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1

Advanced Simulation Capability  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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2

Advanced Simulation Capability  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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3

Advanced Simulation Capability  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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4

Advanced Simulation Capability for  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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5

Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Phase II Demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2009, the National Academies of Science (NAS) reviewed and validated the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (EM) Technology Program in its publication, Advice on the Department of Energy’s Cleanup Technology Roadmap: Gaps and Bridges. The NAS report outlined prioritization needs for the Groundwater and Soil Remediation Roadmap, concluded that contaminant behavior in the subsurface is poorly understood, and recommended further research in this area as a high priority. To address this NAS concern, the EM Office of Site Restoration began supporting the development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific approach that uses an integration of toolsets for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The ASCEM modeling toolset is modular and open source. It is divided into three thrust areas: Multi-Process High Performance Computing (HPC), Platform and Integrated Toolsets, and Site Applications. The ASCEM toolsets will facilitate integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. During fiscal year 2012, the ASCEM project continued to make significant progress in capabilities development. Capability development occurred in both the Platform and Integrated Toolsets and Multi-Process HPC Simulator areas. The new Platform and Integrated Toolsets capabilities provide the user an interface and the tools necessary for end-to-end model development that includes conceptual model definition, data management for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and model output processing including visualization. The new HPC Simulator capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, toolsets for interaction with the Platform, and model confidence testing and verification for quality assurance. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications through a suite of demonstrations being conducted by the Site Applications Thrust. In 2010, the Phase I Demonstration focused on testing initial ASCEM capabilities. The Phase II Demonstration, completed in September 2012, focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site Deep Vadose Zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of ASCEM capabilities on a site with relatively sparse data, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations included in this Phase II report included addressing attenuation-based remedies at the Savannah River Site F-Area, to exercise linked ASCEM components under data-dense and complex geochemical conditions, and conducting detailed simulations of a representative waste tank. This report includes descriptive examples developed by the Hanford Site Deep Vadose Zone, the SRS F-Area Attenuation-Based Remedies for the Subsurface, and the Waste Tank Performance Assessment working groups. The integrated Phase II Demonstration provides test cases to accompany distribution of the initial user release (Version 1.0) of the ASCEM software tools to a limited set of users in 2013. These test cases will be expanded with each new release, leading up to the release of a version that is qualified for regulatory applications in the 2015 time frame.?

Freshley, M.; Hubbard, S.; Flach, G.; Freedman, V.; Agarwal, D.; Andre, B.; Bott, Y.; Chen, X.; Davis, J.; Faybishenko, B.; Gorton, I.; Murray, C.; Moulton, D.; Meyer, J.; Rockhold, M.; Shoshani, A.; Steefel, C.; Wainwright, H.; Waichler, S.

2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

6

Advanced Simulation Capability of Environmental Management | Department of  

Energy Savers [EERE]

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7

ADVANCED SIMULATION CAPABILITY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT- CURRENT STATUS AND PHASE II DEMONSTRATION RESULTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Soil and Groundwater, is supporting development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The modular and open source high-performance computing tool facilitates integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. The ASCEM project continues to make significant progress in development of computer software capabilities with an emphasis on integration of capabilities in FY12. Capability development is occurring for both the Platform and Integrated Toolsets and High-Performance Computing (HPC) Multiprocess Simulator. The Platform capabilities provide the user interface and tools for end-to-end model development, starting with definition of the conceptual model, management of data for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and processing of model output, including visualization. The HPC capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, toolsets for interaction with Platform, and verification and model confidence testing. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications in a set of demonstrations as part of Site Applications Thrust Area activities. The Phase I demonstration focusing on individual capabilities of the initial toolsets was completed in 2010. The Phase II demonstration completed in 2012 focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site deep vadose zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of capabilities, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations, addressing attenuation-based remedies at the Savannah River Site F Area and performance assessment for a representative waste tank, illustrate integration of linked ASCEM capabilities and initial integration efforts with tools from the Cementitious Barriers Partnership.

Seitz, R.

2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

8

ADVANCED SIMULATION CAPABILITY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT – CURRENT STATUS AND PHASE II DEMONSTRATION RESULTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Soil and Groundwater, is supporting development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The modular and open source high-performance computing tool facilitates integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. The ASCEM project continues to make significant progress in development of computer software capabilities with an emphasis on integration of capabilities in FY12. Capability development is occurring for both the Platform and Integrated Toolsets and High-Performance Computing (HPC) Multiprocess Simulator. The Platform capabilities provide the user interface and tools for end-to-end model development, starting with definition of the conceptual model, management of data for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and processing of model output, including visualization. The HPC capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, toolsets for interaction with Platform, and verification and model confidence testing. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications in a set of demonstrations as part of Site Applications Thrust Area activities. The Phase I demonstration focusing on individual capabilities of the initial toolsets was completed in 2010. The Phase II demonstration completed in 2012 focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site deep vadose zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of capabilities, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations, addressing attenuation-based remedies at the Savannah River Site F Area and performance assessment for a representative waste tank, illustrate integration of linked ASCEM capabilities and initial integration efforts with tools from the Cementitious Barriers Partnership.

Seitz, Roger; Freshley, Mark D.; Dixon, Paul; Hubbard, Susan S.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Flach, Gregory P.; Faybishenko, Boris; Gorton, Ian; Finsterle, Stefan A.; Moulton, John D.; Steefel, Carl I.; Marble, Justin

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

9

Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management - Current Status and Phase II Demonstration Results - 13161  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Soil and Groundwater, is supporting development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The modular and open source high-performance computing tool facilitates integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. The ASCEM project continues to make significant progress in development of computer software capabilities with an emphasis on integration of capabilities in FY12. Capability development is occurring for both the Platform and Integrated Tool-sets and High-Performance Computing (HPC) Multi-process Simulator. The Platform capabilities provide the user interface and tools for end-to-end model development, starting with definition of the conceptual model, management of data for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and processing of model output, including visualization. The HPC capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, tool-sets for interaction with Platform, and verification and model confidence testing. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications in a set of demonstrations as part of Site Applications Thrust Area activities. The Phase I demonstration focusing on individual capabilities of the initial tool-sets was completed in 2010. The Phase II demonstration completed in 2012 focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site deep vadose zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of capabilities, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations, addressing attenuation-based remedies at the Savannah River Site F Area and performance assessment for a representative waste tank, illustrate integration of linked ASCEM capabilities and initial integration efforts with tools from the Cementitious Barriers Partnership. (authors)

Seitz, Roger R.; Flach, Greg [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Bldg 773-43A, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Bldg 773-43A, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Freshley, Mark D.; Freedman, Vicky; Gorton, Ian [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, MSIN K9-33, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, MSIN K9-33, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Dixon, Paul; Moulton, J. David [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS B284, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS B284, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States); Hubbard, Susan S.; Faybishenko, Boris; Steefel, Carl I.; Finsterle, Stefan [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, MS 50B-4230, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, MS 50B-4230, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Marble, Justin [Department of Energy, 19901 Germantown Road, Germantown, MD 20874-1290 (United States)] [Department of Energy, 19901 Germantown Road, Germantown, MD 20874-1290 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Advanced simulation capability for environmental management (ASCEM): An overview of initial results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Security Adminis- tration (NNSA), Advanced Simulation andASCEM that were developed by NNSA-, EM-, and Basic Energy

Williamson, M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Lightweighting Automotive Materials for Increased Fuel Efficiency and Delivering Advanced Modeling and Simulation Capabilities to U.S. Manufacturers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract The National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) worked with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), to bring together research and development (R&D) collaborations to develop and accelerate the knowledgebase and infrastructure for lightweighting materials and manufacturing processes for their use in structural and applications in the automotive sector. The purpose/importance of this DOE program: • 2016 CAFÉ standards. • Automotive industry technology that shall adopt the insertion of lightweighting material concepts towards manufacturing of production vehicles. • Development and manufacture of advanced research tools for modeling and simulation (M&S) applications to reduce manufacturing and material costs. • U.S. competitiveness that will help drive the development and manufacture of the next generation of materials. NCMS established a focused portfolio of applied R&D projects utilizing lightweighting materials for manufacture into automotive structures and components. Areas that were targeted in this program: • Functionality of new lightweighting materials to meet present safety requirements. • Manufacturability using new lightweighting materials. • Cost reduction for the development and use of new lightweighting materials. The automotive industry’s future continuously evolves through innovation, and lightweight materials are key in achieving a new era of lighter, more efficient vehicles. Lightweight materials are among the technical advances needed to achieve fuel/energy efficiency and reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions: • Establish design criteria methodology to identify the best materials for lightweighting. • Employ state-of-the-art design tools for optimum material development for their specific applications. • Match new manufacturing technology to production volume. • Address new process variability with new production-ready processes.

Hale, Steve

2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

12

Advanced Post-Irradiation Examination Capabilities Alternatives Analysis Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An alternatives analysis was performed for the Advanced Post-Irradiation Capabilities (APIEC) project in accordance with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order DOE O 413.3B, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets”. The Alternatives Analysis considered six major alternatives: ? No Action ? Modify Existing DOE Facilities – capabilities distributed among multiple locations ? Modify Existing DOE Facilities – capabilities consolidated at a few locations ? Construct New Facility ? Commercial Partnership ? International Partnerships Based on the alternatives analysis documented herein, it is recommended to DOE that the advanced post-irradiation examination capabilities be provided by a new facility constructed at the Materials and Fuels Complex at the Idaho National Laboratory.

Jeff Bryan; Bill Landman; Porter Hill

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

CHARACTERIZATION OF THE ADVANCED RADIOGRAPHIC CAPABILITY FRONT END ON NIF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have characterized the Advanced Radiographic Capability injection laser system and demonstrated that it meets performance requirements for upcoming National Ignition Facility fusion experiments. Pulse compression was achieved with a scaled down replica of the meter-scale grating ARC compressor and sub-ps pulse duration was demonstrated at the Joule-level.

Haefner, C; Heebner, J; Dawson, J; Fochs, S; Shverdin, M; Crane, J K; Kanz, V K; Halpin, J; Phan, H; Sigurdsson, R; Brewer, W; Britten, J; Brunton, G; Clark, W; Messerly, M J; Nissen, J D; Nguyen, H; Shaw, B; Hackel, R; Hermann, M; Tietbohl, G; Siders, C W; Barty, C J

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

14

Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) |  

Energy Savers [EERE]

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15

Loop simulation capability for sodium-cooled systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A one-dimensional loop simulation capability has been implemented in the thermal-hydraulic analysis code, THERMIT-4E. This code had been used to simulate and investigate flow in test sections of experimental sodium loops ...

Adekugbe, Oluwole A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Advanced Test Reactor Capabilities and Future Irradiation Plans  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is one of the most versatile operating research reactors in the Untied States. The ATR has a long history of supporting reactor fuel and material research for the US government and other test sponsors. The INL is owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and currently operated by Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA). The ATR is the third generation of test reactors built at the Test Reactor Area, now named the Reactor Technology Complex (RTC), whose mission is to study the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The current experiments in the ATR are for a variety of customers--US DOE, foreign governments and private researchers, and commercial companies that need neutrons. The ATR has several unique features that enable the reactor to perform diverse simultaneous tests for multiple test sponsors. The ATR has been operating since 1967, and is expected to continue operating for several more decades. The remainder of this paper discusses the ATR design features, testing options, previous experiment programs, future plans for the ATR capabilities and experiments, and some introduction to the INL and DOE's expectations for nuclear research in the future.

Frances M. Marshall

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Advanced Mesh-Enabled Monte carlo capability for Multi-Physics Reactor Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project will accumulate high-precision fluxes throughout reactor geometry on a non- orthogonal grid of cells to support multi-physics coupling, in order to more accurately calculate parameters such as reactivity coefficients and to generate multi-group cross sections. This work will be based upon recent developments to incorporate advanced geometry and mesh capability in a modular Monte Carlo toolkit with computational science technology that is in use in related reactor simulation software development. Coupling this capability with production-scale Monte Carlo radiation transport codes can provide advanced and extensible test-beds for these developments. Continuous energy Monte Carlo methods are generally considered to be the most accurate computational tool for simulating radiation transport in complex geometries, particularly neutron transport in reactors. Nevertheless, there are several limitations for their use in reactor analysis. Most significantly, there is a trade-off between the fidelity of results in phase space, statistical accuracy, and the amount of computer time required for simulation. Consequently, to achieve an acceptable level of statistical convergence in high-fidelity results required for modern coupled multi-physics analysis, the required computer time makes Monte Carlo methods prohibitive for design iterations and detailed whole-core analysis. More subtly, the statistical uncertainty is typically not uniform throughout the domain, and the simulation quality is limited by the regions with the largest statistical uncertainty. In addition, the formulation of neutron scattering laws in continuous energy Monte Carlo methods makes it difficult to calculate adjoint neutron fluxes required to properly determine important reactivity parameters. Finally, most Monte Carlo codes available for reactor analysis have relied on orthogonal hexahedral grids for tallies that do not conform to the geometric boundaries and are thus generally not well-suited to coupling with the unstructured meshes that are used in other physics simulations.

Wilson, Paul; Evans, Thomas; Tautges, Tim

2012-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

18

Advanced Data Analysis Capability and Surrogate Generation | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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19

Advancing Material Models for Automotive Forming Simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simulations in automotive industry need more advanced material models to achieve highly reliable forming and springback predictions. Conventional material models implemented in the FEM-simulation models are not capable to describe the plastic material behaviour during monotonic strain paths with sufficient accuracy. Recently, ESI and Corus co-operate on the implementation of an advanced material model in the FEM-code PAMSTAMP 2G. This applies to the strain hardening model, the influence of strain rate, and the description of the yield locus in these models. A subsequent challenge is the description of the material after a change of strain path.The use of advanced high strength steels in the automotive industry requires a description of plastic material behaviour of multiphase steels. The simplest variant is dual phase steel consisting of a ferritic and a martensitic phase. Multiphase materials also contain a bainitic phase in addition to the ferritic and martensitic phase. More physical descriptions of strain hardening than simple fitted Ludwik/Nadai curves are necessary.Methods to predict plastic behaviour of single-phase materials use a simple dislocation interaction model based on the formed cells structures only. At Corus, a new method is proposed to predict plastic behaviour of multiphase materials have to take hard phases into account, which deform less easily. The resulting deformation gradients create geometrically necessary dislocations. Additional micro-structural information such as morphology and size of hard phase particles or grains is necessary to derive the strain hardening models for this type of materials.Measurements available from the Numisheet benchmarks allow these models to be validated. At Corus, additional measured values are available from cross-die tests. This laboratory test can attain critical deformations by large variations in blank size and processing conditions. The tests are a powerful tool in optimising forming simulations prior to larger scale industrial validation.

Vegter, H.; An, Y.; Horn, C.H.L.J. ten; Atzema, E.H.; Roelofsen, M.E. [Corus Research Development and Technology, PO Box 10000, 1970 CA IJmuiden (Netherlands)

2005-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

20

Advances in three-dimensional turbulence measurement capability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Requirements for three-dimensional turbulence velocity measurements for wind turbine purposes have recently led to advances in anemometer accuracy and resolution, particularly for situations when the angle of the wind relative to the anemometer axis is large. New precision calibration data for a complete three-dimensional UVW propeller anemometer are presented. Repeatability of calibration data and comparison with previous calibrations are shown. Special attention is given to the calibration of the crosswind components, V and W. 4 refs., 9 figs.

Connell, J.R.; Morris, V.R.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced simulation capability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORYS CAPABILITIES FOR ADVANCED ANALYSES OF CYBER THREATS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BNL has several ongoing, mature, and successful programs and areas of core scientific expertise that readily could be modified to address problems facing national security and efforts by the IC related to securing our nation’s computer networks. In supporting these programs, BNL houses an expansive, scalable infrastructure built exclusively for transporting, storing, and analyzing large disparate data-sets. Our ongoing research projects on various infrastructural issues in computer science undoubtedly would be relevant to national security. Furthermore, BNL frequently partners with researchers in academia and industry worldwide to foster unique and innovative ideas for expanding research opportunities and extending our insights. Because the basic science conducted at BNL is unique, such projects have led to advanced techniques, unlike any others, to support our mission of discovery. Many of them are modular techniques, thus making them ideal for abstraction and retrofitting to other uses including those facing national security, specifically the safety of the nation’s cyber space.

DePhillips M. P.

2014-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

22

The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is a DOE Energy Innovation Hub for modeling and simulation of nuclear reactors. It brings together an exceptionally capable team from national labs, industry and academia that will apply existing modeling and simulation capabilities and develop advanced capabilities to create a usable environment for predictive simulation of light water reactors (LWRs). This environment, designated as the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications (VERA), will incorporate science-based models, state-of-the-art numerical methods, modern computational science and engineering practices, and uncertainty quantification (UQ) and validation against data from operating pressurized water reactors (PWRs). It will couple state-of-the-art fuel performance, neutronics, thermal-hydraulics (T-H), and structural models with existing tools for systems and safety analysis and will be designed for implementation on both today's leadership-class computers and the advanced architecture platforms now under development by the DOE. CASL focuses on a set of challenge problems such as CRUD induced power shift and localized corrosion, grid-to-rod fretting fuel failures, pellet clad interaction, fuel assembly distortion, etc. that encompass the key phenomena limiting the performance of PWRs. It is expected that much of the capability developed will be applicable to other types of reactors. CASL's mission is to develop and apply modeling and simulation capabilities to address three critical areas of performance for nuclear power plants: (1) reduce capital and operating costs per unit energy by enabling power uprates and plant lifetime extension, (2) reduce nuclear waste volume generated by enabling higher fuel burnup, and (3) enhance nuclear safety by enabling high-fidelity predictive capability for component performance.

Ronaldo Szilard; Hongbin Zhang; Doug Kothe; Paul Turinsky

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Progress on an integrated multi-physics simulation predictive capability for plasma chamber nuclear components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Understanding the behavior of a plasma chamber component in the fusion environment requires a simulation technique that is capable of integrating multi-disciplinary computational codes while appropriately treating geometric heterogeneity and complexity. Such a tool should be able to interpret phenomena from mutually dependent scientific disciplines and predict performance with sufficient accuracy and consistency. Integrated multi-physics simulation predictive capability (ISPC) relies upon advanced numerical simulation techniques and is being applied to ITER first wall/shield and Test Blanket Module (TBM) designs. In this paper, progress in ISPC development is described through the presentation of a number of integrated simulations. The simulations cover key physical phenomena encountered in a fusion plasma chamber system, including tritium permeation, fluid dynamics, and structure mechanics. Interface engines were developed in order to pass field data, such as surface deformation or nuclear heating rate, from the structural analysis to the thermo-fluid MHD analysis code for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) velocity profile assessments, or from the neutronics analysis to the thermo-fluid analysis for temperature calculations, respectively. Near-term effort toward further ISPC development is discussed.

A. Ying; M. Abdou; H. Zhang; R. Munipalli; M. Ulrickson; M. Sawan; B. Merrill

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

ENHANCED THERMAL VACUUM TEST CAPABILITY FOR RADIOISOTOPE POWER SYSTEMS AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY BETTER SIMULATES ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS OF SPACE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is preparing to fuel and test the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), the next generation space power generator. The INL identified the thermal vacuum test chamber used to test past generators as inadequate. A second vacuum chamber was upgraded with a thermal shroud to process the unique needs and to test the full power capability of the new generator. The thermal vacuum test chamber is the first of its kind capable of testing a fueled power system to temperature that accurately simulate space. This paper outlines the new test and set up capabilities at the INL.

J. C. Giglio; A. A. Jackson

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

EM Leads with Advanced Simulation Capability Technology | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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26

Center for Advanced Modeling and Simulation Intern  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Some interns just copy papers and seal envelopes. Not at INL! Check out how Vanessa Gertman, an INL intern working at the Center for Advanced Modeling and Simulation, spent her summer working with some intense visualization software. Lots more content like this is available at INL's facebook page http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

Gertman, Vanessa

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

27

Center for Advanced Modeling and Simulation Intern  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some interns just copy papers and seal envelopes. Not at INL! Check out how Vanessa Gertman, an INL intern working at the Center for Advanced Modeling and Simulation, spent her summer working with some intense visualization software. Lots more content like this is available at INL's facebook page http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

Gertman, Vanessa

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Magma simulation facility design considerations, capabilities, and operational considerations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high-pressure, high temperature (60 Kpsi or 413.6 MPa/1600/sup 0/C) facility described is being used for molten rock (magma) experiments and metallurgical pressure bonding experiments. The unique design of the facility will accommodate samples as large as 10 cm dia. by 10 cm in height in an isothermal (+-4/sup 0/C at 1400/sup 0/C and 44 Kpsi or 303.3 MPa) cylindrical hot zone. The facility history, capabilities, and operational considerations are thoroughly discussed with appropriate illustrations. Since the system-contained energy while operating is approximately 1 x 10/sup 6/ ft-lbs (1.356 x 10/sup 6/ N-m) or 0.7 lbs (318 g) TNT equivalent, considerable discussion is related to hazards analysis and protection of the equipment and the operating personnel from damage caused by nonstandard conditions (interrupted H/sub 2/O flow, power outage, overpressure, etc.).

Wemple, R.P.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

In-Situ Creep Testing Capability for the Advanced Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An instrumented creep testing capability is being developed for specimens irradiated in Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) coolant conditions at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The test rig has been developed such that samples will be subjected to stresses ranging from 92 to 350 MPa at temperatures between 290 and 370 °C up to at least 2 dpa (displacement per atom). The status of Idaho National Laboratory (INL) efforts to develop the test rig in-situ creep testing capability for the ATR is described. In addition to providing an overview of in-pile creep test capabilities available at other test reactors, this paper reports efforts by INL to evaluate a prototype test rig in an autoclave at INL’s High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL). Initial data from autoclave tests with 304 stainless steel (304 SS) specimens are reported.

B. G. Kim; J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; K. G. Condie; B. H. Sencer

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

advanced hippotherapy simulator: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

31

Large Eddy Simulation (LES) Applied to Advanced Engine Combustion...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Advanced Engine Combustion Research Large Eddy Simulation (LES) Applied to Advanced Engine Combustion Research 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies...

32

Advanced modeling and simulation to design and manufacture high performance and reliable advanced microelectronics and microsystems.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An interdisciplinary team of scientists and engineers having broad expertise in materials processing and properties, materials characterization, and computational mechanics was assembled to develop science-based modeling/simulation technology to design and reproducibly manufacture high performance and reliable, complex microelectronics and microsystems. The team's efforts focused on defining and developing a science-based infrastructure to enable predictive compaction, sintering, stress, and thermomechanical modeling in ''real systems'', including: (1) developing techniques to and determining materials properties and constitutive behavior required for modeling; (2) developing new, improved/updated models and modeling capabilities, (3) ensuring that models are representative of the physical phenomena being simulated; and (4) assessing existing modeling capabilities to identify advances necessary to facilitate the practical application of Sandia's predictive modeling technology.

Nettleship, Ian (University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA); Hinklin, Thomas; Holcomb, David Joseph; Tandon, Rajan; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr. (,; .); Dempsey, James Franklin; Ewsuk, Kevin Gregory; Neilsen, Michael K.; Lanagan, Michael (Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Advanced simulation of intelligent transportation systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A large-scale, comprehensive, scaleable simulation of an Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) has been developed which is capable of running on parallel computers and distributed (networked) computer systems. The simulator currently models instrumented {open_quotes}smart{close_quotes} vehicles with in-vehicle navigation units capable of optimal route planning and Traffic Management Centers (TMC). The TMC has probe vehicle tracking capabilities (display position and attributes of instrumented vehicles), and can provide two-way interaction with traffic to provide advisories and link times. Both the in-vehicle navigation module and the TMC feature detailed graphical user interfaces to support human-factors studies. The prototype has been developed on a distributed system of networked UNIX computers but is designed to run on parallel computers, such as ANL`s IBM SP-2, for large-scale problems. A novel feature of this approach is that vehicles are represented by autonomous computer processes which exchange messages with other processes. The vehicles have a behavior model which governs route selection and driving behavior, and can react to external traffic events much like real vehicles. With this approach, the simulation is scaleable to take advantage of emerging massively parallel processor (MPP) systems.

Ewing, T.; Doss, E.; Hanebutte, U.; Tentner, A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

A CONTROLLER FOR HVAC SYSTEMS WITH FAULT DETECTION CAPABILITIES BASED ON SIMULATION MODELS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 A CONTROLLER FOR HVAC SYSTEMS WITH FAULT DETECTION CAPABILITIES BASED ON SIMULATION MODELS T. I describes a control scheme with fault detection capabilities suitable for application to HVAC systems as a reference of correct operation. Faults that occur in the HVAC system under control cause the PI

35

A Virtual Engineering Framework for Simulating Advanced Power System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report is described the work effort performed to provide NETL with VE-Suite based Virtual Engineering software and enhanced equipment models to support NETL's Advanced Process Engineering Co-simulation (APECS) framework for advanced power generation systems. Enhancements to the software framework facilitated an important link between APECS and the virtual engineering capabilities provided by VE-Suite (e.g., equipment and process visualization, information assimilation). Model enhancements focused on improving predictions for the performance of entrained flow coal gasifiers and important auxiliary equipment (e.g., Air Separation Units) used in coal gasification systems. In addition, a Reduced Order Model generation tool and software to provide a coupling between APECS/AspenPlus and the GE GateCycle simulation system were developed. CAPE-Open model interfaces were employed where needed. The improved simulation capability is demonstrated on selected test problems. As part of the project an Advisory Panel was formed to provide guidance on the issues on which to focus the work effort. The Advisory Panel included experts from industry and academics in gasification, CO2 capture issues, process simulation and representatives from technology developers and the electric utility industry. To optimize the benefit to NETL, REI coordinated its efforts with NETL and NETL funded projects at Iowa State University, Carnegie Mellon University and ANSYS/Fluent, Inc. The improved simulation capabilities incorporated into APECS will enable researchers and engineers to better understand the interactions of different equipment components, identify weaknesses and processes needing improvement and thereby allow more efficient, less expensive plants to be developed and brought on-line faster and in a more cost-effective manner. These enhancements to APECS represent an important step toward having a fully integrated environment for performing plant simulation and engineering. Furthermore, with little effort the modeling capabilities described in this report can be extended to support other DOE programs, such as ultra super critical boiler development, oxy-combustion boiler development or modifications to existing plants to include CO2 capture and sequestration.

Mike Bockelie; Dave Swensen; Martin Denison; Stanislav Borodai

2008-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

36

The Advanced Test Reactor Irradiation Capabilities Available as a National Scientific User Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. The ATR is a very versatile facility with a wide variety of experimental test capabilities for providing the environment needed in an irradiation experiment. These capabilities include simple capsule experiments, instrumented and/or temperature-controlled experiments, and pressurized water loop experiment facilities. Monitoring systems have also been utilized to monitor different parameters such as fission gases for fuel experiments, to measure specimen performance during irradiation. ATR’s control system provides a stable axial flux profile throughout each reactor operating cycle, and allows the thermal and fast neutron fluxes to be controlled separately in different sections of the core. The ATR irradiation positions vary in diameter from 16 mm to 127 mm over an active core height of 1.2 m. This paper discusses the different irradiation capabilities with examples of different experiments and the cost/benefit issues related to each capability. The recent designation of ATR as a national scientific user facility will make the ATR much more accessible at very low to no cost for research by universities and possibly commercial entities.

S. Blaine Grover

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

AXIS: An instrument for imaging Compton radiographs using the Advanced Radiography Capability on the NIF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Compton radiography is an important diagnostic for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF), as it provides a means to measure the density and asymmetries of the DT fuel in an ICF capsule near the time of peak compression. The AXIS instrument (ARC (Advanced Radiography Capability) X-ray Imaging System) is a gated detector in development for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), and will initially be capable of recording two Compton radiographs during a single NIF shot. The principal reason for the development of AXIS is the requirement for significantly improved detection quantum efficiency (DQE) at high x-ray energies. AXIS will be the detector for Compton radiography driven by the ARC laser, which will be used to produce Bremsstrahlung X-ray backlighter sources over the range of 50 keV–200 keV for this purpose. It is expected that AXIS will be capable of recording these high-energy x-rays with a DQE several times greater than other X-ray cameras at NIF, as well as providing a much larger field of view of the imploded capsule. AXIS will therefore provide an image with larger signal-to-noise that will allow the density and distribution of the compressed DT fuel to be measured with significantly greater accuracy as ICF experiments are tuned for ignition.

Hall, G. N., E-mail: hall98@llnl.gov; Izumi, N.; Tommasini, R.; Carpenter, A. C.; Palmer, N. E.; Zacharias, R.; Felker, B.; Holder, J. P.; Allen, F. V.; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D.; Montesanti, R.; Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

38

Software Framework for Advanced Power Plant Simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work accomplished during the Phase II development effort of the Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS). The objective of the project is to develop the tools to efficiently combine high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models with process modeling software. During the course of the project, a robust integration controller was developed that can be used in any CAPE-OPEN compliant process modeling environment. The controller mediates the exchange of information between the process modeling software and the CFD software. Several approaches to reducing the time disparity between CFD simulations and process modeling have been investigated and implemented. These include enabling the CFD models to be run on a remote cluster and enabling multiple CFD models to be run simultaneously. Furthermore, computationally fast reduced-order models (ROMs) have been developed that can be 'trained' using the results from CFD simulations and then used directly within flowsheets. Unit operation models (both CFD and ROMs) can be uploaded to a model database and shared between multiple users.

John Widmann; Sorin Munteanu; Aseem Jain; Pankaj Gupta; Mark Moales; Erik Ferguson; Lewis Collins; David Sloan; Woodrow Fiveland; Yi-dong Lang; Larry Biegler; Michael Locke; Simon Lingard; Jay Yun

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Co-Simulation for Advanced Process Design and Optimization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Meeting the increasing demand for clean, affordable, and secure energy is arguably the most important challenge facing the world today. Fossil fuels can play a central role in a portfolio of carbon-neutral energy options provided CO{sub 2} emissions can be dramatically reduced by capturing CO{sub 2} and storing it safely and effectively. Fossil energy industry faces the challenge of meeting aggressive design goals for next-generation power plants with CCS. Process designs will involve large, highly-integrated, and multipurpose systems with advanced equipment items with complex geometries and multiphysics. APECS is enabling software to facilitate effective integration, solution, and analysis of high-fidelity process/equipment (CFD) co-simulations. APECS helps to optimize fluid flow and related phenomena that impact overall power plant performance. APECS offers many advanced capabilities including ROMs, design optimization, parallel execution, stochastic analysis, and virtual plant co-simulations. NETL and its collaborative R&D partners are using APECS to reduce the time, cost, and technical risk of developing high-efficiency, zero-emission power plants with CCS.

Stephen E. Zitney

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Software...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Software Verification and Validation (V&V) Plan Requirements Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Software Verification and Validation (V&V) Plan Requirements...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced simulation capability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced computer simulations Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: advanced computer simulations Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Simulation of Advanced Large-Scale HPC...

42

Five-Year Implementation Plan For Advanced Separations and Waste Forms Capabilities at the Idaho National Laboratory (FY 2011 to FY 2015)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE-NE separations research is focused today on developing a science-based understanding that builds on historical research and focuses on combining a fundamental understanding of separations and waste forms processes with small-scale experimentation coupled with modeling and simulation. The result of this approach is the development of a predictive capability that supports evaluation of separations and waste forms technologies. The specific suite of technologies explored will depend on and must be integrated with the fuel development effort, as well as an understanding of potential waste form requirements. This five-year implementation plan lays out the specific near-term tactical investments in people, equipment and facilities, and customer capture efforts that will be required over the next five years to quickly and safely bring on line the capabilities needed to support the science-based goals and objectives of INL’s Advanced Separations and Waste Forms RD&D Capabilities Strategic Plan.

Not Listed

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Modelling, Simulation, Testing, and Optimization of Advanced Hybrid Vehicle Powertrains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modelling, Simulation, Testing, and Optimization of Advanced Hybrid Vehicle Powertrains By Jeffrey of the author. #12;ii Modelling, Simulation, Testing and Optimization of Advanced Hybrid Vehicle Powertrains prototypes. A comprehensive survey of the state of the art of commercialized hybrid vehicle powertrains

Victoria, University of

44

Advanced Simulation and Computing Fiscal Year 2011-2012 Implementation Plan, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering (D&E) programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional (3D) simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: Objective 1 - Robust Tools. Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements. Objective 2 - Prediction through Simulation. Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear weapons performance in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile. Objective 3 - Balanced Operational Infrastructure. Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

McCoy, M; Phillips, J; Hpson, J; Meisner, R

2010-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

45

Advanced Simulation & Computing FY09-FY10 Implementation Plan Volume 2, Rev. 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the safety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future nonnuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC)1 is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear-weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable Stockpile Life Extension Programs (SLEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining the support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: Objective 1. Robust Tools--Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements. Objective 2--Prediction through Simulation. Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear-weapons performances in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile. Objective 3--Balanced Operational Infrastructure. Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

Meisner, R; Perry, J; McCoy, M; Hopson, J

2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

46

Advanced Simulation and Computing FY10-FY11 Implementation Plan Volume 2, Rev. 0.5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering (D&E) programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional (3D) simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: (1) Robust Tools - Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements; (2) Prediction through Simulation - Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear weapons performance in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile; and (3) Balanced Operational Infrastructure - Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

Meisner, R; Peery, J; McCoy, M; Hopson, J

2009-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

47

Advanced Simulation and Computing FY10-11 Implementation Plan Volume 2, Rev. 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: Objective 1 Robust Tools--Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements. Objective 2 Prediction through Simulation--Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear weapons performance in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile. Objective 3 Balanced Operational Infrastructure--Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

Carnes, B

2009-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

48

Advanced Simulation and Computing FY09-FY10 Implementation Plan, Volume 2, Revision 0.5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC)1 is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: Objective 1. Robust Tools--Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements. Objective 2. Prediction through Simulation--Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear weapons performance in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile. Objective 3. Balanced Operational Infrastructure--Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

Meisner, R; Hopson, J; Peery, J; McCoy, M

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

49

Advanced Simulation and Computing FY09-FY10 Implementation Plan Volume 2, Rev. 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: (1) Robust Tools - Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements; (2) Prediction through Simulation - Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear weapons performance in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile; and (3) Balanced Operational Infrastructure - Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

Kissel, L

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Development of Computational Capabilities to Predict the Corrosion Wastage of Boiler Tubes in Advanced Combustion Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comprehensive corrosion research project consisting of pilot-scale combustion testing and long-term laboratory corrosion study has been successfully performed. A pilot-scale combustion facility available at Brigham Young University was selected and modified to enable burning of pulverized coals under the operating conditions typical for advanced coal-fired utility boilers. Eight United States (U.S.) coals were selected for this investigation, with the test conditions for all coals set to have the same heat input to the combustor. In addition, the air/fuel stoichiometric ratio was controlled so that staged combustion was established, with the stoichiometric ratio maintained at 0.85 in the burner zone and 1.15 in the burnout zone. The burner zone represented the lower furnace of utility boilers, while the burnout zone mimicked the upper furnace areas adjacent to the superheaters and reheaters. From this staged combustion, approximately 3% excess oxygen was attained in the combustion gas at the furnace outlet. During each of the pilot-scale combustion tests, extensive online measurements of the flue gas compositions were performed. In addition, deposit samples were collected at the same location for chemical analyses. Such extensive gas and deposit analyses enabled detailed characterization of the actual combustion environments existing at the lower furnace walls under reducing conditions and those adjacent to the superheaters and reheaters under oxidizing conditions in advanced U.S. coal-fired utility boilers. The gas and deposit compositions were then carefully simulated in a series of 1000-hour laboratory corrosion tests, in which the corrosion performances of different commercial candidate alloys and weld overlays were evaluated at various temperatures for advanced boiler systems. Results of this laboratory study led to significant improvement in understanding of the corrosion mechanisms operating on the furnace walls as well as superheaters and reheaters in coal-fired boilers resulting from the coexistence of sulfur and chlorine in the fuel. A new corrosion mechanism, i.e., “Active Sulfidation Corrosion Mechanism,” has been proposed to account for the accelerated corrosion wastage observed on the furnace walls of utility boilers burning coals containing sulfur and chlorine. In addition, a second corrosion mechanism, i.e., “Active Sulfide-to-Oxide Corrosion Mechanism,” has been identified to account for the rapid corrosion attack on superheaters and reheaters. Both of the newly discovered corrosion mechanisms involve the formation of iron chloride (FeCl2) vapor from iron sulfide (FeS) and HCl, followed by the decomposition of FeCl2 via self-sustaining cycling reactions. For higher alloys containing sufficient chromium, the attack on superheaters and reheaters is dominated by Hot Corrosion in the presence of a fused salt. Furthermore, two stages of the hot corrosion mechanism have been identified and characterized in detail. The initiation of hot corrosion attack induced by molten sulfate leads to Stage 1 “acidic” fluxing and re-precipitation of the protective scale formed initially on the deposit-covered alloy surfaces. Once the protective scale is penetrated, Stage 2 Hot Corrosion is initiated, which is dominated by “basic” fluxing and re-precipitation of the scale in the fused salt. Based on the extensive corrosion information generated from this project, corrosion modeling was performed using non-linear regression analysis. As a result of the modeling efforts, two predictive equations have been formulated, one for furnace walls and the other for superheaters and reheaters. These first-of-the-kind equations can be used to estimate the corrosion rates of boiler tubes based on coal chemistry, alloy compositions, and boiler operating conditions for advanced boiler systems.

