P., E-mail: matveenko@ippe.ru; Lititskii, V. A.; Shokod'ko, A. G. [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (Russian Federation)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

173

Systematic approach for chemical reactivity evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Screening Tool (RSST) and the Automatic Pressure Tracking Adiabatic Calorimeter (APTAC) were employed to evaluate the reactive systems experimentally. The RSST detected exothermic behavior and measured the overall liberated energy. The APTAC simulated...

Aldeeb, Abdulrehman Ahmed

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

174

Groundwater well with reactive filter pack  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus are disclosed for the remediation of contaminated soil and ground water wherein a reactive pack material is added to the annular fill material utilized in standard well construction techniques. 3 figs.

Gilmore, T.J.; Holdren, G.R. Jr.; Kaplan, D.I.

1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

175

Reactive Attachment Disorder: Concepts, Treatment, and Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reactive Attachment Disorder (RAD) is a disorder characterized by controversy, both with respect to its definition and its treatment. By definition, the RAD diagnosis attempts to characterize and explain the origin of ...

Walter, Uta M.; Petr, Chris

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Relative reactivities of solid benzoic acids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RELATIVE REACTIVITIES OF SOLID BENZOIC ACIDS A Thesis By EDWIN J, WARWAS Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A8rM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1967' Major... Subject: Chemistry RELATIVE REACTIVITIES OF SOLID BENZOIC ACIDS A Thesis By EDWIN J. WARWAS Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ASSAM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MAST ER OF S CIENCE January...

Warwas, Edwin James

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

177

Laboratory testing and modeling to evaluate perfluorocarbon compounds as tracers in geothermal systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermal stability and adsorption characteristics of three perfluorinated hydrocarbon compounds were evaluated under geothermal conditions to determine the potential to use these compounds as conservative or thermally-degrading tracers in Engineered (or Enhanced) Geothermal Systems (EGS). The three compounds tested were perfluorodimethyl-cyclobutane (PDCB), perfluoromethylcyclohexane (PMCH), and perfluorotrimethylcyclohexane (PTCH), which are collectively referred to as perfluorinated tracers, or PFTs. Two sets of duplicate tests were conducted in batch mode in gold-bag reactors, with one pair of reactors charged with a synthetic geothermal brine containing the PFTs and a second pair was charged with the brine-PFT mixture plus a mineral assemblage chosen to be representative of activated fractures in an EGS reservoir. A fifth reactor was charged with deionized water containing the three PFTs. The experiments were conducted at {approx}100 bar, with temperatures ranging from 230 C to 300 C. Semi-analytical and numerical modeling was also conducted to show how the PFTs could be used in conjunction with other tracers to interrogate surface area to volume ratios and temperature profiles in EGS reservoirs. Both single-well and cross-hole tracer tests are simulated to illustrate how different suites of tracers could be used to accomplish these objectives. The single-well tests are especially attractive for EGS applications because they allow the effectiveness of a stimulation to be evaluated without drilling a second well.

Reimus, Paul W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

178

Results of injection and tracer tests in Olkaria north east field in Kenya  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tracer and injection tests were performed in the Olkaria North East Field with the objective to reduce uncertainty in the engineering design and to determine the suitability of well OW-704 as a re-injection well for the waste brine from the steam field during production. An organic dye (sodium fluorescein) was injected into well OW-704 as a slug. The tracer returns were observed in well OW-M2 which is 580 m deep, 620 m from well OW-704 and well OW-716 which is 900 m from well OW-704. The other wells on discharge, OW-714, and OW-725 did not show any tracer returns. However, other chemical constituents suggested., that well OW-716 experienced a chemical breakthrough earlier than OW-M2. Tracer return velocities of 0.31 m/hr and 1.3 m/hr were observed. Results of the tracer and injection tests indicate that OW-704 may be used as a re-injection well provided a close monitoring program is put in place.

Karingithi, C.W. [Kenya Power Company Ltd., Naivasha (Kenya)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

179

Advances In The Past 20 Years- Geochemistry In Geothermal Exploration...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geochemical reaction models into numerical reservoir simulation; scaling and wellflow chemistry modification; new reservoir tracers and flow-line tracer enthalpy technology....

180

Eoeective Recognizability and Model Checking of Reactive Fioeo Automata  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electre. For this, we deøne a particular behavioral model for Electre programs, Reactive Fioeo Au­ tomata speciøed with the reactive language Electre [CR95]. A reactive pro­ gram is supposed to reactEoeective Recognizability and Model Checking of Reactive Fioeo Automata G. Sutre 1 , A. Finkel 1

Sutre, Grégoire

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

A comprehensive study of the analysis and economic benefits of radioactive tracer engineered simulation procedures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydraulic Fracturing is an important technology to enhance production from tight gas reservoirs. Several techniques have been utilized to attempt to evaluate the effectiveness of hydraulic fracturing treatments. One technique, radioactive tracers, is currently used on over 15 % of the stimulation treatments performed in the U.S. With proper materials, design, and execution, tracers can be used to locate the presence and concentration of proppant at the wellbore in order to evaluate vertical and radial proppant distribution. A comprehensive study of over 100 fracture treatments has been completed in which radioactive tracers were used along with production logs, stress logs, post-fracturing completion reports, and production history to analyze completion effectiveness in four different reservoirs. Additionally, an economic benefit model was constructed to evaluate the benefit/cost ratio of applying the technology.

Fisher, K.; Robinson, B.M.; Voneiff, G.W.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

182

Enthalpy and mass flowrate measurements for two-phase geothermal production by Tracer dilution techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new technique has been developed for the measurement of steam mass flowrate, water mass flowrate and total enthalpy of two-phase fluids produced from geothermal wells. The method involves precisely metered injection of liquid and vapor phase tracers into the two-phase production pipeline and concurrent sampling of each phase downstream of the injection point. Subsequent chemical analysis of the steam and water samples for tracer content enables the calculation of mass flowrate for each phase given the known mass injection rates of tracer. This technique has now been used extensively at the Coso geothermal project, owned and operated by California Energy Company. Initial validation of the method was performed at the Roosevelt Hot Springs geothermal project on wells producing to individual production separators equipped with orificeplate flowmeters for each phase.

Hirtz, Paul; Lovekin, Jim; Copp, John; Buck, Cliff; Adams, Mike

1993-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

183

Interpretations of Tracer Tests Performed in the Culebra Dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides (1) an overview of all tracer testing conducted in the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WPP) site, (2) a detailed description of the important information about the 1995-96 tracer tests and the current interpretations of the data, and (3) a summary of the knowledge gained to date through tracer testing in the Culebra. Tracer tests have been used to identify transport processes occurring within the Culebra and quantify relevant parameters for use in performance assessment of the WIPP. The data, especially those from the tests performed in 1995-96, provide valuable insight into transport processes within the Culebra. Interpretations of the tracer tests in combination with geologic information, hydraulic-test information, and laboratory studies have resulted in a greatly improved conceptual model of transport processes within the Culebra. At locations where the transmissivity of the Culebra is low (< 4 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s), we conceptualize the Culebra as a single-porosity medium in which advection occurs largely through the primary porosity of the dolomite matrix. At locations where the transmissivity of the Culebra is high (> 4 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s), we conceptualize the Culebra as a heterogeneous, layered, fractured medium in which advection occurs largely through fractures and solutes diffuse between fractures and matrix at multiple rates. The variations in diffusion rate can be attributed to both variations in fracture spacing (or the spacing of advective pathways) and matrix heterogeneity. Flow and transport appear to be concentrated in the lower Culebra. At all locations, diffusion is the dominant transport process in the portions of the matrix that tracer does not access by flow.

MEIGS,LUCY C.; BEAUHEIM,RICHARD L.; JONES,TOYA L.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Estimation of Fracture Porosity in an Unsaturated Fractured Welded Tuff Using Gas Tracer Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kinematic fracture porosity is an important hydrologic transport parameter for predicting the potential of rapid contaminant migration through fractured rock. The transport velocity of a solute moving within a fracture network is inversely related to the fracture porosity. Since fracture porosity is often one or two orders of magnitude smaller than matrix porosity, and fracture permeability is often orders of magnitude greater than matrix permeability, solutes may travel significantly faster in the fracture network than in the surrounding matrix. This dissertation introduces a new methodology for conducting gas tracer tests using a field portable mass spectrometer along with analytical tools for estimating fracture porosity using the measured tracer concentration breakthrough curves. Field experiments were conducted at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, consisting of air-permeability transient testing and gas-tracer-transport tests. The experiments were conducted from boreholes drilled within an underground tunnel as part of an investigation of rock mass hydrological behavior. Air-permeability pressure transients, recorded during constant mass flux injections, have been analyzed using a numerical inversion procedure to identify fracture permeability and porosity. Dipole gas tracer tests have also been conducted from the same boreholes used for air-permeability testing. Mass breakthrough data has been analyzed using a random walk particle-tracking model, with a dispersivity that is a function of the advective velocity. The estimated fracture porosity using the tracer test and air-injection test data ranges from .001 to .015. These values are an order of magnitude greater than the values estimated by others using hydraulically estimated fracture apertures. The estimates of porosity made using air-permeability test data are shown to be highly sensitive to formation heterogeneity. Uncertainty analyses performed on the gas tracer test results show high confidence in the parameter estimates made.

B.M. Freifeild

2001-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

185

Chemical Imaging and Dynamical Studies of Reactivity and Emergent Behavior in Complex Interfacial Systems. Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research program explored the efficacy of using molecular-level manipulation, imaging and scanning tunneling spectroscopy in conjunction with supersonic molecular beam gas-surface scattering to significantly enhance our understanding of chemical processes occurring on well-characterized interfaces. One program focus was on the spatially-resolved emergent behavior of complex reaction systems as a function of the local geometry and density of adsorbate-substrate systems under reaction conditions. Another focus was on elucidating the emergent electronic and related reactivity characteristics of intentionally constructed single and multicomponent atom- and nanoparticle-based materials. We also examined emergent chirality and self-organization in adsorbed molecular systems where collective interactions between adsorbates and the supporting interface lead to spatial symmetry breaking. In many of these studies we combined the advantages of scanning tunneling (STM) and atomic force (AFM) imaging, scanning tunneling local electronic spectroscopy (STS), and reactive supersonic molecular beams to elucidate precise details of interfacial reactivity that had not been observed by more traditional surface science methods. Using these methods, it was possible to examine, for example, the differential reactivity of molecules adsorbed at different bonding sites in conjunction with how reactivity is modified by the local configuration of nearby adsorbates. At the core of this effort was the goal of significantly extending our understanding of interfacial atomic-scale interactions to create, with intent, molecular assemblies and materials with advanced chemical and physical properties. This ambitious program addressed several key topics in DOE Grand Challenge Science, including emergent chemical and physical properties in condensed phase systems, novel uses of chemical imaging, and the development of advanced reactivity concepts in combustion and catalysis including carbon management. These activities directly benefitted national science objectives in the areas of chemical energy production and advanced materials development.

Sibener, Steven J. [University of Chicago, IL (United States)] [University of Chicago, IL (United States)

2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

186

Advanced Critical Advanced Energy Retrofit Education and Training...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Critical Advanced Energy Retrofit Education and Training and Credentialing - 2014 BTO Peer Review Advanced Critical Advanced Energy Retrofit Education and Training and...

187

Italian Academy Advanced Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Italian Academy for Advanced Studies in America at Columbia University Annual Report 2006­2007 The Italian Academy for Advanced Studies in America at Columbia University Annual Report 2006­2007 #12;italian academy for advanced studies in america 1161 Amsterdam Avenue New York, NY 10027 tel: (212) 854-2306 fax

Qian, Ning

188

Advanced Search Search Tips  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced Search Search Tips Advanced Search Search Tips springerlink.com SpringerLink 2,000 40,000 20,000 2010 11 Please visit 7 http://www.springerlink.com GO 1997 1997 SpringerLink Advanced Search Search Tips CONTENT DOI CITATION DOI ISSN ISBN CATEGORY AND DATE LIMITERS Journals Books Protocols

Kinosita Jr., Kazuhiko

189

ADVANCED HIGH PERFORMANCE SOLID WALL BLANKET CONCEPTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

OAK A271 ADVANCED HIGH PERFORMANCE SOLID WALL BLANKET CONCEPTS. First wall and blanket (FW/blanket) design is a crucial element in the performance and acceptance of a fusion power plant. High temperature structural and breeding materials are needed for high thermal performance. A suitable combination of structural design with the selected materials is necessary for D-T fuel sufficiency. Whenever possible, low afterheat, low chemical reactivity and low activation materials are desired to achieve passive safety and minimize the amount of high-level waste. Of course the selected fusion FW/blanket design will have to match the operational scenarios of high performance plasma. The key characteristics of eight advanced high performance FW/blanket concepts are presented in this paper. Design configurations, performance characteristics, unique advantages and issues are summarized. All reviewed designs can satisfy most of the necessary design goals. For further development, in concert with the advancement in plasma control and scrape off layer physics, additional emphasis will be needed in the areas of first wall coating material selection, design of plasma stabilization coils, consideration of reactor startup and transient events. To validate the projected performance of the advanced FW/blanket concepts the critical element is the need for 14 MeV neutron irradiation facilities for the generation of necessary engineering design data and the prediction of FW/blanket components lifetime and availability.

WONG, CPC; MALANG, S; NISHIO, S; RAFFRAY, R; SAGARA, S

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Water reactive hydrogen fuel cell power system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes devices and methods to combine reactant fuel materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The generated hydrogen is converted in a fuel cell to provide electricity. The water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes a fuel cell, a water feed tray, and a fuel cartridge to generate power for portable power electronics. The removable fuel cartridge is encompassed by the water feed tray and fuel cell. The water feed tray is refillable with water by a user. The water is then transferred from the water feed tray into the fuel cartridge to generate hydrogen for the fuel cell which then produces power for the user.

Wallace, Andrew P; Melack, John M; Lefenfeld, Michael

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

191

Water reactive hydrogen fuel cell power system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes devices and methods to combine reactant fuel materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The generated hydrogen is converted in a fuel cell to provide electricity. The water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes a fuel cell, a water feed tray, and a fuel cartridge to generate power for portable power electronics. The removable fuel cartridge is encompassed by the water feed tray and fuel cell. The water feed tray is refillable with water by a user. The water is then transferred from the water feed tray into a fuel cartridge to generate hydrogen for the fuel cell which then produces power for the user.

Wallace, Andrew P; Melack, John M; Lefenfeld, Michael

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

192

High Efficiency Fuel Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

& Publications Effect of Compression Ratio and Piston Geometry on RCCI load limit Optimization of Advanced Diesel Engine Combustion Strategies Vehicle Technologies Office Merit...

193

Using Thermally-Degrading, Partitioning, and Nonreactive Tracers to Determine Temperature Distribution and Fracture/Heat Transfer Surface Area in Geothermal Reservoirs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Project Summary. The goal of this project is to provide integrated tracer and tracer interpretation tools to facilitate quantitative characterization of temperature distributions and surface area available for heat transfer in EGS.

194

Fracture Model, Ground Displacements and Tracer Observations: Fruitland Coals, San Juan Basin, New Mexico,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that the coal reservoirs consist of six separate coal beds rather than three. Perfluorocarbon tracer monitoring the site consist of two coal beds, each separated by a shale parting. This observation indicates will improve our understanding of Fruitland coal reservoirs; help develop more effective strategies to enhance

Wilson, Thomas H.

195

Physical causes and modeling challenges of anomalous diffusion of sediment tracers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physical causes and modeling challenges of anomalous diffusion of sediment tracers Douglas Jerolmack Earth & Environmental Science, UPenn [sediment@sas.upenn.edu] "Bridging the Gap", Princeton U., 2" describable by: 1. Particle volume, v [L3 ]. 2.Average velocity, us , of bed load sediment [L/T]. 3. Surface

196

BOREHOLE RADAR ATTENUATION-DIFFERENCE TOMOGRAPHY DURING THE TRACER/TIME-LAPSE TEST AT THE BOISE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to those suggested by radar level run attenuation differences, shot-receiver attenuation difference be explained by the difference in support volumes for the radar and chemistry measurements, and alsoBOREHOLE RADAR ATTENUATION-DIFFERENCE TOMOGRAPHY DURING THE TRACER/TIME-LAPSE TEST AT THE BOISE

Barrash, Warren

197

Project EARTH-14-SHELLDP1: Developing Metal Isotope Tracers for Understanding Sediment Depositional Environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project EARTH-14-SHELLDP1: Developing Metal Isotope Tracers for Understanding Sediment Depositional and the mechanisms behind temporal and spatial variations in organic matter quantity and quality. The project work will involve becoming proficient in clean room procedures, chemical separation techniques

Henderson, Gideon

198

Ca and 87/86 Sr isotopes as tracers of silicate weathering in small  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

44/40 Ca and 87/86 Sr isotopes as tracers of silicate weathering in small catchments of the Massif, Laboratory Division, Orléans, France 2 U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Menlo Park, CA 94025).Measurements of 44/40 Ca isotope ratios (44/40 Ca measured by the double spike method on TIMS and normalized

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

199

TRACER: A Trace Replay Tool to Evaluate Energy-Efficiency of Mass Storage Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TRACER: A Trace Replay Tool to Evaluate Energy-Efficiency of Mass Storage Systems Zhuo Liu1 , Fei of accurately evaluating energy-efficient storage systems and objectively comparing a wide range of energy RAID5 enterprise disk array. Our experiments demonstrate that energy-efficient mass storage systems can

Qin, Xiao

200

Near-Infrared Gold Nanocages as a New Class of Tracers for Photoacoustic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radiation damage to the connective tissues of the skin. Therefore, noninvasive, nonionizing, and highNear-Infrared Gold Nanocages as a New Class of Tracers for Photoacoustic Sentinel Lymph Node based on Au nanocages shows a number of attractive features: noninvasiveness, strong optical absorption

Wang, Lihong

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Evaluating the ability of a numerical weather prediction model to forecast tracer concentrations during ETEX 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluating the ability of a numerical weather prediction model to forecast tracer concentrations an operational numerical weather prediction model to forecast air quality are also investigated. These potential a numerical weather prediction (NWP) model independently of the CTM. The NWP output is typically archived

Dacre, Helen

202

Ammonium transport and reaction in contaminated groundwater: Application of isotope tracers and isotope fractionation studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ammonium transport and reaction in contaminated groundwater: Application of isotope tracers the groundwater velocity. Retardation factors and groundwater ages indicate that much of the NH4 + in the plume was recharged early in the history of the wastewater disposal. NO3 Ã? and excess N2 gas, which were related

203

Tracer studies of pathways and rates of meltwater transport through Arctic summer sea ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tracer studies of pathways and rates of meltwater transport through Arctic summer sea ice H. Eicken) program's field site in the northern Chukchi Sea, snow and ice meltwater flow was found to have a strong impact on the heat and mass balance of sea ice during the summer of 1998. Pathways and rates of meltwater

Eicken, Hajo

204

Seasonal Variation in Monthly Average Air Change Rates Using Passive Tracer Gas Measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of indoor air pollution sources. Concurrently, great efforts are made to make buildings energy efficient 1970s, while less attention has been paid to IAQ. Insufficient venting of indoor air pollutantsSeasonal Variation in Monthly Average Air Change Rates Using Passive Tracer Gas Measurements Marie

Hansen, René Rydhof

205

Using chemical tracers in hillslope soils to estimate the importance of chemical denudation under  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

also examine relationships between transient mechanical and chemical denudation rates. Soil particle, burrowing by mammals, or freeze-thaw mechanisms [e.g., see Birkeland, 1999]. Once created, mobile soilUsing chemical tracers in hillslope soils to estimate the importance of chemical denudation under

206

Controls on soil methane fluxes: Tests of biophysical mechanisms using stable isotope tracers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Controls on soil methane fluxes: Tests of biophysical mechanisms using stable isotope tracers November 2006; published 4 May 2007. [1] Understanding factors that control methane exchange between soils-based technique to investigate the relative importance of three mechanisms for explaining landscape

207

Tracer Gas as a Practical Field Diagnostic Tool for Assessing Duct System Leaks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

diagnostic tools for detecting and locating leaks in the air distribution system. The tracer gas tests described are a good complement to these tools in the detection, location, and measurement of duct leakage. Testing for house infiltration once with the air...

Cummings, J. B.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Lignin biomarkers as tracers of mercury sources in lakes water column  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lignin biomarkers as tracers of mercury sources in lakes water column Jean-Franc¸ois Ouellet � Marc the autochthonous from the allochthonous organic matter (OM), lignin derived biomarker signa- tures [Lambda, S/V, C/V, P/(V ? S), 3,5-Bd/V and (Ad/Al)v] were used. Since lignin is exclusively produced by terrigenous

Long, Bernard

209

Isotopic Tracer Studies of Reaction Pathways for Propane Oxidative Dehydrogenation on Molybdenum Oxide Catalysts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Isotopic Tracer Studies of Reaction Pathways for Propane Oxidative Dehydrogenation on Molybdenum of propane over ZrO2-supported MoOx catalysts. Competitive reactions of C3H6 and CH3 13 CH2CH3 showed combustion of propene, or by direct combustion of propane. A mixture of C3H8 and C3D8 undergoes oxidative

Iglesia, Enrique

210

New Tracers Identify Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids and Accidental Releases from Oil and Gas Operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New Tracers Identify Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids and Accidental Releases from Oil and Gas produced waters sampled from conventional oil and gas wells. We posit that boron isotope geochemistry can tool is validated by examining the composition of effluent discharge from an oil and gas brine

Jackson, Robert B.

211

Supporting BioMedical Information Retrieval: The BioTracer Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supporting BioMedical Information Retrieval: The BioTracer Approach Heri Ramampiaro1 and Chen Li2 1 biomedical in- formation has put a high demand on existing search systems. Such a tool should be able the relevant ones the highest rank- ing. Focusing on biomedical information, this work investigates how

Li, Chen

212

Evidence of Multi-Process Matrix Diffusion in a Single Fracturefrom a Field Tracer Test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Compared to values inferred from laboratory tests on matrix cores, many field tracer tests in fractured rock have shown enhanced matrix diffusion coefficient values (obtained using a single-process matrix-diffusion model with a homogeneous matrix diffusion coefficient). To investigate this phenomenon, a conceptual model of multi-process matrix diffusion in a single-fracture system was developed. In this model, three matrix diffusion processes of different diffusion rates were assumed to coexist: (1) diffusion into stagnant water and infilling materials within fractures, (2) diffusion into a degraded matrix zone, and (3) further diffusion into an intact matrix zone. The validity of the conceptual model was then demonstrated by analyzing a unique tracer test conducted using a long-time constant-concentration injection. The tracer-test analysis was conducted using a numerical model capable of tracking the multiple matrix-diffusion processes. The analysis showed that in the degraded zone, a diffusion process with an enhanced diffusion rate controlled the steep rising limb and decay-like falling limb in the observed breakthrough curve, whereas in the intact matrix zone, a process involving a lower diffusion rate affected the long-term middle platform of slowly increasing tracer concentration. The different matrix-diffusion-coefficient values revealed from the field tracer test are consistent with the variability of matrix diffusion coefficient measured for rock cores with different degrees of fracture coating at the same site. By comparing to the matrix diffusion coefficient calibrated using single-process matrix diffusion, we demonstrated that this multi-process matrix diffusion may contribute to the enhanced matrix-diffusion-coefficient values for single-fracture systems at the field scale.

Zhou, Quanlin; Liu, Hui-Hai; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur; Molz, Fred J.

2005-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

213

Studies on Waterborne Pathogen Reactivation after Disinfection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ultraviolet (LP UV) irradiation at five titanium dioxide (TiO_(2)) concentrations (1 g/L, 0.5 g/L, 0.75 g/L, and 0.1 g/L) to achieve 5 log_(10) reduction of a laboratory E. coli K-12 strain (ATCC® 10798). Regrowth and reactivation of E. coli in dark and light...

Kaur, Jasjeet

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

214

Gasification reactivities of solid biomass fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design and operation of the biomass based gasification processes require knowledge about the biomass feedstocks characteristics and their typical gasification behaviour in the process. In this study, the gasification reactivities of various biomasses were investigated in laboratory scale Pressurized Thermogravimetric apparatus (PTG) and in the PDU-scale (Process Development Unit) Pressurized Fluidized-Bed (PFB) gasification test facility of VTT.