Kung, Steven; Rapp, Robert

2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

51

Improved Solvers for Advanced Engine Combustion Simulation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Document:  ace076_mcnenly_2013_o.pdfTechnology Area: Advanced Combustion; Combustion and Emissions ControlPresenter: Matthew McNenlyPresenting Organization: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory ...

52

E-Print Network 3.0 - advance capability reliability Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Formation Partnerships for R&D on commercial and Summary: all factors influencing system energy production, long-term reliability, and safety. Capabilities... Formation Sandia has...

53

Advanced Monte Carlo Methods: Direct Simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

assessment of investment portfolios Computer games Roadway design simulation War gaming #12;Direct Simulation and is lost from the solar system Kepler's Third Law the time taken to describe an orbit with energy ­z is z-3

Mascagni, Michael

54

Advanced accelerator simulation research: miniaturizing accelerators from kilometers to meters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced accelerator simulation research: miniaturizing accelerators from kilometers to meters W: Advanced accelerator research is aimed at finding new technologies that can dramatically reduce the size and cost of future high-energy accelerators. Supercomputing is already playing a dramatic and critical role

Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

55

Sandia National Laboratories: Consortium for Advanced Simulation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the modeling simulation tools built during its first phase to include additional nuclear reactor designs, including small, modular reactors. "As President Obama made clear...

56

Improved Solvers for Advanced Engine Combustion Simulation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Volvo; multi-zone cycle simulation, OpenFOAM model development Bosch; High Performance Computing of HCCISI transition Delphi; direct injection GE Research; new...

57

Presented by CASL: The Consortium for Advanced Simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Presented by Nuclear Energy CASL: The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors A DOE Energy Innovation Hub for Modeling and Simulation of Nuclear Reactors Doug Kothe Director, CASL (BWR) Common types of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) #12;www.casl.gov U.S. Nuclear Energy Increasing

58

Computational physics and applied mathematics capability review June 8-10, 2010 (Advance materials to committee members)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory will review its Computational Physics and Applied Mathematics (CPAM) capabilities in 2010. The goals of capability reviews are to assess the quality of science, technology, and engineering (STE) performed by the capability, evaluate the integration of this capability across the Laboratory and within the scientific community, examine the relevance of this capability to the Laboratory's programs, and provide advice on the current and future directions of this capability. This is the first such review for CPAM, which has a long and unique history at the laboratory, starting from the inception of the Laboratory in 1943. The CPAM capability covers an extremely broad technical area at Los Alamos, encompassing a wide array of disciplines, research topics, and organizations. A vast array of technical disciplines and activities are included in this capability, from general numerical modeling, to coupled mUlti-physics simulations, to detailed domain science activities in mathematics, methods, and algorithms. The CPAM capability involves over 12 different technical divisions and a majority of our programmatic and scientific activities. To make this large scope tractable, the CPAM capability is broken into the following six technical 'themes.' These themes represent technical slices through the CP AM capability and collect critical core competencies of the Laboratory, each of which contributes to the capability (and each of which is divided into multiple additional elements in the detailed descriptions of the themes in subsequent sections): (1) Computational Fluid Dynamics - This theme speaks to the vast array of scientific capabilities for the simulation of fluids under shocks, low-speed flow, and turbulent conditions - which are key, historical, and fundamental strengths of the laboratory; (2) Partial Differential Equations - The technical scope of this theme is the applied mathematics and numerical solution of partial differential equations (broadly defined) in a variety of settings, including particle transport, solvers, and plasma physics; (3) Monte Carlo - Monte Carlo was invented at Los Alamos, and this theme discusses these vitally important methods and their application in everything from particle transport, to condensed matter theory, to biology; (4) Molecular Dynamics - This theme describes the widespread use of molecular dynamics for a variety of important applications, including nuclear energy, materials science, and biological modeling; (5) Discrete Event Simulation - The technical scope of this theme represents a class of complex system evolutions governed by the action of discrete events. Examples include network, communication, vehicle traffic, and epidemiology modeling; and (6) Integrated Codes - This theme discusses integrated applications (comprised of all of the supporting science represented in Themes 1-5) that are of strategic importance to the Laboratory and the nation. The laboratory has in approximately 10 million source lines of code in over 100 different such strategically important applications. Of these themes, four of them will be reviewed during the 2010 review cycle: Themes 1, 2, 3, and 6. Because these capability reviews occur every three years, Themes 4 and 5 will be reviewed in 2013, along with Theme 6 (which will be reviewed during each review, owing to this theme's role as an integrator of the supporting science represented by the other 5 themes). Yearly written status reports will be provided to the Capability Review Committee Chair during off-cycle years.

Lee, Stephen R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Advanced Modeling & Simulation | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehiclesTankless orA BRIEF HISTORY OFEnergyAdvanced

60

Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Simulation and Computing:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0Energy Advanced Nuclear Energy The

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced simulation capability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

ADVANCED TECHNIQUES FOR RESERVOIR SIMULATION AND MODELING OF NONCONVENTIONAL WELLS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nonconventional wells, which include horizontal, deviated, multilateral and ''smart'' wells, offer great potential for the efficient management of oil and gas reservoirs. These wells are able to contact larger regions of the reservoir than conventional wells and can also be used to target isolated hydrocarbon accumulations. The use of nonconventional wells instrumented with downhole inflow control devices allows for even greater flexibility in production. Because nonconventional wells can be very expensive to drill, complete and instrument, it is important to be able to optimize their deployment, which requires the accurate prediction of their performance. However, predictions of nonconventional well performance are often inaccurate. This is likely due to inadequacies in some of the reservoir engineering and reservoir simulation tools used to model and optimize nonconventional well performance. A number of new issues arise in the modeling and optimization of nonconventional wells. For example, the optimal use of downhole inflow control devices has not been addressed for practical problems. In addition, the impact of geological and engineering uncertainty (e.g., valve reliability) has not been previously considered. In order to model and optimize nonconventional wells in different settings, it is essential that the tools be implemented into a general reservoir simulator. This simulator must be sufficiently general and robust and must in addition be linked to a sophisticated well model. Our research under this five year project addressed all of the key areas indicated above. The overall project was divided into three main categories: (1) advanced reservoir simulation techniques for modeling nonconventional wells; (2) improved techniques for computing well productivity (for use in reservoir engineering calculations) and for coupling the well to the simulator (which includes the accurate calculation of well index and the modeling of multiphase flow in the wellbore); and (3) accurate approaches to account for the effects of reservoir heterogeneity and for the optimization of nonconventional well deployment. An overview of our progress in each of these main areas is as follows. A general purpose object-oriented research simulator (GPRS) was developed under this project. The GPRS code is managed using modern software management techniques and has been deployed to many companies and research institutions. The simulator includes general black-oil and compositional modeling modules. The formulation is general in that it allows for the selection of a wide variety of primary and secondary variables and accommodates varying degrees of solution implicitness. Specifically, we developed and implemented an IMPSAT procedure (implicit in pressure and saturation, explicit in all other variables) for compositional modeling as well as an adaptive implicit procedure. Both of these capabilities allow for efficiency gains through selective implicitness. The code treats cell connections through a general connection list, which allows it to accommodate both structured and unstructured grids. The GPRS code was written to be easily extendable so new modeling techniques can be readily incorporated. Along these lines, we developed a new dual porosity module compatible with the GPRS framework, as well as a new discrete fracture model applicable for fractured or faulted reservoirs. Both of these methods display substantial advantages over previous implementations. Further, we assessed the performance of different preconditioners in an attempt to improve the efficiency of the linear solver. As a result of this investigation, substantial improvements in solver performance were achieved.

Louis J. Durlofsky; Khalid Aziz

2004-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

62

Advances in NLTE Modeling for Integrated Simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The last few years have seen significant progress in constructing the atomic models required for non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) simulations. Along with this has come an increased understanding of the requirements for accurately modeling the ionization balance, energy content and radiative properties of different elements for a wide range of densities and temperatures. Much of this progress is the result of a series of workshops dedicated to comparing the results from different codes and computational approaches applied to a series of test problems. The results of these workshops emphasized the importance of atomic model completeness, especially in doubly excited states and autoionization transitions, to calculating ionization balance, and the importance of accurate, detailed atomic data to producing reliable spectra. We describe a simple screened-hydrogenic model that calculates NLTE ionization balance with surprising accuracy, at a low enough computational cost for routine use in radiation-hydrodynamics codes. The model incorporates term splitting, {Delta}n = 0 transitions, and approximate UTA widths for spectral calculations, with results comparable to those of much more detailed codes. Simulations done with this model have been increasingly successful at matching experimental data for laser-driven systems and hohlraums. Accurate and efficient atomic models are just one requirement for integrated NLTE simulations. Coupling the atomic kinetics to hydrodynamics and radiation transport constrains both discretizations and algorithms to retain energy conservation, accuracy and stability. In particular, the strong coupling between radiation and populations can require either very short timesteps or significantly modified radiation transport algorithms to account for NLTE material response. Considerations such as these continue to provide challenges for NLTE simulations.

Scott, H A; Hansen, S B

2009-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

63

An Advanced Neutronic Analysis Toolkit with Inline Monte Carlo capability for BHTR Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monte Carlo capability has been combined with a production LWR lattice physics code to allow analysis of high temperature gas reactor configurations, accounting for the double heterogeneity due to the TRISO fuel. The Monte Carlo code MCNP5 has been used in conjunction with CPM3, which was the testbench lattice physics code for this project. MCNP5 is used to perform two calculations for the geometry of interest, one with homogenized fuel compacts and the other with heterogeneous fuel compacts, where the TRISO fuel kernels are resolved by MCNP5.

William R. Martin; John C. Lee

2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

64

Advanced Reflector and Absorber Materials (Fact Sheet), Thermal Systems Group: CSP Capabilities (TSG)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the BuildingInnovation Portal AdvancedMethods

65

Irradiation research capabilities at HFIR (High Flux Isotope Reactor) and ANS (Advanced Neutron Source)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A variety of materials irradiation facilities exist in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and are planned for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor. In 1986 the HFIR Irradiation Facilities Improvement (HIFI) project began modifications to the HFIR which now permit the operation of two instrumented capsules in the target region and eight capsules of 46-mm OD in the RB region. Thus, it is now possible to perform instrumented irradiation experiments in the highest continuous flux of thermal neutrons available in the western world. The new RB facilities are now large enough to permit neutron spectral tailoring of experiments and the modified method of access to these facilities permit rotation of experiments thereby reducing fluence gradients in specimens. A summary of characteristics of irradiation facilities in HFIR is presented. The ANS is being designed to provide the highest thermal neutron flux for beam facilities in the world. Additional design goals include providing materials irradiation and transplutonium isotope production facilities as good, or better than, HFIR. The reference conceptual core design consists of two annular fuel elements positioned one above the other instead of concentrically as in the HFIR. A variety of materials irradiation facilities with unprecedented fluxes are being incorporated into the design of the ANS. These will include fast neutron irradiation facilities in the central hole of the upper fuel element, epithermal facilities surrounding the lower fuel element, and thermal facilities in the reflector tank. A summary of characteristics of irradiation facilities presently planned for the ANS is presented. 2 tabs.

Thoms, K.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Gasification CFD Modeling for Advanced Power Plant Simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we have described recent progress on developing CFD models for two commercial-scale gasifiers, including a two-stage, coal slurry-fed, oxygen-blown, pressurized, entrained-flow gasifier and a scaled-up design of the PSDF transport gasifier. Also highlighted was NETL’s Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator for coupling high-fidelity equipment models with process simulation for the design, analysis, and optimization of advanced power plants. Using APECS, we have coupled the entrained-flow gasifier CFD model into a coal-fired, gasification-based FutureGen power and hydrogen production plant. The results for the FutureGen co-simulation illustrate how the APECS technology can help engineers better understand and optimize gasifier fluid dynamics and related phenomena that impact overall power plant performance.

Zitney, S.E.; Guenther, C.P.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

advanced beam-dynamics simulation: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

68

Process/equipment co-simulation for designe and analysis of advanced energy systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

b s t r a c t The grand challenge facing the power and energy industries is the development of efficient, environmentally friendly, and affordable technologies for next-generation energy systems. To provide solutions for energy and the environment, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and its research partners in industry and academia are relying increasingly on the use of sophisticated computer-aided process design and optimization tools. In this paper, we describe recent progress toward developing an Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS) for the high-fidelity design, analysis, and optimization of energy plants. The APECS software system combines steady-state process simulation with multiphysics-based equipment simulations, such as those based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD). These co-simulation capabilities enable design engineers to optimize overall process performance with respect to complex thermal and fluid flow phenomena arising in key plant equipment items, such as combustors, gasifiers, turbines, and carbon capture devices. In this paper we review several applications of the APECS co-simulation technology to advanced energy systems, including coal-fired energy plants with carbon capture. This paper also discusses ongoing co-simulation R&D activities and challenges in areas such as CFD-based reduced-order modeling, knowledge management, advanced analysis and optimization, and virtual plant co-simulation. Continued progress in co-simulation technology – through improved integration, solution, and deployment – will have profound positive impacts on the design and optimization of high-efficiency, near-zero emission fossil energy systems.

Zitney, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Overview of ASC Capability Computing System Governance Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains a description of the Advanced Simulation and Computing Program's Capability Computing System Governance Model. Objectives of the Governance Model are to ensure that the capability system resources are allocated on a priority-driven basis according to the Program requirements; and to utilize ASC Capability Systems for the large capability jobs for which they were designed and procured.

Doebling, Scott W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

70

Lessons Learned From Dynamic Simulations of Advanced Fuel Cycles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Years of performing dynamic simulations of advanced nuclear fuel cycle options provide insights into how they could work and how one might transition from the current once-through fuel cycle. This paper summarizes those insights from the context of the 2005 objectives and goals of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). Our intent is not to compare options, assess options versus those objectives and goals, nor recommend changes to those objectives and goals. Rather, we organize what we have learned from dynamic simulations in the context of the AFCI objectives for waste management, proliferation resistance, uranium utilization, and economics. Thus, we do not merely describe “lessons learned” from dynamic simulations but attempt to answer the “so what” question by using this context. The analyses have been performed using the Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Dynamics (VISION). We observe that the 2005 objectives and goals do not address many of the inherently dynamic discriminators among advanced fuel cycle options and transitions thereof.

Steven J. Piet; Brent W. Dixon; Jacob J. Jacobson; Gretchen E. Matthern; David E. Shropshire

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Advancement of DOE's EnergyPlus Building Energy Simulation Payment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EnergyPlus{sup TM} is a new generation computer software analysis tool that has been developed, tested, and commercialized to support DOEâ??s Building Technologies (BT) Program in terms of whole-building, component, and systems R&D (http://www.energyplus.gov). It is also being used to support evaluation and decision making of zero energy building (ZEB) energy efficiency and supply technologies during new building design and existing building retrofits. The 5-year project was managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory and was divided into 5 budget period between 2006 and 2011. During the project period, 11 versions of EnergyPlus were released. This report summarizes work performed by an EnergyPlus development team led by the University of Central Floridaâ??s Florida Solar Energy Center (UCF/FSEC). The team members consist of DHL Consulting, C. O. Pedersen Associates, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Oklahoma State University, GARD Analytics, Inc., and WrightSoft Corporation. The project tasks involved new feature development, testing and validation, user support and training, and general EnergyPlus support. The team developed 146 new features during the 5-year period to advance the EnergyPlus capabilities. Annual contributions of new features are 7 in budget period 1, 19 in period 2, 36 in period 3, 41 in period 4, and 43 in period 5, respectively. The testing and validation task focused on running test suite and publishing report, developing new IEA test suite cases, testing and validating new source code, addressing change requests, and creating and testing installation package. The user support and training task provided support for users and interface developers, and organized and taught workshops. The general support task involved upgrading StarTeam (team sharing) software and updating existing utility software. The project met the DOE objectives and completed all tasks successfully. Although the EnergyPlus software was enhanced significantly under this project, more enhancements are needed for further improvement to ensure that EnergyPlus is able to simulate the latest technologies and perform desired HAVC system operations for the development of next generation HVAC systems. Additional development will be performed under a new 5-year project managed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

Lixing Gu; Don Shirey; Richard Raustad; Bereket Nigusse; Chandan Sharma; Linda Lawrie; Rich Strand; Curt Pedersen; Dan Fisher; Edwin Lee; Mike Witte; Jason Glazer; Chip Barnaby

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

72

Requirements for advanced simulation of nuclear reactor and chemicalseparation plants.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents requirements for advanced simulation of nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants that are of interest to the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) initiative. Justification for advanced simulation and some examples of grand challenges that will benefit from it are provided. An integrated software tool that has its main components, whenever possible based on first principles, is proposed as possible future approach for dealing with the complex problems linked to the simulation of nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants. The main benefits that are associated with a better integrated simulation have been identified as: a reduction of design margins, a decrease of the number of experiments in support of the design process, a shortening of the developmental design cycle, and a better understanding of the physical phenomena and the related underlying fundamental processes. For each component of the proposed integrated software tool, background information, functional requirements, current tools and approach, and proposed future approaches have been provided. Whenever possible, current uncertainties have been quoted and existing limitations have been presented. Desired target accuracies with associated benefits to the different aspects of the nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants were also given. In many cases the possible gains associated with a better simulation have been identified, quantified, and translated into economical benefits.

Palmiotti, G.; Cahalan, J.; Pfeiffer, P.; Sofu, T.; Taiwo, T.; Wei,T.; Yacout, A.; Yang, W.; Siegel, A.; Insepov, Z.; Anitescu, M.; Hovland,P.; Pereira, C.; Regalbuto, M.; Copple, J.; Willamson, M.

2006-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

73

A next-generation modeling capability assesses wind turbine array fluid dynamics and aeroelastic simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A next-generation modeling capability assesses wind turbine array fluid dynamics and aeroelastic of multi-megawatt turbines requires a new generation of modeling capability to assess individual turbine. Key Result The work is generating several models, including actuator line models of several wind

74

New capability will help accelerate design improvements by providing a high-fidelity simulation tool to study power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New capability will help accelerate design improvements by providing a high-fidelity simulation augmentation and use of the combined LES-hydroelastic code will help accelerate the development of effective, efficient, and reliable hydrokinetic energy conversion technologies, thus helping to lower the cost

75

ENVIRONMENTAL CAPABILITIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Section 25 - Electrostatic Discharge Additional Capabilities: · RF Cable Insertion Loss and VSWR Testing to advance technologies. The Institute's clientele include many of the world's aerospace manufacturers, NASAEquipment·FAA ·Medical ·Electrical ·Automotive ·Mechanical ·RailRoad ·Pneumatic ·Nautical ·Hydraulic ·Metallic

76

Advanced capability RFID system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radio-frequency transponder device having an antenna circuit configured to receive radio-frequency signals and to return modulated radio-frequency signals via continuous wave backscatter, a modulation circuit coupled to the antenna circuit for generating the modulated radio-frequency signals, and a microprocessor coupled to the antenna circuit and the modulation circuit and configured to receive and extract operating power from the received radio-frequency signals and to monitor inputs on at least one input pin and to generate responsive signals to the modulation circuit for modulating the radio-frequency signals. The microprocessor can be configured to generate output signals on output pins to associated devices for controlling the operation thereof. Electrical energy can be extracted and stored in an optional electrical power storage device.

Gilbert, Ronald W. (Morgan Hill, CA); Steele, Kerry D. (Kennewick, WA); Anderson, Gordon A. (Benton City, WA)

2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

77

Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC) is to provide an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive-waste storage facility or disposal repository. Achieving the objective of modeling the performance of a disposal scenario requires describing processes involved in waste form degradation and radionuclide release at the subcontinuum scale, beginning with mechanistic descriptions of chemical reactions and chemical kinetics at the atomic scale, and upscaling into effective, validated constitutive models for input to high-fidelity continuum scale codes for coupled multiphysics simulations of release and transport. Verification and validation (V&V) is required throughout the system to establish evidence-based metrics for the level of confidence in M&S codes and capabilities, including at the subcontiunuum scale and the constitutive models they inform or generate. This Report outlines the nature of the V&V challenge at the subcontinuum scale, an approach to incorporate V&V concepts into subcontinuum scale modeling and simulation (M&S), and a plan to incrementally incorporate effective V&V into subcontinuum scale M&S destined for use in the NEAMS Waste IPSC work flow to meet requirements of quantitative confidence in the constitutive models informed by subcontinuum scale phenomena.

Schultz, Peter Andrew

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Simulation information regarding Sandia National Laboratories%3CU%2B2019%3E trinity capability improvement metric.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory each selected a representative simulation code to be used as a performance benchmark for the Trinity Capability Improvement Metric. Sandia selected SIERRA Low Mach Module: Nalu, which is a uid dynamics code that solves many variable-density, acoustically incompressible problems of interest spanning from laminar to turbulent ow regimes, since it is fairly representative of implicit codes that have been developed under ASC. The simulations for this metric were performed on the Cielo Cray XE6 platform during dedicated application time and the chosen case utilized 131,072 Cielo cores to perform a canonical turbulent open jet simulation within an approximately 9-billion-elementunstructured- hexahedral computational mesh. This report will document some of the results from these simulations as well as provide instructions to perform these simulations for comparison.

Agelastos, Anthony Michael; Lin, Paul T.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Recent advances of strong-strong beam-beam simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we report on recent advances in strong-strong beam-beam simulation. Numerical methods used in the calculation of the beam-beam forces are reviewed. A new computational method to solve the Poisson equation on nonuniform grid is presented. This method reduces the computational cost by a half compared with the standard FFT based method on uniform grid. It is also more accurate than the standard method for a colliding beam with low transverse aspect ratio. In applications, we present the study of coherent modes with multi-bunch, multi-collision beam-beam interactions at RHIC. We also present the strong-strong simulation of the luminosity evolution at KEKB with and without finite crossing angle.

Qiang, Ji; Furman, Miguel A.; Ryne, Robert D.; Fischer, Wolfram; Ohmi,Kazuhito

2004-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

80

Prototype Development Capabilities of 3D Spatial Interactions and Failures During Scenario Simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Computers have been used for 3D modeling and simulation, but only recently have computational resources been able to give realistic results in a reasonable time frame for large complex models. This report addressed the methods, techniques, and resources used to develop a prototype for using 3D modeling and simulation engine to improve risk analysis and evaluate reactor structures and components for a given scenario. The simulations done for this evaluation were focused on external events, specifically tsunami floods, for a hypothetical nuclear power facility on a coastline.

Steven Prescott; Ramprasad Sampath; Curtis Smith; Tony Koonce

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced simulation capability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

NOAA's autonomous balloons, capable of crossing oceans and sampling at very low altitudes, use advanced instrument and communication technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA's autonomous balloons, capable of crossing oceans and sampling at very low altitudes, use- grams. This paper traces the innovations in design and gains in capability of the autonomous Lagrangian

Businger, Steven

82

Advanced simulation capability for environmental management (ASCEM): An overview of initial results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WA, USA ¶Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC,Ridge and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), Idahofrom Savannah River National Laboratory. Dr. Williamson has

Williamson, M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Advanced simulation capability for environmental management (ASCEM): An overview of initial results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

River, Oak Ridge, and Hanford. These sites contain some ofNational Lab- oratories, Hanford, and Portsmouth/Paducahthroughout the US. The Hanford, Oak Ridge, and Savannah

Williamson, M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) : FY10 development and integration.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the progress in fiscal year 2010 in developing the Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Campaign. The goal of the Waste IPSC is to develop an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive waste storage or disposal system. The Waste IPSC will provide this simulation capability (1) for a range of disposal concepts, waste form types, engineered repository designs, and geologic settings, (2) for a range of time scales and distances, (3) with appropriate consideration of the inherent uncertainties, and (4) in accordance with robust verification, validation, and software quality requirements. Waste IPSC activities in fiscal year 2010 focused on specifying a challenge problem to demonstrate proof of concept, developing a verification and validation plan, and performing an initial gap analyses to identify candidate codes and tools to support the development and integration of the Waste IPSC. The current Waste IPSC strategy is to acquire and integrate the necessary Waste IPSC capabilities wherever feasible, and develop only those capabilities that cannot be acquired or suitably integrated, verified, or validated. This year-end progress report documents the FY10 status of acquisition, development, and integration of thermal-hydrologic-chemical-mechanical (THCM) code capabilities, frameworks, and enabling tools and infrastructure.

Criscenti, Louise Jacqueline; Sassani, David Carl; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Bouchard, Julie F.; Edwards, Harold Carter; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Wang, Yifeng; Schultz, Peter Andrew

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Cyclus fuel cycle simulation capabilities with the CYDER disposal system model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An algorithm and supporting database for rapid thermal repository loading calculation was implemented in CYDER. This algorithm employs a Specific Temperature Change (STC) method and has resulted from combining detailed spent nuclear fuel composition data with a detailed thermal repository performance analysis tool from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and the Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) campaign. By abstraction of and benchmarking against these detailed thermal models, CYDER captures the dominant physics of thermal phenomena affecting repository capacity in various geologic media and as a function of spent fuel composition. Abstraction based on detailed computational thermal repository performance calculations with the LLNL semi-analytic model has resulted in implementation of the STC estimation algorithm and a supporting reference dataset. This method is capable of rapid estimation of temperature increase near emplacement tunnels as a function of waste composition, limiting radius, waste package spacing, near field thermal conductivity and near field thermal diffusivity. The sensitivity analyses and validation efforts conducted in this work demonstrate the capability of the CYDER tool to provide repository capacity and performance metrics in the context of dynamic fuel cycle.

Huff, K.D. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); University of Wisconsin, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

An advanced signal processing and file management software for relay testing using digital simulators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

simulators due to their capability of generating fault waveforms, have also been developed. User interface software in digital simulators is rather limited. This thesis concentrates on the development of a signal processing and file management software...

Namasivayam, Padmanaban

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

E-Print Network 3.0 - analysis advanced simulation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

time tmax 50000 time units. The advanced user can assign arbitrary... of gyration vs. simulation time, or energy vs. ... Source: Dokholyan, Nikolay V. - Department of...

88

Expand the Modeling Capabilities of DOE's EnergyPlus Building Energy Simulation Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EnergyPlus{trademark} is a new generation computer software analysis tool that has been developed, tested, and commercialized to support DOE's Building Technologies (BT) Program in terms of whole-building, component, and systems R&D (http://www.energyplus.gov). It is also being used to support evaluation and decision making of zero energy building (ZEB) energy efficiency and supply technologies during new building design and existing building retrofits. Version 1.0 of EnergyPlus was released in April 2001, followed by semiannual updated versions over the ensuing seven-year period. This report summarizes work performed by the University of Central Florida's Florida Solar Energy Center (UCF/FSEC) to expand the modeling capabilities of EnergyPlus. The project tasks involved implementing, testing, and documenting the following new features or enhancement of existing features: (1) A model for packaged terminal heat pumps; (2) A model for gas engine-driven heat pumps with waste heat recovery; (3) Proper modeling of window screens; (4) Integrating and streamlining EnergyPlus air flow modeling capabilities; (5) Comfort-based controls for cooling and heating systems; and (6) An improved model for microturbine power generation with heat recovery. UCF/FSEC located existing mathematical models or generated new model for these features and incorporated them into EnergyPlus. The existing or new models were (re)written using Fortran 90/95 programming language and were integrated within EnergyPlus in accordance with the EnergyPlus Programming Standard and Module Developer's Guide. Each model/feature was thoroughly tested and identified errors were repaired. Upon completion of each model implementation, the existing EnergyPlus documentation (e.g., Input Output Reference and Engineering Document) was updated with information describing the new or enhanced feature. Reference data sets were generated for several of the features to aid program users in selecting proper model inputs. An example input data file, suitable for distribution to EnergyPlus users, was created for each new or improved feature to illustrate the input requirements for the model.

Don Shirey

2008-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

89

Advanced virtual energy simulation training and research: IGCC with CO2 capture power plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this presentation, we highlight the deployment of a real-time dynamic simulator of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture at the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL) Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research (AVESTARTM) Center. The Center was established as part of the DOE's accelerating initiative to advance new clean coal technology for power generation. IGCC systems are an attractive technology option, generating low-cost electricity by converting coal and/or other fuels into a clean synthesis gas mixture in a process that is efficient and environmentally superior to conventional power plants. The IGCC dynamic simulator builds on, and reaches beyond, conventional power plant simulators to merge, for the first time, a 'gasification with CO{sub 2} capture' process simulator with a 'combined-cycle' power simulator. Fueled with coal, petroleum coke, and/or biomass, the gasification island of the simulated IGCC plant consists of two oxygen-blown, downward-fired, entrained-flow, slagging gasifiers with radiant syngas coolers and two-stage sour shift reactors, followed by a dual-stage acid gas removal process for CO{sub 2} capture. The combined cycle island consists of two F-class gas turbines, steam turbine, and a heat recovery steam generator with three-pressure levels. The dynamic simulator can be used for normal base-load operation, as well as plant start-up and shut down. The real-time dynamic simulator also responds satisfactorily to process disturbances, feedstock blending and switchovers, fluctuations in ambient conditions, and power demand load shedding. In addition, the full-scope simulator handles a wide range of abnormal situations, including equipment malfunctions and failures, together with changes initiated through actions from plant field operators. By providing a comprehensive IGCC operator training system, the AVESTAR Center is poised to develop a workforce well-prepared to operate and control commercial-scale gasification-based power plants capable of 90% pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture and compression, as well as low sulfur, mercury, and NOx emissions. With additional support from the NETL-Regional University Alliance (NETL-RUA), the Center will educate and train engineering students and researchers by providing hands-on 'learning by operating' experience The AVESTAR Center also offers unique collaborative R&D opportunities in high-fidelity dynamic modeling, advanced process control, real-time optimization, and virtual plant simulation. Objectives and goals are aimed at safe and effective management of power generation systems for optimal efficiency, while protecting the environment. To add another dimension of realism to the AVESTAR experience, NETL will introduce an immersive training system with innovative three-dimensional virtual reality technology. Wearing a stereoscopic headset or eyewear, trainees will enter an interactive virtual environment that will allow them to move freely throughout the simulated 3-D facility to study and learn various aspects of IGCC plant operation, control, and safety. Such combined operator and immersive training systems go beyond traditional simulation and include more realistic scenarios, improved communication, and collaboration among co-workers.

Zitney, S.; Liese, E.; Mahapatra, P.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Provost, G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Enabling Advanced Modeling and Simulations for Fuel-Flexible Combustors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of the present project is to enable advanced modeling and simulations for the design and optimization of fuel-flexible turbine combustors. For this purpose we use a high fidelity, extensively-tested large-eddy simulation (LES) code and state-of-the-art models for premixed/partially-premixed turbulent combustion developed in the PI's group. In the frame of the present project, these techniques are applied, assessed, and improved for hydrogen enriched premixed and partially premixed gas-turbine combustion. Our innovative approaches include a completely consistent description of flame propagation; a coupled progress variable/level set method to resolve the detailed flame structure, and incorporation of thermal-diffusion (non-unity Lewis number) effects. In addition, we have developed a general flamelet-type transformation holding in the limits of both non-premixed and premixed burning. As a result, a model for partially premixed combustion has been derived. The coupled progress variable/level method and the general flamelet transformation were validated by LES of a lean-premixed low-swirl burner that has been studied experimentally at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The model is extended to include the non-unity Lewis number effects, which play a critical role in fuel-flexible combustor with high hydrogen content fuel. More specifically, a two-scalar model for lean hydrogen and hydrogen-enriched combustion is developed and validated against experimental and direct numerical simulation (DNS) data. Results are presented to emphasize the importance of non-unity Lewis number effects in the lean-premixed low-swirl burner of interest in this project. The proposed model gives improved results, which shows that the inclusion of the non-unity Lewis number effects is essential for accurate prediction of the lean-premixed low-swirl flame.

Pitsch, Heinz

2010-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

91

Requirements for Advanced Simulation of Nuclear Reactor and Chemical Separation Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Requirements for Advanced Simulation of Nuclear Reactor and Chemical Separation Plants ANL-AFCI-168 of Nuclear Reactor and Chemical Separation Plants ANL-AFCI-168 by G. Palmiotti, J. Cahalan, P. Pfeiffer, T;2 ANL-AFCI-168 Requirements for Advanced Simulation of Nuclear Reactor and Chemical Separation Plants G

Anitescu, Mihai

92

advanced simulation technologies: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of high-performance tokamak plasmas together with advanced technology in a fusion power plant. Several to ARIES-RS that led to plasmas with higher N and . Advanced...

93

advanced simulation technology: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of high-performance tokamak plasmas together with advanced technology in a fusion power plant. Several to ARIES-RS that led to plasmas with higher N and . Advanced...

94

Large Eddy Simulation (LES) Applied to Advanced Engine Combustion...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

over broad operating ranges) - Requirements for efficient and routine use of high-performance computing (HPC), development of both predictive and affordable models for advanced...

95

Simulation based Bayesian econometric inference: principles and some recent computational advances  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007/15 Simulation based Bayesian econometric inference: principles and some recent computational/15 Simulation based Bayesian econometric inference: principles and some recent computational advances Lennart F aspects of simulation based Bayesian econometric inference. We start at an elementary level on basic

Nesterov, Yurii

96

COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: TOWARDS ADVANCED UNDERSTANDING AND PREDICTIVE CAPABILITY OF CLIMATE CHANGE IN THE ARCTIC USING A HIGH-RESOLUTION REGIONAL ARCTIC CLIMATE SYSTEM MODEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The motivation for this project was to advance the science of climate change and prediction in the Arctic region. Its primary goals were to (i) develop a state-of-the-art Regional Arctic Climate system Model (RACM) including high-resolution atmosphere, land, ocean, sea ice and land hydrology components and (ii) to perform extended numerical experiments using high performance computers to minimize uncertainties and fundamentally improve current predictions of climate change in the northern polar regions. These goals were realized first through evaluation studies of climate system components via one-way coupling experiments. Simulations were then used to examine the effects of advancements in climate component systems on their representation of main physics, time-mean fields and to understand variability signals at scales over many years. As such this research directly addressed some of the major science objectives of the BER Climate Change Research Division (CCRD) regarding the advancement of long-term climate prediction.

Gutowski, William J.

2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

97

Simulation-based evaluation of Advanced Traveler Information Services (ATIS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Drivers using information from an Advanced Traveler Information System (ATIS) could potentially make better travel decisions to reduce travel time and increase trip reliability, thereby benefiting both guided drivers as ...

Florian, Daniel George

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Some Specific CASL Requirements for Advanced Multiphase Flow Simulation of Light Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because of the diversity of physical phenomena occuring in boiling, flashing, and bubble collapse, and of the length and time scales of LWR systems, it is imperative that the models have the following features: • Both vapor and liquid phases (and noncondensible phases, if present) must be treated as compressible. • Models must be mathematically and numerically well-posed. • The models methodology must be multi-scale. A fundamental derivation of the multiphase governing equation system, that should be used as a basis for advanced multiphase modeling in LWR coolant systems, is given in the Appendix using the ensemble averaging method. The remainder of this work focuses specifically on the compressible, well-posed, and multi-scale requirements of advanced simulation methods for these LWR coolant systems, because without these are the most fundamental aspects, without which widespread advancement cannot be claimed. Because of the expense of developing multiple special-purpose codes and the inherent inability to couple information from the multiple, separate length- and time-scales, efforts within CASL should be focused toward development of a multi-scale approaches to solve those multiphase flow problems relevant to LWR design and safety analysis. Efforts should be aimed at developing well-designed unified physical/mathematical and high-resolution numerical models for compressible, all-speed multiphase flows spanning: (1) Well-posed general mixture level (true multiphase) models for fast transient situations and safety analysis, (2) DNS (Direct Numerical Simulation)-like models to resolve interface level phenmena like flashing and boiling flows, and critical heat flux determination (necessarily including conjugate heat transfer), and (3) Multi-scale methods to resolve both (1) and (2) automatically, depending upon specified mesh resolution, and to couple different flow models (single-phase, multiphase with several velocities and pressures, multiphase with single velocity and pressure, etc.) A unified, multi-scale approach is advocated to extend the necessary foundations and build the capability to simultaneously solve the fluid dynamic interface problems (interface resolution) as well as multiphase mixtures (homogenization).

R. A. Berry

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Advanced Techniques for Reservoir Simulation and Modeling of Non-Conventional Wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research results for the second year of this project on the development of improved modeling techniques for non-conventional (e.g., horizontal, deviated or multilateral) wells were presented. The overall program entails the development of enhanced well modeling and general simulation capabilities. A general formulation for black-oil and compositional reservoir simulation was presented.

Durlofsky, Louis J.; Aziz, Khalid

2001-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

100

The New MCNP6 Depletion Capability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first MCNP based inline Monte Carlo depletion capability was officially released from the Radiation Safety Information and Computational Center as MCNPX 2.6.0. Both the MCNP5 and MCNPX codes have historically provided a successful combinatorial geometry based, continuous energy, Monte Carlo radiation transport solution for advanced reactor modeling and simulation. However, due to separate development pathways, useful simulation capabilities were dispersed between both codes and not unified in a single technology. MCNP6, the next evolution in the MCNP suite of codes, now combines the capability of both simulation tools, as well as providing new advanced technology, in a single radiation transport code. We describe here the new capabilities of the MCNP6 depletion code dating from the official RSICC release MCNPX 2.6.0, reported previously, to the now current state of MCNP6. NEA/OECD benchmark results are also reported. The MCNP6 depletion capability enhancements beyond MCNPX 2.6.0 reported here include: (1) new performance enhancing parallel architecture that implements both shared and distributed memory constructs; (2) enhanced memory management that maximizes calculation fidelity; and (3) improved burnup physics for better nuclide prediction. MCNP6 depletion enables complete, relatively easy-to-use depletion calculations in a single Monte Carlo code. The enhancements described here help provide a powerful capability as well as dictate a path forward for future development to improve the usefulness of the technology.

Fensin, Michael Lorne [Los Alamos National Laboratory; James, Michael R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hendricks, John S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goorley, John T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced simulation capability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Simulation Computing: Research &  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0Energy Advanced Nuclear Energy The Advanced

102

Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Simulation Computing: Verification &  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0Energy Advanced Nuclear Energy The AdvancedValidation

103

JIFT Workshop `Advanced Simulation Methods in Plasma Physics'at NIFS, Dec.14-16 Particle Simulation AnalysisParticle Simulation Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JIFT Workshop `Advanced Simulation Methods in Plasma Physics'at NIFS, Dec.14-16 Particle Simulation)Hiroaki Ohtani 1,2), Nobuaki Ohno 3), Ritoku Horiuchi 1,2) 1National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS'at NIFS, Dec.14-16 ContentsContents · Introduction ­ Virtual Realityy · Application to Magnetic

Ito, Atsushi

104

Advanced Thermal Simulator Testing: Thermal Analysis and Test Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Work at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center seeks to develop high fidelity, electrically heated thermal simulators that represent fuel elements in a nuclear reactor design to support non-nuclear testing applicable to the potential development of a space nuclear power or propulsion system. Comparison between the fuel pins and thermal simulators is made at the outer fuel clad surface, which corresponds to the outer sheath surface in the thermal simulator. The thermal simulators that are currently being tested correspond to a liquid metal cooled reactor design that could be applied for Lunar surface power. These simulators are designed to meet the geometric and power requirements of a proposed surface power reactor design, accommodate testing of various axial power profiles, and incorporate imbedded instrumentation. This paper reports the results of thermal simulator analysis and testing in a bare element configuration, which does not incorporate active heat removal, and testing in a water-cooled calorimeter designed to mimic the heat removal that would be experienced in a reactor core.

Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Dickens, Ricky; Dixon, David; Reid, Robert; Adams, Mike; Davis, Joe [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Nuclear Systems Branch/ER24, MSFC, AL 35812 (United States)

2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

105

Advanced computational simulation of flow phenomena associated with orifice meters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents and discusses results from a series of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of fluid flow phenomena associated with orifice meters. These simulations were performed using a new, state-of-the-art CFD code developed at Southwest Research Institute. This code is based on new techniques designed to take advantage of parallel computers to increase computational performance and fidelity of simulation results. This algorithm uses a domain decomposition strategy to create grid systems for very complex geometries composed of simpler geometric subregions, allowing for the accurate representation of the fluid flow domain. The domain decomposition technique maps naturally to parallel computer architectures. Here, the concept of message-passing is used to create a parallel algorithm, using the Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM) library. This code is then used to simulate the flow through an orifice meter run consisting of an orifice with a beta ratio of 0.5 and air flowing at a Reynolds number of 91,100. The work discussed in this paper is but the first step in developing a Virtual Metering Research Facility to support research, analysis, and formulation of new standards for metering.

Freitas, C.J. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

106

Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User Group andCompositional AccountExperience |Reactors TheAdvanced

107

Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User Group andCompositional AccountExperience |Reactors TheAdvancedHow

108

Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearchCASLNanoporousTestimony | NationalMAMBA (MPO Advanced Model for

109

Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearchCASLNanoporousTestimony | NationalMAMBA (MPO Advanced Model

110

Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearchCASLNanoporousTestimony | NationalMAMBA (MPO Advanced

111

Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearchCASLNanoporousTestimony | NationalMAMBA (MPO AdvancedResearch

112

Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Simulation and Computing: Contact  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0Energy Advanced Nuclear Energy TheASC Contact ASC Sandia ASC

113

Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Simulation and Computing: Facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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114

Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Simulation and Computing: Integrated  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0Energy Advanced Nuclear Energy TheASC Contact ASC

115

Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Simulation and Computing: Physics &  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0Energy Advanced Nuclear Energy TheASC Contact ASCEngineering

116

Thermal Simulation of Advanced Powertrain Systems | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of EnergyThe EnergyDepartment of Energy TheAged byEnergySimulation

117

Advances in thermal hydraulic and neutronic simulation for reactor analysis and safety  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes several large-scale computational models developed at Argonne National Laboratory for the simulation and analysis of thermal-hydraulic and neutronic events in nuclear reactors and nuclear power plants. The impact of advanced parallel computing technologies on these computational models is emphasized.

Tentner, A.M.; Blomquist, R.N.; Canfield, T.R.; Ewing, T.F.; Garner, P.L.; Gelbard, E.M.; Gross, K.C.; Minkoff, M.; Valentin, R.A.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

The Modelica Association Modelica 2006, September 4th Advanced modeling and simulation techniques in MOSILAB  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Modelica Association Modelica 2006, September 4th -5th ,2006 Advanced modeling and simulation uses the object- and equation-oriented model description language Modelica®, with a backwards Techniques in MOSILAB: A System Development Case Study #12;The Modelica Association Modelica 2006, September

119

ADVANCED VISUALIZATION OF ENGINE SIMULATION DATA USING TEXTURE SYNTHESIS AND TOPOLOGICAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure 1: Idealized in-cylinder flow through a diesel engine (left) and a gas engine (right). ADVANCED motion found inside diesel and gas engines, respectively. Texture-based flow visualization techniques use at the simulation of in-cylinder flow, namely, the visualization of swirl and tumble motion found inside diesel

Chen, Guoning

120

Challenge problem and milestones for : Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the specification of a challenge problem and associated challenge milestones for the Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) supporting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Campaign. The NEAMS challenge problems are designed to demonstrate proof of concept and progress towards IPSC goals. The goal of the Waste IPSC is to develop an integrated suite of modeling and simulation capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive waste storage or disposal system. The Waste IPSC will provide this simulation capability (1) for a range of disposal concepts, waste form types, engineered repository designs, and geologic settings, (2) for a range of time scales and distances, (3) with appropriate consideration of the inherent uncertainties, and (4) in accordance with robust verification, validation, and software quality requirements. To demonstrate proof of concept and progress towards these goals and requirements, a Waste IPSC challenge problem is specified that includes coupled thermal-hydrologic-chemical-mechanical (THCM) processes that describe (1) the degradation of a borosilicate glass waste form and the corresponding mobilization of radionuclides (i.e., the processes that produce the radionuclide source term), (2) the associated near-field physical and chemical environment for waste emplacement within a salt formation, and (3) radionuclide transport in the near field (i.e., through the engineered components - waste form, waste package, and backfill - and the immediately adjacent salt). The initial details of a set of challenge milestones that collectively comprise the full challenge problem are also specified.

Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Wang, Yifeng; Howard, Robert; McNeish, Jerry A.; Schultz, Peter Andrew; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced simulation capability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC) verification and validation plan. version 1.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC) is to provide an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive-waste storage facility or disposal repository. To meet this objective, NEAMS Waste IPSC M&S capabilities will be applied to challenging spatial domains, temporal domains, multiphysics couplings, and multiscale couplings. A strategic verification and validation (V&V) goal is to establish evidence-based metrics for the level of confidence in M&S codes and capabilities. Because it is economically impractical to apply the maximum V&V rigor to each and every M&S capability, M&S capabilities will be ranked for their impact on the performance assessments of various components of the repository systems. Those M&S capabilities with greater impact will require a greater level of confidence and a correspondingly greater investment in V&V. This report includes five major components: (1) a background summary of the NEAMS Waste IPSC to emphasize M&S challenges; (2) the conceptual foundation for verification, validation, and confidence assessment of NEAMS Waste IPSC M&S capabilities; (3) specifications for the planned verification, validation, and confidence-assessment practices; (4) specifications for the planned evidence information management system; and (5) a path forward for the incremental implementation of this V&V plan.

Bartlett, Roscoe Ainsworth; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.; Urbina, Angel; Bouchard, Julie F.; Edwards, Harold Carter; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Knupp, Patrick Michael; Wang, Yifeng; Schultz, Peter Andrew; Howard, Robert (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); McCornack, Marjorie Turner

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Simulation and performance analysis of basic GAX and advanced GAX cycles with ammonia/water and ammonia/water/LiBr absorption fluids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The generator-absorber heat exchange (GAX) and branched GAX cycles are generally considered with NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O as their working fluid. The potential consequences of using a ternary mixture of NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O/LiBr (advanced fluids) in the GAX and Branched GAX (advanced cycles) are discussed in this study. A modular steady state absorption simulation model(ABSIM) was used to investigate the potential of combining the above advanced cycles with the advanced fluids. ABSIM is capable of modeling varying cycle configurations with different working fluids. Performance parameters of the cycles, including coefficient of performance (COP) and heat duties, were investigated as functions of different operating parameters in the cooling mode for both the NH {sub 3}/H{sub 2}O binary and the NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O/LiBr ternary mixtures. High performance potential of GAX and branched GAX cycles using the NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O/LiBr ternary fluid mixture was achieved especially at the high range of firing temperatures exceeding 400{degrees}F. The cooling COP`s have been improved by approximately 21% over the COP achieved with the NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O binary mixtures. These results show the potential of using advanced cycles with advanced fluid mixtures (ternary or quaternary fluid mixtures).

Zaltash, A.; Grossman, G.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Adding Complex Terrain and Stable Atmospheric Condition Capability to the Simulator for On/Offshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA) (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation describes changes made to NREL's OpenFOAM-based wind plant aerodynamics solver so that it can compute the stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer and flow over terrain. Background about the flow solver, the Simulator for Off/Onshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA) is given, followed by details of the stable stratification/complex terrain modifications to SOWFA, along with some preliminary results calculations of a stable atmospheric boundary layer and flow over a simple set of hills.

Churchfield, M. J.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Development of Advanced Wear and Corrosion Resistant Systems Through Laser Surface Alloying and Materials Simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser surfacing in the form of cladding, alloying, and modifications are gaining widespread use because of its ability to provide high deposition rates, low thermal distortion, and refined microstructure due to high solidification rates. Because of these advantages, laser surface alloying is considered a prime candidate for producing ultra-hard coatings through the establishment or in situ formation of composite structures. Therefore, a program was conducted by the Applied Research Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to develop the scientific and engineering basis for performing laser-based surface modifications involving the addition of hard particles, such as carbides, borides, and nitrides, within a metallic matrix for improved wear, fatigue, creep, and corrosion resistance. This has involved the development of advanced laser processing and simulation techniques, along with the refinement and application of these techniques for predicting and selecting materials and processing parameters for the creation of new surfaces having improved properties over current coating technologies. This program has also resulted in the formulation of process and material simulation tools capable of examining the potential for the formation and retention of composite coatings and deposits produced using laser processing techniques, as well as positive laboratory demonstrations in producing these coatings. In conjunction with the process simulation techniques, the application of computational thermodynamic and kinetic models to design laser surface alloying materials was demonstrated and resulted in a vast improvement in the formulation of materials used for producing composite coatings. The methodology was used to identify materials and to selectively modify microstructures for increasing hardness of deposits produced by the laser surface alloying process. Computational thermodynamic calculations indicated that it was possible to induce the precipitation of titanium carbonitrides during laser surface alloying provided there was sufficient amount of dissolved titanium, carbon, and nitrogen in the liquid steel. This was confirmed experimentally by using a powder mixture of 431-martensitic steel, titanium carbide powder, and nitrogen shielding, during laser deposition to produce deposits exhibiting relatively high hardness (average surface hardness of 724 HV). The same approach was extended to direct diode laser processing and similar microstructures were attained. The above analysis was extended to develop an in-situ precipitation of Ti(CN) during laser deposition. The Ti addition was achieving by mixing the 431 martensitic steel powders with ferro-titanium. The dissolution of nitrogen was achieved by using 100% nitrogen shielding gas, which was indicated by thermodynamic analysis. Demonstrations were also conducted utilizing the tools developed during the program and resulted in several viable composite coating systems being identified. This included the use of TiC and ferro-titanium in martensitic-grade stainless steel matrix material with and without the use of active N2 shielding gas, WC hard particles in a martensitic-grade stainless steel matrix material, WC and BN in a nickel-based matrix material, and WC in highly alloyed iron-based matrix. Although these demonstrations indicated the potential of forming composite coatings, in certain instances, the intended industrial applications involved unique requirements, such as coating of internal surfaces, which hindered the full development of the improved coating technology. However, it is believed that the addition of common hard particles, such as WC or TiC, to matrix material representing martensitic grades of stainless steel offer opportunities for improved performance at relatively low material cost.

R. P. Martukanitz and S. Babu

2007-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

125

Integrating advanced materials simulation techniques into an automated data analysis workflow at the Spallation Neutron Source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation will review developments on the integration of advanced modeling and simulation techniques into the analysis step of experimental data obtained at the Spallation Neutron Source. A workflow framework for the purpose of refining molecular mechanics force-fields against quasi-elastic neutron scattering data is presented. The workflow combines software components to submit model simulations to remote high performance computers, a message broker interface for communications between the optimizer engine and the simulation production step, and tools to convolve the simulated data with the experimental resolution. A test application shows the correction to a popular fixed-charge water model in order to account polarization effects due to the presence of solvated ions. Future enhancements to the refinement workflow are discussed. This work is funded through the DOE Center for Accelerating Materials Modeling.

Borreguero Calvo, Jose M [ORNL] [ORNL; Campbell, Stuart I [ORNL] [ORNL; Delaire, Olivier A [ORNL] [ORNL; Doucet, Mathieu [ORNL] [ORNL; Goswami, Monojoy [ORNL] [ORNL; Hagen, Mark E [ORNL] [ORNL; Lynch, Vickie E [ORNL] [ORNL; Proffen, Thomas E [ORNL] [ORNL; Ren, Shelly [ORNL] [ORNL; Savici, Andrei T [ORNL] [ORNL; Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation: Advancing Computational Science for Future Accelerators and Accelerator Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design and performance optimization of particle accelerators are essential for the success of the DOE scientific program in the next decade. Particle accelerators are very complex systems whose accurate description involves a large number of degrees of freedom and requires the inclusion of many physics processes. Building on the success of the SciDAC-1 Accelerator Science and Technology project, the SciDAC-2 Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS) is developing a comprehensive set of interoperable components for beam dynamics, electromagnetics, electron cooling, and laser/plasma acceleration modelling. ComPASS is providing accelerator scientists the tools required to enable the necessary accelerator simulation paradigm shift from high-fidelity single physics process modeling (covered under SciDAC1) to high-fidelity multiphysics modeling. Our computational frameworks have been used to model the behavior of a large number of accelerators and accelerator R&D experiments, assisting both their design and performance optimization. As parallel computational applications, the ComPASS codes have been shown to make effective use of thousands of processors. ComPASS is in the first year of executing its plan to develop the next-generation HPC accelerator modeling tools. ComPASS aims to develop an integrated simulation environment that will utilize existing and new accelerator physics modules with petascale capabilities, by employing modern computing and solver technologies. The ComPASS vision is to deliver to accelerator scientists a virtual accelerator and virtual prototyping modeling environment, with the necessary multiphysics, multiscale capabilities. The plan for this development includes delivering accelerator modeling applications appropriate for each stage of the ComPASS software evolution. Such applications are already being used to address challenging problems in accelerator design and optimization. The ComPASS organization for software development and applications accounts for the natural domain areas (beam dynamics, electromagnetics, and advanced acceleration), and all areas depend on the enabling technologies activities, such as solvers and component technology, to deliver the desired performance and integrated simulation environment. The ComPASS applications focus on computationally challenging problems important for design or performance optimization to all major HEP, NP, and BES accelerator facilities. With the cost and complexity of particle accelerators rising, the use of computation to optimize their designs and find improved operating regimes becomes essential, potentially leading to significant cost savings with modest investment.

Spentzouris, P.; /Fermilab; Cary, J.; /Tech-X, Boulder; McInnes, L.C.; /Argonne; Mori, W.; /UCLA; Ng, C.; /SLAC; Ng, E.; Ryne, R.; /LBL, Berkeley

2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

127

Technical Basis for Physical Fidelity of NRC Control Room Training Simulators for Advanced Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to determine how simulator physical fidelity influences the effectiveness of training the regulatory personnel responsible for examination and oversight of operating personnel and inspection of technical systems at nuclear power reactors. It seeks to contribute to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC’s) understanding of the physical fidelity requirements of training simulators. The goal of the study is to provide an analytic framework, data, and analyses that inform NRC decisions about the physical fidelity requirements of the simulators it will need to train its staff for assignment at advanced reactors. These staff are expected to come from increasingly diverse educational and experiential backgrounds.

Minsk, Brian S.; Branch, Kristi M.; Bates, Edward K.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Gore, Bryan F.; Faris, Drury K.

2009-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

128

Virtually simulating the next generation of clean energy technologies: NETL's AVESTAR Center is dedicated to the safe, reliable and efficient operation of advanced energy plants with carbon capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Imagine using a real-time virtual simulator to learn to fly a space shuttle or rebuild your car's transmission without touching a piece of equipment or getting your hands dirty. Now, apply this concept to learning how to operate and control a state-of-the-art, electricity-producing power plant capable of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture. That's what the National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL) Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research (AVESTAR) Center (www.netl.doe.gov/avestar) is designed to do. Established as part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) initiative to advance new clean energy technology for power generation, the AVESTAR Center focuses primarily on providing simulation-based training for process engineers and energy plant operators, starting with the deployment of a first-of-a-kind operator training simulator for an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture. The IGCC dynamic simulator builds on, and reaches beyond, conventional power plant simulators to merge, for the first time, a 'gasification with CO{sub 2} capture' process simulator with a 'combined-cycle' power simulator. Based on Invensys Operations Management's SimSci-Esscor DYNSIM software, the high-fidelity dynamic simulator provides realistic training on IGCC plant operations, including normal and faulted operations, as well as plant start-up, shutdown and power demand load changes. The highly flexible simulator also allows for testing of different types of fuel sources, such as petcoke and biomass, as well as co-firing fuel mixtures. The IGCC dynamic simulator is available at AVESTAR's two locations, NETL (Figure 1) and West Virginia University's National Research Center for Coal and Energy (www.nrcce.wvu.edu), both in Morgantown, W.Va. By offering a comprehensive IGCC training program, AVESTAR aims to develop a workforce well prepared to operate, control and manage commercial-scale gasification-based power plants with CO{sub 2} capture. The facility and simulator at West Virginia University promotes NETL's outreach mission by offering hands-on simulator training and education to researchers and university students.

Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Development of Computational Approaches for Simulation and Advanced Controls for Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides the results of the project through September 2009. The Phase I project has recently been extended from September 2009 to March 2011. The project extension will begin work on Chemical Looping (CL) Prototype modeling and advanced control design exploration in preparation for a scale-up phase. The results to date include: successful development of dual loop chemical looping process models and dynamic simulation software tools, development and test of several advanced control concepts and applications for Chemical Looping transport control and investigation of several sensor concepts and establishment of two feasible sensor candidates recommended for further prototype development and controls integration. There are three sections in this summary and conclusions. Section 1 presents the project scope and objectives. Section 2 highlights the detailed accomplishments by project task area. Section 3 provides conclusions to date and recommendations for future work.

Joshi, Abhinaya; Lou, Xinsheng; Neuschaefer, Carl; Chaudry, Majid; Quinn, Joseph

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

130

Simulations of Failure via Three-Dimensional Cracking in Fuel Cladding for Advanced Nuclear Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Enhancing performance of fuel cladding and duct alloys is a key means of increasing fuel burnup. This project will address the failure of fuel cladding via three-dimensional cracking models. Researchers will develop a simulation code for the failure of the fuel cladding and validate the code through experiments. The objective is to develop an algorithm to determine the failure of fuel cladding in the form of three-dimensional cracking due to prolonged exposure under varying conditions of pressure, temperature, chemical environment, and irradiation. This project encompasses the following tasks: 1. Simulate 3D crack initiation and growth under instantaneous and/or fatigue loads using a new variant of the material point method (MPM); 2. Simulate debonding of the materials in the crack path using cohesive elements, considering normal and shear traction separation laws; 3. Determine the crack propagation path, considering damage of the materials incorporated in the cohesive elements to allow the energy release rate to be minimized; 4. Simulate the three-dimensional fatigue crack growth as a function of loading histories; 5. Verify the simulation code by comparing results to theoretical and numerical studies available in the literature; 6. Conduct experiments to observe the crack path and surface profile in unused fuel cladding and validate against simulation results; and 7. Expand the adaptive mesh refinement infrastructure parallel processing environment to allow adaptive mesh refinement at the 3D crack fronts and adaptive mesh merging in the wake of cracks. Fuel cladding is made of materials such as stainless steels and ferritic steels with added alloying elements, which increase stability and durability under irradiation. As fuel cladding is subjected to water, chemicals, fission gas, pressure, high temperatures, and irradiation while in service, understanding performance is essential. In the fast fuel used in advanced burner reactors, simulations of the nuclear fuels are critical to understand the burnup, and thus the fuel efficiency.

Lu, Hongbing; Bukkapatnam, Satish; Harimkar, Sandip; Singh, Raman; Bardenhagen, Scott

2014-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

131

Advances in mass storage technology are producing devices capable of holding terabytes of data. These new devices, often called tertiary storage devices, have dramatically different performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-overwrite technique for managing storage. This technique allows the user to see the entire history of the database of the database at any moment in history. This capability is referred to as time travel. Since only the start time characteristics than magnetic disks. Conventional database systems include explicit dependen- cies on magnetic

California at Irvine, University of

132

A review on recent advances in the numerical simulation for coalbed-methane-recovery process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recent advances in numerical simulation for primary coalbed methane (CBM) recovery and enhanced coalbed-methane recovery (ECBMR) processes are reviewed, primarily focusing on the progress that has occurred since the late 1980s. Two major issues regarding the numerical modeling will be discussed in this review: first, multicomponent gas transport in in-situ bulk coal and, second, changes of coal properties during methane (CH{sub 4}) production. For the former issues, a detailed review of more recent advances in modeling gas and water transport within a coal matrix is presented. Further, various factors influencing gas diffusion through the coal matrix will be highlighted as well, such as pore structure, concentration and pressure, and water effects. An ongoing bottleneck for evaluating total mass transport rate is developing a reasonable representation of multiscale pore space that considers coal type and rank. Moreover, few efforts have been concerned with modeling water-flow behavior in the coal matrix and its effects on CH{sub 4} production and on the exchange of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and CH{sub 4}. As for the second issue, theoretical coupled fluid-flow and geomechanical models have been proposed to describe the evolution of pore structure during CH{sub 4} production, instead of traditional empirical equations. However, there is currently no effective coupled model for engineering applications. Finally, perspectives on developing suitable simulation models for CBM production and for predicting CO{sub 2}-sequestration ECBMR are suggested.

Wei, X.R.; Wang, G.X.; Massarotto, P.; Golding, S.D.; Rudolph, V. [University of Queensland, Brisbane, Qld. (Australia)

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

133

Editorial, Workshop on New Directions for Advanced Computer Simulations and Experiments in Fusion-Related Plasma-Surface Interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because plasma-boundary physics encompasses some of the most important unresolved issues for both the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project and future fusion power reactors, there is a strong interest in the fusion community for better understanding and characterization of plasma-wall interactions. Chemical and physical sputtering cause the erosion of the limiters/divertor plates and vacuum vessel walls (made of C, Be and W, for example) and degrade fusion performance by diluting the fusion fuel and excessively cooling the core, while carbon redeposition could produce long-term in-vessel tritium retention, degrading the superior thermo-mechanical properties of the carbon materials. Mixed plasma-facing materials are proposed, requiring optimization for different power and particle flux characteristics. Knowledge of material properties as well as characteristics of the plasma-material interaction are prerequisites for such optimizations. Computational power will soon reach hundreds of teraflops, so that theoretical and plasma science expertise can be matched with new experimental capabilities in order to mount a strong response to these challenges. To begin to address such questions, a Workshop on New Directions for Advanced Computer Simulations and Experiments in Fusion-Related Plasma-Surface Interactions for Fusion (PSIF) was held at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory from 21 to 23 March, 2005. The purpose of the workshop was to bring together researchers in fusion related plasma-wall interactions in order to address these topics and to identify the most needed and promising directions for study, to exchange opinions on the present depth of knowledge of surface properties for the main fusion-related materials, e.g., C, Be and W, especially for sputtering, reflection, and deuterium (tritium) retention properties. The goal was to suggest the most important next steps needed for such basic computational and experimental work to be facilitated by researchers in fusion, material, and physical sciences. Representatives from many fusion research laboratories attended, and 25 talks were given, the majority of them making up the content of these Workshop proceedings. The presentations of all talks and further information on the Workshop are available at http://www-cfadc.phy.ornl.gov/psif/home.html. The workshop talks dealt with identification of needs from the perspective of integrated fusion simulation and ITER design, recent developments and perspectives on computation of plasma-facing surface properties using the current and expected new generation of computation capability, and with the status of dedicated laboratory experiments which characterize the underlying processes of PSIF. The Workshop summary and conclusions are being published in Nuclear Fusion 45 (2005).

Hogan, John T [ORNL; Krstic, Predrag S [ORNL; Meyer, Fred W [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Thermal Storage and Advanced Heat Transfer Fluids (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fact sheet describing NREL CSP Program capabilities in the area of thermal storage and advanced heat transfer fluids: measuring thermophysical properties, measuring fluid flow and heat transfer, and simulating flow of thermal energy and fluid.

Not Available

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Materials Characterization Capabilities at the HTML: Surface...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

density analysis of forming samples using advanced characterization techniques Materials Characterization Capabilities at the HTML: SurfaceSub-surface dislocation density...

136

Sandia National Laboratories: Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0Energy AdvancedEnergy Commission Linde,Capabilities What We Do

137

Advances  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the BuildingInnovation PortalScienceScripting forAdvances in

138

Collaborative Research: Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic Using a High-Resolution Regional Arctic Climate Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary research task completed for this project was the development of the Regional Arctic Climate Model (RACM). This involved coupling existing atmosphere, ocean, sea ice, and land models using the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate System Model (CCSM) coupler (CPL7). RACM is based on the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) atmospheric model, the Parallel Ocean Program (POP) ocean model, the CICE sea ice model, and the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) land model. A secondary research task for this project was testing and evaluation of WRF for climate-scale simulations on the large pan-Arctic model domain used in RACM. This involved identification of a preferred set of model physical parameterizations for use in our coupled RACM simulations and documenting any atmospheric biases present in RACM.

Cassano, John [Principal Investigator

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

139

The Synergy Between Total Scattering and Advanced Simulation Techniques: Quantifying Geopolymer Gel Evolution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the ever increasing demands for technologically advanced structural materials, together with emerging environmental consciousness due to climate change, geopolymer cement is fast becoming a viable alternative to traditional cements due to proven mechanical engineering characteristics and the reduction in CO2 emitted (approximately 80% less CO2 emitted compared to ordinary Portland cement). Nevertheless, much remains unknown regarding the kinetics of the molecular changes responsible for nanostructural evolution during the geopolymerization process. Here, in-situ total scattering measurements in the form of X-ray pair distribution function (PDF) analysis are used to quantify the extent of reaction of metakaolin/slag alkali-activated geopolymer binders, including the effects of various activators (alkali hydroxide/silicate) on the kinetics of the geopolymerization reaction. Restricting quantification of the kinetics to the initial ten hours of reaction does not enable elucidation of the true extent of the reaction, but using X-ray PDF data obtained after 128 days of reaction enables more accurate determination of the initial extent of reaction. The synergies between the in-situ X-ray PDF data and simulations conducted by multiscale density functional theory-based coarse-grained Monte Carlo analysis are outlined, particularly with regard to the potential for the X-ray data to provide a time scale for kinetic analysis of the extent of reaction obtained from the multiscale simulation methodology.

White, Claire [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bloomer, Breaunnah E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Provis, John L. [The University of Melbourne; Henson, Neil J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Page, Katharine L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

140

A Roadmap for NEAMS Capability Transfer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The vision of the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program is to bring truly predictive modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities to the nuclear engineering community in order to enable a new approach to the design and analysis of nuclear energy systems. From its inception, the NEAMS program has always envisioned a broad user base for its software and scientific products, including researchers within the DOE complex, nuclear industry technology developers and vendors, and operators. However activities to date have focused almost exclusively on interactions with NEAMS sponsors, who are also near-term users of NEAMS technologies. The task of the NEAMS Capability Transfer (CT) program element for FY2011 is to develop a comprehensive plan to support the program's needs for user outreach and technology transfer. In order to obtain community input to this plan, a 'NEAMS Capability Transfer Roadmapping Workshop' was held 4-5 April 2011 in Chattanooga, TN, and is summarized in this report. The 30 workshop participants represented the NEAMS program, the DOE and industrial user communities, and several outside programs. The workshop included a series of presentations providing an overview of the NEAMS program and presentations on the user outreach and technology transfer experiences of (1) The Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program, (2) The Standardized Computer Analysis for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE) project, and (3) The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), followed by discussion sessions. Based on the workshop and other discussions throughout the year, we make a number of recommendations of key areas for the NEAMS program to develop the user outreach and technology transfer activities: (1) Engage not only DOE, but also industrial users sooner and more often; (2) Engage with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to facilitate their understanding and acceptance of NEAMS approach to predictive M&S; (3) Place requirements gathering from prospective users on a more formal footing, updating requirements on a regular basis and incorporate them into planning and execution of the project in a traceable fashion; (4) Seek out the best available data for validation purposes, and work with experimental programs to design and carry out new experiments that satisfy the need for data suitable for validation of high-fidelity M&S codes; (5) Develop and implement program-wide plans and policies for export control, licensing, and distribution of NEAMS software products; (6) Establish a program of sponsored alpha testing by experienced users in order to obtain feedback on NEAMS codes; (7) Provide technical support for NEAMS software products; (8) Develop and deliver documentation, tutorial materials, and live training classes; and (9) Be prepared to support outside users who wish to contribute to the codes.

Bernholdt, David E [ORNL

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

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141

Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) : gap analysis for high fidelity and performance assessment code development.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a gap analysis performed in the process of developing the Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Campaign. The goal of the Waste IPSC is to develop an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive waste storage or disposal system. The Waste IPSC will provide this simulation capability (1) for a range of disposal concepts, waste form types, engineered repository designs, and geologic settings, (2) for a range of time scales and distances, (3) with appropriate consideration of the inherent uncertainties, and (4) in accordance with rigorous verification, validation, and software quality requirements. The gap analyses documented in this report were are performed during an initial gap analysis to identify candidate codes and tools to support the development and integration of the Waste IPSC, and during follow-on activities that delved into more detailed assessments of the various codes that were acquired, studied, and tested. The current Waste IPSC strategy is to acquire and integrate the necessary Waste IPSC capabilities wherever feasible, and develop only those capabilities that cannot be acquired or suitably integrated, verified, or validated. The gap analysis indicates that significant capabilities may already exist in the existing THC codes although there is no single code able to fully account for all physical and chemical processes involved in a waste disposal system. Large gaps exist in modeling chemical processes and their couplings with other processes. The coupling of chemical processes with flow transport and mechanical deformation remains challenging. The data for extreme environments (e.g., for elevated temperature and high ionic strength media) that are needed for repository modeling are severely lacking. In addition, most of existing reactive transport codes were developed for non-radioactive contaminants, and they need to be adapted to account for radionuclide decay and in-growth. The accessibility to the source codes is generally limited. Because the problems of interest for the Waste IPSC are likely to result in relatively large computational models, a compact memory-usage footprint and a fast/robust solution procedure will be needed. A robust massively parallel processing (MPP) capability will also be required to provide reasonable turnaround times on the analyses that will be performed with the code. A performance assessment (PA) calculation for a waste disposal system generally requires a large number (hundreds to thousands) of model simulations to quantify the effect of model parameter uncertainties on the predicted repository performance. A set of codes for a PA calculation must be sufficiently robust and fast in terms of code execution. A PA system as a whole must be able to provide multiple alternative models for a specific set of physical/chemical processes, so that the users can choose various levels of modeling complexity based on their modeling needs. This requires PA codes, preferably, to be highly modularized. Most of the existing codes have difficulties meeting these requirements. Based on the gap analysis results, we have made the following recommendations for the code selection and code development for the NEAMS waste IPSC: (1) build fully coupled high-fidelity THCMBR codes using the existing SIERRA codes (e.g., ARIA and ADAGIO) and platform, (2) use DAKOTA to build an enhanced performance assessment system (EPAS), and build a modular code architecture and key code modules for performance assessments. The key chemical calculation modules will be built by expanding the existing CANTERA capabilities as well as by extracting useful components from other existing codes.

Lee, Joon H.; Siegel, Malcolm Dean; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.; Webb, Stephen Walter; Dewers, Thomas A.; Mariner, Paul E.; Edwards, Harold Carter; Fuller, Timothy J.; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Jove-Colon, Carlos F.; Wang, Yifeng

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

An expanded framework for the advanced computational testing and simulation toolkit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Computational Testing and Simulation (ACTS) Toolkit is a set of computational tools developed primarily at DOE laboratories and is aimed at simplifying the solution of common and important computational problems. The use of the tools reduces the development time for new codes and the tools provide functionality that might not otherwise be available. This document outlines an agenda for expanding the scope of the ACTS Project based on lessons learned from current activities. Highlights of this agenda include peer-reviewed certification of new tools; finding tools to solve problems that are not currently addressed by the Toolkit; working in collaboration with other software initiatives and DOE computer facilities; expanding outreach efforts; promoting interoperability, further development of the tools; and improving functionality of the ACTS Information Center, among other tasks. The ultimate goal is to make the ACTS tools more widely used and more effective in solving DOE's and the nation's scientific problems through the creation of a reliable software infrastructure for scientific computing.