Moilanen, A.; Kurkela, E.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

215

Controlling uranium reactivity March 18, 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the last decade. Most of their work involves depleted uranium, a more common form of uraniumMarch 2008 Controlling uranium reactivity March 18, 2008 Uranium is an often misunderstood metal uranium research. In reality, uranium presents a wealth of possibilities for funda- mental chemistry. Many

Meyer, Karsten

216

Integration of advanced geoscience and engineering techniques to quantify interwell heterogeneity. Quarterly technical report, January 1--March 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to integrate advanced geoscience and reservoir engineering concepts, with the goal of quantifying the dynamics of fluid-rock and fluid-fluid interactions as they relate to reservoir architecture and lithologic characterization. This interdisciplinary effort will integrate geological and geophysical data with engineering and petrophysical results through reservoir simulation. Technical progress is summarized for the following: geological studies; hydrologic and tracer research; and geophysical research.

Martin, F.D.; Buckley, J.S.; Weiss, W.W.; Ouenes, A.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

217

Assessment of the Economic Potential of Microgrids for Reactive Power Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reactive Power from Distributed Energy”, The Electricityvoltage. Electricity consumers’ demand for reactive power ison electricity supply security, the costs of local reactive

Appen, Jan von

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Overview of SIMS-Based Experimental Studies of Tracer Diffusion in Solids and Application to Mg Self-Diffusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tracer diffusivities provide the most fundamental information on diffusion in materials and are the foundation of robust diffusion databases. Compared to traditional radiotracer techniques that utilize radioactive isotopes, the secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) based thin-film technique for tracer diffusion is based on the use of enriched stable isotopes that can be accurately profiled using SIMS. Experimental procedures & techniques that are utilized for the measurement of tracer diffusion coefficients are presented for pure magnesium, which presents some unique challenges due to the ease of oxidation. The development of a modified Shewmon-Rhines diffusion capsule for annealing Mg and an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) system for sputter deposition of Mg isotopes are discussed. Optimized conditions for accurate SIMS depth profiling in polycrystalline Mg are provided. An automated procedure for the correction of heat-up and cool-down times during tracer diffusion annealing is discussed. The non-linear fitting of a SIMS depth profile data using the thin film Gaussian solution to obtain the tracer diffusivity along with the background tracer concentration and tracer film thickness is discussed. An Arrhenius fit of the Mg self-diffusion data obtained using the low-temperature SIMS measurements from this study and the high-temperature radiotracer measurements of Shewmon and Rhines (1954) was found to be a good representation of both types of diffusion data that cover a broad range of temperatures between 250 - 627 C (523 900 K).

Kulkarni, Nagraj S [ORNL; Warmack, Robert J Bruce [ORNL; Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam [ORNL; HunterJr., Jerry [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Sohn, Yong Ho [University of Central Florida; Coffey, Kevin [University of Central Florida; Murch, Prof. Graeme [University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia; Belova, Irina [University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Parallel Web Scripting with Reactive Constraints Thibaud Hottelier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Parallel Web Scripting with Reactive Constraints Thibaud Hottelier James Ide Doug Kimelman Ras Bodik Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences University of California at Berkeley Technical Report to lists, requires prior specific permission. #12;Parallel Web Scripting with Reactive Constraints Thibaud

Bodik, Rastisla

220

Advanced Studies Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering Institute Advanced Studies Institute Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 663-5330 Email UCSD EI Director Michael Todd (858) 534-5951 Professional Staff...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Advanced Reciprocating Engine Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Advanced Reciprocating Engine Systems (ARES) program is designed to promote separate but parallel engine development between the major stationary, gaseous fueled engine manufacturers in the...

222

Advanced Propulsion Technology Strategy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Alternative Sources) Hydrogen Time ADVANCED PROPULSION TECHNOLOGY STRATEGY DOWNSIZED TURBO GAS ENGINE CHEVROLET CRUZE 1.4L TURBO ECOTEC Downsized SIDI Turbo Boosting HCCI -...

223

Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Working with INL Community Outreach Visitor Information Calendar of Events ATR National Scientific User Facility Center for Advanced Energy Studies Light Water Reactor...

224

Advanced Fuel Cycle Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Working with INL Community Outreach Visitor Information Calendar of Events ATR National Scientific User Facility Center for Advanced Energy Studies Light Water Reactor...

225

Advances in Physical Chemistry  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hindawi Publishing Corporation Advances in Physical Chemistry Volume 2011, Article ID 907129, 18 pages doi:10.11552011907129 Review Article Contrast and Synergy between...

226

ENVIRONMENTAL REACTIVITY OF SOLID STATE HYDRIDE MATERIALS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In searching for high gravimetric and volumetric density hydrogen storage systems, it is inevitable that higher energy density materials will be used. In order to make safe and commercially acceptable condensed phase hydrogen storage systems, it is important to understand quantitatively the risks involved in using and handling these materials and to develop appropriate mitigation strategies to handle potential material exposure events. A crucial aspect of the development of risk identification and mitigation strategies is the development of rigorous environmental reactivity testing standards and procedures. This will allow for the identification of potential risks and implementation of risk mitigation strategies. Modified testing procedures for shipping air and/or water sensitive materials, as codified by the United Nations, have been used to evaluate two potential hydrogen storage materials, 2LiBH{sub 4} {center_dot} MgH{sub 2} and NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3}. The modified U.N. procedures include identification of self-reactive substances, pyrophoric substances, and gas-emitting substances with water contact. The results of these tests for air and water contact sensitivity will be compared to the pure material components where appropriate (e.g. LiBH{sub 4} and MgH{sub 2}). The water contact tests are divided into two scenarios dependent on the hydride to water mole ratio and heat transport characteristics. Air contact tests were run to determine whether a substance will spontaneously react with air in a packed or dispersed form. In the case of the 2LiBH{sub 4} {center_dot} MgH{sub 2} material, the results from the hydride mixture compared to the pure materials results showed the MgH{sub 2} to be the least reactive component and LiBH{sub 4} the more reactive. The combined 2LiBH{sub 4} {center_dot} MgH{sub 2} resulted in a material having environmental reactivity between these two materials. Relative to 2LiBH{sub 4} {center_dot} MgH{sub 2}, the chemical hydride NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3} was observed to be less environmentally reactive.

Gray, J; Donald Anton, D

2009-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

227

USING PERFLUOROCARBON TRACERS FOR VERIFICATION OF CAP AND COVER SYSTEMS PERFORMANCE.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) office has committed itself to an accelerated cleanup of its national facilities. The goal is to have much of the DOE legacy waste sites remediated by 2006. This includes closure of several sites (e.g., Rocky Flats and Fernald). With the increased focus on accelerated cleanup, there has been considerable concern about long-term stewardship issues in general, and verification and long-term monitoring (LTM) of caps and covers, in particular. Cap and cover systems (covers) are vital remedial options that will be extensively used in meeting these 2006 cleanup goals. Every buried waste site within the DOE complex will require some form of cover system. These covers are expected to last from 100 to 1000 years or more. The stakeholders can be expected to focus on system durability and sustained performance. DOE EM has set up a national committee of experts to develop a long-term capping (LTC) guidance document. Covers are subject to subsidence, erosion, desiccation, animal intrusion, plant root infiltration, etc., all of which will affect the overall performance of the cover. Very little is available in terms of long-term monitoring other than downstream groundwater or surface water monitoring. By its very nature, this can only indicate that failure of the cover system has already occurred and contaminants have been transported away from the site. This is unacceptable. Methods that indicate early cover failure (prior to contaminant release) or predict approaching cover failure are needed. The LTC committee has identified predictive monitoring technologies as a high priority need for DOE, both for new covers as well as existing covers. The same committee identified a Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) technology as one approach that may be capable of meeting the requirements for LTM. The Environmental Research and Technology Division (ERTD) at BNL developed a novel methodology for verifying and monitoring subsurface barriers (1,2). The technology uses perfluorocarbon tracers (PFTs) to determine flaws (e.g., holes or cracks) and high permeability areas in subsurface barriers. Gaseous tracers are injected on one side of the barrier and searched for on the opposite side of the barrier. The sampling grid, concentration, and time of arrival of the tracer(s) on the opposite side are used to determine the size and location of flaws and relative permeability of the barrier. In addition, there are multiple tracers available, which allows different tracers to be injected in different quadrants of the barrier. This yields additional information on transport phenomena of the barrier.

HEISER,J.; SULLIVAN,T.

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

The Simulation of Synchronous Reactive Systems In Ptolemy II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Simulation of Synchronous Reactive Systems In Ptolemy II by Paul Whitaker Submitted to the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California at Berkeley, in partial;_____________________________________________________________________ Simulation of Synchronous Reactive Systems in Ptolemy II ii Abstract The Synchronous Reactive (SR) domain

229

Autonomic Reactive Systems via Online Learning Sanjit A. Seshia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Autonomic Reactive Systems via Online Learning Sanjit A. Seshia Department of Electrical@eecs.berkeley.edu Abstract-- Reactive systems are those that maintain an ongoing interaction with their environment- covering a class of reactive systems from run-time failures. This class of systems comprises those whose

California at Irvine, University of

230

Towards Synthesis of Reactive & Robust Behavior Chains Amol D. Mali  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Towards Synthesis of Reactive & Robust Behavior Chains Amol D. Mali Electrical Engg. & Computer robots need to be reactive and robust. Behavior-based robots that identify and repair the failures have of reactivity and robustness have been hitherto only informally used and have been loaded with var- ious

Mali, Amol D.

231

A Synchronous Approach to Reactive System Design1 Charles Andr  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

our experience teaching discrete-event reactive systems to Electrical Engineering students. The courseA Synchronous Approach to Reactive System Design1 Charles André I3S Laboratory ­ UNSA/CNRS BP 121 This paper was presented at the 12th EAEEIE Annual Conf., 14-16 May 2001, Nancy (France). Abstract Reactive

André, Charles

232

On Some Properties of Instantaneous Active and Reactive Powers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On Some Properties of Instantaneous Active and Reactive Powers Leszek S. CZARNECKI, Fellow IEEE Louisiana State University, USA Abstract: Some features of the instantaneous active and reactive powers p control. Also it was shown that the instantaneous reactive power q cannot be interpreted as a measure

Czarnecki, Leszek S.

233

Stirring and mixing of biologically reactive tracers K. J. Richards, S. J. Brentnall, P. McLeod, and A. P. Martin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and fluid flow Fluid flow can impact on the marine ecological sys- tem in two distinct ways: (a) through incorpo- rated into models of climate change to predict global warming scenarios (see, e.g., it Cox et al models the marine ecological system is a matter of debate. There is s

Cambridge, University of

234

Nuclear reactivity control using laser induced polarization  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A control element for reactivity control of a fission source provides an atomic density of .sup.3 He in a control volume which is effective to control criticality as the .sup.3 He is spin-polarized. Spin-polarization of the .sup.3 He affects the cross section of the control volume for fission neturons and hence, the reactivity. An irradiation source is directed within the .sup.3 He for spin-polarizing the .sup.3 He. An alkali-metal vapor may be included with the .sup.3 He where a laser spin-polarizes the alkali-metal atoms which in turn, spin-couple with .sup.3 He to spin-polarize the .sup.3 He atoms.

Bowman, Charles D. (Los Alamos, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Nuclear reactivity control using laser induced polarization  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A control element for reactivity control of a fission source provides an atomic density of .sup.3 He in a control volume which is effective to control criticality as the .sup.3 He is spin-polarized. Spin-polarization of the .sup.3 He affects the cross section of the control volume for fission neutrons and hence, the reactivity. An irradiation source is directed within the .sup.3 He for spin-polarizing the .sup.3 He. An alkali-metal vapor may be included with the .sup.3 He where a laser spin-polarizes the alkali-metal atoms which in turn, spin-couple with .sup.3 He to spin-polarize the .sup.3 He atoms.

Bowman, Charles D. (Los Alamos, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Mined land reclamation by biological reactivation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mine reclamation technique, developed in Europe, restores land to full productivity within two years without topsoil replacement. The method deliberately reestablishes within one year following mining, the required biological balance between microbes, enzymes, and trace elements in the rock spoil rather than waiting five or more years for natural processes to restore balance. The technique is called Biological Reactivation (BR). This paper discusses the feasibility of BR reclamation after surface mining operations in the US. Staff of the Ohio Mining and Mineral Resources Research Institute completed an OSM-sponsored research project on BR in which physical and chemical tests characterized 140 spoil samples obtained from 10 surface mining operations. Test results indicated that Biological Reactivation technology could be effectively applied, at least in the test areas sampled within Appalachia. Preliminary estimates make clear that the new technique reduces reclamation costs on prime farmland by approximately 95% compared to topsoil segregation and replacement methods.

Gozon, J.S.; Konya, C.J.; Lukovic, S.S.; Lundquist, R.G.; Olah, J.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor. [LMFBR  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention, which resulted from a contact with the United States Department of Energy, relates to a control mechanism for a nuclear reactor and, more particularly, to an assembly for selectively shifting different numbers of reactivity modifying rods into and out of the core of a nuclear reactor. It has been proposed heretofore to control the reactivity of a breeder reactor by varying the depth of insertion of control rods (e.g., rods containing a fertile material such as ThO/sub 2/) in the core of the reactor, thereby varying the amount of neutron-thermalizing coolant and the amount of neutron-capturing material in the core. This invention relates to a mechanism which can advantageously be used in this type of reactor control system.

Bollinger, L.R.

1982-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

238

Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting Host: Francis Rubinstein Demand Response Research Center demand responsive lighting systems ­ Importance of dimming ­ New wireless controls technologies · Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting (commenced March 2007) #12;Objectives · Provide up-to-date information

239

Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

KASP (Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project) completed the new Layer 0 upgrade for D0, assumed key electronics projects for the US CMS project, finished important new physics measurements with the D0 experiment at Fermilab, made substantial contributions to detector studies for the proposed e+e- international linear collider (ILC), and advanced key initiatives in non-accelerator-based neutrino physics.

Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Bolton, T.; Horton-Smith, G.; Maravin, Y.; Ratra, B.; Stanton, N.; von Toerne, E.; Wilson, G.

2007-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

240

Chemistry 685 (CHE 685) Advanced Organic Chemistry: Organic Reaction Mechanisms and Molecular Interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry 685 (CHE 685) Advanced Organic Chemistry: Organic Reaction Mechanisms and Molecular and physical chemistry Course description and rationale CHE685 is a graduate-level organic chemistry course. These two courses focus on physical organic chemistry, which deals with the structure and reactivity

Mather, Patrick T.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Hillslope Hydrological Processes in a Costa Rican Rainforest: Water Supply Partitioning Using Isotope Tracers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Blancas Hydroelectric Project, and for improved predictions in similar, ungauged watersheds (ICE 2002). Study Watershed The study watershed is located in San Juan de Peñas Blancas, east of the Cordillera de Tilarán mountain range backing up... peaks. These goals were accomplished by supplementing hydraulic and physical data already available at the site with use of isotope tracers. Methods Study Site The 2.2 ha watershed used in this research is located in Peñas Blancas, Costa Rica...

DuMont, Andrea Lyn

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

242

Inversion of field-scale partitioning tracer response for characterizing oil saturation distribution: a streamline approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INVERSION OF FIELD-SCALE PARTITIONING TRACER RESPONSE FOR CHARACTERIZING OIL SATURATION DISTRIBUTION: A STREAMLINE APPROACH A Thesis by PAVEL ALEXANDROVICH ILIASSOV Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... A Thesis by PAVEL ALEXANDROVICH ILIASSOV Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by: c 4- Akhil Datta-Gupta (Chair of Committee...

Iliassov, Pavel Alexandrovich

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Flux Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds from an Urban Tower Platform in Houston, Texas: Trends and Tracers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and traffic counts except during variable working hours. To assign measured fluxes to local sources, we tested a bulk flux footprint model (Kormann and Meixner model) designed for uniform emission surface areas in this urban, heterogeneous landscape. Tracer...

Hale, Martin C

2014-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

244

Integrated Approach to Use Natural Chemical and Isotopic Tracers to Estimate Fracture Spacing and Surface Area in EGS Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. This objective of this project is to develop an innovative approach to estimate fracture surface area and spacing through interpretation of signals of natural chemical and isotopic tracers.

245

Thorium-234 as a tracer of spatial, temporal and vertical variability in particle flux in the North Pacific  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thorium-234 as a tracer of spatial, temporal and vertical variability in particle flux in the North Available online 16 April 2009 Keywords: Thorium-234 Particle flux Sediment trap Scavenging North Pacific

Siegel, David A.

246

ELIXYS - a fully automated, three-reactor high-pressure radiosynthesizer for development and routine production of diverse PET tracers.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cancer treatment with PET/CT: does it make a difference? Jfor decentralized production of PET tracers. In Positronprobes FMAU, FHBG, and FHPG as PET imaging agents for HSV1-

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Interpreting Energy and Tracer Spectra of Upper-Ocean Turbulence in the Submesoscale Range (1–200 km)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Submesoscale (1–200 km) wavenumber spectra of kinetic and potential energy and tracer variance are obtained from in situ observations in the Gulf Stream region and in the eastern subtropical North Pacific. In the Gulf ...

Ferrari, Raffaele

248

High-resolution stratospheric tracer fields estimated from satellite observations using Lagrangian trajectory calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A technique is introduced by which high-resolution tracer fields may be constructed from low-resolution satellite observations. The technique relies upon the continual cascade of tracer variance from large to small scales and makes use of wind fields generated by a data assimilation scheme. To demonstrate its usefulness, the technique has been applied in a study of isentropic distributions of nitrous oxide in the winter midstratosphere, using measurements made by the Improved Stratospheric and Mesospheric Sounder (ISAMS) instrument on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS). The results show that the high-resolution fields significantly increase the amount of information that is available from the satellite observations. The fields give insights into the characteristic structure and evolution of tracer distributions at scales that are normally obscured from view. Two results are particularly noteworthy. First, at the interface between low and middle latitudes there is evidence of active mixing. This mixing occurs on the eastern, equatorward side of air that is being drawn toward high latitudes around the polar vortex. Second, in the anticyclone, a complex pattern of transport is revealed. Air drawn in from low latitudes spirals together with ambient midlatitude air. Small scales are generated relatively slowly in the organized flow, and persistent filamentary structures, with transverse scales of hundreds of kilometers or greater, are seen.

Sutton, R.T.; Maclean, H.; Swinbank, R.; O`Neill, A.; Taylor, F.W. [Oxford Univ., Oxford (United Kingdom)] [Oxford Univ., Oxford (United Kingdom); [Meteorological Office, Bracknell, Berkshire (United Kingdom); [Univ. of Reading, Reading (United Kingdom)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Uncertainties in Air Exchange using Continuous-Injection, Long-Term Sampling Tracer-Gas Methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The PerFluorocarbon Tracer (PFT) method is a low-cost approach commonly used for measuring air exchange in buildings using tracer gases. It is a specific application of the more general Continuous-Injection, Long-Term Sampling (CILTS) method. The technique is widely used but there has been little work on understanding the uncertainties (both precision and bias) associated with its use, particularly given that it is typically deployed by untrained or lightly trained people to minimize experimental costs. In this article we will conduct a first-principles error analysis to estimate the uncertainties and then compare that analysis to CILTS measurements that were over-sampled, through the use of multiple tracers and emitter and sampler distribution patterns, in three houses. We find that the CILTS method can have an overall uncertainty of 10-15percent in ideal circumstances, but that even in highly controlled field experiments done by trained experimenters expected uncertainties are about 20percent. In addition, there are many field conditions (such as open windows) where CILTS is not likely to provide any quantitative data. Even avoiding the worst situations of assumption violations CILTS should be considered as having a something like a ?factor of two? uncertainty for the broad field trials that it is typically used in. We provide guidance on how to deploy CILTS and design the experiment to minimize uncertainties.

Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.; Lunden, Melissa M.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Field studies of streamflow generation using natural and injected tracers on Bickford and Walker Branch Watersheds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Field studies of streamflow generation were undertaken on two forested watersheds, the West Road subcatchment of Bickford Watershed in central Massachusetts and the West Fork of Walker Branch Watershed in eastern Tennessee. A major component of the research was development of a two-stage methodology for the use of naturally-occurring {sup 222}Rn as a tracer. The first of the two stages was solving a mass-balance equation for {sup 222}Rn around a stream reach of interest in order to calculate Rn{sub q}, the {sup 222}Rn content of the lateral inflow to the reach; a conservative tracer (chloride) and a volatile tracer (propane) were injected into the study stream to account for lateral inflow to, and volatilization from, the study reach. The second stage involved quantitative comparison of Rn{sub q} to the measured {sup 222}Rn concentrations of different subsurface waters in order to assess how important these waters were in contributing lateral inflow to the stream reach.

Genereux, D.; Hemond, H. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering); Mulholland, P. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Comparison of observed and predicted short-term tracer gas concentrations in the atmosphere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Laboratory is in the process of conducting a series of atmospheric tracer studies. The inert gas sulfurhexafluoride is released from a height of 62 m for 15 min and concentrations in air are measured on sampling arcs up to 30 km downwind of the release point. Maximum 15 min. air concentrations from 14 of these tracer tests have been compared with the ground-level, centerline air concentration predicted with a Gaussian plume atmospheric transport model using eight different sets of atmospheric dispersion parameters. Preliminary analysis of the results from these comparisons indicates that the dispersion parameters developed at Juelich, West Germany, based on tracers released from a height of 50 m, give the best overall agreement between the predicted and observed values. The median value of the ratio of predicted to observed air concentrations for this set of parameters is 1.3, and the correlation coefficient between the log of the predictions and the log of the observations is 0.72. For the commonly used Pasquill-Gifford dispersion parameters, the values of these same statistics are 4.4 and 0.68, respectively. The Gaussian plume model is widely used to predict air concentrations resulting from short-term radionuclide release to the atmosphere. The results of comparisons such as these must be considered whenever the Gaussian model is used for such purposes. 22 references, 3 tables.

Cotter, S.J.; Miller, C.W.; Lin, W.C.T.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

advanced ceramics advanced: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

253

A novel reactive processing technique: using telechelic polymers to reactively compatibilize polymer blends  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Difunctional reactive polymers, telechelics, were used to reactively form multiblock copolymers in situ when melt-blended with a blend of polystyrene and polyisoprene. To quantify the ability of the copolymer to compatibilize the blends, the time evolution of the domain size upon annealing was analyzed by SEM. It was found that the most effective parameter to quantify the ability of the copolymer to inhibit droplet coalescence is Kreltstable, the relative coarsening constant multiplied by the stabilization time. These results indicate that intermediate-molecular-weight telechelic pairs of both highly reactive Anhydride-PS-Anhydride/NH2-PI-NH2 and slower reacting Epoxy-PS-Epoxy/COOH-PI-COOH both effectively suppress coalescence, with the optimal molecular weight being slightly above the critical molecular weight of the homopolymer,Mc. The effects of telechelic loading were also investigated, where the optimal loading concentration for this system was 0.5 wt %, as higher concentrations exhibited a plasticizing effect due to the presence of unreacted low-molecular-weight telechelics present in the blend. A determination of the interfacial coverage of the copolymer shows that a conversion of 1.5-3.0% was required for 20% surface coverage at 5.0 wt % telechelic loading, indicating a large excess of telechelics in this system. At the optimal loading level of 0.5 wt %, a conversion of 15% was required for 20% surface coverage. The results of these experiments provide a clear understanding of the role of telechelic loading and molecular weight on its ability to reactively form interfacial modifiers in phase-separated polymer blends and provide guidelines for the development of similar reactive processing schemes that can use telechelic polymers to reactively compatibilize a broad range of polymer blends.

Ashcraft, Earl C [ORNL; Ji, Haining [ORNL; Mays, Jimmy [ORNL; Dadmun, Mark D [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Draft Advanced Nuclear Energy Projects Solicitation | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Draft Advanced Nuclear Energy Projects Solicitation Draft Advanced Nuclear Energy Projects Solicitation INFORMATIONAL MATERIALS DRAFT ADVANCED NUCLEAR ENERGY PROJECTS SOLICITATION...

255

Fact Sheet: Energy Storage Technology Advancement Partnership...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Technology Advancement Partnership (October 2012) Fact Sheet: Energy Storage Technology Advancement Partnership (October 2012) The Energy Storage Technology Advancement Partnership...

256

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced reactivity measurement facility...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

< 1 2 3 4 5 > >> Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 41 STANDARDS FOR MEASUREMENTS AND TESTING OF WIND TURBINE POWER QUALITY Poul Srensen, Ris National Laboratory, P.O.Box 49, DK-4000...

257

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced reactivity measurement Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

< 1 2 3 4 5 > >> Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 41 STANDARDS FOR MEASUREMENTS AND TESTING OF WIND TURBINE POWER QUALITY Poul Srensen, Ris National Laboratory, P.O.Box 49, DK-4000...

258

Reactive Air Aluminizing of Nicrofer-6025HT for Use in Advanced Coal-Based Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present work demonstrated the feasibility of preparing RAA coatings on Nicrofer and compared the effect of aluminum powder size on the RAA process.