Marques, Osni A.; Drummond, Leroy A.

2003-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

143

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced analytical simulation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

design and modeling environment which allows integration of existing analytical model and simulation... software including ns2 and NIST ATM simulator. (FY 99) Design and...

144

Weapons Activities/ Advanced Simulation and Computing Campaign FY 2011 Congressional Budget  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the entire weapons lifecycle, from design to safe processes for dismantlement. The ASC simulations play

145

Advanced Data Analysis Capability and Surrogate Generation |...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

comprehensive set of statistical measures that capture the properties of the original dataset. Review the statistical measures carefully for any of the sensitive properties in the...

146

Advancing Explosives Detection Capabilities: Vapor Detection  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

A new, PNNL-developed method provides direct, real-time detection of trace amounts of explosives such as RDX, PETN and C-4. The method selectively ionizes a sample before passing the sample through a mass spectrometer to detect explosive vapors. The method could be used at airports to improve aviation security.

Atkinson, David

2014-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

147

n CAPABILITY STATEMENT Centre for Advanced  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to dynamically varying internet workloads to balance network energy consumption and delay Mobile Applications a world-class, stimulating and flexible research and teaching environment. The emphasis is on identifying with ad hoc and semi-static topologies energy efficient networking ­ including management of peer

Zander, Sebastian

148

PHYSICAL FIDELITY CONSIDERATIONS FOR NRC ADVANCED REACTOR CONTROL ROOM TRAINING SIMULATORS USED FOR INSPECTOR/EXAMINER TRAINING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes research into the physical fidelity requirements of control room simulators to train U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff for their duties as inspectors and license examiners for next-generation nuclear power plants. The control rooms of these power plants are expected to utilize digital instrumentation and controls to a much greater extent than do current plants. The NRC is assessing training facility needs, particularly for control room simulators, which play a central role in NRC training. Simulator fidelity affects both training effectiveness and cost. Research has shown high simulation fidelity sometimes positively affects transfer to the operational environment but sometimes makes no significant difference or actually impedes learning. The conditions in which these different effects occur are often unclear, especially for regulators (as opposed to operators) about whom research is particularly sparse. This project developed an inventory of the tasks and knowledges, skills, and abilities that NRC regulators need to fulfill job duties and used expert panels to characterize the inventory items by type and level of cognitive/behavioral capability needed, difficulty to perform, importance to safety, frequency of performance, and the importance of simulator training for learning these capabilities. A survey of current NRC staff provides information about the physical fidelity of the simulator on which the student trained to the control room to which the student was assigned and the effect lack of fidelity had on learning and job performance. The study concludes that a high level of physical fidelity is not required for effective training of NRC staff.

Branch, Kristi M.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Miller, Mark; Cochrum, Steven

2010-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

149

Advancing Adaptive Optics Technology: Laboratory Turbulence Simulation and Optimization of Laser Guide Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of cone photoreceptors with adaptive optics spectral-domaincoherence tomography,” Optics Express, Vol. 14, Issue 10,of Multi-Object Adaptive Optics on a Simulated 10-Meter

Rampy, Rachel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced computational simulation Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in such a way that it cannot be larger than the minimum timestamp... the simulation model into the hosts was proposed, where computation and communication workload of...

151

Development of an Advanced Simulator to Model Mobility Control and Geomechanics during CO{sub 2} Floods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The simulator is an isothermal, three-dimensional, four-phase, compositional, equation-of– state (EOS) simulator. We have named the simulator UTDOE-CO2 capable of simulating various recovery processes (i.e., primary, secondary waterflooding, and miscible and immiscible gas flooding). We include both the Peng-Robinson EOS and the Redlich-Kwong EOS models. A Gibbs stability test is also included in the model to perform a phase identification test to consistently label each phase for subsequent property calculations such as relative permeability, viscosity, density, interfacial tension, and capillary pressure. Our time step strategy is based on an IMPEC-type method (implicit pressure and explicit concentration). The gridblock pressure is solved first using the explicit dating of saturation-dependent terms. Subsequently, the material balance equations are solved explicitly for the total concentration of each component. The physical dispersion term is also included in the governing equations. The simulator includes (1) several foam model(s) for gas mobility control, (2) compositional relative permeability models with the hysteresis option, (3) corner point grid and several efficient solvers, (4) geomechanics module to compute stress field as the result of CO{sub 2} injection/production, (5) the format of commercial visualization software, S3graf from Science-soft Ltd., was implemented for user friendly visualization of the simulation results. All tasks are completed and the simulator was fully tested and delivered to the DOE office including a user’s guide and several input files and the executable for Windows Pcs. We have published several SPE papers, presented several posters, and one MS thesis is completed (V. Pudugramam, 2013) resulting from this DOE funded project.

Delshad, Mojdeh; Wheeler, Mary; Sepehrnoori, Kamy; Pope, Gary

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

152

Development of Advanced Electrochemical Emission Spectroscopy for Monitoring Corrosion in Simulated DOE Liquid Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various forms of general and localized corrosion represent principal threats to the integrity of DOE liquid waste storage tanks. These tanks, which are of a single wall or double wall design, depending upon their age, are fabricated from welded carbon steel and contain a complex waste-form comprised of NaOH and NaNO{sub 3}, along with trace amounts of phosphate, sulfate, carbonate, and chloride. Because waste leakage can have a profound environmental impact, considerable interest exists in predicting the accumulation of corrosion damage, so as to more effectively schedule maintenance and repair. The different tasks that are being carried out under the current program are as follows: (1) Theoretical and experimental assessment of general corrosion of iron/steel in borate buffer solutions by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), ellipsometry and XPS techniques; (2) Development of a damage function analysis (DFA) which would help in predicting the accumulation of damage due to pitting corrosion in an environment prototypical of DOE liquid waste systems; (3) Experimental measurement of crack growth rate, acoustic emission signals and coupling currents for fracture in carbon and low alloy steels as functions of mechanical (stress intensity), chemical (conductivity), electrochemical (corrosion potential, ECP), and microstructural (grain size, precipitate size, etc) variables in a systematic manner, with particular attention being focused on the structure of the noise in the current and its correlation with the acoustic emissions; (4) Development of fracture mechanisms for carbon and low alloy steels that are consistent with the crack growth rate, coupling current data and acoustic emissions; (5) Inserting advanced crack growth rate models for SCC into existing deterministic codes for predicting the evolution of corrosion damage in DOE liquid waste storage tanks; (6) Computer simulation of the anodic and cathodic activity on the surface of the steel samples in order to exactly predict the corrosion mechanisms; (7) Wavelet analysis of EC noise data from steel samples undergoing corrosion in an environment similar to that of the high level waste storage containers, to extract data pertaining to general, pitting and stress corrosion processes, from the overall data. The Point Defect Model (PDM) is directly applied as the theoretical assessment method for describing the passive film formed on iron/steels. The PDM is used to describe general corrosion in the passive region of iron. In addition, previous work suggests that pit formation is due to the coalescence of cation vacancies at the metal/film interface which would make it possible to use the PDM parameters to predict the onset of pitting. This previous work suggests that once the critical vacancy density is reached, the film ruptures to form a pit. Based upon the kinetic parameters derived for the general corrosion case, two parameters relating to the cation vacancy formation and annihilation can be calculated. These two parameters can then be applied to predict the transition from general to pitting corrosion for iron/mild steels. If cation vacancy coalescence is shown to lead to pitting, it can have a profound effect on the direction of future studies involving the onset of pitting corrosion. The work has yielded a number of important findings, including an unequivocal demonstration of the role of chloride ion in passivity breakdown on nickel in terms of cation vacancy generation within the passive film, the first detection and characterization of individual micro fracture events in stress corrosion cracking, and the determination of kinetic parameters for the generation and annihilation of point defects in the passive film on iron. The existence of coupling between the internal crack environment and the external cathodic environment, as predicted by the coupled environment fracture model (CEFM), has also been indisputably established for the AISI 4340/NaOH system. It is evident from the studies that analysis of coupling current noise is a very sensitive tool f

Digby D. Macdonald; Brian M. Marx; Sejin Ahn; Julio de Ruiz; Balaji Soundararaja; Morgan Smith; and Wendy Coulson

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

Sensor test facilities and capabilities at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories has recently developed two major field test capabilities for unattended ground sensor systems at the Department of energy`s Nevada Test Site (NTS). The first capability utilizes the NTS large area, varied terrain, and intrasite communications systems for testing sensors for detecting and tracking vehicular traffic. Sensor and ground truth data can be collected at either of two secure control centers. This system also includes an automated ground truth capability that consists of differential Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) receivers on test vehicles and live TV coverage of critical road sections. Finally there is a high-speed, secure computer network link between the control centers and the Air Force`s Theater Air Command and Control Simulation Facility in Albuquerque NM. The second capability is Bunker 2-300. It is a facility for evaluating advanced sensor systems for monitoring activities in underground cut-and-cover facilities. The main part of the facility consists of an underground bunker with three large rooms for operating various types of equipment. This equipment includes simulated chemical production machinery and controlled seismic and acoustic signal sources. There has been a thorough geologic and electromagnetic characterization of the region around the bunker. Since the facility is in a remote location, it is well-isolated from seismic, acoustic, and electromagnetic interference.

Boyer, W.B.; Burke, L.J.; Gomez, B.J.; Livingston, L.; Nelson, D.S.; Smathers, D.C.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

154

Accelerator and electrodynamics capability review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) uses capability reviews to assess the science, technology and engineering (STE) quality and institutional integration and to advise Laboratory Management on the current and future health of the STE. Capability reviews address the STE integration that LANL uses to meet mission requirements. The Capability Review Committees serve a dual role of providing assessment of the Laboratory's technical contributions and integration towards its missions and providing advice to Laboratory Management. The assessments and advice are documented in reports prepared by the Capability Review Committees that are delivered to the Director and to the Principal Associate Director for Science, Technology and Engineering (PADSTE). Laboratory Management will use this report for STE assessment and planning. LANL has defined fifteen STE capabilities. Electrodynamics and Accelerators is one of the seven STE capabilities that LANL Management (Director, PADSTE, technical Associate Directors) has identified for review in Fiscal Year (FY) 2010. Accelerators and electrodynamics at LANL comprise a blend of large-scale facilities and innovative small-scale research with a growing focus on national security applications. This review is organized into five topical areas: (1) Free Electron Lasers; (2) Linear Accelerator Science and Technology; (3) Advanced Electromagnetics; (4) Next Generation Accelerator Concepts; and (5) National Security Accelerator Applications. The focus is on innovative technology with an emphasis on applications relevant to Laboratory mission. The role of Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) in support of accelerators/electrodynamics will be discussed. The review provides an opportunity for interaction with early career staff. Program sponsors and customers will provide their input on the value of the accelerator and electrodynamics capability to the Laboratory mission.

Jones, Kevin W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Federal Technical Capability Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Provides requirements and responsibilities to ensure recruitment and hiring of technically capable personnel to retain critical technical capabilities within the Department at all times. Cancels DOE M 426.1-1. Canceled by DOE O 426.1.

2004-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

156

BioSim: An Integrated Simulation of an Advanced Life Support System for Intelligent Control Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

waste heat. · Waste: collects and conditions waste material from anywhere in the vehicle revitalization, water recovery, food production, solid waste processing and the crew. The goal of autonomously acceptable food, and managing wastes. A typical advanced life support system consists of the following

Kortenkamp, David

157

NSTec Overview and Capabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation describes the history of the Nevada National Security Site (Nevada Test Site) Contract as well as current capabilities.

Meidinger, A.

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

158

A Versatile and Powerful Simulator for Design, Advanced Control and Expert Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and powerful steady state simulator which has been satisfactorily applied to both on-line and off-line applications for plant utility and other process systems. Designated as MASSBAL MK II, the simulator has a unique architecture, menu/and or graphic... optimization Process synthesis Start-up,shut-down,on-line changes Training Debugging, trouble-shooting and monitoring Control Plantwide control, scheduling and Economic management [1] MASSBAL MK II was developed over a two-year period by SACDA...

Schindler, H. E.; Leaver, E. W.; Shewchuk, C. F.

159

Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability LANL has strengthened its capability in a key aspect of...

160

High Level Requirements for the Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), has been tasked with the important mission of ensuring that nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy source in the U.S. The motivations behind this mission include cost-effectively meeting the expected increases in the power needs of the country, reducing carbon emissions and reducing dependence on foreign energy sources. In the near term, to ensure that nuclear power remains a key element of U.S. energy strategy and portfolio, the DOE-NE will be working with the nuclear industry to support safe and efficient operations of existing nuclear power plants. In the long term, to meet the increasing energy needs of the U.S., the DOE-NE will be investing in research and development (R&D) and working in concert with the nuclear industry to build and deploy new, safer and more efficient nuclear power plants. The safe and efficient operations of existing nuclear power plants and designing, licensing and deploying new reactor designs, however, will require focused R&D programs as well as the extensive use and leveraging of advanced modeling and simulation (M&S). M&S will play a key role in ensuring safe and efficient operations of existing and new nuclear reactors. The DOE-NE has been actively developing and promoting the use of advanced M&S in reactor design and analysis through its R&D programs, e.g., the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) and Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) programs. Also, nuclear reactor vendors are already using CFD and CSM, for design, analysis, and licensing. However, these M&S tools cannot be used with confidence for nuclear reactor applications unless accompanied and supported by verification and validation (V&V) and uncertainty quantification (UQ) processes and procedures which provide quantitative measures of uncertainty for specific applications. The Nuclear Energy Knowledge base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS) is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory in conjunction with Bettis Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Argonne National Laboratory, Utah State University and others with the objective of establishing a comprehensive and web-accessible knowledge base that will provide technical services and resources for V&V and UQ of M&S in nuclear energy sciences and engineering. The knowledge base will serve as an important resource for technical exchange and collaboration that will enable credible and reliable computational models and simulations for application to nuclear reactor design, analysis and licensing. NE-KAMS will serve as a valuable resource for the nuclear industry, academia, the national laboratories, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the public and will help ensure the safe, economical and reliable operation of existing and future nuclear reactors. From its inception, NE-KAMS will directly support nuclear energy research, development and demonstration programs within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), including the CASL, NEAMS, Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS), Small Modular Reactors (SMR), and Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant (NGNP) programs. These programs all involve M&S of nuclear reactor systems, components and processes, and it is envisioned that NE-KAMS will help to coordinate and facilitate collaboration and sharing of resources and expertise for V&V and UQ across these programs.

Rich Johnson; Hyung Lee; Kimberlyn C. Mousseau

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced simulation capability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Advanced methods in global gyrokinetic full f particle simulation of tokamak transport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new full f nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation code, named ELMFIRE, has been developed for simulating transport phenomena in tokamak plasmas. The code is based on a gyrokinetic particle-in-cell algorithm, which can consider electrons and ions jointly or separately, as well as arbitrary impurities. The implicit treatment of the ion polarization drift and the use of full f methods allow for simulations of strongly perturbed plasmas including wide orbit effects, steep gradients and rapid dynamic changes. This article presents in more detail the algorithms incorporated into ELMFIRE, as well as benchmarking comparisons to both neoclassical theory and other codes.Code ELMFIRE calculates plasma dynamics by following the evolution of a number of sample particles. Because of using an stochastic algorithm its results are influenced by statistical noise. The effect of noise on relevant magnitudes is analyzed.Turbulence spectra of FT-2 plasma has been calculated with ELMFIRE, obtaining results consistent with experimental data.

Ogando, F. [Euratom-Tekes Association TKK (Finland); Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia (Spain); Heikkinen, J. A. [Euratom-Tekes Association VTT (Finland); Henriksson, S.; Janhunen, S. J.; Kiviniemi, T. P.; Leerink, S. [Euratom-Tekes Association TKK (Finland)

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

162

MCAMC: An Advanced Algorithm for Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulations: from Magnetization Switching to Protein Folding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the Monte Carlo with Absorbing Markov Chains (MCAMC) method for extremely long kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. The MCAMC algorithm does not modify the system dynamics. It is extremely useful for models with discrete state spaces when low-temperature simulations are desired. To illustrate the strengths and limitations of this algorithm we introduce a simple model involving random walkers on an energy landscape. This simple model has some of the characteristics of protein folding and could also be experimentally realizable in domain motion in nanoscale magnets. We find that even the simplest MCAMC algorithm can speed up calculations by many orders of magnitude. More complicated MCAMC simulations can gain further increases in speed by orders of magnitude.

M. A. Novotny; Shannon M. Wheeler

2002-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

163

Overview of Capabilities Conversion System Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cycles Heat exchanger design and optimization TES Material Integration & Optimization: Solar power plantOverview of Capabilities Conversion System Technology - Power System Demonstrations - Systems Conceptual Design/Trade Space Exploration - Simulation Modeling for Manufacturing - Hybrid Energy Systems

Lee, Dongwon

164

Quantised State Simulation (QSS): Advances in the Numerical Solution of Ordinary Differential Equations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the computer aided design of huge scale dynamical systems (e.g. as in the simulation of combustion in a distributed way within an internal combustion engine in the automobile industry). With a proper integration within an optimisation framework, furthermore...

Vassiliadis, Vassilios S.; Fiorelli, Fabio

2014-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

165

Advanced Simulation Environment for Autonomous Spacecraft Jeffrey J. Biesiadecki Abhinandan Jain Mark L. James  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RCS Star Tracker Main Engine Solar Panels Dshell Electron. Rate sensor Thrust model Telecomm. link Up to meet the development and test needs of many different kinds of users. ATBE's de­ sign enables easier/Dn. link Antenna FSW GDS Figure 1: Representative types of models in an ATBE S/C simulation 2 libSim DATA

166

Recent Advances in Computational Techniques for Simulation of Flow in Porous Media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are also addressed. Introduction Modeling porous media flow processes is required in many science and engineering applications. Oil recovery, environmental hydrology and groundwater flow are a few drivers in the development of porous media simulation tools. Nowadays high resolution models are constructed as a result

Coutinho, Alvaro L. G. A.

167

Advanced Fuel Performance: Modeling and Simulation Light Water Reactor Fuel Performance:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the Building TechnologiesS1!4TCombustionOptimizing enzymeAdvanced 63

168

ICIS Facilities and Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and government authorities. This core capability extends to unmanned air vehicles (UAV) designs, where designers have access to an isolated airfield with full radio spectrum...

169

Development of an Advanced Stimulation/Production Predictive Simulator for Enhanced Geothermal Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Project objective: to develop a 3-D numerical simulator to model the following aspects of stimulation and long-term operation: (1)perturbation of natural stress, pore pressure, and formation temperature distributions caused by cold water injection, (2) shear slippage and aperture increase along Ťfracture patches? and aperture change caused by changes in effective normal stress,(3) Ťfracture patch? linkup to form connected permeable volume and both reversible and irreversible permeability changes.

170

A survey of Existing V&V, UQ and M&S Data and Knowledge Bases in Support of the Nuclear Energy - Knowledge base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Energy - Knowledge base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS) is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory in conjunction with Bettis Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Argonne National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Utah State University and others. The objective of this consortium is to establish a comprehensive knowledge base to provide Verification and Validation (V&V) and Uncertainty Quantification (UQ) and other resources for advanced modeling and simulation (M&S) in nuclear reactor design and analysis. NE-KAMS will become a valuable resource for the nuclear industry, the national laboratories, the U.S. NRC and the public to help ensure the safe operation of existing and future nuclear reactors. A survey and evaluation of the state-of-the-art of existing V&V and M&S databases, including the Department of Energy and commercial databases, has been performed to ensure that the NE-KAMS effort will not be duplicating existing resources and capabilities and to assess the scope of the effort required to develop and implement NE-KAMS. The survey and evaluation have indeed highlighted the unique set of value-added functionality and services that NE-KAMS will provide to its users. Additionally, the survey has helped develop a better understanding of the architecture and functionality of these data and knowledge bases that can be used to leverage the development of NE-KAMS.

Hyung Lee; Rich Johnson, Ph.D.; Kimberlyn C. Moussesau

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Federal Technical Capability Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Federal Technical Capability Manual provides the process for the recruitment, deployment, development, and retention of Federal personnel with the demonstrated technical capability to safely accomplish the Departments missions and responsibilities at defense nuclear facilities. Canceled by DOE M 426.1-1A. Does not cancel other directives.

2000-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

172

Federal Technical Capability  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This directive defines requirements and responsibilities for meeting the Department of Energy (DOE) commitment to recruiting, deploying, developing, and retaining a technically competent workforce that will accomplish DOE missions in a safe and efficient manner through the Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP). Cancels DOE M 426.1-1A, Federal Technical Capability Manual.

2009-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

173

The dynamic information architecture system : an advanced simulation framework for military and civilian applications.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DIAS, the Dynamic Information Architecture System, is an object-oriented simulation system that was designed to provide an integrating framework in which new or legacy software applications can operate in a context-driven frame of reference. DIAS provides a flexible and extensible mechanism to allow disparate, and mixed language, software applications to interoperate. DIAS captures the dynamic interplay between different processes or phenomena in the same frame of reference. Finally, DIAS accommodates a broad range of analysis contexts, with widely varying spatial and temporal resolutions and fidelity.

Campbell, A. P.; Hummel, J. R.

1998-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

174

Development and use of an advanced coal-fueled diesel cycle simulation with group effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- complished as was a study of the effect of different input parameters on performance and in-cylinder processes on the simulation. The majur conclusions kom this work were: ~ GE1 had a moderate effect on the performance of the engine for the case studied.... Change in performance from the base case, which included both group efFects to a case with GE1 neglected, included a 17% increase in peak cylinder pressure and a 1. 4% increase in power output. Clearly, the effect of GE1 is more important...

Branyon, David Pratt

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Simulations of Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles Using Advanced Lithium Batteries and Ultracapacitors on Various Driving Cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

using Advanced Lithium Batteries and Ultracapacitors onusing advanced lithium batteries having energy densities ofA number of lithium batteries and ultracapacitors have been

Burke, Andy; Zhao, Hengbing

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

RELAP-7 Beta Release: Summary of Capabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

RELAP-7 is a nuclear systems safety analysis code being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Building upon the decades of software development at the INL, we began the development of RELAP-7 in 2011 to support the Risk Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMC) Pathway. As part of this development, the first lines of RELAP-7 code were committed to the software revision control repository on November 7th, 2011. The overall design goal of RELAP-7 is to take advantage of the previous thirty years of advancements in computer architecture, software design, numerical methods, and physical models in order to provide capabilities needed for the RISMC methodology and to support nuclear power safety analysis. RELAP-7 is built using the INL’s modern scientific software development framework, MOOSE (Multi-physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment). MOOSE provides improved numerical calculations (including higher-order integration in both space and time, yielding converged second-order accuracy). The RELAP-7 code structure is based on multiple physical component models such as pipes, junctions, pumps, etc. Each component can have options for different fluid models such as single- and two-phase flow. This component-based and physics-based software architecture allows RELAP-7 to adopt different physical models for different applications. A relatively new two-phase hydrodynamic model, termed the “7-Equation model” for two phasic pressures, velocities, energies, and volumetric fraction, is incorporated into RELAP-7 for liquid-gas (water-steam) flows. This new model allows second-order integration because it is well-posed, which will reduce the numerical error associated with traditional systems analysis codes. In this paper, we provide a RELAP-7 capability list describing analysis features, range of applicability, and reactor components that will be available for the December 15th, 2014 beta release of the software.

Richard C. Martineau; Hongbin Zhang; Haihua Zhao

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

A novel feedback algorithm for simulating controlled dynamics and confinement in the advanced reversed-field pinch  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the advanced reversed-field pinch (RFP), the current density profile is externally controlled to diminish tearing instabilities. Thus the scaling of energy confinement time with plasma current and density is improved substantially as compared to the conventional RFP. This may be numerically simulated by introducing an ad hoc electric field, adjusted to generate a tearing mode stable parallel current density profile. In the present work a current profile control algorithm, based on feedback of the fluctuating electric field in Ohm's law, is introduced into the resistive magnetohydrodynamic code DEBSP [D. D. Schnack and D. C. Baxter, J. Comput. Phys. 55, 485 (1984); D. D. Schnack, D. C. Barnes, Z. Mikic, D. S. Marneal, E. J. Caramana, and R. A. Nebel, Comput. Phys. Commun. 43, 17 (1986)]. The resulting radial magnetic field is decreased considerably, causing an increase in energy confinement time and poloidal {beta}. It is found that the parallel current density profile spontaneously becomes hollow, and that a formation, being related to persisting resistive g modes, appears close to the reversal surface.

Dahlin, J.-E.; Scheffel, J. [Alfven Laboratory, Royal Institute of Technology, 10044 Stockholm (Sweden)

2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan : ASC software quality engineering practices Version 3.0.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. Quality is defined in the US Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Agency (DOE/NNSA) Quality Criteria, Revision 10 (QC-1) as 'conformance to customer requirements and expectations'. This quality plan defines the SNL ASC Program software quality engineering (SQE) practices and provides a mapping of these practices to the SNL Corporate Process Requirement (CPR) 001.3.6; 'Corporate Software Engineering Excellence'. This plan also identifies ASC management's and the software project teams responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals. This SNL ASC Software Quality Plan establishes the signatories commitments to improving software products by applying cost-effective SQE practices. This plan enumerates the SQE practices that comprise the development of SNL ASC's software products and explains the project teams opportunities for tailoring and implementing the practices.

Turgeon, Jennifer L.; Minana, Molly A.; Hackney, Patricia; Pilch, Martin M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Experimental Capabilities & Apparatus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

top-10 green building product" by BuildingGreen, Inc. at the US Green Building Council's annual GreenBuildExperimental Capabilities & Apparatus Directory Building Technologies Research and Integration Center #12;Building Technologies Research Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) Building Technologies

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

180

Metrology Measurement Capabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains descriptions of Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) Metrology capabilities, traceability flow charts, and the measurement uncertainty of each measurement capability. Metrology provides NIST traceable precision measurements or equipment calibration for a wide variety of parameters, ranges, and state-of-the-art uncertainties. Metrology laboratories conform to the requirements of the Department of Energy Development and Production Manual Chapter 13.2, ANSI/ISO/IEC ANSI/ISO/IEC 17025:2005, and ANSI/NCSL Z540-1. FM&T Metrology laboratories are accredited by NVLAP for the parameters, ranges, and uncertainties listed in the specific scope of accreditation under NVLAP Lab code 200108-0. See the Internet at http://ts.nist.gov/Standards/scopes/2001080.pdf. These parameters are summarized. The Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) Metrology Department has developed measurement technology and calibration capability in four major fields of measurement: (1) Mechanical; (2) Environmental, Gas, Liquid; (3) Electrical (DC, AC, RF/Microwave); and (4) Optical and Radiation. Metrology Engineering provides the expertise to develop measurement capabilities for virtually any type of measurement in the fields listed above. A strong audit function has been developed to provide a means to evaluate the calibration programs of our suppliers and internal calibration organizations. Evaluation includes measurement audits and technical surveys.

Dr. Glen E. Gronniger

2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced simulation capability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

MECHANICAL TEST LAB CAPABILITIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MECHANICAL TEST LAB CAPABILITIES · Static and cyclic testing (ASTM and non-standard) · Impact drop testing · Slow-cycle fatigue testing · High temperature testing to 2500°F · ASTM/ Boeing/ SACMA standard testing · Ability to design and fabricate non-standard test fixtures and perform non-standard tests

182

Electronic Mail Analysis Capability  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes the pilot program to test the Department of Energy (DOE) Electronic Mail Analysis Capability (EMAC), which will be used to monitor and analyze outgoing and incoming electronic mail (e-mail) from the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and DOE laboratories that are engaged in nuclear weapons design or work involving special nuclear material. No cancellation.

2001-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

183

Federal Technical Capability  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To define requirements and responsibilities for meeting the Department of Energy (DOE) commitment to recruiting, deploying, developing, and retaining a technically competent workforce that will accomplish DOE missions in a safe and efficient manner through the Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP). Chg. 1 dated 9-20-11 Cancels DOE O 426.1. Cancels DOE P 426.1.

2009-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

184

advanced ceramics advanced: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

185

Metrology Measurement Capabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains descriptions of Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) Metrology capabilities, traceability flow charts, and the measurement uncertainty of each measurement capability. Metrology provides NIST traceable precision measurements or equipment calibration for a wide variety of parameters, ranges, and state-of-the-art uncertainties. Metrology laboratories conform to the requirements of the Department of Energy Development and Production Manual Chapter 8.4, ANSI/ISO/IEC ANSI/ISO/IEC 17025:2000, and ANSI/NCSL Z540-1 (equivalent to ISO Guide 25). FM&T Metrology laboratories are accredited by NVLAP for the parameters, ranges, and uncertainties listed in the specific scope of accreditation under NVLAP Lab code 200108-0. See the Internet at http://ts.nist.gov/ts/htdocs/210/214/scopes/2001080.pdf. These parameters are summarized in the table at the bottom of this introduction.

Barnes, L.M.

2003-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

186

Instruments/Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformation for and Novel ComputationalBeckyScienceCapabilities

187

Advanced Simulation and Computing  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartmentStewardshipAdministration helps INITIATED

188

Sandia National Laboratories: Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive SolarEducation Programs:CRF Researchers answer Alan Alda'sCapabilities

189

Instruments/Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformation for and Novel ComputationalBeckyScienceCapabilities FEI

190

NREL: Geothermal Technologies - Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions and Achievements ofLiz TorresSolectria Photo of twoCapabilities The

191

NREL: Transportation Research - Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andData and ResourcesOtherForecastingAlternative Fuel FleetCapabilities

192

NGNP Data Management and Analysis System Analysis and Web Delivery Capabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Projects for the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office provide data in support of Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing of the very high temperature reactor. Fuel and materials to be used in the reactor are tested and characterized to quantify performance in high-temperature and high-fluence environments. The NGNP Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS) at the Idaho National Laboratory has been established to ensure that VHTR data are (1) qualified for use, (2) stored in a readily accessible electronic form, and (3) analyzed to extract useful results. This document focuses on the third NDMAS objective. It describes capabilities for displaying the data in meaningful ways and for data analysis to identify useful relationships among the measured quantities. The capabilities are described from the perspective of NDMAS users, starting with those who just view experimental data and analytical results on the INL NDMAS web portal. Web display and delivery capabilities are described in detail. Also the current web pages that show Advanced Gas Reactor, Advanced Graphite Capsule, and High Temperature Materials test results are itemized. Capabilities available to NDMAS developers are more extensive, and are described using a second series of examples. Much of the data analysis efforts focus on understanding how thermocouple measurements relate to simulated temperatures and other experimental parameters. Statistical control charts and correlation monitoring provide an ongoing assessment of instrument accuracy. Data analysis capabilities are virtually unlimited for those who use the NDMAS web data download capabilities and the analysis software of their choice. Overall, the NDMAS provides convenient data analysis and web delivery capabilities for studying a very large and rapidly increasing database of well-documented, pedigreed data.

Cynthia D. Gentillon

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Sandia National Laboratories: Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0Energy AdvancedEnergy Commission Linde, Sandia

194

Sandia National Laboratories: Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0Energy AdvancedEnergy Commission Linde, SandiaMolecular

195

Sandia National Laboratories: Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0Energy AdvancedEnergy Commission Linde, SandiaMolecularWins DOE

196

Sandia National Laboratories: Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0Energy AdvancedEnergy Commission Linde, SandiaMolecularWins

197

Sandia National Laboratories: Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0Energy AdvancedEnergy Commission Linde, SandiaMolecularWinsJoint

198

Sandia National Laboratories: Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0Energy AdvancedEnergy Commission Linde,

199

Simulations of Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles Using Advanced Lithium Batteries and Ultracapacitors on Various Driving Cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the rechargeable Zinc-air battery were estimated based onindicated in Table 3, the Zinc-air battery is assumed to bepower capability of the Zinc-air battery is due to a large

Burke, Andy; Zhao, Hengbing

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Nonintrusive subsurface surveying capability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation describes the capabilities of a ground-pentrating radar (GPR) system developed by EG&G Energy Measurements (EM), a prime contractor to the Department of Energy (DOE). The focus of the presentation will be on the subsurface survey of DOE site TA-21 in Los Alamos, New Mexico. EG&G EM developed the system for the Department of Defense. The system is owned by the Department of the Army and currently resides at KO in Albuquerque. EM is pursuing efforts to transfer this technology to environmental applications such as waste-site characterization with DOE encouragement. The Army has already granted permission to use the system for the waste-site characterization activities.

Tunnell, T.W.; Cave, S.P.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced simulation capability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Simulations of Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles Using Advanced Lithium Batteries and Ultracapacitors on Various Driving Cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

7: Simulation results for the batteries alone kW kW Batteryor even lithium-ion batteries. This is another advantagewith the air-electrode batteries. Table 6: Simulation

Burke, Andy; Zhao, Hengbing

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Modern Grid Strategy: Enhanced GridLAB-D Capabilities Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

GridLAB-D is a software simulation environment that was initially developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Electricity (OE) for the purpose of enabling the effective analysis of emerging smart grid technologies. In order to achieve this goal GridLAB-D was developed using an open source approach with the intent that numerous people and organizations would contribute to the ongoing development. Because of the breadth and complexity of the emerging smart grid technologies the inclusion of multiple groups of developers is essential in order to address the many aspects of the smart grid. As part of the continuing Modern Grid Strategy (MGS) the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked with developing an advanced set of GridLAB-D capabilities. These capabilities were developed to enable the analysis of complex use case studies which will allow for multi-disciplinary analysis of smart grid operations. The advanced capabilities which were developed include the implementation of an unbalanced networked power flow algorithm, the implementation of an integrated transmission and distribution system solver, and a set of use cases demonstrating the capabilities of the new solvers.

Schneider, Kevin P.; Fuller, Jason C.; Tuffner, Francis K.; Chen, Yousu

2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

203

Monte Carlo simulation of a Bonner sphere spectrometer for application to the determination of neutron field in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak experimental hall  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To assess the neutron energy spectra and the neutron dose for different positions around the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) device, a Bonner Sphere Spectrometer (BSS) was developed at Peking University, with totally nine polyethylene spheres and a SP9 {sup 3}He counter. The response functions of the BSS were calculated by the Monte Carlo codes MCNP and GEANT4 with dedicated models, and good agreement was found between these two codes. A feasibility study was carried out with a simulated neutron energy spectrum around EAST, and the simulated “experimental” result of each sphere was obtained by calculating the response with MCNP, which used the simulated neutron energy spectrum as the input spectrum. With the deconvolution of the “experimental” measurement, the neutron energy spectrum was retrieved and compared with the preset one. Good consistence was found which offers confidence for the application of the BSS system for dose and spectrum measurements around a fusion device.

Hu, Z. M.; Xie, X. F.; Chen, Z. J.; Peng, X. Y.; Du, T. F.; Cui, Z. Q.; Ge, L. J.; Li, T.; Yuan, X.; Zhang, X.; Li, X. Q.; Zhang, G. H.; Chen, J. X.; Fan, T. S., E-mail: tsfan@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Hu, L. Q.; Zhong, G. Q.; Lin, S. Y.; Wan, B. N. [Institute of Plasma Physics, CAS, Hefei 230031 (China); Gorini, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitŕ di Milano-Bicocca, Milano 20126 (Italy); Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “P. Caldirola,” Milano 20126 (Italy)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

204

Mobile systems capability plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan was prepared to initiate contracting for and deployment of these mobile system services. 102,000 cubic meters of retrievable, contact-handled TRU waste are stored at many sites around the country. Also, an estimated 38,000 cubic meters of TRU waste will be generated in the course of waste inventory workoff and continuing DOE operations. All the defense TRU waste is destined for disposal in WIPP near Carlsbad NM. To ship TRU waste there, sites must first certify that the waste meets WIPP waste acceptance criteria. The waste must be characterized, and if not acceptable, subjected to additional processing, including repackaging. Most sites plan to use existing fixed facilities or open new ones between FY1997-2006 to perform these functions; small-quantity sites lack this capability. An alternative to fixed facilities is the use of mobile systems mounted in trailers or skids, and transported to sites. Mobile systems will be used for all characterization and certification at small sites; large sites can also use them. The Carlsbad Area Office plans to pursue a strategy of privatization of mobile system services, since this offers a number of advantages. To indicate the possible magnitude of the costs of deploying mobile systems, preliminary estimates of equipment, maintenance, and operating costs over a 10-year period were prepared and options for purchase, lease, and privatization through fixed-price contracts considered.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Simulations of Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles Using Advanced Lithium Batteries and Ultracapacitors on Various Driving Cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Batteries for Hybrid Vehicle Applications, 23 rdSimulations of Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles using Advancedultracapacitors in plug-in hybrid vehicles (PHEVs) with high

Burke, Andy; Zhao, Hengbing

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

LANL Analytical and Radiochemistry Capabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overview of this presentation is: (1) Introduction to nonproliferation efforts; (2) Scope of activities Los Alamos National Laboratory; (3) Facilities for radioanalytical work at LANL; (4) Radiochemical characterization capabilities; and (5) Bulk chemical and materials analysis capabilities.

Steiner, Robert E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Burns, Carol J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lamont, Stephen P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tandon, Lav [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

207

Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan. Part 1: ASC software quality engineering practices, Version 2.0.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. The plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to Sandia Corporate Requirements CPR 1.3.2 and 1.3.6 and to a Department of Energy document, ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines. This document also identifies ASC management and software project teams responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals.

Sturtevant, Judith E.; Heaphy, Robert; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Minana, Molly A.; Hackney, Patricia; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr. (,; .); Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan part 2 mappings for the ASC software quality engineering practices, version 2.0.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. The plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to Sandia Corporate Requirements CPR001.3.2 and CPR001.3.6 and to a Department of Energy document, ''ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines''. This document also identifies ASC management and software project teams' responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals.

Heaphy, Robert; Sturtevant, Judith E.; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Minana, Molly A.; Hackney, Patricia; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr. (,; .); Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Solar mechanics thermal response capabilities.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In many applications, the thermal response of structures exposed to solar heat loads is of interest. Solar mechanics governing equations were developed and integrated with the Calore thermal response code via user subroutines to provide this computational simulation capability. Solar heat loads are estimated based on the latitude and day of the year. Vector algebra is used to determine the solar loading on each face of a finite element model based on its orientation relative to the sun as the earth rotates. Atmospheric attenuation is accounted for as the optical path length varies from sunrise to sunset. Both direct and diffuse components of solar flux are calculated. In addition, shadowing of structures by other structures can be accounted for. User subroutines were also developed to provide convective and radiative boundary conditions for the diurnal variations in air temperature and effective sky temperature. These temperature boundary conditions are based on available local weather data and depend on latitude and day of the year, consistent with the solar mechanics formulation. These user subroutines, coupled with the Calore three-dimensional thermal response code, provide a complete package for addressing complex thermal problems involving solar heating. The governing equations are documented in sufficient detail to facilitate implementation into other heat transfer codes. Suggestions for improvements to the approach are offered.

Dobranich, Dean D.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Toward Optimized Bioclogging and Biocementation Through Combining Advanced Geophysical Monitoring and Reactive Transport Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and electrical techniques); (ii) developing and using a reactive transport simulator capable of predicting and Reactive Transport Modeling Approaches Christopher G Hubbard1 , Susan S. Hubbard1 , Yuxin Wu1 , Vikranth heterogeneities at the field scale. Optimization of these strategies requires advances in mechanistic reactive

Hubbard, Susan

211

Liquid filtration simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have a developed a computer code that simulates 3-D filtration of suspended particles in fluids in realistic filter structures. This code, being the most advanced filtration simulation package developed to date, provides LLNL and DOE with new capabilities to address problems in cleaning liquid wastes, medical fluid cleaning, and recycling liquids. The code is an integrated system of commercially available and LLNL-developed software; the most critical are the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solver and the particle transport program. For the CFD solver, we used a commercial package based on Navier-Stokes equations and a LLNL-developed package based on Boltzman-lattice gas equations. For the particle transport program, we developed a cod based on the 3-D Langevin equation of motion and the DLVO theory of electrical interactions. A number of additional supporting packages were purchased or developed to integrate the simulation tasks and to provide visualization output.

Corey, I.; Bergman, W.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Post Irradiation Capabilities at the Idaho National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) oversees the efforts to ensure nuclear energy remains a viable option for the United States. A significant portion of these efforts are related to post-irradiation examinations (PIE) of highly activated fuel and materials that are subject to the extreme environment inside a nuclear reactor. As the lead national laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has a rich history, experience, workforce and capabilities for performing PIE. However, new advances in tools and techniques for performing PIE now enable understanding the performance of fuels and materials at the nano-scale and smaller level. Examination at this level is critical since this is the scale at which irradiation damage occurs. The INL is on course to adopt these advanced tools and techniques to develop a comprehensive nuclear fuels and materials characterization capability that is unique in the world. Because INL has extensive PIE capabilities currently in place, a strong foundation exist to build upon as new capabilities are implemented and work load increases. In the recent past, INL has adopted significant capability to perform advanced PIE characterization. Looking forward, INL is planning for the addition of two facilities that will be built to meet the stringent demands of advanced tools and techniques for highly activated fuels and materials characterization. Dubbed the Irradiated Materials Characterization Laboratory (IMCL) and Advanced Post Irradiation Examination Capability , these facilities are next generation PIE laboratories designed to perform the work of PIE that cannot be performed in current DOE facilities. In addition to physical capabilities, INL has recently added two significant contributors to the Advanced Test Reactor-National Scientific User Facility (ATR-NSUF), Oak Ridge National Laboratory and University of California, Berkeley.

J. L. Schulthess; K. E. Rosenberg

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

A GPU Accelerated Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Capability For Houdini  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the desired result. One common fluid simulation technique is the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method. This method is highly parellelizable. I have implemented a method to integrate a Graphics Processor Unit (GPU) accelerated SPH capability into the 3D...

Sanford, Mathew

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

214

National Criticality Experiments Research Center (NCERC) capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andData andFleetEngineering OfSilicaAdvancedNathanielNCERC capabilities

215

Carbon Nanotube Field-effect Transistors: AC Performance Capabilities.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Nanotube Field-effect Transistors: AC Performance Capabilities. D.L. Pulfrey, D.L. John-barrier carbon nanotube field-effect transistors are examined via simulations using a self-consistent Schrödinger is known about the DC capabilities of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors [1,2,3], and devices

Pulfrey, David L.

216

Development of Advanced Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Development of Advanced Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) Modeling Capabilities for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Development of Advanced Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanica...

217

Description of interfaces of fluid-tethered chains: advances in density functional theories and off-lattice computer simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many objects of nanoscopic dimensions involve fluid-tethered chain interfaces. These systems are of interest for basic science and for several applications, in particular for design of nanodevices for specific purposes. We review recent developments of theoretical methods in this area of research and in particular of density functional (DF) approaches, which provide important insights into microscopic properties of such interfaces. The theories permit to describe the dependence of adsorption, wettability, solvation forces and electric interfacial phenomena on thermodynamic states and on characteristics of tethered chains. Computer simulations for the problems in question are overviewed as well. Theoretical results are discussed in relation to simulation results and to some experimental observations.

S. Soko?owski; J. Ilnytskyi; O. Pizio

2014-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

218

736 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ADVANCED PACKAGING, VOL. 28, NO. 4, NOVEMBER 2005 Simulation of Lossy Package Transmission Lines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Package Transmission Lines Using Extracted Data From One-Port TDR Measurements and Nonphysical RLGC Models, the frequency-dependent characteristic impedance and propagation constant of lossy transmission lines have been ( ), conductance ( ) and capacitance ( ) (RLGC) models have been developed for simulating lossy transmission lines

Swaminathan, Madhavan

219

Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6Energy,MUSEUM DISPLAY STATUS4Tours SHARE ToursCanyon

220

Using EnergyPlus to Simulate the Dynamic Response of a Residential Building to Advanced Cooling Strategies: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study demonstrates the ability of EnergyPlus to accurately model complex cooling strategies in a real home with a goal of shifting energy use off peak and realizing energy savings. The house was retrofitted through the Sacramento Municipal Utility District's (SMUD) deep energy retrofit demonstration program; field tests were operated by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The experimental data were collected as part of a larger study and are used here to validate simulation predictions.

Booten, C.; Tabares-Velasco, P. C.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced simulation capability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

advanced radiographic capability: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: We present optical and X-ray radiographical characterization of silica aerogels with refractive index from 1.05 to 1.07 for a Cherenkov radiator. A novel pin-drying...

222

Leak detection capability in CANDU reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper addresses the moisture leak detection capability of Ontario Hydro CANDU reactors which has been demonstrated by performing tests on the reactor. The tests confirmed the response of the annulus gas system (AGS) to the presence of moisture injected to simulate a pressure tube leak and also confirmed the dew point response assumed in leak before break assessments. The tests were performed on Bruce A Unit 4 by injecting known and controlled rates of heavy water vapor. To avoid condensation during test conditions, the amount of moisture which could be injected was small (2-3.5 g/hr). The test response demonstrated that the AGS is capable of detecting and annunciating small leaks. Thus confidence is provided that it would alarm for a growing pressure tube leak where the leak rate is expected to increase to kg/hr rapidly. The measured dew point response was close to that predicted by analysis.

Azer, N.; Barber, D.H.; Boucher, P.J. [and others

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Assessment of TexSIM capabilities for analyzing freeway ramp metering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

capabilities. The purposes of this study were to calibrate the TEXSIM model for various traffic facilities and to assess its capabilities of freeway simulation with various ramp metering strategies. Due to lack of suitable field data, the TEXSIM model...

Neerudu, Venugopal R

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

224

A bivariate process capability index  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, bivariate and multivariate process capability indices which do consider deviations from the target might be more attractive. 27 REFERENCES [l], J. M. , Juran and F. M. Gryna, Quality Planning and Analysis, McGraw-Hill Publishing Co. , New York, New...A BIVARIATE PROCESS CAPABILITY INDEX A Thesis by SUSAN LOHMER MICHALSKI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major...

Michalski, Susan Lohmer

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Commnity Petascale Project for Accelerator Science And Simulation: Advancing Computational Science for Future Accelerators And Accelerator Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design and performance optimization of particle accelerators are essential for the success of the DOE scientific program in the next decade. Particle accelerators are very complex systems whose accurate description involves a large number of degrees of freedom and requires the inclusion of many physics processes. Building on the success of the SciDAC-1 Accelerator Science and Technology project, the SciDAC-2 Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS) is developing a comprehensive set of interoperable components for beam dynamics, electromagnetics, electron cooling, and laser/plasma acceleration modelling. ComPASS is providing accelerator scientists the tools required to enable the necessary accelerator simulation paradigm shift from high-fidelity single physics process modeling (covered under SciDAC1) to high-fidelity multiphysics modeling. Our computational frameworks have been used to model the behavior of a large number of accelerators and accelerator R&D experiments, assisting both their design and performance optimization. As parallel computational applications, the ComPASS codes have been shown to make effective use of thousands of processors.

Spentzouris, Panagiotis; /Fermilab; Cary, John; /Tech-X, Boulder; Mcinnes, Lois Curfman; /Argonne; Mori, Warren; /UCLA; Ng, Cho; /SLAC; Ng, Esmond; Ryne, Robert; /LBL, Berkeley

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

226

Specification of advanced safety modeling requirements (Rev. 0).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Global Nuclear Energy Partnership has lead to renewed interest in liquid-metal-cooled fast reactors for the purpose of closing the nuclear fuel cycle and making more efficient use of future repository capacity. However, the U.S. has not designed or constructed a fast reactor in nearly 30 years. Accurate, high-fidelity, whole-plant dynamics safety simulations will play a crucial role by providing confidence that component and system designs will satisfy established design limits and safety margins under a wide variety of operational, design basis, and beyond design basis transient conditions. Current modeling capabilities for fast reactor safety analyses have resulted from several hundred person-years of code development effort supported by experimental validation. The broad spectrum of mechanistic and phenomenological models that have been developed represent an enormous amount of institutional knowledge that needs to be maintained. Complicating this, the existing code architectures for safety modeling evolved from programming practices of the 1970s. This has lead to monolithic applications with interdependent data models which require significant knowledge of the complexities of the entire code in order for each component to be maintained. In order to develop an advanced fast reactor safety modeling capability, the limitations of the existing code architecture must be overcome while preserving the capabilities that already exist. To accomplish this, a set of advanced safety modeling requirements is defined, based on modern programming practices, that focuses on modular development within a flexible coupling framework. An approach for integrating the existing capabilities of the SAS4A/SASSYS-1 fast reactor safety analysis code into the SHARP framework is provided in order to preserve existing capabilities while providing a smooth transition to advanced modeling capabilities. In doing this, the advanced fast reactor safety models will target leadership-class computing architectures for massively-parallel high-fidelity computations while providing continued support for rapid prototyping using modest fidelity computations on multiple-core desktop platforms.

Fanning, T. H.; Tautges, T. J.

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

227

A hybrid-Vlasov model based on the current advance method for the simulation of collisionless magnetized plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a numerical scheme for the integration of the Vlasov-Maxwell system of equations for a non-relativistic plasma, in the hybrid approximation, where the Vlasov equation is solved for the ion distribution function and the electrons are treated as a fluid. In the Ohm equation for the electric field, effects of electron inertia have been retained, in order to include the small scale dynamics up to characteristic lengths of the order of the electron skin depth. The low frequency approximation is used by neglecting the time derivative of the electric field, i.e. the displacement current in the Ampere equation. The numerical algorithm consists in coupling the splitting method proposed by Cheng and Knorr in 1976 [C.Z. Cheng, G. Knorr, J. Comput. Phys. 22 (1976) 330-351.] and the current advance method (CAM) introduced by Matthews in 1994 [A.P. Matthews, J. Comput. Phys. 112 (1994) 102-116.] In its present version, the code solves the Vlasov-Maxwell equations in a five-dimensional phase space (2-D in the physical space and 3-D in the velocity space) and it is implemented in a parallel version to exploit the computational power of the modern massively parallel supercomputers. The structure of the algorithm and the coupling between the splitting method and the CAM method (extended to the hybrid case) is discussed in detail. Furthermore, in order to test the hybrid-Vlasov code, the numerical results on propagation and damping of linear ion-acoustic modes and time evolution of linear elliptically polarized Alfven waves (including the so-called whistler regime) are compared to the analytical solutions. Finally, the numerical results of the hybrid-Vlasov code on the parametric instability of Alfven waves are compared with those obtained using a two-fluid approach.

Valentini, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica and CNISM, Universita degli Studi della Calabria, Ponte P. Bucci, Cubo 31C, 87036 Arcavacata di Rende (Serbia and Montenegro) (Italy)]. E-mail: valentin@fis.unical.it; Travnicek, P. [Institute of Atmospheric Physics, AS CR, Prague (Czech Republic); Califano, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica and CNISM, Universita di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Hellinger, P. [Institute of Atmospheric Physics, AS CR, Prague (Czech Republic); Mangeney, A. [LESIA - Observatoire de Paris, Section de Meudon 5, place Jules Janssen, 92195 Meudon Cedex (France)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Building Technologies Experimental Capabilities and Apparatus...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Experimental Capabilities and Apparatus Directory October 01, 2014 ORNL Building Technologies Research and Integration Center (BTRIC) provides unique experimental capabilities...

229

Science based integrated approach to advanced nuclear fuel development - vision, approach, and overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advancing the performance of Light Water Reactors, Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles, and Advanced Rcactors, such as the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plants, requires enhancing our fundamental understanding of fuel and materials behavior under irradiation. The capability to accurately model the nuclear fuel systems is critical. In order to understand specific aspects of the nuclear fuel, fully coupled fuel simulation codes are required to achieve licensing of specific nuclear fuel designs for operation. The backbone of these codes, models, and simulations is a fundamental understanding and predictive capability for simulating the phase and microstructural behavior of the nuclear fuel system materials and matrices. The purpose of this paper is to identify the modeling and simulation approach in order to deliver predictive tools for advanced fuels development. The coordination between experimental nuclear fuel design, development technical experts, and computational fuel modeling and simulation technical experts is a critical aspect of the approach and naturally leads to an integrated, goal-oriented science-based R & D approach and strengthens both the experimental and computational efforts. The Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) and Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Fuels Integrated Performance and Safety Code (IPSC) are working together to determine experimental data and modeling needs. The primary objective of the NEAMS fuels IPSC project is to deliver a coupled, three-dimensional, predictive computational platform for modeling the fabrication and both normal and abnormal operation of nuclear fuel pins and assemblies, applicable to both existing and future reactor fuel designs. The science based program is pursuing the development of an integrated multi-scale and multi-physics modeling and simulation platform for nuclear fuels. This overview paper discusses the vision, goals and approaches how to develop and implement the new approach.

Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pasamehmetoglu, Kemal [IDAHO NATIONAL LAB; Carmack, Jon [IDAHO NATIONAL LAB

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Research for new UAV capabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses research for new Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) capabilities. Findings indicate that UAV performance could be greatly enhanced by modest research. Improved sensors and communications enhance near term cost effectiveness. Improved engines, platforms, and stealth improve long term effectiveness.

Canavan, G.H.; Leadabrand, R.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

An Overview of Facilities and Capabilities to Support the Development of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract. The future of American space exploration depends on the ability to rapidly and economically access locations of interest throughout the solar system. There is a large body of work (both in the US and the Former Soviet Union) that show that Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) is the most technically mature, advanced propulsion system that can enable this rapid and economical access by its ability to provide a step increase above what is a feasible using a traditional chemical rocket system. For an NTP system to be deployed, the earlier measurements and recent predictions of the performance of the fuel and the reactor system need to be confirmed experimentally prior to launch. Major fuel and reactor system issues to be addressed include fuel performance at temperature, hydrogen compatibility, fission product retention, and restart capability. The prime issue to be addressed for reactor system performance testing involves finding an affordable and environmentally acceptable method to test a range of engine sizes using a combination of nuclear and non-nuclear test facilities. This paper provides an assessment of some of the capabilities and facilities that are available or will be needed to develop and test the nuclear fuel, and reactor components. It will also address briefly options to take advantage of the greatly improvement in computation/simulation and materials processing capabilities that would contribute to making the development of an NTP system more affordable. Keywords: Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP), Fuel fabrication, nuclear testing, test facilities.

James Werner; Sam Bhattacharyya; Mike Houts

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan. Part 1 : ASC software quality engineering practices version 1.0.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. Quality is defined in DOE/AL Quality Criteria (QC-1) as conformance to customer requirements and expectations. This quality plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to the SNL Corporate Process Requirements (CPR 1.3.2 and CPR 1.3.6) and the Department of Energy (DOE) document, ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines (GP&G). This quality plan identifies ASC management and software project teams' responsibilities for cost-effective software engineering quality practices. The SNL ASC Software Quality Plan establishes the signatories commitment to improving software products by applying cost-effective software engineering quality practices. This document explains the project teams opportunities for tailoring and implementing the practices; enumerates the practices that compose the development of SNL ASC's software products; and includes a sample assessment checklist that was developed based upon the practices in this document.

Minana, Molly A.; Sturtevant, Judith E.; Heaphy, Robert; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr.; Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Innovative and Advanced Coupled Neutron Transport and Thermal Hydraulic Method (Tool) for the Design, Analysis and Optimization of VHTR/NGNP Prismatic Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project will develop a 3D, advanced coarse mesh transport method (COMET-Hex) for steady- state and transient analyses in advanced very high-temperature reactors (VHTRs). The project will lead to a coupled neutronics and thermal hydraulic (T/H) core simulation tool with fuel depletion capability. The computational tool will be developed in hexagonal geometry, based solely on transport theory without (spatial) homogenization in complicated 3D geometries. In addition to the hexagonal geometry extension, collaborators will concurrently develop three additional capabilities to increase the code’s versatility as an advanced and robust core simulator for VHTRs. First, the project team will develop and implement a depletion method within the core simulator. Second, the team will develop an elementary (proof-of-concept) 1D time-dependent transport method for efficient transient analyses. The third capability will be a thermal hydraulic method coupled to the neutronics transport module for VHTRs. Current advancements in reactor core design are pushing VHTRs toward greater core and fuel heterogeneity to pursue higher burn-ups, efficiently transmute used fuel, maximize energy production, and improve plant economics and safety. As a result, an accurate and efficient neutron transport, with capabilities to treat heterogeneous burnable poison effects, is highly desirable for predicting VHTR neutronics performance. This research project’s primary objective is to advance the state of the art for reactor analysis.

Rahnema, Farzad; Garimeela, Srinivas; Ougouag, Abderrafi; Zhang, Dingkang

2013-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

234

The Development of a Human Systems Simulation Laboratory at Idaho National Laoboratory: Progress, Requirements and Lessons Learned  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Next generation nuclear power plants and digital upgrades to the existing nuclear fleet introduce potential human performance issues in the control room. Safe application of new technologies calls for a thorough understanding of how those technologies affect human performance and in turn, plant safety. In support of advancing human factors for small modular reactors and light water reactor sustainability, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed a reconfigurable simulation laboratory capable of testing human performance in multiple nuclear power plant (NPP) control room simulations. This paper discusses the laboratory infrastructure and capabilities, the laboratory’ s staffing requirements, lessons learned, and the researcher’s approach to measuring human performance in the simulation lab.

David I Gertman; Katya L. LeBlanc; William phoenix; Alan R Mecham

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ES-C2M2) Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ES-C2M2) Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity...

236

Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model v. 1.1. (February 2014) Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model v. 1.1. (February 2014) The...

237

Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model - Frequently Asked Questions...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

- Frequently Asked Questions (February 2014) Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model - Frequently Asked Questions (February 2014) The Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (C2M2)...

238

Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model - Facilitator Guide ...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

- Facilitator Guide (February 2014) Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model - Facilitator Guide (February 2014) The Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (C2M2) program is...

239

Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD) Industry Day...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD) Industry Day Agenda Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD) Industry Day Agenda Agenda outlines the activities of the 2014...

240

An Approximate Method to Assess the Peaking Capability of the NW Hydroelectric System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DRAFT 1 An Approximate Method to Assess the Peaking Capability of the NW Hydroelectric System September 26, 2005 The best way to assess the hydroelectric system's peaking capability is to simulate its. This model simulates the operation of the major hydroelectric projects over a one-week (168 hour) period

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced simulation capability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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241

ORISE Science Education Programs: Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory | NationalJohnSecurityControlsOMBRadiation TreatmentCapabilities

242

Testing whether major innovation capabilities are systemic design capabilities: analyzing rule-renewal design capabilities in a case-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Testing whether major innovation capabilities are systemic design capabilities: analyzing rule-renewal design capabilities are positively related to new business development, whereas rule-reuse design-renewal design capabilities in a case- control study of historical new business developments. Authors: Pascal Le

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

243

An advanced fuel cell simulator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fuel cell power generation systems provide a clean alternative to the conventional fossil fuel based systems. Fuel cell systems have a high e?ciency and use easily available hydrocarbons like methane. Moreover, since the by-product is water...

Acharya, Prabha Ramchandra

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Advanced Simulation and Computing Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUCProductstwrmrAre theAdministratorCFM LEAP Aircraft Engines Are Fuel-

245

Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS) Code Verification and Validation Data Standards and Requirements: Fluid Dynamics Version 1.0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

V&V and UQ are the primary means to assess the accuracy and reliability of M&S and, hence, to establish confidence in M&S. Though other industries are establishing standards and requirements for the performance of V&V and UQ, at present, the nuclear industry has not established such standards or requirements. However, the nuclear industry is beginning to recognize that such standards are needed and that the resources needed to support V&V and UQ will be very significant. In fact, no single organization has sufficient resources or expertise required to organize, conduct and maintain a comprehensive V&V and UQ program. What is needed is a systematic and standardized approach to establish and provide V&V and UQ resources at a national or even international level, with a consortium of partners from government, academia and industry. Specifically, what is needed is a structured and cost-effective knowledge base that collects, evaluates and stores verification and validation data, and shows how it can be used to perform V&V and UQ, leveraging collaboration and sharing of resources to support existing engineering and licensing procedures as well as science-based V&V and UQ processes. The Nuclear Energy Knowledge base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS) is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory in conjunction with Bettis Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Argonne National Laboratory, Utah State University and others with the objective of establishing a comprehensive and web-accessible knowledge base to provide V&V and UQ resources for M&S for nuclear reactor design, analysis and licensing. The knowledge base will serve as an important resource for technical exchange and collaboration that will enable credible and reliable computational models and simulations for application to nuclear power. NE-KAMS will serve as a valuable resource for the nuclear industry, academia, the national laboratories, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the public and will help ensure the safe, economical and reliable operation of existing and future nuclear reactors.

Greg Weirs; Hyung Lee

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Sandia National Laboratories: Enabling Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0EnergySandiaConsortium for AdvancedEnergyElectric Go About

247

Sandia National Laboratories: Enabling Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0EnergySandiaConsortium for AdvancedEnergyElectric Go AboutLIMITS

248

Sandia National Laboratories: Enabling Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0EnergySandiaConsortium for AdvancedEnergyElectric Go

249

Sandia National Laboratories: Enabling Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0EnergySandiaConsortium for AdvancedEnergyElectric GoFusion Energy

250

Sandia National Laboratories: Enabling Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0EnergySandiaConsortium for AdvancedEnergyElectric GoFusion

251

Project Development and Finance: Capabilities (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Capabilities overview of NREL's Project Finance and Development Group within the Deployment and Market Transformation Directorate.

Not Available

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

aicd advanced: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

253

advanced quantra fticr: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

254

advanced power plant: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

255

advanced nuclear reactor: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

256

advanced nuclear plant: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

257

abwr advanced boiling: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

258

advanced nuclear power: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

259

advanced computational model: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

260

advanced metal-membrane technology-commercialization: Topics...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced simulation capability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

advanced boiling curve: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

262

advanced thermal reactor: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

263

advanced dynamic models: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

264

advanced power group: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

265

advanced applications singapore: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

266

advanced burner reactors: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

267

advanced application examples: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

268

applying advanced model: Topics by E-print Network  

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. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

269

advanced accelerator applications: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

270

advanced nuclear plants: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

271

advanced cervix carcinoma: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

272

advanced power systems: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

273

advanced burner reactor: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

274

advanced modeling tool: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

275

advanced oropharyngeal carcinoma: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

276

advanced unresectable rectal: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

277

advanced steam plant: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

278

advanced vulvar carcinomas: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

279

advanced maxillary sinus: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

280

advanced epidermoid carcinoma: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced simulation capability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

advanced nsclc patients: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

282

advanced hypopharyngeal carcinoma: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

283

advanced intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

284

advanced large power: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

285

advanced radioisotope power: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

286

advanced steam plants: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

287

advanced melanoma results: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

288

advanced passive plant: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

289

advanced power plants: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

290

advanced model approaches: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

291

advanced nuclear reactors: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

292

advanced applications kyoto: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

293

advanced astroculture plant: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

294

advanced orthotopic hepatocellular: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

295

advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

296

advanced thermal reactor fugen: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

297

advanced coolside sorbent: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

298

advanced power system: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

299

advanced computational modeling: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

300

advanced fimbrial ectopic: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced simulation capability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

advanced mixing models: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

302

aries advanced power: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

303

2014 Advanced Grid Modeling Peer Review Presentations - Day Two...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

with Advanced Computing - Yousu Chen, PNNL Advancing the Adoption of High Performance Computing for Time Domain Simulation - Liang Min, LLNL, Carol Woodward, LLNL An...

304

Development of 3rd Generation Advanced High Strength Steels ...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3rd Generation Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) with an Integrated Experimental and Simulation Approach Development of 3rd Generation Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) with...

305

Nuclear Hybrid Energy System Modeling: RELAP5 Dynamic Coupling Capabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nuclear hybrid energy systems (NHES) research team is currently developing a dynamic simulation of an integrated hybrid energy system. A detailed simulation of proposed NHES architectures will allow initial computational demonstration of a tightly coupled NHES to identify key reactor subsystem requirements, identify candidate reactor technologies for a hybrid system, and identify key challenges to operation of the coupled system. This work will provide a baseline for later coupling of design-specific reactor models through industry collaboration. The modeling capability addressed in this report focuses on the reactor subsystem simulation.

Piyush Sabharwall; Nolan Anderson; Haihua Zhao; Shannon Bragg-Sitton; George Mesina

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Development of a fourth generation predictive capability maturity model.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Predictive Capability Maturity Model (PCMM) is an expert elicitation tool designed to characterize and communicate completeness of the approaches used for computational model definition, verification, validation, and uncertainty quantification associated for an intended application. The primary application of this tool at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has been for physics-based computational simulations in support of nuclear weapons applications. The two main goals of a PCMM evaluation are 1) the communication of computational simulation capability, accurately and transparently, and 2) the development of input for effective planning. As a result of the increasing importance of computational simulation to SNL's mission, the PCMM has evolved through multiple generations with the goal to provide more clarity, rigor, and completeness in its application. This report describes the approach used to develop the fourth generation of the PCMM.

Hills, Richard Guy; Witkowski, Walter R.; Urbina, Angel; Rider, William J.; Trucano, Timothy Guy

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

OPSAID improvements and capabilities report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Process Control System (PCS) and Industrial Control System (ICS) security is critical to our national security. But there are a number of technological, economic, and educational impediments to PCS owners implementing effective security on their systems. Sandia National Laboratories has performed the research and development of the OPSAID (Open PCS Security Architecture for Interoperable Design), a project sponsored by the US Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (DOE/OE), to address this issue. OPSAID is an open-source architecture for PCS/ICS security that provides a design basis for vendors to build add-on security devices for legacy systems, while providing a path forward for the development of inherently-secure PCS elements in the future. Using standardized hardware, a proof-of-concept prototype system was also developed. This report describes the improvements and capabilities that have been added to OPSAID since an initial report was released. Testing and validation of this architecture has been conducted in another project, Lemnos Interoperable Security Project, sponsored by DOE/OE and managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL).

Halbgewachs, Ronald D.; Chavez, Adrian R.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Accelerating development of advanced inverters : evaluation of anti-islanding schemes with grid support functions and preliminary laboratory demonstration.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high penetration of utility interconnected photovoltaic (PV) systems is causing heightened concern over the effect that variable renewable generation will have on the electrical power system (EPS). These concerns have initiated the need to amend the utility interconnection standard to allow advanced inverter control functionalities that provide: (1) reactive power control for voltage support, (2) real power control for frequency support and (3) better tolerance of grid disturbances. These capabilities are aimed at minimizing the negative impact distributed PV systems may have on EPS voltage and frequency. Unfortunately, these advanced control functions may interfere with island detection schemes, and further development of advanced inverter functions requires a study of the effect of advanced functions on the efficacy of antiislanding schemes employed in industry. This report summarizes the analytical, simulation and experimental work to study interactions between advanced inverter functions and anti-islanding schemes being employed in distributed PV systems.

Neely, Jason C.; Gonzalez, Sigifredo; Ropp, Michael [Northern Plains Power Technologies, Brookings, SD] [Northern Plains Power Technologies, Brookings, SD; Schutz, Dustin [Northern Plains Power Technologies, Brookings, SD] [Northern Plains Power Technologies, Brookings, SD

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Future Transient Testing of Advanced Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The transient in-reactor fuels testing workshop was held on May 4–5, 2009 at Idaho National Laboratory. The purpose of this meeting was to provide a forum where technical experts in transient testing of nuclear fuels could meet directly with technical instrumentation experts and nuclear fuel modeling and simulation experts to discuss needed advancements in transient testing to support a basic understanding of nuclear fuel behavior under off-normal conditions. The workshop was attended by representatives from Commissariat ŕ l'Énergie Atomique CEA, Japanese Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Department of Energy (DOE), AREVA, General Electric – Global Nuclear Fuels (GE-GNF), Westinghouse, Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), universities, and several DOE national laboratories. Transient testing of fuels and materials generates information required for advanced fuels in future nuclear power plants. Future nuclear power plants will rely heavily on advanced computer modeling and simulation that describes fuel behavior under off-normal conditions. TREAT is an ideal facility for this testing because of its flexibility, proven operation and material condition. The opportunity exists to develop advanced instrumentation and data collection that can support modeling and simulation needs much better than was possible in the past. In order to take advantage of these opportunities, test programs must be carefully designed to yield basic information to support modeling before conducting integral performance tests. An early start of TREAT and operation at low power would provide significant dividends in training, development of instrumentation, and checkout of reactor systems. Early start of TREAT (2015) is needed to support the requirements of potential users of TREAT and include the testing of full length fuel irradiated in the FFTF reactor. The capabilities provided by TREAT are needed for the development of nuclear power and the following benefits will be realized by the refurbishment and restart of TREAT. •TREAT is an absolute necessity in the suite of reactor fuel test capabilities •TREAT yields valuable information on reactivity effects, margins to failure, fuel dispersal, and failure propagation •Most importantly, interpretation of TREAT experiment results is a stringent test of the integrated understanding of fuel performance.

Jon Carmack

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Analyzing the proliferation resistance of advanced nuclear fuel cycles : in search of an assessment methodology for use in fuel cycle simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A methodology to assess proliferation resistance of advanced nuclear energy systems is investigated. The framework, based on Multi-Attribute Utility Theory (MAUT), is envisioned for use within early-stage fuel cycle ...

Pierpoint, Lara Marie

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Towards the Integration of APECS and VE-Suite for Virtual Power Plant Co-Simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Process modeling and simulation tools are widely used for the design and operation of advanced power generation systems. These tools enable engineers to solve the critical process systems engineering problems that arise throughout the lifecycle of a power plant, such as designing a new process, troubleshooting a process unit or optimizing operations of the full process. To analyze the impact of complex thermal and fluid flow phenomena on overall power plant performance, the Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has developed the Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS). The APECS system is an integrated software suite that combines process simulation (e.g., Aspen Plus) and high-fidelity equipment simulations such as those based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD), together with advanced analysis capabilities including case studies, sensitivity analysis, stochastic simulation for risk/uncertainty analysis, and multi-objective optimization. In this paper we discuss the initial phases of the integration of the APECS system with the immersive and interactive virtual engineering software, VE-Suite, developed at Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory. VE-Suite uses the ActiveX (OLE Automation) controls in the Aspen Plus process simulator wrapped by the CASI library developed by Reaction Engineering International to run process/CFD co-simulations and query for results. This integration represents a necessary step in the development of virtual power plant co-simulations that will ultimately reduce the time, cost, and technical risk of developing advanced power generation systems.

Zitney, S.E.; McCorkle, D. (Iowa State University, Ames, IA); Yang, C. (Reaction Engineering International, Salt Lake City, UT); Jordan, T.; Swensen, D. (Reaction Engineering International, Salt Lake City, UT); Bryden, M. (Iowa State University, Ames, IA)

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Cielo Computational Environment Usage Model With Mappings to ACE Requirements for the General Availability User Environment Capabilities Release Version 1.1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cielo is a massively parallel supercomputer funded by the DOE/NNSA Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program, and operated by the Alliance for Computing at Extreme Scale (ACES), a partnership between Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The primary Cielo compute platform is physically located at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This Cielo Computational Environment Usage Model documents the capabilities and the environment to be provided for the Q1 FY12 Level 2 Cielo Capability Computing (CCC) Platform Production Readiness Milestone. This document describes specific capabilities, tools, and procedures to support both local and remote users. The model is focused on the needs of the ASC user working in the secure computing environments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory, or Sandia National Laboratories, but also addresses the needs of users working in the unclassified environment. The Cielo Computational Environment Usage Model maps the provided capabilities to the tri-Lab ASC Computing Environment (ACE) Version 8.0 requirements. The ACE requirements reflect the high performance computing requirements for the Production Readiness Milestone user environment capabilities of the ASC community. A description of ACE requirements met, and those requirements that are not met, are included in each section of this document. The Cielo Computing Environment, along with the ACE mappings, has been issued and reviewed throughout the tri-Lab community.