Joshi, Vineet V.; Choi, Jung-Pyung; Darsell, Jens T.; Meier, Alan; Weil, K. Scott

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Search Asia Advanced Search  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Asia Times Search Asia Times Advanced Search Southeast Asia Malaysia tackles illegal logging:52:14 AM Search #12;Asia Times illegal logging," he said, adding that nine Malaysians had been arrested

260

Search Asia Advanced Search  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Asia Times Search Asia Times Advanced Search Southeast Asia Indonesia looks to curb log smuggling.html (1 of 2)9/4/2007 12:59:34 PM Search #12;Asia Times No material from Asia Times Online may

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Advanced Review Geometry optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced Review Geometry optimization H. Bernhard Schlegel Geometry optimization is an important part of most quantum chemical calcu- lations. This article surveys methods for optimizing equilibrium geometries, lo- cating transition structures, and following reaction paths. The emphasis is on optimizations

Schlegel, H. Bernhard

262

Advanced Materials | More Science | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Materials SHARE Advanced Materials ORNL has the nation's most comprehensive materials research program and is a world leader in research that supports the development of...

263

Renewable Chemicals and Advanced Biofuels  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Afternoon Plenary Session: Current Trends in the Advanced Bioindustry Advanced Biofuels & Policy—Brett Lund, Executive Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary, Gevo Inc.

264

IAEA sodium void reactivity benchmark calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, the IAEA-1 992 ``Benchmark Calculation of Sodium Void Reactivity Effect in Fast Reactor Core`` problem is evaluated. The proposed design is a large axially heterogeneous oxide-fueled fast reactor as described in Section 2; the core utilizes a sodium plenum above the core to enhance leakage effects. The calculation methods used in this benchmark evaluation are described in Section 3. In Section 4, the calculated core performance results for the benchmark reactor model are presented; and in Section 5, the influence of steel and interstitial sodium heterogeneity effects is estimated.

Hill, R.N.; Finck, P.J.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

IAEA sodium void reactivity benchmark calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, the IAEA-1 992 Benchmark Calculation of Sodium Void Reactivity Effect in Fast Reactor Core'' problem is evaluated. The proposed design is a large axially heterogeneous oxide-fueled fast reactor as described in Section 2; the core utilizes a sodium plenum above the core to enhance leakage effects. The calculation methods used in this benchmark evaluation are described in Section 3. In Section 4, the calculated core performance results for the benchmark reactor model are presented; and in Section 5, the influence of steel and interstitial sodium heterogeneity effects is estimated.

Hill, R.N.; Finck, P.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Theoretical and Experimental Evaluation of Chemical Reactivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

released and the rate of energy released for a specific reactive chemical. 2.1 DSC DSC is a popular screening tool (safe and fast) and can provide an overall indication of exothermic activity of the chemical being tested. In a DSC, a sample and a... endothermic or exothermic reaction. When the rate of heat generation in the sample exceeds a particular value, the heat supply to the sample is cut off and this additional heat gain is attributed to exothermic activity within the sample.17 From the DSC...

Wang, Qingsheng

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

267

Preparation of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to the preparation of fine particles of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate by means of a solid state process which comprises firing a mixture of calcium sulfate, silica and a reducing additive selected from the group consisting of calcium sulfide, carbon, carbon monoxide, methane and hydrogen, at a temperature of about 850.degree.-1000.degree. C. A carrier gas such as nitrogen or carbon dioxide may also be added, if desired. A high concentration of sulfur dioxide is a by-product of this process.

Shen, Ming-Shing (Laramie, WY, NJ); Chen, James M. (Rahway, NJ); Yang, Ralph T. (Amherst, NY)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Preparation of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to the preparation of fine particles of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate by means of a solid state process which comprises firing a mixture of calcium sulfate, silica, and a reducing additive selected from the group consisting of calcium sulfide, carbon, carbon monoxide, methane, and hydrogen, at a temperature of about 850 to 1000/sup 0/C. A carrier gas such as nitrogen or carbon dioxide may also be added, if desired. A high concentration of sulfur dioxide is a by-product of this process.

Shen, M.S.; Chen, J.M.; Yang, R.T.

1980-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

269

Section 10: Turbulence and reactive flows 1 Section 10: Turbulence and reactive flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

premixed combustion is recently a theme of interest in gas turbines and other industrial applications flames #12;2 Section 10: Turbulence and reactive flows for gas turbine application. In: International Gas combustion LES in- cluding thickened flame model A. Hosseinzadeh, A. Sadiki, J. Janicka (TU Darmstadt) Lean

Kohlenbach, Ulrich

270

Kinetic analysis of 18F-fluorodihydrorotenone as a deposited myocardial flow tracer: Comparison to thallium-201.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this investigation was to assess the accuracy of 18F-fluorodihydrorotenone (18F-FDHR) as a new deposited myocardial flow tracer and compare the results to those for 201Tl. Methods. The kinetics of these flow tracers were evaluated in 22 isolated, erythrocyte- and albumin-perfused rabbit hearts over a flow range encountered in patients. The two flow tracers plus a vascular reference tracer (131I-albumin) were introduced as a bolus through a port just above the aortic cannula. Myocardial extraction, retention, washout, and uptake parameters were computed from the venous outflow curves using the multiple indicator dilution technique and spectral analysis. Results. The mean initial extraction fractions of 18F-FDHR (0.85 +- 0.07) and 201Tl (0.87 +- 0.05) were not significantly different, although the initial extraction fraction for 18F-FDHR declined with flow (P < 0.0001), whereas the initial extraction fraction of 201Tl did not. Washout of 201Tl was faster (P < 0.001) and more affected by flow (P < 0.05) than 18F-FDHR washout. Except for initial extraction fraction, 18F-FDHR retention was greater (P < 0.001) and less affected by flow (P < 0.05) than 201Tl retention. Reflecting its superior retention, net uptake of 18F-FDHR was better correlated with flow than 201Tl uptake at both one and fifteen minutes after tracer introduction (P < 0.0001 for both comparisons). Conclusion. The superior correlation of 18F-FDHR uptake with flow indicates that it is a better flow tracer than 201Tl in the isolated rabbit heart. Compared to the other currently available positron-emitting flow tracers (82Rb, 13N-ammonia, and 15O-water), 18F-FDHR has the potential of providing excellent image resolution without the need for an on-site cyclotron.

Marshall, Robert C.; Powers-Risius, Patricia; Reutter, Bryan W.; O'Neil, James P.; La Belle, Michael; Huesman, Ronald H.; VanBrocklin, Henry F.

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

A new statistical dispersion model for tracer tests and contaminant spread in porous media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dispersion of solutes moving in permeable media is an essential control to describe fluid flow in permeable media. Dispersion can be thought of as a spreading of a solute caused by the presence of microscopic inhomogeneities. An accurate model for dispersion is needed for accurate estimation of oil recovery efficiencies and clean up costs of subsurface contaminants. Current approaches utilizing the fickian assumption fall short in describing the real physics of spreading during a solute transport process. Numerous field investigations have shown that dispersivities measured in the field are much larger than those measured in the lab for the same type of porous material. Moreover, field measured dispersivities have been shown to be scale dependent, that is, a tracer test conducted over a longer travel path will yield a larger dispersivity value than a tracer test conducted in the same geologic formation over a shorter travel path. Numerous approaches to address this problem have been developed yet none attempted to go beyond the Fickian dispersion assumption. In this study, a convective dispersivity is introduced. New model assumes that dispersion is dimensionless and mainly determined by pore size distribution. The new model results in a spread that increases linearly with time contrary to conventional model, which predicts a mixing zone length that increases with square root of time. Therefore, new model explains the field test results that indicate increasing dispersivity with distance. The model validations are in perfect agreement with experimental results, which include; Ganapathy et al.`s slug experiment on Antolini sandstone, Handy`s radioactive tracer experiment on Alhambra sandstone, and CT experiment conducted at BDM-OK/NIPER facilities on Tallant sandstone.

Ates, H.; Kasap, E. [Univ. of Tulsa, OK (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

272

Results of injection and tracer tests in Olkaria East Geothermal Field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents results of a six month Injection and Tracer test done in Olkaria East Geothermal Field The Injection tests show that commencement of injection prior to onset of large drawdown in the reservoir leads to greater sustenance of well production and can reduce well cycling which is a common feature of wells in Olkaria East Field. For cases where injection is started after some drawdown has occurred in the reservoir, injection while leading to improvement of well output can also lead to increase in well cycling which is a non desirable side effect. Tracer tests reveal slow rate of fluid migration (< 5 m/hr). However estimates of the cumulative tracer returns over the period of injection is at least 31% which is large and reveals the danger of late time thermal drawdown and possible loss of production. It is shown in the discussion that the two sets of results are consistent with a reservoir where high permeability occurs along contact surfaces which act as horizontal "fractures" while the formations between the "fractures" have low permeability. This type of fracture system will lead to channeled flow of injected fluid and therefore greater thermal depletion along the fractures while formations further from the fracture would still be at higher temperature. In an attempt to try and achieve a more uniform thermal depletion in the reservoir, it is proposed that continuous injection be done for short periods (~2 years) and this be followed by recovery periods of the nearly the same length of time before resumption of injection again.

Ambusso, Willis J.

1994-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

273

Reactive Dehydration technology for Production of Fuels and Chemicals...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Catalytic and Reactive Distillation) for compact, inexpensive production of biomass-based chemicals from complex aqueous mixtures. SeparationPurification of Biomass...

274

Chemically Reactive Working Fluids for the Capture and Transport...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Optical Waveguide Coupler Transformers for High-Power Solar Enegy Collection and Transmission Chemically Reactive Working Fluids Low-Cost Light Weigh Thin Film Solar Concentrators...

275

Chemical Analysis of Complex Organic Mixtures Using Reactive...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mass Spectrometry. Abstract: Reactive nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) combined with high-resolution mass spectrometry was utilized for the analysis of...

276

Airborne measurement of OH reactivity during INTEX-B  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plus OH sign), reactiv- propane ing different gases gases atisoprene (plus sign), propane (star) and propene (triangle).NMHC includes ethane, ethene, propane, propene, i-butane, n-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Advanced Hydride Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal hydrides have been used at the Savannah River Tritium Facilities since 1984. However, the most extensive application of metal hydride technology at the Savannah River Site is being planned for the Replacement Tritium Facility, a $140 million facility schedules for completion in 1990 and startup in 1991. In the new facility, metal hydride technology will be used to store, separate, isotopically purify, pump, and compress hydrogen isotopes. In support of the Replacement Tritium Facility, a $3.2 million, cold,'' process demonstration facility, the Advanced Hydride Laboratory began operation in November of 1987. The purpose of the Advanced Hydride Laboratory is to demonstrate the Replacement Tritium Facility's metal hydride technology by integrating the various unit operations into an overall process. This paper will describe the Advanced Hydride Laboratory, its role and its impact on the application of metal hydride technology to tritium handling.

Motyka, T.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Advanced Hydride Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal hydrides have been used at the Savannah River Tritium Facilities since 1984. However, the most extensive application of metal hydride technology at the Savannah River Site is being planned for the Replacement Tritium Facility, a $140 million facility schedules for completion in 1990 and startup in 1991. In the new facility, metal hydride technology will be used to store, separate, isotopically purify, pump, and compress hydrogen isotopes. In support of the Replacement Tritium Facility, a $3.2 million, ``cold,`` process demonstration facility, the Advanced Hydride Laboratory began operation in November of 1987. The purpose of the Advanced Hydride Laboratory is to demonstrate the Replacement Tritium Facility`s metal hydride technology by integrating the various unit operations into an overall process. This paper will describe the Advanced Hydride Laboratory, its role and its impact on the application of metal hydride technology to tritium handling.

Motyka, T.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

279

Advanced Vehicle Electrification and Transportation Sector Electrifica...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Advanced Vehicle Electrification and Transportation Sector Electrification Advanced Vehicle Electrification & Transportation Sector...

280

Advanced Optical Technologies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearch Highlights MediaFuelAbout Us >Portal AdvancedAdvanced

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Advanced fuel chemistry for advanced engines.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Autoignition chemistry is central to predictive modeling of many advanced engine designs that combine high efficiency and low inherent pollutant emissions. This chemistry, and especially its pressure dependence, is poorly known for fuels derived from heavy petroleum and for biofuels, both of which are becoming increasingly prominent in the nation's fuel stream. We have investigated the pressure dependence of key ignition reactions for a series of molecules representative of non-traditional and alternative fuels. These investigations combined experimental characterization of hydroxyl radical production in well-controlled photolytically initiated oxidation and a hybrid modeling strategy that linked detailed quantum chemistry and computational kinetics of critical reactions with rate-equation models of the global chemical system. Comprehensive mechanisms for autoignition generally ignore the pressure dependence of branching fractions in the important alkyl + O{sub 2} reaction systems; however we have demonstrated that pressure-dependent 'formally direct' pathways persist at in-cylinder pressures.

Taatjes, Craig A.; Jusinski, Leonard E.; Zador, Judit; Fernandes, Ravi X.; Miller, James A.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Completing the complex Poynting theorem: Conservation of reactive energy in reactive time  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The complex Poynting theorem is extended canonically to a time-scale domain $(t, s)$ by replacing the phasors of time-harmonic fields by the analytic signals $X(r, t+is)$ of fields $X(r,t)$ with general time dependence. The imaginary time $s>0$ is shown to play the role of a time resolution scale, and the extended Poynting theorem splits into two conservation laws: its real part gives the conservation in $t$ of the scale-averaged active energy at fixed $s$, and its imaginary part gives the conservation in $s$ of the scale-averaged reactive energy at fixed $t$. At coarse scales (large $s$, slow time), where the system reduces to the circuit level, this may have applications to the theory of electric power transmission and conditioning. At fine scales (small $s$, fast time) it describes reactive energy dynamics in radiating systems.

Gerald Kaiser

2014-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

283

Potential method for measurement of CO2 leakage from underground sequestration fields using radioactive tracers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reduction of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) release to the environment is a pressing challenge that should be addressed to avert the potential devastating effects of global warming. Within the United States, the most abundant sources of CO2 emissions are those generate from coal- or gas-fired power plants; one method to control CO2 emissions is to sequester it in deep underground geological formations. From integrated assessment models the overall leakage rates from these storage locations must be less than 0.1% of stored volume per year for long-term control. The ability to detect and characterize nascent leaks, in conjunction with subsequent remediation efforts, will significantly decrease the amount of CO2 released back into the environment. Because potential leakage pathways are not necessarily known a priori, onsite monitoring must be performed; the monitoring region in the vicinity of a CO2 injection well may be as large as 100 km2, which represents the estimated size of a supercritical CO2 bubble that would form under typical injection scenarios. By spiking the injected CO2 with a radiological or stable isotope tracer, it will be possible to detect ground leaks from the sequestered CO2 using fewer sampling stations, with greater accuracy than would be possible using simple CO2 sensors. The relative merits of various sorbent materials, radiological and stable isotope tracers, detection methods and potential interferences will be discussed.

Bachelor, Paula P.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Amonette, James E.; Hayes, James C.; Milbrath, Brian D.; Saripalli, Prasad

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

The Lagrangian dynamics of thermal tracer particles in Navier-Stokes fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A basic issue for Navier-Stokes (NS) fluids is their characterization in terms of the so-called NS phase-space classical dynamical system, which provides a mathematical model for the description of the dynamics of infinitesimal (or i\\textit{deal}) tracer particles in these fluids. The goal of this paper is to analyze the properties of a particular subset of solutions of the NS dynamical system, denoted as \\textit{thermal tracer particles} (TTPs), whose states are determined uniquely by the NS fluid fields. Applications concerning both deterministic and stochastic NS fluids are pointed out. In particular, in both cases it is shown that in terms of the ensemble of TTPs a statistical description of NS fluids can be formulated. In the case of stochastic fluids this feature permits to uniquely establish the corresponding Langevin and Fokker-Planck dynamics. Finally, the relationship with the customary statistical treatment of hydrodynamic turbulence (HT) is analyzed and a solution to the closure problem for the statistical description of HT is proposed.

Massimo Tessarotto; Claudio Asci; Claudio Cremaschini; Alessandro Soranzo; Marco Tessarotto; Gino Tironi

2012-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

285

A Really Good Hammer: Quantification of Mass Transfer Using Perfluorocarbon Tracers (475th Brookhaven Lecture)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brookhaven Lab’s perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) technology can be viewed as a hammer looking for nails. But, according to Tom Watson, leader of the Lab’s Tracer Technology Group in the Environmental Research and Technology Division (ERTD), “It’s a really good hammer!” The colorless, odorless and safe gases have a number of research uses, from modeling how airborne contaminants might move through urban canyons to help first responders plan their response to potential terrorist attacks and accidents to locating leaks in underground gas pipes. Their extremely low background level — detectable at one part per quadrillion — allows their transport to be easily tracked. Lab researchers used PFTs during the 2005 Urban Dispersion Program field studies in New York City, gathering data to help improve models of how a gas or chemical release might move around Manhattan’s tall buildings and canyons. Closer to home, scientists also used PFTs to make ventilation measurements in Bldg. 400 on the Lab site to provide data to test air flow models used in determining the effects of passive and active air exchange on the levels of indoor and outdoor air pollution, and to determine the effects of an accidental or intentional release of hazardous substances in or around buildings.

Watson, Tom [BNL Environmental Sciences, Tracer Technology Group

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

286

The Specification and Execution of Heterogeneous Synchronous Reactive Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Specification and Execution of Heterogeneous Synchronous Reactive Systems by Stephen Anthony in Engineering---Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences in the GRADUATE DIVISION of the UNIVERSITY of Heterogeneous Synchronous Reactive Systems Copyright ã 1997 by Stephen Anthony Edwards #12; Abstract

287

A Modified Reactive Control Framework for Cooperative Mobile Robots  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Modified Reactive Control Framework for Cooperative Mobile Robots J. Salido a , J.M. Dolan a , J Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engineering, Carnegie Mellon Univ. Pittsburgh, PA 15213­3890 USA. Purely reactive approaches such as that of Brooks are efficient, but lack a mechanism for global control

288

Reactive Sputtering of Bismuth Vanadate Photoanodes for Solar Water Splitting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reactive Sputtering of Bismuth Vanadate Photoanodes for Solar Water Splitting Le Chen,, Esther of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 has remained relatively underexplored. Here, we report the synthesis of BiVO4 thin films by reactive

Javey, Ali

289

Reactive Rearrangement of Parts under Sensor Inaccuracy: Particle Filter Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reactive Rearrangement of Parts under Sensor Inaccuracy: Particle Filter Approach Hal^uk Bayram, Electrical and Electronic Engineering Bogazici University, Bebek 34342 Istanbul Turkey Abstract-- The paper will be left undisturbed, the robot is required to employ a reactive strategy. A feedback-based event

290

Reactive oxygen species deglycosilate glomerular a-dystroglycan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reactive oxygen species deglycosilate glomerular a-dystroglycan NPJ Vogtla¨nder1 , WPM Tamboer1 open. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are known to degrade and depolymerize carbohydrates, and to playDa in skeletal muscle, ranging from 120 kDa in brain to 190 kDa in the Torpedo electric organ.8

Campbell, Kevin P.

291

Towards Interactive Timing Analysis for Designing Reactive Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Towards Interactive Timing Analysis for Designing Reactive Systems Insa Fuhrmann David Broman Steven Smyth Reinhard von Hanxleden Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences University of California Interactive Timing Analysis for Designing Reactive Systems Insa Fuhrmann1 , David Broman2,3 , Steven Smyth1

292

Reactive ion etched substrates and methods of making and using  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed herein are substrates comprising reactive ion etched surfaces and specific binding agents immobilized thereon. The substrates may be used in methods and devices for assaying or isolating analytes in a sample. Also disclosed are methods of making the reactive ion etched surfaces.

Rucker, Victor C. (San Francisco, CA); Shediac, Rene (Oakland, CA); Simmons, Blake A. (San Francisco, CA); Havenstrite, Karen L. (New York, NY)

2007-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

293

Tropospheric Reactive Nitrogen Speciation, Deposition, and Chemistry at Harvard Forest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and absolute contributions of nitric acid (HNO3) and NOx (nitric oxide (NO) + nitrogen dioxide (NO2)) to totalTropospheric Reactive Nitrogen Speciation, Deposition, and Chemistry at Harvard Forest A thesis. Steven C. Wofsy Cassandra Volpe Horii Tropospheric Reactive Nitrogen Speciation, Deposition

294

On-Road Emission Measurements of Reactive Nitrogen Compounds from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), ammonia (NH3), and nitrous acid (HONO) produced by internalOn-Road Emission Measurements of Reactive Nitrogen Compounds from Three California Cities G A R Y measurements of reactive nitrogen compounds from light-duty vehicles. At the San Jose and wLA sites

Denver, University of

295

ALUMINOSILICATE-COATED SILICA SAND FOR REACTIVE TRANSPORT EXPERIMENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ALUMINOSILICATE-COATED SILICA SAND FOR REACTIVE TRANSPORT EXPERIMENTS By JORGE ANTONIO JEREZ transport experiments; Dr. Barbara Williams and Jason Shira from University of Idaho for providing access-COATED SILICA SAND FOR REACTIVE TRANSPORT EXPERIMENTS Abstract by Jorge Antonio Jerez Briones, Ph.D. Washington

Flury, Markus

296

REAL-TIME TRACER MONITORING OF RESERVOIR STIMULATION PROCEDURES VIA ELECTRONIC WIRELINE AND TELEMETRY DATA TRANSMISSION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Finalized Phase 2-3 project work has field-proven two separate real-time reservoir processes that were co-developed via funding by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Both technologies are presently patented in the United States and select foreign markets; a downhole-commingled reservoir stimulation procedure and a real-time tracer-logged fracturing diagnostic system. Phase 2 and early Phase 3 project work included the research, development and well testing of a U.S. patented gamma tracer fracturing diagnostic system. This stimulation logging process was successfully field-demonstrated; real-time tracer measurement of fracture height while fracturing was accomplished and proven technically possible. However, after the initial well tests, there were several licensing issues that developed between service providers that restricted and minimized Realtimezone's (RTZ) ability to field-test the real-time gamma diagnostic system as was originally outlined for this project. Said restrictions were encountered after when one major provider agreed to license their gamma logging tools to another. Both of these companies previously promised contributory support toward Realtimezone's DE-FC26-99FT40129 project work, however, actual support was less than desired when newly-licensed wireline gamma logging tools from one company were converted by the other from electric wireline into slickline, batter-powered ''memory'' tools for post-stimulation logging purposes. Unfortunately, the converted post-fracture measurement memory tools have no applications in experimentally monitoring real-time movement of tracers in the reservoir concurrent with the fracturing treatment. RTZ subsequently worked with other tracer gamma-logging tool companies for basic gamma logging services, but with lessened results due to lack of multiple-isotope detection capability. In addition to real-time logging system development and well testing, final Phase 2 and Phase 3 project work included the development of a real-time reservoir stimulation procedure, which was successfully field-demonstrated and is presently patented in the U.S. and select foreign countries, including Venezuela, Brazil and Canada. Said patents are co-owned by RTZ and the National Energy Technology Lab (NETL). In 2002, Realtimezone and the NETL licensed said patents to Halliburton Energy Services (HES). Additional licensing agreements (LA) are anticipated with other service industry companies in 2005. Final Phase 3 work has led to commercial applications of the real-time reservoir stimulation procedure. Four successfully downhole-mixed well tests were conducted with commercially expected production results. The most recent, fourth field test was a downhole-mixed stimulated well completed in June, 2004, which currently produces 11 BOPD with 90 barrels of water per day. Conducted Phase 2 and Phase 3 field-test work to date has resulted in the fine-tuning of a real-time enhanced stimulation system that will significantly increase future petroleum well recoveries in the United States and foreign petroleum fields, both onshore and offshore, and in vertical and horizontal wells.

George L. Scott III

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Arnold Schwarzenegger ADVANCEMENT OF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor ADVANCEMENT OF ELECTROCHROMIC WINDOWS Prepared For: California the time to provide insightful technical and market-related input into the direction of this R&D: Carl Mechoshade Systems, Inc. Grant Brohard Pacific Gas & Electric Company Charles Hayes SAGE Electrochromics, Inc

298

Advanced fossil energy utilization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This special issue of Fuel is a selection of papers presented at the symposium ‘Advanced Fossil Energy Utilization’ co-sponsored by the Fuels and Petrochemicals Division and Research and New Technology Committee in the 2009 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) Spring National Meeting Tampa, FL, on April 26–30, 2009.