Vigil,Benny Manuel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ballance, Robert [SNL; Haskell, Karen [SNL

2012-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

313

Mobile Munitions Assessment System Field Capabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US has developed, stored, tested, and conducted disposal operations on various forms of chemical munitions for several decades. The remnants of these activities have resulted in the presence of suspect CWM at more than 200 sites in the US, the District of Columbia, and the US Virgin Islands. An advanced Mobile Munitions Assessment System (Phase II MMAS) has been designed, fabricated, assembled, and tested by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory under contract to the US Army's Project Manager for Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel for use in the assessment and characterization of ''non-stockpile'' chemical warfare materiel (CWM). The Phase II MMAS meets the immediate need to augment response equipment currently used by the US Army with a system that includes state-of-the-art assessment equipment and advanced sensors. The Phase II MMAS will be used for response to known storage and remediation sites. This system is designed to identify the munition type; evaluate the condition of the CWM; evaluate the environmental conditions in the vicinity of the CWM; determine if fuzes, bursters, or safety and arming devices are in place; identify the chemical fill; provide other data (e.g., meteorological data) necessary for assessing the risk associated with handling, transporting, and disposing of CWM; and record the data on a dedicated computer system. The Phase II MMAS is capable of over-the-road travel and air transport to any site for conducting rigorous assessments of suspect CWM. The Phase II MMAS utilizes a specially-designed commercial motor home to provide a means to transport an interactive network of non-intrusive characterization and assessment equipment. The assessment equipment includes radiography systems, a gamma densitometer system, a Portable Isotopic Neutron Spectroscopy (PINS) system, a Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) system, air monitoring equipment (i.e., M-90s and a field ion spectroscopy system), and a phase determination equipment Command and control equipment includes a data acquisition and handling system, two meteorological stations, video equipment, and multiple communication systems. The Phase II MMAS motor home also serves an as environmentally controlled on-site command post for the MMAS operators when deployed. The data developed by the MMAS will be used to help determine the appropriate methods and safeguards necessary to transport, store, and dispose of agent-filled munitions in a safe and environmentally acceptable manner.

A. M. Snyder; D. A. Verrill; K. D. Watts

1999-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

314

Visual Absorption Capability1 Lee Anderson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Visual Absorption Capability1 Lee Anderson 2a/ Jerry Mosier 2b/ Geoffrey Chandler 2c/ 1/ Submitted, Lassen National Forest, Susanville, California. Abstract: Visual absorption capability (VAC) is a tool development which is in harmony with the visual resource vis- ual absorption capability (VAC) is a tool which

Standiford, Richard B.

315

Acoustic Waveform Logging - Advances In Theory And Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Full-waveform acoustic logging has made significant advances in both theory and application in recent years, and these advances have greatly increased the capability of log analysts to measure the physical properties of ...

Cheng, C. H.

316

Scalable Equation of State Capability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this techbase project was to investigate the use of parallel array data types to reduce the memory footprint of the Livermore Equation Of State (LEOS) library. Addressing the memory scalability of LEOS is necessary to run large scientific simulations on IBM BG/L and future architectures with low memory per processing core. We considered using normal MPI, one-sided MPI, and Global Arrays to manage the distributed array and ended up choosing Global Arrays because it was the only communication library that provided the level of asynchronous access required. To reduce the runtime overhead using a parallel array data structure, a least recently used (LRU) caching algorithm was used to provide a local cache of commonly used parts of the parallel array. The approach was initially implemented in a isolated copy of LEOS and was later integrated into the main trunk of the LEOS Subversion repository. The approach was tested using a simple test. Testing indicated that the approach was feasible, and the simple LRU caching had a 86% hit rate.

Epperly, T W; Fritsch, F N; Norquist, P D; Sanford, L A

2007-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

317

Measuring Advances in HVAC Distribution System Design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Substantial commercial building energy savings have been achieved by improving the performance of the HV AC distribution system. The energy savings result from distribution system design improvements, advanced control capabilities, and use of variable-speed motors. Yet, much of the commercial building stock remains equipped with inefficient systems. Contributing to this is the absence of a definition for distribution system efficiency as well as the analysis methods for quantifying performance. This research investigates the application of performance indices to assess design advancements in commercial building thermal distribution systems. The index definitions are based on a first and second law of thermodynamics analysis of the system. The second law or availability analysis enables the determination of the true efficiency of the system. Availability analysis is a convenient way to make system efficiency comparisons since performance is evaluated relative to an ideal process. A TRNSYS simulation model is developed to analyze the performance of two distribution system types, a constant air volume system and a variable air volume system, that serve one floor of a large office building. Performance indices are calculated using the simulation results to compare the performance of the two systems types in several locations. Changes in index values are compared to changes in plant energy, costs, and carbon emissions to explore the ability of the indices to estimate these quantities.

Franconi, E.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Comparison of the ATP version of the EMTP and the NETOMAC program for simulation of HVdc systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper investigates the capabilities and limitations of the EMTP and NETOMAC program as applied to HVdc system simulation. The fundamental differences between the two programs and their effect on simulation results are described. Consistency of the results obtained from these programs is examined through simulation of a test HVdc network. As expected, a very high degree of agreement between the two sets of simulation results proved to be achievable, but only when particular care was taken to overcome internal program differences. Finally, the new advanced stability feature of NETOMAC is briefly discussed and then tested against the complex transient models established in the EMTP and in the NETOMAC transients program section.

Lehn, P.; Rittiger, J. [Siemens AG, Erlangen (Germany)] [Siemens AG, Erlangen (Germany); Kulicke, B. [Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany)] [Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Vehicle Technologies Office: 2011 Advanced Power Electronics...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

2012 Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors R&D Annual Progress Report Electro-thermal-mechanical Simulation and Reliability for Plug-in Vehicle Converters and Inverters...

320

Localization of gravitational wave sources with networks of advanced detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coincident observations with gravitational wave (GW) detectors and other astronomical instruments are among the main objectives of the experiments with the network of LIGO, Virgo, and GEO detectors. They will become a necessary part of the future GW astronomy as the next generation of advanced detectors comes online. The success of such joint observations directly depends on the source localization capabilities of the GW detectors. In this paper we present studies of the sky localization of transient GW sources with the future advanced detector networks and describe their fundamental properties. By reconstructing sky coordinates of ad hoc signals injected into simulated detector noise, we study the accuracy of the source localization and its dependence on the strength of injected signals, waveforms, and network configurations.

Klimenko, S.; Mitselmakher, G.; Pankow, C. [University of Florida, P.O. Box 118440, Gainesville, Florida, 32611 (United States); Vedovato, G. [INFN, Sezione di Padova, via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Drago, M.; Prodi, G. [University of Trento, Physics Department and INFN, Gruppo Collegato di Trento, via Sommarive 14, 38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); Mazzolo, G.; Salemi, F. [Max Planck Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Callinstrasse 38, 30167 Hannover and Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Hannover (Germany); Re, V. [INFN, Sezione di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Yakushin, I. [LIGO Livingston Observatory, Louisiana (United States)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced simulation capability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

G. Vlad, annual meeting of the Task Force ITM, Garching 19-21st September 2007 Recent advances in simulations of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

G. Vlad, annual meeting of the Task Force ITM, Garching 19-21st September 2007 1 Recent advances equation; · Maxwellian, Slowing-down energetic particle distribution functions ­ self inverted #12;G. Vlad, annual meeting of the Task Force ITM, Garching 19-21st September 2007 9 Bursting

Vlad, Gregorio

322

Nuclear Systems Modeling & Simulation | More Science | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Systems Modeling and Simulation SHARE Nuclear Systems Modeling and Simulation Reactor physics depletion model for the Advanced Test Reactor Reactor physics depletion model for the...

323

Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation & Validation | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Systems Modeling and Simulation SHARE Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation and Validation Reactor physics depletion model for the Advanced Test Reactor Reactor physics depletion...

324

Available transfer capability and first order sensitivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method of calculating Available Transfer Capability and the exploration of the first order effects of certain power system network variables are described. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has ordered that bulk electrical control areas must provide to market participants a ``commercially viable`` network transfer capability for the import, export, and through-put of energy. A practical method for deriving this transfer capability utilizing both linear and non-linear power flow analysis methods is developed that acknowledges both thermal and voltage system limitations. The Available Transfer Capability is the incremental transfer capability derived by the method reduced by margins. A procedure for quantifying the first order effect of network uncertainties such as load forecast error and simultaneous transfers on the calculated transfer capability of a power system snapshot are explored. The quantification of these network uncertainties can provide information necessary for system operation, planning, and energy market participation.

Gravener, M.H. [PJM Interconnection, L.L.C., Valley Forge, PA (United States)] [PJM Interconnection, L.L.C., Valley Forge, PA (United States); Nwankpa, C. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory: Focus on Carbon Fiber and Composites Project ID: LM027 DOE 2011 Vehicle Technologies Annual Merit...

326

Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

2010 -- Washington D.C. lm028laracurzio2010o.pdf More Documents & Publications Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory and HTML...

327

Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Review and Peer Evaluation lm028laracurzio2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory and HTML...

328

Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Peer Evaluation Meeting lm028laracurzio2012o.pdf More Documents & Publications Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory and HTML...

329

Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. lm01laracurzio.pdf More Documents & Publications Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory and HTML...

330

Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Laboratory: Focus on Carbon Fiber and Composites Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory: Focus on Carbon Fiber and Composites 2011 DOE...

331

Materials Capability Review Los Alamos National Laboratory April 29-May 2, 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) uses Capability Reviews to assess the quality and institutional integration of science, technology and engineering (STE) and to advise Laboratory Management on the current and future health of LANL STE. The capabilities are deliberately chosen to be crosscutting over the Laboratory and therefore will include experimental, theoretical and simulation disciplines from multiple line organizations. Capability Reviews are designed to provide a more holistic view of the STE quality, integration to achieve mission requirements, and mission relevance. The scope of these capabilities necessitate that there will be significant overlap in technical areas covered by capability reviews (e.g., materials research and weapons science and engineering). In addition, LANL staff may be reviewed in different capability reviews because of their varied assignments and expertise. The principal product of the Capability Review is the report that includes the review committee's assessments, recommendations, and recommendations for STE.

Taylor, Antoinette J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

332

EMSL Research and Capability Development Proposals Cryogenic NMR and Advanced Electronic Structure Theory as a Unique EMSL Capability  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct:DirectivesSAND2015-21271 7An Integrated Workflow

333

Analytical Chemistry Core Capability Assessment - Preliminary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The concept of 'core capability' can be nebulous one. Even at a fairly specific level, where core capability equals maintaining essential services, it is highly dependent upon the perspective of the requestor. Samples are submitted to analytical services because the requesters do not have the capability to conduct adequate analyses themselves. Some requests are for general chemical information in support of R and D, process control, or process improvement. Many analyses, however, are part of a product certification package and must comply with higher-level customer quality assurance requirements. So which services are essential to that customer - just those for product certification? Does the customer also (indirectly) need services that support process control and improvement? And what is the timeframe? Capability is often expressed in terms of the currently utilized procedures, and most programmatic customers can only plan a few years out, at best. But should core capability consider the long term where new technologies, aging facilities, and personnel replacements must be considered? These questions, and a multitude of others, explain why attempts to gain long-term consensus on the definition of core capability have consistently failed. This preliminary report will not try to define core capability for any specific program or set of programs. Instead, it will try to address the underlying concerns that drive the desire to determine core capability. Essentially, programmatic customers want to be able to call upon analytical chemistry services to provide all the assays they need, and they don't want to pay for analytical chemistry services they don't currently use (or use infrequently). This report will focus on explaining how the current analytical capabilities and methods evolved to serve a variety of needs with a focus on why some analytes have multiple analytical techniques, and what determines the infrastructure for these analyses. This information will be useful in defining a roadmap for what future capability needs to look like.

Barr, Mary E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farish, Thomas J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

334

Off-gas Adsorption Model and Simulation - OSPREY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The absence of industrial scale nuclear fuel reprocessing in the U.S. has precluded the necessary driver for developing the advanced simulation capability now prevalent in so many other countries. Thus, it is essential to model complex series of unit operations to simulate, understand, and predict inherent transient behavior. A capability of accurately simulating the dynamic behavior of advanced fuel cycle separation processes is expected to provide substantial cost savings and many technical benefits. To support this capability, a modeling effort focused on the off-gas treatment system of a used nuclear fuel recycling facility is in progress. The off-gas separation consists of a series of scrubbers and adsorption beds to capture constituents of interest. Dynamic models are being developed to simulate each unit operation involved so each unit operation can be used as a stand-alone model and in series with multiple others. Currently, an adsorption model has been developed within Multi-physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Off-gas Separation and REcoverY (OSPREY) models the adsorption of offgas constituents for dispersed plug flow in a packed bed under non-isothermal and non-isobaric conditions. Inputs to the model include gas composition, sorbent and column properties, equilibrium and kinetic data, and inlet conditions. The simulation outputs component concentrations along the column length as a function of time from which breakthrough data can be obtained. The breakthrough data can be used to determine bed capacity, which in turn can be used to size columns. In addition to concentration data, the model predicts temperature along the column length as a function of time and pressure drop along the column length. A description of the OSPREY model, results from krypton adsorption modeling and plans for modeling the behavior of iodine, xenon, and tritium will be discussed.

Veronica J Rutledge

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Uncertainty Analyses of Advanced Fuel Cycles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy is developing technology, experimental protocols, computational methods, systems analysis software, and many other capabilities in order to advance the nuclear power infrastructure through the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFDI). Our project, is intended to facilitate will-informed decision making for the selection of fuel cycle options and facilities for development.

Laurence F. Miller; J. Preston; G. Sweder; T. Anderson; S. Janson; M. Humberstone; J. MConn; J. Clark

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

336

Core Capabilities and Technical Enhancement -- FY-98 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Core Capability and Technical Enhancement (CC&TE) Program, a part of the Verification, Validation, and Engineering Assessment Program, was implemented to enhance and augment the technical capabilities of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The purpose for strengthening the technical capabilities of the INEEL is to provide the technical base to serve effectively as the Environmental Management Laboratory for the Office of Environmental Management (EM). An analysis of EM's science and technology needs as well as the technology investments currently being made by EM across the complex was used to formulate a portfolio of research activities designed to address EM's needs without overlapping work being done elsewhere. An additional purpose is to enhance and maintain the technical capabilities and research infrastructure at the INEEL. This is a progress report for fiscal year 1998 for the five CC&TE research investment areas: (a) transport aspects of selective mass transport agents, (b) chemistry of environmental surfaces, (c) materials dynamics, (d) characterization science, and (e) computational simulation of mechanical and chemical systems. In addition to the five purely technical research areas, this report deals with the science and technology foundations element of the CC&TE from the standpoint of program management and complex-wide issues. This report also provides details of ongoing and future work in all six areas.

Miller, David Lynn

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Core capabilities and technical enhancement, FY-98 annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Core Capability and Technical Enhancement (CCTE) Program, a part of the Verification, Validation, and Engineering Assessment Program, was implemented to enhance and augment the technical capabilities of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The purpose for strengthening the technical capabilities of the INEEL is to provide the technical base to serve effectively as the Environmental Management Laboratory for the Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (EM). An analysis of EM's science and technology needs as well as the technology investments currently being made by EM across the complex was used to formulate a portfolio of research activities designed to address EM's needs without overlapping work being done elsewhere. An additional purpose is to enhance and maintain the technical capabilities and research infrastructure at the INEEL. This is a progress report for fiscal year 1998 for the five CCTE research investment areas: (a) transport aspects of selective mass transport agents, (b) chemistry of environmental surfaces, (c) materials dynamics, (d) characterization science, and (e) computational simulation of mechanical and chemical systems. In addition to the five purely technical research areas, this report deals with the science and technology foundations element of the CCTE from the standpoint of program management and complex-wide issues. This report also provides details of ongoing and future work in all six areas.

Miller, D.L.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Foundational development of an advanced nuclear reactor integrated safety code.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the activities and results of a Sandia LDRD project whose objective was to develop and demonstrate foundational aspects of a next-generation nuclear reactor safety code that leverages advanced computational technology. The project scope was directed towards the systems-level modeling and simulation of an advanced, sodium cooled fast reactor, but the approach developed has a more general applicability. The major accomplishments of the LDRD are centered around the following two activities. (1) The development and testing of LIME, a Lightweight Integrating Multi-physics Environment for coupling codes that is designed to enable both 'legacy' and 'new' physics codes to be combined and strongly coupled using advanced nonlinear solution methods. (2) The development and initial demonstration of BRISC, a prototype next-generation nuclear reactor integrated safety code. BRISC leverages LIME to tightly couple the physics models in several different codes (written in a variety of languages) into one integrated package for simulating accident scenarios in a liquid sodium cooled 'burner' nuclear reactor. Other activities and accomplishments of the LDRD include (a) further development, application and demonstration of the 'non-linear elimination' strategy to enable physics codes that do not provide residuals to be incorporated into LIME, (b) significant extensions of the RIO CFD code capabilities, (c) complex 3D solid modeling and meshing of major fast reactor components and regions, and (d) an approach for multi-physics coupling across non-conformal mesh interfaces.

Clarno, Kevin (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Lorber, Alfred Abraham; Pryor, Richard J.; Spotz, William F.; Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Belcourt, Kenneth (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Hooper, Russell Warren; Humphries, Larry LaRon

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

High Performance Computing Modeling Advances Accelerator Science for High Energy Physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development and optimization of particle accelerators are essential for advancing our understanding of the properties of matter, energy, space and time. Particle accelerators are complex devices whose behavior involves many physical effects on multiple scales. Therefore, advanced computational tools utilizing high-performance computing (HPC) are essential for accurately modeling them. In the past decade, the DOE SciDAC program has produced such accelerator-modeling tools, which have beem employed to tackle some of the most difficult accelerator science problems. In this article we discuss the Synergia beam-dynamics framework and its applications to high-intensity particle accelerator physics. Synergia is an accelerator simulation package capable of handling the entire spectrum of beam dynamics simulations. We present the design principles, key physical and numerical models in Synergia and its performance on HPC platforms. Finally, we present the results of Synergia applications for the Fermilab proton source upgrade, known as the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP).

Amundson, James; Macridin, Alexandru; Spentzouris, Panagiotis

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

340

CTH reference manual : composite capability and technologies.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The composite material research and development performed over the last year has greatly enhanced the capabilities of CTH for non-isotropic materials. The enhancements provide the users and developers with greatly enhanced capabilities to address non-isotropic materials and their constitutive model development. The enhancements to CTH are intended to address various composite material applications such as armor systems, rocket motor cases, etc. A new method for inserting non-isotropic materials was developed using Diatom capabilities. This new insertion method makes it possible to add a layering capability to a shock physics hydrocode. This allows users to explicitly model each lamina of a composite without the overhead of modeling each lamina as a separate material to represent a laminate composite. This capability is designed for computational speed and modeling efficiency when studying composite material applications. In addition, the layering capability also allows a user to model interlaminar mechanisms. Finally, non-isotropic coupling methods have been investigated. The coupling methods are specific to shock physics where the Equation of State (EOS) is used with a nonisotropic constitutive model. This capability elastically corrects the EOS pressure (typically isotropic) for deviatoric pressure coupling for non-isotropic materials.

Key, Christopher T.; Schumacher, Shane C.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced simulation capability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Validation of Heavy Ion Transport Capabilities in PHITS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The performance of the Monte Carlo code system PHITS is validated for heavy ion transport capabilities by performing simulations and comparing results against experimental data from heavy ion reactions of benchmark quality. These data are from measurements of secondary neutron production cross sections in reactions of Xe at 400 MeV/u with lithium and lead targets, measurements of neutrons outside of thick concrete and iron shields, and measurements of isotope yields produced in the fragmentation of a 140 MeV/u 48Ca beam on a beryllium target and on a tantalum target. A practical example that tests magnetic field capabilities is shown for a simulated 48Ca beam at 500 MeV/u striking a lithium target to produce the rare isotope 44Si, with ion transport through a fragmentation-reaction magnetic pre-separator. The results of this study show that PHITS performs reliably for the simulation of radiation fields that is necessary for designing safe, reliable and cost effective future high-powered heavy-ion accelerators in rare isotope beam facilities.

Ronningen, Reginald M. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States)

2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

342

THE ADVANCED CHEMISTRY BASINS PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the next decades, oil exploration by majors and independents will increasingly be in remote, inaccessible areas, or in areas where there has been extensive shallow exploration but deeper exploration potential may remain; areas where the collection of data is expensive, difficult, or even impossible, and where the most efficient use of existing data can drive the economics of the target. The ability to read hydrocarbon chemistry in terms of subsurface migration processes by relating it to the evolution of the basin and fluid migration is perhaps the single technological capability that could most improve our ability to explore effectively because it would allow us to use a vast store of existing or easily collected chemical data to determine the major migration pathways in a basin and to determine if there is deep exploration potential. To this end a the DOE funded a joint effort between California Institute of Technology, Cornell University, and GeoGroup Inc. to assemble a representative set of maturity and maturation kinetic models and develop an advanced basin model able to predict the chemistry of hydrocarbons in a basin from this input data. The four year project is now completed and has produced set of public domain maturity indicator and maturation kinetic data set, an oil chemistry and flash calculation tool operable under Excel, and a user friendly, graphically intuitive basin model that uses this data and flash tool, operates on a PC, and simulates hydrocarbon generation and migration and the chemical changes that can occur during migration (such as phase separation and gas washing). The DOE Advanced Chemistry Basin Model includes a number of new methods that represent advances over current technology. The model is built around the concept of handling arbitrarily detailed chemical composition of fluids in a robust finite-element 2-D grid. There are three themes on which the model focuses: chemical kinetic and equilibrium reaction parameters, chemical phase equilibrium, and physical flow through porous media. The chemical kinetic scheme includes thermal indicators including vitrinite, sterane ratios, hopane ratios, and diamonoids; and a user-modifiable reaction network for primary and secondary maturation. Also provided is a database of type-specific kerogen maturation schemes. The phase equilibrium scheme includes modules for primary and secondary migration, multi-phase equilibrium (flash) calculations, and viscosity predictions.

William Goddard; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang; Lawrence Cathles III

2004-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

343

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Analysis Capabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Analysis Capabilities Overview The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is the nation's primary laboratory for renewable energy and energy efficiency research and development (R&D). NREL

344

DIRSIG Cloud Modeling Capabilities; A Parametric Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 DIRSIG Cloud Modeling Capabilities; A Parametric Study Kristen Powers powers:................................................................................................................... 13 Calculation of Sensor Reaching Radiance Truth Values for Cloudless & Stratus Cloud Scenes and Atmospheric Database Creation for Stratus Cloud Scene & Calculation of Associated Sensor Reaching Radiance

Salvaggio, Carl

345

capabilitiesFlier_subsurfaceFlow_WEB  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

From the micron scale to the geographic scale, EMSL houses an integrated suite of capabilities to support EMSL offers users access to cutting-edge instruments and the in-house...

346

Workflow Collaboration with Constraint Solving Capabilities   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, perform specialised tasks and achieve common goals. We give an account of our approach for the workflow assisted collaboration with a specialised knowledge agent. In this case, a system with constraint solving capabilities. We found that systems built...

Chen-Burger, Y-H; Hui, K; Preece, A D; Gray, P.M.D; Tate, Austin

347

The RD53 Collaboration's SystemVerilog-UVM Simulation Framework and its General Applicability to Design of Advanced Pixel Readout Chips  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The foreseen Phase 2 pixel upgrades at the LHC have very challenging requirements for the design of hybrid pixel readout chips. A versatile pixel simulation platform is as an essential development tool for the design, verification and optimization of both the system architecture and the pixel chip building blocks (Intellectual Properties, IPs). This work is focused on the implemented simulation and verification environment named VEPIX53, built using the SystemVerilog language and the Universal Verification Methodology (UVM) class library in the framework of the RD53 Collaboration. The environment supports pixel chips at different levels of description: its reusable components feature the generation of different classes of parameterized input hits to the pixel matrix, monitoring of pixel chip inputs and outputs, conformity checks between predicted and actual outputs and collection of statistics on system performance. The environment has been tested performing a study of shared architectures of the trigger latency buffering section of pixel chips. A fully shared architecture and a distributed one have been described at behavioral level and simulated; the resulting memory occupancy statistics and hit loss rates have subsequently been compared.

S. Marconi; E. Conti; P. Placidi; J. Christiansen; T. Hemperek

2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

348

Verification of New Floating Capabilities in FAST v8: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the latest release of NREL's wind turbine aero-hydro-servo-elastic simulation software, FAST v8, several new capabilities and major changes were introduced. FAST has been significantly altered to improve the simulator's modularity and to include new functionalities in the form of modules in the FAST v8 framework. This paper is focused on the improvements made for the modeling of floating offshore wind systems. The most significant change was to the hydrodynamic load calculation algorithms, which are embedded in the HydroDyn module. HydroDyn is now capable of applying strip-theory (via an extension of Morison's equation) at the member level for user-defined geometries. Users may now use a strip-theory-only approach for applying the hydrodynamic loads, as well as the previous potential-flow (radiation/diffraction) approach and a hybrid combination of both methods (radiation/diffraction and the drag component of Morison's equation). Second-order hydrodynamic implementations in both the wave kinematics used by the strip-theory solution and the wave-excitation loads in the potential-flow solution were also added to HydroDyn. The new floating capabilities were verified through a direct code-to-code comparison. We conducted a series of simulations of the International Energy Agency Wind Task 30 Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration Continuation (OC4) floating semisubmersible model and compared the wind turbine response predicted by FAST v8, the corresponding FAST v7 results, and results from other participants in the OC4 project. We found good agreement between FAST v7 and FAST v8 when using the linear radiation/diffraction modeling approach. The strip-theory-based approach inherently differs from the radiation/diffraction approach used in FAST v7 and we identified and characterized the differences. Enabling the second-order effects significantly improved the agreement between FAST v8 and the other OC4 participants.

Wendt, F.; Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.; Hayman, G.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Deployment of a Suite of High-Performance Computational Tools for Multi-scale Multi-physics Simulation of Generation IV Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project has been to deploy advanced simulation capabilities for next generation reactor systems utilizing newly available, high-performance computing facilities. The approach includes the following major components: The development of new simulation capabilities using state-of-the-art computer codes of different scales: molecular dynamics (MD) level, DNS (FronTier and PHASTA) and CFD (NPHASE-CMFD); The development of advanced numerical solvers for large-size computational problems; The deployment of a multiple-code computational platform for multiscale simulations of gas/liquid two-phase flow during reactor transients and accidents; and Application of the new computational methodology to study the progression of loss-of-flow accident in sodium fast reactor (SFR).

Michael Z. Podowski

2013-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

350

Plasma Simulation Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many others in the fusion energy and advanced scientific computing communities participated in the development of this plan. The core planning team is grateful for their important contributions. This summary is meant as a quick overview the Fusion Simulation Program's (FSP's) purpose and intentions. There are several additional documents referenced within this one and all are supplemental or flow down from this Program Plan. The overall science goal of the DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) Fusion Simulation Program (FSP) is to develop predictive simulation capability for magnetically confined fusion plasmas at an unprecedented level of integration and fidelity. This will directly support and enable effective U.S. participation in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) research and the overall mission of delivering practical fusion energy. The FSP will address a rich set of scientific issues together with experimental programs, producing validated integrated physics results. This is very well aligned with the mission of the ITER Organization to coordinate with its members the integrated modeling and control of fusion plasmas, including benchmarking and validation activities. [1]. Initial FSP research will focus on two critical Integrated Science Application (ISA) areas: ISA1, the plasma edge; and ISA2, whole device modeling (WDM) including disruption avoidance. The first of these problems involves the narrow plasma boundary layer and its complex interactions with the plasma core and the surrounding material wall. The second requires development of a computationally tractable, but comprehensive model that describes all equilibrium and dynamic processes at a sufficient level of detail to provide useful prediction of the temporal evolution of fusion plasma experiments. The initial driver for the whole device model will be prediction and avoidance of discharge-terminating disruptions, especially at high performance, which are a critical impediment to successful operation of machines like ITER. If disruptions prove unable to be avoided, their associated dynamics and effects will be addressed in the next phase of the FSP.

Greenwald, Martin

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

351

advanced gas-cooled reactor: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

352

advanced coal-based power: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

353

advanced test-analysis model: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

354

advanced self-shielding models: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

355

advanced t-stage nasopharyngeal: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

356

advanced unresectable non-small: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

357

advanced gas-cooled reactors: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

358

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced microwave sounding Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

power systems. It is described as an advanced modern tool ready for the direct use in simulation... in a number of advanced commercial software available by the ... Source:...

359

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced scientific computing Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of scientific knowledge as a lever for advancing... and transportation, high-performance computing, modeling and simulation, and advanced weapons technologies... and objective...

360

Application of advanced reservoir characterization, simulation, and production optimization strategies to maximize recovery in slope and basin clastic reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin). Technical progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost effective way to recover a higher percentage of the original oil in place through strategic placement of infill wells and geologically based field development. Project objectives are divided into two major phases. The objectives of the reservoir characterization phase of the project are to provide a detailed understanding of the architecture and heterogeneity of two fields, the Ford Geraldine unit and Ford West field, which produce from the Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon Formations, respectively, of the Delaware Mountain Group and to compare Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon reservoirs. Reservoir characterization will utilize 3-D seismic data, high-resolution sequence stratigraphy, subsurface field studies, outcrop characterization, and other techniques. One the reservoir-characterization study of both field is completed, a pilot area of approximately 1 mi{sup 2} in one of the fields will be chosen for reservoir simulation. The objectives of the implementation phase of the project are to: (1) apply the knowledge gained from reservoir characterization and simulation studies to increase recovery from the pilot area; (2) demonstrate that economically significant unrecovered oil remains in geologically resolvable untapped compartments; and (3) test the accuracy of reservoir characterization and flow simulation as predictive tools in resource preservation of mature fields. A geologically designed, enhanced recovery program (CO{sub 2} flood, waterflood, or polymer flood) and well-completion program will be developed, and one to three infill well will be drilled and cored. Technical progress is summarized for: geophysical characterization; reservoir characterization; outcrop characterization; and producibility problem characterization.

Dutton, S.P.

1996-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced simulation capability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Doing More With Less: Cost-Effective Infrastructure for Automotive Vision Capabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

recognition, and 360-degree sensing. At the same time, fully autonomous vehicles have been demonstrated is automotive systems. In this domain, a proliferation of advanced sensor technology is being fueled by an expanding range of autonomous capabilities. Driver-assist features, such as blind spot warnings, automatic

Jeffay, Kevin

362

PV Performance and Reliability Validation Capabilities at Sandia...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Performance and Reliability Validation Capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories PV Performance and Reliability Validation Capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories This...

363

Combined Heat and Power Systems (CHP): Capabilities (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

D&MT Capabilities fact sheet that describes the NREL capabilities related to combined heat and power (CHP).

Not Available

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Experimental and CFD Analysis of Advanced Convective Cooling Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to study the fundamental physical phenomena in the reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS) of very high-temperature reactors (VHTRs). One of the primary design objectives is to assure that RCCS acts as an ultimate heat sink capable of maintaining thermal integrity of the fuel, vessel, and equipment within the reactor cavity for the entire spectrum of postulated accident scenarios. Since construction of full-scale experimental test facilities to study these phenomena is impractical, it is logical to expect that computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations will play a key role in the RCCS design process. An important question then arises: To what extent are conventional CFD codes able to accurately capture the most important flow phenomena, and how can they be modified to improve their quantitative predictions? Researchers are working to tackle this problem in two ways. First, in the experimental phase, the research team plans to design and construct an innovative platform that will provide a standard test setting for validating CFD codes proposed for the RCCS design. This capability will significantly advance the state of knowledge in both liquid-cooled and gas-cooled (e.g., sodium fast reactor) reactor technology. This work will also extend flow measurements to micro-scale levels not obtainable in large-scale test facilities, thereby revealing previously undetectable phenomena that will complement the existing infrastructure. Second, in the computational phase of this work, numerical simulation of the flow and temperature profiles will be performed using advanced turbulence models to simulate the complex conditions of flows in critical zones of the cavity. These models will be validated and verified so that they can be implemented into commercially available CFD codes. Ultimately, the results of these validation studies can then be used to enable a more accurate design and safety evaluation of systems in actual nuclear power applications (both during normal operation and accident scenarios).

Yassin A. Hassan; Victor M. Ugaz

2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

365

Network Communication as a Service-Oriented Capability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In widely distributed systems generally, and in science-oriented Grids in particular, software, CPU time, storage, etc., are treated as"services" -- they can be allocated and used with service guarantees that allows them to be integrated into systems that perform complex tasks. Network communication is currently not a service -- it is provided, in general, as a"best effort" capability with no guarantees and only statistical predictability. In order for Grids (and most types of systems with widely distributed components) to be successful in performing the sustained, complex tasks of large-scale science -- e.g., the multi-disciplinary simulation of next generation climate modeling and management and analysis of the petabytes of data that will come from the next generation of scientific instrument (which is very soon for the LHC at CERN) -- networks must provide communication capability that is service-oriented: That is it must be configurable, schedulable, predictable, and reliable. In order to accomplish this, the research and education network community is undertaking a strategy that involves changes in network architecture to support multiple classes of service; development and deployment of service-oriented communication services, and; monitoring and reporting in a form that is directly useful to the application-oriented system so that it may adapt to communications failures. In this paper we describe ESnet's approach to each of these -- an approach that is part of an international community effort to have intra-distributed system communication be based on a service-oriented capability.

Johnston, William; Johnston, William; Metzger, Joe; Collins, Michael; Burrescia, Joseph; Dart, Eli; Gagliardi, Jim; Guok, Chin; Oberman, Kevin; O'Conner, Mike

2008-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

366

Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) summary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for developing the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) to accept spent nuclear fuel from the commercial facilities. In support of the development of the CRWMS, OCRWM sponsored the Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) project. The objective of this project was to assess the capability of each commercial facility to handle various spent nuclear fuel shipping casks. The purpose of this report is to summarize the results of the facility assessments completed within the FICA project. The project was conducted in two phases. During Phase I, the data items required to complete the facility assessments were identified and the data base for the project was created. During Phase II, visits were made to 122 facilities on 76 sites to collect data and information, the data base was updated, and assessments of the cask-handling capabilities at each facility were performed.

Viebrock, J.M.; Mote, N. [Nuclear Assurance Corp., Norcross, GA (United States); Pope, R.B. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Final Technical Report: Development of Post?Installation Monitoring Capabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of approaches to harness marine and hydrokinetic energy at large?scale is predicated on the compatibility of these generation technologies with the marine environment. At present, aspects of this compatibility are uncertain. Demonstration projects provide an opportunity to address these uncertainties in a way that moves the entire industry forward. However, the monitoring capabilities to realize these advances are often under?developed in comparison to the marine and hydrokinetic energy technologies being studied. Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish County has proposed to deploy two 6?meter diameter tidal turbines manufactured by OpenHydro in northern Admiralty Inlet, Puget Sound, Washington. The goal of this deployment is to provide information about the environmental, technical, and economic performance of such turbines that can advance the development of larger?scale tidal energy projects, both in the United States and internationally. The objective of this particular project was to develop environmental monitoring plans in collaboration with resource agencies, while simultaneously advancing the capabilities of monitoring technologies to the point that they could be realistically implemented as part of these plans. In this, the District was joined by researchers at the Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center at the University of Washington, Sea Mammal Research Unit, LLC, H.T. Harvey & Associates, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Over a two year period, the project team successfully developed four environmental monitoring and mitigation plans that were adopted as a condition of the operating license for the demonstration project that issued by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission in March 2014. These plans address nearturbine interactions with marine animals, the sound produced by the turbines, marine mammal behavioral changes associated with the turbines, and changes to benthic habitat associated with colonization of the subsea base support structure. In support of these plans, the project team developed and field tested a strobe?illuminated stereooptical camera system suitable for studying near?turbine interactions with marine animals. The camera system underwent short?term field testing at the proposed turbine deployment site and a multi?month endurance test in shallower water to evaluate the effectiveness of biofouling mitigation measures for the optical ports on camera and strobe pressure housings. These tests demonstrated that the camera system is likely to meet the objectives of the near?turbine monitoring plan and operate, without maintenance, for periods of at least three months. The project team also advanced monitoring capabilities related to passive acoustic monitoring of marine mammals and monitoring of tidal currents. These capabilities will be integrated in a recoverable monitoring package that has a single interface point with the OpenHydro turbines, connects to shore power and data via a wet?mate connector, and can be recovered to the surface for maintenance and reconfiguration independent of the turbine. A logical next step would be to integrate these instruments within the package, such that one instrument can trigger the operation of another.

Polagye, Brian [University of Washington] [University of Washington

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

368

National laboratories` capabilities summaries for the DOE Virtual Center for Multiphase Dynamics (VCMD)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Virtual Center For Multiphase Dynamics (VCMD) integrates and develops the resources of industry, government, academia, and professional societies to enable reliable analysis in multiphase computational fluid dynamics. The primary means of the VCMD focus will be by the creation, support, and validation of a computerized simulation capability for multiphase flow and multiphase flow applications. This paper briefly describes the capabilities of the National Laboratories in this effort.

Joyce, E.L.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Connectivity To Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish DOE and NNSA connectivity to Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) for sites and facilities that have the potential for releasing hazardous materials sufficient to generate certain emergency declarations and to promote efficient use of resources for consequence assessment activities at DOE sites, facilities, operations, and activities in planning for and responding to emergency events. No cancellations.

2001-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

370

Matlab-based Optimization Basic Capabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Matlab-based Optimization Basic Capabilities Gene Cliff (AOE/ICAM - ecliff@vt.edu ) 3:00pm - 4:45pm: Interdisciplinary Center for Applied Mathematics 1 / 28 #12;Matlab-based Optimization Introduction & function functions fminbnd fminsearch lsqnonneg fzero 2 / 28 #12;INTRO: Basic Matlab provides several functions

Crawford, T. Daniel

371

TMV Technology Capabilities Brake Stroke Monitor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TMV Technology Capabilities Brake Stroke Monitor Brake monitoring systems are proactive maintenance This technology allows for CMV operators to have knowledge of their steer, drive, and tandem axle group weights setup is required. Current Safety/Enforcement Technologies EOBR (electronic on-board recorder) On

372

Dynamic Capabilities Building Blocks of Innovation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pollution Control licensing · 1992 · Irish Environmental Protection Agency. #12;High DC · strategy to `liftDynamic Capabilities Building Blocks of Innovation Rachel Hilliard Centre for Innovation the intellectual capacity of the organisation' · `routine setting of new environmental targets and objectives

Paxton, Anthony T.

373

Chemical Imaging Initiative Delivering New Capabilities for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical Imaging Initiative Delivering New Capabilities for In Situ, Molecular-Scale Imaging A complete, precise and realistic view of chemical, materials and biochemical processes and an understanding sources and mathematical models. At Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Chemical Imaging Initiative

374

n CAPABILITY STATEMENT Centre for Ocean Engineering,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

n CAPABILITY STATEMENT Centre for Ocean Engineering, Science and Technology Overview The Centre for Ocean Engineering, Science and Technology (COEST) is dedicated to the ocean, the most fascinating and the most challenging environment for human endeavour. COEST brings together the disciplines of ocean

Liley, David

375

Fuel Fabrication Capability Research and Development Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to provide a comprehensive review of the mission of the Fuel Fabrication Capability (FFC) within the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Convert Program, along with research and development (R&D) needs that have been identified as necessary to ensuring mission success. The design and fabrication of successful nuclear fuels must be closely linked endeavors.

Senor, David J.; Burkes, Douglas

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

376

Blue Waters: An Extraordinary Research Capability for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Blue Waters: An Extraordinary Research Capability for Ad ancing Science & Engineering Frontiers will talk about the new supercomputer Blue Waters and its proposed use by the science and engineering of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. This system, called Blue Waters, is based on the latest computing

377

Lattice physics capabilities of the SCALE code system using TRITON  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes ongoing calculations used to validate the TRITON depletion module in SCALE for light water reactor (LWR) fuel lattices. TRITON has been developed to provide improved resolution for lattice physics mixed-oxide fuel assemblies as programs to burn such fuel in the United States begin to come online. Results are provided for coupled TRITON/PARCS analyses of an LWR core in which TRITON was employed for generation of appropriately weighted few-group nodal cross-sectional sets for use in core-level calculations using PARCS. Additional results are provided for code-to-code comparisons for TRITON and a suite of other depletion packages in the modeling of a conceptual next-generation boiling water reactor fuel assembly design. Results indicate that the set of SCALE functional modules used within TRITON provide an accurate means for lattice physics calculations. Because the transport solution within TRITON provides a generalized-geometry capability, this capability is extensible to a wide variety of non-traditional and advanced fuel assembly designs. (authors)

DeHart, M. D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, MS 6170, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6170 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Advanced Process Technology: Combi Materials Science and Atmospheric Processing (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Capabilities fact sheet for the National Center for Photovoltaics: Process Technology and Advanced Concepts -- High-Throughput Combi Material Science and Atmospheric Processing that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information.

Not Available

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Development of directional capabilities to an ultradeep water dynamic kill simulator and simulations runs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the increasing demand of oil and gas is the impetus to search for oil in more difficult and challenging areas. One challenging area is offshore in ultradeep water, with water depths greater than 5000 ft. This is the new arena for drilling technology...

Meier, Hector Ulysses

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced turbine systems-research Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

models and advanced control strategies... .139) Track: Technical VARIABLE SPEED WIND TURBINES - FAULT RIDE-THROUGH AND GRID SUPPORT CAPABILITIES... is on the fault ride through...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced simulation capability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced non-polluting turbine Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

models and advanced control strategies... .139) Track: Technical VARIABLE SPEED WIND TURBINES - FAULT RIDE-THROUGH AND GRID SUPPORT CAPABILITIES... is on the fault ride through...

382

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced multistage turbine Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

models and advanced control strategies... .139) Track: Technical VARIABLE SPEED WIND TURBINES - FAULT RIDE-THROUGH AND GRID SUPPORT CAPABILITIES... is on the fault ride through...

383

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced wind turbine Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

models and advanced control strategies... .139) Track: Technical VARIABLE SPEED WIND TURBINES - FAULT RIDE-THROUGH AND GRID SUPPORT CAPABILITIES... is on the fault ride through...

384

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced hydropower turbine Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

models and advanced control strategies... .139) Track: Technical VARIABLE SPEED WIND TURBINES - FAULT RIDE-THROUGH AND GRID SUPPORT CAPABILITIES... is on the fault ride through...

385

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced experimental analysis Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Physics - Develop advanced experimental techniques and new diagnostics to support... , simulation and analysis new experiments and simulation and ... Source: Los Alamos National...

386

ARAC: A support capability for emergency managers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is intended to introduce to the non-radiological emergency management community the 20-year operational history of the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC), its concept of operations, and its applicability for use in support of emergency management decision makers. ARAC is a centralized federal facility for assessing atmospheric releases of hazardous materials in real time, using a robust suite of three-dimensional atmospheric transport and diffusion models, extensive geophysical and source-description databases, automated meteorological data acquisition systems, and experienced staff members. Although originally conceived to respond to nuclear accidents, the ARAC system has proven to be extremely adaptable, and has been used successfully during a wide variety of nonradiological hazardous chemical situations. ARAC represents a proven, validated, operational support capability for atmospheric hazardous releases.

Pace, J.C.; Sullivan, T.J.; Baskett, R.L. [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

AST Review, October 2010 The mission of the PSAAP Center at Stanford is to build and demonstrate computational capabilities for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

capabilities for the simulations of supersonic combustion engines (scramjet) of hypersonic the operability limit of the scramjet as the fuel flow rate is increased the scramjet performance. Quantification of Margins and Uncertainties (QMU) provides

Prinz, Friedrich B.

388

Deployment of a Full-Scope Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Control Room Simulator at the Idaho National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The INL operates the HSSL to conduct research in the design and evaluation of advanced reactor control rooms, integration of intelligent support systems to assist operators, development and assessment of advanced human performance models, and visualizations to assess advanced operational concepts across various infrastructures. This advanced facility consists of a reconfigurable simulator and a virtual reality capability (known as the Computer-Aided Virtual Environment (CAVE)) (Figure 2). It supports human factors research, including human-in-the-loop performance, HSI, and analog and digital hybrid control displays. It can be applied to the development and evaluation of control systems and displays for complex systems such as existing and advanced NPP control rooms, command and control systems, and advance emergency operations centers. The HSSL incorporates a reconfigurable control room simulator, which is currently housed in the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES), a joint venture of the DOE and the Idaho University System. The simulator is a platform- and plant-neutral environment intended for full-scope and part-task testing of operator performance in various control room configurations. The simulator is not limited to a particular plant or even simulator architecture. It can support engineering simulator platforms from multiple vendors using digital interfaces. Due to its ability to be reconfigured, it is possible to switch the HSI - not just to digital panels but also to different control modalities such as those using greater plant automation or intelligent alarm filtering. The simulator currently includes three operator workstations, each capable of driving up to eight 30-inch monitors. The size and number of monitors varies depending on the particular front-end simulator deployed for a simulator study. These operator workstations would typically be used for the shift supervisor or senior reactor operator, reactor operator, and assistant reactor operator in current US NPPs. In addition to the three workstations, information can be shared between the workstations and further displayed on a large-screen overview display or a panel mimic. An 82-inch high-definition display is commonly used for the overview display.

Ronald Boring; Julius Persensky; Kenneth Thomas

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Recombinant organisms capable of fermenting cellobiose  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to a recombinant microorganism which expresses pyruvate decarboxylase, alcohol dehydrogenase, Klebsiella phospho-.beta.-glucosidase and Klebsiella (phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system) cellobiose-utilizing Enzyme II, wherein said phospho-.beta.-glucosidase and said (phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase) cellobiose-utilizing Enzyme II are heterologous to said microorganism and wherein said microorganism is capable of utilizing both hemicellulose and cellulose, including cellobiose, in the production of ethanol.

Ingram, Lonnie O. (Gainesville, FL); Lai, Xiaokuang (Gainesville, FL); Moniruzzaman, Mohammed (Gainesville, FL); York, Sean W. (Gainesville, FL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

ORISE: Capabilities in Climate and Atmospheric Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory |CHEMPACK Mapping Application ORISE develops mappingCapabilities

391

Advanced Hot Section Materials and Coatings Test Rig  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phase I of the Hyperbaric Advanced Hot Section Materials & Coating Test Rig Program has been successfully completed. Florida Turbine Technologies has designed and planned the implementation of a laboratory rig capable of simulating the hot gas path conditions of coal gas fired industrial gas turbine engines. Potential uses of this rig include investigations into environmental attack of turbine materials and coatings exposed to syngas, erosion, and thermal-mechanical fatigue. The principle activities during Phase 1 of this project included providing several conceptual designs for the test section, evaluating various syngas-fueled rig combustor concepts, comparing the various test section concepts and then selecting a configuration for detail design. Conceptual definition and requirements of auxiliary systems and facilities were also prepared. Implementation planning also progressed, with schedules prepared and future project milestones defined. The results of these tasks continue to show rig feasibility, both technically and economically.

Dan Davis

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

392

Advanced Technology Vehicle Lab Benchmarking - Level 2 (in-depth...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Reduce cost, increase energy of energy storage Low-cost power electronics Modeling Simulation and Laboratory and Field Testing "VTP is advancing the large-scale, cost-...

393

Advanced PHEV Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

- Very limited transient engines and emissions models for PHEV simulations - PHEV optimization needs to include advanced engine combustion modes and emissions controls * Partners...

394

Advanced Combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The activity reported in this presentation is to provide the mechanical and physical property information needed to allow rational design, development and/or choice of alloys, manufacturing approaches, and environmental exposure and component life models to enable oxy-fuel combustion boilers to operate at Ultra-Supercritical (up to 650{degrees}C & between 22-30 MPa) and/or Advanced Ultra-Supercritical conditions (760{degrees}C & 35 MPa).

Holcomb, Gordon R. [NETL

2013-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

395

RADIOISOTOPE POWER SYSTEM CAPABILITIES AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY (INL)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

--Idaho National Laboratory’s, Space Nuclear Systems and Technology Division established the resources, equipment and facilities required to provide nuclear-fueled, Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) to Department of Energy (DOE) Customers. RPSs are designed to convert the heat generated by decay of iridium clad, 238PuO2 fuel pellets into electricity that is used to power missions in remote, harsh environments. Utilization of nuclear fuel requires adherence to governing regulations and the INL provides unique capabilities to safely fuel, test, store, transport and integrate RPSs to supply power—supporting mission needs. Nuclear capabilities encompass RPS fueling, testing, handling, storing, transporting RPS nationally, and space vehicle integration. Activities are performed at the INL and in remote locations such as John F. Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Station to support space missions. This paper will focus on the facility and equipment capabilities primarily offered at the INL, Material and Fuel Complex located in a security-protected, federally owned, industrial area on the remote desert site west of Idaho Falls, ID. Nuclear and non-nuclear facilities house equipment needed to perform required activities such as general purpose heat source (GPHS) module pre-assembly and module assembly using nuclear fuel; RPS receipt and baseline electrical testing, fueling, vibration testing to simulate the launch environment, mass properties testing to measure the mass and compute the moment of inertia, electro-magnetic characterizing to determine potential consequences to the operation of vehicle or scientific instrumentation, and thermal vacuum testing to verify RPS power performance in the vacuum and cold temperatures of space.

Kelly Lively; Stephen Johnson; Eric Clarke

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Fission matrix capability for MCNP, Part II - Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the initial experience and results from implementing a fission matrix capability into the MCNP Monte Carlo code. The fission matrix is obtained at essentially no cost during the normal simulation for criticality calculations. It can be used to provide estimates of the fundamental mode power distribution, the reactor dominance ratio, the eigenvalue spectrum, and higher mode spatial eigenfunctions. It can also be used to accelerate the convergence of the power method iterations. Past difficulties and limitations of the fission matrix approach are overcome with a new sparse representation of the matrix, permitting much larger and more accurate fission matrix representations. Numerous examples are presented. A companion paper (Part I - Theory) describes the theoretical basis for the fission matrix method. (authors)

Carney, S. E. [University of Michigan, NERS Department, 2355 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Brown, F. B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Monte Carlo Codes Group, MS A143, PO Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Kiedrowski, B. C. [University of Michigan, NERS Department, 2355 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Martin, W. R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Monte Carlo Codes Group, MS A143, PO Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Improving Department of Energy Capabilities for Mitigating Beyond...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Improving Department of Energy Capabilities for Mitigating Beyond Design Basis Events Improving Department of Energy Capabilities for Mitigating Beyond Design Basis Events April...

398

Oil and Natural Gas Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oil and Natural Gas Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (February 2014) Oil and Natural Gas Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (February 2014) The Oil...

399

analysis capability fact: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

provides improved resource optimization and enhanced capabilities Narasayya, Vivek 127 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) We are applying our unique capabilities in actinide and...

400

Local Energy Alliance Program Adds Green Appraisal Capabilities...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Local Energy Alliance Program Adds Green Appraisal Capabilities to its Energy Efficiency Services Local Energy Alliance Program Adds Green Appraisal Capabilities to its Energy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced simulation capability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Leveraging National Lab Capabilities: 2014 Fuel Cell Seminar...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Leveraging National Lab Capabilities: 2014 Fuel Cell Seminar and Energy Exposition Leveraging National Lab Capabilities: 2014 Fuel Cell Seminar and Energy Exposition Presentation...

402

Property:Wind Capabilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExploration JumpSanyalTempWellhead JumpCapabilities" Showing 25 pages using this

403

NREL: Process Development and Integration Laboratory - Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions and AchievementsResearchReliabilityand7 NovemberCapabilities The

404

Sandia National Laboratories: Joint Capability Technology Demonstration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErik Spoerke SSLS ExhibitIowa State University SandiaJim SpeckCapability

405

Integration of Advanced Probabilistic Analysis Techniques with Multi-Physics Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An integrated simulation platform that couples probabilistic analysis-based tools with model-based simulation tools can provide valuable insights for reactive and proactive responses to plant operating conditions. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the benefits of a partial implementation of the Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) Detailed Framework Specification through the coupling of advanced PRA capabilities and accurate multi-physics plant models. Coupling a probabilistic model with a multi-physics model will aid in design, operations, and safety by providing a more accurate understanding of plant behavior. This represents the first attempt at actually integrating these two types of analyses for a control system used for operations, on a faster than real-time basis. This report documents the development of the basic communication capability to exchange data with the probabilistic model using Reliability Workbench (RWB) and the multi-physics model using Dymola. The communication pathways from injecting a fault (i.e., failing a component) to the probabilistic and multi-physics models were successfully completed. This first version was tested with prototypic models represented in both RWB and Modelica. First, a simple event tree/fault tree (ET/FT) model was created to develop the software code to implement the communication capabilities between the dynamic-link library (dll) and RWB. A program, written in C#, successfully communicates faults to the probabilistic model through the dll. A systems model of the Advanced Liquid-Metal Reactor–Power Reactor Inherently Safe Module (ALMR-PRISM) design developed under another DOE project was upgraded using Dymola to include proper interfaces to allow data exchange with the control application (ConApp). A program, written in C+, successfully communicates faults to the multi-physics model. The results of the example simulation were successfully plotted.

Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit; none,; Flanagan, George F. [ORNL] [ORNL; Poore III, Willis P. [ORNL] [ORNL; Muhlheim, Michael David [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

406

Tonopah Test Range capabilities: technical manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This manual describes Tonopah Test Range (TTR), defines its testing capabilities, and outlines the steps necessary to schedule tests on the Range. Operated by Sandia National Laboratories, TTR is a major test facility for DOE-funded weapon programs. The Range presents an integrated system for ballistic test vehicle tracking and data acquisition. Multiple radars, optical trackers, telemetry stations, a central computer complex, and combined landline/RF communications systems assure full Range coverage for any type of test. Range operations are conducted by a department within Sandia's Field Engineering Directorate. While the overall Range functions as a complete system, it is operationally divided into the Test Measurements, Instrumentation Development, and Range Operations divisions. The primary function of TTR is to support DOE weapons test activities. Management, however, encourages other Government agencies and their contractors to schedule tests on the Range which can make effective use of its capabilities. Information concerning Range use by organizations outside of DOE is presented. Range instrumentation and support facilities are described in detail. This equipment represents the current state-of-the-art and reflects a continuing commitment by TTR management to field the most effective tracking and data acquisition system available.

Manhart, R.L.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

CASMO-3/SIMULATE-3 benchmark on Ringhals units  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Validation of the Studsvik Core Management System (Studsvik-CMS) is presented on Ringhals units 2, 3, and 4, Westinghouse three-loop, 157-assembly pressurized water reactors (PWRs) operated by the Swedish State Power Board (SSPB). The work is a part of the project to develop full in-house in-core fuel management (ICFM) capability based on a modern reactor physics methodology. The major codes of Studsvik-CMS are the cell data code CASMO-3 and the advanced nodal code SIMULATE-3. The SSPB has used CASMO-3 since its first reloads for both PWR and boiling water reactor units. The code SIMULATE-3 was recently installed for PWRs to replace conventional nodal core models and to obtain pin-power reconstruction capability. The Ringhals cores have several advanced features that make them especially interesting for testing the accuracy of modern nodal methods. The Ringhals units operate on an annual cycle with summer refueling. The analyzed cycles include base load, load-follow, and coastdown operation.

Kurcyusz-Ohlofsson, E.; Johansson, M.; Erikksson, M.; Bernro, R.; Hanberg, J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

NUCLEAR INCIDENT CAPABILITIES, KNOWLEDGE & ENABLER LEVERAGING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The detonation of a 10 Kiloton Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) is a serious scenario that the United States must be prepared to address. The likelihood of a single nuclear bomb exploding in a single city is greater today than at the height of the Cold War. Layered defenses against domestic nuclear terrorism indicate that our government continues to view the threat as credible. The risk of such an event is further evidenced by terrorists desire to acquire nuclear weapons. The act of nuclear terrorism, particularly an act directed against a large population center in the United States, will overwhelm the capabilities of many local and state governments to respond, and will seriously challenge existing federal response capabilities. A 10 Kiloton IND detonation would cause total infrastructure damage in a 3-mile radius and levels of radiation spanning out 3,000 square miles. In a densely populated urban area, the anticipated casualties would be in excess of several hundred thousand. Although there would be enormous loss of life, housing and infrastructure, an IND detonation is a recoverable event. We can reduce the risk of these high-consequence, nontraditional threats by enhancing our nuclear detection architecture and establishing well planned and rehearsed plans for coordinated response. It is also important for us to identify new and improved ways to foster collaboration regarding the response to the IND threat to ensure the demand and density of expertise required for such an event is postured and prepared to mobilize, integrate, and support a myriad of anticipated challenges. We must be prepared to manage the consequences of such an event in a deliberate manner and get beyond notions of total devastation by adopting planning assumptions around survivability and resiliency. Planning for such a scenario needs to be decisive in determining a response based on competencies and desired outcomes. It is time to synthesize known threats and plausible consequences into action. Much work needs to be accomplished to enhance nuclear preparedness and to substantially bolster and clarify the capacity to deploy competent resources. Until detailed plans are scripted, and personnel and other resources are postured, and exercised, IND specific planning remains an urgent need requiring attention and action. Although strategic guidance, policies, concepts of operations, roles, responsibilities, and plans governing the response and consequence management for the IND scenario exist, an ongoing integration challenge prevails regarding how best to get capable and competent surge capacity personnel (disaster reservists) and other resources engaged and readied in an up-front manner with pre-scripted assignments to augment the magnitude of anticipated demands of expertise. With the above in mind, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) puts science to work to create and deploy practical, high-value, cost-effective nuclear solutions. As the Department of Energy's (DOE) applied research and development laboratory, SRNL supports Savannah River Site (SRS) operations, DOE, national initiatives, and other federal agencies, across the country and around the world. SRNL's parent at SRS also employs more than 8,000 personnel. The team is a great asset that seeks to continue their service in the interest of national security and stands ready to accomplish new missions. Overall, an integral part of the vision for SRNL's National and Homeland Security Directorate is the establishment of a National Security Center at SRNL, and development of state of the science capabilities (technologies and trained technical personnel) for responding to emergency events on local, regional, or national scales. This entails leveraging and posturing the skills, knowledge and experience base of SRS personnel to deliver an integrated capability to support local, state, and federal authorities through the development of pre-scripted requests for assistance, agreements, and plans. It also includes developing plans, training, exercises, recruitment strategies, and processes to e

Kinney, J.; Newman, J.; Goodwyn, A.; Dewes, J.

2011-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

409

ADVANCED REACTOR SAFETY PROGRAM – STAKEHOLDER INTERACTION AND FEEDBACK  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the Spring of 2013, we began discussions with our industry stakeholders on how to upgrade our safety analysis capabilities. The focus of these improvements would primarily be on advanced safety analysis capabilities that could help the nuclear industry analyze, understand, and better predict complex safety problems. The current environment in the DOE complex is such that recent successes in high performance computer modeling could lead the nuclear industry to benefit from these advances, as long as an effort to translate these advances into realistic applications is made. Upgrading the nuclear industry modeling analysis capabilities is a significant effort that would require substantial participation and coordination from all industry segments: research, engineering, vendors, and operations. We focus here on interactions with industry stakeholders to develop sound advanced safety analysis applications propositions that could have a positive impact on industry long term operation, hence advancing the state of nuclear safety.

Spencer, Benjamin W; Huang, Hai

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Using a scalable modeling and simulation framework to evaluate the benefits of intelligent transportation systems.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A scalable, distributed modeling and simulation framework has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory to study Intelligent Transportation Systems. The framework can run on a single-processor workstation, or run distributed on a multiprocessor computer or network of workstations. The framework is modular and supports plug-in models, hardware, and live data sources. The initial set of models currently includes road network and traffic flow, probe and smart vehicles, traffic management centers, communications between vehicles and centers, in-vehicle navigation systems, roadway traffic advisories. The modeling and simulation capability has been used to examine proposed ITS concepts. Results are presented from modeling scenarios from the Advanced Driver and Vehicle Advisory Navigation Concept (ADVANCE) experimental program to demonstrate how the framework can be used to evaluate the benefits of ITS and to plan future ITS operational tests and deployment initiatives.

Ewing, T.; Tentner, A.

2000-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

411

Advanced Combustion  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the Building TechnologiesS1!4T opAddress:AdolphusAdvanced Energy

412

A COMPUTATIONAL WORKBENCH ENVIRONMENT FOR VIRTUAL POWER PLANT SIMULATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report is described the work effort to develop and demonstrate a software framework to support advanced process simulations to evaluate the performance of advanced power systems. Integrated into the framework are a broad range of models, analysis tools, and visualization methods that can be used for the plant evaluation. The framework provides a tightly integrated problem-solving environment, with plug-and-play functionality, and includes a hierarchy of models, ranging from fast running process models to detailed reacting CFD models. The framework places no inherent limitations on the type of physics that can be modeled, numerical techniques, or programming languages used to implement the equipment models, or the type or amount of data that can be exchanged between models. Tools are provided to analyze simulation results at multiple levels of detail, ranging from simple tabular outputs to advanced solution visualization methods. All models and tools communicate in a seamless manner. The framework can be coupled to other software frameworks that provide different modeling capabilities. Three software frameworks were developed during the course of the project. The first framework focused on simulating the performance of the DOE Low Emissions Boiler System Proof of Concept facility, an advanced pulverized-coal combustion-based power plant. The second framework targeted simulating the performance of an Integrated coal Gasification Combined Cycle - Fuel Cell Turbine (IGCC-FCT) plant configuration. The coal gasifier models included both CFD and process models for the commercially dominant systems. Interfacing models to the framework was performed using VES-Open, and tests were performed to demonstrate interfacing CAPE-Open compliant models to the framework. The IGCC-FCT framework was subsequently extended to support Virtual Engineering concepts in which plant configurations can be constructed and interrogated in a three-dimensional, user-centered, interactive, immersive environment. The Virtual Engineering Framework (VEF), in effect a prototype framework, was developed through close collaboration with NETL supported research teams from Iowa State University Virtual Reality Applications Center (ISU-VRAC) and Carnegie Mellon University (CMU). The VEF is open source, compatible across systems ranging from inexpensive desktop PCs to large-scale, immersive facilities and provides support for heterogeneous distributed computing of plant simulations. The ability to compute plant economics through an interface that coupled the CMU IECM tool to the VEF was demonstrated, and the ability to couple the VEF to Aspen Plus, a commercial flowsheet modeling tool, was demonstrated. Models were interfaced to the framework using VES-Open. Tests were performed for interfacing CAPE-Open-compliant models to the framework. Where available, the developed models and plant simulations have been benchmarked against data from the open literature. The VEF has been installed at NETL. The VEF provides simulation capabilities not available in commercial simulation tools. It provides DOE engineers, scientists, and decision makers with a flexible and extensible simulation system that can be used to reduce the time, technical risk, and cost to develop the next generation of advanced, coal-fired power systems that will have low emissions and high efficiency. Furthermore, the VEF provides a common simulation system that NETL can use to help manage Advanced Power Systems Research projects, including both combustion- and gasification-based technologies.

Mike Bockelie; Dave Swensen; Martin Denison; Adel Sarofim; Connie Senior

2004-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

413

National Scientific User Facility Purpose and Capabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007. This designation allows the ATR to become a cornerstone of nuclear energy research and development (R&D) within the U.S. by making it easier for universities, the commercial power industry, other national laboratories, and international organizations to conduct nuclear energy R&D. The mission of the ATR NSUF is to provide nuclear energy researchers access to world-class facilities, thereby facilitating the advancement of nuclear science and technology within the U.S. In support of this mission, hot cell laboratories are being upgraded. These upgrades include a set of lead shielded cells that will house Irradiated Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) test rigs and construction of a shielded laboratory facility. A primary function of this shielded laboratory is to provide a state of the art type laboratory facility that is functional, efficient and flexible that is dedicated to the analysis and characterization of nuclear and non-nuclear materials. The facility shall be relatively easy to reconfigure to provide laboratory scale hot cave space for housing current and future nuclear material scientific research instruments.

K. E. Rosenberg; T. R. Allen; J. C. Haley; M. K. Meyer

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Advanced Vehicle Testing & Evaluation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Provide benchmark data for advanced technology vehicles Develop lifecycle cost data for production vehicles utilizing advanced power trains Provide fleet...

415

Business Capabilities Centric Enterprise Architecture Thiago Barroero,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Architecture and Business Capabilities modeling Nowadays scenario of Enterprise Architecture (EA) testifies each enterprise capability into business component (BC). Each BC is an individual business model are the modular building blocks that compose an enterprise. 1.2 Business Capabilities Models A Business Capability

Boyer, Edmond

416

Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes, Volume I, Part 1. Final report, September 1986--September 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this program was the development of a predictive capability for the design, scale up, simulation, control and feedstock evaluation in advanced coal conversion devices. The foundation to describe coal specific conversion behavior was AFR`s Functional Group and Devolatilization, Vaporization and Crosslinking (DVC) models, which had been previously developed. The combined FG-DVC model was integrated with BYU`s comprehensive two-dimensional reactor model for combustion and coal gasification, PCGC-2, and a one-dimensional model for fixed-bed gasifiers, FBED-1. Progress utilizing these models is described.

Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G. [and others

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Advanced LIGO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are second generation instruments designed and built for the two LIGO observatories in Hanford, WA and Livingston, LA. The two instruments are identical in design, and are specialized versions of a Michelson interferometer with 4 km long arms. As in initial LIGO, Fabry-Perot cavities are used in the arms to increase the interaction time with a gravitational wave, and power recycling is used to increase the effective laser power. Signal recycling has been added in Advanced LIGO to improve the frequency response. In the most sensitive frequency region around 100 Hz, the design strain sensitivity is a factor of 10 better than initial LIGO. In addition, the low frequency end of the sensitivity band is moved from 40 Hz down to 10 Hz. All interferometer components have been replaced with improved technologies to achieve this sensitivity gain. Much better seismic isolation and test mass suspensions are responsible for the gains at lower frequencies. Higher laser power, larger test masses and improved mirror coatings lead to the improved sensitivity at mid- and high- frequencies. Data collecting runs with these new instruments are planned to begin in mid-2015.

The LIGO Scientific Collaboration

2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

418

Improved Solvers for Advanced Engine Combustion Simulation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

419

COLLOQUIUM: Advanced Simulation for Technology Innovation and...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

them by e-mail regarding any possible speakers or topics for future colloquia. Carol Ann Austin caustin@pppl.gov Dennis Mueller, Chair mueller@pppl.gov Elena Belova,...

420

Advanced Vadose Zone Simulations Using TOUGH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and dissociation of gas hydrates deposited in permafrost andstudies of gas production from methane hydrates. SPE Journalinduced gas production from class 1 hydrate deposits. SPE

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced simulation capability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Simulation and Computing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive SolarEducation Programs: CroSSlinksHuman ResourcesFacebook Twitter YouTube

422

Improved Solvers for Advanced Engine Combustion Simulation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

costs found using HPCToolkit (Mellor-Crummey, Rice): * The transport and chemistry cost the same when there are 100-250 fluid cells per multizone reactor (+150 species). *...

423

Turbine vane with high temperature capable skins  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A turbine vane assembly includes an airfoil extending between an inner shroud and an outer shroud. The airfoil can include a substructure having an outer peripheral surface. At least a portion of the outer peripheral surface is covered by an external skin. The external skin can be made of a high temperature capable material, such as oxide dispersion strengthened alloys, intermetallic alloys, ceramic matrix composites or refractory alloys. The external skin can be formed, and the airfoil can be subsequently bi-cast around or onto the skin. The skin and the substructure can be attached by a plurality of attachment members extending between the skin and the substructure. The skin can be spaced from the outer peripheral surface of the substructure such that a cavity is formed therebetween. Coolant can be supplied to the cavity. Skins can also be applied to the gas path faces of the inner and outer shrouds.

Morrison, Jay A. (Oviedo, FL)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

424

Presented by CASL: The Consortium for Advanced  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Presented by Nuclear Energy CASL: The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors A DOE Energy Innovation Hub for Modeling and Simulation of Nuclear Reactors Doug Kothe Director, CASL is a DOE Energy Innovation Hub? · Modeled after research entities like the Manhattan Project (nuclear

425

Wind retrieval capability of rotating, range-gated, fanbeam spaceborne scatterometer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at different azimuth view-angles over the resolution cell, and inverting the backscatter model, a so-called geophysical model function (GMF), to extract the wind information using the azimuth anisotropy of the radar simulations and an investigation of advanced features such as multi-beam, dual-polarisation, dual- frequency

Stoffelen, Ad

426

Systems Analyses of Advanced Brayton Cycles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main objective is to identify and assess advanced improvements to the Brayton Cycle (such as but not limited to firing temperature, pressure ratio, combustion techniques, intercooling, fuel or combustion air augmentation, enhanced blade cooling schemes) that will lead to significant performance improvements in coal based power systems. This assessment is conducted in the context of conceptual design studies (systems studies) that advance state-of-art Brayton cycles and result in coal based efficiencies equivalent to 65% + on natural gas basis (LHV), or approximately an 8% reduction in heat rate of an IGCC plant utilizing the H class steam cooled gas turbine. H class gas turbines are commercially offered by General Electric and Mitsubishi for natural gas based combined cycle applications with 60% efficiency (LHV) and it is expected that such machine will be offered for syngas applications within the next 10 years. The studies are being sufficiently detailed so that third parties will be able to validate portions or all of the studies. The designs and system studies are based on plants for near zero emissions (including CO{sub 2}). Also included in this program is the performance evaluation of other advanced technologies such as advanced compression concepts and the fuel cell based combined cycle. The objective of the fuel cell based combined cycle task is to identify the desired performance characteristics and design basis for a gas turbine that will be integrated with an SOFC in Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell (IGFC) applications. The goal is the conceptualization of near zero emission (including CO{sub 2} capture) integrated gasification power plants producing electricity as the principle product. The capability of such plants to coproduce H{sub 2} is qualitatively addressed. Since a total systems solution is critical to establishing a plant configuration worthy of a comprehensive market interest, a baseline IGCC plant scheme is developed and used to study how alternative process schemes and power cycles might be used and integrated to achieve higher systems efficiency. To achieve these design results, the total systems approach is taken requiring creative integration of the various process units within the plant. Advanced gas turbine based cycles for Integrated gasification Combined cycle (IGCC) applications are identified by a screening analysis and the more promising cycles recommended for detailed systems analysis. In the case of the IGFC task, the main objective is met by developing a steady-state simulation of the entire plant and then using dynamic simulations of the hybrid Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC)/Gas Turbine sub-system to investigate the turbo-machinery performance. From these investigations the desired performance characteristics and a basis for design of turbo-machinery for use in a fuel cell gas turbine power block is developed.

A.D. Rao; D.J. Francuz; J.D. Maclay; J. Brouwer; A. Verma; M. Li; G.S. Samuelsen

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

427

CSCE 6933/5933 Advanced Topics in VLSI Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is shown. 6-bit ADC has similar structure. Advanced Topics in VLSI Systems 9 #12;Threshold Inverter increases. Advanced Topics in VLSI Systems 10 #12;TIQ Comparator Formed by four cascaded inverters. Provide. Advanced Topics in VLSI Systems 12 #12;Functional Simulation Transient analysis carried out. Ramp generated

Mohanty, Saraju P.

428

Advanced Outage and Control Center: Strategies for Nuclear Plant Outage Work Status Capabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research effort is a part of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program. LWRS is a research and development program sponsored by the Department of Energy, performed in close collaboration with industry to provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. The LWRS Program serves to help the US nuclear industry adopt new technologies and engineering solutions that facilitate the continued safe operation of the plants and extension of the current operating licenses. The Outage Control Center (OCC) Pilot Project was directed at carrying out the applied research for development and pilot of technology designed to enhance safe outage and maintenance operations, improve human performance and reliability, increase overall operational efficiency, and improve plant status control. Plant outage management is a high priority concern for the nuclear industry from cost and safety perspectives. Unfortunately, many of the underlying technologies supporting outage control are the same as those used in the 1980’s. They depend heavily upon large teams of staff, multiple work and coordination locations, and manual administrative actions that require large amounts of paper. Previous work in human reliability analysis suggests that many repetitive tasks, including paper work tasks, may have a failure rate of 1.0E-3 or higher (Gertman, 1996). With between 10,000 and 45,000 subtasks being performed during an outage (Gomes, 1996), the opportunity for human error of some consequence is a realistic concern. Although a number of factors exist that can make these errors recoverable, reducing and effectively coordinating the sheer number of tasks to be performed, particularly those that are error prone, has the potential to enhance outage efficiency and safety. Additionally, outage management requires precise coordination of work groups that do not always share similar objectives. Outage managers are concerned with schedule and cost, union workers are concerned with performing work that is commensurate with their trade, and support functions (safety, quality assurance, and radiological controls, etc.) are concerned with performing the work within the plants controls and procedures. Approaches to outage management should be designed to increase the active participation of work groups and managers in making decisions that closed the gap between competing objectives and the potential for error and process inefficiency.