Shekhawat, D.; Berry, D.; Spivey, J.; Pennline, H.; Granite, E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Standard version Advanced version  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Minimum octane 8.5 7 4.5 To produce these products, Margaret purchases crude oil at a price of £11 per version Margaret Oil - basic (2) Before crude can be used to produce products for sale, it must version Advanced version Margaret Oil - basic (3) Crude Distill Naphtha Gasoline Distilled 1 Jet fuel

Hall, Julian

300

Advanced Test Reactor Tour  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory is the foremost nuclear materials test reactor in the world. This virtual tour describes the reactor, how experiments are conducted, and how spent nuclear fuel is handled and stored. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

Miley, Don

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Advanced Test Reactor Tour  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory is the foremost nuclear materials test reactor in the world. This virtual tour describes the reactor, how experiments are conducted, and how spent nuclear fuel is handled and stored. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

Miley, Don

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

302

International for Advanced Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Technology at the University of Ulm ICAS-Affiliations The International Center for Advanced Studies in Health in medical technology and pharma- ceutical industry. The International Advisory Panel of ICAS consists, transfer of state-of-the-art clinical technologies, and utilization of methodologies appropriate

Pfeifer, Holger

303

Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Training and Technology Transfer 43 Lectures and Seminars 44 CABM Lecture Series 45 Annual Retreat 46 15th An Advanced Technology Center of The New Jersey Commission on Science and Technology Jointly Administered from CABM laboratories have appeared in high impact international journals including Development, Genes

304

Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shatkin 41 Education, Training and Technology Transfer 43 Lectures and Seminars 44 CABM Lecture Series 45 An Advanced Technology Center of The New Jersey Commission on Science and Technology Jointly Administered for the improvement of human health. In 2002 peer-reviewed CABM studies were published in leading international

305

Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vikas Nanda 63 Protein Crystallography Ann Stock 67 Education, Training and Technology Transfer 71 Report An Advanced Technology Center of the New Jersey Commission on Science and Technology Jointly, the CIPR will house the Rutgers-based Protein Data Bank (PDB), an international repository directed

306

Addition of tracers into the polypropylene in view of automatic sorting of plastic wastes using X-ray fluorescence spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study focused on the detection of rare earth oxides, used as tracers for the identification of polymer materials, using XRF (X-ray fluorescence) spectrometry. The tests were carried out in a test system device which allows the collection of static measurements of the samples' spectrum through the use of energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence technology. A sorting process based on tracers added into the polymer matrix is proposed in order to increase sorting selectivity of polypropylene during end-of-life recycling. Tracers consist of systems formed by one or by several substances dispersed into a material, to add a selective property to it, with the aim of improving the efficiency of sorting and high speed identification. Several samples containing rare earth oxides (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CeO{sub 2}, Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3}) in different concentrations were prepared in order to analyse some of the parameters which can influence the detection, such as the concentration of tracers, the acquisition time and the possible overlapping among the tracers. This work shows that by using the XRF test system device, it was possible to detect 5 of the 7 tracers tested for 1 min exposure time and at a concentration level of 1000 ppm. These two parameters will play an important role in the development of an industrial device, which indicates the necessity of further works that needs to be conducted in order to reduce them.

Bezati, F., E-mail: feliks.bezati@ensam.e [MAPIE-Laboratoire de Modelisation, Analyse et Prevention des Impacts Environnementaux, Institut ENSAM Savoie Technolac, 4 Rue du Lac Majeur, F-73375 Le Bourget du Lac Cedex (France); IMP/LMM-Ingenierie des Materiaux Polymeres - Laboratoire des Materiaux Macromoleculaires UMR 5223, INSA de Lyon Bat. Jules VERNE, 17, rue Jean Capelle F-69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Froelich, D. [MAPIE-Laboratoire de Modelisation, Analyse et Prevention des Impacts Environnementaux, Institut ENSAM Savoie Technolac, 4 Rue du Lac Majeur, F-73375 Le Bourget du Lac Cedex (France); Massardier, V. [IMP/LMM-Ingenierie des Materiaux Polymeres - Laboratoire des Materiaux Macromoleculaires UMR 5223, INSA de Lyon Bat. Jules VERNE, 17, rue Jean Capelle F-69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Maris, E. [MAPIE-Laboratoire de Modelisation, Analyse et Prevention des Impacts Environnementaux, Institut ENSAM Savoie Technolac, 4 Rue du Lac Majeur, F-73375 Le Bourget du Lac Cedex (France)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

307

Biodiesel Fuel Property Effects on Particulate Matter Reactivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Controlling diesel particulate emissions to meet the 2007 U.S. standard requires the use of a diesel particulate filter (DPF). The reactivity of soot, or the carbon fraction of particulate matter, in the DPF and the kinetics of soot oxidation are important in achieving better control of aftertreatment devices. Studies showed that biodiesel in the fuel can increase soot reactivity. This study therefore investigated which biodiesel fuel properties impact reactivity. Three fuel properties of interest included fuel oxygen content and functionality, fuel aromatic content, and the presence of alkali metals. To determine fuel effects on soot reactivity, the performance of a catalyzed DPF was measured with different test fuels through engine testing and thermo-gravimetric analysis. Results showed no dependence on the aromatic content or the presence of alkali metals in the fuel. The presence and form of fuel oxygen was the dominant contributor to faster DPF regeneration times and soot reactivity.

Williams, A.; Black, S.; McCormick, R. L.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Geochemical fluid characteristics and main achievements about tracer tests at Soultz-sous-Forts (France) 1 EC Contract SES6-CT-2003-502706  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geochemical fluid characteristics and main achievements about tracer tests at Soultz Related with Work Package WP1a (Short term fluid circulation tests) and WP1c (Data acquisition) GEOCHEMICAL FLUID CHARACTERISTICS AND MAIN ACHIEVEMENTS ABOUT TRACER TESTS AT SOULTZ-SOUS-FORÃ?TS (FRANCE

Boyer, Edmond

309

Herty Advanced Materials Development Center  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Session 1-B: Advancing Alternative Fuels for the Military and Aviation Sector Breakout Session 1: New Developments and Hot Topics Jill Stuckey, Acting Director, Herty Advanced Materials Development Center

310

Search Advanced Search Home > News  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Search Advanced Search Home > News [-] Text [+] Email Print tweet 0 tweets RSS Feeds Newsletters with bodily tissues, "these approaches might have the potential to redefine design strategies for advanced

Rogers, John A.

311

Advanced Technology Vehicle Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) is to increase the body of knowledge as well as the awareness and acceptance of electric drive and other advanced technology vehicles (ATV). The AVTA accomplishes this goal by testing ATVs on test tracks and dynamometers (Baseline Performance testing), as well as in real-world applications (Fleet and Accelerated Reliability testing and public demonstrations). This enables the AVTA to provide Federal and private fleet managers, as well as other potential ATV users, with accurate and unbiased information on vehicle performance and infrastructure needs so they can make informed decisions about acquiring and operating ATVs. The ATVs currently in testing include vehicles that burn gaseous hydrogen (H2) fuel and hydrogen/CNG (H/CNG) blended fuels in internal combustion engines (ICE), and hybrid electric (HEV), urban electric, and neighborhood electric vehicles. The AVTA is part of DOE's FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program.

James Francfort

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Advanced Separation Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was formed in 2001 under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy to conduct fundamental research in advanced separation and to develop technologies that can be used to produce coal and minerals in an efficient and environmentally acceptable manner. The CAST consortium consists of seven universities - Virginia Tech, West Virginia University, University of Kentucky, Montana Tech, University of Utah, University of Nevada-Reno, and New Mexico Tech. The consortium brings together a broad range of expertise to solve problems facing the US coal industry and the mining sector in general. At present, a total of 60 research projects are under way. The article outlines some of these, on topics including innovative dewatering technologies, removal of mercury and other impurities, and modelling of the flotation process. 1 photo.

NONE

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Advanced Photon Source Upgrade Project  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Upgrade to Advanced Photon Source announced by Department Of Energy. Read more: http://go.usa.gov/ivZ

Mitchell, John; Gibson, Murray; Young, Linda; Joachimiak, Andrzej

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

314

Advanced Polymer Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Radiation-assisted nanotechnology applications will continue to grow; (2) The APPF will provide a unique focus for radiolytic processing of nanomaterials in support of DOE-DP, other DOE and advanced manufacturing initiatives; (3) {gamma}, X-ray, e-beam and ion beam processing will increasingly be applied for 'green' manufacturing of nanomaterials and nanocomposites; and (4) Biomedical science and engineering may ultimately be the biggest application area for radiation-assisted nanotechnology development.

Muenchausen, Ross E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

315

ADVANCED CHEMISTRY BASINS MODEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The advanced Chemistry Basin Model project has been operative for 48 months. During this period, about half the project tasks are on projected schedule. On average the project is somewhat behind schedule (90%). Unanticipated issues are causing model integration to take longer then scheduled, delaying final debugging and manual development. It is anticipated that a short extension will be required to fulfill all contract obligations.

William Goddard III; Lawrence Cathles III; Mario Blanco; Paul Manhardt; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Advanced Materials Manufacturing | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the BuildingInnovation Portal Advanced Material

317

Advanced Microturbine Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dept. of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement DE-FC02-00-CH11061 was originally awarded to Honeywell International, Inc. â?? Honeywell Power Systems Inc. (HPSI) division located in Albuquerque, NM in October 2000 to conduct a program titled Advanced Microturbine Systems (AMS). The DOE Advanced Microturbines Systems Program was originally proposed as a five-year program to design and develop a high efficiency, low emissions, durable microturbine system. The period of performance was to be October 2000 through September 2005. Program efforts were underway, when one year into the program Honeywell sold the intellectual property of Honeywell Power Systems Inc. and HPSI ceased business operations. Honeywell made an internal decision to restructure the existing program due to the HPSI shutdown and submitted a formal request to DOE on September 24, 2001 to transfer the Cooperative Agreement to Honeywell Engines, Systems and Services (HES&S) in Phoenix, AZ in order to continue to offer support for DOE's Advanced Microturbine Program. Work continued on the descoped program under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-00-CH11061 and has been completed.

None

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

318

Advanced Technology Vehicle Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The light-duty vehicle transportation sector in the United States depends heavily on imported petroleum as a transportation fuel. The Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) is testing advanced technology vehicles to help reduce this dependency, which would contribute to the economic stability and homeland security of the United States. These advanced technology test vehicles include internal combustion engine vehicles operating on 100% hydrogen (H2) and H2CNG (compressed natural gas) blended fuels, hybrid electric vehicles, neighborhood electric vehicles, urban electric vehicles, and electric ground support vehicles. The AVTA tests and evaluates these vehicles with closed track and dynamometer testing methods (baseline performance testing) and accelerated reliability testing methods (accumulating lifecycle vehicle miles and operational knowledge within 1 to 1.5 years), and in normal fleet environments. The Arizona Public Service Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant and H2-fueled vehicles are demonstrating the feasibility of using H2 as a transportation fuel. Hybrid, neighborhood, and urban electric test vehicles are demonstrating successful applications of electric drive vehicles in various fleet missions. The AVTA is also developing electric ground support equipment (GSE) test procedures, and GSE testing will start during the fall of 2003. All of these activities are intended to support U.S. energy independence. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory manages these activities for the AVTA.

James Francfort

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

90Sr liquid scintillation urine analysis utilizing different approaches for tracer recovery.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

90Sr is one of the isotopes most commonly produced by nuclear fission. This medium lived isotope presents serious challenges to radiation workers, the environment, and following a nuclear event, the general public. Methods of identifying this nuclide have been in existence for a number of years (e.g. Horwitz, E.P. [1], Maxwell, S.L.[2], EPA 905.0 [3]) which are time consuming, requiring a month or more for full analysis. This time frame is unacceptable in the present security environment. It is therefore important to have a dependable and rapid method for the determination of Sr. The purposes of this study are to reduce analysis time to less than half a day by utilizing a single method of radiation measurement while continuing to yield precise results. This paper presents findings on three methods that can meet this criteria; (1) stable Sr carrier, (2) 85Sr by gamma spectroscopy, and (3) 85Sr by LSC. Two methods of analyzing and calculating the 85Sr tracer recovery were investigated (gamma spectroscopy and a low energy window-Sr85LEBAB by LSC) as well as the use of two different types of Sr tracer (85Sr and stable Sr carrier). Three separate stock blank urine samples were spiked with various activity levels of 239Pu, 137Cs, 90Sr /90Y to determine the effectiveness of the Eichrome Sr-spec%C2%AE resin 2mL extractive columns. The objective was to compare the recoveries of 85Sr versus a stable strontium carrier, attempt to compare the rate at which samples can be processed by evaluating evaporation, neutralization, and removing the use of another instrument (gamma spectrometer) by using the LSC spectrometer to obtain 85Sr recovery. It was found that when using a calibration curve comprised of a different cocktail and a non-optimum discriminator setting reasonable results (bias of %C2%B1 25%) were achieved. The results from spiked samples containing 85Sr demonstrated that a higher recovery is obtained when using gamma spectroscopy (89-95%) than when using the LEB window from LSC (120-470%). The high recovery for 85Sr by LSC analysis may be due to the interference/cross talk from the alpha region since alpha counts were observed in all sample sets. After further investigation it was determined that the alpha counts were due to 239Pu breakthrough on the Sr-spec%C2%AE column. This requires further development to purify the Sr before an accurate tracer recovery determination can be made. Sample preparation times varied and ranged from 4-6 hours depending on the specific sample preparation process. The results from the spiked samples containing stable strontium nitrate Sr(NO3)2 carrier demonstrate that gravimetric analysis yields the most consistent high recoveries (97-101%) when evaporation is carefully performed. Since this method did not have a variation on the tracer recovery method, the samples were counted in 1) LEB/Alpha/Beta mode optimized for Sr-90, 2) DPM for Sr-90, and 3) general LEB/Alpha/Beta mode. The results (from the known) ranged from 79-104%, 107-177%, and 85-89% for 1, 2, and 3 respectively. Counting the prepared samples in a generic low energy beta/alpha/beta protocol yielded more accurate and consistent results and also yielded the shortest sample preparation turn-around-time of 3.5 hours.

Piraner, Olga [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA; Preston, Rose T. [Sandia Staffing Alliance, LLC, Albuquerque, NM; Shanks, Sonoya Toyoko; Jones, Robert [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Mixing properties in the advection of passive tracers via recurrences and extreme value theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we characterize the mixing properties in the advection of passive tracers by exploiting the extreme value theory for dynamical systems. With respect to classical techniques directly related to the Poincar\\'e recurrences analysis, our method provides reliable estimations of the characteristic mixing times and distinguishes between barriers and unstable fixed points. The method is based on a check of convergence for extreme value laws on finite datasets. We define the mixing times in terms of the shortest time intervals such that extremes converge to the asymptotic (known) parameters of the Generalized Extreme Value distribution. Our technique is suitable for applications in the analysis of other systems where mixing time scales need to be determined and limited datasets are available.

Davide Faranda; Xavier Leoncini; Sandro Vaienti

2014-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Advanced Energy Design Guides | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Design Guides EERE Building Technologies Program - This fact sheet discusses the Advanced Energy Design Guides (AEDGs) and how they...

322

E-Print Network 3.0 - ameliorating reactive oxygen Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

structure and surface relaxation Summary: reactivity of each type of oxygen the adsorption of hydrogen over different oxygen sites is studied. Full... oxygen is the reactive...

323

Metal-Pyrrolide Complexes in Three-fold Symmetry: Synthesis, Structure, Reactivity and Magnetism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structure, Reactivity and Magnetism by William Hill Harman AStructure, Reactivity and Magnetism by William Hill Harmanlost time. Dave taught me magnetism and what it takes to win

Harman, William Hill

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Synthesis, characterization, and reactivity studies of iridium complexes bearing the ligand diphenylphosphidoboratabenzene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The synthesis, structure, and reactivity properties of three iridium square planar complexes bearing the anionic phosphine ligand diphenylphosphidoboratabenzene (DPB) are described. Reactivity studies show a rate enhancement ...

Arizpe, Luis (Luis Alfredo)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Aging Enhances the Production of Reactive Oxygen Species andBactericid...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Enhances the Production of Reactive Oxygen Species andBactericidal Activity in Peritoneal Macrophages by Aging Enhances the Production of Reactive Oxygen Species andBactericidal...

326

Reactivity of iron-bearing minerals and CO2 sequestration: A...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Reactivity of iron-bearing minerals and CO2 sequestration: A multi-disciplinary experimental approach Re-direct Destination: The reactivity of sandstones was studied under...

327

Using conversions of chemically reacting tracers for numerical determination of temperature profiles in flowing systems and temperature histories in batch systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the mathematical bases for measuring internal temperatures within batch and flowing systems using chemically reacting tracers. This approach can obtain temperature profiles of plug-flow systems and temperature histories within batch systems. The differential equations for reactant conversion can be converted into Fredholm integral equations of the first kind. The experimental variable is the tracer-reaction activation energy. When more than one tracer is used, the reactions must have different activation energies to gain information. In systems with temperature extrema, multiple solutions for the temperature profiles or histories can exist, When a single parameter in the temperature distribution is needed, a single-tracer test may furnish this information. For multi-reaction tracer tests, three Fredholm equations are developed. Effects of tracer-reaction activation energy, number of tracers used, and error in the data are evaluated. The methods can determine temperature histories and profiles for many existing systems, and can be a basis for analysis of the more complicated dispersed-flow systems. An alternative to using the Fredholm-equation approach is the use of an assumed temperature- distribution function and incorporation of this function into the basic integral equation describing tracer behavior. The function contains adjustable parameters which are optimized to give the temperature distribution. The iterative Fredholm equation method is tested to see what is required to discriminate between two models of the temperature behavior of Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal reservoirs. Experimentally, ester and amide hydrolyses are valid HDR tracer reactions for measuring temperatures in the range 75-100{degrees}C. Hydrolyses of bromobenzene derivatives are valid HDR tracer reactions for measuring temperatures in the range 150-275{degrees}C.

Brown, L.F.; Chemburkar, R.M.; Robinson, B.A.; Travis, B.J.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

AN INTEGRATED APPROACH TO CHARACTERIZING BYPASSED OIL IN HETEROGENEOUS AND FRACTURED RESERVOIRS USING PARTITIONING TRACERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We explore the use of efficient streamline-based simulation approaches for modeling and analysis partitioning interwell tracer tests in heterogeneous and fractured hydrocarbon reservoirs. The streamline approach is generalized to model water injection in naturally fractured reservoirs through the use of a dual media approach. The fractures and matrix are treated as separate continua that are connected through a transfer function, as in conventional finite difference simulators for modeling fractured systems. A detailed comparison with a commercial finite difference simulator shows very good agreement. Furthermore, an examination of the scaling behavior of the computation time indicates that the streamline approach is likely to result in significant savings for large-scale field applications. We also propose a novel approach to history matching finite-difference models that combines the advantage of the streamline models with the versatility of finite-difference simulation. In our approach, we utilize the streamline-derived sensitivities to facilitate history matching during finite-difference simulation. The use of finite-difference model allows us to account for detailed process physics and compressibility effects. The approach is very fast and avoids much of the subjective judgments and time-consuming trial-and-errors associated with manual history matching. We demonstrate the power and utility of our approach using a synthetic example and two field examples. Finally, we discuss several alternative ways of using partitioning interwell tracer tests (PITTs) in oil fields for the calculation of oil saturation, swept pore volume and sweep efficiency, and assess the accuracy of such tests under a variety of reservoir conditions.

Akhil Datta-Gupta

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

{sup 41}Ca as a tracer for calcium uptake and deposition in heart tissue during ischemia and reperfusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed techniques and are commencing experiments using enriched {sup 41}Ca as a tracer in isolated rabbit heart preparations. The aims of the study are to measure calcium uptake and deposition in response to cardiac ischemia and reperfusion, and to investigate events and mechanism leading to irreversible myocyte injury.

Southon, J.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Bishop, M.S.; Kost, G.J. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Medical Pathology and Biomedical Engineering

1993-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

330

Self-consistent magnetic properties of magnetite tracers optimized for magnetic particle imaging measured by ac susceptometry,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Self-consistent magnetic properties of magnetite tracers optimized for magnetic particle imaging measured by ac susceptometry, magnetorelaxometry and magnetic particle spectroscopy Frank Ludwig a , Hilke. Krishnan b,n a Institute of Electrical Measurement and Fundamental Electrical Engineering, TU Braunschweig

Krishnan, Kannan M.

331

Thorium isotopes as tracers of particles dynamics and deep water circulation in the Indian sector of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thorium isotopes as tracers of particles dynamics and deep water circulation in the Indian sector to study the distribution of thorium isotopes (234 Th, 232 Th and 230 Th) in the water column of the Indian in surface water (0­100 m) and a model was applied to estimate a residence time relative to the thorium

Coppola, Laurent

332

Effects from influent boundary conditions on tracer migration and spatial variability features in intermediate-scale experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In previous unsaturated transport studies at Los Alamos dispersion coefficients were estimated to be higher close to the tracer source than at greater distances from the source. Injection of tracers through discrete influent outlets could have accounted for those higher dispersions. Also, a lack of conservation of mass of the tracers was observed and suspected to be due to spatial variability in transport. In the present study experiments were performed under uniform influent (ponded) conditions in which breakthrough of tracers was monitored at four locations at each of four depths. All other conditions were similar to those of the unsaturated transport experiments. A comparison of results from these two sets of experiments indicates differences in the parameter estimates. Estimates were made for the dispersion coefficient and the retardation factor by the one-dimensional steady flow computer code, CFITIM. Estimates were also made for mass and for velocity and the dispersion coefficient by the method of moments. The dispersion coefficient decreased with depth under discrete influent application and increased with depth under ponded influent application. Retardation was predicted better under the discrete influent application than under ponded influent application. Differences in breakthroughs and in estimated parameters among locations at the same depth were observed under ponded influent application. Those differences indicate that there is a lack of conservation of mass as well as significant spatial variability across the experimental domain. 14 refs., 9 figs., 8 tabs.

Fuentes, H.R.; Polzer, W.L.; Springer, E.P.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Isotopic Tracer Studies of Propane Reactions on H-ZSM5 Zeolite Joseph A. Biscardi and Enrique Iglesia*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Isotopic Tracer Studies of Propane Reactions on H-ZSM5 Zeolite Joseph A. Biscardi and Enrique unlabeled products from mixtures of propene and propane-2-13C reactants. Aromatic products of propane-2-13C-Parmer) that allowed differential reactor operation (propane reactions were

Iglesia, Enrique

334

Future Transient Testing of Advanced Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The transient in-reactor fuels testing workshop was held on May 4–5, 2009 at Idaho National Laboratory. The purpose of this meeting was to provide a forum where technical experts in transient testing of nuclear fuels could meet directly with technical instrumentation experts and nuclear fuel modeling and simulation experts to discuss needed advancements in transient testing to support a basic understanding of nuclear fuel behavior under off-normal conditions. The workshop was attended by representatives from Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique CEA, Japanese Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Department of Energy (DOE), AREVA, General Electric – Global Nuclear Fuels (GE-GNF), Westinghouse, Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), universities, and several DOE national laboratories. Transient testing of fuels and materials generates information required for advanced fuels in future nuclear power plants. Future nuclear power plants will rely heavily on advanced computer modeling and simulation that describes fuel behavior under off-normal conditions. TREAT is an ideal facility for this testing because of its flexibility, proven operation and material condition. The opportunity exists to develop advanced instrumentation and data collection that can support modeling and simulation needs much better than was possible in the past. In order to take advantage of these opportunities, test programs must be carefully designed to yield basic information to support modeling before conducting integral performance tests. An early start of TREAT and operation at low power would provide significant dividends in training, development of instrumentation, and checkout of reactor systems. Early start of TREAT (2015) is needed to support the requirements of potential users of TREAT and include the testing of full length fuel irradiated in the FFTF reactor. The capabilities provided by TREAT are needed for the development of nuclear power and the following benefits will be realized by the refurbishment and restart of TREAT. •TREAT is an absolute necessity in the suite of reactor fuel test capabilities •TREAT yields valuable information on reactivity effects, margins to failure, fuel dispersal, and failure propagation •Most importantly, interpretation of TREAT experiment results is a stringent test of the integrated understanding of fuel performance.