Gregory Weatherby

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Development of Advanced Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) Modeling Capabilities for Enhanced Geothermal Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Project objectives: Develop a general framework for effective flow of water, steam and heat in in porous and fractured geothermal formations. Develop a computational module for handling coupled effects of pressure, temperature, and induced rock deformations. Develop a reliable model of heat transfer and fluid flow in fractured rocks.

430

Analysis of the Pebble-Bed VHTR Spectrum Shifting Capabilities for Advanced Fuel Cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be subcritical is indeed subcritical. KENO-VI and CENTRM have validation reports noting that the codes were validated using the 238-group ENDF/B-V library against critical experiments. A wide range of experiments were selected, which include high... fuel, the neutron steaming effects in a pebble-bed type HTR, and the effects of accidental water ingress (since HTR systems generally tend to be under moderated, an accident of this type can lead to large positive reactivity changes, in particular...

Pritchard, Megan; Tsvetkov, Pavel

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

431

Analysis of Pebble-Bed VHTR Spectrum Shifting Capabilities for Advanced Fuel Cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of validation is to establish an acceptance criteria such that there is a high degree of confidence that a system is calculated to be subcritical is indeed subcritical. KENO-VI and CENTRM have validation reports noting that the codes were...-heterogeneity in LEU fuel, the neutron steaming effects in a pebble-bed type HTR, and the effects of accidental water ingress (since HTR systems generally tend to be under moderated, an accident of this type can lead to large positive reactivity changes...

Pritchard, Megan

2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

432

In-situ Creep Testing Capability Development for Advanced Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Creep is the slow, time-dependent strain that occurs in a material under a constant strees (or load) at high temperature. High temperature is a relative term, dependent on the materials being evaluated. A typical creep curve is shown in Figure 1-1. In a creep test, a constant load is applied to a tensile specimen maintained at a constant temperature. Strain is then measured over a period of time. The slope of the curve, identified in the figure below, is the strain rate of the test during Stage II or the creep rate of the material. Primary creep, Stage I, is a period of decreasing creep rate due to work hardening of the material. Primary creep is a period of primarily transient creep. During this period, deformation takes place and the resistance to creep increases until Stage II, Secondary creep. Stage II creep is a period with a roughly constant creep rate. Stage II is referred to as steady-state creep because a balance is achieved between the work hardening and annealing (thermal softening) processes. Tertiary creep, Stage III, occurs when there is a reduction in cross sectional area due to necking or effective reduction in area due to internal void formation; that is, the creep rate increases due to necking of the specimen and the associated increase in local stress.

B. G. Kim; J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; K. G. Condie; B. H. Sencer

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Thermal Storage and Advanced Heat Transfer Fluids (Fact Sheet), Thermal Systems Group: CSP Capabilities (TSG)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2 andThe1 MembersStability of MnBi Magnetic

434

A New Capability for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a new capability for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) design that has been developed, and presents the results of some analyses performed with this design tool. The purpose of the tool is to design to specified mission and material limits, while maximizing system thrust to weight. The head end of the design tool utilizes the ROCket Engine Transient Simulation (ROCETS) code to generate a system design and system design requirements as inputs to the core analysis. ROCETS is a modular system level code which has been used extensively in the liquid rocket engine industry for many years. The core design tool performs high-fidelity reactor core nuclear and thermal-hydraulic design analysis. At the heart of this process are two codes TMSS-NTP and NTPgen, which together greatly automate the analysis, providing the capability to rapidly produce designs that meet all specified requirements while minimizing mass. A PERL based command script, called CORE DESIGNER controls the execution of these two codes, and checks for convergence throughout the process. TMSS-NTP is executed first, to produce a suite of core designs that meet the specified reactor core mechanical, thermal-hydraulic and structural requirements. The suite of designs consists of a set of core layouts and, for each core layout specific designs that span a range of core fuel volumes. NTPgen generates MCNPX models for each of the core designs from TMSS-NTP. Iterative analyses are performed in NTPgen until a reactor design (fuel volume) is identified for each core layout that meets cold and hot operation reactivity requirements and that is zoned to meet a radial core power distribution requirement.

Amiri, Benjamin W. [Nuclear Systems Design Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Nuclear and Radiological Engineering Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Kapernick, Richard J. [Nuclear Systems Design Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Sims, Bryan T. [Nuclear Systems Design Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Simpson, Steven P. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States)

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

435

Continuous chain bit with downhole cycling capability  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A continuous chain bit for hard rock drilling is capable of downhole cycling. A drill head assembly moves axially relative to a support body while the chain on the head assembly is held in position so that the bodily movement of the chain cycles the chain to present new composite links for drilling. A pair of spring fingers on opposite sides of the chain hold the chain against movement. The chain is held in tension by a spring-biased tensioning bar. A head at the working end of the chain supports the working links. The chain is centered by a reversing pawl and piston actuated by the pressure of the drilling mud. Detent pins lock the head assembly with respect to the support body and are also operated by the drilling mud pressure. A restricted nozzle with a divergent outlet sprays drilling mud into the cavity to remove debris. Indication of the centered position of the chain is provided by noting a low pressure reading indicating proper alignment of drilling mud slots on the links with the corresponding feed branches.

Ritter, Don F. (Albuquerque, NM); St. Clair, Jack A. (Albuquerque, NM); Togami, Henry K. (Albuquerque, NM)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Refueling machine with relative positioning capability  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A refueling machine is disclosed having relative positioning capability for refueling a nuclear reactor. The refueling machine includes a pair of articulated arms mounted on a refueling bridge. Each arm supports a respective telescoping mast. Each telescoping mast is designed to flex laterally in response to application of a lateral thrust on the end of the mast. A pendant mounted on the end of the mast carries an air-actuated grapple, television cameras, ultrasonic transducers and waterjet thrusters. The ultrasonic transducers are used to detect the gross position of the grapple relative to the bail of a nuclear fuel assembly in the fuel core. The television cameras acquire an image of the bail which is compared to a pre-stored image in computer memory. The pendant can be rotated until the television image and the pre-stored image match within a predetermined tolerance. Similarly, the waterjet thrusters can be used to apply lateral thrust to the end of the flexible mast to place the grapple in a fine position relative to the bail as a function of the discrepancy between the television and pre-stored images. 11 figs.

Challberg, R.C.; Jones, C.R.

1998-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

437

Meso-scale machining capabilities and issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Meso-scale manufacturing processes are bridging the gap between silicon-based MEMS processes and conventional miniature machining. These processes can fabricate two and three-dimensional parts having micron size features in traditional materials such as stainless steels, rare earth magnets, ceramics, and glass. Meso-scale processes that are currently available include, focused ion beam sputtering, micro-milling, micro-turning, excimer laser ablation, femto-second laser ablation, and micro electro discharge machining. These meso-scale processes employ subtractive machining technologies (i.e., material removal), unlike LIGA, which is an additive meso-scale process. Meso-scale processes have different material capabilities and machining performance specifications. Machining performance specifications of interest include minimum feature size, feature tolerance, feature location accuracy, surface finish, and material removal rate. Sandia National Laboratories is developing meso-scale electro-mechanical components, which require meso-scale parts that move relative to one another. The meso-scale parts fabricated by subtractive meso-scale manufacturing processes have unique tribology issues because of the variety of materials and the surface conditions produced by the different meso-scale manufacturing processes.

BENAVIDES,GILBERT L.; ADAMS,DAVID P.; YANG,PIN

2000-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

438

Ohio Advanced Energy Manufacturing Center  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The program goal of the Ohio Advanced Energy Manufacturing Center (OAEMC) is to support advanced energy manufacturing and to create responsive manufacturing clusters that will support the production of advanced energy and energy-efficient products to help ensure the nation's energy and environmental security. This goal cuts across a number of existing industry segments critical to the nation's future. Many of the advanced energy businesses are starting to make the transition from technology development to commercial production. Historically, this transition from laboratory prototypes through initial production for early adopters to full production for mass markets has taken several years. Developing and implementing manufacturing technology to enable production at a price point the market will accept is a key step. Since these start-up operations are configured to advance the technology readiness of the core energy technology, they have neither the expertise nor the resources to address manufacturing readiness issues they encounter as the technology advances toward market entry. Given the economic realities of today's business environment, finding ways to accelerate this transition can make the difference between success and failure for a new product or business. The advanced energy industry touches a wide range of industry segments that are not accustomed to working together in complex supply chains to serve large markets such as automotive and construction. During its first three years, the Center has catalyzed the communication between companies and industry groups that serve the wide range of advanced energy markets. The Center has also found areas of common concern, and worked to help companies address these concerns on a segment or industry basis rather than having each company work to solve common problems individually. EWI worked with three industries through public-private partnerships to sew together disparate segments helping to promote overall industry health. To aid the overall advanced energy industry, EWI developed and launched an Ohio chapter of the non-profit Advanced Energy Economy. In this venture, Ohio joins with six other states including Colorado, Connecticut, Illinois, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont to help promote technologies that deliver energy that is affordable, abundant and secure. In a more specific arena, EWI's advanced energy group collaborated with the EWI-run Nuclear Fabrication Consortium to promote the nuclear supply chain. Through this project EWI has helped bring the supply chain up to date for the upcoming period of construction, and assisted them in understanding the demands for the next generation of facilities now being designed. In a more targeted manner, EWI worked with 115 individual advanced energy companies that are attempting to bring new technology to market. First, these interactions helped EWI develop an awareness of issues common to companies in different advanced energy sectors. By identifying and addressing common issues, EWI helps companies bring technology to market sooner and at a lower cost. These visits also helped EWI develop a picture of industry capability. This helped EWI provide companies with contacts that can supply commercial solutions to their new product development challenges. By providing assistance in developing supply chain partnerships, EWI helped companies bring their technology to market faster and at a lower cost than they might have been able to do by themselves. Finally, at the most granular level EWI performed dedicated research and development on new manufacturing processes for advanced energy. During discussions with companies participating in advanced energy markets, several technology issues that cut across market segments were identified. To address some of these issues, three crosscutting technology development projects were initiated and completed with Center support. This included reversible welds for batteries and high temperature heat exchangers. It also included a novel advanced weld trainer that EWI

Kimberly Gibson; Mark Norfolk

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

439

Stand Up of Uranium Capability for Swipe Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The INL has established the capability to process and analyze swipe samples to determine if the amount of U and Pu present on equipment and facilities are at the level typical for natural background, to quantify their isotopic composition and to determine if any off-normal isotopic ratio present in the sample is statistically relevant. A previous report detailed this capability for Pu and preliminarily for U; this report describes the measurements and analysis that were performed to demonstrate the INL capability for U. To establish that a piece of equipment is not contaminated with the element to be sampled, a fabric swipe is used to collect a sample of the materials present on the surface. The swipes are then processed and analyzed to determine if Pu and U are present on the sample at levels above what is accepted as natural background and, for the case of U, whether the isotope ratios deviate from the accepted natural background levels. Both the method applied for chemical processing of the swipes to remove and isolate the U and Pu and the method used to analyze the extracts influences the sensitivity and specificity. Over the years various methods have been developed for processing and analyzing these types of samples; the gold standard for these measurements involves a lengthy and complex separation process followed by analysis using thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). However, this method is expensive and time consuming, thus driving a need for a less complicated and more efficient method that provides the necessary level of sensitivity and specificity. Advances in Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICPMS) over the last decade have enabled analyses of U and Pu that rival that of TIMS. This, coupled with the potential for simplifying the extraction and separation process required for an ICPMS analysis, prompted the INL’s development of methods that provide the analysis of swipes in a timely and efficient manner. U is present in the blank swipe material at nanogram (~2 x 10-9 g) levels for a typical sample, a level easily detected with ICPMS. The abundance of the isotopes ranges over 4 orders of magnitude for the naturally occurring 234U, 235U and 238U and a goal was set to be able to detect the presence of 236U at 6 orders of magnitude lower than the 238U. The 236U measurement is particularly important because the presence of 236U is a strong indicator that the uranium as been in a nuclear reactor. To demonstrate these capabilities the following sample types were used: blank swipe material, blank process reagents, swipe material spiked with a natural abundance U isotope standard, swipe material spiked with an environmental standard (Columbia River sediment), and swipes taken at various locations within the processing laboratories and the INL environment. This report summarizes the method used to extract the U from the swipe material, the ICPMS analyses that demonstrate the limit of detection (LOD) and the limit of quantification (LOQ) for the U isotopes of interest, the precision of the measured isotope ratios and the dependence of precision on the quantity of U present, and the method proposed to determine if an off-normal ratio is statistically relevant.

Matthew Watrous; Anthony Appelhans; Robert Hague; Tracy Houghton; John Olson

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Evolution of a Unique Systems Engineering Capability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a science-based, applied engineering laboratory dedicated to supporting U.S. Department of Energy missions in nuclear and energy research, science, and national security. The INL’s Systems Engineering organization supports all of the various programs under this wide array of missions. As with any multifaceted organization, strategic planning is essential to establishing a consistent culture and a value discipline throughout all levels of the enterprise. While an organization can pursue operational excellence, product leadership or customer intimacy, it is extremely difficult to excel or achieve best-in-class at all three. In fact, trying to do so has resulted in the demise of a number of organizations given the very intricate balancing act that is necessary. The INL’s Systems Engineering Department has chosen to focus on customer intimacy where the customer’s needs are first and foremost and a more total solution is the goal. Frequently a total solution requires the employment of specialized tools to manage system complexity. However, it is only after understanding customer needs that tool selection and use would be pursued. This results in using both commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) tools and, in some cases, requires internal development of specialized tools. This paper describes how a unique systems engineering capability, through the development of customized tools, evolved as a result of this customer-focused culture. It also addresses the need for a common information model or analysis framework and presents an overview of the tools developed to manage and display relationships between entities, support trade studies through the application of utility theory, and facilitate the development of a technology roadmap to manage system risk and uncertainty.

Robert M. Caliva; James A. Murphy; Kyle B. Oswald

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced simulation capability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

REDUCTIONS WITHOUT REGRET: DEFINING THE NEEDED CAPABILITIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the second of three papers (in addition to an introductory summary) aimed at providing a framework for evaluating future reductions or modifications of the U.S. nuclear force, first by considering previous instances in which nuclear-force capabilities were eliminated; second by looking forward into at least the foreseeable future at the features of global and regional deterrence (recognizing that new weapon systems currently projected will have expected lifetimes stretching beyond our ability to predict the future); and third by providing examples of past or possible undesirable outcomes in the shaping of the future nuclear force, as well as some closing thoughts for the future. This paper begins with a discussion of the current nuclear force and the plans and procurement programs for the modernization of that force. Current weapon systems and warheads were conceived and built decades ago, and procurement programs have begun for the modernization or replacement of major elements of the nuclear force: the heavy bomber, the air-launched cruise missile, the ICBMs, and the ballistic-missile submarines. In addition, the Nuclear Weapons Council has approved a new framework for nuclear-warhead life extension ? not fully fleshed out yet ? that aims to reduce the current number of nuclear explosives from seven to five, the so-called ?3+2? vision. This vision includes three interoperable warheads for both ICBMs and SLBMs (thus eliminating one backup weapon) and two warheads for aircraft delivery (one gravity bomb and one cruise-missile, eliminating a second backup gravity bomb). This paper also includes a discussion of the current and near-term nuclear-deterrence mission, both global and regional, and offers some observations on future of the strategic deterrence mission and the challenges of regional and extended nuclear deterrence.

Swegle, J.; Tincher, D.

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

442

Sandia National Laboratories: User Fees for NSTTF Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FacilityUser Fees for NSTTF Capabilities User Fees for NSTTF Capabilities NSTTFpricing A site access fee is charged for all projects. The fee includes such things as office space,...

443

Oil and Natural Gas Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Oil and Natural Gas Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ONG-C2M2) Oil and Natural Gas Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ONG-C2M2) Oil and Natural...

444

Federal Technical Capability Policy for Defense Nuclear Facilities  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The policy regarding the Federal Technical Capability Program, which provides for the recruitment, deployment, development, and retention of Federal personnel with the demonstrated technical capability to safely accomplish the Department’s missions and responsibilities.

1998-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

445

Methods for fluid separations, and devices capable of separating fluids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Wick-Containing apparatus capable of separating fluids and methods of separating fluids using wicks are disclosed.

TeGrotenhuis, Ward E [Kennewick, WA; Stenkamp, Victoria S [Richland, WA

2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

446

Methods for fluid separations, and devices capable of separating fluids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Wick-Containing apparatus capable of separating fluids and methods of separating fluids using wicks are disclosed.

TeGrotenhuis, Ward E. (Kennewick, WA); Stenkamp, Victoria S. (Richland, WA)

2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

447

Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Illness Compensation Program Pamphlet Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP) Accident Investigation Reports Nuclear Safety Facility Safety Security Classification...

448

The Capability Concept and the Evolution of European Social Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, University of Cambridge Abstract Amartya Sen's capability approach has the potential to counter neoliberal of `capability', developed by Amartya Sen in a series of economic and philosophical texts,1 could play a major equivalent to Sen's notion of `capability'. However, certain legal concepts undoubtedly bear a certain

de Gispert, AdriĂ 

449

Simulating Collisions for Hydrokinetic Turbines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evaluations of blade-strike on an axial-flow Marine Hydrokinetic turbine were conducted using a conventional methodology as well as an alternative modeling approach proposed in the present document. The proposed methodology integrates the following components into a Computa- tional Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model: (i) advanced eddy-resolving flow simulations, (ii) ambient turbulence based on field data, (iii) moving turbine blades in highly transient flows, and (iv) Lagrangian particles to mimic the potential fish pathways. The sensitivity of blade-strike prob- ability to the following conditions was also evaluated: (i) to the turbulent environment, (ii) to fish size and (iii) to mean stream flow velocity. The proposed methodology provided fraction of collisions and offered the capability of analyzing the causal relationships between the flow envi- ronment and resulting strikes on rotating blades. Overall, the conventional methodology largely overestimates the probability of strike, and lacks the ability to produce potential fish and aquatic biota trajectories as they interact with the rotating turbine. By using a set of experimental corre- lations of exposure-response of living fish colliding on moving blades, the occurrence, frequency and intensity of the particle collisions was next used to calculate the survival rate of fish crossing the MHK turbine. This step indicated survival rates always greater than 98%. Although the proposed CFD framework is computationally more expensive, it provides the advantage of evaluating multiple mechanisms of stress and injury of hydrokinetic turbine devices on fish.

Richmond, Marshall C.; Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ; Rakowski, Cynthia L.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Implementation of an advanced BWR design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past several years, Advanced Nuclear Fuels (ANF) Corporation has devoted substantial development and design effort to the implementation of an advanced 9 x 9 array fuel design for boiling water reactors (BWRs). This advanced 9 x 9 design, designated AND-95, which has increased interior moderation through the use of five water rods, is capable of higher burnup than 8 x 8 fuel because of its lower linear heat generation rate (LHGR) and promises to allow unrestricted power maneuvering and load follow without the extra cost of introducing a zirconium liner. The first fuel reload incorporating this design is under fabrication and is expected to be in operation in a 47 kW/l power density BWR during the summer of 1988. Key design features of this fuel are given and are compared to a late-model 8 x 8 fuel. The paper discusses increased neutron economy, improved burnup capability, improved emergency core cooling system, improved critical heat flux capability, load-follow capability, and fuel cycle costs.

Sofer, G.A.; Collingham, R.E.; Walters, K.V.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Advanced Manufacture of Reflectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main project objective has been to develop an advanced gravity sag method for molding large glass solar reflectors with either line or point focus, and with long or short focal length. The method involves taking standard sized squares of glass, 1.65 m x 1.65 m, and shaping them by gravity sag into precision steel molds. The method is designed for high volume manufacture when incorporated into a production line with separate pre-heating and cooling. The performance objectives for the self-supporting glass mirrors made by this project include mirror optical accuracy of 2 mrad root mean square (RMS), requiring surface slope errors <1 mrad rms, a target not met by current production of solar reflectors. Our objective also included development of new methods for rapidly shaping glass mirrors and coating them for higher reflectivity and soil resistance. Reflectivity of 95% for a glass mirror with anti-soil coating was targeted, compared to the present ~94% with no anti-soil coating. Our mirror cost objective is ~$20/m2 in 2020, a significant reduction compared to the present ~$35/m2 for solar trough mirrors produced for trough solar plants. During the first year a custom batch furnace was built to develop the method with high power radiative heating to simulate transfer of glass into a hot slumping zone in a production line. To preserve the original high polish of the float glass on both front and back surfaces, as required for a second surface mirror, the mold surface is machined to the required shape as grooves which intersect the glass at cusps, reducing the mold contact area to significantly less than 1%. The mold surface is gold-plated to reflect thermal radiation. Optical metrology of glass replicas made with the system has been carried out with a novel, custom-built test system. This test provides collimated, vertically-oriented parallel beams from a linear array of co-aligned lasers translated in a perpendicular direction across the reflector. Deviations of each reflected beam from the paraboloid focus give a direct measure of surface slope error. Key findings • A gravity sag method for large (2.5 m2) second surface glass solar reflectors has been developed and demonstrated to a uniquely high level of accuracy. Mirror surface slope accuracy of 0.65 mrad in one dimension, 0.85 mrad in 2 dimensions (point focus) has been demonstrated by commercial partner REhnu using this process. This accuracy exceeds by a factor of two current solar reflector accuracy. Our replicas meet the Sunshot accuracy objective of 2 mrad optical, which requires better than 1 mrad rms slope error. • Point-focus as well as line-focus mirrors have been demonstrated at 1.65 m x 1.65 m square – a unique capability. • The new process using simple molds is economical. The molds for the 1.65 m square reflectors are bent and machined steel plates on a counter-weighted flotation support. To minimize thermal coupling by radiative heat transfer, the mold surface is grooved and gilded. The molds are simple to manufacture, and have minimal thermal stresses and distortion in use. Lapping and bending techniques have been developed to obtain better than 1 mrad rms surface mold accuracy. Float glass is sagged into the molds by rapid radiative heating, using a custom high power (350 kW) furnace. The method of manufacture is well suited for small as well as large volume production, and as it requires little capital investment and no high technology, it could be used anywhere in the world to make solar concentrating reflectors. • A novel slope metrology method for full 1.65 aperture has been demonstrated, with 25 mm resolution across the face of the replicas. The method is null and therefore inherently accurate: it can easily be reproduced without high-tech equipment and does not need sophisticated calibration. We find by cross calibration with reference trough reflectors from RioGlass that our null-test laser system yields a measurement accuracy better than 0.4 mrad rms slope error. Our system is inexpensive and could have broad application for test

Angel, Roger [University of Arizona

2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

452

Fuel Fabrication Capability Research and Development Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to provide a comprehensive review of the mission of the Fuel Fabrication Capability (FFC) within the Global Threat Reduction Initiative Convert Program, along with research and development (R&D) needs that have been identified as necessary to ensuring mission success. The design and fabrication of successful nuclear fuels must be closely linked endeavors. Therefore, the overriding motivation behind the FFC R&D program described in this plan is to foster closer integration between fuel design and fabrication to reduce programmatic risk. These motivating factors are all interrelated, and progress addressing one will aid understanding of the others. The FFC R&D needs fall into two principal categories, 1) baseline process optimization, to refine the existing fabrication technologies, and 2) manufacturing process alternatives, to evaluate new fabrication technologies that could provide improvements in quality, repeatability, material utilization, or cost. The FFC R&D Plan examines efforts currently under way in regard to coupon, foil, plate, and fuel element manufacturing, and provides recommendations for a number of R&D topics that are of high priority but not currently funded (i.e., knowledge gaps). The plan ties all FFC R&D efforts into a unified vision that supports the overall Convert Program schedule in general, and the fabrication schedule leading up to the MP-1 and FSP-1 irradiation experiments specifically. The fabrication technology decision gates and down-selection logic and schedules are tied to the schedule for fabricating the MP-1 fuel plates, which will provide the necessary data to make a final fuel fabrication process down-selection. Because of the short turnaround between MP-1 and the follow-on FSP-1 and MP-2 experiments, the suite of specimen types that will be available for MP-1 will be the same as those available for FSP-1 and MP-2. Therefore, the only opportunity to explore parameter space and alternative processing is between now and 2016 when the candidate processes are down-selected in preparation for the MP-1, FSP-1, and MP-2 plate manufacturing campaigns. A number of key risks identified by the FFC are discussed in this plan, with recommended mitigating actions for those activities within FFC, and identification of risks that are impacted by activities in other areas of the Convert Program. The R&D Plan does not include discussion of FFC initiatives related to production-scale manufacturing of fuel (e.g., establishment of the Pilot Line Production Facility), rather, the goal of this plan is to document the R&D activities needed ultimately to enable high-quality and cost-effective production of the fuel by the commercial fuel fabricator. The intent is for this R&D Plan to be a living document that will be reviewed and updated on a regular basis (e.g., annually) to ensure that FFC R&D activities remain properly aligned to the needs of the Convert Program. This version of the R&D Plan represents the first annual review and revision.

Senor, David J.; Burkes, Douglas

2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

453

Computational physics and applied mathematics capability review June 8-10, 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory will review its Computational Physics and Applied Mathematics (CPAM) capabilities in 2010. The goals of capability reviews are to assess the quality of science, technology, and engineering (STE) performed by the capability, evaluate the integration of this capability across the Laboratory and within the scientific community, examine the relevance of this capability to the Laboratory's programs, and provide advice on the current and future directions of this capability. This is the first such review for CPAM, which has a long and unique history at the Laboratory, starting from the inception of the Laboratory in 1943. The CPAM capability covers an extremely broad technical area at Los Alamos, encompassing a wide array of disciplines, research topics, and organizations. A vast array of technical disciplines and activities are included in this capability, from general numerical modeling, to coupled multi-physics simulations, to detailed domain science activities in mathematics, methods, and algorithms. The CPAM capability involves over 12 different technical divisions and a majority of our programmatic and scientific activities. To make this large scope tractable, the CPAM capability is broken into the following six technical 'themes.' These themes represent technical slices through the CPAM capability and collect critical core competencies of the Laboratory, each of which contributes to the capability (and each of which is divided into multiple additional elements in the detailed descriptions of the themes in subsequent sections), as follows. Theme 1: Computational Fluid Dynamics - This theme speaks to the vast array of scientific capabilities for the simulation of fluids under shocks, low-speed flow, and turbulent conditions - which are key, historical, and fundamental strengths of the Laboratory. Theme 2: Partial Differential Equations - The technical scope of this theme is the applied mathematics and numerical solution of partial differential equations (broadly defined) in a variety of settings, including particle transport, solvers, and plasma physics. Theme 3: Monte Carlo - Monte Carlo was invented at Los Alamos. This theme discusses these vitally important methods and their application in everything from particle transport, to condensed matter theory, to biology. Theme 4: Molecular Dynamics - This theme describes the widespread use of molecular dynamics for a variety of important applications, including nuclear energy, materials science, and biological modeling. Theme 5: Discrete Event Simulation - The technical scope of this theme represents a class of complex system evolutions governed by the action of discrete events. Examples include network, communication, vehicle traffic, and epidemiology modeling. Theme 6: Integrated Codes - This theme discusses integrated applications (comprised of all of the supporting science represented in Themes 1-5) that are of strategic importance to the Laboratory and the nation. The Laboratory has in approximately 10 million source lines of code in over 100 different such strategically important applications. Of these themes, four of them will be reviewed during the 2010 review cycle: Themes 1,2, 3, and 6. Because these reviews occur every three years, Themes 4 and 5 will be reviewed in 2013, along with Theme 6 (which will be reviewed during each review, owing to this theme's role as an integrator of the supporting science represented by the other five themes). Yearly written status reports will be provided to the CPAM Committee Chair during off-cycle years.

Lee, Stephen R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Materials capability review Los Alamos National Laboratory, May 3-6, 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2010 'Capability Review' process at LANL significantly differs from the Division reviews of prior years. The Capabilities being reviewed (some 4-8 per year) are deliberately chosen to be crosscutting over the Laboratory, and therefore will include not only several experimental, theoretical and simulation disciplines, but also contributions from multiple line organizations. This approach is consistent with the new Laboratory organizational structure, focusing on agile and integrated capabilities applied to present national security missions, and also nurtured to be available for rapid application to future missions. The overall intent is that the Committee assess the quality of the science, engineering, and technology identified in the agenda, and advise the LANS Board of Governors and Laboratory management. Specifically, the Committees will: (1) Assess the quality of science, technology and engineering within the Capability in the areas defined in the agenda. Identify issues to develop or enhance the core competencies within this capability. (2) Evaluate the integration of this capability across the Laboratory organizations that are listed in the agenda in terms of joint programs, projects, proposals, and/or publications. Describe the integration of this capability in the wider scientific community using the recognition as a leader within the community, ability to set research agendas, and attraction and retention of staff. (3) Assess the quality and relevance of this capability's science, technology and engineering contributions to current and emerging Laboratory programs, including Nuclear Weapons, Threat Reduction/Homeland Security, and Energy Security. (4) Advise the Laboratory Director/Principal Associate Director for Science, Technology and Engineering on the health of the Capability including the current and future (5 year) science, technology and engineering staff needs, mix of research and development activities, program opportunities, environment for conducting science, technology and engineering. The specific charge for the Materials Capability Review is to assess the Los Alamos Laboratory Directed Research and Development project titled, 'First Principles Predictive Capabilities for Transuranic Materials: Mott Insulators to Correlated Metals' using the criteria performance, quality, and relevance for the current status of the project. The committee is requested to provide advice on future direction of the project.

Taylor, Antoinette [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Real-time capable first principle based modelling of tokamak turbulent transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A real-time capable core turbulence tokamak transport model is developed. This model is constructed from the regularized nonlinear regression of quasilinear gyrokinetic transport code output. The regression is performed with a multilayer perceptron neural network. The transport code input for the neural network training set consists of five dimensions, and is limited to adiabatic electrons. The neural network model successfully reproduces transport fluxes predicted by the original quasilinear model, while gaining five orders of magnitude in computation time. The model is implemented in a real-time capable tokamak simulator, and simulates a 300s ITER discharge in 10s. This proof-of-principle for regression based transport models anticipates a significant widening of input space dimensionality and physics realism for future training sets. This aims to provide unprecedented computational speed coupled with first-principle based physics for real-time control and integrated modelling applications.

Breton, S; Felici, F; Imbeaux, F; Aniel, T; Artaud, J F; Baiocchi, B; Bourdelle, C; Camenen, Y; Garcia, J

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

A NATIONAL COLLABORATORY TO ADVANCE THE SCIENCE OF HIGH TEMPERATURE PLASMA PHYSICS FOR MAGNETIC FUSION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work of the University of Utah, which was a member of the National Fusion Collaboratory (NFC) Project funded by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) under the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing Program (SciDAC) to develop a persistent infrastructure to enable scientific collaboration for magnetic fusion research. A five year project that was initiated in 2001, it the NFC built on the past collaborative work performed within the U.S. fusion community and added the component of computer science research done with the USDOE Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientific Computer Research. The project was itself a collaboration, itself uniting fusion scientists from General Atomics, MIT, and PPPL and computer scientists from ANL, LBNL, and Princeton University, and the University of Utah to form a coordinated team. The group leveraged existing computer science technology where possible and extended or created new capabilities where required. The complete finial report is attached as an addendum. The In the collaboration, the primary technical responsibility of the University of Utah in the collaboration was to develop and deploy an advanced scientific visualization service. To achieve this goal, the SCIRun Problem Solving Environment (PSE) is used on FusionGrid for an advanced scientific visualization service. SCIRun is open source software that gives the user the ability to create complex 3D visualizations and 2D graphics. This capability allows for the exploration of complex simulation results and the comparison of simulation and experimental data. SCIRun on FusionGrid gives the scientist a no-license-cost visualization capability that rivals present day commercial visualization packages. To accelerate the usage of SCIRun within the fusion community, a stand-alone application built on top of SCIRun was developed and deployed. This application, FusionViewer, allows users who are unfamiliar with SCIRun to quickly create visualizations and perform analysis of their simulation data from either the MDSplus data storage environment or from locally stored HDF5 files. More advanced tools for visualization and analysis also were created in collaboration with the SciDAC Center for Extended MHD Modeling. Versions of SCIRun with the FusionViewer have been made available to fusion scientists on the Mac OS X, Linux, and other Unix based platforms and have been downloaded 1163 times. SCIRun has been used with NIMROD, M3D, BOUT fusion simulation data as well as simulation data from other SciDAC application areas (e.g., Astrophysics). The subsequent visualization results - including animations - have been incorporated into invited talks at multiple APS/DPP meetings as well as peer reviewed journal articles. As an example, SCIRun was used for the visualization and analysis of a NIMROD simulation of a disruption that occurred in a DIII-D experiment. The resulting animations and stills were presented as part of invited talks at APS/DPP meetings and the SC04 conference in addition to being highlighted in the NIH/NSF Visualization Research Challenges Report. By achieving its technical goals, the University of Utah played a key role in the successful development of a persistent infrastructure to enable scientific collaboration for magnetic fusion research. Many of the visualization tools developed as part of the NFC continue to be used by Fusion and other SciDAC application scientists and are currently being supported and expanded through follow-on up on SciDAC projects (Visualization and Analytics Center for Enabling Technology, and the Visualization and Analysis in Support of Fusion SAP).

Allen R. Sanderson; Christopher R. Johnson

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Advanced Motors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Project Summary Transportation energy usage is predicted to increase substantially by 2020. Hybrid vehicles and fuel cell powered vehicles are destined to become more prominent as fuel prices rise with the demand. Hybrid and fuel cell vehicle platforms are both dependent on high performance electric motors. Electric motors for transportation duty will require sizeable low-speed torque to accelerate the vehicle. As motor speed increases, the torque requirement decreases which results in a nearly constant power motor output. Interior permanent magnet synchronous motors (IPMSM) are well suited for this duty. , , These rotor geometries are configured in straight lines and semi circular arc shapes. These designs are of limited configurations because of the lack of availability of permanent magnets of any other shapes at present. We propose to fabricate rotors via a novel processing approach where we start with magnet powders and compact them into a net shape rotor in a single step. Using this approach, widely different rotor designs can be implemented for efficiency. The current limitation on magnet shape and thickness will be eliminated. This is accomplished by co-filling magnet and soft iron powders at specified locations in intricate shapes using specially designed dies and automatic powder filling station. The process fundamentals for accomplishing occurred under a previous Applied Technology Program titled, ���������������¢��������������������������������Motors and Generators for the 21st Century���������������¢�������������������������������. New efficient motor designs that are not currently possible (or cost prohibitive) can be accomplished by this approach. Such an approach to motor fabrication opens up a new dimension in motor design. Feasibility Results We were able to optimize a IPMSM rotor to take advantage of the powder co-filling and DMC compaction processing methods. The minimum low speed torque requirement of 5 N-m can be met through an optimized design with magnet material having a Br capability of 0.2 T. This level of magnetic performance can be met with a variety of bonded magnet compositions. The torque ripple was found to drop significantly by using thinner magnet segments. The powder co-filling and subsequent compaction processing allow for thinner magnet structures to be formed. Torque ripple can be further reduced by using skewing and pole shaping techniques. The techniques can be incorporated into the rotor during the powder co-filling process.

Knoth, Edward A.; Chelluri, Bhanumathi; Schumaker, Edward J.

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

458

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic-resolution simulations predict Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

resolution simulations predict Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: atomic-resolution simulations predict Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1...

459

Specification of requirements for the virtual environment for reactor applications simulation environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2010, the United States Dept. of Energy initiated a research and development effort to develop modern modeling and simulation methods that could utilize high performance computing capabilities to address issues important to nuclear power plant operation, safety and sustainability. To r