Jon Carmack

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

A 100 MWe advanced sodium-cooled fast reactor core concept  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An Advanced sodium-cooled Fast Reactor core concept (AFR-100) was developed targeting a small electrical grid to be transportable to the plant site and operable for a long time without frequent refueling. The reactor power rating was strategically decided to be 100 MWe, and the core barrel diameter was limited to 3.0 m for transportability. The design parameters were determined by relaxing the peak fast fluence limit and bulk coolant outlet temperature to beyond irradiation experience assuming that advanced cladding and structural materials developed under US-DOE programs would be available when the AFR-100 is deployed. With a de-rated power density and U-Zr binary metallic fuel, the AFR-100 can maintain criticality for 30 years without refueling. The average discharge burnup of 101 MWd/kg is comparable to conventional design values, but the peak discharge fast fluence of {approx}6x10{sup 23} neutrons/cm{sup 2} is beyond the current irradiation experiences with HT-9 cladding. The evaluated reactivity coefficients provide sufficient negative feedbacks and the reactivity control systems provide sufficient shutdown margins. The integral reactivity parameters obtained from quasi-static reactivity balance analysis indicate that the AFR-100 meets the sufficient conditions for acceptable asymptotic core outlet temperature following postulated unprotected accidents. Additionally, the AFR-100 has sufficient thermal margins by grouping the fuel assemblies into eight orifice zones. (authors)

Kim, T. K.; Grandy, C.; Hill, R. N. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Reactive Blast Waves from Composite Charges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Investigated here is the performance of composite explosives - measured in terms of the blast wave they drive into the surrounding environment. The composite charge configuration studied here was a spherical booster (1/3 charge mass), surrounded by aluminum (Al) powder (2/3 charge mass) at an initial density of {rho}{sub 0} = 0.604 g/cc. The Al powder acts as a fuel but does not detonate - thereby providing an extreme example of a 'non-ideal' explosive (where 2/3 of the charge does not detonate). Detonation of the booster charge creates a blast wave that disperses the Al powder and ignites the ensuing Al-air mixture - thereby forming a two-phase combustion cloud embedded in the explosion. Afterburning of the booster detonation products with air also enhances and promotes the Al-air combustion process. Pressure waves from such reactive blast waves have been measured in bomb calorimeter experiments. Here we describe numerical simulations of those experiments. A Heterogeneous Continuum Model was used to model the dispersion and combustion of the Al particle cloud. It combines the gasdynamic conservation laws for the gas phase with a dilute continuum model for the dispersed phase, as formulated by Nigmatulin. Inter-phase mass, momentum and energy exchange are prescribed by phenomenological models of Khasainov. It incorporates a combustion model based on mass conservation laws for fuel, air and products; source/sink terms are treated in the fast-chemistry limit appropriate for such gasdynamic fields, along with a model for mass transfer from the particle phase to the gas. The model takes into account both the afterburning of the detonation products of the booster with air, and the combustion of the Al particles with air. The model equations were integrated by high-order Godunov schemes for both the gas and particle phases. Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) was used to capture the energy-bearing scales of the turbulent flow on the computational grid, and to track/resolve reaction zones. Numerical simulations of the explosion fields from 1.5-g and 10-kg composite charges were performed. Computed pressure histories (red curve) are compared with measured waveforms (black curves) in Fig. 1. Comparison of these results with a waveform for a non-combustion case in nitrogen (blue curve) demonstrates that a reactive blast wave was formed. Cross-sectional views of the temperature field at various times are presented in Fig. 2, which shows that the flow is turbulent. Initially, combustion occurs at the fuel-air interface, and the energy release rate is controlled by the rate of turbulent mixing. Eventually, oxidizer becomes distributed throughout the cloud via ballistic mixing of the particles with air; energy release then occurs in a distributed combustion mode, and Al particle kinetics controls the energy release rate. Details of the Heterogeneous Continuum Model and results of the numerical simulations of composite charge explosions will be described in the paper.

Kuhl, A L; Bell, J B; Beckner, V E

2009-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

337

The Safe Storage Study for Autocatalytic Reactive Chemicals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the U.S. Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board (CSB) report, Improving Reactive Hazard Management, there are 37 out of 167 accidents, which occurred in a storage tank or a storage area. This fact demonstrates that thermal runaway...

Liu, Lijun

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

338

Reactivity of the Quinone Methide of Butylated hydroxytoluene in Solution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BHT is a common antioxidant in pharmaceutical formulations and when oxidized it forms a quinone methide (QM). QM is a highly reactive electrophilic species which can undergo nucleophilic addition. This research investigated ...

Willcockson, Maren Gulsrud

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

339

Evaluation of Methods to Predict Reactivity of Gold Nanoparticles...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

relationship to the concept of frontier molecular orbital theory. The d-band theory of Hammer and Nørskov is perhaps the most widely used predictor of reactivity on metallic...

340

Pre-plated reactive diffusion-bonded battery electrode plaques  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high strength, metallic fiber battery plaque is made using reactive diffusion bonding techniques, where a substantial amount of the fibers are bonded together by an iron-nickel alloy.

Maskalick, Nicholas J. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Dynamic Reactive Power Control of Isolated Power Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation presents dynamic reactive power control of isolated power systems. Isolated systems include MicroGrids in islanded mode, shipboard power systems operating offshore, or any other power system operating in islanded mode intentionally...

Falahi, Milad

2012-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

342

Mechanical properties of amorphous Lix Si alloys: a reactive...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

was downloaded on 08102013 at 15:46 Please note that terms and conditions apply. Mechanical properties of amorphous Li x Si alloys: a reactive force field study View the table...

343

Reactive oxygen species: a breath of life or death?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AP1, activator protein-1; ODD, oxygen-dependent degradationSignaling response when oxygen levels decrease (Fig. 1C;3. Halliwell B. Reactive oxygen species in living sys- tems:

Fruehauf, John P; Meyskens, Frank L Jr

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Local Control of Reactive Power by Distributed Photovoltaic Generators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High penetration levels of distributed photovoltaic (PV) generation on an electrical distribution circuit may severely degrade power quality due to voltage sags and swells caused by rapidly varying PV generation during cloud transients coupled with the slow response of existing utility compensation and regulation equipment. Although not permitted under current standards for interconnection of distributed generation, fast-reacting, VAR-capable PV inverters may provide the necessary reactive power injection or consumption to maintain voltage regulation under difficult transient conditions. As side benefit, the control of reactive power injection at each PV inverter provides an opportunity and a new tool for distribution utilities to optimize the performance of distribution circuits, e.g. by minimizing thermal losses. We suggest a local control scheme that dispatches reactive power from each PV inverter based on local instantaneous measurements of the real and reactive components of the consumed power and the re...

Turitsyn, Konstantin S; Backhaus, Scott; Chertkov, Misha

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

ADVANCED SULFUR CONTROL CONCEPTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conventional sulfur removal in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants involves numerous steps: COS (carbonyl sulfide) hydrolysis, amine scrubbing/regeneration, Claus process, and tail-gas treatment. Advanced sulfur removal in IGCC systems involves typically the use of zinc oxide-based sorbents. The sulfides sorbent is regenerated using dilute air to produce a dilute SO{sub 2} (sulfur dioxide) tail gas. Under previous contracts the highly effective first generation Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) for catalytic reduction of this SO{sub 2} tail gas to elemental sulfur was developed. This process is currently undergoing field-testing. In this project, advanced concepts were evaluated to reduce the number of unit operations in sulfur removal and recovery. Substantial effort was directed towards developing sorbents that could be directly regenerated to elemental sulfur in an Advanced Hot Gas Process (AHGP). Development of this process has been described in detail in Appendices A-F. RTI began the development of the Single-step Sulfur Recovery Process (SSRP) to eliminate the use of sorbents and multiple reactors in sulfur removal and recovery. This process showed promising preliminary results and thus further process development of AHGP was abandoned in favor of SSRP. The SSRP is a direct Claus process that consists of injecting SO{sub 2} directly into the quenched coal gas from a coal gasifier, and reacting the H{sub 2}S-SO{sub 2} mixture over a selective catalyst to both remove and recover sulfur in a single step. The process is conducted at gasifier pressure and 125 to 160 C. The proposed commercial embodiment of the SSRP involves a liquid phase of molten sulfur with dispersed catalyst in a slurry bubble-column reactor (SBCR).

Apostolos A. Nikolopoulos; Santosh K. Gangwal; William J. McMichael; Jeffrey W. Portzer

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

(Electronic structure and reactivities of transition metal clusters)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following are reported: theoretical calculations (configuration interaction, relativistic effective core potentials, polyatomics, CASSCF); proposed theoretical studies (clusters of Cu, Ag, Au, Ni, Pt, Pd, Rh, Ir, Os, Ru; transition metal cluster ions; transition metal carbide clusters; bimetallic mixed transition metal clusters); reactivity studies on transition metal clusters (reactivity with H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, hydrocarbons; NO and CO chemisorption on surfaces). Computer facilities and codes to be used, are described. 192 refs, 13 figs.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

3D Field-Scale Reactive Transport Modeling of In Situ Immobilization of Uranium in Structured Porous Media via Biostimulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A several-month-long ethanol injection experiment is being conducted to study the impacts of porous media structure (i.e., heterogeneity existing at multiple scales) on the effectiveness of metal/radionuclide bioremediation in a highly heterogeneous unconfined aquifer near Oak Ridge, TN, USA. We have constructed a 3D field-scale groundwater flow and multicomponent reactive transport model to simulate the experimental observations. The model incorporates a suite of abiotic reactions and microbially-mediated redox reactions for multiple terminal electron accepting processes (TEAPs) including soluble oxygen, nitrate, U(VI) and sulfate and solid-phase electron acceptors. Different biomass populations are considered in the model. Growth of these populations is derived from the bioenergetics-based approach in which the partitioning of electron flow between energy generation and cell biomass production is dependent on the free energy of the corresponding TEAP. TEAP reaction rates were free energy constrained. The TEAP model and reaction system have been formulated and used to simulate laboratory batch experimental observations. We conducted the field-scale simulation starting with the reaction system and parameters obtained from the batch experiment and hydrologic parameters estimated from the results of pumping tests, water level monitoring and model interpretation of a tracer test conducted in August 2004. Reaction parameters were investigated to compare simulation results and field experiment observations.

Fang, Yilin; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Roden, Eirc E.; Kamolpornwijit, Wiwat; Brooks, Scott C.

2006-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

348

Horizontal Advanced Tensiometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An horizontal advanced tensiometer is described that allows the monitoring of the water pressure of soil positions, particularly beneath objects or materials that inhibit the use of previous monitoring wells. The tensiometer includes a porous cup, a pressure transducer (with an attached gasket device), an adaptive chamber, at least one outer guide tube which allows access to the desired horizontal position, a transducer wire, a data logger and preferably an inner guide tube and a specialized joint which provides pressure on the inner guide tube to maintain the seal between the gasket of the transducer and the adaptive chamber.

Hubbell, Joel M.; Sisson, James B.

2004-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

349

Advanced Manufacture of Reflectors  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Advance Manufacture of Reflectors fact sheet describes a SunShot Initiative project being conducted research team led by the University of Arizona, which is working to develop a novel method for shaping float glass. The technique developed by this research team can drastically reduce the time required for the shaping step. By enabling mass production of solar concentrating mirrors at high speed, this project should lead to improved performance and as much as a 40% reduction in manufacturing costs for reflectors made in very high volume.

350

Advanced Manufacturing Office Overview  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' ResearchThe Office ofReporting (Connecticut)41AdamEnergyAdvanced DOE Workshop:

351

Advanced Materials | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearch Highlights MediaFuelAbout Us >Portal Advanced

352

Advanced Feedstock Supply System  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartment of EnergyAdministrative2 DOE Hydrogen andEnzymeAdvanced Feedstock

353

Advanced Simulation Capability  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power Systems EngineeringDepartment of EnergyAbout UsAdvanced Modeling &NuclearNewsletter3

354

Advanced Simulation Capability  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power Systems EngineeringDepartment of EnergyAbout UsAdvanced Modeling

355

Advanced Simulation Capability  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power Systems EngineeringDepartment of EnergyAbout UsAdvanced Modeling2 Annual Report

356

Advanced Simulation Capability for  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power Systems EngineeringDepartment of EnergyAbout UsAdvanced Modeling2 Annual Reportfor

357

Geothermal: Advanced Search  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr Flickr Editor'sshortGeothermal Heat Pumps GeothermalAdvanced Search

358

Advanced Conversion Roadmap Workshop  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: Top Five EERE Blog Posts1-034 Advance Patent WaiverLeslie Pezzullo Office of the

359

Advanced Combustion FAQs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the Building TechnologiesS1!4T opAddress:AdolphusAdvanced

360

Advanced Photon Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the BuildingInnovation Portal AdvancedMethods Home Group Members

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Advanced Photon Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the BuildingInnovation Portal AdvancedMethods Home Group

362

Advanced Photon Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the BuildingInnovation Portal AdvancedMethods Home GroupISM Day -

363

Advanced Photon Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the BuildingInnovation Portal AdvancedMethods Home GroupISM Day

364

Advanced Photon Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the BuildingInnovation Portal AdvancedMethods Home GroupISM Day0

365

Advanced Rooftop Unit Control  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the BuildingInnovation Portal AdvancedMethodsServices »

366

Advanced Studies Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the BuildingInnovation PortalScience of Signatures Advanced

367

Advanced Target Effects Modeling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the BuildingInnovation PortalScience of SignaturesAdvanced Target

368

Advanced Ultraviolet Spectroradiometer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the BuildingInnovation PortalScience ofTechnologyMoreAdvanced

369

AdvAnced  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUCProductstwrmrAre theAdministrator Referencesalkali metalsTiO2(110). | AdvAnced

370

Application of the ''reactivity constraint approach'' to automatic reactor control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ''reactivity constraint approach'' is described and demonstrated to be an effective and reliable means for the automatic control of power in nuclear reactors. This approach functions by restricting the effect of the delayed neutron populations to that which can be balanced by an induced change in the prompt population. This is done by limiting the net reactivity to the amount that can be offset by reversing the direction of motion of the automated control mechanism. The necessary reactivity constraints are obtained from the dynamic period equation, which gives the instantaneous reactor period as a function of the reactivity and the rate of change of reactivity. The derivation of this equation is described with emphasis on the recently obtained ''alternate'' formulation. Following a discussion of the behavior of each term of this alternate equation as a function of reactivity, its use in the design and operation of a nonlinear, closed-loop, digital controller for reactor power is in the design and operation of a nonlinear, closed-loop, digital controller for reactor power is described. Details of the initial experimental trials of the resulting controller are given.

Bernard, J.A.; Henry, A.F.; Lanning, D.D.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Advanced Vehicle Electrification and Transportation Sector Electrifica...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Advanced Vehicle Electrification and Transportation Sector Electrification Plug-in Hybrid (PHEV) Vehicle Technology Advancement and...

372

Advanced Battery Materials Characterization: Success stories...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced Battery Materials Characterization: Success stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program Advanced Battery Materials Characterization: Success...

373

SCR Performance Optimization Through Advancements in Aftertreatment...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Performance Optimization Through Advancements in Aftertreatment Packaging SCR Performance Optimization Through Advancements in Aftertreatment Packaging The impact of improved urea...

374

Smith Electric Vehicles: Advanced Vehicle Electrification + Transporta...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Smith Electric Vehicles: Advanced Vehicle Electrification + Transportation Sector Electrification Smith Electric Vehicles: Advanced Vehicle Electrification + Transportation Sector...

375

Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009 Paper 336 Time-Scale Analysis for Reactive Deposition of Ozone via Passive Reactive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009 Paper 336 Time-Scale Analysis for Reactive Deposition) homogeneous reactions with indoor pollutants. The #12;Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009 Paper 336 latter

Siegel, Jeffrey

376

Advanced thermochemical hydrogen cycles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this program is to contribute to the development of practical thermochemical cycles for the production of hydrogen from water. Specific goals are: investigate and evaluate the technical and economic viability of thermochemical cycles as an advanced technology for producing hydrogen from water; investigate and evaluate the engineering principles involved in interfacing individual thermochemical cycles with the different thermal energy sources (high temperature fission, solar, and fusion); and conduct a continuing research and development effort to evaluate the use of solid sulfates, oxides and other compounds as potentially advanced cycles and as alternates to H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ based cycles. Basic thermochemistry studies have been completed for two different steps in the decomposition of bismuth sulfate. Two different bismuth sulfate cycles have been defined for different sulfuric acid strengths. The eventual best cycle will depend on energy required to form sulfuric acid at different concentrations. A solids decomposition facility has been constructed and practical studies of solid decompositions are being conducted. The facility includes a rotary kiln system and a dual-particle fluidized bed system. Evaluation of different types of cycles for coupling with different heat sources is continuing.

Hollabaugh, C.M.; Bowman, M.G.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Accelerating development of advanced inverters : evaluation of anti-islanding schemes with grid support functions and preliminary laboratory demonstration.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high penetration of utility interconnected photovoltaic (PV) systems is causing heightened concern over the effect that variable renewable generation will have on the electrical power system (EPS). These concerns have initiated the need to amend the utility interconnection standard to allow advanced inverter control functionalities that provide: (1) reactive power control for voltage support, (2) real power control for frequency support and (3) better tolerance of grid disturbances. These capabilities are aimed at minimizing the negative impact distributed PV systems may have on EPS voltage and frequency. Unfortunately, these advanced control functions may interfere with island detection schemes, and further development of advanced inverter functions requires a study of the effect of advanced functions on the efficacy of antiislanding schemes employed in industry. This report summarizes the analytical, simulation and experimental work to study interactions between advanced inverter functions and anti-islanding schemes being employed in distributed PV systems.

Neely, Jason C.; Gonzalez, Sigifredo; Ropp, Michael [Northern Plains Power Technologies, Brookings, SD] [Northern Plains Power Technologies, Brookings, SD; Schutz, Dustin [Northern Plains Power Technologies, Brookings, SD] [Northern Plains Power Technologies, Brookings, SD

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Application of Partial-Order Methods to Reactive Programs with Event Memorization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with event memorization. The reactive systems are specified with an asynchronous reactive language Electre, 3 (2001) 287-316" #12;2 Electre: an Asynchronous Reactive Language with Event Memorization 3 2 of a semantic model of an asyn- chronous reactive language: Electre [PRH92, CR95]. Indeed, this language

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

379

Development and Evaluation of a State-of-the-Science Reactive Plume  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for plume rise, plume visibility, and stack opacity (5). Examples of other reactive plume models include

Zhang, Yang

380

Measurement of HVAC system performance and local ventilation using passive perfluorocarbon tracer technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In April of 1993, two (2) perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) ventilation/indoor air quality assessment tests were performed in the Gleeson Hall building of the SUNY Farmingdale campus. The building was being modified, in part, as a result of significant occupant complaints of perceived poor air quality. The four story building had a basement first floor with air supplied normally by an HVAC system labelled as AC1. During this study, AC1 was inoperational and the basement interior rooms (walls) were primarily gone; the other three floors were still being used for classes. It is possible that a sense of poor air quality may have been perceived by first-floor occupants because they were working in the basement, but this issue could not be addressed. The second floor had two (2) lecture halls--Rm 202 (handled by AC4) and Rm 204 (handled by AC5); the balance of the second floor interior rooms and corridors was split between two other air handling systems, AC2 for the west side of the building and AC3 for the east side. The remaining 3rd and 4th floors were also split about evenly between AC2 and AC3. The perimeter rooms, equipped with wall units having their own outside air (OA) source plus centralized return air (RA) bypasses, were not included in this testing which was restricted to the basement floor (1st floor) and the four operating air handling systems, AC2 to AC5, during Test 1 and only AC2 to AC5 during Test 2. Two types of tests were performed using the full suite of 5 PFT types available. The first test was designed to measure the infiltration, exfiltration, and air exchange between the 5 AC zones above and the second test used the 5th tracer, which had been in the basement, as a distributed source throughout the four other zones to act as a surrogate pollutant source. This report provides final conclusions of both tests and suggestions regarding its usefulness in similar building ventilation and indoor air quality assessments.

Dietz, R.N.; Goodrich, R.W.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural gas combustion turbines are rapidly becoming the primary technology of choice for generating electricity. At least half of the new generating capacity added in the US over the next twenty years will be combustion turbine systems. The Department of Energy has cosponsored with Siemens Westinghouse, a program to maintain the technology lead in gas turbine systems. The very ambitious eight year program was designed to demonstrate a highly efficient and commercially acceptable power plant, with the ability to fire a wide range of fuels. The main goal of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program was to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost effective competitive gas turbine systems for base load application in utility, independent power producer and industrial markets. Performance targets were focused on natural gas as a fuel and included: System efficiency that exceeds 60% (lower heating value basis); Less than 10 ppmv NO{sub x} emissions without the use of post combustion controls; Busbar electricity that are less than 10% of state of the art systems; Reliability-Availability-Maintainability (RAM) equivalent to current systems; Water consumption minimized to levels consistent with cost and efficiency goals; and Commercial systems by the year 2000. In a parallel effort, the program was to focus on adapting the ATS engine to coal-derived or biomass fuels. In Phase 1 of the ATS Program, preliminary investigators on different gas turbine cycles demonstrated that net plant LHV based efficiency greater than 60% was achievable. In Phase 2 the more promising cycles were evaluated in greater detail and the closed-loop steam-cooled combined cycle was selected for development because it offered the best solution with least risk for achieving the ATS Program goals for plant efficiency, emissions, cost of electricity and RAM. Phase 2 also involved conceptual ATS engine and plant design and technology developments in aerodynamics, sealing, combustion, cooling, materials, coatings and casting development. The market potential for the ATS gas turbine in the 2000-2014 timeframe was assessed for combined cycle, simple cycle and integrated gasification combined cycle, for three engine sizes. The total ATS market potential was forecasted to exceed 93 GW. Phase 3 and Phase 3 Extension involved further technology development, component testing and W501ATS engine detail design. The technology development efforts consisted of ultra low NO{sub x} combustion, catalytic combustion, sealing, heat transfer, advanced coating systems, advanced alloys, single crystal casting development and determining the effect of steam on turbine alloys. Included in this phase was full-load testing of the W501G engine at the McIntosh No. 5 site in Lakeland, Florida.

Gregory Gaul

2004-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

382

Advanced Integrated Systems Technology Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conditioning in buildings featuring integrated design withconditioning in buildings featuring integrated design withof a building with advanced integrated design involving one

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

not finalized, AARF is considering: * 2 nd generation biofuels * Non-food sources * Jatropha * Algae * Lignocellulose * Other biomass-to-liquid * Advanced processing of edible...

384

ADVANCED HYBRID PARTICULATE COLLECTOR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new concept in particulate control, called an advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC), is being developed under funding from the US Department of Energy. The AHPC combines the best features of electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and baghouses in a manner that has not been done before. The AHPC concept consists of a combination of fabric filtration and electrostatic precipitation in the same housing, providing major synergism between the two collection methods, both in the particulate collection step and in the transfer of dust to the hopper. The AHPC provides ultrahigh collection efficiency, overcoming the problem of excessive fine-particle emission with conventional ESPs, and it solves the problem of reentrainment and collection of dust in conventional baghouses. The AHPC is currently being tested at the 2.7-MW scale at the Big Stone power station.

Stanley Miller; Rich Gebert; William Swanson

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Advanced drilling systems study.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the results of a study of advanced drilling concepts conducted jointly for the Natural Gas Technology Branch and the Geothermal Division of the U.S. Department of Energy. A number of alternative rock cutting concepts and drilling systems are examined. The systems cover the range from current technology, through ongoing efforts in drilling research, to highly speculative concepts. Cutting mechanisms that induce stress mechanically, hydraulically, and thermally are included. All functions necessary to drill and case a well are considered. Capital and operating costs are estimated and performance requirements, based on comparisons of the costs for alternative systems to conventional drilling technology, are developed. A number of problems common to several alternatives and to current technology are identified and discussed.

Pierce, Kenneth G.; Livesay, Billy Joe; Finger, John Travis (Livesay Consultants, Encintas, CA)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Advanced Containment System  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An advanced containment system for containing buried waste and associated leachate. A trench is dug on either side of the zone of interest containing the buried waste so as to accommodate a micro tunnel boring machine. A series of small diameter tunnels are serially excavated underneath the buried waste. The tunnels are excavated by the micro tunnel boring machine at a consistent depth and are substantially parallel to each other. As tunneling progresses, steel casing sections are connected end to end in the excavated portion of the tunnel so that a steel tube is formed. Each casing section has complementary interlocking structure running its length that interlocks with complementary interlocking structure on the adjacent casing section. Thus, once the first tube is emplaced, placement of subsequent tubes is facilitated by the complementary interlocking structure on the adjacent, previously placed, casing sections.

Kostelnik, Kevin M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kawamura, Hideki (Tokyo, JP); Richardson, John G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Noda, Masaru (Tokyo, JP)

2005-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

387

Advanced Containment System  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An advanced containment system for containing buried waste and associated leachate. A trench is dug on either side of the zone of interest containing the buried waste so as to accommodate a micro tunnel boring machine. A series of small diameter tunnels are serially excavated underneath the buried waste. The tunnels are excavated by the micro tunnel boring machine at a consistent depth and are substantially parallel to each other. As tunneling progresses, steel casing sections are connected end to end in the excavated portion of the tunnel so that a steel tube is formed. Each casing section has complementary interlocking structure running its length that interlocks with complementary interlocking structure on the adjacent casing section. Thus, once the first tube is emplaced, placement of subsequent tubes is facilitated by the complementary interlocking structure on the adjacent, previously placed, casing sections.

Kostelnik, Kevin M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kawamura, Hideki (Tokyo, JP); Richardson, John G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Noda, Masaru (Tokyo, JP)

2004-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

388

Early maturation processes in coal. Part 2: Reactive dynamics simulations using the ReaxFF reactive force field on Morwell Brown coal structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for each source rock. This allowed the bulk rate of oil and gas generation for a source rockEarly maturation processes in coal. Part 2: Reactive dynamics simulations using the ReaxFF reactive

Goddard III, William A.

389

Monitoring of saline tracer movement with vertically distributed self-potential measurements at the HOBE agricultural test site, Voulund, Denmark  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The self-potential (SP) method is sensitive to water fluxes in saturated and partially saturated porous media, such as those associated with rainwater infiltration and groundwater recharge. We present a field-based study at the Voulund agricultural test site, Denmark, that is, to the best of our knowledge, the first to focus on the vertical self-potential distribution prior to and during a saline tracer test. A coupled hydrogeophysical modeling framework is used to simulate the SP response to precipitation and saline tracer infiltration. A layered hydrological model is first obtained by inverting dielectric and matric potential data. The resulting model that compares favorably with electrical resistance tomography models is subsequently used to predict the SP response. The electrokinetic contribution (caused by water fluxes in a charged porous soil) is modeled by an effective excess charge approach that considers both water saturation and pore water salinity. Our results suggest that the effective excess char...

Jougnot, Damien; Haarder, Eline B; Looms, Majken C

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Preliminary Interpretation of a Radionuclide and Colloid Tracer Test in a Granodiorite Shear Zone at the Grimsel Test Site, Switzerland  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In February and March 2012, a tracer test involving the injection of a radionuclide-colloid cocktail was conducted in the MI shear zone at the Grimsel Test Site, Switzerland, as part of the Colloids Formation and Migration (CFM) project. The colloids were derived from FEBEX bentonite, which is mined in Spain and is being considered as a potential waste package backfill in a Spanish nuclear waste repository. The tracer test, designated test 12-02 (second test in 2012), involved the injection of the tracer cocktail into borehole CFM 06.002i2 and extraction from the Pinkel surface packer at the main access tunnel wall approximately 6.1 m from the injection interval. The test configuration is depicted in Figure 1. This configuration has been used in several conservative tracer tests and two colloid-homologue tracer tests since 2007, and it is will be employed in an upcoming test involving the emplacement of a radionuclide-doped bentonite plug into CFM 06.002i2 to evaluate the swelling and erosion of the bentonite and the transport of bentonite colloids and radionuclides from the source to the extraction point at the tunnel wall. Interpretive analyses of several of the previous tracer tests, from 09-01 through 12-02 were provided in two previous Used Fuel Disposition Program milestone reports (Arnold et al., 2011; Kersting et al., 2012). However, only the data for the conservative tracer Amino-G Acid was previously analyzed from test 12-02 because the other tracer data from this test were not available at the time. This report documents the first attempt to quantitatively analyze the radionuclide and colloid breakthrough curves from CFM test 12-02. This report was originally intended to also include an experimental assessment of colloid-facilitated transport of uranium by bentonite colloids in the Grimsel system, but this assessment was not conducted because it was reported by German collaborators at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) that neither uranium nor neptunium adsorbed appreciably to FEBEX bentonite colloids in Grimsel groundwater (Huber et al., 2011). The Grimsel groundwater has a relatively high pH of {approx}9, so the lack of uranium and neptunium adsorption to clay is not surprising given the tendency for these actinides to form very stable negative or neutrally-charged uranyl- or calcium-uranyl-carbonate complexes at these pH, particularly in a water that is effectively saturated with respect to calcite. It was also observed in testing conducted at LANL earlier in 2012 that uranium did not adsorb measurably to Grimsel granodiorite in a synthetic Grimsel groundwater at pH {approx}8.5 (Kersting et al., 2012). Thus, the planned experimental work was not pursued because all the available information clearly pointed to an expected result that uranium transport would not be facilitated by clay colloids in the Grimsel system.

Reimus, Paul W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

391

Transport of tracers and pollutants from the Geysers Geothermal Resource Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An initial analysis of both surface and aerial SF/sub 6/ tracer data from the Geysers illustrates the importance that terrain, vertical wind shear, time-varying winds and stability have on the downwind distribution of cooling tower effluents during the daytime. Atmospheric stability and near surface winds above 3 m/s results in fumigation and surface impaction of a portion of cooling tower plumes on downwind surfaces and terrain. Vertical wind shear and possible gravity waves in upper-levels (approx. 1800 to 2000 m m.s.l), in addition, to terrain influences assist in distributing plumes horizontally and in the vertical at relative short (approx. 10 to 20 km) distances from the source. Small quantities of gaseous sulfur, primarily H/sub 2/S, are transported up to 20 km or more from the Geysers area. A variety of trace materials such as sulfate, copper, zinc, arsenic, bromine, lead, antimony, selenium and barium appear to be enriched over background levels and transported downwind from the Geysers Area at times.

Orgill, M.M.; Lee, R.N.; Schreck, R.I.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Reservoir characterization based on tracer response and rank analysis of production and injection rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantification of the spatial distribution of properties is important for many reservoir-engineering applications. But, before applying any reservoir-characterization technique, the type of problem to be tackled and the information available should be analyzed. This is important because difficulties arise in reservoirs where production records are the only information for analysis. This paper presents the results of a practical technique to determine preferential flow trends in a reservoir. The technique is a combination of reservoir geology, tracer data, and Spearman rank correlation coefficient analysis. The Spearman analysis, in particular, will prove to be important because it appears to be insightful and uses injection/production data that are prevalent in circumstances where other data are nonexistent. The technique is applied to the North Buck Draw field, Campbell County, Wyoming. This work provides guidelines to assess information about reservoir continuity in interwell regions from widely available measurements of production and injection rates at existing wells. The information gained from the application of this technique can contribute to both the daily reservoir management and the future design, control, and interpretation of subsequent projects in the reservoir, without the need for additional data.

Refunjol, B.T. [Lagoven, S.A., Pdvsa (Venezuela); Lake, L.W. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

A New Multi-wavelength Solar Telescope: Optical and Near-infrared Solar Eruption Tracer (ONSET)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new multi-wavelength solar telescope, Optical and Near-infrared Solar Eruption Tracer (ONSET) of Nanjing University, was constructed, being fabricated by Nanjing Institute of Astronomical Optics & Technology and run in cooperation with Yunnan Astronomical Observatory. ONSET is able to observe the Sun in three wavelength windows: He {\\small I} 10830 \\AA, H$\\alpha$, and white-light at 3600 \\AA and 4250 \\AA, which are selected in order to obtain the dynamics in the corona, chromosphere, and the photosphere simultaneously. Full-disk or partial-disk solar images with a field of 10 arcmin at three wavelengths can be obtained nearly simultaneously. It is designed to trace solar eruptions with high spatial and temporal resolutions. This telescope was installed at a new solar observing site near Fuxian Lake in Yunnan Province, southwest China. The site is located at E102N24, with an altitude of 1722 m. The seeing is stable and of high quality. We give a brief description of the scientific objectives and the basi...

Fang, C; Li, Z; Ding, M D; Dai, Y; Zhang, X Y; Mao, W J; Zhang, J P; Li, T; Liang, Y J; Lu, H T

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Wear Measurement of Highly Cross-linked UHMWPE using a 7Be Tracer Implantation Technique  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The very low wear rates achieved with the current highly cross-linked ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylenes (UHMWPE) used in joint prostheses have proven to be difficult to measure accurately by gravimetry. Tracer methods are there- fore being explored. The purpose of this study was to perform a proof-of-concept experiment on the use of the radioactive tracer beryllium-7 (7Be) for the determination of in vitro wear in a highly cross-linked orthopedic UHMWPE. Three cross-linked and four conventional UHMWPE pins made from compression- molded GUR 1050, were activated with 109 to 1010 7Be nuclei using a new implantation setup that produced a homogenous distribution of implanted nuclei up to 8.5 lm below the surface. The pins were tested for wear in a six-station pin-on-flat appara- tus for up to 7.1 million cycles (178 km). A Germanium gamma detector was employed to determine activity loss of the UHMWPE pins at preset intervals during the wear test. The wear of the cross-linked UHMWPE pins was readily detected and esti- mated to be 17 6 3 lg per million cycles. The conventional-to- cross-linked ratio of the wear rates was 13.1 6 0.8, in the expected range for these materials. Oxidative degradation dam- age from implantation was negligible; however, a weak depend- ence of wear on implantation dose was observed limiting the number of radioactive tracer atoms that can be introduced. Future applications of this tracer technology may include the analysis of location-specific wear, such as loss of material in the post or backside of a tibial insert.

Wimmer, Markus A. [Rush Uniiv. Medical Center; Laurent, Michael P. [Rush Univ. Medical Center; Dwivedi, Yasha [Rush Univ. Medical Center; Gallardo, Luis A. [Rush Univ. Medical Center; Chipps, K. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Blackmon, Jeffery C [Louisiana State University; Kozub, R. L. [Tennessee Technological University; Bardayan, Daniel W [ORNL; Gross, Carl J [ORNL; Stracener, Daniel W [ORNL; Smith, Michael Scott [ORNL; Nesaraja, Caroline D [ORNL; Erikson, Luke [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Patel, Nidhi [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Rehm, Karl E. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Ahmad, Irshad [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Greene, John P. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Greife, Uwe [Colorado School of Mines, Golden

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Interpretation of Colloid-Homologue Tracer Test 10-03, Including Comparisons to Test 10-01  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation covers the interpretations of colloid-homologue tracer test 10-03 conducted at the Grimsel Test Site, Switzerland, in 2010. It also provides a comparison of the interpreted test results with those of tracer test 10-01, which was conducted in the same fracture flow system and using the same tracers than test 10-03, but at a higher extraction flow rate. A method of correcting for apparent uranine degradation in test 10-03 is presented. Conclusions are: (1) Uranine degradation occurred in test 10-03, but not in 10-01; (2) Uranine correction based on apparent degradation rate in injection loop in test 11-02 seems reasonable when applied to data from test 10-03; (3) Colloid breakthrough curves quite similar in the two tests with similar recoveries relative to uranine (after correction); and (4) Much slower apparent desorption of homologues in test 10-03 than in 10-01 (any effect of residual homologues from test 10-01 in test 10-03?).

Reimus, Paul W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

396

Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Siemens has developed a roadmap to achieve the DOE goals for efficiency, cost reduction, and emissions through innovative approaches and novel technologies which build upon worldwide IGCC operational experience, platform technology, and extensive experience in G-class operating conditions. In Phase 1, the technologies and concepts necessary to achieve the program goals were identified for the gas turbine components and supporting technology areas and testing plans were developed to mitigate identified risks. Multiple studies were conducted to evaluate the impact in plant performance of different gas turbine and plant technologies. 2015 gas turbine technologies showed a significant improvement in IGCC plant efficiency, however, a severe performance penalty was calculated for high carbon capture cases. Thermodynamic calculations showed that the DOE 2010 and 2015 efficiency targets can be met with a two step approach. A risk management process was instituted in Phase 1 to identify risk and develop mitigation plans. For the risks identified, testing and development programs are in place and the risks will be revisited periodically to determine if changes to the plan are necessary. A compressor performance prediction has shown that the design of the compressor for the engine can be achieved with additional stages added to the rear of the compressor. Tip clearance effects were studied as well as a range of flow and pressure ratios to evaluate the impacts to both performance and stability. Considerable data was obtained on the four candidate combustion systems: diffusion, catalytic, premix, and distributed combustion. Based on the results of Phase 1, the premixed combustion system and the distributed combustion system were chosen as having the most potential and will be the focus of Phase 2 of the program. Significant progress was also made in obtaining combustion kinetics data for high hydrogen fuels. The Phase 1 turbine studies indicate initial feasibility of the advanced hydrogen turbine that meets the aggressive targets set forth for the advanced hydrogen turbine, including increased rotor inlet temperature (RIT), lower total cooling and leakage air (TCLA) flow, higher pressure ratio, and higher mass flow through the turbine compared to the baseline. Maintaining efficiency with high mass flow Syngas combustion is achieved using a large high AN2 blade 4, which has been identified as a significant advancement beyond the current state-of-the-art. Preliminary results showed feasibility of a rotor system capable of increased power output and operating conditions above the baseline. In addition, several concepts were developed for casing components to address higher operating conditions. Rare earth modified bond coat for the purpose of reducing oxidation and TBC spallation demonstrated an increase in TBC spallation life of almost 40%. The results from Phase 1 identified two TBC compositions which satisfy the thermal conductivity requirements and have demonstrated phase stability up to temperatures of 1850 C. The potential to join alloys using a bonding process has been demonstrated and initial HVOF spray deposition trials were promising. The qualitative ranking of alloys and coatings in environmental conditions was also performed using isothermal tests where significant variations in alloy degradation were observed as a function of gas composition. Initial basic system configuration schematics and working system descriptions have been produced to define key boundary data and support estimation of costs. Review of existing materials in use for hydrogen transportation show benefits or tradeoffs for materials that could be used in this type of applications. Hydrogen safety will become a larger risk than when using natural gas fuel as the work done to date in other areas has shown direct implications for this type of use. Studies were conducted which showed reduced CO{sub 2} and NOx emissions with increased plant efficiency. An approach to maximize plant output is needed in order to address the DOE turbine goal for 20-30% reduction o

Joesph Fadok

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Advanced LBB methodology and considerations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

LBB applications have existed in many industries and more recently have been applied in the nuclear industry under limited circumstances. Research over the past 10 years has evolved the technology so that more advanced consideration of LBB can now be given. Some of the advanced considerations for nuclear plants subjected to seismic loading evaluations are summarized in this paper.

Olson, R.; Rahman, S.; Scott, P. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)] [and others

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Systems Engineering Advancement Research Initiative  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Systems Engineering Advancement Research Initiative RESEARCH PORTFOLIO Fall 2008 About SEAri http://seari.mit.edu The Systems Engineering Advancement Research Initiative brings together a set of sponsored research projects and a consortium of systems engineering leaders from industry, government, and academia. SEAri is positioned within

de Weck, Olivier L.

399

Apparatus for making environmentally stable reactive alloy powders  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus and method are disclosed for making powder from a metallic melt by atomizing the melt to form droplets and reacting the droplets downstream of the atomizing location with a reactive gas. The droplets are reacted with the gas at a temperature where a solidified exterior surface is formed thereon and where a protective refractory barrier layer (reaction layer) is formed whose penetration into the droplets is limited by the presence of the solidified surface so as to avoid selective reduction of key reactive alloyants needed to achieve desired powder end use properties. The barrier layer protects the reactive powder particles from environmental constituents such as air and water in the liquid or vapor form during subsequent fabrication of the powder to end-use shapes and during use in the intended service environment. 7 figs.

Anderson, I.E.; Lograsso, B.K.; Terpstra, R.L.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

400

Environmentally stable reactive alloy powders and method of making same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus and method are disclosed for making powder from a metallic melt by atomizing the melt to form droplets and reacting the droplets downstream of the atomizing location with a reactive gas. The droplets are reacted with the gas at a temperature where a solidified exterior surface is formed thereon and where a protective refractory barrier layer (reaction layer) is formed whose penetration into the droplets is limited by the presence of the solidified surface so as to avoid selective reduction of key reactive alloys needed to achieve desired powder end use properties. The barrier layer protects the reactive powder particles from environmental constituents such as air and water in the liquid or vapor form during subsequent fabrication of the powder to end-use shapes and during use in the intended service environment. 7 figs.

Anderson, I.E.; Lograsso, B.K.; Terpstra, R.L.

1998-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Options for Control of Reactive Power by Distributed Photovoltaic Generators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High penetration levels of distributed photovoltaic(PV) generation on an electrical distribution circuit present several challenges and opportunities for distribution utilities. Rapidly varying irradiance conditions may cause voltage sags and swells that cannot be compensated by slowly responding utility equipment resulting in a degradation of power quality. Although not permitted under current standards for interconnection of distributed generation, fast-reacting, VAR-capable PV inverters may provide the necessary reactive power injection or consumption to maintain voltage regulation under difficult transient conditions. As side benefit, the control of reactive power injection at each PV inverter provides an opportunity and a new tool for distribution utilities to optimize the performance of distribution circuits, e.g. by minimizing thermal losses. We discuss and compare via simulation various design options for control systems to manage the reactive power generated by these inverters. An important design de...

Sulc, Petr; Backhaus, Scott; Chertkov, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

ADVANCED MIXING MODELS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The process of recovering the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank with one to four dual-nozzle jet mixers located within the tank. The typical criteria to establish a mixed condition in a tank are based on the number of pumps in operation and the time duration of operation. To ensure that a mixed condition is achieved, operating times are set conservatively long. This approach results in high operational costs because of the long mixing times and high maintenance and repair costs for the same reason. A significant reduction in both of these costs might be realized by reducing the required mixing time based on calculating a reliable indicator of mixing with a suitably validated computer code. The work described in this report establishes the basis for further development of the theory leading to the identified mixing indicators, the benchmark analyses demonstrating their consistency with widely accepted correlations, and the application of those indicators to SRS waste tanks to provide a better, physically based estimate of the required mixing time. Waste storage tanks at SRS contain settled sludge which varies in height from zero to 10 ft. The sludge has been characterized and modeled as micron-sized solids, typically 1 to 5 microns, at weight fractions as high as 20 to 30 wt%, specific gravities to 1.4, and viscosities up to 64 cp during motion. The sludge is suspended and mixed through the use of submersible slurry jet pumps. To suspend settled sludge, water is added to the tank as a slurry medium and stirred with the jet pump. Although there is considerable technical literature on mixing and solid suspension in agitated tanks, very little literature has been published on jet mixing in a large-scale tank. If shorter mixing times can be shown to support Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) or other feed requirements, longer pump lifetimes can be achieved with associated operational cost and schedule savings. The focus of the present work is to establish mixing criteria associated with the waste processing at SRS and to quantify the mixing time required to suspend sludge particles with the submersible jet pump. Literature results for a turbulent jet flow are reviewed briefly, since the decay of the axial jet velocity and the evolution of the jet flow patterns are important phenomena affecting sludge suspension and mixing operations. One of the main objectives in the waste processing is to provide the DWPF a uniform slurry composition at a certain weight percentage (typically {approx}13 wt%) over an extended period of time. In preparation of the sludge for slurrying to DWPF, several important questions have been raised with regard to sludge suspension and mixing of the solid suspension in the bulk of the tank: (1) How much time is required to prepare a slurry with a uniform solid composition for DWPF? (2) How long will it take to suspend and mix the sludge for uniform composition in any particular waste tank? (3) What are good mixing indicators to answer the questions concerning sludge mixing stated above in a general fashion applicable to any waste tank/slurry pump geometry and fluid/sludge combination? Grenville and Tilton (1996) investigated the mixing process by giving a pulse of tracer (electrolyte) through the submersible jet nozzle and by monitoring the conductivity at three locations within the cylindrical tank. They proposed that the mixing process was controlled by the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate in the region far away from the jet entrance. They took the energy dissipation rates in the regions remote from the nozzle to be proportional to jet velocity and jet diameter at that location. The reduction in the jet velocity was taken to be proportional to the nozzle velocity and distance from the nozzle. Based on their analysis, a correlation was proposed. The proposed correlation was shown to be valid over a wide range of Reynolds numbers (50,000 to 300,000) with a relative standard deviation of {+-} 11.83%. An improved correlat

Lee, S; Richard Dimenna, R; David Tamburello, D

2008-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

403

Assessment of natural and anthropogenic hydrocarbon inputs using PAHs as tracers.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to produce liquid hydrocarbons and water. -- Coal-to-liquids (CTLs) are derived either by pyrolysis of coal authors accept that conventional oil resources are at an advanced stage of depletion and that liquid fuels is a heterogeneous mix of hydrocarbons that remain in liquid phase when extracted to the surface. -- Condensate

404

Development of an Optimum Tracer Set for Apportioning Emissions of Individual Power Plants Using Highly Time-Resolved Measurements and Advanced Receptor Modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In previous studies, 11 elements (Al, As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Se, and Zn) were determined in 30-minute aerosol samples collected with the University of Maryland Semicontinuous Elements in Aerosol Sampler (SEAS; Kidwell and Ondov, 2001, 2004; SEAS-II) in several locations in which air quality is influenced by emissions from coal- or oil-fired power plants. At this time resolution, plumes from stationary high temperature combustion sources are readily detected as large excursions in ambient concentrations of elements emitted by these sources (Pancras et al. ). Moreover, the time-series data contain intrinsic information on the lateral diffusion of the plume (e.g., {sigma}{sub y}), which Park et al. (2005 and 2006) have exploited in their Pseudo-Deterministic Receptor Model (PDRM), to calculate emission rates of SO{sub 2} and 11 elements (mentioned above) from four individual coal- and oil-fired power plants in the Tampa Bay area. In the current project, we proposed that the resolving power of source apportionment methods might be improved by expanding the set of maker species and that there exist some optimum set of marker species that could be used. The ultimate goal was to determine the utility of using additional elements to better identify and isolate contributions of individual power plants to ambient levels of PM and its constituents. And, having achieved better resolution, achieve, also, better emission rate estimates. In this study, we optimized sample preparation and instrumental protocols for simultaneous analysis of 28 elements in dilute slurry samples collected with the SEAS with a new state-of-the-art Thermo-Systems, Inc., X-series II, Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS), and reanalyzed the samples previously collected in Tampa during the modeling period studied by Park et al. (2005) in which emission rates from four coal- and oil-fired power plants affected air quality at the sampling site. In the original model, Park et al. (2005), included 6 sources. Herein, we reassessed the number of contributing sources in light of the new data. A comprehensive list of sources was prepared and both our Gaussian Plume model and PMF were used to identify and predict the relative strengths of source contributions at the receptor sites. Additionally, PDRM was modified to apply National Inventory Emissions, Toxic Release Inventory, and Chemical Mass Balance source profile data to further constrain solutions. Both the original Tampa data set (SO{sub 2} plus 11 elements) and the new expanded data set (SO{sub 2} plus 23 elements) were used to resolve the contributions of particle constituents and PM to sources using Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) and PDRM.

John Ondov; Gregory Beachley

2007-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

405

Plasma & reactive ion etching to prepare ohmic contacts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of making a low-resistance electrical contact between a metal and a layer of p-type CdTe surface by plasma etching and reactive ion etching comprising: a) placing a CdS/CdTe layer into a chamber and evacuating said chamber; b) backfilling the chamber with Argon or a reactive gas to a pressure sufficient for plasma ignition; and c) generating plasma ignition by energizing a cathode which is connected to a power supply to enable the plasma to interact argon ions alone or in the presence of a radio-frequency DC self-bias voltage with the p-CdTe surface.

Gessert, Timothy A. (Conifer, CO)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Dielectric covered hairpin probe for its application in reactive plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hairpin probe is a well known technique for measuring local electron density in low temperature plasmas. In reactive plasmas, the probe characteristics are affected by surface sputtering, contamination, and secondary electron emission. At higher densities, the plasma absorbs the entire electromagnetic energy of hairpin and hence limits the density measurements. These issues can be resolved by covering the hairpin surface with a thin layer of dielectric. In this letter, the dielectric contribution to the probe characteristics is incorporated in a theory which is experimentally verified. The dielectric covering improves the performance of probe and also allows the hairpin tip to survive in reactive plasma where classical electrical probes are easily damaged.

Gogna, G. S.; Gaman, C.; Turner, M. M. [NCPST, School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Karkari, S. K. [Institute for Plasma Research Center, Bhat Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India)

2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

407

ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the second quarterly progress report for Year-4 of the ACTS Project. It includes a review of progress made in: (1) Flow Loop construction and development and (2) research tasks during the period of time between October 1, 2002 and December 30, 2002. This report presents a review of progress on the following specific tasks. (a) Design and development of an Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility Task 3: Addition of a Cuttings Injection/Separation System, Task 4: Addition of a Pipe Rotation System. (b) New research project (Task 9b): ''Development of a Foam Generator/Viscometer for Elevated Pressure and Elevated Temperature (EPET) Conditions''. (d) Research project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions''. (e) Research on three instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution in a flowing slurry (Task 11), Foam texture while transporting cuttings. (Task 12), and Viscosity of Foam under EPET (Task 9b). (f) New Research project (Task 13): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions''. (g) Development of a Safety program for the ACTS Flow Loop. Progress on a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. (Task 1S). (h) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Lei Zhou; Zhu Chen; Crystal Redden; Aimee Washington

2003-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

408

Advanced robot locomotion.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the results of a research effort on advanced robot locomotion. The majority of this work focuses on walking robots. Walking robot applications include delivery of special payloads to unique locations that require human locomotion to exo-skeleton human assistance applications. A walking robot could step over obstacles and move through narrow openings that a wheeled or tracked vehicle could not overcome. It could pick up and manipulate objects in ways that a standard robot gripper could not. Most importantly, a walking robot would be able to rapidly perform these tasks through an intuitive user interface that mimics natural human motion. The largest obstacle arises in emulating stability and balance control naturally present in humans but needed for bipedal locomotion in a robot. A tracked robot is bulky and limited, but a wide wheel base assures passive stability. Human bipedal motion is so common that it is taken for granted, but bipedal motion requires active balance and stability control for which the analysis is non-trivial. This report contains an extensive literature study on the state-of-the-art of legged robotics, and it additionally provides the analysis, simulation, and hardware verification of two variants of a proto-type leg design.

Neely, Jason C.; Sturgis, Beverly Rainwater; Byrne, Raymond Harry; Feddema, John Todd; Spletzer, Barry Louis; Rose, Scott E.; Novick, David Keith; Wilson, David Gerald; Buerger, Stephen P.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

ADVANCED HYBRID PARTICULATE COLLECTOR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new concept in particulate control, called an advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC), is being developed under funding from the US Department of Energy. The AHPC combines the best features of electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and baghouses in an entirely novel manner. The AHPC concept combines fabric filtration and electrostatic precipitation in the same housing, providing major synergism between the two methods, both in the particulate collection step and in transfer of dust to the hopper. The AHPC provides ultrahigh collection efficiency, overcoming the problem of excessive fine-particle emissions with conventional ESPs, and solves the problem of reentrainment and recollection of dust in conventional baghouses. Phase I of the development effort consisted of design, construction, and testing of a 5.7-m{sup 3}/min (200-acfm) working AHPC model. Results from both 8-hour parametric tests and 100-hour proof-of-concept tests with two different coals demonstrated excellent operability and greater than 99.99% fine-particle collection efficiency.

Stanley J. Miller; Grant L. Schelkoph; Grant E. Dunham

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Advanced Chemistry Basins Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE-funded Advanced Chemistry Basin model project is intended to develop a public domain, user-friendly basin modeling software under PC or low end workstation environment that predicts hydrocarbon generation, expulsion, migration and chemistry. The main features of the software are that it will: (1) afford users the most flexible way to choose or enter kinetic parameters for different maturity indicators; (2) afford users the most flexible way to choose or enter compositional kinetic parameters to predict hydrocarbon composition (e.g., gas/oil ratio (GOR), wax content, API gravity, etc.) at different kerogen maturities; (3) calculate the chemistry, fluxes and physical properties of all hydrocarbon phases (gas, liquid and solid) along the primary and secondary migration pathways of the basin and predict the location and intensity of phase fractionation, mixing, gas washing, etc.; and (4) predict the location and intensity of de-asphaltene processes. The project has be operative for 36 months, and is on schedule for a successful completion at the end of FY 2003.

William Goddard; Mario Blanco; Lawrence Cathles; Paul Manhardt; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang

2002-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

411

Advanced hybrid gasification facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this procurement is to provide a test facility to support early commercialization of advanced fixed-bed coal gasification technology for electric power generation applications. The proprietary CRS Sirrine Engineers, Inc. PyGas{trademark} staged gasifier has been selected as the initial gasifier to be developed under this program. The gasifier is expected to avoid agglomeration when used on caking coals. It is also being designed to crack tar vapors and ammonia, and to provide an environment in which volatilized alkali may react with aluminosilicates in the coal ash thereby minimizing their concentration in the hot raw coal gas passing through the system to the gas turbine. This paper describes a novel, staged, airblown, fixed-bed gasifier designed to solve both through the incorporation of pyrolysis (carbonization) with gasification. It employs a pyrolyzer (carbonizer) to avoid sticky coal agglomeration which occurs in a fixed-bed process when coal is gradually heated through the 400{degrees}F to 900{degrees}F range. In a pyrolyzer, the coal is rapidly heated such that coal tar is immediately vaporized. Gaseous tars are then thermally cracked prior to the completion of the gasification process. During the subsequent endothermic gasification reactions, volatilized alkali can be chemically bound to aluminosilicates in (or added to) the ash. To reduce NOx from fuel home nitrogen, moisture is minimized to control ammonia generation, and HCN in the upper gasifier region is partially oxidized to NO which reacts with NH3/HCN to form N2.

Sadowski, R.S.; Skinner, W.H. [CRS Sirrine, Inc., Greenville, SC (United States); Johnson, S.A. [PSI Technology Co., Andover, MA (United States); Dixit, V.B. [Riley Stoker Corp., Worcester, MA (United States). Riley Research Center

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Modeling The GRB Host Galaxy Mass Distribution: Are GRBs Unbiased Tracers of Star Formation?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We model the mass distribution of long gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxies given recent results suggesting that GRBs occur in low metallicity environments. By utilizing measurements of the redshift evolution of the mass-metallicity (M-Z) relationship for galaxies, along with a sharp host metallicity cut-off suggested by Modjaz and collaborators, we estimate an upper limit on the stellar mass of a galaxy that can efficiently produce a GRB as a function of redshift. By employing consistent abundance indicators, we find that sub-solar metallicity cut-offs effectively limit GRBs to low stellar mass spirals and dwarf galaxies at low redshift. At higher redshifts, as the average metallicity of galaxies in the Universe falls, the mass range of galaxies capable of hosting a GRB broadens, with an upper bound approaching the mass of even the largest spiral galaxies. We compare these predicted limits to the growing number of published GRB host masses and find that extremely low metallicity cut-offs of 0.1 to 0.5 Z{sub {circle_dot}} are effectively ruled out by a large number of intermediate mass galaxies at low redshift. A mass function that includes a smooth decrease in the efficiency of producing GRBs in galaxies of metallicity above 12+log(O/H){sub KK04} = 8.7 can, however, accommodate a majority of the measured host galaxy masses. We find that at z {approx} 1, the peak in the observed GRB host mass distribution is inconsistent with the expected peak in the mass of galaxies harboring most of the star formation. This suggests that GRBs are metallicity biased tracers of star formation at low and intermediate redshifts, although our model predicts that this bias should disappear at higher redshifts due to the evolving metallicity content of the universe.

Kocevski, Daniel; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; West, Andrew A.; /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /MIT, MKI; Modjaz, Maryam; /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept.

2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

413

Effect of Cr2O3 on the 18O Tracer Incorporation in SOFC Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Investigations of the impact of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlayers on the oxygen self diffusion in two SOFC materials were conducted to gain insight into the Cr poisoning mechanism at the cathode side of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) with stainless steel interconnects. High density Y{sub 0.15}Zr{sub 0.85}O{sub 2} (YSZ) and La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (LSCF) sintered pellets were covered with 3 to 30 nm Cr overlayers that were subsequently oxidized, forming Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Standard {sup 18}O tracer diffusion experiments at 800 C were performed and ToF-SIMS profiling revealed that the oxygen ion diffusion coefficients were unaffected by the thin Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlayers, which is predictable since they are a bulk property, but the extracted effective surface exchange coefficients varied with Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlayer thickness. Solid-state reaction measurements and electronic structure considerations concerning the surface exchange, led to the conclusion that the observed oxygen uptake hindrance for Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} capped LSCF and the slight increase of the surface exchange coefficient for Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} capped YSZ can be attributed to the electronic properties of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. A critical thickness for Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} was determined to be 12 nm where the transition from decreasing cathode-performance to a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-property-governed regime occurs.

Finsterbusch, M.; Lussier, A; Negusse, E; Zhu, Z; Smith, R; Schaefer, J; Idzerda, Y

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Advanced Neutron Source reactor control and plant protection systems design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the reactor control and plant protection systems' conceptual design of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS). The Plant Instrumentation, Control, and Data Systems and the Reactor Instrumentation and Control System of the ANS are planned as an integrated digital system with a hierarchical, distributed control structure of qualified redundant subsystems and a hybrid digital/analog protection system to achieve the necessary fast response for critical parameters. Data networks transfer information between systems for control, display, and recording. Protection is accomplished by the rapid insertion of negative reactivity with control rods or other reactivity mechanisms to shut down the fission process and reduce heat generation in the fuel. The shutdown system is designed for high functional reliability by use of conservative design features and a high degree of redundance and independence to guard against single failures. Two independent reactivity control systems of different design principles are provided, and each system has multiple independent rods or subsystems to provide appropriate margin for malfunctions such as stuck rods or other single failures. Each system is capable of maintaining the reactor in a cold shutdown condition independently of the functioning of the other system. A highly reliable, redundant channel control system is used not only to achieve high availability of the reactor, but also to reduce challenges to the protection system by maintaining important plant parameters within appropriate limits. The control system has a number of contingency features to maintain acceptable, off-normal conditions in spite of limited control or plant component failures thereby further reducing protection system challenges.

Anderson, J.L.; Battle, R.E.; March-Leuba, J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Khayat, M.I. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Non-Energetic Reactive Armor (NERA) and Semi-Energetic Reactive Armor (SERA) FY13 Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

INL researchers have proposed prototypes for future lightweight armor systems that reside in a technology gap between explosive reactive armor and passive armor. The targets were designed to react under impact and throw a steel front plate into the path of the projectile, forcing the projectile to engage more of the front plate during its penetration process. These prototypes are intended to exhibit the enhanced efficiency of explosive reactive armor without the collateral damage often associated with explosive reactive armor. One of the prototype systems, Semi Energetic Reactive Armor (SERA), functions similarly to explosive reactive armor, but features a reactive material that reacts much slower than explosive reactive armor. Two different SERA test groups were built and featuring different ratios of aluminum Teflon(copyright) powders pressed into 0.5 in. thick energetic tiles and sandwiched between 0.25 in. thick RHA plates. The other prototype system, Non Energetic Reactive Armor (NERA), utilizes the strain energy in compressed rubber to launch a front flyer plate into the path of an incoming projectile. It is comprised of a 1 in. thick rubber layer sandwiched between two 0.25 in. thick RHA plates with bolt holes around the perimeter. Bolts are inserted through the entire target and tightened to compress the rubber sheet to significant strain levels (approximately 40%). A fourth group of targets was tested as a control group. It featured a 0.5 in. thick rubber sheet sandwiched between two 0.25 in. thick RHA plates, similar to the NERA test articles, but the rubber is uncompressed. The four test groups (uncompressed rubber, compressed rubber, 70/30 Al/PTFE, 50/50 Al/PTFE) were each fabricated with three identical test articles in each group. All twelve targets were subjected to ballistic testing at the National Security Test Range on July 17, 2013. They were tested with 0.5 in. diameter steel rods shot at a consistent velocity at each target. In order to characterize the energetic materials, break wires were embedded in the targets and burn velocities were measured. The residual mass method was used to compare the target performance of each group and final performance data is presented below.

Ben Langhorst; Nikki Rasmussen; Andrew Robinson

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

State Technologies Advancement Collaborative  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO), and Association of State Energy Research and Technology Transfer Institutions (ASERTTI) signed an intergovernmental agreement on November 14, 2002, that allowed states and territories and the Federal Government to better collaborate on energy research, development, demonstration and deployment (RDD&D) projects. The agreement established the State Technologies Advancement Collaborative (STAC) which allowed the states and DOE to move RDD&D forward using an innovative competitive project selection and funding process. A cooperative agreement between DOE and NASEO served as the contracting instrument for this innovative federal-state partnership obligating funds from DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and Office of Fossil Energy to plan, fund, and implement RDD&D projects that were consistent with the common priorities of the states and DOE. DOE's Golden Field Office provided Federal oversight and guidance for the STAC cooperative agreement. The STAC program was built on the foundation of prior Federal-State efforts to collaborate on and engage in joint planning for RDD&D. Although STAC builds on existing, successful programs, it is important to note that it was not intended to replace other successful joint DOE/State initiatives such as the State Energy Program or EERE Special Projects. Overall the STAC process was used to fund, through three competitive solicitations, 35 successful multi-state research, development, deployment, and demonstration projects with an overall average non-federal cost share of 43%. Twenty-two states were awarded at least one prime contract, and organizations in all 50 states and some territories were involved as subcontractors in at least one STAC project. Projects were funded in seven program areas: (1) Building Technologies, (2) Industrial Technologies, (3) Transportation Technologies, (4) Distributed Energy Resources, (5) Hydrogen Technology Learning Centers, (6) Fossil Energy, and (7) Rebuild America.

David S. Terry

2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

417

Advanced Geothermal Turbodrill  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approximately 50% of the cost of a new geothermal power plant is in the wells that must be drilled. Compared to the majority of oil and gas wells, geothermal wells are more difficult and costly to drill for several reasons. First, most U.S. geothermal resources consist of hot, hard crystalline rock formations which drill much slower than the relatively soft sedimentary formations associated with most oil and gas production. Second, high downhole temperatures can greatly shorten equipment life or preclude the use of some technologies altogether. Third, producing viable levels of electricity from geothermal fields requires the use of large diameter bores and a high degree of fluid communication, both of which increase drilling and completion costs. Optimizing fluid communication often requires creation of a directional well to intersect the best and largest number of fracture capable of producing hot geothermal fluids. Moineau motor stators made with elastomers cannot operate at geothermal temperatures, so they are limited to the upper portion of the hole. To overcome these limitations, Maurer Engineering Inc. (MEI) has developed a turbodrill that does not use elastomers and therefore can operate at geothermal temperatures. This new turbodrill uses a special gear assembly to reduce the output speed, thus allowing a larger range of bit types, especially tri-cone roller bits, which are the bits of choice for drilling hard crystalline formations. The Advanced Geothermal Turbodrill (AGT) represents a significant improvement for drilling geothermal wells and has the potential to significantly reduce drilling costs while increasing production, thereby making geothermal energy less expensive and better able to compete with fossil fuels. The final field test of the AGT will prepare the tool for successful commercialization.

W. C. Maurer

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The market for power generation equipment is undergoing a tremendous transformation. The traditional electric utility industry is restructuring, promising new opportunities and challenges for all facilities to meet their demands for electric and thermal energy. Now more than ever, facilities have a host of options to choose from, including new distributed generation (DG) technologies that are entering the market as well as existing DG options that are improving in cost and performance. The market is beginning to recognize that some of these users have needs beyond traditional grid-based power. Together, these changes are motivating commercial and industrial facilities to re-evaluate their current mix of energy services. One of the emerging generating options is a new breed of advanced fuel cells. While there are a variety of fuel cell technologies being developed, the solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) and molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) are especially promising, with their electric efficiency expected around 50-60 percent and their ability to generate either hot water or high quality steam. In addition, they both have the attractive characteristics of all fuel cells--relatively small siting footprint, rapid response to changing loads, very low emissions, quiet operation, and an inherently modular design lending itself to capacity expansion at predictable unit cost with reasonably short lead times. The objectives of this project are to:(1) Estimate the market potential for high efficiency fuel cell hybrids in the U.S.;(2) Segment market size by commercial, industrial, and other key markets;(3) Identify and evaluate potential early adopters; and(4) Develop results that will help prioritize and target future R&D investments. The study focuses on high efficiency MCFC- and SOFC-based hybrids and competing systems such as gas turbines, reciprocating engines, fuel cells and traditional grid service. Specific regions in the country have been identified where these technologies and the corresponding early adopters are likely to be located.

Sy Ali

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Development of a system model for advanced small modular reactors.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a system model that can be used to analyze three advance small modular reactor (SMR) designs through their lifetime. Neutronics of these reactor designs were evaluated using Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX/6). The system models were developed in Matlab and Simulink. A major thrust of this research was the initial scoping analysis of Sandia's concept of a long-life fast reactor (LLFR). The inherent characteristic of this conceptual design is to minimize the change in reactivity over the lifetime of the reactor. This allows the reactor to operate substantially longer at full power than traditional light water reactors (LWRs) or other SMR designs (e.g. high temperature gas reactor (HTGR)). The system model has subroutines for lifetime reactor feedback and operation calculations, thermal hydraulic effects, load demand changes and a simplified SCO2 Brayton cycle for power conversion.

Lewis, Tom Goslee,; Holschuh, Thomas Vernon,

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

MARKETS FOR REACTIVE POWER AND RELIABILITY: A WHITE PAPER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 MARKETS FOR REACTIVE POWER AND RELIABILITY: A WHITE PAPER Engineering and Economics of Electricity Research Group (E3 RG) CORNELL UNIVERSITY E3 RG contributing authors: Robert Thomas, Director the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) and in part by the National Science

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Surface tension in a reactive binary mixture of incompressible fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Surface tension in a reactive binary mixture of incompressible fluids Henning Struchtrup Institute with a distributed form of surface tension. The model describes chemistry, diffusion, viscosity and heat transfer tension at the front. Keywords: Binary mixtures, Surface tension, Irreversible thermodynamics, Hele

Struchtrup, Henning

422

Dependency Analysis for Control Flow Cycles in Reactive Communicating Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the system. The way in which cycle executions are combined is not ar- bitrary since cycles may depend are combined is certainly not arbitrary. For instance, the repetition of one cycle may rely on the repetitionsDependency Analysis for Control Flow Cycles in Reactive Communicating Processes Stefan Leue1 , Alin

Leue, Stefan

423

Dependency Analysis for Control Flow Cycles in Reactive Communicating Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

processes of the system. The way in which cycle executions are combined is not ar- bitrary since cycles may in which cycle executions are combined is certainly not arbitrary. For instance, the repetition of oneDependency Analysis for Control Flow Cycles in Reactive Communicating Processes Stefan Leue1 , Alin

Reiterer, Harald

424

Active and reactive power in stochastic resonance for energy harvesting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A power allocation to active and reactive power in stochastic resonance is discussed for energy harvesting from mechanical noise. It is confirmed that active power can be increased at stochastic resonance, in the same way of the relationship between energy and phase at an appropriate setting in resonance.

Kubota, Madoka; Hikihara, Takashi

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Permeable Reactive Biobarriers for the Containment of Heavy Metal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Heavy metals are leached as ground water reaches the exposed ores. Arizona has a rich historyPermeable Reactive Biobarriers for the Containment of Heavy Metal Contamination in Acid Mine) is defined as the presence heavy metals, increased acidity, and sulfate as a direct result of mining

Fay, Noah

426

Reactive materials can quickly form plugs for blowout control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various types of reactive materials, or gunk, can react directly with produced fluids (oil, condensate, or brine) or with an additionally injected fluid to form a plug to kill blowout wells or shut off large flow paths. Several recent blowouts were successfully controlled with reactive plugs; other conventional methods would have been more difficult operationally and cost more. Several plug mixtures are available on the market and can be made to suit the type of application and any particular environmental concerns. With proper planning and application, reactive plugs should be considered as a prime well control method when injection into the blowout flow path is available. This method of blowout control can save significant time and expense. The paper discusses the two basic methods of using reactive fluids depending on the flow path available, the use of cements, application steps, environmental concerns, and three case histories: a horizontal well in Texas, a high pressure, high temperature well offshore Louisiana, and a gas blowout in Argentina.

Flak, L.H. [Wright Boots and Coots, Houston, TX (United States)

1995-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

427

Toward a new paradigm for reactive flow modeling.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Traditional reactive flow modeling provides a computational representation of shock initiation of energetic materials. Most reactive flow models require ad hoc assumptions to obtain robust simulations, assumptions that result from partitioning energy and volume change between constituents in a reactive mixture. For example, most models assume pressure and/or temperature equilibrium for the mixture. Many mechanical insults to energetic materials violate these approximations. Careful analysis is required to ensure that the model assumptions and limitations are not exceeded. One limitation is that the shock to detonation transition is replicated only for strong planar shocks. Many models require different parameters to match data from thin pulse, ramp wave, or multidimensional loading, an approach that fails for complex loading. To accurately simulate reaction under non-planar shock impact scenarios a new formalism is required. The continuum mixture theory developed by Baer and Nunziato is used to eliminate ad hoc assumptions and limitations of current reactive flow models. This modeling paradigm represents the multiphase nature of reacting condensed/gas mixtures. Comparisons between simulations and data are presented.

Schmitt, Robert Gerard

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Substituent Effects on the Reactivity of the Silicon-Carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Canada L8S 4M1 Received April 28, 2000 ABSTRACT Laser flash photolysis of various organosilicon compounds as a reactive intermediate in the high-temperature pyrolysis of a silacyclobutane deriva- tive.9 Hundreds describes our efforts to employ these techniquess laser flash photolysis methods in particularsto study

Leigh, William J.

429

Author's personal copy Reactivity of lithium exposed graphite surface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the surface [18]. Hence the effect of lithium on plasma­wall interactions is expected to dependAuthor's personal copy Reactivity of lithium exposed graphite surface S.S. Harilal a, *, J in fusion devices [1­5]. For example, wall conditioning with thin lithium layers gives rise to low hydrogen

Harilal, S. S.

430

A REACTIVE APPROACH FOR MINING PROJECT EVALUATION UNDER PRICE UNCERTAINTY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

deterministic forward commodity price which, in most cases, historical data demonstrates to be quite volatileA REACTIVE APPROACH FOR MINING PROJECT EVALUATION UNDER PRICE UNCERTAINTY Meimei Zhang and operating cash flow. This industry is usually considered high risk because of historically volatile

Duffy, Ken

431

Neutron economic reactivity control system for light water reactors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A neutron reactivity control system for a LWBR incorporating a stationary seed-blanket core arrangement. The core arrangement includes a plurality of contiguous hexagonal shaped regions. Each region has a central and a peripheral blanket area juxapositioned an annular seed area. The blanket areas contain thoria fuel rods while the annular seed area includes seed fuel rods and movable thoria shim control rods.

Luce, Robert G. (Glenville, NY); McCoy, Daniel F. (Latham, NY); Merriman, Floyd C. (Rotterdam, NY); Gregurech, Steve (Scotia, NY)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Stability, electronic structure and reactivity of the polymerized fullerite forms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stability, electronic structure and reactivity of the polymerized fullerite forms V.V. Belavina , L density distribution from selected crystal orbitals of polymerized C60 forms was carried out. Linear chain with the highest occupied (HO) and lowest unoccupied (LU) bands. The polymerized C60 forms were found to be less

433

Field, Laboratory, and Modeling Study of Reactive Transport of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of New York, Flushing, New York 11367, Department of Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry, Woods Hole Bay, MA, shed light on coupled control of chemistry and hydrology on reactive transport), phosphate (5), and oxyanions of molybdenum (6) and uranium (7, 8) in aquifers. In addition

434

Effect of Number of Fractionating Trays on Reactive Distillation Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of Number of Fractionating Trays on Reactive Distillation Performance Muhammad A. Al and rectifying sec- tions of a reacti®e distillation column can degrade performance. This effect, if true®e distillation columns cannot use conser®ati®e estimates of tray numbers, that is, we cannot simply add excess

Al-Arfaj, Muhammad A.

435

Towards Energy-Efficient Reactive Thermal Management in Instrumented Datacenters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Towards Energy-Efficient Reactive Thermal Management in Instrumented Datacenters Ivan Rodero, Eun techniques used to alleviate thermal anomalies (i.e., hotspots) in cloud datacenter's servers of by reducing such as voltage scaling that also can be applied to reduce the temperature of the servers in datacenters. Because

Pompili, Dario

436

Generalized Chemical Reactivity of Curved Surfaces: Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Following the decomposition, the total reaction energy Etotal, which is the index of chemical reactivity, can be divided into three terms: strain energy Estrain, C-X binding energy EC-X, and global relaxation in a CNT can enhance the hydrogenation energy at the location of the excess deformation so

Srivastava, Deepak

437

Local control of reactive power by distributed photovoltaic generators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High penetration levels of distributed photovoltaic (PV) generation on an electrical distribution circuit may severely degrade power quality due to voltage sags and swells caused by rapidly varying PV generation during cloud transients coupled with the slow response of existing utility compensation and regulation equipment. Although not permitted under current standards for interconnection of distributed generation, fast-reacting, VAR-capable PV inverters may provide the necessary reactive power injection or consumption to maintain voltage regulation under difficult transient conditions. As side benefit, the control of reactive power injection at each PV inverter provides an opportunity and a new tool for distribution utilities to optimize the performance of distribution circuits, e.g. by minimizing thermal losses. We suggest a local control scheme that dispatches reactive power from each PV inverter based on local instantaneous measurements of the real and reactive components of the consumed power and the real power generated by the PVs. Using one adjustable parameter per circuit, we balance the requirements on power quality and desire to minimize thermal losses. Numerical analysis of two exemplary systems, with comparable total PV generation albeit a different spatial distribution, show how to adjust the optimization parameter depending on the goal. Overall, this local scheme shows excellent performance; it's capable of guaranteeing acceptable power quality and achieving significant saving in thermal losses in various situations even when the renewable generation in excess of the circuit own load, i.e. feeding power back to the higher-level system.

Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Turitsyn, Konstantin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sulc, Petr [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Backhaus, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Reactive Phosphorus Removal from Aquaculture and Poultry Productions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reactive Phosphorus Removal from Aquaculture and Poultry Productions Systems Using Polymeric and poultry production wastewater effluents. The sorbent used was a cross-linked polyamine (PAA,HCl) polymeric poultry and aquaculture wastewater effluents. Upon treatment, phosphorus anion concentrations were reduced

Rubloff, Gary W.

439

Abduction with Negation as Failure for Active and Reactive Rules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abduction with Negation as Failure for Active and Reactive Rules Fariba Sadri and Francesca Toni suggested abductive logic programming as a suitable formalism to represent active databases and intelligent agents. In particular, abducibles in abductive logic programs can be used to repre- sent actions

Toni, Francesca

440

Nitrogen dynamics in flow-through microcosms of reactive media.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wastewater inputs to estuaries is similarly an important issue. Individual wastewater treatments have been University, Worcester MA December 19, 2005 Marine Biological Laboratory 1 #12;Abstract There have been many, the Marine Biological Laboratory is currently testing two experimental permeable reactive barriers along

Vallino, Joseph J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Draft Advanced Nuclear Energy Solicitation Public Meeting Presentation...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Draft Advanced Nuclear Energy Solicitation Public Meeting Presentation Draft Advanced Nuclear Energy Solicitation Public Meeting Presentation Draft Advanced Nuclear Solicitation...

442

Advanced Mud System for Microhole Coiled Tubing Drilling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An advanced mud system was designed and key components were built that augment a coiled tubing drilling (CTD) rig that is designed specifically to drill microholes (less than 4-inch diameter) with advanced drilling techniques. The mud system was tailored to the hydraulics of the hole geometries and rig characteristics required for microholes and is capable of mixing and circulating mud and removing solids while being self contained and having zero discharge capability. Key components of this system are two modified triplex mud pumps (High Pressure Slurry Pumps) for advanced Abrasive Slurry Jetting (ASJ) and a modified Gas-Liquid-Solid (GLS) Separator for well control, flow return and initial processing. The system developed also includes an additional component of an advanced version of ASJ which allows cutting through most all materials encountered in oil and gas wells including steel, cement, and all rock types. It includes new fluids and new ASJ nozzles. The jetting mechanism does not require rotation of the bottom hole assembly or drill string, which is essential for use with Coiled Tubing (CT). It also has low reactive forces acting on the CT and generates cuttings small enough to be easily cleaned from the well bore, which is important in horizontal drilling. These cutting and mud processing components and capabilities compliment the concepts put forth by DOE for microhole coiled tubing drilling (MHTCTD) and should help insure the reality of drilling small diameter holes quickly and inexpensively with a minimal environmental footprint and that is efficient, compact and portable. Other components (site liners, sump and transfer pumps, stacked shakers, filter membranes, etc.. ) of the overall mud system were identified as readily available in industry and will not be purchased until we are ready to drill a specific well.

Kenneth Oglesby

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Westinghouse Advanced Reactors...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Advanced Reactors Div Plutonium and Advanced Fuel Labs - PA 10 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: WESTINGHOUSE ADVANCED REACTORS DIV., PLUTONIUM FUEL LABORATORIES, AND THE ADVANCED FUEL...

444

advanced search Economist.com  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEARCH advanced search » Economist.com RESEARCH TOOLS Choose a research tool... Help their movements cause? A company is paying them to do a job, so why should it not read their e-mails when

Nissenbaum, Helen

445

SERI advanced wind turbine blades  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary goal of the Solar Energy Research Institute`s (SERI) advanced wind turbine blades is to convert the kinetic energy in the wind into mechanical energy in an inexpensive and efficient manner. To accomplish this goal, advanced wind turbine blades have been developed by SERI that utilize unique airfoil technology. Performance characteristics of the advanced blades were verified through atmospheric testing on fixed-pitch, stall-regulated horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs). Of the various wind turbine configurations, the stall-regulated HAWT dominates the market because of its simplicity and low cost. Results of the atmospheric tests show that the SERI advanced blades produce 10% to 30% more energy than conventional blades. 6 refs.

Tangler, J.; Smith, B.; Jager, D.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

SERI advanced wind turbine blades  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary goal of the Solar Energy Research Institute's (SERI) advanced wind turbine blades is to convert the kinetic energy in the wind into mechanical energy in an inexpensive and efficient manner. To accomplish this goal, advanced wind turbine blades have been developed by SERI that utilize unique airfoil technology. Performance characteristics of the advanced blades were verified through atmospheric testing on fixed-pitch, stall-regulated horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs). Of the various wind turbine configurations, the stall-regulated HAWT dominates the market because of its simplicity and low cost. Results of the atmospheric tests show that the SERI advanced blades produce 10% to 30% more energy than conventional blades. 6 refs.

Tangler, J.; Smith, B.; Jager, D.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Ohio Advanced Energy Manufacturing Center  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The program goal of the Ohio Advanced Energy Manufacturing Center (OAEMC) is to support advanced energy manufacturing and to create responsive manufacturing clusters that will support the production of advanced energy and energy-efficient products to help ensure the nation's energy and environmental security. This goal cuts across a number of existing industry segments critical to the nation's future. Many of the advanced energy businesses are starting to make the transition from technology development to commercial production. Historically, this transition from laboratory prototypes through initial production for early adopters to full production for mass markets has taken several years. Developing and implementing manufacturing technology to enable production at a price point the market will accept is a key step. Since these start-up operations are configured to advance the technology readiness of the core energy technology, they have neither the expertise nor the resources to address manufacturing readiness issues they encounter as the technology advances toward market entry. Given the economic realities of today's business environment, finding ways to accelerate this transition can make the difference between success and failure for a new product or business. The advanced energy industry touches a wide range of industry segments that are not accustomed to working together in complex supply chains to serve large markets such as automotive and construction. During its first three years, the Center has catalyzed the communication between companies and industry groups that serve the wide range of advanced energy markets. The Center has also found areas of common concern, and worked to help companies address these concerns on a segment or industry basis rather than having each company work to solve common problems individually. EWI worked with three industries through public-private partnerships to sew together disparate segments helping to promote overall industry health. To aid the overall advanced energy industry, EWI developed and launched an Ohio chapter of the non-profit Advanced Energy Economy. In this venture, Ohio joins with six other states including Colorado, Connecticut, Illinois, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont to help promote technologies that deliver energy that is affordable, abundant and secure. In a more specific arena, EWI's advanced energy group collaborated with the EWI-run Nuclear Fabrication Consortium to promote the nuclear supply chain. Through this project EWI has helped bring the supply chain up to date for the upcoming period of construction, and assisted them in understanding the demands for the next generation of facilities now being designed. In a more targeted manner, EWI worked with 115 individual advanced energy companies that are attempting to bring new technology to market. First, these interactions helped EWI develop an awareness of issues common to companies in different advanced energy sectors. By identifying and addressing common issues, EWI helps companies bring technology to market sooner and at a lower cost. These visits also helped EWI develop a picture of industry capability. This helped EWI provide companies with contacts that can supply commercial solutions to their new product development challenges. By providing assistance in developing supply chain partnerships, EWI helped companies bring their technology to market faster and at a lower cost than they might have been able to do by themselves. Finally, at the most granular level EWI performed dedicated research and development on new manufacturing processes for advanced energy. During discussions with companies participating in advanced energy markets, several technology issues that cut across market segments were identified. To address some of these issues, three crosscutting technology development projects were initiated and completed with Center support. This included reversible welds for batteries and high temperature heat exchangers. It also included a novel advanced weld trainer that EWI

Kimberly Gibson; Mark Norfolk

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

448

February 2000 Advanced Technology Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF COMMERCE Economic Assessment Office Technology Administration Advanced Technology Program National .................................................................................................6 V. IIH Focused Program Project Selection Process information infrastructure in healthcare. A discussion of the ATP "white paper" process4 notes differences

449

Advanced Policy Practice Spring 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced Policy Practice Spring 2014 SW 548-001 Instructor course that focuses on the theory and evidence-based skill sets of policy analysis, development, implementation, and change. The course focuses on policy

Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

450

Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2011-2015 MYPP Goals (cross-cut w Advanced Combustion Engines) - By 2015, improve the fuel economy of light-duty gasoline vehicles by 25% and of light-duty diesel vehicles by 40%...

451

Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2011-1015 MYPP Goals (cross-cut w Advanced Combustion Engines) - By 2015, improve the fuel economy of light-duty gasoline vehicles by 25% and of light-duty diesel vehicles by 40%...

452

SCANNING THE TECHNOLOGY Scanning Advanced  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

state of refinement. This has been made possible by advancements in a wide spec- trum of scientific economy, lower emissions and improved safety. The availability of computers on board the vehicle

453

Advancing Measurement of Family Leisure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study advanced knowledge of the measurement properties of the Family Leisure Activity Profile (FLAP). The FLAP is a sixteen-item index based on the Core and Balance Model of Family Functioning. This study assessed three distinct scaling...

Melton, Karen

2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

454

Advanced Process Management and Implementation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced Process Management is a method to achieve optimum process performance during the life cycle of a plant through proper design, effective automation, and adequate operator decision support. Developing a quality process model is an effective...

Robinson, J.

455

Tribal Renewable Energy Advanced Course: Project Development...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Development and Financing Essentials Tribal Renewable Energy Advanced Course: Project Development and Financing Essentials Watch the DOE Office of Indian Energy advanced course...

456

Current trends in the Advanced Bioindustry  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Afternoon Plenary Session: Current Trends in the Advanced Bioindustry State of Technology—Michael McAdams, President, Advanced Biofuels Association

457

Advancing Transportation Through Vehicle Electrification - PHEV...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Meeting arravt067vssbazzi2012o.pdf More Documents & Publications Advancing Transportation Through Vehicle Electrification - PHEV Advancing Plug In Hybrid Technology and...

458

Funding Opportunity Webinar - Advancing Solutions To Improve...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Funding Opportunity Webinar - Advancing Solutions To Improve the Energy Efficiency of US Commercial Buildings Funding Opportunity Webinar - Advancing Solutions To Improve the...

459

Advanced Hybrid Water Heater using Electrochemical Compressor...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Advanced Hybrid Water Heater using Electrochemical Compressor Advanced Hybrid Water Heater using Electrochemical Compressor Xergy is using its Electro Chemical Compression (ECC)...

460

Advanced Manufacturing Initiative Improves Turbine Blade Productivity...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Advanced Manufacturing Initiative Improves Turbine Blade Productivity Advanced Manufacturing Initiative Improves Turbine Blade Productivity May 20, 2011 - 2:56pm Addthis This is an...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Independent Oversight Review, Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Review, Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project - April 2013 April 2013 Review of Radiation Protection Program Implementation at the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project of...

462

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency, DOE. LBNL 275-E Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid:Renewable Energy Laboratory), and Ryan Wiser ( LBNL). i Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid:

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Advanced Ceramic Filter For Diesel Emission Control  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8 ACM Structure Overview Dow Automotive Advanced Ceramic Cordierite and Silicon carbide Advanced Ceramic Cordierite and Silicon carbide 9272004 DEER2004 9 ACM DPF Chemical...

464

A Prospective Target for Advanced Biofuel Production  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A Prospective Target for Advanced Biofuel Production A Prospective Target for Advanced Biofuel Production Print Thursday, 02 February 2012 13:34 The sesquiterpene bisabolene was...

465

Advanced Materials for Proton Exchange Membranes | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced Materials for Proton Exchange Membranes Advanced Materials for Proton Exchange Membranes A presentation to the High Temperature Membranes Working Group meeting, May 19,...

466

ALS Ceramics Materials Research Advances Engine Performance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ALS Ceramics Materials Research Advances Engine Performance ALS Ceramics Materials Research Advances Engine Performance Print Thursday, 27 September 2012 00:00 ritchie ceramics...

467

Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines (ARES) - Presentation...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines (ARES) - Presentation by Caterpillar, Inc., June 2011 Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines (ARES) - Presentation by Caterpillar,...

468

Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines (ARES) - Presentation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Cummins, Inc., June 2011 Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines (ARES) - Presentation by Cummins, Inc., June 2011 Presentation on Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines...

469

Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines (ARES) - Presentation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Dresser Waukesha, June 2011 Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines (ARES) - Presentation by Dresser Waukesha, June 2011 Presentation on Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating...

470

Advanced Engine Development | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Engine Development High-performance computing accelerates advanced engine development July 11, 2014 Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Dean Edwards and a...

471

Measuring Advances in HVAC Distribution System Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advances in HV AC Distribution System Design Ellen FranconiAdvances in HVAC Distribution System Design Ellen Franconisavings result from distribution system design improvements,

Franconi, E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

farms with advanced coal generation facilities and operatingfarms with advanced coal generation facilities and operatingin the stand-alone coal generation option (IGCC+CCS plant)

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Advances in understanding solar energy collection materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Understanding solar energy collection materials Advances in understanding solar energy collection materials A LANL team and collaborators have made advances in the understanding of...

474

Advanced Combustion Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Science & Innovation Clean Coal Advanced Combustion Technologies Advanced Combustion Technologies Joe Yip, a researcher at FE's National Energy Technology Laboratory, uses...

475

Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Incentive Program...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Incentive Program Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Incentive Program This is an interim final rule that establishes the...

476

Advancing Energy Systems through Integration | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Advancing Energy Systems through Integration Advancing Energy Systems through Integration This presentation was given by Ever-Green Energy's Ken Smith as part of the November 20,...

477

Chemistry & Physics at Interfaces | Advanced Materials | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Materials Home | Science & Discovery | Advanced Materials | Research Areas | Chemistry and Physics at Interfaces SHARE Chemistry and Physics at Interfaces Chemical...

478

Application of advanced hydrocarbon characterization and its...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

advanced hydrocarbon characterization and its consequences on future fuel properties and advanced combustion research Rafal Gieleciak, Craig Fairbridge and Darcy Hager Poster...

479

Application of advanced hydrocarbon characterization and its...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

on future fuel properties and advanced combustion research Research on future fuels chemistry and effects on combustion in advanced internal combustion engines p-14gieleciak.pdf...

480

Optimization of Advanced Diesel Engine Combustion Strategies  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

- UW-ERC 1 "University Research in Advanced Combustion and Emissions Control" Optimization of Advanced Diesel Engine Combustion Strategies Profs. Rolf Reitz, D. Foster, J....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advancing reactive tracer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Optimization of Advanced Diesel Engine Combustion Strategies...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Optimization of Advanced Diesel Engine Combustion Strategies Optimization of Advanced Diesel Engine Combustion Strategies 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual...

482

Nick Wright Named Advanced Technologies Group Lead  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nick Wright Named Advanced Technologies Group Lead Nick Wright Named Advanced Technologies Group Lead February 4, 2013 Nick Nick Wright has been named head of the National Energy...

483

Particulate Emissions Control by Advanced Filtration Systems...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Particulate Emissions Control by Advanced Filtration Systems or GDI Engines Particulate Emissions Control by Advanced Filtration Systems or GDI Engines 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel...

484

Advanced Computational Methods for Turbulence and Combustion...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Computational Methods for Turbulence and Combustion Advanced Computational Methods for Turbulence and Combustion Bell.png Key Challenges: Development and application of...

485

Advanced Diesel Engine and Aftertreatment Technology Development...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced Diesel Engine and Aftertreatment Technology Development for Tier 2 Emissions Advanced Diesel Engine and Aftertreatment Technology Development for Tier 2 Emissions 2003...

486

Advanced Membrane Systems: Recovering Wasteful and Hazardous...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Advanced Membrane Systems: Recovering Wasteful and Hazardous Fuel Vapors at the Gasoline Tank Advanced Membrane Systems: Recovering Wasteful and Hazardous Fuel Vapors at the...

487

Webinar: Systems Performance Advancement II Funding Opportunity...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Webinar: Systems Performance Advancement II Funding Opportunity Announcement Webinar: Systems Performance Advancement II Funding Opportunity Announcement January 22, 2015 2:00PM to...

488

Advanced Low Temperature Absorption Chiller Module Integrated...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced Low Temperature Absorption Chiller Module Integrated with a CHP System at a Distributed Data Center - Presentation by Exergy Partners Corp., June 2011 Advanced Low...

489

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Figures Figure ES-1. Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Basicviii Figure 1. Advanced-Coal Wind Hybrid: Basic29 Figure 9. Sensitivity to Coal

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Westinghouse advanced particle filter system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycles (IGCC), Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) and Advanced PFBC (APFB) are being developed and demonstrated for commercial power generation application. Hot gas particulate filters are key components for the successful implementation of IGCC, PFBC and APFB in power generation gas turbine cycles. The objective of this work is to develop and qualify through analysis and testing a practical hot gas ceramic barrier filter system that meets the performance and operational requirements of these advanced, solid fuel power generation cycles.

Lippert, T.E.; Bruck, G.J.; Sanjana, Z.N.; Newby, R.A.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Reactive Transport Modeling and Geophysical Monitoring of Bioclogging at Reservoir Scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reactive Transport Modeling and Geophysical Monitoring of Bioclogging at Reservoir Scale Vikranth scale using a combination of reactive transport modeling and geophysical imaging tools (EM & seismic Sacramento basin, California; the model well (Citizen Green #1) was characterized using sonic, electrical

Hubbard, Susan

492

An Aircraft Electric Power Testbed for Validating Automatically Synthesized Reactive Control Protocols  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Aircraft Electric Power Testbed for Validating Automatically Synthesized Reactive Control reactive synthesis; testbed; aircraft electric power system 1. INTRODUCTION AND MOTIVATION Aircraft of Pennsylvania utopcu@seas.upenn.edu ABSTRACT Modern aircraft increasingly rely on electric power for sub

Xu , Huan

493

Stabilization of liquid crystal photoaligning layers by reactive mesogens O. Yaroshchuk,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stabilization of liquid crystal photoaligning layers by reactive mesogens O. Yaroshchuk,1 V photoaligning layers by thin layers of reactive mesogens, strong enhancement in LC alignment stability layer, the photoalignment technique minimizes me- chanical damage and electric charging, provides

494

Pollution-enhanced reactive chlorine chemistry in the eastern tropical Atlantic boundary layer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

doi:10.1029/2008GL036666, 2009 Pollution-enhanced reactiveE. S. Saltzman (2009), Pollution-enhanced reactive chlorine5 L08810 LAWLER ET AL. : POLLUTION-ENHANCED CLX IN THE MBL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Solution-mediated strategies for synthesizing metal oxides, borates and phosphides using nanocrystals as reactive precursors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Because of their high surface area (and hence, increased reactivity) nanocrystals can be used as reactive precursors in the low-temperature synthesis of solid state materials. When nanocrystals are used as reactants, the temperatures needed...

Henkes, Amanda Erin

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

496

Photoluminescent silicon nanocrystals synthesized by reactive laser Daria Riabinina,a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Photoluminescent silicon nanocrystals synthesized by reactive laser ablation Daria Riabinina reactive laser ablation in oxygen atmosphere followed by annealing. We observe a strong photoluminescence size, obtained independently by fitting photoluminescence spectra and from x-ray diffraction patterns

497

Bioinformatic analysis of xenobiotic reactive metabolite target proteins and their interacting partners  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Background Protein covalent binding by reactive metabolites of drugs, chemicals and natural products can lead to acute cytotoxicity. Recent rapid progress in reactive metabolite target protein identification has shown ...

Hanzlik, Robert P.; Fang, Jianwen; Koen, Yakov M.

2009-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

498

Chemical Reactivity of Reduced TiO2(110): The dominant role of...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reactivity of Reduced TiO2(110): The dominant role of surface defects in oxygen chemisorption. Chemical Reactivity of Reduced TiO2(110): The dominant role of surface defects in...

499

Advanced Distillation Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Distillation project was concluded on December 31, 2009. This U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded project was completed successfully and within budget during a timeline approved by DOE project managers, which included a one year extension to the initial ending date. The subject technology, Microchannel Process Technology (MPT) distillation, was expected to provide both capital and operating cost savings compared to conventional distillation technology. With efforts from Velocys and its project partners, MPT distillation was successfully demonstrated at a laboratory scale and its energy savings potential was calculated. While many objectives established at the beginning of the project were met, the project was only partially successful. At the conclusion, it appears that MPT distillation is not a good fit for the targeted separation of ethane and ethylene in large-scale ethylene production facilities, as greater advantages were seen for smaller scale distillations. Early in the project, work involved flowsheet analyses to discern the economic viability of ethane-ethylene MPT distillation and develop strategies for maximizing its impact on the economics of the process. This study confirmed that through modification to standard operating processes, MPT can enable net energy savings in excess of 20%. This advantage was used by ABB Lumus to determine the potential impact of MPT distillation on the ethane-ethylene market. The study indicated that a substantial market exists if the energy saving could be realized and if installed capital cost of MPT distillation was on par or less than conventional technology. Unfortunately, it was determined that the large number of MPT distillation units needed to perform ethane-ethylene separation for world-scale ethylene facilities, makes the targeted separation a poor fit for the technology in this application at the current state of manufacturing costs. Over the course of the project, distillation experiments were performed with the targeted mixture, ethane-ethylene, as well as with analogous low relative volatility systems: cyclohexane-hexane and cyclopentane-pentane. Devices and test stands were specifically designed for these efforts. Development progressed from experiments and models considering sections of a full scale device to the design, fabrication, and operation of a single-channel distillation unit with integrated heat transfer. Throughout the project, analytical and numerical models and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations were validated with experiments in the process of developing this platform technology. Experimental trials demonstrated steady and controllable distillation for a variety of process conditions. Values of Height-to-an-Equivalent Theoretical Plate (HETP) ranging from less than 0.5 inch to a few inches were experimentally proven, demonstrating a ten-fold performance enhancement relative to conventional distillation. This improvement, while substantial, is not sufficient for MPT distillation to displace very large scale distillation trains. Fortunately, parallel efforts in the area of business development have yielded other applications for MPT distillation, including smaller scale separations that benefit from the flowsheet flexibility offered by the technology. Talks with multiple potential partners are underway. Their outcome will also help determine the path ahead for MPT distillation.

Maddalena Fanelli; Ravi Arora; Annalee Tonkovich; Jennifer Marco; Ed Rode

2010-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

500

Advanced Integrated Traction System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy elaborates the compelling need for a commercialized competitively priced electric traction drive system to proliferate the acceptance of HEVs, PHEVs, and FCVs in the market. The desired end result is a technically and commercially verified integrated ETS (Electric Traction System) product design that can be manufactured and distributed through a broad network of competitive suppliers to all auto manufacturers. The objectives of this FCVT program are to develop advanced technologies for an integrated ETS capable of 55kW peak power for 18 seconds and 30kW of continuous power. Additionally, to accommodate a variety of automotive platforms the ETS design should be scalable to 120kW peak power for 18 seconds and 65kW of continuous power. The ETS (exclusive of the DC/DC Converter) is to cost no more than $660 (55kW at $12/kW) to produce in quantities of 100,000 units per year, should have a total weight less than 46kg, and have a volume less than 16 liters. The cost target for the optional Bi-Directional DC/DC Converter is $375. The goal is to achieve these targets with the use of engine coolant at a nominal temperature of 105C. The system efficiency should exceed 90% at 20% of rated torque over 10% to 100% of maximum speed. The nominal operating system voltage is to be 325V, with consideration for higher voltages. This project investigated a wide range of technologies, including ETS topologies, components, and interconnects. Each technology and its validity for automotive use were verified and then these technologies were integrated into a high temperature ETS design that would support a wide variety of applications (fuel cell, hybrids, electrics, and plug-ins). This ETS met all the DOE 2010 objectives of cost, weight, volume and efficiency, and the specific power and power density 2015 objectives. Additionally a bi-directional converter was developed that provides charging and electric power take-off which is the first step towards enabling a smart-grid application. GM under this work assessed 29 technologies; investigated 36 configurations/types power electronics and electric machines, filed 41 invention disclosures; and ensured technology compatibility with vehicle production. Besides the development of a high temperature ETS the development of industrial suppliers took place because of this project. Suppliers of industrial power electronic components are numerous, but there are few that have traction drive knowledge. This makes it difficult to achieve component reliability, durability, and cost requirements necessary of high volume automotive production. The commercialization of electric traction systems for automotive industry requires a strong diverse supplier base. Developing this supplier base is dependent on a close working relationship between the OEM and supplier so that appropriate component requirements can be developed. GM has worked closely with suppliers to develop components for electric traction systems. Components that have been the focus of this project are power modules, capacitors, heavy copper boards, current sensors, and gate drive and controller chip sets. Working with suppliers, detailed component specifications have been developed. Current, voltage, and operation environment during the vehicle drive cycle were evaluated to develop higher resolution/accurate component specifications.

Greg Smith; Charles Gough

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z